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College Students' Psychic Income from Intercollegiate Football and Its Impact of College Satisfaction

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042570/00001

Material Information

Title: College Students' Psychic Income from Intercollegiate Football and Its Impact of College Satisfaction
Physical Description: 1 online resource (119 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Kim, Woo
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2010

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: college, impact, income, psychic, satisfaction, social
Health and Human Performance -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Health and Human Performance thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: A great amount of research has been conducted to determine the criteria of college student satisfaction and to develop measurement instruments to examine the overall quality of life among college students, but limited research has investigated specific aspects of college satisfaction. In addition, relatively few studies have attempted to explain the link between student satisfaction and college sports despite the enhanced interests in this link. The primary goal of this study was to develop a valid and reliable scale to measure how college students psychic income from the school s athletic teams influences their satisfaction with college. Instead of developing a new framework, Crompton s (2004) psychic income paradigm was adopted and the preliminary questionnaire was established by a comprehensive literature review, expert review, a field test, and a pilot study. Confirmatory factor analysis and reliability tests were employed with the total number of 663 data for the final purification of the scale of psychic income (SPI). As a result of a factor analysis, the 7-factor model with 27 ites was conceptualized: Social Bonding (3 items), Excitement (3 items), Emotional Involvement (5 items), Collective Self-esteem (3 items), Pride from Being a Major Collegiate Sport Institution (5 items), Pride from Increased Institution Visibility (4 items), and Pride Due to Additional Campus Development Efforts (4 items). The hierarchical analysis in multiple regression was employed to identity the best predictors of college satisfaction and revealed that six independent variables significantly predicted the outcome and collectively explained approximately 40% of the variance in college satisfaction. The six variables were gender, Excitement, Emotional Involvement, Pride from Being a Major Collegiate Sport Institution, Pride from Increased Institution Visibility, and Pride Due to Additional Campus Development Efforts. This study provided an important step towards better understanding psychic income, which is one segment of social impact analysis measurement, and should prove useful for college administrators, sport practitioners, and marketers. The findings of this study will help explain why college sport receive increasingly more television air time and also why its business aspect is getting acceptable to the college administrators and entrepreneurs. In addition, the findings of this study will fulfill the call for supplementary construct of college life.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Woo Kim.
Thesis: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2010.
Local: Adviser: Sagas, Michael B.

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2010
System ID: UFE0042570:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042570/00001

Material Information

Title: College Students' Psychic Income from Intercollegiate Football and Its Impact of College Satisfaction
Physical Description: 1 online resource (119 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Kim, Woo
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2010

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: college, impact, income, psychic, satisfaction, social
Health and Human Performance -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Health and Human Performance thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: A great amount of research has been conducted to determine the criteria of college student satisfaction and to develop measurement instruments to examine the overall quality of life among college students, but limited research has investigated specific aspects of college satisfaction. In addition, relatively few studies have attempted to explain the link between student satisfaction and college sports despite the enhanced interests in this link. The primary goal of this study was to develop a valid and reliable scale to measure how college students psychic income from the school s athletic teams influences their satisfaction with college. Instead of developing a new framework, Crompton s (2004) psychic income paradigm was adopted and the preliminary questionnaire was established by a comprehensive literature review, expert review, a field test, and a pilot study. Confirmatory factor analysis and reliability tests were employed with the total number of 663 data for the final purification of the scale of psychic income (SPI). As a result of a factor analysis, the 7-factor model with 27 ites was conceptualized: Social Bonding (3 items), Excitement (3 items), Emotional Involvement (5 items), Collective Self-esteem (3 items), Pride from Being a Major Collegiate Sport Institution (5 items), Pride from Increased Institution Visibility (4 items), and Pride Due to Additional Campus Development Efforts (4 items). The hierarchical analysis in multiple regression was employed to identity the best predictors of college satisfaction and revealed that six independent variables significantly predicted the outcome and collectively explained approximately 40% of the variance in college satisfaction. The six variables were gender, Excitement, Emotional Involvement, Pride from Being a Major Collegiate Sport Institution, Pride from Increased Institution Visibility, and Pride Due to Additional Campus Development Efforts. This study provided an important step towards better understanding psychic income, which is one segment of social impact analysis measurement, and should prove useful for college administrators, sport practitioners, and marketers. The findings of this study will help explain why college sport receive increasingly more television air time and also why its business aspect is getting acceptable to the college administrators and entrepreneurs. In addition, the findings of this study will fulfill the call for supplementary construct of college life.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Woo Kim.
Thesis: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2010.
Local: Adviser: Sagas, Michael B.

