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Factors controlling phosphorus removal in large constructed wetlands in South Florida

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042248/00001

Material Information

Title: Factors controlling phosphorus removal in large constructed wetlands in South Florida
Physical Description: 1 online resource (117 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Jerauld, Michael
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2010

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Soil and Water Science -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Soil and Water Science thesis, M.S.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The Florida Everglades is an oligotrophic, subtropical wetland extremely susceptible eutrophication from anthropogenic phosphorus (P) inputs. Six large treatment marshes (total effective treatment area 18,000 ha), called Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs), have been constructed over the last fifteen years to remove P from agricultural runoff before it enters the Everglades. Because of the massive investment to build and maintain these wetlands, it is important to evaluate the factors that contribute to their performance. Naturally, each STA had a different performance record. This study attempted to account for those differences by investigating 1) the relative wetted area (RWA), 2) the relationship between the total P (TP) areal loading rate (ALR) and the outflow TP concentration and 3) the wetland characteristics co-variant with the outflow TP concentration and the TP areal settling rate. The RWA was determined by subtracting the elevation distribution function from the average water level (stage). The RWA was less than 1.0 in 230 out of 1044 (22%) of months. The TPALR was not statistically different when calculated with the RWA rather than the nominal area; the nominal area was deemed sufficient for most loading rate calculations. Among months with substantial re-flooding (n = 39), the TP areal settling rate was negatively correlated with the magnitude of the re-flooding event (r = -0.605, p < 0.0001). In most of the STAs, the monthly outflow TP concentration was uncorrelated to the monthly TPALR. The vegetation type (submerged vs. emergent) and the magnitude of the loading rate were hypothesized to contribute to this uncoupling, but neither played a quantifiable role. The cause of this independence remains unclear. Possibly, the Damko umlauthler number (areal settling rate divided by hydraulic loading rate) was sufficiently high in most STAs such that wetland factors other than the loading rate and settling rate tended to control the outflow TP concentration. Through multiple linear regression, five variables (inflow TP concentration, change in monthly wetted area, hydraulic residence time, wetland age and inflow Ca concentration) were found to explain 32% of the variability in the monthly outflow TP concentration. Six factors (hydraulic loading rate, inflow dissolved organic P fraction, inflow particulate P fraction, wetland age, outflow water temperature and TPALR) accounted for 51% of the variation in the monthly TP areal settling rate. The proportion of explained variability may be improved in future analyses by including variables not considered herein. Additional research is needed to confidently identify the factors that control the outflow TP concentration.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Michael Jerauld.
Thesis: Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 2010.
Local: Adviser: Jawitz, James W.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2011-02-28

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2010
System ID: UFE0042248:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042248/00001

Material Information

Title: Factors controlling phosphorus removal in large constructed wetlands in South Florida
Physical Description: 1 online resource (117 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Jerauld, Michael
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2010

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Soil and Water Science -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Soil and Water Science thesis, M.S.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The Florida Everglades is an oligotrophic, subtropical wetland extremely susceptible eutrophication from anthropogenic phosphorus (P) inputs. Six large treatment marshes (total effective treatment area 18,000 ha), called Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs), have been constructed over the last fifteen years to remove P from agricultural runoff before it enters the Everglades. Because of the massive investment to build and maintain these wetlands, it is important to evaluate the factors that contribute to their performance. Naturally, each STA had a different performance record. This study attempted to account for those differences by investigating 1) the relative wetted area (RWA), 2) the relationship between the total P (TP) areal loading rate (ALR) and the outflow TP concentration and 3) the wetland characteristics co-variant with the outflow TP concentration and the TP areal settling rate. The RWA was determined by subtracting the elevation distribution function from the average water level (stage). The RWA was less than 1.0 in 230 out of 1044 (22%) of months. The TPALR was not statistically different when calculated with the RWA rather than the nominal area; the nominal area was deemed sufficient for most loading rate calculations. Among months with substantial re-flooding (n = 39), the TP areal settling rate was negatively correlated with the magnitude of the re-flooding event (r = -0.605, p < 0.0001). In most of the STAs, the monthly outflow TP concentration was uncorrelated to the monthly TPALR. The vegetation type (submerged vs. emergent) and the magnitude of the loading rate were hypothesized to contribute to this uncoupling, but neither played a quantifiable role. The cause of this independence remains unclear. Possibly, the Damko umlauthler number (areal settling rate divided by hydraulic loading rate) was sufficiently high in most STAs such that wetland factors other than the loading rate and settling rate tended to control the outflow TP concentration. Through multiple linear regression, five variables (inflow TP concentration, change in monthly wetted area, hydraulic residence time, wetland age and inflow Ca concentration) were found to explain 32% of the variability in the monthly outflow TP concentration. Six factors (hydraulic loading rate, inflow dissolved organic P fraction, inflow particulate P fraction, wetland age, outflow water temperature and TPALR) accounted for 51% of the variation in the monthly TP areal settling rate. The proportion of explained variability may be improved in future analyses by including variables not considered herein. Additional research is needed to confidently identify the factors that control the outflow TP concentration.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Michael Jerauld.
Thesis: Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 2010.
Local: Adviser: Jawitz, James W.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2011-02-28

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2010
System ID: UFE0042248:00001


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FACTORS CONTROLLING PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL
IN LARGE CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS IN SOUTH FLORIDA





















By

MICHAEL JERAULD


A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT
OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF
MASTER OF SCIENCE

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

2010


































2010 Michael Jerauld


































To the people and places in this world in need of our mercy









ACKNOWLEDGMENTS


Without a doubt, my first and sincerest thanks are due to my parents. Only with their

unending support has the success of my last 24 years been possible. I owe the same debt of

gratitude to my extraordinary wife, Sarah, who forfeited countless evenings, weekends and

getaways with me, to see my completion of this degree. I recognize also that this degree would

not have been possible without the lavish love of my God.

My advisor, Dr. James Jawitz, deserves no less than the highest praise, not only for his

keen scientific eye, but for his unwavering patience and faultless advice as I progressed through

my studies. His ability to unify criticism, instruction, and praise is unmatched in my experience.

