Entrepreneurship among the Ethiopian and Eritrean Migrants

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Entrepreneurship among the Ethiopian and Eritrean Migrants Anthropological Ethnographic Case Studies in the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Area
Physical Description:
1 online resource (295 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Idris, Mussa Sultan
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Anthropology
Committee Chair:
SPRING,ANITA
Committee Co-Chair:
BABER,WILLIE L
Committee Members:
KANE,ABDOULAYE
DAVIS,RICHARD H,JR

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
entrepreneurship
Anthropology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Anthropology thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
This dissertation examines business experiences among Ethiopian and Eritrean transnational migrants in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. It studies how they establish their businesses (e.g., with limited financial capital, and coming from subsistence agricultural economic systems), and what is different about their migrant business experiences compared to well-established neighborhoods in “ethnic enclaves,” which primarily target their own diasporas, in other areas of the U.S. Participant observation and in-depth interviews with 20 “successful” Ethiopian and Eritrean migrant entrepreneurs in Adams Morgan, U Street Corridor, and Virginia were conducted during two ethnographic periods: September to December of 2009, and June to August of 2011. Supplementary secondary sources were analyzed to articulate the historical and contemporary patterns of these migrant experiences. The theoretical framework used is interdisciplinary. It emphasizes transnational migration theory to highlight the importance of home connections to the migrant entrepreneurs. This dissertation utilizes an integrative approach, combining micro-level factors and macro-level ones to better understand transnational entrepreneurship. Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threat analyses (SWOT) of the cases are provided. Findings show that both migrant communities originally come from subsistence cultures where by business (neged) is considered a “socially stigmatized job sector,” but they started to view business as a socially acceptable economic activity after they migrated to the U.S. In the process, they mostly created small- and medium-scale formal businesses, owned either by families or individuals. They primarily depended on family or kin-based networks and personal savings. Their traditional businesses—restaurants, cafes, and grocery stores—use an “ethnic entrepreneurship niche” model to conduct business with a focus on the re-creation of ethnic identities in a specific geographic niche, but with the intention of targeting their migrant communities, host societies, and tourists alike. This business model is different in scale from the one in “ethnic enclaves,” which primarily target their own diaspora (e.g., “Little Italy” in New York and “Little Havana” in Miami). Their non-traditional and combined types of businesses (e.g., transportation, gas stations, 7-Elevens, real estate, and advertising) are neither “ethnic enclaves” nor “ethnic entrepreneurial niches.” They are scattered around the metropolitan D.C. area without geographic concentration.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Mussa Sultan Idris.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2013.
Local:
Adviser: SPRING,ANITA.
Local:
Co-adviser: BABER,WILLIE L.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2013
System ID:
UFE0043568:00001