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Validation of Autodesk Ecotect BIM Environmental Analysis Software using Rinker Hall as a Case Study

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042375/00001

Material Information

Title: Validation of Autodesk Ecotect BIM Environmental Analysis Software using Rinker Hall as a Case Study
Physical Description: 1 online resource (141 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Vangimalla, Prasanthi
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2010

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: analysis, autodesk, bim, daylighting, ecotect, energy, performance, rinkerhall, thermal, validation
Building Construction -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Building Construction thesis, M.S.B.C.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Emergence of numerous energy analysis tools has necessitated the need to validate them before incorporating them during the design or preconstruction process. Autodesk Ecotect is an energy analysis tool that performs shading analysis, thermal analysis, lighting analysis and acoustic analysis. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, Autodesk Ecotect has not been validated and, therefore, the research was conducted to validate the software. The study measured the thermal loads and illuminance levels of Rinker Hall and compared these results to the simulated thermal loads and illuminance levels obtained by Autodek Ecotect. Analysis of thermal performance was conducted over a period of one year while the lighting performance was studied on mid-winter (December 21st or 22nd). The results showed that the thermal loads never achieved the required percentage difference between the field measurements and Ecotect measurements of 15% and the lighting illuminance levels achieved the required percentage difference between field measurements and Ecotect measurements of 15% on 12 cases of the possible 400 cases. The research therefore concluded that at present Autodesk Ecotect should not be relied upon for accurate analysis of thermal performance and lighting performance. The study also presented the lighting performance of Rinker Hall based on the field measurements and investigated how factors such as distance, time, orientation, obstructions and openings affected illuminance levels. The research concluded that a sensor point received more daylight when it was closer to the window, the east oriented classroom 238 received more appropriate amount of light compared to the west oriented classrooms 220 and 225, the classrooms received more daylight during the summer season, and, the openings in the classroom doors provided light to the sensor points away from window.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Prasanthi Vangimalla.
Thesis: Thesis (M.S.B.C.)--University of Florida, 2010.
Local: Adviser: Olbina, Svetlana.
Local: Co-adviser: Issa, R. Raymond.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2011-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2010
System ID: UFE0042375:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042375/00001

Material Information

Title: Validation of Autodesk Ecotect BIM Environmental Analysis Software using Rinker Hall as a Case Study
Physical Description: 1 online resource (141 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Vangimalla, Prasanthi
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2010

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: analysis, autodesk, bim, daylighting, ecotect, energy, performance, rinkerhall, thermal, validation
Building Construction -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Building Construction thesis, M.S.B.C.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Emergence of numerous energy analysis tools has necessitated the need to validate them before incorporating them during the design or preconstruction process. Autodesk Ecotect is an energy analysis tool that performs shading analysis, thermal analysis, lighting analysis and acoustic analysis. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, Autodesk Ecotect has not been validated and, therefore, the research was conducted to validate the software. The study measured the thermal loads and illuminance levels of Rinker Hall and compared these results to the simulated thermal loads and illuminance levels obtained by Autodek Ecotect. Analysis of thermal performance was conducted over a period of one year while the lighting performance was studied on mid-winter (December 21st or 22nd). The results showed that the thermal loads never achieved the required percentage difference between the field measurements and Ecotect measurements of 15% and the lighting illuminance levels achieved the required percentage difference between field measurements and Ecotect measurements of 15% on 12 cases of the possible 400 cases. The research therefore concluded that at present Autodesk Ecotect should not be relied upon for accurate analysis of thermal performance and lighting performance. The study also presented the lighting performance of Rinker Hall based on the field measurements and investigated how factors such as distance, time, orientation, obstructions and openings affected illuminance levels. The research concluded that a sensor point received more daylight when it was closer to the window, the east oriented classroom 238 received more appropriate amount of light compared to the west oriented classrooms 220 and 225, the classrooms received more daylight during the summer season, and, the openings in the classroom doors provided light to the sensor points away from window.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Prasanthi Vangimalla.
Thesis: Thesis (M.S.B.C.)--University of Florida, 2010.
Local: Adviser: Olbina, Svetlana.
Local: Co-adviser: Issa, R. Raymond.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2011-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2010
System ID: UFE0042375:00001


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1 VALIDATION OF AUTODESK ECOTECT BIM ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS SOFTWARE USING RINKER HALL AS A CASE STUDY By PRASANTHI REDDY VANGIMALLA A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILL MENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DE GREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2010

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2 2010 Prasanthi Reddy Vangimalla

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3 To my Mother, Father, Brother and Grandmother who have always supported me and given me the stre ngth and confidence to succeed in all my endeavors

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4 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I like to take this opportunity to thank Dr. Svetlana Olbina for her constant support and motivation through out th is research I like to thank Dr. Raymond R. Issa, Dr. Jimm i e H inze, a nd Dr. Paul Oppenheim for their valuable input I also like to thank Ralph Giro, Glenn Wilson and Bill Thompson from the Physical Plant Department at the University of Florida for providing the data required for th is research. Special thanks to Maya Joann ides Sankar aleengam Alagapan, Seshupriya Alluru and all of my friends in the building construction department for their help and support.

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5 TABLE OF CONTENTS page ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 4 LIST OF TABLES ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 7 LIST OF FIGURES ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 13 LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS ................................ ................................ ........................... 15 ABSTRACT ................................ ................................ ................................ ................... 16 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION ................................ ................................ ................................ .... 18 Stateme nt of the Problem ................................ ................................ ....................... 19 Research Objectives ................................ ................................ ............................... 20 Methodology ................................ ................................ ................................ ........... 20 Overview ................................ ................................ ................................ ................. 21 2 LITERATUR E REVIEW ................................ ................................ .......................... 23 Sustainability ................................ ................................ ................................ ........... 23 Energy Performance ................................ ................................ ........................ 25 Thermal Performance ................................ ................................ ....................... 25 Daylighting Performance ................................ ................................ .................. 27 Building Information Modeling (BIM) ................................ ................................ ....... 29 Autodesk Revit ................................ ................................ ................................ 30 Autodesk Ecotect ................................ ................................ ............................. 31 Shadows and reflections ................................ ................................ ............ 31 Shading devices ................................ ................................ ......................... 32 Solar analysis ................................ ................................ ............................. 32 Right to light ................................ ................................ ......................... 32 Thermal analysis ................................ ................................ ........................ 33 L ighting design ................................ ................................ ........................... 33 Rinker Hall at the University of Florida ................................ ................................ .... 34 3 METHODOLOGY ................................ ................................ ................................ ... 37 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 37 Limitations of the Research ................................ ................................ .................... 37 Limitations of the Software ................................ ................................ ...................... 38 Field Measurements of Thermal Loads ................................ ................................ ... 38 Field Measurements of Illuminance ................................ ................................ ........ 38

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6 Simulations by Autode sk Ecotect ................................ ................................ ............ 42 Lighting Performance Study ................................ ................................ .................... 48 Analysis of Results ................................ ................................ ................................ 48 4 RESULTS AND DATA ANALYSIS ................................ ................................ .......... 49 Validation of Autodesk Ecotect for Thermal Load Calculation ................................ 49 Validation of Autodesk Ecotect for Illuminance Level Calculation ........................... 52 Results ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 53 Data Analysis ................................ ................................ ................................ ... 57 Daylighting Performance Study ................................ ................................ .............. 61 Effect of Distance ................................ ................................ ............................. 61 Effect of Time ................................ ................................ ................................ ... 63 Effect of Orientation ................................ ................................ .......................... 67 Effect of Obstructions and Open ings ................................ ................................ 68 5 CONCLUSIONS AND RECCOMENDATIONS ................................ ....................... 71 Validation of Ecotect for Thermal Analysis ................................ .............................. 71 Validation of Ecotect for Lighting Analysis ................................ .............................. 71 Lighting Performance of Rinker Hall ................................ ................................ ....... 72 Recommendations ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 72 The AEC Industry ................................ ................................ ............................. 72 Future Research ................................ ................................ ............................... 73 APPENDIX: A: FIELD MEASUREMENTS AND ECOTECT MEASUREMENTS OF ILLUMINANCE LEVELS ................................ ................................ ......................... 74 B: PERCENTAGE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN FIELD MEASUREMENTS AND ECOTECT MEASUREMENTS OF ILLUMINANCE LEVELS ................................ 107 C: ZONE PROPERTIES OF RINKER HALL ................................ ............................. 131 D: HVAC SYSTEM OPERATION SCHEDULE FOR RINKER HALL ......................... 134 LIST OF REFERENCES ................................ ................................ ............................. 139 BIOGRAP HICAL SKETCH ................................ ................................ .......................... 141

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7 LIST OF TABLES Table page 2 1 Green facts of the University of Florida (Facilities & Planning, University of Florida) ................................ ................................ ................................ ............... 34 4 1 Field measurements (FM) of thermal loads of Rinker Hall at University of Florida in 2009 ................................ ................................ ................................ .... 50 4 2 Ecotect measurements (EM) of thermal loads of Rin ker Hall at University of Florida in 2009 ................................ ................................ ................................ .... 51 4 3 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measure ments (EM) of thermal loads of Rinker Hall at University of Florida in 2009 ................................ ................................ ................................ ................... 52 4 4 Weather forecast and actual weather con ditions of Gainesville, Florida on 01/17/2010 ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 53 4 5 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 220 (with more trees west side) on 01/17/2010 (lux) ................. 54 4 6 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 (with fewer trees west side) on 01/17/2010 (lux) ................ 55 4 7 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 (east side) on 01/17/2010 (lux) ................................ ............. 56 4 8 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skylights and in corridor on 01/17/ 2010 (lux) ................................ .. 57 4 9 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance l evels in room 220 on 01/17/2010 .............. 58 4 10 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM ) of illuminance levels in room 225 on 01/17/2010 .............. 59 4 11 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotec t measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 on 01/17/2010 .............. 60 4 12 Percentage difference between field measuremen ts (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skylights and in corridor on 01/17/2010 ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 61 A 1 Weather f orecast and actual weather conditions of Gainesville, Florida on 02/27/2010 ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 74

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8 A 2 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect mea surements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 220 (with more trees west side) on 02/27/2010 (lux) ................. 75 A 3 Field measureme nts (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 (with fewer trees west side) on 02/27/2010 (lux) ................ 76 A 4 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 (east side) on 02/27/2010 (lux) ................................ ............. 77 A 5 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in under skylights and in corridor on 02/27/2010 (lux) .............................. 78 A 6 Weather forecast and actual weather conditions of Gainesville, Florida on 03/20/2010 ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 78 A 7 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 220 (with more trees west side) on 03/20/2010 (lux) ................. 79 A 8 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 (with fewer trees west side) on 03/20/2010 (lux) ................ 80 A 9 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 (east side) on 03/20/2010 (lux) ................................ ............. 81 A 10 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skylights and in corridor on 03/20 /2010 (lux) ................................ .. 82 A 11 Weather forecast and actual weather conditions of Gainesville, Florida on 04/17/2010 ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 82 A 12 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 220 (with more trees west side) on 04/17/201 0 (lux) ................. 83 A 13 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 (with fewer trees west side) on 04/17/2010 (lux) ................ 84 A 14 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 (east side) on 04/17/2010 (lux) ................................ ............. 85 A 15 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance lev els under skylights and in corridor on 04/17/2010 (lux) ................................ .. 86 A 16 Weather forecast and actual weather conditions of Gainesvi lle, Florida on 05/22/2010 ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 86 A 17 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 22 0 (with more trees west side) on 05/22/2010 (lux) ................. 87

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9 A 18 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illum inance levels in room 225 (with fewer trees west side) on 05/22/2010 (lux) ................ 88 A 19 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 (east side) on 05/22/2010 (lux) ................................ ............. 89 A 20 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skylights and in corridor on 05/22/2010 (lux) ................................ .. 90 A 21 Weather forecast and actual weather conditions of Gainesville, Florida on 06/21/2010 ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 90 A 22 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 220 (with more trees west side) on 06/21/2010 (lux) ................. 91 A 23 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 (with fewer trees west side) on 06/21/2010 (lux) ................ 92 A 24 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 (east side) on 06/21/2010 (lux ) ................................ ............. 93 A 25 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skylights and in corridor on 0 6/21/2010 (lux) ................................ .. 94 A 26 Weather forecast and actual weather conditions of Gainesville, Florida on 07/24/2010 ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 94 A 27 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 220 (with more trees west side) on 07/24 /2010 (lux) ................. 95 A 28 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 (with fewer tr ees west side) on 07/24/2010 (lux) ................ 96 A 29 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 (east side) on 07/24/2010 (lux) ................................ ............. 97 A 30 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance l evels under skylights and corridor on 07/24/2010 (lux) ................................ ...... 98 A 31 Weather forecast and actual weather conditions of Gainesvi lle, Florida on 08/28/2010 ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 98 A 32 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 220 (with more trees west side) on 08/28/2010 (lux) ................. 99 A 33 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 (with fewer trees west side) on 08/28/2010 (lux) .............. 100

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10 A 34 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 (east side) on 08/28/2010 (lux) ................................ ........... 101 A 35 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skylights and in corridor on 08 /28/2010 (lux) ................................ 102 A 36 Weather forecast and actual weather conditions of Gainesville, Florida on 09/18/2010 ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 102 A 37 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 220 (with more trees west side) on 09/18/2010 (lux) ............... 103 A 38 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 (with fewer trees west side) on 09/18/2010 (lux) .............. 104 A 39 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 (east side) on 09/18/2010 (lux) ................................ ........... 105 A 40 Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skylights and in corridor on 09/18/2010 (lux) ................................ 106 B 1 Percentage difference between field measure ments (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 220 on 02/27/2010 ............ 107 B 2 Percentage difference bet ween field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 on 02/27/2010 ............ 108 B 3 Percent age difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 on 02/27/2010 ............ 109 B 4 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skylights and in corridor on 02/27/2010 ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 109 B 5 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 220 on 03/20/2010 ............ 110 B 6 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 on 03/20/2010 ............ 111 B 7 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 on 03/20/2010 ............ 112 B 8 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skyli ghts and in corridor on 03/20/2010 ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 112

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11 B 9 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 220 on 04/17/2010 ............ 113 B 10 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 on 04/17/2010 ............ 114 B 11 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 on 04/17/2010 ............ 115 B 12 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skylights and in corridor on 04/17/2010 ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 115 B 13 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 220 on 05/22/2010 ............ 116 B 14 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 on 05/22/2010 ............ 117 B 15 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 on 05/ 22/2010 ............ 118 B 16 Percentage difference between Field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skylights and in corridor on 05/22/2010 ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 118 B 17 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect me asurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room220 on 06/21/2010 ............. 119 B 18 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 on 06/21/2010 ............ 120 B 19 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 on 06/21/2010 ............ 121 B 20 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skylights and in corri dor on 06/21/2010 ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 121 B 21 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminan ce levels in room 220 on 07/24/2010 ............ 122 B 22 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 on 07/24/2010 ............ 123 B 23 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 on 07/24/2010 ............ 124

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12 B 24 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skylights and in corridor on 07/24/2010 ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 124 B 25 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room220 on 08/28/2010 ............. 125 B 26 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 on 08/28/2010 ............ 126 B 27 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 on 08/28/2010 ............ 127 B 28 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skyl ights and in corridor on 08/28/2010 ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 127 B 29 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 220 on 09/18/2010 ............ 128 B 30 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ec otect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 on 09/18/2010 ............ 129 B 31 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 on 09/18/2010 ............ 130 B 32 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skylights and in corridor on 09/18/2010 ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 130 C 1 Zone properties of Rinker Hall as input into Autodesk Ecotect ......................... 131 D 1 HVAC system operation schedule for Rinker Hall on weekdays as input into Autodesk Ecotect ................................ ................................ .............................. 134 D 2 HVAC system operation schedule for Rinker Hall on weekends as input into Autodesk Ecotect ................................ ................................ .............................. 136

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13 LIST OF FIGURES Figure page 3 1 Layout of the SPs in room 220 ................................ ................................ ........... 39 3 2 Layout of the SPs in room 225 ................................ ................................ ........... 39 3 3 Layout of the SPs in room 238 ................................ ................................ ........... 40 3 4 Layout of the SPs under the skylights and in the corridor of the third floor ......... 40 3 5 Room 238 Blinds and louvers were left open to allow the sunlight to pass through the window ................................ ................................ ............................ 41 3 6 Room 225 and room 220 arranged to measure the illuminance levels. .............. 42 3 7 A 3 D Ecotect model of Rinker Hall showing the daily sun path diagram for April 17 th 2010 ................................ ................................ ................................ .... 43 3 8 Project information of the Rinker Hall ................................ ................................ 43 3 9 A 3D cross section Autodesk Ecotect model of room 220 showing the louvers, blinds, table surfaces, SPs and opening in the door ............................. 44 3 10 Zone properties General settings for room 110 of Rinker Hall, University of Florida ................................ ................................ ................................ ................ 45 3 11 Sample output of Ecotect thermal analysis ................................ ......................... 46 3 12 Screen shot of the summary of information entered for lighting analysis in Autodesk Ecotect. ................................ ................................ ............................... 47 4 1 The effect of distance on illuminance levels at SPs over a period of time in room 220 at 2:00 p.m. ................................ ................................ ........................ 62 4 2 The effect distance on illuminance lev els at SPs in different classrooms on May 22 nd at 2:00 p.m. ................................ ................................ ......................... 63 4 3 Effect of time on illuminance levels at SP 1 and SP 6 in room 220 at 9:00 a.m. ................................ ................................ ................................ .................... 64 4 4 Effect of time on illuminance levels at SP1 and SP 6 in room 220 at 2:00 p.m. 65 4 5 Effect of time on illuminance levels at SP 1 and SP 6 in room 220 on March 20 th ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 66 4 6 Effect of time on illuminance levels at SP 1 and SP 6 in room 220 on June 21 st ................................ ................................ ................................ ...................... 67

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14 4 7 Effect of orientation on illuminance room 238 and room 225 on May 22 nd ................................ ................................ 68 4 8 window in room 238 and room 225 on Ma y 22 nd ................................ ................ 68 4 9 Effect of obstruction by tress on illuminance levels at SP 1 and SP 6 in room 220 and room 225 on May 22 nd at 2:00 p.m. ................................ ...................... 69 4 10 Effect of openings in the door on illuminance levels at SP 5 and SP 6 in room 220 at 12:00 p.m. in the summer season (May to August) ................................ 70

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15 LIST OF ABBREVIATION S A Assumed AS Achieved LEED Score BIM Building I nformation M odeling B tu British thermal unit CF Cubic Feet EM Ecotect Measurements ES Expected LEED Score FM Field Measurements g bXML G reen building extensible markup language R Recorded SF Square Feet Wh Watt h our

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16 Abstract of Thesis Presented to th e Graduate School of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Building Construction VALIDATION OF AUTODESK ECOTECT BIM ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS SOFTWARE USING RINKER HALL AS A CASE STUDY By Prasanthi Reddy Vangimalla December 2010 Chair: Svetlana Olbina Cochair: R. Raymond Issa Major: Building Construction The e mergence of numerous energy analysis tools has necessitated the need to validate them before incorporating them d uring the design or preconstruction process. Autodesk Ecotect is an energy analysis tool that performs shading analysis, thermal analysis, lighting analysis and acoustic analysis. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, Autodesk Ecotect has not been va lidated and t herefore, th is research was conducted to validate the software. The study measur ed the thermal loads and illum inance levels of Rinker Hall and compar ed these results to the simulated thermal loads and illuminance level s obtained by Autode s k E cotect Analysis of thermal performance was conducted over a period of one year while the lighting performance was studied in mid winter (December 21 st or 22 nd ) The results showed that the thermal loads never achieved the required percentage difference be tween the field measurements and Ecotect measurements of 15% and the lighting illuminance levels achieved the required percentage difference between field measurements and Ecotect measurements o f 15% in 12 cases of the possible 400 cases The research ther efore concluded that at present Autodesk Ecotect should not be relied upon for accurate

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17 analysis of thermal perfor mance and lighting performance. The study also presented th e lighting performance of Rinker Hall based on the field measurements and investi gated how factors such as distance, time, orientation, obstru ctions and openings affected illuminance levels The research concluded that a sensor point (SP) received more daylight when it was closer to the window that the east oriented classroom 238 rec eived a more appropriate amount of light compared to the west oriented classrooms 220 and 225 that the classrooms received more day light during the summer season, and that the o penings in the classroom door s provided light to the SP s away from window

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18 CH APTER 1 INTRODUCTION M any inventions that were neve r thought possible came with the Industrial R evolution Artificial heating, cooling, ventilation and lighting weakened if not nearly eliminated attention to the local climate or to consumption of natural resources, instigating a rapid development of buildin gs which were completely dependent on artificial meth ods to maintain usability. The ene rgy a building consumes for both its operation and maintenance is direc tly linked to its carbon emissions, and a maj or part of the total energy consumed serves to m aintain a comfort level through artificial heating or cooling while other energy consuming factors include lighting, appliances and building service systems. Developed countries tend to consum e more energy to maintain a comfort level and standard of living In the United States alone, building sector is responsible for 39% of CO2 emissions, 40% of energy consumption, 13% water consumption and 15% of GDP (Gross domestic product) per year, making green building a source of significant economi c and environmental opportunity (USGBC, 2010) In the past few years, negativ e impacts on the environment due to human ignorance have begun to be acknowledged The Wilderness Act of 1964 was one of the first acts to be passe d in an effort to save the environment from further damage. The Wi lderness Act established a National Wilderness Preservation System and, according to the U.S. Department of the Interior, legally protected almost 9 million acres of wilderness in the United States by designating it then saw the creation of the Earth Day and the establishment of the Environment al formation of AIA / Committee on

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19 the Environment (COTE) and the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) (Krygiel & Nies, 2008) Both a rchitects and e ngineers realized the need for energy efficient design features and strategies early on in design stages if a building was to be environmentally friendly. However, standard c riteria t hat would judge such energy efficient features and strategies did not exist was incorporated into the design. A need to standardize green building criteria resulted in the introduction of bui lding assessment systems which provided criteria for evaluation or comparison purposes. LEED in USA, BREEM in UK, CASBEE in Japan, and Green Star in Australia are some of the building assessment systems that were established and have gained recognition in the construction industry (Krygiel and Nies, 2008) The establishment of such building assessment systems promoted competition in the area of energy efficiency in green buildings As a result, each project striv es to achieve high ratings. Statement of the P roblem Given the need for design ing energy efficient buildings, the construction industry has seen a surge in the develop ment of new applications that would assess and evaluate the energy efficiency of a building in its early conceptual stage s According to the Building Energy Software Tools Directory (U.S. Department of Energy) as of 2010 there are 374 building software tools for evaluating energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainability in buildings. However, not all of the 374 software have bee n validated and hence the re is a need to validate the results of th ese software before basing the anal ysis and design of th e building simulated results A s stated earlier, a major part o f the energy consumption in the building sector is used to maintain

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20 comfort levels by artificial heating, cooling, ventilation and lighting Daylighting efficiency and thermal efficiency greatly reduce the energy consumption and carbon emissions of a building The most cost effective reduction in energy consumptio n occurs during the design process and hence there is a need t o study the performance of daylighti ng under various conditions to explore efficient lighting design strategies. Research Objective s The primary objective of th e research wa s to valida te the simulated results of thermal loads and illuminance levels of Rinker Hall obtained by the Autodesk Ecotect analysis tool. The secondary objective wa s to evaluate the lighting performance of Rinker Hall and to study how elements such as time, distance orientation, obstructions and openings affect the lighting performance The goal of the research wa s to provide the AEC (Architecture Engineering and C onstruction ) community recommendations on whether or not Ecotect can be used as a thermal and lighti ng analysis tool in the d esi gn and constructi on of buildings The research included simulati on of a BIM model in Autodesk Ecotect to calculate thermal loads and illuminance levels Methodology To achieve the primary research objective, the actual field me asurements and the simulated results of the thermal loads and illuminance levels from Autodesk Ecotect were measured and the percentage difference between both the actual and simulated measurements was calculated to validate Autodesk Ecotect To achieve t he secondary objective, f ield measurements were used to study the lighting performance of Rinker Hall To measure the actual illuminance levels of Rinker Hall, SP s were first marked in room 220, room 225 and room 238 and under the skylights and i n the cor ridor of the

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21 third floor as shown in Figure 3 1, Figure 3 2, Figure 3 3, and Figure 3 4 Illuminance levels were then measured once every month from January 2010 to September 2010 The Facilities and Planning D epartment of the University of Florida provide d the field measurement data for calculating the thermal loads. Units were converted to B tu units for validation purpose s T he total monthly thermal loads were then calculated by adding the monthly chilled water, steam and recover y loads of Rinker Hall. T o simulate thermal loads and illuminance levels i n Autodesk Ecotect a gbxml file of the BIM model of Rinker Hall created in Revit Architecture was imported into Autodesk Ecotect Project details such as location, orientation and weather were assigned to the model. T he materials specific to the building components of Rinker Hall were created loaded in to the element library of Autodesk Ecotect and assigned to the model. Surfaces which represented the desks in the classrooms SP s and e lectric al lights tha t were turned on while taking the field measurements were also created in the model. The s chedule library of Autodesk Ecotect was updated to reflect the Rinker Hall occupancy and operation schedule. The general usage and thermal properties of each zone (ro om) were assigned in accordance to the actual usage of the particular zone. I lluminance levels and thermal loads were then simulated using the lighting analysis and thermal analysis tools of Autodesk Ecotec t, respectively. Lighting performance study was co nducted to study the effect of distance, time, orientation, obstructions and openings on illuminance levels using the field measurements of Rinker Hall. Overview This thesis consists of five chapters Chapter one presents an introduction of the research. Chapter two presents the literature review on the application of sustainability,

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22 BIM, and energy analysis tools in the construction industry as well as a description of the energy efficient features of Rinker Hall Chapter three presents the methodology of the researc h describing the various research tasks performed the tools us ed, and the methods applied to achieve the desired research objective. Chapter four presents the results of the field measurements and the Ecotect measurements, the validation resul ts and the lighting performance study of Rinker Hall Chapter five presents the conclusion and the recommendation s to the AEC community and future research

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23 CHAPTER 2 LITERATURE REVIEW Sustainability Sustainability can be defined as the d evelopme nt t hat meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs (World Commission on Environment and Developme 1987 ) Sustainable development is a process or an evolution whe re the limitations of economic, societal and environmental resources are considered in order to contribute to present and future generations' welfare (Glavic and Lukman, 2007) To achieve sustainability, one must measure the negative impacts on the enviro nment and apply sustainability principles to govern these impact s. Sustainability principles can be applied to many contexts of environmental, s ocial and economic organizatio n while encompassing biological and human activity For instance, sustainability principles focus not only on the total carrying capacity of the planet but also the sustainability of economic sectors, ecosystems, countries, municipalities, neighborhoods, home gardens individual goods and services, occupations, lifestyles, behavior pat terns and so on (Hessami et al., 2009). Energy efficiency is the foremost step for achieving a sustainable future and can be achieved throughout the energy cycle. Energy efficiency not only reduces the amount of energy required, but also reduces the costs involved, the dependence on fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions, all while increas ing competit ion and improv ing consumer welfare According to the International Energy Agency, energy efficient buildings, industrial processes and transportation cou ld reduce the world's

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24 projected energy needs for 2050 by one third, and is crucial in controlling global emissions of greenhouse gases (Hebden, 2006) In the wake of the 1970 oil crises, many industrialized nations brought energy issues to the forefront. M any policies have since been adopted and have contributed to a decline in energy intensity during the past 30 years (Geller et al., 2006). The United States F ederal G overnment adopted a number of laws between 1975 and 19 80 that established educational effo rts, financial incentives, and authorized the setting of efficiency standards ( Clinton et al., 1986 ) Energy efficient standards have since been established on vehicles, appliances, buildings, etc The state of California has shown a strong dedication tow ards creating an energy efficient future since the adoption of the Warren Alquist Energy Act in 1974 (Geller et al., 2006). The adoption of national building energy efficiency standards (also known as building energy codes) passed in 1976 ; however legislat ion was strongly opposed by the building industry and it was eventually converted to voluntary guidelines and design tools (Clinton et al., 1986). During the same time, various states and localities adopted energy codes for new residential and commercial b uildings which were made mandatory. Recent legislation established minimum efficiency standards on a wide range of household appliances and major types of equipment used in the commercial and industrial sectors. To complement these federal initiatives, man y states have improvised their building energy codes and have implemented utility based energy efficiency programs a mong other policies (Geller et al., 2006).