His influence magnified the value of all other aspects of my education at the University of

Florida and all my future work will testify to the quality of his guidance. He has earned my

deepest respect.

Each of the members of my advisory committee contributed significantly and uniquely to

my training. Dr. K. Ramesh Reddy generously offered his extensive understanding of wetland

biogeochemistry though both his lecture course and his critiques of my work throughout my

tenure here. It was a pleasure to work closely with Dr. Reddy on the project with which I began

this degree. It was perhaps Dr. Mark Clark's passion and enthusiasm for wetlands that drew me

into the field. I will long measure myself against his remarkable energy and his drive to affect

real change in this world. Dr. Mike Annable provided me a firm foundation in wetland

hydrology that was indispensable to my work.

I would be amiss to exclude my excellent friends and colleagues, with whom I exchanged

many insightful conversations over lunches eaten on the lawn. I am indebted to Rupesh Bhomia,

for his overwhelming kindness (and excellent cooking); to R.J. Sindelar for being ever ready for









racquetball and cycling; to Luke Gommermann for the constant assistance he provides to those

around him; to Moshe Doron for many laughs and his unique perspective on the world; to Davie

Kadyampakeni for his undying and infectious cheerfulness; and to Alex Cheesman for

demonstrating his friendship by bearing too many jokes about "lift" and "torch". Each of these,

and many more not mentioned here, deserves much credit for lightening the burden of graduate

school. Much gratitude is also due Rajendra Paudel and Rupesh Bhomia, once more, for their

GIS and soils analyses, respectively, that enabled much of this work.

Finally, I was fortunate enough to interact with several professional wetland scientists,

each of whom was instrumental in my graduate education. Dr. Robert Knight, of Wetland

Solutions Inc., graciously shared his advice and expertise and his passion for treatment wetlands.

Any success I achieve in the field will be due, in large part, to his mentoring. Mike Korvela and

Dr. Mike Chimney, of the South Florida Water Management District went to great lengths to

collate and provide the vast datasets investigated in this thesis and offered their invaluable advice

without hesitation.










TABLE OF CONTENTS

page

A C K N O W L E D G M E N T S ..............................................................................................................4

T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S ........................................................ .........................................6

LIST OF TA BLE S .................................................................................................. 9

LIST OF FIGURES .................................. .. .... ..... ................... 10

L IST O F A B B R E V IA T IO N S .... ..... ................................................................ ... .................. 11

A B S T R A C T ......... ....................... ............................................................ 12

CHAPTER

1 INTRODUCTION .................. ................... ...........................................14

Phosphorus C cycling in W wetlands ............................................................................ ............14
Methods ........................................ 18
S ite D e sc rip tio n ............................................................................................................... 1 8
D ata S o u rc e s .........................................................................................19
C a lcu latio n s .............................................................................2 0
Hydraulic flows .................................... ......................... ... ......... 20
Water column chemical and physical properties ...............................................21
W etland chem ical and physical properties............................................. 23
Wetland performance models..................... ...............23
T im e-Step Selection ................................................................24
D ata S c re e n in g .................................................................................................................2 6

2 INFLUENCE OF WETTED AREA ON PHOSPHORUS DYNAMICS IN THE
STORMWATER TREATMENT AREAS ......................................................................31

In tro d u ctio n ................... ................... ...................1..........
O bje ctiv e s ................... ...................3...................3..........
M eth o d s ........................................................................3 4
Calculation of the W etted A rea .............................................................. ............... 34
Statistical A nalyses................................................... 36
R results and D iscu ssion ................................................. ........ ............. ............... 36
Characterization of Elevation Distribution and Wetted Area in the STAs ...................36
Relative Wetted Area and Total Phosphorus Removal Performance .............................37
Relative Wetted Area and Total Phosphorus Mass Loading Rate ................................40
C onclu sions.......... ..........................................................43

3 ASSOCIATION BETWEEN LOADING RATE AND OUTFLOW
CONCENTRATION IN THE STORMWATER TREATMENT AREAS ............................52









Intro du action .................. ........... ....................................................................................... 52
O bjectiv es ....................... ..........................55..........
M e th o d s ...........................................................................5 5
V vegetation .................................................. .. ....... .......................... ...............55
Outflow Concentration and Total Phosphorus Areal Loading Rate................................57
Results and Discussion ...................................... .......................... 57
Outflow Concentration- Areal Loading Relationship ...................................... 57
Effect of vegetation type and cover ................................57
Effect of areal total phosphorus loading rate ........................................ ....58
Factors Controlling the Apparent Background Concentration ..... ............... ..60
Inflow phosphorus fractions .......................................... .... ........... 60
Long-term real loading ........ .................................... ...............61
S e a so n a lity ......................................................................................... 6 3
C onclusions......................................... .................... 65

4 MULTIPLE LINEAR REGRESSION TO DETERMINE FACTORS CONTROLLING
PHOSPHORUS CONCENTRATION AND SETTLING RATE IN THE
STORMWATER TREATMENT AREAS ....................................................... 72

In tro du ctio n ................... ...................7...................2..........
O bje ctiv e s ................... ...................7...................4..........
M methods .................... ................................... ..................... 74
M multiple Linear Regression ................................................................... 74
V ariab les C o n sid ered ................................................................................................. 7 6
k-C* m odel term s ............................................................................. 77
Inflow phosphorus fractions ............................................................ ............77
W etland age and soil phosphorus ................................................................. 78
C calcium and pH ...........................................................79
W after tem p eratu re ....................................................... ................ .. .................... 80
Relative w etted area and w after depth..................................................................... ...80
R results and D discussion .......................................... ................................... ............... 81
Outflow Total Phosphorus Concentration: All Cells ................................................81
Outflow Total Phosphorus Concentration: Cells with Non-significant r'-values ...........83
Outflow Total Phosphorus Concentration: Single Cell ................................................ 85
Total Phosphorus Areal Settling Rate: All Cells......................................................86
Total Phosphorus Areal Settling Rate: Single Cell ............... .................................... 88
Limitations and Future Application of the Multiple Regression Technique ................ 88
Conclusions................................................... .. .......... .... .. ..... ......... 90