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2010
System ID: UFE0042570:00001


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PAGE 9

Social Bonding Excitement Emotional Involvement Collective Self esteem Pride from Being a Major Collegiate Sport Institution ( Pride from Increased Institution Visibility

PAGE 10

Pride Due to Additional Campus Development Efforts

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College Satisfaction

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Intercollegiate Sport as an Industry

PAGE 15

Overview of the Research Problem

PAGE 17

Purpose of the Study

PAGE 18

Delimitation s

PAGE 20

Overview of College Satisfaction

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Indirect Impact of Big time Intercollegiate Athletics Beer and Circus

PAGE 27

Psychic Income from a Collegiate Athletic Team

PAGE 31

Pride from Increased Institution Visibility

PAGE 33

Pride from Being a Bigtime Collegiate Sport Institution

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Pride in Efforts of Additional Campus Development

PAGE 36

Excitement Quotient from Games

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Emotional Involvement with a Team

PAGE 40

Tangible Focus for Social Bonding

PAGE 41

Enhanced Collective Self esteem

PAGE 45

Crompton s (2004) This Study Dimension Description Dimension Definition

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Item Generation

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strongly disagree) strongly agree) not relevant at all

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social bonding

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Data Collection

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Data Analysis

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t

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team name team name

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team name Team name

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Descriptive Statistics Demographic Descriptive Statistics of Scales M = 4.65, SD = 2.04 (M = 6.65, SD = .76

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Confirmatory Factor Analysis 2 df p df

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social bonding excitement emotional involvement collective self esteem pride from being a major collegiate sport institution ( pride from increased institution visibility pride due to additional campus development efforts 2= (df = df t t social bonding pride from increased institution visibility pride from being a major collegiate sport institution pride from increased institution visibility

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pride due to additional campus development efforts emotional involvement pride due to additional campus development efforts social bonding Hierarchical Multiple Regression Analysis

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R p p p

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Note

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Social Bonding Excitement Quotient Emotional Involvement Collective Self esteem e from Being a Majo r Collegiate Sport Institution Pride fr om Increased Institution Visibility Pride Due to Additional Campus Development Efforts

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Review of the Conceptual Framework

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Discussion of the Results pride from being a major collegiate sport institution pride from increased institution visibility emotional i nvolvement collective self esteem

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L imitations and Future Directions

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pride from being a major collegiate sport institution pride due to additional campus development efforts

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relevance c larity Not Relevant at all ( 1 ) to Very Relevant ( 5 and Not Clear at all ( 1 ) to Very Clear ( 5 ) Pride from Increased Institutio n Visibility Dimension definition & Items Relevance Clarity

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Pride from Being a Bigtime Collegiate Sport Institution Dimension definition & Items Relevance Clarity

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Pride in Efforts of Additional Campus Development Dimension definition & Items Relevance Clarity

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Excitement Quotient from Visitors Dimension definition & Items Relevance Clarity

PAGE 88

Emotional Involvement with a Team Dimension definition & Items Relevance Clarity

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Tangible Focus for Social Bonding Dimension definition & Items Relevance Clarity

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Enhanced Collective Self esteem Dimension definition & Items Relevance Clarity Again, thank you for your cooperation.

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NOT

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Comments for the Scale of Psychic Income (SPI) Thank you so much for your assistance.

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I. Pride from Increased Institution Visibility II. Pride from Being a Major Collegiate Sport Institution III. Pride Due to Additional Campus Development Efforts

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IV. Excitement Quotient V. Emotional Involvement with the Team VI. Social Bonding

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VII. Enhanced Collective Self esteem

PAGE 104

Journal of Happiness Studies, 5 Annals of Tourism Research32 Journal of Travel Research, 39 Psychological Bulletin, 103 Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice 43 What matters most in college: four critical years Journal of College Student Personnel,40 Journal of Urban Affairs, 24 Social Science Quarterly, 77 The practice of social research Humanities, Social Sciences and Law

PAGE 105

Sloan Management Review, 32 Handbook of practical program eval uation Tertiary Education and Management, 8 Measurement and Evaluation in Guidance, 4 Journal of Marketing, 67 Planning for Higher Education, 37 Structural equations with latent variables Psychology: Its principals and meanings Journal of the Philosophy of Sport, 33 Journal of Sport and Social Issues, 15 Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, 33 Organizational identity: a reader Testing structural models

PAGE 106

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Journal of Marketing Research, 17 College peer group Sport and community: Exploring the relationship between fan identification and sense of community on selected NCAA Division IA campuses Regulation, 23 Journal of Sports Science, 22 Journal of Sport Management, 18 Psychometrika, 16 Journal of Happiness Studies, 3 Eve nt Management, 7 International Journal of Educational Management, 19 Wellbeing: The foundations of hedonic psychology of Personality Assessment, 49

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PAGE 109

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PAGE 110

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Journal of Sport Management, 21 The Planning and Evaluation of Hallmark Events International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, 38 International Review for the Sociology of Sport 39 Structural equation modeling: Concepts, issues, and applications Journal of Sport Behavior, 25 Journal of Sports Economics, 2 Journal of Sport Economics Contemporary Economic Policy, 18 Psychometrika, 39

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Education Economics, 3 Economics of Ed ucation Review, 13 Glory for sale The value of recreational sports in higher education: impact on student enrollment, success, and buying power Journal of Applied Psychology, 75 International Journal of Educational Management, 15 The business of sports Psychometric Theory Quality and Quantity, 41 Educational Psychology Review, 2 Public Finance and Management 6 Review of Educational Research, 48

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PAGE 117

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International Journal of Sport Finance, 2 of Sport & Social Issues 19 North American Journal of Psychology, 5 Annual Review of Sociology, 27 Annals of Tourism Research, 28 Journal of Computer Mediated Communication, 10 Recreational Sports Journal, 32 Applied Research Quality, 3 Journal of Sport & Social Issues, 21 Unpaid professionals