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25 Energy Performance Developed countries tend to consume more energy to maintain their comfort lev el and standard of living In the United States alone, the building sector accounts for 72% of electricity consumption, 39% of energy use, 38% of all carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, 40% of raw materials use, 30% of waste output (136 million tons annually), and 14% of potable water consumption (USGBC, 2010) The energy a building consumes for its operation and maintenance is directly linked to its amount of carbon emissions Maintaining the comfort level of a building through artificial heating or cooling makes up a major portion of energy consumption Other energy consuming factors include lighting, appliances and building service systems (Krygiel and Nies 2008) Energy performance and indoor environment have become increasingly important in building de sign Building developers and designers are straining to produce end user buildings with low energy consumption and high indoor environmental performance. This attention to energy performance has led to a growing awareness that in order to achieve low ene rgy buildings with satisfactory indoor climate the designer must be aware of the consequences of critical design decisions as early as possible in the design process ( Hviid, et al., 2008) Thermal Performance As stated earlier, maintaining the comfort lev el of a building through artificial heating or cooling makes up a major portion of energy consumption The most cost effective energy reduction occurs during the design process. Designers typically

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26 combine time tested p assive s olar or n atural c onditioning which utilize on site assets such as sunlight, solar heat, prevailing breezes, and the coolness of the earth below the building to reduce thermal load s The building industry uses the f ollowing energy efficient features in achiev ing thermal efficiency: Or ientation: The orientation of the building plays a major part in defining the heating and cooling loads of a building (Parker, et al., 1998) Photovoltaic s ystem: Solar energy is an ever abundant renewable energy resource. A p hotovoltaic system uses this r enewable energy to produce electricity. Though the initial cost is high, the long term benefits of this system make it the most energy efficient feature ( Parker, et al., 1998 ) Solar water h eater: A solar water heater also uses solar energy by captur ing th e solar energy and convert ing it into heat energy. The consumption of electricity or natural gas is then reduced ( Parker, et al., 1998 ) Reflective r oofs: Using a white roof compared to conventional darker shades can reflect a greater amount of heat (as op posed to absorbing the heat) and can reduce cooling loads in a building ( Parker, et al., 1998 ) Added i nsulation: A properly insulated building lets in less heat or cold which in turn reduces the heating or cooling loads ( Parker, et al., 1998 ) Shading de vices: Shading devices which are well designed can significantly reduce the amount of heat that is let into the building ( Parker, et al., 1998 ) Natural v entilation: This is likely one of the most ancient methods of conditionin g air and assuring air qualit y A well ventilated building which is designed for proper wind flow through the building can reduce the cooling and the condition loads of the building ( Parker, et al., 1998 ) High efficiency windows: Windows which are double glazed and/or solar controlle d allow for daylight while simultaneously reduc ing the amount of the heat or cold let into the building ( Parker, et al., 1998 ) Solar lights: The use of solar lights on the exterior faade of the building or the landscaping helps in reducing the electricit y loads ( Parker, et al., 1998 ) High efficiency f luorescent or LED l ighting: Using lights that consume less energy but have the same intensity of lighting helps in significant ly reduc ing the utility bills ( Parker, et al., 1998 )

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27 High efficiency e quipment: Appliances or machineries that consume less energy and perform more efficiently reduce the energy and fuel loads otherwise required ( Parker, et al., 1998 ) Oversized ducts: Oversized ducts, because of their size, reduce the friction inside and hence reduce the load required ( Parker, et al., 1998 ) Programmable t hermostats: Programmable thermostats eliminate the need to manually set the temperature. Once the temperature is set the thermostat maintains the temperature at th e level specified ( Parker, et al., 1998 ) Ground source heat p temperature to extract or discharge heat which is then used for heating or cooling a building (Mueller, 2007) Geothermal v entilation: This system draws fresh air into the ho use through an air duct buried beneath the ground. Coupled with an energy recovery system, the air can be heated or left cool (Mueller, 2007) Daylighting Performance Daylighting performance is define d based on d ifferent aspects of design such as architectu ral, lighting energy savings, building energy consumption, load management and cost Designers concentrate on t he architectural definition of daylighting performance ; the interplay of natural light and building form to provide a visually stimulating, hea lthful, and productive interior environment Engine ers and energy consultants concentrate on the building energy consumption definition of daylight ing performance ; the use of fenestration systems and responsive electric lighting controls to reduce overal l building energy requirements and the cost definit ion of daylighting performance ; the use of daylighting strategies to minimize operating costs and maximize output, sales, or productivity (Reinhart, et al., 2006) Daylight is recognized as an effecti ve means to reduce the artificial lighting requirements of buildings ; however, daylight is a greatly underexploited natural resource ( Nabil and Mardaljevic, 2006) The following are v arious methods of utilizing daylight :

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28 Windows: Windows are the most commo n way to admit daylight into a building Their vertical orientation means that they selectively admit sunlight and diffuse daylight at different times of the day and year (Booth, et al., 1983) Light shelves: Light shelves are an effective way to enhance t he lighting from windows on the equator facing side of a structure T his effect is obtained by placing a white or reflective metal light shelf outside the window (Booth, et al., 1983) Skylights: Skylights are horizontal windows or domes placed at the roof of buildings. Though these features do not make a significant difference for multi stored buildings, when incorporated in a single story building it is one of the best methods for daylighting (Booth, et al., 1983) Light tubes: T he light tube, also called a solar tube, is placed through the roof into the interior of the buildin g, admit ting light to a focused area of the interior (Booth, et al., 1983) Clerestory windows: C lerestory windows are high, vertically placed windows which can be used to increase d irect solar gain when oriented towards the equator (Booth, et al., 1983) Sawtooth r oof: Sawtooth roofs have vertical roof glass facing away from the equator side of the building to capture diffused light (Booth, et al., 1983) Solarium: A solarium, sunro om or a greenhouse is a structure which is constructed onto the side of a house. The interior of a solarium warms quickly in sunlight, even on cold days, and may provide a means of heating the part of the main house into which the sun room or conservatory opens (Booth, et al., 1983) Fiber optic concrete wall: Another way to make a secure structural concrete wall is to embed optical fiber cables in it. Daylight can then pass directly through a thick solid concrete wall (Losonczi, 2001) Hybrid solar light ing: This design uses a roof mounted light collector, large diameter optical fiber, and modified efficient fluorescent lighting fixtures that have transparent rods connected to the optical fiber cables. Essentially no electricity is needed for daytime natu ral interior lighting (Voss Lapsa, 2007) Daylight factor approach, daylight autonomy, and useful daylight schema (UDI) are some of the methods used to assess daylighting performance. The daylight factor approach measures illuminance at a point as the rati o of the internal illuminance in a building at a certain point to the unshaded, external horizontal illuminance (Reinhart, et al., 2006) Daylight autonomy of illuminance at a point measures how often a minimum

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29 work plane illuminance threshold of 500 lux c an be maintained by daylight alone ( Nabil and Mardaljevic, 2006 ). The useful daylight illuminance schema is a relatively new measure and measures how often in the year d aylight illuminance within a range is achieved ( Nabil and Mardaljevic, 2005 ). Building Information Modeling (BIM) BIM is defined as the creation and use of coordinated, consistent, computable information about a building project in design parametric information used for design decision making, production of high quality construction document s, prediction of building performance, cost estimating, and construction planning ( Krygiel and Nies, 2008) BIM represents functional and physical modeling; vertically and horizontally integrated building information that is gathered and applied throughout the entire lifecycle, preserved and interchanged efficiently using open and interoperable technology for business, and able to process support and operations (NIBS, 2007) Early constructions of buildings were based upon designs which were tec hnologically speaking, simple in nature As technology began to advance, the need to draft and document the construction drawings arose. Manual pencil drafting proved to be more time consuming as reduc ed construction times and increasing ly complex building design s became necessary for competition Towards the 20 th century, CAD (Computer Aided Design) drafting replaced pencil drafting. With CAD tools, one could save a copy of a drawing which could then be edited eliminating the need to draft the drawing ent irely. (Krygie l and Nies 2008) With the boost in the competition in creat ing a sustainable building, a tool which could be adequately sensitive to growing needs was required.

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30 This was when tools such a s virtual building design and building information modeling came into existence Building i nformation m odeling (BIM) is an emerging tool in the design industry that is used to design and document a project. It helps to better understand the project by all those involved in the design & construction process of the building. A BIM model can be holistically used throughout the design process and the construction process. Unlike the CAD based drawings, a BIM model contains the buildings actual constructions and assemblies rather than only a two dimensional representation of the building. A BIM model can speed up the design process by allowing parametric changes to the building design. A change made in one view of the project is also simultaneously made in all other related views in a docume ntation set. Autodesk Revit Autodesk Revit Architecture is a building information modeling tool that helps architects and designers capture and a nalyze early concepts and better maintain designs through documentation and construction (Autodesk, 2010) Rev it Architecture provides support for sustainable design, clash detection, construction planning, and fabrication and presents every schedule, drawing sheet, 2D view, and 3D view from a single foundational database, automatically coordinating changes across all facets and presentations as the project progresses. All model information is stored in a single, coordinated database within Revit Architecture which automatically updates r evisions and alterations to information throughout the model, significantly re ducing errors and omissions. Detail libraries can be created, shared, and edited to accommodat e required standards.

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31 Autodesk Revit Architecture supports sustainable design processes from the earliest stages. Building information, including materials and r oom volumes, can be exported to green building extensible markup language (gbXML) and can then be used to perform energy analysis using Autodesk Green Building Studio and study building performance by employing the use of Autodesk Ecotect software. Autode sk Ecotect Ecotect was written and developed by architects with its application in architecture and the design process Ecotect can also be used by engineers, local authorities, environmental consultants, building designers, owner builders and environment al enthusiasts alike Ecotect provides a wide variety of simulation and analysis functions that are necessary to understand the operation and performance of a building allowing real time interact ion and provid ing visual feedback (Autodesk, 2010) Shadows and r eflections, s hading d evices, s olar a nalysis, r ight to light, t hermal a nalysis and l ighting d esign are some of the simulations tools in Ecotect Shadows and r eflections The shadow analysis tool allows the displaying of the position and path of t he sun relative to the model at any date, time or location The tool also allows displaying the m onthly paths over the entire year, o verlay ing shadows from a range of different times, isola ting the shadows from only selected objects in the model, and assi gn ing zones their own specific shadow colors. The reflection analysis tools allows t he tag ging of objects in the model as solar reflectors track the movement of reflections across the site and use s the sun path diagram to identify affected point s over the year (Autodesk, 2010)

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32 Shading d evices The shading devices wizard generates a shading shape that can accurately shade a window for any specified period of time. Solar radiation hitting a window and travelling back towards the sun can be tracked and display ed on a grid. C utting planes that follow the path of the sun through the sky can be generated and then be used to generate site solar envelopes. The likeliness of how complex shading and light redirection systems work under different conditions throughout the year can be visualized by tracking solar rays. The wizard determine s not only where shading is required, but also what intensity of solar radiation needs to be protected from (Autodesk, 2010) Solar a nalysis The solar analysis tool helps in calculatin g and visualizing incident solar radiation on the windows and surfaces of the building. The amount of solar radiation falling on any object and the shading and reflection percentages can be calculated The solar analysis tool helps in determining the best location and orientation for solar panels. The energy production of a building throughout the year can be determined by defining a ppliances and equipment and assign ing complex operational schedules Electricity consumption can be compared to electrical pr oduction on the same graph which can then be used for demand matching and the sizing of solar collectors (Autodesk, 2010) Right to l ight The Right to Light Wizard helps in the analysis of site projection angles, the assessment of obstructions, the cal culation of v ertical s ky c omponents for any point or surface and and the visualization of the no sky line in any space. The v ertical s ky c omponents and d aylight f actors for any windows or surfaces can be calculated b ased

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33 on the sun path diagrams and point distributions used in the BRE Guidelines (Autodesk, 2010) Thermal a nalysis ECOTECT uses the CIBSE Admittance Method to calculate heating and cooling loads for building models with any number of zones or type of geometry. Detailed material properties can be assigned to all building components as well as annual hourly operational schedules to occupancy, internal gains, infiltration and individual items of equipment. In addition to internal temperature and loads graphs, Ecotect can calculate the spatial dis tribution of both mean radiant temperatures within a model and predicted comfort levels. S pace loads can be calculated monthly where as i nternal hourly temperatures can be shown for any day of the year using real climate data (Autodesk, 2010) Some of the other advantages of thermal analysis tool are listed below; The r equired air movement distribution rates can be calculated to assist with the ventilation requirements. Statistical analysis is used to provide information on the passive performance of a bui lding. Surface gains, mass effects and insulation requirements can be emphasized The demands on any HVAC systems can be calculated with consideration of direct/indirect solar gains, accurate overshadowing, internal gains, inter zonal heat flow and com prehensive operational schedules. The percentage time each month for which internal temperatures within each zone are outside a specified comfort band can be calculated. The external temperatures, radiation and wind effects can be represented graphical ly. Lighting d esign Ecotect uses the BRE Daylight Factor method for day l ighting calculation and the Point to Point method for electric lighting. Daylight factors and illuminance levels at any point in the model can be calculated D etailed analysis can be p erformed by export ing

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34 the g eometric and material information of the building model directly to software tools such as Dayism and Radiance. Ecotect allows the editing or importing the IES profiles of different lights and luminaires, displaying them directly within the context of your model as you design your lighting system. Profiles based on user definable design illuminance levels can be created and can be set for the zone to which the lights belong, showing illuminance contours as a volumetric boundary at which the required zone illuminance is exactly met by each light. Rinker Hall at the University of Florida Rinker Hal l at the University of Florida in Gainesville was designed by a joint venture of the Croxton Collaborative Architects and GouldEvans has a chieved a "gold" LEED rating from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). success has raised the bar for this university's new buildings which will now be expected to meet or exceed LEED gold standards. Rinker Hall is an educational building with a total GSF of 46,530. The building facilitates Classrooms, Teaching Laboratories, Office/Computer, and Campus Support Services. Table 2 1 provides the details of the green facts of Rinker Hall with the Achieved LEED score (AS) to the Expected LEED s core (ES). Table 2 1 Green f acts of the University of Florida (Facilities & Planning, University of Florida) LEED NC v. 2.0 AS/ES GOLD 39/ 69 Sustainable Site 9/14 Water Efficiency 4/5 Energy & Atmosphere 9/17 Materials & Resources 6/13 Indoor E nvironmental Quality 8/15 Innovation & Design 3/5

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35 The site was a former parking lot. It was selected in part because of its proximity to public transit service. The old asphalt and limestone base from the former parking lot was reused. T he drywall debri s was returned to the manufacturer for reuse on other projects. According to the contractor over 50 percent of construction waste was recycled or reused through the waste management plan. There was an emphasis on local (within 500 miles, or 800 kilometers ) materials which reduced transportation fuel costs and helped support the local economy. Recycled content such as aluminum wall panels and glazing systems, railings, and ceiling tile were used in the building. The wood used in the construction was from su stainably managed forests and other materials with renewable content, such as wheat board and linoleum. The building employs rainwater harvesting using the collected water to flush the toilets. Reclaimed water is used to maintain the landscaping. Low flo w fixtures, electronic faucets, and waterless urinals were used to further reduce the water wastage. Rinker hall used Faade Wall Shading, High Performance Wall, and Lighting and Photocells/Motion Detectors features to cut the energy consumptions. Accordi ng to the Facilities and Planning Department at the University of Florida, there is a 50% Energy Savings over ASHRAE 90.1 standard. spectrally selective low e insulated glass p anels, thermally broken curtainwall/storefront system, thermally broken storefront doors and cellulose and rigid insulation supported by wood strips. The Energy Star rated white thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) mechanically fastened roof membrane produces f ewer harmful chemicals than other low sloping roof options.

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36 The light color of the roof reflects sunlight reducing the amount of heat that is absorbed by the building. Rinker Hall lighting system makes the most use of natural daylight, not only reduc ing t he electricity load and also the mechanical cooling load. A series of skylights are provided along the building's spine. Also, the low e glazing and interior louvers filter the strong Florida sun and control heat gain and glare. Low energy fluorescent ligh ts are used to illuminate the interiors during the nights. Motion detectors and d aylighting sensors keep the use of electric light to a minimum. The indoor environment is maintained by an efficient HVAC system which uses an enthalpy wheel. The enthalpy whe el takes advantage of air that has already been cooled or heated. During the summer, the cooled dry return air is used to precondition the incoming hot and moist outside air. This helps in the reduction of the load on the air conditioning coils. In the win ter, the warm return air is used for the same process.

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37 CHAPTER 3 METHODOLOGY Introduction The main objective as stated in Chapter 1 is to validate the simulated measurements obtained by the Autodesk Ecotect analysis tool. The secondary objective is to e valuate the lighting performance of Rinker Hall and to study how elements such as time, distance, orientation, and obstructions affect the lighting performance To a chieve th e first objective the field measurements of the rmal loads and illuminance levels of Rinker Hall at the University of Florida were compared to the simulated measurements of illuminance levels and thermal loads obtained by Autodesk Ecotect To achieve the second objective f ield measurements of illuminance levels of the classrooms in Rin ker Hall were studied by analyzing the effect of various factors on the illuminance levels. The following sections present the limitations of the study and the tasks that were performed to achieve the desired research objectives. Limitations of the Researc h Limitations of the research include : The lighting illuminance levels were measured on the field only during weekends and holidays in order to avoid conflicts with classes conducted in the classrooms. Few of the electric lights in the corridor on the thir d floor had to be left turned on for the safety of the students and faculty working over the weekend or on holidays. F ield measurements were taken from January to September to validate the results of Autodesk Ecotect. The field measurements were taken in January instead of in December in order to compare with the Autodesk Ecotect measurements. The difference between the sun altitude angle on 21 st December 2010 and 17 th January 2010 was 2.75 ( 11.73% ) The HVAC system of Rinker Hall was assumed to be the m ost efficient in the Ecotect a nalysis

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38 Limitations of the Software Limitations of the software include : Simulated illuminance levels we re neither date dependent nor time dependent T he levels represent ed the worst case design conditions based on an 'averag e' cloudy or uniform sky distribution in mid winter (December 21 st or 22 nd ) There were only two types of sky conditions nifo r m and vercast which could be assigned to the model for lighting level simulations. The loaded weather file was not used f or the calculation of the lighting illuminance levels. Autodesk Ecotect does not allow the user to set a specific type of HVAC system or specify operation schedules of the system. The thermal analysis tool did not allow for the calculation of daily heating or cooling loads. Field Measurements of Thermal Loads The Facilities and Planning D e partment at University of Florida regulates and measures the daily energy consumption of Rinker Hall T he data for calculating the thermal loads was provided by the Facil ities and Planning D e partment personnel T o calculate t he t otal monthly thermal load for each month in the year 2009, t he units of measurement that were specific to the usage at the U niversity of Florida were first converted to British thermal units ( B tu) to match the output units of the simulated measurements obtained by Autodesk Ecotect after which the chilled water, steam and recover y loads were added. Field Measurements of I lluminance The lighting illuminance levels were measured in room 220, room 22 5, room 238, and under the skylights and i n the corridor of the third floor of Rinker Hall at University of Florida. Two of these room s, room 220 and room 225 were on the west side and the other room room 238 was on the ea st side. SP s were marked on the tables adjacent to

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39 the walls in t he classrooms, under the skylights and also i n the corridor a s shown in the floor plans in figure 3 1, figure 3 2 and figure 3 3 Figure 3 1. Layout of the SP s in r oom 220 Figure 3 2 Layout of the SP s in r oom 225

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40 Figure 3 3 Layout of the SP s in r oom 238 Figure 3 4 Layout of the SP s under the skylights and in the corridor of the third floor

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41 All the windows in the rooms had open blinds and louvers as shown in Figur e 3 4 The electric lights ins ide the clas sroom were turned off Few electric lights in the corridor near skylight 3 had to be left turned o n for the safety of the students and f aculty Figure 3 5 shows room 220 and room 225 appropriately arranged for the measurements to be taken A light meter (E xtech Instruments) was used to measure the illuminance levels every hour from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on January 17 th February 27 th March 20 th April 17 th May 22 nd June 21 st July 24 th August 28 th and September 18 th 2010 Sky illuminance levels for ea ch hour were simultaneously measured. Weekends or holidays were chosen as the most appropriate da ys for measurements in order to avoid conflicts with classes scheduled in the selected classrooms. The measured readings are provided in Appendix B. Figure 3 5 Room 238 Blinds and l ouvers we re left open to allow the sunlight to pass through the window

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42 Figure 3 6 Room 225 and r oom 220 arranged to measure the illuminance levels Simulations by Autodesk Ecotect An Autodesk Revit BIM model of Rinker Ha ll at the University of Florida was exported as a g bXML file which was then used to import the BIM model into Autodesk Ecotect Figure 3 7 shows a 3 D view of the Autodesk Ecotect model of Rinker Hall. Project information such as site location, orientation altitude and terrain were input into the model. Figure 3 8 shows the screen shot of p roject informat ion input into Autodesk Ecotect The w eather file for the city of Gainesville was imported from the U.S. Department of E nergy website in .epw file format and was converted to .wea file format using the in n Materials specific to the Rinker Hall building components had to be created and up loaded to the Autodesk Ecotect element library.

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43 Figure 3 7 A 3 D Ecotect model of Ri nker Hall showing the daily sun path diagram for April 17 th 2010 Figure 3 8 Project information of the Rinker Hall The model had to be edited to add blinds and louvers to the external windows and glass to the doors of room 220, room 225 and room 238. Surfaces were created to act as tables in the model. SP s were then assigned as show n in figure 3 9 Electric lights in

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44 the corridor that were left turned on for the field measurements were created in the model. Figure 3 9 A 3D cross section Autodesk E cotect model of room 220 showing the louvers, blinds, table surfaces, SP s and opening in the door The s chedule library was updated to reflect the Rinker Hall o ccupancy and operation schedule T he properties of each zone were assigned to the model in accord ance to the actu al usage of the part icular zone. Figure 3 10 presents a screen shot of the general settings of the classroom 110. The general setting for each room is divided into three main segment ; shadow and reflection internal design conditions and o ccupancy and operation settings. The HVAC system operation and performance details of the HVAC system were obtained from the P hysical P lant D epartment at University of Florida The thermal properties of each zone are divided into two main segment s; HVAC s ystem settings and HVAC system operation schedule settings Appendix C and Appendix D provide a detail ed list of the zones and their properties.