5 C O N C L U SIO N S ............................................................................................ 103

Inflow Total Phosphorus Concentration........................ ............... ............... 104
Hydraulic and Total Phosphorus Loading Rates ................. ............. ....................105
Inflow Phosphorus Fractions .................... ............... ................. 105
W etland A ge and Soil Phosphorus ............................................ .................... .....106
C calcium and pH ................................................................................ 107
W after T em perature ............................................................................................ 107


7









Relative Wetted Area and Water Depth .................................................................108

APPENDIX: DATA SCREENING CRITERIA.......................................................................110

L IST O F R E F E R E N C E S .................................................................................. ..................... 112

B IO G R A PH IC A L SK E T C H ......................................................................... ........................ 117
















































8









LIST OF TABLES
Table page

2-1 Average annual relative wetted area by water year for each cell in the Stormwater
Treatm ent Areas ....................... ......... ...... ................. ..........45

2-2 Intra-annual trends in relative wetted area........... ................................................46

2-3 Changes in the coefficients of correlation for different subsets of data. .........................47

3-1 Coefficients of correlation between monthly outflow total phosphorus (TP)
concentration and monthly TP areal loading rate (ALR) within each cell .......................67

4-1 Coefficients of determination (r2) of multiple linear regression models explaining the
monthly outflow total phosphorus concentration in all cells.........................................93

4-2 Estimates of parameters for the model explaining monthly outflow total phosphorus
(TP) concentration in all cells. ............................................ ..........................................94

4-3 Coefficients of determination (r2) of multiple linear regression models explaining the
monthly outflow total phosphorus concentration in all cells with non-significant r'-
v alu es .......................................................... ...................................9 5

4-4 Estimates of parameters for the model explaining outflow total phosphorus (TP)
concentration in all cells with non-significant r'-values........................................96

4-5 Estimates of parameters for the model explaining outflow total phosphorus (TP)
concentration in STA -1W Cell 1. ............................................. ............................. 97

4-6 Coefficients of determination (r2) of multiple linear regression models explaining the
monthly total phosphorus (TP) areal settling rate in all cells ........................................98

4-7 Estimates of parameters for the model explaining the monthly total phosphorus areal
settling rate in all cells. .......................... ...... .........................................99

4-8 Estimates of parameters for the model explaining monthly total phosphorus (TP)
real settling rate in STA -1W Cell 1.......................................... .......................... 100









LIST OF FIGURES
Figure page

1-1 Phosphorus (P) cycle in surface flow wetlands.. ....................................... ...............28

1-2 Map showing the locations of the six Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs), the
Everglades Agricultural Area and the Everglades Protection Area in South Florida........29

1-3 Schematics of the configuration of the treatment cells within each Stormwater
Treatm ent A rea (STA ) ................... .... .... .................... .. ........... ............... 30

2-1 Cumulative elevation distribution for each cell in the Stormwater Treatment Areas........48

2-2 Relative wetted area in each of the Stormwater Treatment Areas.......................... 49

2-3 Histogram of monthly relative wetted area (determined by the elevation distribution)
values across all non-screened months and all included cells. ........................................50

2-4 Monthly relative wetted area (determined by the elevation distribution) with respect
to monthly hydraulic loading for all non-screened months and all included cells. ...........51

3-1 When a wetland treats to background concentration (C*), the areal loading rate
(ALR) does not affect the outflow concentration. .................................. .................68

3-2 Correlation between outflow total phosphorus (TP) concentration and TP mass
loading rate with respect to submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) coverage ....................69

3-3 Correlation between outflow total phosphorus (TP) concentration and TP areal
loading rate (ALR) as a function of the average annual TPALR ...................................69

3-4 Outflow total phosphorus (TP) concentration with respect to the correlation
coefficient between the TP areal loading rate (TPALR) and the outflow TP
concentration s. .......................................................... ................. 70

3-5 Period-of-record (POR) flow-weighted mean outflow total phosphorus (TP)
concentration as a function of the POR average annual TP areal loading rate..................70

3-6 Monthly average temperature (C) of inflow and outflow water in STA-1W Cell 4........71

4-1 Changes in the coefficient of determination (r2) with increasing complexity of the
model explaining monthly outflow TP concentration in all cells.................................101

4-2 Changes in the coefficient of determination (r2) with increasing model complexity of
the model explaining the monthly total phosphorus settling rate in all cells.................102









LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

ALR Areal loading rate

Ca MR Calcium mass retention

CDF Cumulative distribution function

CFW Central Flow-way

DIP Dissolved inorganic phosphorus

DOP Dissolved organic phosphorus

EAA Everglades Agricultural Area

EAV Emergent aquatic vegetation

NFW North Flow-way

P Phosphorus

PIP Particulate inorganic phosphorus

POP Particulate organic phosphorus

POR Period of record

PP Particulate phosphorus

RWA Relative wetted area

SAV Submerged aquatic vegetation

SFWMD South Florida Water Management District

SRP Soluble reactive phosphorus

STA Stormwater treatment area

TDP Total dissolved phosphorus

TP Total phosphorus

TPALR Total phosphorus areal loading rate

WA Wetted area









Abstract of Thesis Presented to the Graduate School
of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the
Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science

FACTORS CONTROLLING PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL
IN LARGE CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS IN SOUTH FLORIDA

By

Michael Jerauld

August 2010
Chair: James Jawitz
Major: Soil and Water Science

The Florida Everglades is an oligotrophic, subtropical wetland extremely susceptible

eutrophication from anthropogenic phosphorus (P) inputs. Six large treatment marshes (total

effective treatment area 18,000 ha), called Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs), have been

constructed over the last fifteen years to remove P from agricultural runoff before it enters the

Everglades. Because of the massive investment to build and maintain these wetlands, it is

important to evaluate the factors that contribute to their performance. Naturally, each STA had a

different performance record. This study attempted to account for those differences by

investigating 1) the relative wetted area (RWA), 2) the relationship between the total P (TP) areal

loading rate (ALR) and the outflow TP concentration and 3) the wetland characteristics co-

variant with the outflow TP concentration and the TP areal settling rate.

