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Characterizing a Reinforced Concrete Beam-Column-Slab Subassemblage Connection for Progressive Collapse Assessment

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042946/00001

Material Information

Title: Characterizing a Reinforced Concrete Beam-Column-Slab Subassemblage Connection for Progressive Collapse Assessment
Physical Description: 1 online resource (209 p.)
Language: english
Creator: KOH,YONG HONG
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2011

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: ABNORMAL -- BEAM -- COLLAPSE -- COLUMN -- CONCRETE -- CONNECTION -- ELEMENT -- FAST -- FINITE -- INTERIOR -- LOADS -- PROGRESSIVE -- REINFORCED -- RUNNING -- SIMPLIFIED -- SLAB -- SUBASSEMBLAGES
Civil and Coastal Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Civil Engineering thesis, M.S.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Finite element (FE) codes; an advance numerical tool can be used in the fast and accurate assessment of progressive collapse of building structures. Past research on moment resisting steel frames have proved the feasibility of the usage of FE codes for the analysis of progressive collapse. In the same research, it was shown that the accuracy of the overall building structure simulation is highly dependent on the accuracy of the modeling of the steel connections. Similarly, FE codes have also been used successfully to derive the resistance function of reinforced concrete (RC) interior connection (with rectangle beam cross-section only). The objective of this study is to better understand the behavior of reinforced concrete beam-column connection under monotonic loading. The interior beam-column-slab subassemblage connection of a 4 story full scale reinforced concrete building frame that was tested for progressive collapse under blast loads was selected as the prototype connection to be studied. A predominantly continuum based FE model using Abaqus was developed for this interior connection subassemblage. This FE model considered the effect of the longitudinal, transverse, spandrel beams and slab on load resistance of the connection. The load resistance function of this interior connection subassemblage under monotonic loading was then derived. A fast running simplified structural elements based FE model was also developed to attempt to simulate the behavior of this interior connection. This simplified FE model was able to produce reasonably good estimates of the load-rotation function of the interior connection at a much reduced computational time. This reduction in computation time could result in significance time and cost saving in the progressive collapse assessment of building structure.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by YONG HONG KOH.
Thesis: Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 2011.
Local: Adviser: Krauthammer, Theodor.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2013-04-30

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2011
System ID: UFE0042946:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042946/00001

Material Information

Title: Characterizing a Reinforced Concrete Beam-Column-Slab Subassemblage Connection for Progressive Collapse Assessment
Physical Description: 1 online resource (209 p.)
Language: english
Creator: KOH,YONG HONG
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2011

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: ABNORMAL -- BEAM -- COLLAPSE -- COLUMN -- CONCRETE -- CONNECTION -- ELEMENT -- FAST -- FINITE -- INTERIOR -- LOADS -- PROGRESSIVE -- REINFORCED -- RUNNING -- SIMPLIFIED -- SLAB -- SUBASSEMBLAGES
Civil and Coastal Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Civil Engineering thesis, M.S.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Finite element (FE) codes; an advance numerical tool can be used in the fast and accurate assessment of progressive collapse of building structures. Past research on moment resisting steel frames have proved the feasibility of the usage of FE codes for the analysis of progressive collapse. In the same research, it was shown that the accuracy of the overall building structure simulation is highly dependent on the accuracy of the modeling of the steel connections. Similarly, FE codes have also been used successfully to derive the resistance function of reinforced concrete (RC) interior connection (with rectangle beam cross-section only). The objective of this study is to better understand the behavior of reinforced concrete beam-column connection under monotonic loading. The interior beam-column-slab subassemblage connection of a 4 story full scale reinforced concrete building frame that was tested for progressive collapse under blast loads was selected as the prototype connection to be studied. A predominantly continuum based FE model using Abaqus was developed for this interior connection subassemblage. This FE model considered the effect of the longitudinal, transverse, spandrel beams and slab on load resistance of the connection. The load resistance function of this interior connection subassemblage under monotonic loading was then derived. A fast running simplified structural elements based FE model was also developed to attempt to simulate the behavior of this interior connection. This simplified FE model was able to produce reasonably good estimates of the load-rotation function of the interior connection at a much reduced computational time. This reduction in computation time could result in significance time and cost saving in the progressive collapse assessment of building structure.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by YONG HONG KOH.
Thesis: Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 2011.
Local: Adviser: Krauthammer, Theodor.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2013-04-30