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45 Figure 3 10 Z one properties General settings for room 110 of Rinker Hall, University of Florida The opera tion schedule of the HVAC system of Rinker Hall has two settings i n a day. The off peak time (1 1:05 p.m. to 6 a.m. on weekdays and 7 p.m. to 8 a.m. on weekends ) at for heating T he peak time ( 6 a.m. to 1 1:05 p.m. on week days and 8 a.m. to 7 for coo ling and at for heating. Autodesk Ecotect however does not allow such specific input in the thermal properties of each zone. Therefore, one set of readings for the off peak time and one set of readings for the peak time were simulated sep a rately and the results were added to achieve the total heating and cooling loads per month. Figure 3 11

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46 shows a sample output of the results from Autodesk Ecotect The output units were in Wh whi ch were conv erted to B tu for the validation p urposes Figure 3 11. Sample o utput of Ecot ect thermal analysis The simulations of the lighting performance were done using the Lighting analysis tool. All of the 40 SP s were selected and information was entered to calc ulate the lighting illuminance levels. Figure 3 12 presents a sample summary of the information entered for an overcast sky condition. Design sky illuminance was set at 9500 lux from January to mid April when the sky illuminance levels were not calculated. The actual sky illuminance levels recorded from mid April to September were used for the rest of the calculations. The Sky Luminance distribution model in Autodesk Ecotect has two options; CIE Overcast Sky Condition and CIE Uniform Sky Condition. Th erefo re, the

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47 actual sky conditions Clear and Partly Cloudy were categorized as CIE Uniform Sky Condition and the actual sky conditions Mostly Cloudy and Overcast were categorized as CIE Overcast Sky Condition. Window cleanliness was given an average value of .9 0 and the room average window areas were calculated. The increased accuracy mode was chosen as the most effective way to calculate the illuminance levels over the regulatory compliance mode l as increased accuracy mode considers both the transparency and refractive index of window glazing and the actual surface reflectance of external obstructions instead of the standard BRE design values. Figure 3 12 Screen shot of the summary of information entered for lighting analysis in Autodesk Ecotect

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48 Lighting P erformance S tudy T he field measurements from January to September were chosen over the Ecotect measurements to study the lighting performance of Rinker Hall As mentioned in the literature review, t he measurements obtained from Autodesk Ecotect were n eit her date nor time s pecific U se of these results would have been inaccurate in study ing the lighting performance over a period of time. The effect of the following factors was studied : Effect of d istance The effect of distance from the window on illumina nce levels at SP s was analyzed. Effect of t ime The effect of monthly and hourly time on illuminance levels at SP s was analyzed. Effect of o rientation The e ffect of west and east orientation on the illuminance levels at SP s was analyzed. Effect of o bstr uctions and o penings The e ffect of trees ( outside the west side classrooms ) on illuminance levels at SP s was analyzed Also t he effect of the openings in the classr oom doors on illuminance levels was analyzed Analysis of Results The percentage differe nce of the field measurements and Autodesk Ecotect mea surements was calculated to validate the results obtained by Autodesk Ecotect The field measurements taken i n January were used for validation purposes of illuminance levels while t he entire set of fie ld measurements were used for studying the lighting performance of Rinker Hall. The e ffect of distance, time, orientation obstructions and openings on illuminance levels at SP s was analyzed Chapter 4 present s the results and detail analysis of the data used to validate Autodesk Ecotect aas well as the analysis of the lighting performance of Rinker Hall

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49 CHAPTER 4 RESULT S AND DATA ANALYSIS Validation of Autodesk Ecotect for Thermal Load Calculation The F ield M easurements(FM) of thermal loads for the year 2009 were measured and the Ecotect M easurements(EM) of thermal loads for the the year 2009 were simulated The percentage difference of the F ield M easurements (FM) and Ecotect M easurements (EM) of thermal loads was calculated to validate the results obtain ed by Autodesk Ecotect The acceptable percentage difference was set at 15% b ased on research in the literature review. The following sections present the results obtained and the analysis of the obtained data to validate Autodesk Ecotect for thermal load calculation The field measurements of the thermal loads of Rinker Hall show that the highest thermal load of 4,466,470,965 B tu was recorded during the month of September and the l owest thermal load of 1,620,705,061 B tu was recorded during the month of Ma y. The total thermal load of Rinker Hall recorded for the year 2009 was 29,208,625,350 B tu. Table 4 1, shows the total and monthly loads of chilled water, steam and recover y as well as the total monthly and annual thermal load s calculated as the total sum of the chilled water, steam and recovery consumption

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50 Table 4 1. Field m easurements (FM) of t hermal l oads of Rinker Hall at University of Florida in 2009 Month Chilled Water (Btu) Steam (Btu) Recover y (Btu) Total Thermal Load (Btu) January 1 161 297 490 543 489 051 30 109 108 1 734 895 649 February 1 233 751 848 614 986 738 6 422 127 1 842 316 459 March 1 632 267 530 488 284 756 15 479 842 2 136 032 128 April 1 807 454 341 408 822 676 47 380 706 2 263 657 723 May 1 542 922 834 100 544 371 22 762 143 1 620 705 061 June 2 344 944 095 75 595 671 73 212 622 2 347 327 143 July 2 860 952 557 104 795 808 699 273 353 3 665 021 718 August 2 398 509 670 173 673 485 281 191 653 2 853 374 807 September 3 682 371 885 459 625 137 324 473 943 4 466 470 965 October 2 614 514 326 114 751 147 158 824 650 2 888 090 123 November 1 565 966 617 12 236 840 66 137 357 1 644 340 814 December 1 707 751 585 12 684 981 25 956 194 1 746 392 760 Annual 24,552,704,778 3,109,490,661 1,546,429,912 29,208,625,350 Th e E cotect measurements of the thermal loads of Rinker Hall show that the largest heating load of 517,381,967 B tu was recorded during the month of January and the lowest heating load of 10,447 B tu was recorded during the month of July. The largest cooling load of 411,046,849 Btu was recorded during the month of August and the lowest cooling load of 731,360 Btu was recorded during the month of January. The largest thermal load of 518,113,337 B tu was recorded during the month of January and the lowest therma l load of 240,941,131 B tu was recorded during the month of October. T he annual thermal load of Rinker Hall recorded for the year 2009 was 4,184,136,599 B tu. Table 4 2, shows the total and monthly heating and cooling loads as well as the monthly and annual thermal load s obtained by summing heating and cooling load consumptions

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51 Table 4 2. Ecotect measurements (EM) of t hermal l oads of Rinker Hall at University of Florida in 2009 Month Heating Load (Btu) Cooling Load (Btu) Total Thermal Load (Btu) January 517,381,967 731,360 518,113,337 February 274,474,601 24,108,437 298,583,028 March 189,675,169 96,433,101 286,108,264 April 65,720,341 180,079,978 245,800,313 May 3,073,080 371,515,044 374,588,131 June 10,730 339,610,297 339,621,030 July 10,447 399,1 03,866 399,114,319 August 11,852 411,046,849 411,058,707 September 427,962 304,299,153 304,727,106 October 61,085,473 179,855,665 240,941,131 November 239,776,238 27,488,538 267,264,779 December 485,948,695 12,267,446 498,216,157 Annual 1,837,596,589 2,346,539,791 4,184,136,599 The percentage difference of the F ield M easurements (FM) and Ecotect M easurements (EM) was calculated by using the following formula : Percentage Difference = ((FM EM)/EM)/100 Table 4 3 shows the percentage difference of the t otal thermal load for every month and the percentage difference of the total thermal load for the year 2009. The acceptable percentage difference of 15% was not met in any month The largest percentage difference between the EM and FM was during the month of September at 1366%. The lowest percentage difference was during the month of January at 235%. The percentage difference of the total thermal load of Rinker Hall for the year 2009 was 598%.

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52 Table 4 3. Percentage d ifference between field m easurement s ( FM) and Ecotect m easurements (EM) of t hermal l oads of Rinker Hall at University of Florida in 2009 Month Percentage Difference January 235% February 517% March 647% April 821% May 333% June 591% July 818% August 594% September 1366% October 1099% November 515% December 251% Annual 598% Validation of Autodesk Ecotect for Illuminance Level Calculation The Field Measurements(FM) of thermal loads for the year 2009 were measured and the Ecotect Measurements(EM) of illuminance levels for the the year 2009 were simulate d. The percentage difference between the Field Measurements (FM) and Ecotect Measurements (EM) of illuminance levels was calculated to validate the results obtained by Autodesk Ecotect The acceptable percentage difference was set at 15% based on research in the literature review. The following sections present the results obtained and the analysis of the obtained data to validate Autodesk Ecotect for illuminance level calculation Table 4 4 presents the data of the weather condition s recorded on January 17 th 2010. The temperature was low with readings ranging from a high of 71 F to a low of 64 F The sky was mostly cloudy throughout the day. The external sky illuminance levels were not calculate d and hence an average illuminance of 9500 lux was assumed as suggested by Autodesk Ecotect for the simulations.

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53 Table 4 4 Weather f orecast and a ctual w eather c onditions of Gainesville, Florida on 01/17/2010 Time Temperature Assumed Sky Illuminance (Lux) Observed Sky Conditions 8:00 a.m. 9500 Overcast 9:00 a.m. 65 9500 Partly Cloudy 10:00 a.m. 67 9500 Mostly Cloudy 11:00 a. m. 68 9500 Mostly Cloudy 12:00 p.m. 69 9500 Partly Cloudy 1:00 p.m. 70 9500 Overcast 2:00 p.m. 71 9500 Overcast 3:00 p.m. 70 9500 Overcast 4:00 p.m. 69 9500 Partly Cloudy 5:00 p.m. 64 9500 Partly Cloudy Results The F ield measurements (FM) and the Ec otect M easurements (EM) of room 220 room 225, room 238 and the skylights are presented in table 4 5 table 4 6 table 4 7 and table 4 8 respectively The field measurements show that the illuminance levels for rooms 220 and 225 gradually increase throug hout the day with the largest illuminance level s recorded at 4.00 p m. wh ile, in room 238 the illuminance levels gradually decrease throughout the day with the lowest illuminace levels recorded at 5:00 p.m. T he increase and decrease is due to the w est ori entation of the rooms 220 and 225 and the east orientation of the room 238. Both FM and EM show that the SPs within the classrooms which were closest to the window recorded larger illuminance levels when compared to the illuminance levels recorded at the S Ps furthermost from the window. It was also noted that room 225 which ha s less trees outside than room 220 had larger illuminance levels than those of room 220 The illuminance levels for the skylights gradually i ncreased with the peak value at 1 1:00 p.m and the n decreased towards the end of the day with the lowest illuminace level recorded at 5:00 p.m.

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54 Table 4 5 Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in room 220 (w ith m ore trees west s ide) on 01/17/2010 ( l ux ) Tim e SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 9:00 a.m. 69 1510 40 1363 24 1028 15 1042 10:00 a.m. 71 1275 40 1134 33 805 16 832 11:00 a.m. 137 1275 68 1134 55 805 33 832 12:00 p.m. 129 1510 71 1363 44 1028 26 1042 1:00 p.m 190 1275 110 1134 77 805 51 832 2:00 p.m. 234 1275 118 1134 67 805 37 832 3:00 p.m. 176 1275 99 1134 57 805 36 832 4:00 p.m. 926 1510 3760 1363 393 1028 266 1042 5:00 p.m. 114 1510 69 1363 49 1028 41 1042 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 9:00 a.m. 10 1084 9 1079 60 825 35 542 10:00 a.m. 11 902 10 945 86 705 50 432 11:00 a.m. 17 902 15 945 137 705 74 432 12:00 p.m. 16 1084 12 1079 145 825 82 542 1:00 p.m. 32 902 27 945 206 705 98 432 2:00 p m. 24 902 17 94 5 252 705 115 432 3:00 p.m. 25 902 19 945 201 705 111 432 4:00 p.m. 153 1084 102 1079 1098 825 636 542 5:00 p.m. 25 1084 21 1079 118 825 71 542 Time SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 9:00 a.m. 21 476 13 520 12 393 8 419 10:00 a.m. 32 379 19 434 15 324 8 352 11:00 a.m. 42 379 28 434 21 324 15 419 12:00 p.m. 44 476 28 520 19 393 12 419 1:00 p.m. 45 379 26 434 17 324 9 352 2:00 p.m. 59 379 39 434 19 324 12 352 3:00 p.m. 61 379 42 434 31 324 24 352 4:00 p.m. 314 476 214 520 124 393 83 419 5:00 p.m. 40 476 26 520 20 393 15 419

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55 Table 4 6 Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in room 225 (w ith f ewer trees west side) on 01/17/2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 9:05 a.m. 79 551 49 472 32 323 24 552 10:05 a.m. 100 477 57 414 41 279 19 526 11:05 a.m. 207 477 126 414 60 279 51 526 12:05 p.m. 163 551 91 472 49 323 32 552 1:05 p.m. 169 477 103 414 64 279 42 526 2:05 p.m. 13 9 477 75 414 45 279 32 526 3:05 p.m. 679 477 413 414 215 279 142 526 4:05 p.m. 1068 551 648 472 428 323 266 552 5:05 p.m. 137 551 108 472 64 323 56 552 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 9:05 a.m. 15 1583 12 1805 112 591 61 475 10:05 a.m. 16 1855 13 2133 146 519 90 414 11:05 a.m. 34 1855 33 2133 290 519 167 414 12:05 p.m. 18 1583 17 1805 224 591 111 475 1:05 p.m. 27 1855 21 2133 242 519 143 414 2:05 p.m. 18 1855 15 2133 199 519 106 414 3:05 p.m. 86 1855 66 21 33 944 519 492 414 4:05 p.m. 154 1583 107 1805 1260 591 676 475 5:05 p.m. 39 1583 20 1805 184 591 98 475 Time SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 9:05 a.m. 40 520 27 285 18 273 13 327 10:05 a.m. 59 475 37 246 19 237 11 287 11:05 a.m. 96 475 81 246 36 237 28 287 12:05 p.m. 61 520 51 285 26 273 16 327 1:05 p.m. 86 475 56 246 36 237 25 287 2:05 p.m. 68 475 40 246 26 237 18 287 3:05 p.m. 266 475 166 246 107 237 65 287 4:05 p.m. 359 520 235 285 152 273 91 327 5:05 p.m. 50 520 34 285 21 273 17 327

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56 Table 4 7 Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in room 238 (e ast side) on 01/17/2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 9:10 a.m. 5580 449 991 335 564 226 360 197 10:10 a.m. 1250 367 489 285 232 195 130 177 11:10 a.m. 501 367 304 285 185 195 126 177 12:10 p.m. 608 449 377 335 233 226 152 197 1:10 p.m. 526 367 288 285 166 195 120 177 2:10 p.m. 376 367 218 285 127 195 80 177 3:1 0 p.m. 269 367 161 285 98 195 72 177 4:10 p.m. 219 449 159 335 107 226 81 197 5:10 p.m. 151 449 104 335 65 226 51 197 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 9:10 a.m. 240 257 909 555 5500 334 881 214 10:10 a.m. 86 242 1535 474 546 287 348 184 11:10 a.m. 90 242 1104 474 422 287 219 184 12:10 p.m. 116 257 530 555 329 334 176 214 1:10 p.m. 90 242 333 474 215 287 127 184 2:10 p.m. 52 242 304 474 184 287 110 184 3:10 p.m. 59 242 266 474 175 287 86 184 4:10 p.m. 58 257 225 555 155 334 96 214 5:10 p.m. 35 257 168 555 99 334 59 214 Time SP 9 SP 10 FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 9:10 a.m. 514 295 340 292 10:10 a.m. 225 271 96 270 11:10 a.m. 114 271 77 270 12:10 p.m. 102 295 66 292 1:10 p.m. 78 271 57 270 2:10 p.m. 58 271 33 270 3:10 p.m. 45 271 37 270 4:10 p.m. 61 295 47 292 5:10 p.m. 34 295 25 292

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57 Table 4 8 Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance levels under skylights and in c orridor on 01/17/2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:15 a.m. 195 6004 89 5745 260 6062 84 5545 9:15 a.m. 1090 5874 546 5738 1060 5944 510 5550 10:15 a.m. 1069 6004 970 5745 1755 6062 609 5545 11:15 a.m. 2680 6004 1346 5745 3450 6062 1355 5545 12:15 p.m. 1750 5874 612 5 738 1782 5944 824 5550 1:15 p.m. 2200 6004 954 5745 1830 6062 653 5545 2:15 p.m. 1221 6004 510 5745 1560 6062 548 5545 3:15 p.m. 1363 6004 577 5745 1529 6062 500 5545 4:15 p.m. 892 5874 478 5738 834 5944 402 5550 5:15 p.m. 207 5874 96 5738 221 5944 10 0 5550 Time SP 5 SP 6 FM EM FM EM 8:15 a.m. 227 6053 238 5566 9:15 a.m. 1250 5946 589 5575 10:15 a.m. 1354 6053 701 5566 11:15 a.m. 2410 6053 1181 5566 12:15 p.m. 2180 5946 1050 5575 1:15 p.m. 2130 6053 814 5566 2:15 p.m. 2010 6053 701 5566 3:15 p.m. 1427 6053 649 5566 4:15 p.m. 838 5946 529 5575 5:15 p.m. 227 5946 223 5575 Data Analysis The percentage difference between the F ield M easurements (FM) and Ecotect M easurements (EM) of illuminance levels w as calculated by using the following formul a : Percentage Difference = ((FM EM)/EM) /100 Table 4 10 shows the percentage difference for each SP in room 220. The acceptable percentage difference of 15% was achieved in only one case The highest percentage difference of 11894% was observed at 9:00 a m for SP 6 while the leas t percentage difference of 15% was observed at 4:00 p.m. for SP 8.

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58 Table 4 9 Percentage difference between f iel d m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurements (EM) of illuminance l evels in r oom 220 on 01/17 /2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:00 a.m. 9:00 a.m. 2088% 3307% 4183% 6847% 10739% 11894% 10:00 a.m. 1696% 2735% 2340% 5098% 8099% 9353% 11:00 a.m. 831% 1568% 1364% 2420% 5205% 6202% 12:00 p.m. 1071% 1820% 2236% 3908% 6674% 8896% 1:00 p.m. 571% 931% 946% 1531% 2718% 3401% 2:00 p.m. 445% 861% 1102% 2148% 3658% 5461% 3:00 p.m. 624% 1045% 1313% 2210% 3507% 4876% 4:00 p.m. 63% 64% 162% 292% 608% 958% 5:00 p.m. 1225% 1875% 1998% 2442% 4235% 5040% Time SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 8:00 a.m. 9:00 a.m. 1275% 1450% 2166% 3900% 3174% 5139% 10:00 a.m. 719% 764% 1085% 2186% 2057% 4296% 11:00 a.m. 414% 484% 803% 1451% 1441% 2694% 12:00 p.m. 469% 562% 981% 1757% 1968% 3393% 1:00 p.m. 242% 341% 743% 1570% 1803% 3808% 2:00 p.m. 180% 276% 543% 10 13% 1603% 2831% 3:00 p.m. 251% 289% 522% 934% 944% 1365% 4:00 p.m. 25% 15% 52% 143% 217% 405% 5:00 p.m. 599% 664% 1090% 1900% 1864% 2694% Table 4 11 shows the percentage difference for each S P in room 225. The acceptable percentage difference of 15% w as achieved i n only one case. The highest percentage difference of 14946% was observed at 9:05 a.m. for SP6 while the least percentage difference of 0% was observed at 3:05 p.m. for SP 2.

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59 Table 4 1 0 Percentage difference between field measurements (F M) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 on 01/17 /2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:05 a.m. 9:05 a.m. 598% 863% 909% 2198% 10453% 14946% 10:05 a.m. 377% 627% 580% 2667% 11495% 16307% 11:05 a.m. 130% 229% 365 % 931% 5356% 6363% 12:05 p.m. 238% 418% 559% 1624% 8694% 10520% 1:05 p.m. 182% 302% 336% 1152% 6771% 10056% 2:05 p.m. 243% 452% 520% 1543% 10206% 14119% 3:05 p.m. 30% 0% 30% 270% 2057% 3132% 4:05 p.m. 48% 27% 25% 107% 928% 1587% 5:05 p.m. 302% 337% 4 05% 885% 3959% 8927% Time SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 8:05 a.m. 9:05 a.m. 428% 678% 1199% 956% 1417% 2413% 10:05 a.m. 256% 360% 705% 565% 1147% 2512% 11:05 a.m. 79% 148% 395% 204% 558% 926% 12:05 p.m. 164% 328% 752% 459% 950% 1942% 1:05 p.m. 115% 189% 452% 339% 558% 1049% 2:05 p.m. 161% 290% 598% 515% 811% 1496% 3:05 p.m. 45% 16% 79% 48% 121% 342% 4:05 p.m. 53% 30% 45% 21% 80% 259% 5:05 p.m. 221% 384% 939% 739% 1200% 1822% Table 4 1 1 shows the percentage difference for each SP in room 238. The acceptable percentage difference of 15% was achieved in ten cases The highest percentage difference of 1069% was observed at 9:10 a.m. for SP 10 while the least percentage difference of 1 % was observed at 1:10 p.m. for SP 2.

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60 Table 4 1 1 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 on 01/17 /2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 8:10 a.m. 9:10 a.m. 92% 66% 60% 45% 7% 10:10 a.m. 71% 42% 16% 37% 182% 11:10 a.m. 27% 6% 6% 41% 169% 12:10 p.m. 26% 11% 3% 30% 121% 1:10 p.m. 30% 1% 18% 48% 169% 2:10 p.m. 2% 31% 54% 122% 366% 3:10 p.m. 36% 77% 99% 146% 311% 4:10 p.m. 105% 111% 111% 143% 342% 5:10 p.m. 198% 222% 247% 286% 633% Time SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 1 0 8:10 a.m. 9:10 a.m. 39% 94% 76% 43% 14% 10:10 a.m. 69% 47% 47% 20% 181% 11:10 a.m. 57% 32% 16% 138% 250% 12:10 p.m. 5% 2% 22% 189% 343% 1:10 p.m. 42% 34% 45% 247% 373% 2:10 p.m. 56% 56% 68% 367% 717% 3:10 p.m. 78% 64% 114% 502% 628% 4:1 0 p.m. 147% 116% 123% 384% 522% 5:10 p.m. 230% 238% 263% 768% 1069% Table 4 1 2 shows the percentage difference for each SP under the skylights and i n the corridor of the third floor The acceptable percentage difference of 15% was not achieved in any ca se The highest percentage difference of 6355% was observed at 8.15 a m for SP 2 while the least percentage difference of 76% was observed at 11:15 a.m. for SP 3.

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61 Table 4 1 2 Percentage difference between f iel d m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easuremen ts (EM) of illuminance l evels under s kylights and in c orridor on 01/17 /2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:15 a.m. 2979% 6355% 2232% 6501% 2566% 2239% 9:15 a.m. 439% 951% 461% 988% 376% 846% 10:15 a.m. 462% 492% 245% 810% 347% 694% 11:15 a.m. 124% 327% 76% 309% 151% 371% 12:15 p.m. 236% 838% 234% 573% 173% 431% 1:15 p.m. 173% 502% 231% 749% 184% 584% 2:15 p.m. 392% 1026% 289% 912% 201% 694% 3:15 p.m. 341% 896% 296% 1009% 324% 758% 4:15 p.m. 559% 1100% 613% 1281% 610% 954% 5:15 p.m. 2738% 5877 % 2590% 5450% 2519% 2400% Dayl ighting Performance Study Effect of Distance This section of the study examines how distance affects the level of day lighting in a room. I lluminance levels of SP s both closest to the window and furthermost from the window ar e studied over a period of time to understand any patterns Figure 4 1 shows the effect of distance from the window on illuminance levels at SPs for the months of January, May and September. On January 17 th illuminance levels decreased when the distance from the window was increased (i.e., reducing from SP1 to SP6). On May 22 nd illuminance levels decreased when the distance from the window was increased (i.e., reducing from SP1 to SP6). On September 18 th illuminance levels decreased when the distance f rom the window was increased (i.e., reducing from SP1 to SP6). It was also observed that the illuminance levels decreased at a lesser rate in the month of January when compared to the month of December.

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62 Figure 4 1. The effect of distance on illuminance levels at SP s over a period of time in room 220 at 2:00 p.m. Figure 4 2 shows the effect of distance from the window on the SPs for the rooms 220, 225 and 238. In room 220, illuminance levels decreased when the distance from the window was increased (i.e ., reducing from SP1 to SP6) In room 225, illuminance levels decreased when the distance from the window was increased (i.e., reducing from SP1 to SP6). In room 238, illuminance levels decreased w hen the distance from the window was increased (i.e., reduc ing from SP1 to SP5). It was also observed that the west oriented room 238 has a greater rate of reduction in illuminance levels on SPs increasing in distance from the window when compared to the east oriented rooms 220 and 225.

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63 Figure 4 2. The effect d istance on illuminance levels at SP s in different classrooms on May 22 nd at 2:00 p.m. Effect of Time This section of the study examines how time affects the level of day lighting in a room. The pattern of chang ing illuminance levels over a month and the tr end of lighting illuminance levels over a period of time are evaluated. Figure 4 3 shows the effect of time on illuminance levels in room 220 at SP 1 which is closest to the window at SP 6 which is f u rthermost from the window. The illuminance levels were me asured at 9:00 a.m. from January to September. The illuminance levels at SP1 gradually increased in February until reaching a peak value in July and the n gradually decreas ing The illuminance levels at SP6 gradually increased in Februar y until reaching a p eak value in June and then gradually decreas ing It was also observed that SP 1, close st to the window ha d the highest illuminance levels and SP6 furthermost from the window had the lowe st illuminance levels.

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64 Figure 4 3. Effect of time on illuminance levels at SP 1 and SP 6 in room 220 at 9:00 a.m. Figure 4 4 shows the effect of time on illuminance levels in room 220 at SP1 which is closest to the window and at SP6 which is f u rthermost from the window. The illuminance levels were measured at 2:00 p.m. from January to September The illuminance levels at SP1 did not display a specific pattern of change between the months January and September. The illuminance levels at SP6 did not display a specific pattern of change between the months January and Septe mber. Both SP1 and SP6 displayed a similar trend in the change of illuminance levels over time. It was also observed that SP1 close st to the window had the highest illuminance levels and SP6 furthermost from the window had the lowest illuminance levels

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65 Figure 4 4 Effect of time on illuminance levels at SP 1 and SP 6 in room 220 at 2:00 p.m. Figure 4 5 shows the effect of time on illuminance levels in room 220 at SP 1 which is closest to the window and at SP 6 which is the f u rthermost from the window The illuminance levels were measured on March 20 th The illuminance levels at SP1 gradually increased throughout the day and reached a peak value at 5:00 p.m. The illuminance levels at SP6 gradually increased throughout the day and reach ed a peak value at 5:00 p.m. The illuminance levels at SP1 increased at a higher rate than did the illuminance levels at SP6. It was also observed that SP1 close st to the window had higher illuminance levels and SP6 furthermost from the window had lower illuminance le vels.