The RWA was determined by subtracting the elevation distribution function from the

average water level (stage). The RWA was less than 1.0 in 230 out of 1044 (22%) of months.

The TPALR was not statistically different when calculated with the RWA rather than the

nominal area; the nominal area was deemed sufficient for most loading rate calculations. Among

months with substantial re-flooding (n = 39), the TP areal settling rate was negatively correlated

with the magnitude of the re-flooding event (r = -0.605, p < 0.0001).









In most of the STAs, the monthly outflow TP concentration was uncorrelated to the

monthly TPALR. The vegetation type (submerged vs. emergent) and the magnitude of the

loading rate were hypothesized to contribute to this uncoupling, but neither played a quantifiable

role. The cause of this independence remains unclear. Possibly, the Damkohler number (areal

settling rate divided by hydraulic loading rate) was sufficiently high in most STAs such that

wetland factors other than the loading rate and settling rate tended to control the outflow TP

concentration.

Through multiple linear regression, five variables (inflow TP concentration, change in

monthly wetted area, hydraulic residence time, wetland age and inflow Ca concentration) were

found to explain 32% of the variability in the monthly outflow TP concentration. Six factors

(hydraulic loading rate, inflow dissolved organic P fraction, inflow particulate P fraction,

wetland age, outflow water temperature and TPALR) accounted for 51% of the variation in the

monthly TP areal settling rate. The proportion of explained variability may be improved in future

analyses by including variables not considered herein.

Additional research is needed to confidently identify the factors that control the outflow TP

concentration.









CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION

Phosphorus (P) is a naturally occurring, abundant element required by all forms of life. In

the natural environment, the biosphere obtains P weathered from minerals. Typically, hydrologic

flows transport P from uplands to aquatic environments, often via wetland ecotones. Excess P

applied to the landscape (often as fertilizer) can join this migration and frequently contributes to

eutrophication of downstream water bodies. In the landscape, mediating wetlands can serve as P

sinks, dampening the transfer of P into aquatic systems (Richardson, 1999) and natural wetlands

have long been used as receiving sites for point discharges of wastewater (Kadlec and Wallace,

2008). From this insight, it followed that wetlands could be employed to reduce P loads to

downstream ecosystems, and many wetlands have been restored or constructed for the purpose of

water treatment (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). Treatment wetlands as a technology have

progressed from being first a novelty, past trial pilot systems, to a point where optimization and

diversity of application has become the focus (e.g. Mitsch et al., 1995; Kadlec and Knight, 1996;

Higgins et al., 2000; Braskerud, 2002a; Turner et al., 2006; Vymazal, 2007; Kadlec and Wallace,

2008). Understanding and quantifying the internal P processing mechanisms are essential to

maximizing treatment wetland P removal and retention.

Phosphorus Cycling in Wetlands

Phosphorus is found in wide variety of biological molecules beyond the notable examples

including DNA and ATP (Turner and Newman, 2005). Phosphorus is also chemically active and

may be found in myriad minerals in association with Ca, Mg, Fe, Al (Reddy et al, 1999). It is

convenient to classify these many forms of P by their physical, chemical or operational

characteristics. Many taxonomic schemes exist, but four broad P pools are commonly

conceptualized: dissolved inorganic P (DIP), dissolved organic P (DOP), particulate inorganic P









(PIP) and particulate organic P (POP) (Reddy and DeLaune, 2008). In each of these terms,

"dissolved" and "particulate" distinguish particles that do and do not pass through a filter

membrane (pore size typically, but not always, 0.45 [im), respectively. For methodological

convenience, the following pools are often determined for water-column P: soluble reactive P

(SRP), dissolved organic P (DOP) and particulate P (PP). These groups are somewhat

operationally defined (i.e. the boundaries of these groups depend more on analytical technique

than the chemical or physical properties of the compounds). Soluble reactive P is composed

mainly of orthophosphate (P04-P) (Reddy and DeLaune, 2008) but may include some readily

hydrolysable organic P (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). Particulate P encompasses all P-containing

molecules larger than 0.45 im.

Commonly, P is not limiting in wetlands, although the Florida Everglades are a well-

known exception. Phosphorus enters wetlands through surface water, groundwater, wet and dry

atmospheric deposition, and biological transfers (e.g. guano production). Surface water flow

dominates the P budget in many treatment wetlands (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). Within

wetlands, P is cycled between various storage compartments at rates which depend on the

physical, chemical and biological conditions (Figure 1-1). The net effect of these P

transformations determines the status of a given wetland as a source or sink of P. Wetlands have

been successful as a P treatment technology because often the P processing results in net storage

or P within the system. Four broad processes that contribute to P retention in wetlands: sorption

to soil solids, sedimentation, co-precipitation and biological uptake. Various physical, chemical

and biological characteristics inhibit or enhance each of these processes in a given wetland.

The movements of P on and off charged sites on the surface of soil solids are called

adsorption and desorption, respectively (Reddy and DeLaune, 2008). Froelich (1988) described









two steps in the sorption process. First, following changes in pore water P concentration (e.g. in

response to novel anthropogenic P loads) adsorption/desorption equilibria are reached within

minutes or hours (Froelich, 1988). Reddy and DeLaune (2008) note "The balance between P

adsorption and desorption maintains the equilibrium between solid phases and P in soil pore

water." Second, absorption, the "solid-state diffusion of adsorbed phosphate from the surface

into the interior of particles" occurs over days to months (Froelich, 1988). Generally, sorption is

limited to SRP and some reactive components of DOP (Anderson and Magdoff, 2005). The net

direction of the flux (on or off the soil) is controlled by the pore water P concentration and the

affinity of the soil particles for P ions. In wetlands, the amount of P that can be adsorbed to the

soils is often related to the amount of iron and aluminum in the soil (Lijklema, 1977). In South

Florida wetlands, soil calcium is an important determinant of soil P sorption capacity (Reddy et

al., 1998). Soil adsorption is not considered a sustainable P removal mechanism in treatment

wetlands due to the relatively fast reaction time and the finite sorption capacity (Kadlec and

Wallace, 2008).

