Attention Capture and Affective Engagement by Emotional Facial Expressions and Naturalistic Scenes

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Material Information

Title:
Attention Capture and Affective Engagement by Emotional Facial Expressions and Naturalistic Scenes Implications for Social Anxiety
Physical Description:
1 online resource (51 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Wangelin, Bethany
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Psychology, Clinical and Health Psychology
Committee Chair:
Lang, Peter J
Committee Members:
Robinson, Michael E
Bradley, Margaret M
Keil, Andreas

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
anxiety -- attention -- eeg -- electrodermal -- emotion -- faces -- psychophysiology -- social -- startle
Clinical and Health Psychology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Psychology thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Pictures of facial expressions, and of affective naturalistic scenes, are widely employed in emotion research. The current study examined the extent to which these stimulus types similarly or differentially engage motivational response systems, evaluating central and peripheral physiological reactivity when faces and scenes were viewed intermixed in the same paradigm, and further investigating how self-reported social anxiety influences responding. Sixty undergraduates viewed pictures depicting angry, neutral, and happy faces, and violent, neutral, and erotic scenes that were presented for 3 seconds each. Acoustic startle probes were presented throughout picture viewing and skin conductance, electrocortical responses (i.e., probe P300, late-positive potential), startle eyeblink magnitude, and reaction time to the startle probe were measured. Participant reports of social phobia symptoms were measured and the effects of these characteristics on reactivity were also assessed. Results demonstrated that arousing emotional scene stimuli were associated with strong activation of appetitive and defensive responses, whereas these responses were not engaged during processing of emotional and neutral faces. However, differences emerged when participants were grouped according to social anxiety symptom severity, as higher social anxiety was associated with increased orienting prompted by angry faces (indexed by skin conductance), enhanced attention to happy faces (indexed by probe P300 amplitude), and uniquely, greater startle reactivity when viewing both emotional expressions relative to neutral faces. Thus, although face stimuli did not seem to prompt strong motivational activation in the current free-viewing paradigm, they did distinguish between high and low social anxiety groups, demonstrating their significance for clinical research.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Bethany Wangelin.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2012.
Local:
Adviser: Lang, Peter J.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2013-08-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2012
System ID:
UFE0043132:00001


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Full Text

PAGE 11

Affective Scenes: Robust Reactivity Across Multiple Measures

PAGE 13

Affective Facial Expressions

PAGE 15

Neural Structures Engaged During Face and Scene Processing

PAGE 16

Social Anxiety and Reactivity to Affective Faces

PAGE 17

The Current Study

PAGE 18

Hypotheses

PAGE 19

Participants and Screening Measures Materials and Design

PAGE 20

Apparatus and Physiological Response Measurement

PAGE 21

Procedure Data Reduction

PAGE 23

Data Analysis

PAGE 24

Faces and Scenes: Skin Conductance, LPP, Probe P3 F p 2 p F p 2 p F p 2 p F p 2 p F F p 2 p F p 2 p

PAGE 27

Faces and Scenes: Probe Reaction Time F p 2 p F F p 2 p F p 2 p

PAGE 28

F p 2 p F p 2 p F p F p 2 p

PAGE 29

Faces and Scenes: Startle Magnitu de F p 2 p p F p 2 p F p F p 2 p F p 2 p p

PAGE 30

Follow up Analysis: Affective Faces v. Neutral Scenes F t F p 2 p F p 2 p

PAGE 31

Effects of Social Anxiety F p 2 p F p 2 p F F p 2 p

PAGE 32

F p p F p 2 p

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PAGE 36

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PAGE 37

Reactivity Across Multiple Measures

PAGE 39

Faces Compared to Neutral Scenes

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Social Anxiety and Facial Expressions

PAGE 43

Conclusions and Implications