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66 Figure 4 5. Effect of time on illuminance levels at SP 1 and SP 6 in room 220 on March 20 th Figure 4 6 shows the effect of time on illuminance levels in room 220 at SP1 which is closest to the window and at SP 6 which is the f u rthermost from the window The illuminance levels were measured on June 21 st The illuminance levels at SP1 gradually increased throughout the day reached a peak value at 3:00 p.m ., and then gradually decreased The illuminance levels at SP6 gradually increased throughout the da y, reached a peak value at 12:00 p.m and then gradually decreased The illuminance levels at SP 1 displayed a slightly different pattern of change compared to the illuminance levels of SP6. It was also observed that SP1 close st to the window had h igher illuminance levels and S P 6 furthermost from the window had lower illuminance levels.

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67 Figure 4 6. Effect of time on illuminance levels at SP 1 and SP 6 in room 220 on June 21 st Effect of Orientation This section of the study examines how orient ation affects the level of day lighting in a room. Patterns of illuminance levels on May 22 nd from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. for SPs closest to the window and furthermost from the window were evaluated. Figure 4 7 shows the effect of orientation on illuminance levels at the SPs closest to the window in room s 238 and 225 on May 22 nd Room 238 which has an east orientation, has illuminance levels which gradually increase until reaching a peak value at 9:00 a.m. and then gradually d ecreas ing throughout the day. R oom 225 which has a west orientation has illuminance levels which gradually increase throughout the day. Room 238 has higher illuminance levels than room 225.

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68 Figure 4 7. Effect of orientation on illuminance levels at closest to the window in roo m 238 and room 225 on May 22 nd Figure 4 8 shows the effect of orientation on illuminance at the SPs furthermost from the window in room s 238 and 225 on May 22 nd Room 238 which has an east orientation has illuminance levels which gradually decrease thro ughout the day. Room 225 which has a west orientation has illuminance levels which gradually increase throughout the day. Room 238 has higher illuminance levels than room 225. Figure 4 8. Effect of orie ntation on furthermost from the window in room 238 and room 225 on May 22 nd Effect of Obstructions and Openings This section of the study examines how obstruction s and openings affect the level of lighting in a room. Patterns of illuminance levels were evaluated on May 22 nd fo r SPs

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69 1 6 in rooms which had trees outside obstructing da y light from entering Patterns of illuminance levels over the summer at the two SP s closest to the door w ere evaluated to study the effect of openings. Figure 4 9 shows the effect of trees outside ro om s 220 and 225 on SP s 1 6 on May 22 nd at 2:00 p.m. Room 225 which had a lower number of trees outside had greater levels of illuminance than did room 220 which had a higher number of trees outside It was also observed that the largest difference in t he illuminance levels between room s 220 and 225 occurred at SP1 and the smallest difference in illuminance levels between room s 220 and 225 occurred at SP6 Figure 4 9. Effect of obstruction by tress on illuminance levels at SP 1 and SP 6 in room 220 an d room 225 on May 22 nd at 2:00 p.m. Figure 4 10 shows the effect of openings in the door on illuminance levels at SP5 and SP6 in room 220 measured over the summer month s from May to August at 12:00 p.m. SP6 had greater illuminance levels in the months of M ay and June than did SP5. SP5 and SP6 had the same illuminance levels in the month of July. SP5 had greater illuminance levels in the month of August than did SP 6.

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70 Figure 4 10. Effect of openings in the door on illuminance levels at SP 5 and SP 6 in r oom 220 at 12:00 p.m. in the summer season (May to August)

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71 CHAPTER 5 CONCLUSIONS AND RECC OMENDATIONS Validation of Ecotect for Thermal Analysis Though Autodesk Ecotect allows the for the input of most of the actual usage conditions for analyzing thermal l oads, the lack of the ability to specify the type of HVAC system was a major drawback in accurat ely simulating results. O ther limitations of the software include the inability to input the accurate operation schedule of the HVAC system as well as the inabi lity to simulate daily thermal loads T he research assumption that Rinker Hall ha s the most efficient system may also have affected the accuracy of the results As per the data analysis of the thermal loads discussed in the previous chapter, Ecotect under estimates thermal loads and it can be concluded that Autodesk Ecotect cannot be used for accurate simulation of thermal loads. Validation of Ecotect for Lighting Analysis The accuracy of the results simulated by Autodesk Ecotect was affected by many softwa re and research limitations as discussed in chapter three The major drawback was the inability of the research to measure lighting illuminance levels on the 21 st of December 2009 as Autodesk Ecotect bases the sky conditions and ligh ting illuminance level s on December 21 st L imitations of the software which may have affected the accuracy of the results include not using the weather file and having limited sky conditions. C onsidering the 11.73% sun a ngle difference between the 21 st of December 2009 and the 17 th of January 2010, the 15% allowable limit for the percentage difference was met i n only twelve cases of the possible 400 cases The refore, as per the data analysis of the field measurements and Ecotect measurements of lighting illuminance levels dis c ussed in the previous chapter, Ecotect overestimates illuminance

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72 levels and it can be concluded that Autodesk Ecotect cannot be relied upon for accurate lighting analysis. Lighting Performance of Rinker Hall The lighting study provides insight into how fa ctors such as distance, time, orientation, obstructions and openings can affect the amount of lighting different areas in a room receive The study shows that the closer a point is to the opening, the more natural light it receives, eliminating the need f or artificial lighting. The east oriented classroom performed better than the west oriented classrooms in terms of receiving appropriate amounts of natural light necessary for a classroom The classrooms receive d more natural light during the summer month s when the days we re longer. Also, the openings in the door helped in providing natural light to points away from the window. These factors applied to design can reduce the amount of artificial lighting and in turn reduc e electricity consumption. Recomme ndations The AEC Industry Based on the thermal loads and illuminance levels simulated in this research using Autodesk Ecotect, t he AEC industry should not rely upon Autodesk Ecotect for design guidelines. Lighting stud ies also cannot be used to study the variations of lighting illuminance levels Autodesk Ecotect requires must improv e the quality of input information that can be entered in order to more accurately simulate results Another major improvement to the software would be to mak e the lighting an alysis both date and time specific At present relying on Autodesk Ecotect for developing even conceptual design is in accurate.

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73 Future Research There were many limitations in th is research which can be avoided in future studies. The inability to measure lighting illuminance levels on weekdays as well as the necessity to measure illuminance levels with a minimal number of electric lights turned on were some of the limitations that can be avoided in future by either selecting an area which is unused or by c onstructing a classroom solely for the purpose of the research. The inability of the present research to measure lighting illuminance levels i n mid winter can be avoided in the future by beginning the measurements at an ealier date Observed sky conditions could also include the amount of clouds present on the day illuminance levels are recorded. S olar and shading device analysis in Autodesk Ecotect can be also explored and combine d with this r esearch for validation purpose s The s tudy of the thermal perfor mance of Rinker Hall in determin ing efficient design strategies can be performed as well

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74 APPENDIX A FIELD MEASUREMENTS A ND ECOTECT MEASUREMENTS OF ILLUMINANCE LEVELS Table A 1. Weather f orecast and a ctual w eather c onditions of Gainesville, Florida on 02/27/2010 Time Temperature Assumed Sky Illuminance (Lux) Observed Sky Conditions 8:00 a.m. 9500 Overcast 9:00 a.m. 9500 Overcast 10:00 a.m. 9500 Overcast 11:00 a.m. 45 9500 Overcast 12:00 p.m. 46 9500 Overcast 1:00 p.m. 48 9500 Mostly Cl oudy 2:00 p.m. 49 9500 Mostly Cloudy 3:00 p.m. 50 9500 Mostly Cloudy 4:00 p.m. 51 9500 Partly Cloudy 5:00 p.m. 49 9500 Partly Cloudy

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75 Table A 2. Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in r oo m 220 (w ith m ore trees west side) on 02/27/2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 19 1275 9 1134 4 805 2 832 9:00 a.m. 36 1275 18 1134 9 805 5 832 10:00 a.m. 44 1275 18 1134 9 805 7 832 11:00 a.m. 28 1275 13 1134 7 805 3 832 12:00 p.m. 50 1275 26 1134 13 805 8 832 1:00 p.m. 262 1275 151 1134 83 805 53 832 2:00 p.m. 302 1275 183 1134 106 805 64 832 3:00 p.m. 373 1275 218 1134 131 805 88 832 4:00 p.m. 1328 1510 760 1363 458 1028 279 1042 5:00 p.m. 2610 1510 888 1363 432 1028 309 1042 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 1 902 3 945 21 705 12 432 9:00 a.m. 2 902 5 945 40 705 24 432 10:00 a.m. 2 902 5 945 51 705 28 432 11:00 a.m. 1 902 4 945 31 705 15 432 12:00 p.m. 2 902 7 945 59 705 27 43 2 1:00 p.m. 33 902 32 945 281 705 158 432 2:00 p.m. 43 902 35 945 341 705 185 432 3:00 p.m. 57 902 45 945 408 705 226 432 4:00 p.m. 176 1084 126 1079 1488 825 823 542 5:00 p.m. 193 1084 206 1079 5720 825 2100 542 Time SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 FM EM F M EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 5 379 2 434 1 324 0 352 9:00 a.m. 11 379 5 434 3 324 2 352 10:00 a.m. 11 379 7 434 3 324 1 352 11:00 a.m. 8 379 3 434 1 324 0 352 12:00 p.m. 16 379 10 434 4 324 2 352 1:00 p.m. 87 379 56 434 35 324 21 352 2:00 p.m. 100 379 64 434 42 324 29 352 3:00 p.m. 140 379 117 434 63 324 37 352 4:00 p.m. 462 476 290 520 177 393 114 419 5:00 p.m. 435 476 297 520 205 393 130 419

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76 Table A 3 Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of i lluminance l evels in room 225 (w ith f ewer trees west side) on 02/27/2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 28 477 11 414 7 279 3 526 9:05 a.m. 53 477 31 414 17 279 11 526 10:05 a.m. 49 477 20 414 11 279 5 526 11:05 a.m. 34 477 18 414 10 279 8 526 12:05 p.m. 86 477 45 414 27 279 17 526 1:05 p.m. 278 477 178 414 94 279 71 526 2:05 p.m. 581 477 430 414 221 279 144 526 3:05 p.m. 758 477 548 414 281 279 211 526 4:05 p.m. 1313 551 871 472 578 323 367 552 5:05 p.m. 1139 551 751 472 558 323 1046 552 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 2 1855 4 2133 40 519 17 414 9:05 a.m. 4 1855 8 2133 75 519 41 414 10:05 a.m. 3 1855 7 2133 66 519 41 414 11:05 a.m. 3 1855 5 2133 46 519 24 414 12:05 p.m. 10 1855 10 2133 128 519 81 414 1:05 p.m. 40 1855 35 2133 287 519 185 414 2:05 p.m. 75 1855 66 2133 778 519 461 414 3:05 p.m. 132 1855 94 2133 1096 519 524 414 4:05 p.m. 214 1583 152 1805 1556 591 911 475 5:05 p.m. 255 1583 221 1805 3760 591 748 475 Time SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 FM EM F M EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 9 475 4 246 2 237 0 287 9:05 a.m. 19 475 13 246 9 237 4 287 10:05 a.m. 16 475 11 246 7 237 3 287 11:05 a.m. 15 475 7 246 4 237 2 287 12:05 p.m. 34 475 21 246 12 237 8 287 1:05 p.m. 99 475 68 246 42 237 32 287 2:05 p.m. 257 475 153 246 81 237 50 287 3:05 p.m. 316 475 215 246 129 237 74 287 4:05 p.m. 500 520 313 285 198 273 119 327 5:05 p.m. 431 520 289 285 194 273 142 327

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77 Table A 4 Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in r oom 2 38 (east s ide) on 02/2 7/2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 47 367 26 285 15 195 9 177 9:10 a.m. 104 367 64 285 37 195 24 177 10:10 a.m. 110 367 60 285 29 195 21 177 11:10 a.m. 82 367 47 285 20 195 11 177 12:10 p.m. 186 367 107 285 60 195 39 177 1:10 p.m. 366 367 242 285 167 195 107 177 2:10 p.m. 601 367 380 285 232 195 138 177 3:10 p.m. 453 367 285 285 184 195 137 177 4:10 p.m. 227 449 167 335 100 226 87 197 5:10 p.m. 179 449 107 335 84 226 60 197 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 5 242 50 474 26 287 15 184 9:10 a.m. 18 242 102 474 67 287 47 184 10:10 a.m. 15 242 120 474 60 287 41 184 11:10 a.m. 8 242 81 474 44 287 28 184 12:10 p.m. 26 242 181 474 121 287 67 184 1:10 p.m. 57 242 3 37 474 218 287 154 184 2:10 p.m. 95 242 648 474 397 287 233 184 3:10 p.m. 87 242 447 474 258 287 151 184 4:10 p.m. 68 257 244 555 145 334 86 214 5:10 p.m. 43 257 35 555 47 334 92 214 Time SP 9 SP 10 FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 8 271 4 270 9:10 a.m. 24 2 71 18 270 10:10 a.m. 27 271 15 270 11:10 a.m. 15 271 11 270 12:10 p.m. 42 271 26 270 1:10 p.m. 89 271 61 270 2:10 p.m. 142 271 95 270 3:10 p.m. 102 271 72 270 4:10 p.m. 71 295 51 292 5:10 p.m. 106 295 182 292

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78 Table A 5 Field m easurements (F M) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in under s kylights and in c orridor on 02/2 7/2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:15 a.m. 233 6004 83 5745 253 6062 72 5545 9:15 a.m. 459 6004 161 5745 479 6062 139 5545 10: 15 a.m. 483 6004 167 5745 525 6062 159 5545 11:15 a.m. 418 6004 174 5745 515 6062 137 5545 12:15 p.m. 578 6004 206 5745 634 6062 202 5545 1:15 p.m. 2450 6004 953 5745 3180 6062 940 5545 2:15 p.m. 2650 6004 2130 5745 3930 6062 1425 5545 3:15 p.m. 2070 6004 913 5745 1730 6062 820 5545 4:15 p.m. 864 5874 357 5738 668 5944 256 5550 5:15 p.m. 312 5874 176 5738 323 5738 140 5550 Time SP 5 SP 6 FM EM FM EM 8:15 a.m. 283 6053 211 5566 9:15 a.m. 499 6053 272 5566 10:15 a.m. 553 6053 290 5566 11:15 a.m. 482 6053 225 5566 12:15 p.m. 642 6053 326 5566 1:15 p.m. 3060 6053 1075 5566 2:15 p.m. 4420 6053 1609 5566 3:15 p.m. 2620 6053 1344 5566 4:15 p.m. 688 5946 366 5575 5:15 p.m. 363 5946 273 5575 Table A 6. Weather f orecast and a ctual w e ather c ondit ions of Gainesville, Florida on 03/20/2010 Time Temperature Assumed Sky Illuminance (Lux) Observed Sky Conditions 8:00 a.m. 44 9500 Sunny 9:00 a.m. 49 9500 Sunny 10:00 a.m. 57 9500 Sunny 11:00 a.m. 66 9500 Sunny 12:00 p.m. 70 9500 Sunny 1:00 p.m 72 9500 Mostly Sunny 2:00 p.m. 73 9500 Mostly Sunny 3:00 p.m. 75 9500 Partly Couldy 4:00 p.m. 75 9500 Partly Couldy 5:00 p.m. 75 9500 Partly Couldy

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79 Table A 7. Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in r oom 22 0 (w ith m o re trees west s ide) on 03/20 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 28 1510 15 1363 8 1028 5 1042 9:00 a.m. 59 1510 34 1363 21 1028 15 1042 10:00 a.m. 79 1510 49 1363 31 1028 20 1042 11:00 a.m. 94 1510 58 136 3 36 1028 25 1042 12:00 p.m. 112 1510 67 1363 44 1028 29 1042 1:00 p.m. 140 1510 86 1363 55 1028 35 1042 2:00 p.m. 186 1510 113 1363 69 1028 45 1042 3:00 p.m. 379 1510 224 1363 132 1028 83 1042 4:00 p.m. 961 1510 543 1363 273 1028 128 1042 5:00 p.m. 1430 1510 1166 1363 833 1028 290 1042 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 2 1084 2 1079 32 825 21 542 9:00 a.m. 11 1084 11 1079 65 825 50 542 10:00 a.m. 15 1084 15 1079 78 825 47 542 11:00 a.m. 17 1084 17 1079 87 825 87 542 12 :00 p.m. 21 1084 21 1079 103 825 71 542 1:00 p.m. 24 1084 20 1079 144 825 90 542 2:00 p.m. 31 1084 28 1079 205 825 173 542 3:00 p.m. 53 1084 45 1079 471 825 268 542 4:00 p.m. 81 1084 57 1079 1115 825 622 542 5:00 p.m. 181 1084 140 1079 1645 825 882 54 2 Time SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 11 476 4 520 3 393 2 419 9:00 a.m. 28 476 20 520 12 393 12 419 10:00 a.m. 29 476 20 520 15 393 11 419 11:00 a.m. 36 476 26 520 18 393 12 419 12:00 p.m. 43 476 29 520 20 393 16 419 1:0 0 p.m. 56 476 37 520 25 393 17 419 2:00 p.m. 74 476 50 520 32 393 21 419 3:00 p.m. 154 476 82 520 59 393 34 419 4:00 p.m. 333 476 209 520 128 393 88 419 5:00 p.m. 516 476 324 520 201 393 134 419

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80 Table A 8. Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easu rement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in room 225 (w ith f ewer trees west s ide) on 03/20 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 47 551 25 472 15 323 10 552 9:05 a.m. 81 551 53 472 36 323 28 552 10:05 a.m. 95 551 64 472 44 3 23 32 552 11:05 a.m. 102 551 67 472 45 323 32 552 12:05 p.m. 116 551 76 472 52 323 37 552 1:05 p.m. 144 551 92 472 61 323 41 552 2:05 p.m. 190 551 120 472 77 323 52 552 3:05 p.m. 403 551 252 472 159 323 102 552 4:05 p.m. 811 551 534 472 314 323 192 5 52 5:05 p.m. 1361 551 800 472 481 323 304 552 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 7 1583 7 1805 65 591 42 475 9:05 a.m. 19 1583 19 1805 128 591 79 475 10:05 a.m. 24 1583 24 1805 154 591 94 475 11:05 a.m. 21 1583 21 1805 162 59 1 102 475 12:05 p.m. 26 1583 26 1805 162 591 105 475 1:05 p.m. 27 1583 25 1805 215 591 131 475 2:05 p.m. 34 1583 32 1805 269 591 128 475 3:05 p.m. 65 1583 56 1805 614 591 327 475 4:05 p.m. 121 1583 99 1805 1261 591 723 475 5:05 p.m. 190 1583 155 1805 1839 591 1031 475 Time SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 20 520 15 285 12 273 7 327 9:05 a.m. 49 520 36 285 27 273 18 327 10:05 a.m. 60 520 42 285 29 273 19 327 11:05 a.m. 63 520 43 285 29 273 19 327 12:05 p.m. 61 520 45 285 29 273 18 327 1:05 p.m. 79 520 52 285 34 273 20 327 2:05 p.m. 75 520 45 285 29 273 26 327 3:05 p.m. 168 520 112 285 75 273 50 327 4:05 p.m. 391 520 241 285 148 273 91 327 5:05 p.m. 563 520 347 285 214 273 135 327

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81 Table A 9. Field m easurements (F M) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in room 238 (east s ide) on 03/20 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 1502 449 1494 335 1256 226 1128 197 9:10 a.m. 5600 449 1392 335 853 226 638 197 10:10 a.m. 209 0 449 1380 335 798 226 478 197 11:10 a.m. 1502 449 919 335 541 226 336 197 12:10 p.m. 808 449 525 335 328 226 211 197 1:10 p.m. 478 449 323 335 207 226 136 197 2:10 p.m. 525 449 359 335 237 226 152 197 3:10 p.m. 462 449 332 335 216 226 145 197 4:10 p .m. 324 449 264 335 177 226 128 197 5:10 p.m. 241 449 185 335 128 226 99 197 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 1054 257 991 555 705 334 617 214 9:10 a.m. 403 257 1930 555 1376 334 949 214 10:10 a.m. 305 257 2110 555 1435 334 944 214 11:10 a.m. 218 257 1578 555 944 334 608 214 12:10 p.m. 143 257 823 555 503 334 333 214 1:10 p.m. 98 257 500 555 294 334 202 214 2:10 p.m. 107 257 564 555 317 334 217 214 3:10 p.m. 105 257 475 555 288 334 199 214 4:10 p.m. 92 257 364 555 226 3 34 161 214 5:10 p.m. 72 257 257 555 162 334 116 214 Time SP 9 SP 10 FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 502 295 493 292 9:10 a.m. 610 295 427 292 10:10 a.m. 568 295 364 292 11:10 a.m. 343 295 213 292 12:10 p.m. 200 295 129 292 1:10 p.m. 123 295 84 292 2:10 p. m. 132 295 90 292 3:10 p.m. 121 295 86 292 4:10 p.m. 106 295 76 292 5:10 p.m. 79 295 57 292

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82 Table A 10 Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (E M) of illuminance l evels under s kylights and in c orridor on 03 /2 0 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:15 a.m. 286 5874 173 5738 292 5944 113 5550 9:15 a.m. 858 5874 438 5738 814 5944 383 5550 10:15 a.m. 1770 5874 887 5738 1665 5944 791 5550 11:15 a.m. 2070 5874 1664 5738 2010 5944 1372 5550 12:15 p.m. 2430 5874 1378 5738 2470 5944 1355 5550 1:15 p.m. 2780 5874 1264 5738 2960 5944 1098 5550 2:15 p.m. 2960 5874 1629 5738 3110 5944 1445 5550 3:15 p.m. 3600 5874 2020 5738 3600 5944 1873 5550 4:15 p.m. 1933 5874 1377 5738 2130 5944 1571 5550 5:15 p.m. 1582 5874 1076 5738 1670 5944 957 5550 Time SP 5 SP 6 FM EM FM EM 8:15 a.m. 350 5946 264 5575 9:15 a.m. 960 5946 542 5575 10:15 a.m. 1834 5946 909 5575 11:15 a.m. 2130 5946 1375 5575 12:15 p.m. 2540 5946 1385 5575 1:15 p.m. 2930 5946 1185 5575 2:15 p.m. 3370 594 6 1592 5575 3:15 p.m. 3630 5946 1850 5575 4:15 p.m. 2460 5946 1504 5575 5:15 p.m. 1672 5946 1023 5575 Table A 1 1 Weather f orecast and a ctual w eather c onditio ns of Gainesville, Florida on 04/1 7/2010 Time Temperature Assumed(A) / Recorded (R) Sk y Illuminance (Lux) Observed Sky Conditions 8:00 a.m. 56 9500 (A) Clear 9:00 a.m. 61 9500 (A) Clear 10:00 a.m. 68 9500 (A) Partly Cloudy 11:00 a.m. 75 9500 (A) Partly Cloudy 12:00 p.m. 78 9500 (A) Partly Cloudy 1:00 p.m. 80 9500 (A) Partly Cloudy 2: 00 p.m. 81 97200 (R) Partly Cloudy 3:00 p.m. 81 32700 (R) Mostly Cloudy 4:00 p.m. 81 20400 (R) Mostly Cloudy 5:00 p.m. 80 25300 (R) Mostly Cloudy

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83 Table A 1 2. Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in room 220 (w i th m o re trees west s ide) on 04/1 7/2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 55 1510 32 1363 18 1028 13 1042 9:00 a.m. 86 1510 51 1363 32 1028 24 1042 10:00 a.m. 123 1510 74 1363 47 1028 33 1042 11:00 a.m. 136 1510 84 1363 53 1028 37 1042 12:00 p.m. 185 1510 106 1363 61 1028 41 1042 1:00 p.m. 261 1510 114 1363 87 1028 58 1042 2:00 p.m. 221 15450 119 13944 69 10518 45 10662 3:00 p.m. 347 4388 191 3903 111 2772 71 2863 4:00 p.m. 213 2737 113 2435 66 1729 42 1786 5:00 p. m. 302 3395 156 3020 84 2145 56 2215 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 10 1084 9 1079 63 825 36 542 9:00 a.m. 16 1084 16 1079 98 825 56 542 10:00 a.m. 25 1084 24 1079 126 825 74 542 11:00 a.m. 26 1084 25 1079 139 825 86 542 12:00 p.m. 28 1084 26 1079 206 825 114 542 1:00 p.m. 40 1084 35 1079 288 825 155 542 2:00 p.m. 31 11090 27 11045 266 8439 170 5550 3:00 p.m. 45 3104 39 3254 390 2425 209 1487 4:00 p.m. 28 1937 24 2030 233 1513 121 927 5:00 p.m. 35 2402 29 2518 379 187 6 186 1150 Time SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 19 476 13 520 10 393 8 419 9:00 a.m. 33 476 24 520 16 393 12 419 10:00 a.m. 44 476 33 520 24 393 18 419 11:00 a.m. 53 476 37 520 27 393 20 419 12:00 p.m. 63 476 44 520 32 393 23 419 1:00 p.m. 87 476 55 520 36 393 27 419 2:00 p.m. 104 4869 65 5320 45 4019 33 4288 3:00 p.m. 120 1306 80 1495 52 1114 37 1211 4:00 p.m. 66 815 43 932 29 695 20 755 5:00 p.m. 104 1010 66 1156 44 862 32 937