The inflow water to wetlands often contains suspended solids, some of which contain P.

The aggregate of suspended solids often includes eroded soil particles, macrophyte detritus, and

algae or other plankton cells (Stuck et al., 2001). Wetlands function to remove suspended

particles primarily by reducing water velocity (by low elevation gradients and drag caused by

dense plant stems) such that gravity allows the particles to settle out. This removal is enhanced

by the trapping of particles within benthic litter and on biofilms (Schmid et al., 2005).

Sedimentation of suspended solids can account for a significant portion of total phosphorus (TP)

removal, and sustainability is constrained only by changes in bottom elevation (due to sediment

accretion) that prevent surface water flows (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008).









An additional pathway of removal is the precipitation of P with Ca, Fe, Al or Mg cations

(Reddy and DeLaune, 2008). It may be difficult to quantify precipitation separately from

adsorption, since the precipitates often form on the surfaces of soil particles. Reddy and DeLaune

(2008) provided a thorough discussion of P co-precipitation in wetlands, particularly regarding

the conditions that promote P co-precipitation with each of the identified cations. Generally,

acidic conditions promote the co-precipitation of P with Fe and Al, and alkaline environments

support the formation of P-Ca and P-Mg precipitates. In wetlands, both apatite (Ca5(C1)(PO4)3)

and hydroxylapatite (Ca5(OH)(PO4)3) are notable precipitates (Reddy and D'Angelo, 1994). Co-

precipitation with Ca may be particularly important for P dynamics in the Everglades; Reddy et

al. (1993) found a linear correlation between P and Ca accumulation in Everglades soils.

Apparently promoted by the consumption of carbonate ions by submerged photosynthesizers, the

precise mechanism of the P-Ca interaction may be either adsorption of P onto the surface of

CaCO3 precipitates or the formation of mixed crystals during co-precipitation (Otsuki and

Wetzel, 1972; Scinto, 1997).

The P requirement of all organisms combined with the high productivity of wetland

primary producers makes biological uptake an important mechanism of wetland P removal.

Algae and other microorganisms can consume significant amounts of P very rapidly; for

example, a diverse algal community reduced mesocosm water column P concentrations from

1,100 gg/L to 50 pg/L in 28 days (Havens et al., 1999). Plants and microorganisms typically can

utilize only SRP directly. Other forms of P must first be hydrolyzed before they can be taken up

biologically. In wetlands, much of this SRP is promptly transformed into PP (Noe et al., 2003).

Many studies have investigated the P uptake potential of wetland plants (e.g. Reddy and DeBusk,

1985; Tanner, 1996). Nearly all of the P incorporated into microbial biomass and most of the









macrophyte-P is returned to the P cycle through decomposition (Reddy et al., 1995; Kadlec and

Wallace, 2008). However, the anaerobic condition resulting from flooding slows decomposition

and promotes organic matter accumulation. The P stored in refractory biomass compounds

contributes to the long-term sustainable P removal by burial in accrued sediments.

The conditions supporting and enhancing each of these P removal mechanisms vary from

wetland to wetland depending in large part on soil characteristics, vegetation type and density

and water column chemistry, including cation availability and the distribution of the TP pool

among the various functional P forms. Maximizing P treatment in wetlands requires an

understanding and quantification (and manipulation) of the relative contributions of each of these

processes to net P removal.

Methods

Site Description

Over the past 15 years, 6 treatment marshes, called Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs)

have been constructed in South Florida to capture P from agricultural runoff before it enters the

Florida Everglades, an oligotrophic wetland susceptible to anthropogenic eutrophication

(Chimney and Goforth, 2001). Many investigations have demonstrated P enrichment and the

associated disruption of the existing ecosystems in the Everglades (see Reddy and DeLaune,

2008, for a comprehensive review of these works). In particular, most notable to the lay

observer, is the shift from saw grass (Cladiumjamaicense Crantz) prairies to dense monotypic

cattail (Typha spp.) stands. The Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA), comprising 280,000 ha and

approximately 27% of the original Everglades expanse, is a rich producer of sugarcane and

winter vegetable crops (Reddy and DeLaune, 2008), and the primary source of P to the

Everglades and to the STAs (Pietro et al., 2009).









The STAs are strategically located, spatially and hydrologically, between the EAA and the

remnants of the Everglades, now broadly defined by the Everglades Protection Area (Figure

1-2). Altogether, the 6 STAs have a total footprint of over 26,000 ha, with more than 18,000 ha

of effective treatment area, subdivided into 35 cells (Figure 1-3; Pietro et al., 2009). The balance

of the land area is consumed by roads, levees, pump stations and other infrastructure. As of 2009,

the STAs had retained over 1,200 metric tons of P since the inception of the Everglades Nutrient

Removal Project (the forerunner to the STA project) in 1994 (Pietro et al., 2010). Over the same

time period, flow-weighted mean TP concentration was reduced from 0.143 mg/L to 0.040 mg/L

(Pietro et al., 2010).

This report took advantage of the water and P mass balance data compiled by Chimney

(2009). It was therefore constrained to the cells for which data were reported in Chimney (2009).

Excluded cells are indicated in Figure 1-3. Some currently subdivided cells were treated as

combined larger units (e.g. Cell 1A and Cell 1B of STA-5 were considered together as the North

Flow-way (NFW)). This was necessary to maintain longer records in cells that had been

subdivided after startup or in cases where data were not available at the levee between sub-cells.

Data Sources

South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) staff collect daily flow and weekly

or biweekly water quality data for all STA cells. The data were retrieved from the publicly-

accessible, online database, DBHYDRO, maintained by SFWMD.