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2011
System ID: UFE0042946:00001


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PAGE 17

"

PAGE 19

,

PAGE 21

p ck t ~

PAGE 22

,

PAGE 25

Introduction Bad connections prevent the structure from mobilizing its full resistance

PAGE 26

Objectives and Scope

PAGE 27

Research Significance

PAGE 28

Overview Beam Column Connections

PAGE 29

TwoMember Connection/ Knee Connection 1 s A

PAGE 30

n s A h h yj f y f sj a 1 2 2 1 1 yj f y f 2 1 hh 1 s A n ThreeMember Connection/ TConnection

PAGE 31

Four Member Connection/ Interior Connection sF 2 Connection Behavior Compressive Strut and Truss Mechanism Model

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= + jv cv sv Strut and Tie Model

PAGE 33

Beam ColumnSlab Subassemblage rM rM beams allongitudin theof strength flexural theofSum columns bottomandtopof strength flexural theallofSum Mr

PAGE 34

Effect of Slab on Flexural Strength

PAGE 35

Effect of Transverse Beam

PAGE 36

Force Transfer Mechanism Interior connection

PAGE 38

Exterior connection Continuous frame D xT yT

PAGE 39

Slab Contribution to Flexural Strength of Longitudinal Beam Type of connections

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Lateral deformation e Load history

PAGE 42

Shear deformation

PAGE 43

Rotation of the slab

PAGE 44

Boundary condition and continuity

PAGE 46

Joint Shear Behavior xC xC cC

PAGE 47

uv Formulation of Effective Flange Width/ Effective Slab Width

PAGE 48

rM eb eb fb 4/ Lbe andtbf8 215.0 SorSbf

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eb

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Modeling of Beam ColumnSlab Subassemblages bd

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t i s i T i p

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cfA x x S fAyt sl s ys s8.0 2* sA sS yt ysfandf x slA c

PAGE 53

Experiments and Test Results

PAGE 55

Plastic Hinge

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pl zdlb p075.025.0 )(2.05.0b b b pd z ddl bd z hlp5.0

PAGE 57

)(022.008.0 MPafdlly lb p )(15.008.0 ksi fdlly lb p l h lbd yf d Moment Rotation Formulation for Connections

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s sn n ik M1 01 ik 0 sn M Material Models Concrete Compression stressstrain curve

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"cf 0c 2 0 0 "2 cc ccff 0038.00than less andc 0"c cd ccEff cf c cff' "9.0 cf' c c cE f" 08.1 cE c ccfwE '335.1 3 3/160 /90 ftlb w ftlbc c cf E '57000 cf' cdE

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ksi or f Ec cd500 0038.0 "15.00 Tensile strength c ctff '7.6 c rff '5.7 cf' cr c cccEf cr c 005.0 1cr c cr cf f

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cE c cr crE f c crff '4 cf' cr c cccEf cr c 002.0 1cr c cr cf f cE c cr crE f c crff '4 cf' cr c cccEf c cf E'47000 cr c 4.0 c cr cr cff

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c crf f '75.3 cf' cf' crf cr Reinforcement yf yf yf sssEf ysff

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y y y y sf f f ff '5.043.0 1000 45 2 1 ysff p y y pE f f E '5.23.3 y s pforE E 10 025.0 y y cr yf f f f 5.1 *4 1 c crf f'75.3 yf sE sc sssEf ysff

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y y y y sf f f ff '5.043.0 1000 45 2 1 ysff p y y pE f f E '5.23.3 y s pforE E 10 025.0 maxffs maxffs sc y p y scE ff' max s y yE f'' sc y Finite Element Analysis

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Verification and Validation Processes

PAGE 66

The Finite E lement (FE) C ode Abaqus it 1 it

PAGE 67

Concrete damaged plasticity model (CDP)

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oE co cu oE to

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cd td in c c el oc el occ in c 0Ec el oc c pl c o c c c in c pl cEd d 1 ck t ~ t

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el ot 100to t el ott ck t~ 0Et el ot t to pl t o t t t ck t pl tEd d 1~ Defining the plasticity parameters for CDP co boff / K G

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qp p q p ) tan( ) sin( G

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co boff / K Classical metal plasticity c L nom nom trueA P )1(

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0A PL nom c nom trueA A 0 Etrue nom pl )1ln(ln nom true& LP cAA &0 nom pl&ln Elements