PAGE 84

84 Table A 1 3. Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in room 225 (w i th f ewer trees west s ide) on 04/1 7/2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 77 551 52 472 34 323 26 552 9:05 a.m. 111 551 74 472 51 323 37 552 10:05 a.m. 142 551 94 472 64 323 44 552 11:05 a.m. 153 551 105 472 69 323 50 552 12:05 p.m. 237 551 144 472 92 323 59 552 1:05 p.m. 309 551 177 472 108 323 79 552 2:05 p.m. 301 5639 183 4827 116 3304 79 5643 3:05 p.m. 310 1641 181 1425 113 960 74 1809 4:05 p.m 239 1024 139 889 83 599 55 1129 5:05 p.m. 352 1270 199 1103 118 743 76 1400 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 19 1583 19 1805 120 591 72 475 9:05 a.m. 28 1583 28 1805 173 591 105 475 10:05 a.m. 33 1583 32 1805 216 591 135 4 75 11:05 a.m. 35 1583 34 1805 253 591 153 475 12:05 p.m. 40 1583 36 1805 350 591 206 475 1:05 p.m. 49 1583 42 1805 447 591 256 475 2:05 p.m. 55 16196 50 18473 432 6052 246 4855 3:05 p.m. 50 6386 44 7341 440 1787 235 1425 4:05 p.m. 36 3984 31 4580 339 1115 183 889 5:05 p.m. 52 4941 43 5680 611 1383 277 1102 Time SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 44 520 33 285 25 273 18 327 9:05 a.m. 65 520 47 285 34 273 24 327 10:05 a.m. 83 520 57 285 41 273 28 327 11:05 a.m. 83 520 61 28 5 43 273 29 327 12:05 p.m. 121 520 82 285 56 273 31 327 1:05 p.m. 148 520 96 285 65 273 44 327 2:05 p.m. 142 5316 91 2917 61 2794 42 3343 3:05 p.m. 131 1634 83 847 56 816 36 989 4:05 p.m. 100 1020 65 528 43 509 29 617 5:05 p.m. 156 1264 99 655 66 631 44 765

PAGE 85

85 Table A 1 4. Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in room 238 (east s ide) on 04/1 7/2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 5080 449 1361 335 643 226 587 197 9:10 a.m. 5990 449 1514 335 929 226 608 197 10:10 a.m. 2230 449 1481 335 865 226 537 197 11:10 a.m. 1647 449 987 335 573 226 356 197 12:10 p.m. 1096 449 664 335 404 226 261 197 1:10 p.m. 818 449 531 335 324 226 215 197 2:10 p.m. 792 4598 475 3425 298 2309 199 2015 3:10 p.m. 596 1264 355 981 218 672 144 611 4:10 p.m. 461 788 269 612 161 419 106 381 5:10 p.m. 424 978 246 759 148 520 98 473 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 446 257 6260 555 4000 334 952 214 9:10 a.m. 400 257 2380 555 1980 334 929 214 10:10 a.m. 347 257 2130 555 1354 334 840 214 11:10 a.m. 233 257 1561 555 913 334 588 214 12:10 p.m. 182 257 1048 555 600 334 399 214 1:10 p.m. 154 257 837 555 477 334 306 214 2:10 p.m. 142 2624 754 5676 447 3422 295 2194 3:10 p.m. 103 83 4 576 1630 334 989 217 634 4:10 p.m. 75 520 423 1017 248 617 161 396 5:10 p.m. 69 645 392 1261 224 765 146 491 Time SP 9 SP 10 FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 563 295 422 292 9:10 a.m. 541 295 350 292 10:10 a.m. 477 295 301 292 11:10 a.m. 334 295 216 292 1 2:10 p.m. 236 295 154 292 1:10 p.m. 179 295 124 292 2:10 p.m. 177 3018 121 2991 3:10 p.m. 130 933 89 928 4:10 p.m. 95 582 65 579 5:10 p.m. 86 722 60 718

PAGE 86

86 Table A 1 5. Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (E M) of illuminance l evels unde r s kylights and in c orridor on 04/1 7/2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:15 a.m. 653 5874 342 5738 633 5944 289 5550 9:15 a.m. 1330 5874 720 5738 1330 5944 643 5550 10:15 a.m. 2250 5874 1446 5738 2230 5944 1375 5550 11:15 a.m 2780 5874 1576 5738 2810 5944 1227 5550 12:15 p.m. 3100 5874 1641 5738 3300 5944 1547 5550 1:15 p.m. 3200 5874 1367 5738 3760 5944 1189 5550 2:15 p.m. 3540 60105 1742 58704 3600 60820 1620 56781 3:15 p.m. 2170 20667 950 19774 2110 20868 784 19086 4: 15 p.m. 1707 12893 657 12336 1698 13018 555 11907 5:15 p.m. 1703 15990 706 15299 1684 16145 615 14767 Time SP 5 SP 6 FM EM FM EM 8:15 a.m. 747 5946 380 5575 9:15 a.m. 1514 5946 800 5575 10:15 a.m. 2290 5946 1522 5575 11:15 a.m. 2720 5946 1453 5575 12:15 p.m. 3090 5946 1552 5575 1:15 p.m. 4090 5946 1357 5575 2:15 p.m. 3970 60837 1764 57036 3:15 p.m. 2100 20834 895 19158 4:15 p.m. 1723 12997 683 11952 5:15 p.m. 1774 16119 720 14822 Table A 1 6 Weather f orecast and a ctual w eather c onditions of Gainesville, Florida on 05/22 /2010 Time Temperature Recorded Sky Illuminance (Lux) Observed Sky Conditions 8:00 a.m. 72 62500 Partly Cloudy 9:00 a.m. 75 68900 Partly Cloudy 10:00 a.m. 79 99100 Partly Cloudy 11:00 a.m. 83 98900 Partly Cloudy 12:00 p.m. 85 118000 Partly Cloudy 1:00 p.m. 87 115200 Partly Cloudy 2:00 p.m. 88 121900 Partly Cloudy 3:00 p.m. 89 101200 Partly Cloudy 4:00 p.m. 89 76300 Partly Cloudy 5:00 p.m. 89 75200 Partly Cloudy

PAGE 87

87 Table A 17 Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in room 220 (w ith mo re trees west s ide) on 05/22 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 59 9934 34 8966 20 6763 13 6856 9:00 a.m. 98 10952 60 9884 37 7456 27 7558 10:00 a.m. 89 157 52 55 14217 36 10724 26 10870 11:00 a.m. 110 15720 66 14188 42 10702 29 10848 12:00 p.m. 139 18756 84 16928 53 12769 37 12943 1:00 p.m. 210 18311 126 16527 79 12466 52 12636 2:00 p.m. 281 19376 169 17488 98 13191 65 13371 3:00 p.m. 444 16086 254 14518 148 10951 91 11101 4:00 p.m. 971 12128 514 10946 294 8256 178 8369 5:00 p.m. 1386 11953 735 10788 403 8137 239 8249 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 10 7131 9 7102 64 5426 36 3569 9:00 a.m. 18 7861 17 7829 92 5982 55 3934 10:00 a.m. 18 11306 19 11261 91 8604 53 5659 11:00 a.m. 21 11284 21 11238 104 8586 65 5647 12:00 p.m. 29 13463 33 13408 131 10245 82 6738 1:00 p.m. 35 13143 32 13090 214 10002 127 6578 2:00 p.m. 45 13908 45 13851 298 10583 168 6960 3:00 p.m. 62 11546 56 11499 477 8786 276 5779 4:00 p.m. 110 8705 83 8670 1071 6624 621 4357 5:00 p.m. 141 8580 111 8545 1483 6529 822 4294 Time SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 20 3131 15 3421 10 2584 8 2758 9:00 a.m. 34 3451 24 3771 17 2849 12 3040 10:00 a.m. 35 4964 26 5424 18 4098 13 4372 11:00 a.m. 41 4954 29 5413 20 4090 15 4363 12:00 p.m. 52 5911 36 6458 26 4879 18 5206 1:00 p.m. 77 5770 51 6305 35 4764 26 5083 2:00 p.m. 99 6106 65 6672 44 5041 32 5378 3:00 p.m. 159 5069 99 5539 66 4 185 45 4465 4:00 p.m. 332 3822 207 4176 137 3155 92 3366 5:00 p.m. 450 3767 287 4116 179 3110 123 3318

PAGE 88

88 Table A 18 Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in room 225 (w ith f ewer trees west s ide) on 05/22 /2010 ( l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 120 3626 64 3104 40 2124 27 3629 9:05 a.m. 118 3997 77 3422 57 2342 37 4000 10:05 a.m. 112 5749 75 4921 51 3368 35 5754 11:05 a.m. 121 5737 79 4911 53 3362 37 5742 12:05 p.m. 145 6845 92 5860 63 4011 44 6851 1:05 p.m. 221 6683 139 5721 81 3916 60 6689 2:05 p.m. 300 7071 183 6054 114 4143 77 7078 3:05 p.m. 505 5871 268 5026 178 3440 115 5876 4:05 p.m. 1028 4426 556 3789 313 2593 194 4430 5:05 p.m. 1388 4362 786 3734 448 2556 289 436 6 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 20 10414 18 11878 170 3891 76 3122 9:05 a.m. 28 11481 27 13094 184 4290 105 3442 10:05 a.m. 27 16513 27 18834 165 6170 105 4950 11:05 a.m. 28 16480 28 18796 186 6158 114 4940 12:05 p.m. 33 19662 36 22426 219 7347 130 5894 1:05 p.m. 41 19196 37 21894 313 7172 182 5754 2:05 p.m. 52 20312 49 23167 418 7589 234 6089 3:05 p.m. 76 16863 65 19233 706 6301 400 5055 4:05 p.m. 134 12714 91 14501 1229 4750 769 3811 5:05 p.m. 179 12531 144 14292 1 786 4682 980 3756 Time SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 44 3418 31 1876 21 1796 13 2149 9:05 a.m. 65 3768 44 2068 32 1980 21 2369 10:05 a.m. 66 5420 45 2974 33 2848 21 3408 11:05 a.m. 71 5409 49 2968 34 2842 24 3401 12:05 p. m. 81 6453 53 3541 36 3391 25 4058 1:05 p.m. 110 6300 77 3457 41 3311 32 3962 2:05 p.m. 138 6667 88 3658 58 3503 39 4192 3:05 p.m. 229 5535 143 3037 94 2908 60 3480 4:05 p.m. 373 4173 219 2290 140 2193 91 2624 5:05 p.m. 550 4113 348 2257 217 2161 136 2586

PAGE 89

89 Table A 19 Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (E M) of illuminance l evels in room 238 (east s ide) on 05 /2 2 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 1784 2956 1132 2203 731 1484 503 1296 9:10 a.m. 2650 3 259 1481 2428 865 1636 554 1428 10:10 a.m. 1902 4687 1187 3492 705 2354 450 2054 11:10 a.m. 1370 4678 839 3485 505 2349 337 2050 12:10 p.m. 785 5581 516 4158 318 2803 210 2446 1:10 p.m. 572 5449 395 4060 242 2736 161 2388 2:10 p.m. 513 5766 337 4296 2 23 2895 154 2527 3:10 p.m. 435 4787 320 3566 205 2404 138 2098 4:10 p.m. 337 3609 260 2689 177 1812 126 1582 5:10 p.m. 258 3557 191 2650 129 1786 91 1559 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 347 1688 3320 3649 1201 2201 831 1411 9:10 a.m. 361 1860 2270 4023 1398 2426 929 1555 10:10 a.m. 316 2676 1890 5786 1169 3489 739 2237 11:10 a.m. 217 2670 1383 5775 807 3482 521 2232 12:10 p.m. 145 3186 834 6890 483 4155 320 2663 1:10 p.m. 113 3110 620 6727 363 4056 234 2600 2:10 p.m. 1 11 3291 547 7118 326 4292 210 2751 3:10 p.m. 100 2732 493 5909 306 3563 200 2284 4:10 p.m. 89 2060 369 4455 237 2687 167 1722 5:10 p.m. 72 2030 287 4391 183 2648 130 1697 Time SP 9 SP 10 FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 464 1941 316 1923 9:10 a.m. 356 2139 53 7 2120 10:10 a.m. 418 3077 230 3049 11:10 a.m. 306 3071 201 3043 12:10 p.m. 191 3664 129 3631 1:10 p.m. 142 3577 100 3545 2:10 p.m. 127 3785 87 3751 3:10 p.m. 120 3142 86 3114 4:10 p.m. 104 2369 72 2348 5:10 p.m. 84 2335 63 2314

PAGE 90

90 Table A 20 Fi eld m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (E M) of illuminance l evels under s kylights and in c orridor on 05 /2 2 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:15 a.m. 878 38648 575 37747 864 39108 447 36511 9:15 a.m. 1950 42605 1022 41612 1860 43112 840 40249 10:15 a.m. 2220 61279 2630 59851 2090 62009 1545 57891 11:15 a.m. 2650 61156 1640 59731 2660 61884 1418 57774 12:15 p.m. 3690 72966 1328 71266 3230 73835 1179 68932 1:15 p.m. 4650 71235 1098 69575 4650 72083 951 67296 2:15 p .m. 3820 75378 1817 73622 3810 76275 1553 71210 3:15 p.m. 3870 62578 2200 61120 4360 63323 1890 59118 4:15 p.m. 2860 47181 1718 46081 3200 47742 1645 44572 5:15 p.m. 1968 46501 1420 45417 2040 47054 1273 43930 Time SP 5 SP 6 FM EM FM EM 8:15 a.m. 100 9 39118 563 36674 9:15 a.m. 1960 43124 896 40430 10:15 a.m. 2230 62026 1818 58151 11:15 a.m. 2640 61901 1528 58034 12:15 p.m. 3300 73855 1297 69241 1:15 p.m. 4640 72103 1043 67598 2:15 p.m. 3800 76296 1584 71530 3:15 p.m. 4270 63340 1980 59383 4:15 p.m. 2930 47755 1707 44772 5:15 p.m. 2110 47067 1416 44127 Table A 2 1. Weather f orecast and a ctual w eather c onditio ns of Gainesville, Florida on 06/21 /201 0 Time Temperature Recorded Sky Illuminance (Lux) Observed Sky Conditions 8:00 a.m. 77 7 6300 Overcast 9:00 a.m. 80 101000 Overcast 10:00 a.m. 82 102000 Overcast 11:00 a.m. 85 130200 Overcast 12:00 p.m. 87 128500 Overcast 1:00 p.m. 88 105000 Mostly Cloudy 2:00 p.m. 88 73500 Mostly Cloudy 3:00 p.m. 88 121800 Mostly Cloudy 4:00 p.m. 88 1 550 Partly Cloudy 5:00 p.m. 87 1550 Partly Cloudy

PAGE 91

91 Table A 2 2 Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in room 220 (w ith m o re trees west s ide) on 06/21 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8 :00 a.m. 88 12128 60 10946 42 8256 33 8369 9:00 a.m. 111 16054 77 14489 55 10929 41 11079 10:00 a.m. 124 16213 74 14633 50 11037 35 11188 11:00 a.m. 205 17472 119 15541 72 11037 50 11399 12:00 p.m. 213 17243 127 15338 79 10893 58 11250 1:00 p.m. 224 1 4090 124 12533 72 8901 49 9193 2:00 p.m. 227 9863 126 8773 72 6231 49 6435 3:00 p.m. 380 16344 236 14538 144 10325 91 10664 4:00 p.m. 62 208 33 185 19 131 12 136 5:00 p.m. 28 208 16 185 10 131 7 136 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8 :00 a.m. 26 8705 26 8670 128 6624 80 4357 9:00 a.m. 32 11523 31 11477 168 8769 110 5767 10:00 a.m. 27 11637 24 11590 130 8856 76 5824 11:00 a.m. 35 12360 33 12956 218 9656 127 5919 12:00 p.m. 41 12199 44 12787 217 9530 136 5842 1:00 p.m. 33 9968 29 10 449 260 7787 137 4773 2:00 p.m. 33 6977 28 7314 246 5451 137 3341 3:00 p.m. 50 11562 40 12120 352 9033 202 5537 4:00 p.m. 8 147 8 154 83 115 40 70 5:00 p.m. 4 147 4 154 34 115 17 70 Time SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 51 3 822 36 4176 28 3155 20 3366 9:00 a.m. 71 5059 50 5528 36 4176 27 4456 10:00 a.m. 45 5109 33 5582 25 4218 19 4500 11:00 a.m. 15 5199 52 5951 36 4435 27 4820 12:00 p.m. 77 5131 53 5874 40 4377 31 4757 1:00 p.m. 74 4193 51 4800 37 3576 27 3887 2:00 p.m. 71 2935 46 3360 37 2503 25 2721 3:00 p.m. 122 4863 78 5567 62 4149 44 4509 4:00 p.m. 20 62 14 71 9 53 7 57 5:00 p.m. 9 62 6 71 4 53 3 57

PAGE 92

92 Table A 2 3. Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in room 225 (w i th f ewe r trees west s ide) on 06 /2 1 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 59 4426 36 3789 25 2593 16 4430 9:05 a.m. 79 5859 52 5016 34 3433 25 5864 10:05 a.m. 161 5917 111 5065 76 3467 55 5922 11:05 a.m. 209 6533 132 5675 89 3821 63 7204 12:05 p.m. 246 6448 162 5601 105 3771 71 7110 1:05 p.m. 273 5269 163 4577 100 3082 69 5810 2:05 p.m. 265 3688 150 3204 96 2157 66 4067 3:05 p.m. 507 6112 299 5309 180 3575 113 6739 4:05 p.m. 87 78 55 68 35 45 25 86 5:05 p.m. 34 78 24 68 15 45 10 86 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 13 12714 13 14501 69 4750 40 3811 9:05 a.m. 19 16830 18 19195 89 6288 56 5045 10:05 a.m. 41 16996 36 19385 230 6351 146 5095 11:05 a.m. 45 25425 44 29231 310 7117 185 5673 12:05 p.m. 52 25093 57 28850 355 7024 200 5599 1:05 p.m. 44 20504 41 23574 384 5739 206 4575 2:05 p.m. 44 14353 36 16501 343 4018 179 3202 3:05 p.m. 73 23785 62 27345 700 6658 387 5307 4:05 p.m. 17 303 15 348 133 85 66 68 5:05 p.m. 8 303 7 348 49 85 27 68 Time SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 25 4173 17 2290 12 2193 10 2624 9:05 a.m. 34 5524 25 3031 18 2903 13 3473 10:05 a.m. 90 5578 61 3061 44 2931 31 3508 11:05 a.m. 112 6507 76 3371 52 3247 37 3937 12:05 p.m. 126 6422 82 332 7 57 3205 39 3886 1:05 p.m. 110 5248 76 2718 52 2619 37 3175 2:05 p.m. 102 3674 67 1903 44 1833 32 2223 3:05 p.m. 222 6088 139 3153 89 3038 55 3683 4:05 p.m. 35 77 24 40 16 39 10 47 5:05 p.m. 15 77 10 40 7 39 6 47

PAGE 93

93 Table A 2 4. Field m easurements ( FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in room 238 (east s ide) on 06 /2 1 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 2020 3609 1412 2689 912 1812 626 1582 9:10 a.m. 2220 4777 1469 3559 863 2399 554 2094 10:10 a .m. 1833 4825 1155 3594 652 2423 424 2114 11:10 a.m. 1357 5031 854 3907 505 2677 326 2432 12:10 p.m. 917 4965 586 3856 332 2642 227 2400 1:10 p.m. 444 4057 303 3151 184 2159 134 1961 2:10 p.m. 407 2840 292 2206 186 1511 128 1373 3:10 p.m. 572 4706 405 3655 272 2504 181 2275 4:10 p.m. 50 60 33 47 20 32 14 29 5:10 p.m. 14 60 9 47 6 32 4 29 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 416 2060 6180 4455 4330 2687 916 1722 9:10 a.m. 365 2727 2340 5897 1470 3556 935 2280 10:10 a.m. 292 2754 1993 5956 1193 3591 736 2302 11:10 a.m. 215 3321 1536 6490 850 3937 543 2526 12:10 p.m. 156 3278 1025 6406 568 3886 369 2493 1:10 p.m. 94 2679 527 5234 312 3175 205 2037 2:10 p.m. 85 1875 484 3664 280 2223 191 1426 3:10 p.m. 135 3107 791 6072 452 3683 287 2363 4:10 p.m. 10 40 60 77 34 47 23 30 5:10 p.m. 3 40 16 77 8 47 6 30 Time SP 9 SP 10 FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 571 2369 389 2348 9:10 a.m. 562 3136 359 3108 10:10 a.m. 434 3167 265 3139 11:10 a.m. 310 3713 200 3694 12:10 p.m. 216 3665 142 3646 1:10 p.m. 120 2995 84 2979 2:10 p.m. 115 2096 80 2085 3:10 p.m. 164 3474 111 3455 4:10 p.m. 14 44 10 44 5:10 p.m. 3 44 2 44

PAGE 94

94 Table A 25 Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (E M) of illuminance l evels under s kylights and in c orrid or on 06 /2 1 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:15 a.m. 736 47181 382 46081 708 47742 319 44572 9:15 a.m. 1657 62454 855 60999 1614 63198 737 59001 10:15 a.m. 2250 63073 41200 61603 2100 63823 33600 59585 11:15 a.m. 2800 8228 9 1799 78732 2870 83087 1670 75994 12:15 p.m. 2490 81215 1510 77704 2650 82002 1301 75002 1:15 p.m. 38500 66362 1054 63494 34500 67006 912 61285 2:15 p.m. 2200 46453 774 44445 3510 46904 734 42900 3:15 p.m. 4020 76980 2230 73652 4410 77727 2100 71091 4:15 p.m. 313 980 123 937 311 989 99 905 5:15 p.m. 86 980 38 937 80 989 28 905 Time SP 5 SP 6 FM EM FM EM 8:15 a.m. 838 47755 481 44772 9:15 a.m. 1793 63215 703 59266 10:15 a.m. 2220 63841 33900 59853 11:15 a.m. 3440 82953 1779 76279 12:15 p.m. 266 00 81870 1417 75283 1:15 p.m. 3540 66898 1202 61515 2:15 p.m. 3650 46828 967 43061 3:15 p.m. 4530 77601 2140 71358 4:15 p.m. 348 988 230 908 5:15 p.m. 115 988 165 908 Table A 26 Weather f orecast and a ctual w eather c onditions of Gainesville, Florid a on 07/24 /2010 Time Temperature Recorded Sky Illuminance (Lux) Observed Sky Conditions 8:00 a.m. 82 17820 Overcast 9:00 a.m. 83 11420 Overcast 10:00 a.m. 85 10860 Overcast 11:00 a.m. 87 121700 Overcast 12:00 p.m. 89 111400 Overcast 1:00 p.m. 89 18600 Mostly Cloudy 2:00 p.m. 90 137200 Mostly Cloudy 3:00 p.m. 82 31000 Mostly Cloudy 4:00 p.m. 91 38500 Partly Cloudy 5:00 p.m. 91 16500 Partly Cloudy

PAGE 95

95 Table A 2 7 Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of i llum inance l evels in roo m 220 (w ith m o re trees west s ide) on 07 /2 4 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 78 2391 42 2127 27 1511 18 1560 9:00 a.m. 118 1532 66 1363 43 968 31 1000 10:00 a.m. 164 1457 98 1296 52 921 43 951 11:00 a.m. 153 16331 94 14526 58 10317 40 10655 12:00 p.m. 243 14949 147 13297 82 9443 56 9753 1:00 p.m. 231 2496 139 2220 87 1577 60 1628 2:00 p.m. 267 18411 160 16376 97 11630 63 12012 3:00 p.m. 189 4160 99 3700 58 2628 38 2714 4:00 p.m. 467 5166 247 4595 139 3264 89 3 371 5:00 p.m. 447 2214 223 1969 125 1399 81 1445 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 14 1692 12 1773 82 1322 46 810 9:00 a.m. 20 1084 20 1136 115 847 64 519 10:00 a.m. 32 1031 31 1081 169 805 101 494 11:00 a.m. 30 11553 27 121 10 151 9025 91 5532 12:00 p.m. 41 10575 41 11085 236 8261 134 5064 1:00 p.m. 41 1766 33 1851 157 1379 82 846 2:00 p.m. 44 13024 42 13653 272 10175 164 6237 3:00 p.m. 25 2943 20 3085 191 2299 106 1409 4:00 p.m. 58 3655 48 3831 481 2855 259 1750 5:00 p .m. 52 1566 43 1642 449 1224 239 750 Time SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 26 712 17 815 12 607 9 660 9:00 a.m. 46 456 30 522 20 389 16 423 10:00 a.m. 63 434 40 496 27 370 17 402 11:00 a.m. 55 4859 39 5563 28 4145 20 4505 12 :00 p.m. 78 4448 54 5092 36 3794 26 4124 1:00 p.m. 44 743 30 850 20 634 16 689 2:00 p.m. 97 5478 64 6271 43 4673 31 5079 3:00 p.m. 62 1238 40 1417 27 1056 18 1148 4:00 p.m. 147 1537 97 1760 64 1311 48 1425 5:00 p.m. 129 659 81 754 44 562 30 611