Data from topographic surveys of each STA cell were provided by SFWMD.

Vegetation coverage data, including maps generated from aerial images and field survey

results were produced and collected, respectively, by various contractors hired by SFWMD. The

data were made available to this project by SFWMD.









Calculations

Several physical and chemical characteristics of the STAs were important to multiple

aspects of this study. For convenience, the methods employed to calculate each relevant

parameter are described here.

Hydraulic flows

Daily inflow and outflow volumes were summed to determine the total flows for each

period of interest:


Q1= Ql, (1-1)
ti

t2
Q2 = Q2 (1-2)
t\

where tl = starting date of the period of interest, t2 = end date of the period of interest, Q1 = total

inflow volume in the period of interest[L3/T], Q2 = total outflow volume in the period of

interest[L3/T], Qlt = inflow volume on day t [L3/T] and Q2t = outflow volume on day t [L3/T].

The hydraulic loading rate (q) is the rainfall equivalent [L/T] of the inflow volume:

01
q= (1-3)

where A = wetland area [L2]. Chapter 2 provides a discussion of methods for calculating A.

The nominal hydraulic residence time (z) is an estimate of the travel time [T] required for

an average packet of water to pass through the wetland:

Ah h
-r <(1-4)
where h mean water depth [L].
where h = mean water depth [L].









Water column chemical and physical properties

Weekly and bi-weekly composite samples were linearly interpolated to estimate daily TP

concentrations. Similarly, weekly and bi-weekly grab samples were linearly interpolated to

estimate daily SRP, total dissolved P (TDP) and Ca concentrations. These daily values were

flow-weighted to calculate average inflow and outflow concentrations for larger time steps. The

same method of flow-weighting was employed for all constituents:

C1= QltClt
Cl (1-5)


2C Q C2
C2= 2 (1-6)
Zt Q2t

where Cl = flow-weighted mean inflow concentration in the period of interest [M/L3], C2 =

flow-weighted mean outflow concentration in the period of interest [M/L3], Clt = estimated

inflow concentration on day t [M/L3] and C2t = estimated outflow concentration on day t [M/L3].

In cells with multiple inflow or outflow stations, concentration values were again flow-weighted

by station to estimate a single average value for each cell.

Inflow and outflow concentrations of the P forms DOP and PP were calculated by

difference using measured TP, TDP and SRP values:

C1DOP= ClTDp-ClsRP ( 1-7)

C2DOP= C2TDP-C2SRP ( 1-8 )

CIpp= CITP-CITDP ( 1-9 )

C2pp= C2TP-C2TDP (1-10 )

where C1DOP = inflow DOP concentration [M/L3], Clpp = inflow PP concentration [M/L3], C1SRP

= inflow SRP concentration [M/L3], C1TDP = inflow TDP concentration [M/L3], C1TP = inflow

TP concentration [M/L3], C2DOP = outflow DOP concentration [M/L3], C2pp = outflow PP









concentration [M/L3], C2SRP = outflow SRP concentration [M/L3], C2TDP = outflow TDP

concentration [M/L3] and C2TP = outflow TP concentration [M/L3].

The relative proportions of each of these forms within the TP pool were calculated using

the inflow and outflow concentrations:

CISRP
SRP1R T (1-11)

C2SRP
SRP2R= C2 (1-12)
C2TP

C1DOP
DOPIR= C- ( 1-13)


C2DOP
DOP2R= C2-- (1-14)


C1pp
PP1R= C- (1-15)
CITP

C2pp
PP2R= (1-16)

where SRP1R = inflow SRP fraction, SRP2R = outflow SRP fraction, DOP1R = inflow DOP

fraction, DOP2R = outflow DOP fraction, PP1R = inflow PP fraction and PP2R = outflow PP

fraction.

The same procedure was used to calculate areal loading rates (ALR) for both TP and Ca:


ALR= ltl (1-17)
A

Chapter 2 provides a discussion of methods for calculating A.

The mass retention rate of Ca was calculated for each STA cell:

ltC-2 t2
CaMR= tl QtCt-tl- QtC2t ( 1-18 )
A

where CaMR = Ca mass retention rate [M/L2/T].









Weekly and bi-weekly inflow and outflow temperature and pH readings were linearly

interpolated to estimate daily values of each. The daily values were averaged arithmetically (not

flow-weighted) to generate monthly figures.

Wetland chemical and physical properties

Wetland age for any given time period was calculated as the number of whole years

between the date of the time period of interest and the initiation of operation. That is, the current

age of each wetland was not reflected back to the beginning of the period of record (POR), but

rather the actual age of the wetland at each time step was used.

Soil TP concentrations from each sampling event were assumed to be spatially

representative of each cell, so the values were arithmetically averaged to obtain a single value for

each cell for each sampling event. The resulting value was applied to the entire year in which the

sampling occurred. Annual values were linearly interpolated across years in which sampling

events did not take place. Estimates were not extrapolated to years before the first sampling

event or to years after the last sample collection in each cell.

The daily average water depth was estimated by subtracting the elevation cumulative

distribution function (CDF) from the daily mean water surface elevation (stage). A detailed

description of the process by which the elevation CDF was obtained for each cell is available in

Chapter 2. The resulting function describes the continuous cumulative distribution of depths in

the wetland and was compartmentalized into 0.5 ft depth increments for convenience. The mean

water depth was the area-weighted average of these depth increments.

Wetland performance models

The k-C* model is commonly used to predict the outflow concentration of contaminants

from wetlands (Kadlec and Knight, 1996):









-kA
C2-C*=(C-C*) exp( ) (1-19)

where A = wetland area [L2], C1 = inflow concentration [M/L3], C2 = outflow concentration

[M/L3], C* = background concentration [M/L3], k = contaminant areal settling rate [L/T], and Q

= flow rate [L3/T]. Equation ( 1-19 ) can be configured to include depth, such that it considers the

volume rather than the surface area of the wetland (Kadlec and Knight, 1996):

-k, hA
C2-C*=(C1-C*) exp (- )
(1-20)
=(C1-C*) exp (kvr)

where kv = contaminant volumetric rate constant [T1].