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Connectors Convergence and iteration control P I 0 IP

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P 0K 0u aC au aI aR aR aR aR nR nR a aIPR aC nC nR nC

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5 lsN 0I RI 0I aR 0I RI RI

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0I RI Progressive Collapse

PAGE 83

Summary

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sfdb /

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cf to '53 cf to '32 cf to '86 cf to '64 cf to '128 cf to '86 a sh

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nR nC lsN 0I RI

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Overview

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Beam ColumnSlab Interior Connection Characterization

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bd bd bd

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g L bh L hb g 1tan pl p p pluu vv 12 12tan Simplified Finite Element Model

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Summary

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Overview Verification of the Finite Element Code

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Validation of the Finite Element Code

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Cantilever Rectangular Beam

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cf'

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fC sC

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Ex terior Connection Beam ColumnSlab Subassemblages

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' pE pE yf '10 Interior Connection Beam ColumnSlab Subaasemblages

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R einforced C oncrete Beam ColumnSlab Connection in This Study

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cf c crf f '75.3 80.0 fC 50.0 sC Resistance Function of the Beam ColumnSlab Connection in t his Study

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Moment Rotation Resistance bd

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pl

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Simplified Structural Elements Based FE Models

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crf c crf f '75.3

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co boff / K c crf f '75.3 80.0 fC 50.0 sC

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Summary

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Conclusion Validations Characterizations of the Moment Rotation of Interior Connection Structural Element Based Simplified FE Model

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Limitations

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Recommendations for Future Research

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Concrete Material Models Selection. c crff '5.7 crf

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crf c crf f '75.3 c crff '5.7 crf Steel Material Models Selection. c crf f '75.3

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yf yf fC 'sE yf sC sssECE

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yf yf yf fC 0.1 fC yf fC sC sE

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sC 5.0 sC Displacement Controlled Versus Force Controlled Loading.

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Embedded Versus Tie Nodes Modeling Technique.

PAGE 186

Summary

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80 .0 fC 50 .0 sC c crf f '75.3

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Geometry ORIGIN 1 h 21.75 in b 185.25 in d 1 1.3 in d 2 2.5 in d 3 5.5 in d 4 8.7 in d 5 19.25 in A s1 340.11 () 3.74 in 2 A s2 4 1.27 () 5.08 in2A s3 2 1.27 () 2.54 in 2 A s4 340.11 () 3.74 in 2 A s5 3 1.27 () 3.81 in2 f s1 c() s1 c()E s s1 c() y if f y otherwise s1 c()0 if s1 c()E s s1 c() y if f y otherwise s1 c()0 if f s2 c() s2 c()E s s2 c() y if f y otherwise s2 c()0 if s2 c()E s s2 c() y if f y otherwise s2 c()0 if

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f s3 c() s3 c()E s s3 c() y if f y otherwise s3 c()0 if s3 c()E s s3 c() y if f y otherwise s3 c()0 if f s4 c() s4 c()E s s4 c() y if f y otherwise s4 c()0 if s4 c()E s s4 c() y if f y otherwise s4 c()0 if f s5 c() s5 c()E s s5 c() y if f y otherwise s5 c()0 if s5 c()E s s5 c() y if f y otherwise s5 c()0 if f c 0.85 f c 3.4 ksi ac() c F c c() 0.85 f c ac() b F s1 c()f s1 c()A s1 F s2 c()f s2 c()A s2 F s3 c()f s3 c()A s3 F s4 c()f s4 c()A s4 F s5 c()f s5 c()A s5 Pc()F c c()F s1 c() F s2 c() F s3 c() F s4 c() F s5 c() c root Pc()c 1 22 ( ) c 1.545 in

PAGE 195

Check s1 c() 4.755104 s2 c() 1.855 103 s3 c() 7.681 103 s4 c() 0.014 s5 c() 0.034 f s1 c() 13.79 ksi f s2 c() 53.789 ksi f s3 c() 60 ksi f s4 c() 60 ksi f s5 c() 60 ksi FCT F c c()F s1 c() F s2 c() 605.4 Kips F TT F s3 c()F s4 c() F s5 c() 605.4 Kips l 1 cd 1 0.245 in l 2 cd 2 0.955 in l 3 cd 3 3.955 in l 4 cd 4 7.155 in l 5 cd 5 17.705 in l c c ac() 2 0.888 in MF s1 c()l 1 F s2 c()l 2 F s3 c()l 3 F s4 c()l 4 F s5 c()l 5 F c c()l c 7.264103 Kipin

PAGE 197

C onnector elements moment rotation relationship. Stiffness of the beam elements.