PAGE 96

96 Ta ble A 28 Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in room 225 (w i th f ewer trees west s ide) on 07 /2 4 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 106 894 64 777 44 523 31 986 9:05 a.m. 142 5 73 83 498 55 335 38 632 10:05 a.m. 144 545 91 473 51 319 41 601 11:05 a.m. 184 6107 122 5305 81 3572 59 6734 12:05 p.m. 261 5590 149 4856 95 3270 66 6164 1:05 p.m. 176 933 111 811 97 546 61 1029 2:05 p.m. 265 6885 167 5981 104 4027 70 7591 3:05 p.m. 216 1556 125 1351 78 910 51 1715 4:05 p.m. 557 1932 328 1678 205 1130 128 2130 5:05 p.m. 496 828 268 719 159 484 104 913 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 23 3480 20 4001 162 974 94 776 9:05 a.m. 27 2230 26 2564 239 624 137 4 98 10:05 a.m. 31 2121 27 2438 205 594 122 473 11:05 a.m. 41 23766 40 27323 297 6652 182 5302 12:05 p.m. 48 21754 49 25010 405 6089 214 4854 1:05 p.m. 46 3632 38 4176 259 1017 149 810 2:05 p.m. 45 26792 44 30803 387 7499 225 5978 3:05 p.m. 34 6054 28 6960 316 1694 173 1351 4:05 p.m. 85 7518 86 8644 787 2104 401 1677 5:05 p.m. 68 3222 58 3704 703 902 363 719 Time SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 67 891 36 461 27 444 20 539 9:05 a.m. 76 571 56 296 33 285 23 345 10:05 a.m. 76 543 50 281 34 271 25 328 11:05 a.m. 105 6083 74 3151 50 3035 34 3680 12:05 p.m. 125 5568 81 2884 56 2778 36 3369 1:05 p.m. 94 930 59 482 39 464 26 562 2:05 p.m. 135 6857 88 3552 57 3422 39 4149 3:05 p.m. 98 1549 62 803 40 773 27 937 4:05 p.m. 226 1924 158 997 97 960 62 1164 5:05 p.m. 192 825 120 427 66 412 56 499

PAGE 97

97 Table A 29 Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (E M) of illuminance l evels in room 238 (east s ide) on 07 /2 4 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 2050 689 1441 535 903 366 635 333 9:10 a.m. 761 441 441 343 312 235 183 213 10:10 a.m. 514 420 316 326 184 223 122 203 11:10 a.m. 1632 4702 1004 3652 600 2502 379 2273 12:10 p.m. 1094 4304 675 3343 347 2290 254 2081 1:10 p.m. 636 719 364 55 8 212 382 136 347 2:10 p.m. 679 5301 427 4117 236 2821 142 2563 3:10 p.m. 291 1198 201 930 131 637 91 579 4:10 p.m. 547 1488 356 1155 217 792 147 719 5:10 p.m. 322 638 210 495 131 339 91 308 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 446 455 3050 888 1390 539 921 346 9:10 a.m. 136 291 805 569 531 345 343 222 10:10 a.m. 88 277 402 541 264 328 173 211 11:10 a.m. 243 3105 1582 6067 931 3680 603 2361 12:10 p.m. 174 2842 1060 5553 623 3369 413 2161 1:10 p.m. 95 474 797 927 475 562 333 361 2:10 p.m. 97 3500 675 6839 413 4149 251 2662 3:10 p.m. 66 791 301 1545 175 937 120 601 4:10 p.m. 104 982 537 1919 327 1164 220 747 5:10 p.m. 66 421 303 823 157 499 136 320 Time SP 9 SP 10 FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 573 508 318 506 9:10 a.m. 226 32 6 159 324 10:10 a.m. 101 310 68 308 11:10 a.m. 341 3471 228 3453 12:10 p.m. 249 3177 172 3160 1:10 p.m. 202 530 138 528 2:10 p.m. 178 3913 127 3892 3:10 p.m. 74 884 54 879 4:10 p.m. 129 1098 98 1092 5:10 p.m. 88 471 65 468

PAGE 98

98 Table A 30 Field m e asurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels under s kylights and c orridor on 07/24 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:15 a.m. 942 11263 504 10776 931 11372 496 10401 9:15 a.m. 813 7218 391 6906 712 7288 308 6666 10:15 a.m. 967 6864 316 6567 905 6930 292 6339 11:15 a.m. 2420 76917 1629 73592 2400 77663 1446 71033 12:15 p.m. 2760 70407 1434 67364 2720 71090 1360 65021 1:15 p.m. 51300 11756 1306 11247 50800 11870 1073 10856 2:15 p.m. 49600 86713 1692 82 965 48900 87554 1481 80080 3:15 p.m. 3450 19593 1292 18746 3320 19783 940 18094 4:15 p.m. 2750 24333 1106 23281 2720 24569 932 22471 5:15 p.m. 1692 10428 612 9978 1691 10529 516 9631 Time SP 5 SP 6 FM EM FM EM 8:15 a.m. 1074 11353 588 10440 9:15 a.m 670 7276 399 6691 10:15 a.m. 856 6919 410 6362 11:15 a.m. 2460 77538 1573 71299 12:15 p.m. 2730 70975 1385 65265 1:15 p.m. 51100 11850 1138 10897 2:15 p.m. 48700 87413 1501 80380 3:15 p.m. 3340 19751 1062 18162 4:15 p.m. 2770 24529 1050 22556 5:1 5 p.m. 1739 10512 642 9667 Table A 3 1. Weather f orecast and a ctual w eather c onditio ns of Gainesville, Florida on 08/28 /2010 Time Tempe rature Recorded Sky Illuminance (Lux) Observed Sky Conditions 8:00 a.m. 76 12250 Mostly cloudy 9:00 a.m. 79 20700 Mostly cloudy 10:00 a.m. 80 30000 Mostly cloudy 11:00 a.m. 81 14150 Mostly cloudy 12:00 p.m. 83 32500 Overcast 1:00 p.m. 84 45900 Mostly cloudy 2:00 p.m. 85 54000 Mostly cloudy 3:00 p.m. 86 78000 Mostly cloudy 4:00 p.m. 86 20600 Mostly cloudy 5:00 p.m. 85 13700 Mostly cloudy

PAGE 99

99 Table A 3 2. Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in room 220 (w ith m o re trees west s ide) on 08 /2 8 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 34 1644 23 1462 15 1038 11 1072 9:00 a.m. 48 2778 28 2471 18 1755 14 1812 10:00 a.m. 176 4026 104 3581 64 2543 42 2627 11:00 a.m. 169 1899 100 1 689 57 1199 37 1239 12:00 p.m. 228 4361 130 3879 78 2755 53 2845 1:00 p.m. 253 6159 146 5479 87 3891 57 4019 2:00 p.m. 226 7246 128 6445 78 4578 52 4728 3:00 p.m. 490 10467 285 9310 162 6612 103 6829 4:00 p.m. 419 2764 230 2459 134 1746 92 1804 5:00 p.m. 1536 1838 832 1635 455 1161 288 1199 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 9 1163 8 1219 41 908 25 557 9:00 a.m. 10 1965 9 2060 56 1535 37 941 10:00 a.m. 30 2848 25 2985 198 2225 111 1364 11:00 a.m. 27 1343 23 1408 196 1049 108 643 12:00 p.m. 36 3085 33 3234 261 2410 141 1477 1:00 p.m. 40 4357 33 4568 308 3404 164 2087 2:00 p.m. 36 5126 31 5374 265 4005 144 2455 3:00 p.m. 70 7405 60 7762 621 5784 343 3546 4:00 p.m. 61 1956 51 2050 512 1528 294 936 5:00 p.m. 134 1301 86 1363 1757 1016 976 623 Time SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 16 489 11 560 9 417 8 453 9:00 a.m. 17 827 11 946 8 705 7 766 10:00 a.m. 64 1198 43 1371 31 1022 24 1111 11:00 a.m. 60 565 40 647 28 482 20 524 12:00 p.m. 80 1298 52 1486 33 1107 24 1203 1:00 p.m. 92 1833 60 2098 39 1563 29 1699 2:00 p.m. 82 2156 55 2468 37 1839 27 1999 3:00 p.m. 195 3115 128 3565 84 2657 55 2888 4:00 p.m. 130 823 86 942 56 702 40 763 5:00 p.m. 512 547 312 626 187 467 115 507

PAGE 100

100 Table A 3 3. F ield m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in room 225 (w i th f ewer trees west s ide) on 08 /2 8 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 56 615 34 534 24 360 17 678 9:05 a.m. 40 1039 25 902 17 608 12 1145 10:05 a.m. 211 1505 128 1308 82 881 53 1660 11:05 a.m. 198 710 114 617 71 415 48 783 12:05 p.m. 258 1631 157 1417 95 954 64 1798 1:05 p.m. 319 2303 180 2001 116 1347 78 2540 2:05 p.m. 312 2710 182 2354 110 1585 73 2988 3:05 p.m. 602 3914 355 3400 213 2289 142 4316 4:05 p.m. 482 1034 275 898 165 605 109 1140 5:05 p.m. 505 687 172 597 117 402 80 758 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 12 2392 12 2750 82 670 49 534 9:05 a.m. 9 4042 9 4647 56 1131 34 902 10:05 a.m 36 5858 32 6735 300 1640 163 1307 11:05 a.m. 32 2763 29 3177 277 773 150 617 12:05 p.m. 41 6347 38 7297 381 1776 208 1416 1:05 p.m. 51 8963 45 10305 447 2509 244 2000 2:05 p.m. 51 10545 45 12124 449 2952 250 2353 3:05 p.m. 90 15232 76 17512 849 4263 450 3398 4:05 p.m. 73 4023 63 4625 691 1126 462 898 5:05 p.m. 57 2675 54 3076 446 749 220 597 Time SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 30 612 19 317 15 306 11 370 9:05 a.m. 20 1035 17 536 12 516 9 626 10:05 a.m. 92 1499 59 777 39 748 28 907 11:05 a.m. 82 707 53 366 36 353 25 428 12:05 p.m. 119 1624 76 841 51 811 35 983 1:05 p.m. 135 2294 86 1188 57 1145 39 1388 2:05 p.m. 140 2699 91 1398 61 1347 41 1633 3:05 p.m. 268 3898 169 2019 109 1945 71 2359 4:05 p.m. 223 1030 144 5 33 73 514 48 623 5:05 p.m. 115 685 68 355 48 342 32 414

PAGE 101

101 Table A 3 4. Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (E M) of illuminance l evels in room 238 (east s ide) on 08 /2 8 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 3 89 473 210 368 125 252 87 229 9:10 a.m. 334 800 194 621 109 426 73 387 10:10 a.m. 953 1159 430 900 250 617 158 560 11:10 a.m. 886 547 498 425 283 291 181 264 12:10 p.m. 899 1256 442 975 282 668 197 607 1:10 p.m. 772 1774 452 1377 253 944 166 857 2:10 p.m. 890 2087 510 1621 296 1110 197 1009 3:10 p.m. 798 3014 511 2341 320 1604 220 1457 4:10 p.m. 536 796 349 618 198 424 132 385 5:10 p.m. 394 529 228 411 135 282 90 256 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 62 312 332 611 204 3 70 141 238 9:10 a.m. 49 528 352 1032 209 626 150 402 10:10 a.m. 111 765 647 1496 371 907 242 582 11:10 a.m. 126 361 717 705 417 428 274 275 12:10 p.m. 135 829 773 1620 456 983 300 631 1:10 p.m. 128 1171 672 2288 389 1388 252 890 2:10 p.m. 138 1378 78 4 2692 460 1633 296 1048 3:10 p.m. 156 1990 730 3888 462 2359 321 1513 4:10 p.m. 94 526 487 1027 286 623 196 400 5:10 p.m. 62 349 351 683 206 414 140 266 Time SP 9 SP 10 FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 87 349 63 348 9:10 a.m. 102 590 75 587 10:10 a.m. 162 8 56 125 851 11:10 a.m. 164 404 111 401 12:10 p.m. 180 927 125 922 1:10 p.m. 156 1309 108 1302 2:10 p.m. 180 1540 125 1532 3:10 p.m. 198 2225 142 2213 4:10 p.m. 120 588 85 584 5:10 p.m. 86 391 61 389

PAGE 102

102 Table A 3 5. Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotec t m easurement s (E M) of illuminance l evels under s kylights and in c orridor on 08 /2 8 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:15 a.m. 576 7742 340 7408 592 7817 262 7150 9:15 a.m. 933 13083 492 12517 979 13210 462 12082 10:15 a.m. 21 20 18961 1046 18141 2390 19145 928 17510 11:15 a.m. 1635 8943 870 8557 2130 9030 673 8259 12:15 p.m. 2650 20541 1060 19653 2760 20740 873 18969 1:15 p.m. 3090 29010 1216 27756 3340 29291 1010 26790 2:15 p.m. 4060 34129 1562 32654 4290 34460 1365 31518 3:15 p.m. 4170 49298 2140 47167 3610 49776 1712 45526 4:15 p.m. 1720 13020 654 12457 1800 13146 618 12024 5:15 p.m. 1125 8659 472 8284 1133 8743 354 7996 Time SP 5 SP 6 FM EM FM EM 8:15 a.m. 648 7805 372 7177 9:15 a.m. 1106 13188 629 12127 10:15 a. m. 2380 19114 1130 17576 11:15 a.m. 2070 9015 703 8290 12:15 p.m. 2790 20706 1015 19040 1:15 p.m. 3470 29244 1143 26891 2:15 p.m. 4640 34404 1402 31636 3:15 p.m. 3780 49695 1850 45697 4:15 p.m. 1924 13125 781 12069 5:15 p.m. 1192 8729 505 8026 Ta ble A 36 Weather f orecast and a ctual w eather c onditio ns of Gainesville, Florida on 0 9/1 8 /2010 Time Weather Forecast Actual Weather Tempera ture Precipitation Sky Conditions External Sky Illuminance Sky Conditions 8:00 a.m. 69 10% Mostly Sunny 73900 Partly Cloudy 9:00 a.m. 73 10% Mostly Sunny 90300 Partly Cloudy 10:00 a.m. 79 10% Partly Cloudy 104900 Partly Cloudy 11:00 a.m. 84 10% Pa rtly Cloudy 121600 Partly Cloudy 12:00 p.m. 87 10% Partly Cloudy 96300 Mostly Cloudy 1:00 p.m. 88 10% Partly Cloudy 129200 Mostly Cloudy 2:00 p.m. 90 10% Partly Cloudy 110000 Mostly Cloudy 3:00 p.m. 90 10% Partly Cloudy 50500 Mostly Cloudy 4:00 p.m. 9 0 0% Partly Cloudy 88000 Mostly Cloudy 5:00 p.m. 89 0% Partly Cloudy 72000 Mostly Cloudy

PAGE 103

103 Table A 37 Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in room 220 (w ith m o re trees west s ide) on 09/18 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 59 11746 35 10602 21 7997 13 8106 9:00 a.m. 79 14353 48 12954 29 9771 21 9905 10:00 a.m. 99 16674 67 15049 38 11351 27 11506 11:00 a.m. 142 19328 85 17445 53 13158 35 13338 12:00 p.m. 154 12922 109 11494 72 8163 47 8431 1:00 p.m. 172 17337 99 15421 59 10952 39 11311 2:00 p.m. 268 14761 165 13130 102 9325 67 9631 3:00 p.m. 428 6777 259 6028 155 4281 98 4421 4:00 p.m. 446 11809 240 10504 125 7460 80 7704 5:00 p.m. 163 9662 926 8594 511 6103 300 6304 Ti me SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 9 8431 8 8397 53 6416 30 4220 9:00 a.m. 14 10302 13 10261 67 7840 39 5156 10:00 a.m. 20 11968 16 11920 71 9107 49 5990 11:00 a.m. 25 13873 22 13817 117 10557 68 6943 12:00 p.m. 33 9142 30 9583 127 7142 86 4378 1:00 p.m. 28 12265 22 12857 156 9581 83 5873 2:00 p.m. 47 10442 38 10946 238 8158 146 5001 3:00 p.m. 64 4794 49 5025 426 3745 238 2296 4:00 p.m. 55 8354 43 8757 428 6526 229 4000 5:00 p.m. 187 6835 132 7165 1287 5340 725 3273 Time SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:00 a.m. 16 3702 12 4045 8 3056 7 3260 9:00 a.m. 24 4523 16 4942 12 3734 9 3984 10:00 a.m. 31 5254 22 5741 15 4338 12 4628 11:00 a.m. 43 6091 29 6655 21 5028 14 5365 12:00 p.m. 54 3845 37 4402 27 3280 20 3565 1:00 p.m. 46 5159 30 5906 22 4401 15 4783 2:00 p.m. 86 4392 59 5028 38 3747 28 4072 3:00 p.m. 134 2016 85 2308 57 1720 40 1870 4:00 p.m. 120 3514 72 4022 48 2997 33 3258 5:00 p.m. 400 2875 244 3291 157 2452 104 2665

PAGE 104

104 Table A 3 8 Field m easur ements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in room 225 (w ith f ewer trees west s ide) on 09/18 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 67 4287 43 3670 30 2512 23 4291 9:05 a.m. 79 5238 53 4484 38 3069 2 9 5243 10:05 a.m. 95 6085 62 5209 45 3566 32 6090 11:05 a.m. 124 7054 80 6039 58 4133 39 7060 12:05 p.m. 149 4832 95 4198 63 2826 45 5328 1:05 p.m. 159 6483 96 5632 62 3792 41 7149 2:05 p.m. 212 5520 136 4795 91 3229 63 6086 3:05 p.m. 338 2534 217 22 01 140 1482 94 2794 4:05 p.m. 314 4416 190 3836 122 2583 84 4869 5:05 p.m. 1136 3613 625 3138 381 2113 246 3984 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 16 12314 16 14045 111 4601 70 3691 9:05 a.m. 22 15047 22 17162 132 5622 86 4510 10:05 a.m. 24 17479 24 19936 159 6531 103 5240 11:05 a.m. 29 20262 28 23110 203 7571 128 6074 12:05 p.m. 32 18805 33 21620 228 5264 140 4196 1:05 p.m. 30 25230 28 29007 245 7062 136 5629 2:05 p.m. 45 21481 41 24696 301 6013 186 4793 3:05 p.m. 63 986 2 56 11338 536 2760 316 2200 4:05 p.m. 56 17185 51 19757 132 4810 231 3834 5:05 p.m. 159 14060 139 16165 1563 3936 859 3137 Time SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:05 a.m. 41 4042 31 2218 23 2124 16 2541 9:05 a.m. 55 4939 39 2710 30 25 95 22 3105 10:05 a.m. 64 5737 45 3148 31 3015 23 3608 11:05 a.m. 79 6650 54 3649 37 3495 25 4182 12:05 p.m. 84 4813 57 2493 39 2402 27 2912 1:05 p.m. 77 6457 51 3345 35 3222 21 3907 2:05 p.m. 106 5498 76 2848 31 2743 33 3326 3:05 p.m. 177 2524 111 13 07 73 1259 49 1527 4:05 p.m. 128 4398 80 2278 54 2195 38 2661 5:05 p.m. 435 3599 265 1864 162 1796 107 2177

PAGE 105

105 Table A 39 Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels in room 238 (east s ide) on 0 9/18 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 6450 3495 4500 2604 1621 1755 655 1532 9:10 a.m. 6630 4271 1547 3182 948 2145 610 1872 10:10 a.m. 2150 4962 1375 3697 786 2491 475 2175 11:10 a.m. 1599 5752 983 4285 576 2888 360 2521 12:10 p.m. 483 3 721 283 2890 166 1980 111 1799 1:10 p.m. 663 4992 418 3877 260 2656 175 2413 2:10 p.m. 506 4250 338 3301 219 2262 149 2055 3:10 p.m. 463 1951 321 1516 209 1038 144 943 4:10 p.m. 244 3400 161 2641 102 1809 72 1644 5:10 p.m. 211 2782 149 2161 102 1480 7 7 1345 Time SP 5 SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 1774 1995 1928 4315 1260 2602 897 1668 9:10 a.m. 395 2438 2230 5273 1481 3179 936 2038 10:10 a.m. 293 2832 2030 6125 1280 3694 798 2368 11:10 a.m. 244 3283 1516 7100 925 4282 582 2745 12:10 p.m. 80 2457 418 4801 259 2912 183 1868 1:10 p.m. 123 3296 608 6441 371 3907 253 2506 2:10 p.m. 108 2806 503 5484 319 3326 219 2134 3:10 p.m. 103 1288 446 2517 300 1527 205 980 4:10 p.m. 53 2245 223 4387 141 2661 100 1707 5:10 p.m. 59 1837 195 3589 125 2177 95 1397 Time SP 9 SP 10 FM EM FM EM 8:10 a.m. 606 2295 458 2274 9:10 a.m. 584 2804 395 2779 10:10 a.m. 459 3257 301 3228 11:10 a.m. 342 3776 233 3742 12:10 p.m. 111 2746 83 2732 1:10 p.m. 158 3685 112 3665 2:10 p.m. 136 3137 98 3121 3:10 p.m. 132 1440 92 1433 4:10 p.m. 64 2510 49 2497 5:10 p.m. 64 2053 53 2043

PAGE 106

106 Table A 40 Field m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurement s (EM) of illuminance l evels under sk ylights and in c orridor on 09/18 /2010 (l ux) Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 FM EM FM EM FM EM FM EM 8:15 a.m. 621 45697 313 44632 558 46241 250 43170 9:15 a.m. 1144 55838 582 54537 1072 56503 475 52751 10:15 a.m. 1970 64866 1062 63354 1880 65638 885 61279 11:15 a.m. 2740 75193 1768 73440 2880 76088 1682 71035 12:15 p.m. 2880 60 864 1576 58233 2980 61454 1375 56207 1:15 p.m. 3210 81657 1422 78127 3480 82449 1221 75410 2:15 p.m. 3000 69522 1494 66517 3590 70197 1412 64204 3:15 p.m. 3420 31917 1910 30537 3310 32227 1696 29475 4:15 p.m. 1992 55618 1302 53214 2000 56157 1152 51363 5:15 p.m. 878 45505 631 43538 991 45947 596 42024 Time SP 5 SP 6 FM EM FM EM 8:15 a.m. 671 46253 355 43364 9:15 a.m. 1238 56518 613 52987 10:15 a.m. 2000 65656 1079 61554 11:15 a.m. 3410 76108 1715 71354 12:15 p.m. 2960 61355 1474 56418 1:15 p.m. 3520 82316 1364 75693 2:15 p.m. 4120 70083 1506 64445 3:15 p.m. 3840 32175 1893 29586 4:15 p.m. 2060 56067 1279 51556 5:15 p.m. 1058 45873 702 42182

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107 APPENDIX B PERCENTAGE DIFFERENC E BETWEEN FIELD MEAS UREMENTS AND ECOTECT MEASUREMENTS OF ILLUMINANCE LEVELS Table B 1. Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 220 on 02/2 7 /2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:00 a.m. 6610% 12499% 20033% 41486% 90084% 31412% 9:00 a.m. 3441% 62 00% 8848% 16535% 44992% 18807% 10:00 a.m. 2797% 6200% 8848% 11782% 44992% 18807% 11:00 a.m. 4453% 8622% 11405% 27624% 90084% 23534% 12:00 p.m. 2450% 4261% 6095% 10297% 44992% 13405% 1:00 p.m. 387% 651% 870% 1469% 2633% 2854% 2:00 p.m. 322% 520% 660% 1 200% 1997% 2601% 3:00 p.m. 242% 420% 515% 845% 1482% 2001% 4:00 p.m. 14% 79% 124% 273% 516% 757% 5:00 p.m. 42% 53% 138% 237% 462% 424% Time SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 8:00 a.m. 3255% 3499% 7487% 21612% 32257% 9:00 a.m. 1661% 1699% 3349% 8585% 10686% 17485% 10:00 a.m. 1281% 1442% 3349% 6104% 10686% 35069% 11:00 a.m. 2173% 2779% 4642% 14375% 32257% 12:00 p.m. 1094% 1500% 2271% 4242% 7989% 17485% 1:00 p.m. 151% 173% 336% 675% 824% 1575% 2:00 p.m. 107% 133% 279% 579% 670% 1113% 3:00 p.m. 7 3% 91% 171% 271% 414% 851% 4:00 p.m. 45% 34% 3% 79% 122% 268% 5:00 p.m. 86% 74% 9% 75% 92% 222%

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108 Table B 2. Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 on 02/2 7 /201 0 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:00 a.m. 1603% 3665% 3883% 17421% 92658% 53221% 9:00 a.m. 799% 1236% 1540% 4679% 46279% 26561% 10:00 a.m. 873% 1971% 2435% 10413% 61739% 30369% 11:00 a.m. 1302% 2201% 2688% 6470% 61739% 42557% 12:00 p.m. 454% 820% 933% 2992% 18452% 21228% 1:00 p.m. 71% 133% 197% 640% 4538% 5994% 2:00 p.m. 18% 4% 26% 265% 2374% 3132% 3:00 p.m. 37% 24% 1% 149% 1305% 2169% 4:00 p.m. 58% 46% 44% 50% 640% 1088% 5:00 p.m. 52% 37% 42% 47% 521% 717% Time SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 8:00 a.m. 1198% 2335% 5176% 6049% 11747% 9:00 a.m. 592% 910% 2399% 1792% 2533% 7082% 10:00 a.m. 687% 910% 2868% 2136% 3285% 9476% 11:00 a.m. 1029% 1625% 3065% 3414% 5823% 14264% 12:00 p.m. 306% 411% 1297% 1071% 1874% 3491% 1:00 p.m. 81% 124% 380 % 262% 464% 798% 2:00 p.m. 33% 10% 85% 61% 193% 475% 3:00 p.m. 53% 21% 50% 14% 84% 288% 4:00 p.m. 62% 48% 4% 9% 38% 175% 5:00 p.m. 84% 37% 21% 1% 41% 130%