Kadlec and Wallace (2008) noted that most wetland contaminant removal processes are

"typically apportioned to wetland area to a greater extent than to wetland water volume."

Further, they found that kv decreased with increasing depth, and advise that the areal settling rate

is more appropriate for most situations. Thus, the area-based form of the k-C* model (Equation (

1-19 )) is considered throughout this document.

The selection of k over kv has an additional implication. Because of the negative depth

dependence of k, the increases in T associated with increases in depth do not result in

commiserate improvements in performance. Therefore, only the changes in r associated with

changes in q (Equation ( 1-4 )) effect changes in wetland performance, so q may be considered as

a proxy for r.

Time-Step Selection

With respect to the ultimate purpose of the STAs, to reduce the P load to downstream

ecosystems, it is the long-term outflow TP concentration that is justly of interest to regulators on

behalf of the Everglades. Practice has shown that the long-term outflow TP concentrations varied









among cells over the history of the project. Numerous studies have been undertaken to

understand the root of these differences and to explore options for improving treatment

effectiveness and decreasing outflow concentrations. In this and other studies comparing the

STAs to one another, (POR) averages are valuable, but limiting in that the number of values is

restrained by the number of cells (or STAs, depending on the design of the study). Frequently,

the characteristics that potentially differentiate STA cells from one another also vary over time

within cells (e.g. depth, Ca concentration, hydraulic loading, etc). By increasing the temporal

resolution of the data, the number of data values available to explore correlative trends expands.

In addition, many of the wetland biogeochemical mechanisms relevant to P processing occur at

short time scales (minutes to days), suggesting that shorter periods of time averaging might

elucidate valuable process-level information.

Conversely, the non-zero r observed in all wetlands dictate that at any instant, the outflow

water is independent of the inflow water. Also, due to the imperfect hydraulics ubiquitous in

wetlands, the outflow water at any instant comprises a mixture of water that entered the wetland

a range of r previously, thereby preventing the simple comparison of inflow waters with waters

exiting precisely one mean r later. These two phenomena necessitate an upper limit on the

resolution of the time step. Kadlec and Wallace (2008) suggested an averaging period of at least

three nominal r to ensure that the bulk of the outflow water considered in a given data value

entered the wetland during that same period.

For the reasons presented above, many analyses throughout this work aimed to assess the

workings of the STAs in the "short-term." Determining the appropriate time step required

striking a balance between the aforementioned competing considerations for short- versus long-

term averaging, while maintaining data manageability. All of the data included in this study were









provided by SFWMD, either directly or through the publicly-accessible, online database,

DBHYDRO, which SFWMD populates and maintains. The flow and water quality data were

organized by cell at a monthly time step so, given the data at hand, the minimum possible

averaging period was 30 d by default. Following the prescription of Kadlec and Wallace (2008),

the monthly r calculated from this data were examined. The average monthly r was 23 d. In only

44% of the non-screened months was the r less than 10 d. The r was less than 30 d in only 77%

of months. Together, these findings suggest that the monthly time step was too fine. The

additional finding that 95% of months had r s less than 90 d suggested that a quarterly (90 d)

averaging period was more appropriate. However, upon the initial conversion of select data to

the quarterly time step, it was found that the correlations between the outflow TP concentration

and both the inflow TP concentration and the TPALR were slightly stronger among the monthly

data than the quarterly values. Ultimately, it is the physical connection between the inflow and

outflow water, as measured by the solutes in that water, which must be maintained by selecting a

sufficiently long averaging period. Because the 90 d time step failed to measurably strengthen

the inflow-outflow relationship, the 30 d averaging period was selected. Throughout this work,

each use of the phrase "short-term" indicates the use of monthly data.

Data Screening

When analyzing data for relationships between known dependent variables and possible

independent variables, it is common practice to screen data points generated by unusual

operating conditions in the system of interest. For example, within treatment wetland science,

convention calls for the exclusion of data from the "start-up period," the time immediately after

initiation of treatment, when temporary nutrient sinks (plant biomass expansion and soil

sorption) may exaggerate observed treatment performance (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). Also,

some authors elect to omit periods of internal maintenance (e.g. Pietro et al., 2008; Juston and









DeBusk, 2006). Within this analysis, the former etiquette was observed implicitly; the POR for

each cell was selected to correspond with the data range included in Chimney (2009), who

omitted start-up years therein.

Extremely low flow events created difficulties for the data analysis required by this study.

For example, very low hydraulic loading causes the calculated r to become very large (exceeding

tens of thousands of days in some cases). Likewise, exceptionally low flows (in or out) can

generate extreme calculated TP mass removal values. In an effort to suppress such extravagant

values (which, being outliers, have unique power to disrupt correlation and regression analyses),

while simultaneously maintaining a large number of data points, all months in which neither the

inflow nor outflow volume was at least 10% of the respective long-term average were screened.

Of the original 1419 data months, 1050 (74%) remained after this criteria was applied.

Some variables required additional special consideration. The appendix lists these

variables and the conditions that resulted in the omission of individual values.


















POP D> OP DIP PIP
A f PeriphytonP AEROBIC


Figure 1-1. Phosphorus (P) cycle in surface flow wetlands. DIP = particulate inorganic P, DOP
dissolved organic P, PIP = particulate inorganic P, POP = particulate organic P.
Image: Reddy and DeLaune, 2008.











































Figure 1-2. Map showing the locations of the six Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs), the
Everglades Agricultural Area and the Everglades Protection Area in South Florida.
Image: Pietro et al., 2008.











STA-1W


SSTA-1E s-319

G-3


0 Inflow Stations
* Outflow Stations
W Emergent Cell
L SAV Cell
: Flow direction


S;- STA-3/4


Figure 1-3. Schematics of the configuration of the treatment cells within each Stormwater
Treatment Area (STA). The dominant vegetation type in each cell is also indicated.
Cells marked with "X" were not included in this study. Image: Pietro et al., 2010.