PAGE 198

Calculation of the transformed moment of inertia for longitudinal beam, where bottom of the concrete fi bre have not reached cracked moment (See Figure C 3) 21.75 12 2.5 5.55.5 19.25 4 1.27 5.08 2 2 1.27 2.54 2 3 1.27 3.81 2 4000 57000 3.605106 290001000 2.9107 8.044 1 80.517 341.517 2 2 2 1 1 1

PAGE 199

Calculation of the effective moment of inertia for longitudinal beam (based on cracked section) See Figure C 4 2 2 2.838103 1 1 1 704.527 10.374 1 12 3 2 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1.511104 4 21.75 12 2.5 19.25 5.5 16.25 2.5 4 1.27 5.08 2 2 1.27 2.54 2 3 1.27 3.81 4000 57000 3.605106 290001000 2.9107 8.044 1 88.137 12 12 88.137 2 2 2 1

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1 1.186103 12 2 88.137 6 2 1186 6 2 88.137 1186 214.6895 197.67 214.6895 197.67 0 8.517637984238060491 23.207137984238060491 8.52 1 12 3 2 2 1 2 2 2 9.372103 4 3 1 3 1 12 3 1.029104 4 75371000 7.537106 7.5 1 13.23 7.5 474.342 3.689105 3 1 3 9.373103 4

PAGE 203

Earthquake effects on reinforced concrete structure: U.S Japan Research, SP 84 Building code requirements for structural concrete (ACI 31802) and commentary Building code requirements for structural concrete (ACI 31808) and commentary ACI J., Recommendations for design of beam column connections in monolithic reinforced concrete structures (ACI 352R 02) Struct. Engrg. Rept. No. 8803, J. Struct. Engrg., Minimum design loads for buildings and other structures. Rep. No. CIPPSTR 0032009, Finite element procedures Plasticity in reinforced concrete Design of Beam Column Joints for Seismic Resista nce Design of Beam Column Joints for Seismic Resistance Structural design for physical security. State of the Practice report

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Concepts and applications of finite element analysis ACI Str uct. J., J. Struct. Div., Report UMEE 82R3, J. Struct. Engrg., Proc., Workshop on Prevention of Progressive Collapse ACI J., T ech. Rep. to the Office of the Chief of Engineers Department of the Army Int. J. for Numerical Methods in Engrg. J. Struct. Engrg., J. Struct. Engrg., Design of Beam Column Joints for Seismic Resistance Progressive Collapse Analysis and Design Guidelines for New Federal Buildings and Major Modernization Projects.

PAGE 205

Structural concrete theory and design. Bulletin 399 Unified theory of reinforced concrete. Foundations of Civil and Environmental Engrg., Rep. to U.S. Army Engineering Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, Mississippi Doctor of Philosophy Design of Beam Column Joints for Seismic Resistance Modern Protective Structures Design of Beam Column Joints for Seismic Resistance J. Engrg. Mech., Rep. No. EERC 76 2, Reinforced Concrete: Mechanics and design J. Performance of Constructed Facilities

PAGE 206

Int. Conference on Bridge Engrg. Challenges in the 21st Century Bulletin 97 Prestressed concrete structures Limit analysis and concrete plasticity Document No. D7:1973 J. Struct. Div. Design of concrete structures Appl. Mech. Rev., Reinforced concrete structures J. Struct. Engrg., J. Struct. Engrg., Seismic design of reinforced concrete and masonry buildings. Can. J. Civ. Engrg., CE299 Report J. Struct. Engrg.,

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J. Struct. Engrg., ACI Struct. J., Proc., International Symposium on the Flexural Mech. of Reinf. Conc., J. Struct. Engrg., Abaqus version 6.10 documentation Trans. Japan Concr. Inst., Master of Science UFC-402303, Design of buildings to resist progressive collapse. The Indian Concrete J., Advanced Mech. of Reinforced Concrete Reinforced concrete design. Special Publications ACI J., Doctor of Philosophy Earthquake Effects on RC Structures: U.S. Japan Resear ch

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Report No. 30