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109 Table B 3. Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 on 02/2 7 /2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 8:10 a.m. 681% 997% 1202% 1872% 4747% 9:10 a.m. 253% 345% 428% 639% 1246% 10:10 a.m. 234% 375% 574% 745% 1516% 11:10 a.m. 348% 507% 877% 1513% 2929% 12:10 p. m. 97% 166% 226% 355% 832% 1:10 p.m. 0% 18% 17% 66% 325% 2:10 p.m. 39% 25% 16% 29% 155% 3:10 p.m. 19% 0% 6% 30% 179% 4:10 p.m. 98% 100% 126% 126% 277% 5:10 p.m. 151% 213% 169% 228% 497% Time SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 1 0 8:10 a.m. 847% 1005% 1129% 3287% 6638% 9:10 a.m. 364% 329% 292% 1029% 1397% 10:10 a.m. 295% 379% 350% 903% 1697% 11:10 a.m. 485% 553% 558% 1706% 2350% 12:10 p.m. 162% 137% 175% 545% 937% 1:10 p.m. 41% 32% 20% 204% 342% 2:10 p.m. 27% 28% 21% 91% 184% 3:10 p.m. 6% 11% 22% 166% 274% 4:10 p.m. 127% 131% 149% 315% 473% 5:10 p.m. 1485% 612% 133% 178% 61% Table B 4. Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skylights and in corridor on 02/2 7 /2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:15 a.m. 2477% 6821% 2296% 7601% 2039% 2538% 9:15 a.m. 1208% 3468% 1166% 3889% 1113% 1946% 10:15 a.m. 1143% 3340% 1055% 3387% 995% 1819% 11:15 a.m. 1336% 3202% 1077% 3947% 1156% 2374% 12:15 p.m. 939% 2689% 856% 2645% 843% 1607% 1:15 p.m. 145% 503% 91% 490% 98% 418% 2:15 p.m. 127% 170% 54% 289% 37% 246% 3:15 p.m. 190% 529% 250% 576% 131% 314% 4:15 p.m. 580% 1507% 790% 2068% 764% 1423% 5:15 p.m. 1783% 3160% 1676% 3864% 1538% 1942%

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110 Table B 5 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 220 on 0 3 /2 0 /2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:00 a.m. 5293% 8986% 12750% 20741% 54093% 53874% 9:00 a.m. 2459% 3908% 4795% 6847% 9753% 9714% 10:00 a.m. 1811% 2681% 321 6% 5110% 7126% 7097% 11:00 a.m. 1506% 2250% 2756% 4068% 6276% 6250% 12:00 p.m. 1248% 1934% 2236% 3493% 5061% 5040% 1:00 p.m. 979% 1485% 1769% 2877% 4416% 5297% 2:00 p.m. 712% 1106% 1390% 2216% 3396% 3755% 3:00 p.m. 298% 508% 679% 1155% 1945% 2299% 4: 00 p.m. 57% 151% 277% 714% 1238% 1794% 5:00 p.m. 6% 17% 23% 259% 499% 671% Time SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 8:00 a.m. 2477% 2483% 4226% 12898% 12994% 20857% 9:00 a.m. 1169% 985% 1599% 2500% 3174% 3393% 10:00 a.m. 957% 1054% 1541% 2500% 2519% 3710 % 11:00 a.m. 848% 524% 1222% 1900% 2082% 3393% 12:00 p.m. 701% 664% 1007% 1693% 1864% 2520% 1:00 p.m. 473% 503% 750% 1305% 1471% 2366% 2:00 p.m. 302% 214% 543% 940% 1128% 1896% 3:00 p.m. 75% 102% 209% 534% 566% 1133% 4:00 p.m. 26% 13% 43% 149% 207% 3 76% 5:00 p.m. 50% 38% 8% 60% 95% 213%

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111 Table B 6 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 on 0 3 /2 0 /2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:00 a.m. 1073% 1787% 2053% 5416% 22514% 25693% 9:00 a.m. 580% 790% 797% 1870% 8232% 9403% 10:00 a.m. 480% 637% 634% 1624% 6496% 7423% 11:00 a.m. 440% 604% 618% 1624% 7438% 8498% 12:00 p.m. 375% 521% 521% 1391% 5988% 6844% 1:00 p.m. 283% 413% 429% 1245% 5763% 7122% 2:00 p.m. 190% 293% 319% 961% 4556% 5542% 3:00 p.m. 37% 87% 103% 441% 2335% 3124% 4:00 p.m. 32% 12% 3% 187% 1208% 1724% 5:00 p.m. 60% 41% 33% 81% 733% 1065% Time SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 8:00 a.m. 810% 1030% 2498% 1801% 2175% 4567% 9:00 a.m. 362% 501% 960% 692% 911% 1715% 10:00 a.m. 284% 405% 766% 579% 841% 1620% 11:00 a.m. 265% 365% 725% 563% 841% 1620% 12:00 p.m. 265% 352% 752% 534% 841% 1715% 1:00 p.m. 175% 262% 558% 448% 703% 1534% 2:00 p.m. 120% 271% 593% 534% 841% 1157% 3:00 p.m. 4% 45% 209% 155% 264% 553% 4:00 p.m. 53% 34% 33% 18% 84% 259% 5:00 p.m. 68% 54% 8% 18% 28% 142%

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112 Table B 7 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 on 03/20/2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 8:10 a.m. 70% 78% 82% 83% 76% 9:10 a.m. 92% 76% 74% 69% 36% 10:10 a.m. 79% 76% 72% 59% 16% 11:10 a.m. 70% 64% 58% 41% 18% 12:10 p.m. 44% 36% 31% 7% 79% 1:10 p.m. 6% 4% 9% 45% 162% 2:10 p.m. 14% 7% 5% 30% 140% 3:10 p.m. 3% 1% 4% 36% 144% 4:10 p.m. 39% 27% 27% 54% 179% 5:10 p.m. 86% 81% 76% 99% 256% Time SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 1 0 8:10 a.m. 44% 53% 65% 41% 41% 9:10 a.m. 71% 76% 77% 52% 32% 10:10 a.m. 74% 77% 77% 48% 20% 11:10 a.m. 65% 65% 65% 14% 37% 12:10 p.m. 33% 34% 36% 47% 127% 1:10 p.m. 11% 14% 6% 140% 248% 2:10 p.m. 2% 6% 1% 123% 225% 3:10 p.m. 17% 16% 8% 144% 240% 4:10 p.m. 52% 48% 33% 178% 285% 5:10 p.m. 116% 106% 85% 273% 413% Table B 8 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skylights and in corridor on 03/20/2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:15 a.m. 1954% 3216% 1936% 4811% 1599% 2012% 9:15 a.m. 585% 1210% 630% 1349% 519% 929% 10:15 a.m. 232% 547% 257% 602% 224% 513% 11: 15 a.m. 184% 245% 196% 304% 179% 305% 12:15 p.m. 142% 316% 141% 310% 134% 302% 1:15 p.m. 111% 354% 101% 405% 103% 370% 2:15 p.m. 98% 252% 91% 284% 76% 250% 3:15 p.m. 63% 184% 65% 196% 64% 201% 4:15 p.m. 204% 317% 179% 253% 142% 271% 5:15 p.m. 271% 43 3% 256% 480% 256% 445%

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113 Table B 9 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 220 on 04 / 1 7 /2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:00 a.m. 2646% 4159% 5611% 7916% 10739% 11894% 9: 00 a.m. 1656% 2572% 3112% 4242% 6674% 6647% 10:00 a.m. 1128% 1742% 2087% 3058% 4235% 4398% 11:00 a.m. 1010% 1522% 1840% 2716% 4069% 4218% 12:00 p.m. 716% 1186% 1585% 2442% 3771% 4052% 1:00 p.m. 479% 1096% 1082% 1697% 2610% 2984% 2:00 p.m. 6891% 11618% 15143% 23593% 35673% 40807% 3:00 p.m. 1165% 1943% 2397% 3932% 6798% 8244% 4:00 p.m. 1185% 2055% 2520% 4152% 6816% 8358% 5:00 p.m. 1024% 1836% 2453% 3855% 6762% 8581% Time SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 8:00 a.m. 1209% 1407% 2405% 3900% 3828% 5139% 9:00 a.m. 742% 869% 1342% 2066% 2355% 3393% 10:00 a.m. 555% 633% 981% 1476% 1537% 2229% 11:00 a.m. 493% 531% 798% 1305% 1355% 1996% 12:00 p.m. 300% 376% 655% 1082% 1128% 1722% 1:00 p.m. 186% 250% 447% 845% 991% 1452% 2:00 p.m. 3073% 3165% 4581% 8084% 8832% 12895% 3:00 p.m. 522% 611% 988% 1768% 2042% 3172% 4:00 p.m. 549% 666% 1134% 2069% 2296% 3676% 5:00 p.m. 395% 518% 871% 1652% 1858% 2827%

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114 Table B 10 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 on 04/1 7 /2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:00 a.m. 616% 807% 850% 2021% 8232% 9403% 9:00 a.m. 396% 538% 533% 1391% 5554% 6348% 10:00 a.m. 288% 402% 405% 1154% 4697% 5542% 11:00 a.m. 260% 349% 368% 1003% 4423 % 5210% 12:00 p.m. 133% 228% 251% 835% 3857% 4915% 1:00 p.m. 78% 167% 199% 598% 3131% 4199% 2:00 p.m. 1773% 2538% 2748% 7044% 29348% 36846% 3:00 p.m. 429% 688% 749% 2345% 12671% 16585% 4:00 p.m. 328% 540% 621% 1952% 10966% 14674% 5:00 p.m. 261% 454% 529% 1742% 9401% 13110% Time SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 8:00 a.m. 393% 559% 1081% 764% 992% 1715% 9:00 a.m. 242% 352% 699% 507% 703% 1261% 10:00 a.m. 174% 252% 526% 400% 566% 1067% 11:00 a.m. 134% 210% 526% 367% 535% 1027% 12:00 p.m. 69% 130% 3 29% 248% 388% 954% 1:00 p.m. 32% 85% 251% 197% 320% 643% 2:00 p.m. 1301% 1874% 3644% 3105% 4480% 7859% 3:00 p.m. 306% 506% 1148% 920% 1356% 2647% 4:00 p.m. 229% 386% 920% 713% 1083% 2027% 5:00 p.m. 126% 298% 711% 562% 856% 1639%

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115 Table B 11 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 on 04/1 7 /2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 8:10 a.m. 91% 75% 65% 66% 42% 9:10 a.m. 92% 78% 76% 68% 36% 10:10 a.m. 80% 77% 74% 63% 26% 11:10 a.m. 73% 66% 61% 45% 10% 12:10 p.m. 59% 50% 44% 25% 41% 1:10 p.m. 45% 37% 30% 8% 67% 2:10 p.m. 481% 621% 675% 913% 1748% 3:10 p.m. 112% 176% 208% 324% 710% 4:10 p.m. 71% 128% 161% 260% 594% 5:10 p.m. 131% 209% 251% 382% 835% Time SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 1 0 8:10 a.m. 91% 92% 77% 48% 31% 9:10 a.m. 77% 83% 77% 45% 16% 10:10 a.m. 74% 75% 74% 38% 3% 11:10 a.m. 64% 63% 64% 12% 35% 12:10 p.m. 47% 44% 46% 25% 90% 1:10 p.m. 34% 30% 30% 65% 136% 2:10 p.m. 653% 666% 644% 1605% 2372% 3:10 p.m. 183% 196% 192% 617% 942% 4:10 p.m. 140% 149% 146% 512% 790% 5:10 p.m. 222% 242% 236% 739% 1096% Table B 12 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skylights and in corridor on 0 4/1 7 /2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:15 a.m. 800% 1578% 839% 1820% 696% 1367% 9:15 a.m. 342% 697% 347% 763% 293% 597% 10:15 a.m. 161% 297% 167% 304% 160% 266% 11:15 a.m. 111% 264% 112% 352% 119% 284% 12:15 p.m. 89% 250% 80% 259% 92% 259% 1:15 p.m. 84% 320% 58% 367% 45% 311% 2:15 p.m. 1598% 3270% 1589% 3405% 1432% 3133% 3:15 p.m. 852% 1981% 889% 2334% 892% 2041% 4:15 p.m. 655% 1778% 667% 2045% 654% 1650% 5:15 p.m. 839% 2067% 859% 2301% 809% 1959%

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116 Table B 1 3 Percentage difference betwe en field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 220 on 05 /2 2 /2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:00 a.m. 16738% 26271% 33716% 52636% 71206% 78810% 9:00 a.m. 11075% 16374% 20050% 27891% 43571% 45954% 10:00 a.m. 17599% 25749% 29688% 41709% 62713% 59167% 11:00 a.m. 14191% 21397% 25381% 37308% 53631% 53414% 12:00 p.m. 13394% 20053% 23992% 34882% 46323% 40531% 1:00 p.m. 8620% 13016% 15679% 24201% 37452% 40807% 2:00 p.m. 6795% 10248% 13360% 20471% 30806% 30681% 3:00 p.m. 3523% 5616% 7299% 12098% 18522% 20435% 4:00 p.m. 1149% 2030% 2708% 4602% 7814% 10346% 5:00 p.m. 762% 1368% 1919% 3351% 5985% 7598% Time SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 8:00 a.m. 8379% 9813% 15553% 22704% 25744% 34369% 9:00 a.m. 6402% 7053% 10051% 15612% 16659% 25232% 10:00 a.m. 9355% 10577% 14083% 20761% 22665% 33533% 11:00 a.m. 8156% 8588% 11983% 18565% 20348% 28990% 12:00 p.m. 7720% 8117% 11267% 17839% 18667% 28823% 1:00 p.m. 4574% 5079% 7394% 12263% 13510% 19449% 2:00 p.m. 3451% 4043 % 6068% 10164% 11356% 16707% 3:00 p.m. 1742% 1994% 3088% 5495% 6240% 9822% 4:00 p.m. 519% 602% 1051% 1917% 2203% 3559% 5:00 p.m. 340% 422% 737% 1334% 1637% 2597%

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117 Table B 14 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Eco tect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 on 05/22/2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:00 a.m. 2921% 4750% 5211% 13340% 51972% 65890% 9:00 a.m. 3287% 4344% 4009% 10712% 40903% 48398% 10:00 a.m. 5033% 6462% 6505% 16339% 61059% 69655% 11:00 a.m. 4641% 6117% 6243% 15419% 58756% 67028% 12:00 p.m. 4621% 6269% 6266% 15471% 59483% 62194% 1:00 p.m. 2924% 4016% 4734% 11048% 46719% 59072% 2:00 p.m. 2257% 3208% 3535% 9092% 38962% 47180% 3:00 p.m. 1062% 1775% 1832% 5009% 22088% 29489% 4:00 p .m. 331% 581% 729% 2183% 9388% 15835% 5:00 p.m. 214% 375% 471% 1411% 6900% 9825% Time SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 8:00 a.m. 2189% 4008% 7668% 5950% 8454% 16434% 9:00 a.m. 2231% 3178% 5697% 4599% 6088% 11183% 10:00 a.m. 3639% 4614% 8112% 6509% 853 1% 16129% 11:00 a.m. 3210% 4233% 7518% 5957% 8260% 14072% 12:00 p.m. 3255% 4434% 7867% 6581% 9320% 16132% 1:00 p.m. 2191% 3062% 5628% 4390% 7975% 12280% 2:00 p.m. 1716% 2502% 4731% 4057% 5940% 10649% 3:00 p.m. 792% 1164% 2317% 2024% 2994% 5700% 4:00 p.m. 287% 396% 1019% 946% 1466% 2783% 5:00 p.m. 162% 283% 648% 548% 896% 1802%

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118 Table B 15 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 on 05/22/2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 S P 3 SP 4 SP 5 8:10 a.m. 66% 95% 103% 158% 386% 9:10 a.m. 23% 64% 89% 158% 415% 10:10 a.m. 146% 194% 234% 357% 747% 11:10 a.m. 241% 315% 365% 508% 1131% 12:10 p.m. 611% 706% 781% 1065% 2097% 1:10 p.m. 853% 928% 1031% 1383% 2653% 2:10 p.m. 1024% 1175% 1198% 1541% 2865% 3:10 p.m. 1000% 1014% 1072% 1420% 2632% 4:10 p.m. 971% 934% 924% 1155% 2215% 5:10 p.m. 1279% 1287% 1284% 1613% 2720% Time SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 1 0 8:10 a.m. 10% 83% 70% 318% 509% 9:10 a.m. 77% 74% 67% 501% 295% 10:10 a.m. 206% 198 % 203% 636% 1226% 11:10 a.m. 318% 332% 328% 904% 1414% 12:10 p.m. 726% 760% 732% 1818% 2715% 1:10 p.m. 985% 1017% 1011% 2419% 3445% 2:10 p.m. 1201% 1217% 1210% 2880% 4211% 3:10 p.m. 1099% 1064% 1042% 2519% 3521% 4:10 p.m. 1107% 1034% 931% 2178% 3161% 5:10 p.m. 1430% 1347% 1206% 2680% 3573% Table B 16 Percentage d ifference between Fiel d m easurements (FM) and Ecotect m easurements (EM) of illuminance l evels under skylights and in c orridor on 05/22/2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:15 a.m. 430 2% 6465% 4426% 8068% 3777% 6414% 9:15 a.m. 2085% 3972% 2218% 4692% 2100% 4412% 10:15 a.m. 2660% 2176% 2867% 3647% 2681% 3099% 11:15 a.m. 2208% 3542% 2226% 3974% 2245% 3698% 12:15 p.m. 1877% 5266% 2186% 5747% 2138% 5239% 1:15 p.m. 1432% 6237% 1450% 697 6% 1454% 6381% 2:15 p.m. 1873% 3952% 1902% 4485% 1908% 4416% 3:15 p.m. 1517% 2678% 1352% 3028% 1383% 2899% 4:15 p.m. 1550% 2582% 1392% 2610% 1530% 2523% 5:15 p.m. 2263% 3098% 2207% 3351% 2131% 3016%

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119 Table B 1 7 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 220 on 06 /2 1 /2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:00 a.m. 13682% 18143% 19558% 25262% 33381% 33246% 9:00 a.m. 14363% 18717% 19771% 26921% 35910% 36921% 10:00 a.m. 12975% 19 674% 21975% 31867% 43001% 48193% 11:00 a.m. 8423% 12959% 15229% 22698% 35214% 39161% 12:00 p.m. 7996% 11977% 13689% 19297% 29652% 28961% 1:00 p.m. 6190% 10007% 12262% 18661% 30105% 35929% 2:00 p.m. 4245% 6863% 8554% 13033% 21044% 26021% 3:00 p.m. 4201 % 6060% 7070% 11618% 23025% 30201% 4:00 p.m. 235% 461% 592% 1031% 1739% 1828% 5:00 p.m. 643% 1056% 1214% 1839% 3579% 3756% Time SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 8:00 a.m. 5075% 5346% 7394% 11500% 11168% 16732% 9:00 a.m. 5120% 5143% 7025% 10955% 11501% 16404% 10:00 a.m. 6712% 7563% 11254% 16817% 16771% 23585% 11:00 a.m. 4329% 4561% 34559% 11345% 12218% 17752% 12:00 p.m. 4292% 4195% 6564% 10983% 10842% 15245% 1:00 p.m. 2895% 3384% 5566% 9311% 9566% 14297% 2:00 p.m. 2116% 2339% 4034% 7204% 6666% 1078 4% 3:00 p.m. 2466% 2641% 3886% 7038% 6591% 10148% 4:00 p.m. 38% 76% 209% 406% 487% 720% 5:00 p.m. 238% 314% 588% 1081% 1220% 1813%

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120 Table B 18 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illum inance levels in room 225 on 06/21/2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:00 a.m. 7402% 10425% 10274% 27587% 97699% 111445% 9:00 a.m. 7316% 9546% 9997% 23356% 88477% 106539% 10:00 a.m. 3575% 4463% 4462% 10667% 41354% 53748% 11:00 a.m. 3026% 4200% 4194 % 11335% 56401% 66335% 12:00 p.m. 2521% 3358% 3492% 9914% 48157% 50513% 1:00 p.m. 1830% 2708% 2982% 8320% 46501% 57396% 2:00 p.m. 1292% 2036% 2147% 6062% 32521% 45737% 3:00 p.m. 1106% 1676% 1886% 5864% 32482% 44005% 4:00 p.m. 11% 23% 30% 243% 1680% 22 20% 5:00 p.m. 129% 182% 203% 758% 3684% 4871% Time SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 8:00 a.m. 6785% 9428% 16591% 13369% 18174% 26140% 9:00 a.m. 6965% 8909% 16146% 12024% 16026% 26618% 10:00 a.m. 2661% 3390% 6098% 4918% 6562% 11215% 11:00 a.m. 2196% 2 966% 5710% 4335% 6145% 10541% 12:00 p.m. 1879% 2699% 4997% 3957% 5522% 9864% 1:00 p.m. 1395% 2121% 4671% 3477% 4936% 8482% 2:00 p.m. 1071% 1689% 3502% 2740% 4066% 6846% 3:00 p.m. 851% 1271% 2642% 2169% 3313% 6597% 4:00 p.m. 36% 2% 121% 67% 142% 369% 5:00 p.m. 73% 150% 416% 301% 452% 681%

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121 Table B 19 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 on 06/21/2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 8:10 a.m. 79% 90% 99% 153% 395% 9:10 a.m. 115% 142% 178% 278% 647% 10:10 a.m. 163% 211% 272% 399% 843% 11:10 a.m. 271% 358% 430% 646% 1445% 12:10 p.m. 441% 558% 696% 957% 2001% 1:10 p.m. 814% 940% 1073% 1364% 2750% 2:10 p.m. 598% 655% 712% 973% 2106% 3:10 p.m. 723% 803% 821% 1157% 2202% 4:10 p.m. 20% 41% 59% 107% 295% 5:10 p.m. 328% 417% 431% 624% 1218% Time SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 1 0 8:10 a.m. 28% 38% 88% 315% 504% 9:10 a.m. 152% 142% 144% 458% 766% 10:10 a.m. 199% 201% 213% 630% 1084% 11:10 a.m. 323% 363% 365% 1098% 17 47% 12:10 p.m. 525% 584% 576% 1597% 2467% 1:10 p.m. 893% 918% 894% 2396% 3446% 2:10 p.m. 657% 694% 647% 1723% 2506% 3:10 p.m. 668% 715% 723% 2018% 3013% 4:10 p.m. 29% 38% 31% 216% 340% 5:10 p.m. 383% 486% 401% 1374% 2099% Table B 20 Percentage d ifference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skylights and in corridor on 06/21/2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:15 a.m. 6310% 11963% 6643% 13872% 5599% 9208% 9:15 a.m. 3669% 7034% 3816% 7906% 3426% 8330% 10:15 a.m. 2703% 50% 2939% 77% 2776% 77% 11:15 a.m. 2839% 4276% 2795% 4451% 2311% 4188% 12:15 p.m. 3162% 5046% 2994% 5665% 208% 5213% 1:15 p.m. 72% 5924% 94% 6620% 1790% 5018% 2:15 p.m. 2012% 5642% 1236% 5745% 1183% 4353% 3:15 p.m. 1815% 3203% 1663% 3285% 1613% 3234% 4:15 p.m. 213% 662% 218% 814% 184% 295% 5:15 p.m. 1039% 2367% 1136% 3131% 759% 450%

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122 Table B 2 1. Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 220 on 0 7 /2 4 /2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:00 a.m. 2966% 4964% 5495% 8567% 11983% 14677% 9:00 a.m. 1199% 1965% 2151% 3125% 5321% 5582% 10:00 a.m. 789% 1223% 1670% 2111% 3122% 3386% 11:00 a.m. 10574% 15353% 17687% 26537% 38410% 44753% 12:00 p.m. 605 2% 8945% 11416% 17316% 25693% 26938% 1:00 p.m. 980% 1497% 1712% 2614% 4207% 5509% 2:00 p.m. 6795% 10135% 11890% 18966% 29501% 32407% 3:00 p.m. 2101% 3638% 4431% 7042% 11671% 15324% 4:00 p.m. 1006% 1760% 2248% 3687% 6201% 7882% 5:00 p.m. 395% 783% 1019 % 1683% 2912% 3718% Time SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 8:00 a.m. 1512% 1661% 2637% 4691% 4958% 7230% 9:00 a.m. 636% 711% 891% 1640% 1845% 2542% 10:00 a.m. 377% 389% 588% 1141% 1270% 2265% 11:00 a.m. 5877% 5980% 8735% 14164% 14704% 22427% 12:00 p.m 3401% 3679% 5603% 9330% 10440% 15762% 1:00 p.m. 779% 931% 1588% 2734% 3068% 4204% 2:00 p.m. 3641% 3703% 5548% 9699% 10768% 16284% 3:00 p.m. 1104% 1229% 1897% 3443% 3811% 6276% 4:00 p.m. 494% 576% 946% 1714% 1949% 2869% 5:00 p.m. 173% 214% 411% 831% 1177% 1936%

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123 Table B 2 2. Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 on 07/24/2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:00 a.m. 744% 1114% 1089% 3081% 15030% 19904% 9 :00 a.m. 304% 500% 509% 1563% 8160% 9761% 10:00 a.m. 278% 420% 525% 1366% 6741% 8930% 11:00 a.m. 3219% 4248% 4310% 11313% 57865% 68207% 12:00 p.m. 2042% 3159% 3342% 9239% 45221% 50942% 1:00 p.m. 430% 630% 463% 1587% 7796% 10889% 2:00 p.m. 2498% 3481% 3772% 10745% 59439% 69906% 3:00 p.m. 620% 981% 1066% 3263% 17705% 24756% 4:00 p.m. 247% 412% 451% 1564% 8745% 9951% 5:00 p.m. 67% 168% 205% 778% 4638% 6287% Time SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 8:00 a.m. 501% 726% 1229% 1182% 1546% 2594% 9:00 a.m. 1 61% 263% 651% 428% 763% 1401% 10:00 a.m. 190% 288% 614% 462% 697% 1214% 11:00 a.m. 2140% 2813% 5693% 4158% 5970% 10724% 12:00 p.m. 1403% 2168% 4354% 3461% 4861% 9258% 1:00 p.m. 293% 444% 889% 716% 1089% 2063% 2:00 p.m. 1838% 2557% 4979% 3936% 5903% 10 538% 3:00 p.m. 436% 681% 1481% 1195% 1833% 3372% 4:00 p.m. 167% 318% 751% 531% 890% 1778% 5:00 p.m. 28% 98% 330% 256% 524% 791%

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124 Table B 2 3. Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminan ce levels in room 238 on 07/24/2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 8:10 a.m. 66% 63% 59% 48% 2% 9:10 a.m. 42% 22% 25% 17% 114% 10:10 a.m. 18% 3% 21% 66% 215% 11:10 a.m. 188% 264% 317% 500% 1178% 12:10 p.m. 293% 395% 560% 719% 1533% 1:10 p.m. 13% 53% 80% 155% 399% 2:10 p.m. 681% 864% 1095% 1705% 3508% 3:10 p.m. 312% 363% 387% 536% 1098% 4:10 p.m. 172% 225% 265% 389% 844% 5:10 p.m. 98% 136% 159% 239% 538% Time SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 1 0 8:10 a.m. 71% 61% 62% 11% 59% 9:10 a.m. 29% 35% 35% 44% 104% 10 :10 a.m. 35% 24% 22% 207% 353% 11:10 a.m. 283% 295% 292% 918% 1414% 12:10 p.m. 424% 441% 423% 1176% 1737% 1:10 p.m. 16% 18% 8% 163% 282% 2:10 p.m. 913% 905% 960% 2098% 2965% 3:10 p.m. 413% 436% 401% 1095% 1529% 4:10 p.m. 257% 256% 240% 751% 1015% 5: 10 p.m. 171% 218% 135% 435% 620% Table B 2 4. Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skylights and in corridor on 07/24/2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:15 a.m. 1096% 2038% 1121% 1997% 957% 1676% 9:15 a.m. 788% 1666% 924% 2064% 986% 1577% 10:15 a.m. 610% 1978% 666% 2071% 708% 1452% 11:15 a.m. 3078% 4418% 3136% 4812% 3052% 4433% 12:15 p.m. 2451% 4598% 2514% 4681% 2500% 4612% 1:15 p.m. 77% 761% 77% 912% 77% 858% 2:15 p.m. 75% 4803% 79% 5307% 79% 5255% 3:15 p.m. 468% 1351% 496% 1825% 491% 1610% 4:15 p.m. 785% 2005% 803% 2311% 786% 2048% 5:15 p.m. 516% 1530% 523% 1766% 505% 1406%

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125 Table B 25 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measuremen ts (EM) of illuminance levels in room 220 on 0 8 /2 8 /2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:00 a.m. 4735% 6257% 6823% 9650% 12821% 15137% 9:00 a.m. 5687% 8724% 9649% 12845% 19551% 22787% 10:00 a.m. 2187% 3343% 3874% 6154% 9393% 11841% 11:00 a.m. 1024% 1 589% 2004% 3248% 4875% 6022% 12:00 p.m. 1813% 2884% 3432% 5269% 8470% 9700% 1:00 p.m. 2335% 3652% 4372% 6950% 10793% 13741% 2:00 p.m. 3106% 4936% 5769% 8992% 14140% 17234% 3:00 p.m. 2036% 3167% 3982% 6530% 10478% 12836% 4:00 p.m. 560% 969% 1203% 1860% 3106% 3919% 5:00 p.m. 20% 97% 155% 316% 871% 1485% Time SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 8:00 a.m. 2116% 2128% 2957% 4990% 4536% 5569% 9:00 a.m. 2641% 2443% 4762% 8502% 8713% 10847% 10:00 a.m. 1024% 1129% 1772% 3089% 3196% 4528% 11:00 a.m. 435% 496% 842% 1517% 1621% 2519% 12:00 p.m. 823% 948% 1522% 2757% 3254% 4913% 1:00 p.m. 1005% 1172% 1892% 3397% 3909% 5759% 2:00 p.m. 1411% 1605% 2530% 4388% 4871% 7304% 3:00 p.m. 831% 934% 1497% 2685% 3063% 5150% 4:00 p.m. 198% 219% 533% 995% 1153% 1807% 5:0 0 p.m. 42% 36% 7% 101% 150% 341%

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126 Table B 2 6 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 on 08/28/2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:00 a.m. 998% 1471% 1398% 3887% 19835% 22819% 9:00 a.m. 2497% 3509% 3474% 9444% 44814% 51537% 10:00 a.m. 613% 922% 974% 3032% 16173% 20948% 11:00 a.m. 259% 441% 485% 1531% 8535% 10855% 12:00 p.m. 532% 802% 904% 2710% 15380% 19102% 1:00 p.m. 622% 1012% 1061% 3156% 17475% 22800% 2:00 p.m. 769% 1193% 1341% 3993% 20577% 26841% 3:00 p.m. 550% 858% 975% 2939% 16824% 22942% 4:00 p.m. 114% 227% 266% 946% 5411% 7241% 5:00 p.m. 36% 247% 244% 848% 4594% 5596% Time SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 8:00 a.m. 717% 989% 1941% 1569% 1937 % 3268% 9:00 a.m. 1920% 2553% 5073% 3052% 4202% 6855% 10:00 a.m. 447% 702% 1530% 1216% 1818% 3140% 11:00 a.m. 179% 311% 762% 591% 880% 1612% 12:00 p.m. 366% 581% 1265% 1007% 1489% 2708% 1:00 p.m. 461% 720% 1599% 1282% 1908% 3459% 2:00 p.m. 557% 841% 1828% 1436% 2108% 3883% 3:00 p.m. 402% 655% 1355% 1095% 1685% 3222% 4:00 p.m. 63% 94% 362% 270% 604% 1198% 5:00 p.m. 68% 171% 495% 422% 612% 1195%

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127 Table B 27 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurement s (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 on 08/28/2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 8:10 a.m. 22% 75% 101% 163% 404% 9:10 a.m. 139% 220% 290% 430% 978% 10:10 a.m. 22% 109% 147% 255% 589% 11:10 a.m. 38% 15% 3% 46% 186% 12:10 p.m. 40% 121% 137% 208% 514% 1:10 p.m. 130% 205% 273% 417% 815% 2:10 p.m. 134% 218% 275% 412% 898% 3:10 p.m. 278% 358% 401% 562% 1176% 4:10 p.m. 49% 77% 114% 192% 459% 5:10 p.m. 34% 80% 109% 184% 464% Time SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 1 0 8:10 a.m. 84% 82% 69% 302% 452% 9:10 a.m. 19 3% 200% 168% 479% 683% 10:10 a.m. 131% 145% 140% 428% 581% 11:10 a.m. 2% 3% 0% 146% 262% 12:10 p.m. 110% 116% 110% 415% 638% 1:10 p.m. 240% 257% 253% 739% 1106% 2:10 p.m. 243% 255% 254% 756% 1126% 3:10 p.m. 433% 411% 371% 1024% 1458% 4:10 p.m. 111% 118% 104% 390% 588% 5:10 p.m. 95% 101% 90% 354% 537% Table B 28 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skylights and in corridor on 08/28/2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:15 a.m. 1244% 2079% 1220% 2629% 1104% 1829% 9:15 a.m. 1302% 2444% 1249% 2515% 1092% 1828% 10:15 a.m. 794% 1634% 701% 1787% 703% 1455% 11:15 a.m. 447% 884% 324% 1127% 336% 1079% 12:15 p.m. 675% 1754% 651% 2073% 642% 1776% 1:15 p.m. 839% 2183% 777% 25 53% 743% 2253% 2:15 p.m. 741% 1991% 703% 2209% 641% 2157% 3:15 p.m. 1082% 2104% 1279% 2559% 1215% 2370% 4:15 p.m. 657% 1805% 630% 1846% 582% 1445% 5:15 p.m. 670% 1655% 672% 2159% 632% 1489%

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128 Table B 29 Percentage difference between field measureme nts (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 220 on 0 9 / 18 /2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:00 a.m. 19809% 30191% 37980% 62255% 93581% 104866% 9:00 a.m. 18069% 26888% 33594% 47067% 73488% 78829% 10:00 a.m. 16742% 22361% 29 772% 42517% 59740% 74399% 11:00 a.m. 13511% 20423% 24727% 38009% 55393% 62706% 12:00 p.m. 8291% 10445% 11238% 17838% 27602% 31843% 1:00 p.m. 9980% 15477% 18463% 28904% 43703% 58340% 2:00 p.m. 5408% 7857% 9042% 14274% 22118% 28706% 3:00 p.m. 1483% 2227 % 2662% 4412% 7391% 10156% 4:00 p.m. 2548% 4277% 5868% 9531% 15089% 20265% 5:00 p.m. 5827% 828% 1094% 2001% 3555% 5328% Time SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 8:00 a.m. 12006% 13966% 23035% 33605% 38097% 46478% 9:00 a.m. 11601% 13121% 18746% 30788% 310 16% 44167% 10:00 a.m. 12727% 12124% 16850% 25996% 28817% 38468% 11:00 a.m. 8923% 10111% 14065% 22849% 23844% 38221% 12:00 p.m. 5523% 4990% 7021% 11797% 12048% 17725% 1:00 p.m. 6042% 6976% 11115% 19586% 19903% 31787% 2:00 p.m. 3328% 3325% 5007% 8422% 9 759% 14444% 3:00 p.m. 779% 865% 1405% 2616% 2918% 4574% 4:00 p.m. 1425% 1647% 2828% 5487% 6144% 9772% 5:00 p.m. 315% 351% 619% 1249% 1462% 2463%

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129 Table B 30 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 225 on 09/18/2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:00 a.m. 6298% 8435% 8273% 18555% 76862% 87679% 9:00 a.m. 6531% 8361% 7977% 17979% 68294% 77907% 10:00 a.m. 6306% 8302% 7823% 18933% 72731% 82968% 11:00 a.m. 5589% 7448% 7026% 18003% 69770% 82436% 12:00 p.m. 3143% 4319% 4386% 11741% 58667% 65416% 1:00 p.m. 3978% 5766% 6016% 17336% 84001% 103495% 2:00 p.m. 2504% 3426% 3448% 9561% 47635% 60134% 3:00 p.m. 650% 914% 959% 2873% 15553% 20146% 4:00 p.m. 1306% 1919% 201 7% 5696% 30587% 38639% 5:00 p.m. 218% 402% 455% 1519% 8743% 11529% Time SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 10 SP 11 SP 12 8:00 a.m. 4045% 5173% 9758% 7054% 9134% 15784% 9:00 a.m. 4159% 5145% 8879% 6848% 8551% 14016% 10:00 a.m. 4008% 4987% 8864% 6896% 9625% 15585% 11: 00 a.m. 3629% 4645% 8318% 6658% 9345% 16627% 12:00 p.m. 2209% 2897% 5630% 4274% 6058% 10686% 1:00 p.m. 2782% 4039% 8286% 6459% 9106% 18505% 2:00 p.m. 1898% 2477% 5087% 3647% 8750% 9980% 3:00 p.m. 415% 596% 1326% 1078% 1625% 3017% 4:00 p.m. 3544% 1560% 3336% 2748% 3964% 6903% 5:00 p.m. 152% 265% 727% 603% 1008% 1935%

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130 Table B 3 1 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels in room 238 on 09/18/2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 8:10 a.m. 46% 42% 8% 134% 12% 9:10 a.m. 36% 106% 126% 207% 517% 10:10 a.m. 131% 169% 217% 358% 867% 11:10 a.m. 260% 336% 401% 600% 1246% 12:10 p.m. 670% 921% 1093% 1521% 2971% 1:10 p.m. 653% 828% 922% 1279% 2580% 2:10 p.m. 740% 877% 933% 1279% 2498 % 3:10 p.m. 321% 372% 397% 555% 1151% 4:10 p.m. 1294% 1540% 1674% 2183% 4136% 5:10 p.m. 1219% 1350% 1351% 1647% 3013% Time SP 6 SP 7 SP 8 SP 9 SP 1 0 8:10 a.m. 124% 107% 86% 279% 396% 9:10 a.m. 136% 115% 118% 380% 603% 10:10 a.m. 202% 189% 197% 610% 972% 11:10 a.m. 368% 363% 372% 1004% 1506% 12:10 p.m. 1048% 1024% 921% 2374% 3192% 1:10 p.m. 959% 953% 891% 2232% 3173% 2:10 p.m. 990% 943% 874% 2207% 3084% 3:10 p.m. 464% 409% 378% 991% 1457% 4:10 p.m. 1867% 1787% 1607% 3822% 4995% 5:10 p.m. 1741% 1642% 1370% 3109% 3754% Table B 32 Percentage difference between field measurements (FM) and Ecotect measurements (EM) of illuminance levels under skylights and in corridor on 09/18/2010 Time SP 1 SP 2 SP 3 SP 4 SP 5 SP 6 8:15 a.m. 7259% 14159% 8187% 1 7168% 6793% 12115% 9:15 a.m. 4781% 9271% 5171% 11005% 4465% 8544% 10:15 a.m. 3193% 5866% 3391% 6824% 3183% 5605% 11:15 a.m. 2644% 4054% 2542% 4123% 2132% 4061% 12:15 p.m. 2013% 3595% 1962% 3988% 1973% 3728% 1:15 p.m. 2444% 5394% 2269% 6076% 2239% 5449 % 2:15 p.m. 2217% 4352% 1855% 4447% 1601% 4179% 3:15 p.m. 833% 1499% 874% 1638% 738% 1463% 4:15 p.m. 2692% 3987% 2708% 4359% 2622% 3931% 5:15 p.m. 5083% 6800% 4536% 6951% 4236% 5909%

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131 APPENDIX C ZONE PROPERTIES OF R INKER HALL Table C 1. Zon e p roper ties of Rinker Hall as i nput into Autodesk Ecotect Zone Floor Area (SF) Surface Area ( SF ) Exposed Area ( SF ) Window Area ( SF ) Volume ( CF ) HVAC System 0030 1485 5353 1915 0 18244 None 0030a 497 1790 478 0 3774 None 0106 955 3641 2292 326 10355 Air Conditioning 0110 1803 5806 2752 428 19066 Air Conditioning 0110a 73 625 175 0 931 Air Conditioning 0115 500 2356 1156 117 5337 Air Condit ioning 0125 1667 5464 2745 350 17889 Air Conditioning 0134 85 616 277 0 767 Air C onditioning 0136 296 1476 855 117 3784 Air Conditioning 0138 734 2872 1250 242 7846 Air Conditioning 0140 1331 4 729 2118 313 14687 Air Conditioning 0140a 436 1955 869 204 5582 Air Conditioning 0141 110 625 118 1 1036 Air Conditioning 0143 108 606 133 1 1021 Air Conditioning 0145 235 1296 746 27 2411 Air Conditioning 0146 27 8 1532 845 27 2921 Air Conditioning 0146a 73 607 167 0 938 Air Conditioning 0201 245 1176 740 60 2293 Air Conditioning 0202 595 2424 1526 121 5968 Air Conditioning 0203 929 3949 3360 788 9551 Air Conditio ning 0203a 147 729 335 0 1313 Air Conditioning 0204 214 927 452 0 1723 Air Conditioning 0205 29 327 73 0 363 Air Conditioning 0206 1191 4419 3422 516 11973 Air Conditioning 0207a 76 433 233 0 612 Air Conditioning 0208 438 1717 1114 121 4022 Air Conditio ning 0209 144 899 297 0 1821 Air Conditioning 0210 889 3418 2334 121 8895 Air Conditioning 0215 914 3457 2423 151 9205 Air Conditioning 0230 1006 3664 2806 151 10053 Air Co nditioning 0235 236 1395 785 60 2982 Air Conditioning 0235a 32 334 236 0 307 Air Conditioning 0238 1240 5359 3846 238 12615 Air Conditioning 0240 1435 5071 3634 301 14220 Air Conditioning

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132 0 245 208 1137 718 27 2065 Air Conditioning 0245a 25 302 86 0 315 Air Conditioning 0246 261 1362 1051 27 2619 Air Conditioning 0246a 23 214 46 0 202 Air Conditioning 0301 170 912 650 63 1600 Air Conditioni ng 0301a 456 1726 1080 0 4064 Air Conditioning 0302 259 1271 806 126 2478 Air Condit ioning 0303 656 2871 2392 531 6904 Air Conditioning 0305 1140 3879 2990 425 10608 Air Conditioning 0306 283 1466 1083 184 2592 Air Conditioning 0307 257 935 558 65 22 Air Condi tioning 0308 184 943 487 0 1644 Air Conditioning 0308a 69 598 381 0 882 Air Conditioning 0309 153 754 466 33 1368 Air Conditioning 0310 255 1089 882 48 2274 Air Conditioning 0311 152 750 462 33 1355 Air Conditioning 0312 277 1167 642 96 2465 Air Conditioning 0313 167 861 597 0 1487 Air Conditioning 0314 153 754 466 33 1368 Air Conditioning 0315 152 750 462 33 1355 Air Conditioning 0316 153 754 466 33 1368 Air Conditioning 0319 152 750 462 33 1355 Ai r Conditioning 0320 363 1400 1042 72 3234 Air Conditioning 0321 153 754 466 33 1368 Air Conditioning 0322 152 750 462 33 1355 Air Conditioning 0323 153 754 466 33 1368 Air Conditioning 0324 317 1267 766 72 2825 Air Conditioning 0325 152 750 462 33 1355 Air Conditioning 0326 3 17 1267 767 96 2825 Air Conditioning 0327 153 754 601 33 1368 Air Con ditioning 0328 434 1604 1217 96 3864 Air Conditioning 0331 153 754 601 33 1368 Air Cond itioning 0332 176 824 625 33 1567 Air Conditioning 0333 22 211 122 0 198 Air Conditioning 0334 253 1407 1236 0 3224 Air Conditioning 0336 533 2371 1759 126 5339 Air Condit ioning 0338 593 2446 1764 126 5948 Air Conditioning 0340 555 2357 1715 126 5453 Air Conditi oning 0341 597 2451 1843 126 6004 Air Conditioning 0342 164 886 526 63 1539 Air Conditioning 0343 75 59 3 517 0 958 Air Conditioning

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133 0344 165 894 524 63 1553 Air Conditioni ng 0345 225 1208 982 27 2233 Air Conditioning 0 345a 52 500 345 0 666 Air Conditioning 0346 269 1392 1054 27 2724 Air Conditioning C199d 4029 16248 8202 865 42509 Air Conditioning C299a 3027 12818 9530 281 30118 Air Conditioning S198a 194 1202 581 87 2484 None S298b 0 0 0 0 0 None S398a 197 1191 962 75 2516 None S398b 0 0 0 0 0 None T otal 39503 165338 102879 9123 400861

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134 APPENDIX D HVAC SYSTEM OPERATIO N SCHEDULE FOR RINKE R HALL Table D 1. HVAC system operation schedule for Rinker Hall on weekdays as i nput into Autodesk Ecotect Zone Temp. Range ( F) Operation Hours Temp. Range ( F) Op eration Hours 0030 64 74 00 24 64 74 00 24 0030a 64 74 00 24 64 74 00 24 0106 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0110 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0110a 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0115 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0125 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0134 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0136 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0138 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0140 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0140a 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0141 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0143 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0145 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0146 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0146a 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0201 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0202 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0203 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0203a 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0204 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0205 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0206 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0207a 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0208 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0209 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0210 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0215 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0230 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0235 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0235a 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0238 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0240 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06

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135 0 245 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0245a 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0246 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0246a 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0301 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0301a 71 7 4 06 23 64 88 23 06 0302 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0303 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0305 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0306 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0307 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0308 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0308a 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0309 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0310 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0311 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0312 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0313 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0314 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0315 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0316 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0319 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0320 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0321 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0322 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0323 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0324 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0325 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0326 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0327 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0328 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0331 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0332 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0333 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0334 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0336 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0338 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0340 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0341 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0342 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0343 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06

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136 0344 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0345 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0 345a 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 0346 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 C199d 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 C299a 71 74 06 23 64 88 23 06 S198a 64 74 00 24 64 74 00 24 S298b 64 74 00 24 64 74 00 24 S398a 64 74 00 24 64 74 00 24 S398b 64 74 00 24 64 74 00 24 Table D 2. HVAC system operation schedule for Rinker Hall on weekends as input into Autodesk Ecotect Zone Temp. Range ( F) Operation Hours Temp. Range ( F) Operation Hours 0030 64 74 00 24 64 74 00 24 0030a 64 74 00 24 64 74 00 24 0106 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0110 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0110a 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0115 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0125 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0134 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0136 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0138 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0140 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0140a 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0141 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0143 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0145 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0146 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0146a 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0201 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0202 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0203 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0203a 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 0 8 0204 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0205 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0206 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0207a 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0208 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08

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137 0209 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0210 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0215 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0230 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0235 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0235a 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0238 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0240 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0 245 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0245a 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0246 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0246a 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0301 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0301a 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0302 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0303 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0305 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0306 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0307 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0308 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0308a 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0309 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0310 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0311 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0312 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0313 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0314 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0315 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0316 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0319 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0320 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0321 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0322 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0323 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0324 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0325 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0326 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0327 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0328 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0331 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0332 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08

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138 0333 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0334 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0336 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0338 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0340 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0341 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0342 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0343 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0344 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0345 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0 345a 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 0346 71 7 4 08 19 64 88 19 08 C199d 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 C299a 71 74 08 19 64 88 19 08 S198a 64 74 00 24 64 74 19 08 S298b 64 74 00 24 64 74 19 08 S398a 64 74 00 24 64 74 19 08 S398b 64 74 00 24 64 74 19 08

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139 LIST OF REFERENCES Autodesk 2010. Autodesk Revit Architecture Retrieved 10 07, 2010, from http://images.autodesk.com/adsk/files/autodesk_revit_architecture_2011_brochur e.pdf Booth, D., Booth, J., & Boyles, P. 1983. Sun/Earth Buffering and Superinsulatio n. Canterbury: Community Builders. Christian, J. (2005). Ultra low Energy Residences. ASHRAE Journal 20 26. Clinton, J., Geller, H., & Hirst, E. 1986 Review of Government and Utility Energy Conservation Programs,. Annual Review of Energy 11 pp. 95 142 Facilities and Planning Department, 2010 Facilities and Planning Department (University of Florida) Retrieved 05 10, 2010, from http://www.facilities.ufl.edu/sustain/certified.htm Geller, H., Harrington, P., Rosenfeld, A., Tanishima, S., & Urander, F. 2006. Policies for Increasing Energy Efficiency: Thirty Years of Experience in OECD Countries. Energy Policy 34 95 142. Glavic, P., & Lukman, R. 2007. Review of Sustainability Terms and their Definitions. Journal of Cleaner Production 1875 1885. Hebden, S. 2006. Invest in Clean Technology says IEA Report. Retrieved 10 05, 2010, from Science and Development Network: http://www.scidev.net/en/news/invest in clean technology says iea report.html Hessami, A., Hsu, F., & Jahankhani, H. 2009. A Systems Framework for Sustainbility. Global security, safety, and sustainbilty 45 76 94. Hviid, C., Nielsen, T., & Svendsen, S. 2008. Simple Tool to Evaluate the Impact of Daylight on Building Energy Consumption. 82 IEA, I nternational Energy Agency, 2010. (OE CD/IEA) Retrieved 10 05, 2010, from http://www.iea.org/about/docs/iea2008.pdf Krygiel, E., & Nies, B. 2008 Green BIM: Successful Sustainable Design with Buiding Information Modeling. Wiley Publishing, Inc. Losonczi, 2001. transmitting Concrete (Litracon Kft. (Ltd)) Retrieved 10 05, 2010, from Litracon: http://www.litracon.hu/product.php?id=7 Mueller, H ., 2007. What is Zero energy House ? Boulder Green Journal. 31. Nabil, A., & Mardaljevic, J. 2005. Useful Daylight Illuminance: A New Paradigm for Assessing Daylight in Buildings. Lighting Research and Technology 37

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140 Nadel, S. 2004. Supplementary Information on Energy Efficiency for the National Commission on Energy Policy. American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. Washigton. N IBS, 2007. National Building Information Modeling Standard. USA. Puchall, L. 2005. Green Building (Architecture Week) Retrieved 05 10, 2010, from http://www.architectureweek.com/2005/0309/environment_1 2.html Reinhart, C., Mardaljevic, J., & Rogers, Z. 2006. Dynamic Daylight Performance Metrics for Sustainable Building. LEUKOS Parker, D.S., J.P. Dunlop, J.R. Sherwin, S.F. Barkaszi, Jr., M.P. Anello, S. Durand, D. Metzger, J.K. Sonne,. 1998. Field Evaluation of Efficient Building Technology with Photovol taic Power Production in New Florida Residential Housing. Florida Solar Energy Center. Report No. FSEC CR 1044 98. USGBC. 2010. USGBC: About USGBC Retrieved September 09, 2010, from https://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=124 Voss Lapsa, M. 200 7. Hybrid Solar Lighting Illuminates Energy Savings for Government Facilities. Oak Ridge: U.S. Department of Energy. WCED, W. C. 1987. Our Common Future. USA: Oxford University Press. Worster, D. 1994. Nature's Economy: A History of Ecological Ideas. Cam bridge University Press.

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141 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH Prasanthi Reddy Vangimalla was born in Nellore India. After completing high school in a small town in India, she w ent on to receive her Bachelor of Architecture degree from Hindustan College of Engineering a ffiliated to Anna University in Chennai India After graduation she went on to work with multinational design build firms as architect for a period of two years. During this time, she worked on different types of commercial, residential and institutiona l buildings including a 40 acre township development project for the Visakapatnam Urban Development Authority (VUDA) in which she managed a team of four while designing the buildings, producing working drawings and attending client meetings under the guid ance of the p rincipal a rchitect. In the fall of 2008 she traveled to the United States to attend graduate school She received her Master of Science in Building C onstruction degree from the University of Florida in fall 2010 During her time at Universit y of Florida, she work ed part time as a graduate tea ching assistant for the course computer and graphic c ommunication s where she instructed and assist ed students in understanding and operating BIM (building information modeling) software such as Autode s k Revit and in navigating tools such as Google SketchUp. In addition, she volunteers for Neutral Gator, a non profit organization working to offset carbon emissions. She has a passion for photograph y and loves to both travel and cook. She is eager to ent er into a professional career in building construction specializing in BIM