G-32S r
STA-2


,, 4 211/
'\\ ,, ,,}


STA-6


~t~]lU
~~lr
~--~--
ui r
2'--.1









CHAPTER 2
INFLUENCE OF WETTED AREA ON PHOSPHORUS DYNAMICS IN THE
STORMWATER TREATMENT AREAS

Introduction

Performance, measured by any metric (outflow concentration, concentration reduction, or

settling rate) varied across the STAs, with some cells and STAs having removed P less

effectively than their peers (Pietro et al., 2009). The total expenditures on the STA project are

difficult to estimate, but the construction, monitoring and management of treatment wetlands

with a combined footprint of over 26,000 ha (Pietro et al., 2009) is an enormous financial

undertaking. As such, poor P removal performance by an STA is unaffordable by the SFWMD

as well as unacceptable for the preservation of downstream ecosystems. As part of a larger

diagnostic exercise to elucidate the controlling factors behind measured performance (and

ultimately to advise SFWMD on management strategies to improve performance in trouble

STAs), the relationship between TP areal loading rate (TPALR) and outflow TP concentration

was explored.

Terms A, C1, and Q from Equation ( 1-19 ) are related by:

C Q
ALR= (2-1)
A

where ALR = areal loading rate [M/L2/T]. It can easily be seen that in the k-C* model, any

change in A, C1, or Q that would cause ALR to increase, would correspondingly cause the

outflow concentration (C2) to increase. In other words, the outflow concentration of a

contaminant is directly proportional to the ALR of that contaminant.

It is common for C1 and Q to vary over the daily, monthly and even annual operation of a

treatment wetland. Less prevalent are changes in the treatment area. As a result, ALR is typically

calculated for the nominal area (An), that is, the design or built wetland area. However, in certain









circumstances, the actual wetted area (WA) may not be equal to An. All wetlands have a

distribution of elevations arising from both macro-scale ground slope and micro-scale

topographic heterogeneity. The size of the STAs enhances this variation on both scales, and also

precludes grading, which, in many constructed wetlands, minimizes topographic heterogeneity.

Most wetlands, including the STAs, experience temporal variability in flow, driven primarily by

regional rainfall patterns. During times of low flow, particularly during seasonal or regional

drought, insufficient water may be delivered to the wetland to maintain the stage above the

maximum ground elevation. When this occurs, WA will be less than An. The interaction of the

spatial elevation distribution and the temporal stage distribution controls the WA in the STAs.

Often, estimates of k are derived from Equation ( 1-19 ), when the other variables are

known, so that treatment performance can be compared across wetlands with diverse inputs.

Clearly, when WA < An, the use of A = An in Equation ( 2-1 ) would result in suppressed

estimates of k.

Some STA cells did experience periodic dry-down conditions in whole or in part (Pietro et

al., 2008) due to variability in weather conditions in the tributary basins, therefore previous

estimates of k and ALR (of specific relevance to this study, kTp and TPALR) that incorporated An

may have been inaccurate. It was hypothesized that poor performance (specifically as measured

by the outflow TP concentration relative to the inflow TPALR), was, in some circumstances, an

artifact of imprecise calculations. For example, hypothetical wetlands A and B have nominal

TPALR of 1 g/m2/yr and observed outflow TP concentrations of 0.075 and 0.10 mg/L,

respectively. Investigation reveals that only half of the nominal area of wetland B was actually

flooded, due to topographic and stage variability. The revised TPALR in wetland B becomes 2

g/m2/yr, and it becomes evident that some portion of the "poor performance" (high outflow









concentration relative to loading rate) of wetland B was a product of the data used in the ALR

calculation. If the hypothesis held true, an extension of that logic would suggest that realized

performance (absolute outflow concentration, regardless of inlet loading) could be improved by

increasing the flooded area of candidate wetlands (while maintaining historical flow rates)

through earthwork to reduce the topographic variability.

Accurate estimation of the changes in WA over time is important beyond assuring correct

k and ALR calculations. The drying of portions of cells is of particular concern for submerged

aquatic vegetation (SAV) which may die if desiccated (Harwell, 2003). However, White et al.

(2006) subjected SAV mesocosms to 1-month periods of dry out (the condition of the vegetative

communities upon re-flooding was not reported), and found net treatment of TP (outflow

concentration lower than inflow concentration) to resume 0-3 weeks following re-flooding.

Nonetheless, it may be difficult to maintain SAV in treatment cells that regularly or

intermittently dry out. Additionally, re-flooding of exposed sediments results in a flux of P out of

the sediments into the water column (Olila et al., 1997, White et al., 2006; Bostic and White,

2007; Pietro et al., 2008 and 2009). Thus, the changing WA due to stage and topographic

interaction would be expected to reduce treatment effectiveness.

Objectives

This chapter attempts to answer three primary questions: 1) Was the RWA, or changes in

RWA, significantly correlated to kTp? 2) Did WA < An significantly alter the TPALR realized by

any cell in the STAs? If so, does the use of A = WA, rather than A = An, in Equations ( 1-19 )

and ( 2-1 ) usefully improve the correlation between outflow TP concentration and TPALR? 3) Is

there significant value added by calculating WA via the elevation distribution, as compared to

simpler methods? The following hypotheses were tested to address the questions above:









The long-term TP removal performance will be negatively correlated with variation in elevation
within cells.

The short-term TP removal performance will be positively correlated with RWA, and negatively
correlated with monthly ARWA, in months when ARWA was positive.

The STA-wide TPALR calculated by substituting A = WA into Equation ( 2-1 ) will be
significantly higher than the TPALR calculated using A = An.

The correlation between the monthly TPALR and the monthly outflow TP concentration will be
usefully higher when Equation ( 2-1 ) is evaluated using A = WA derived from the stage-
area curve, than when Equation ( 2-1 ) is solved using either A = WA derived from the
mean elevation or A = An.

Methods

Calculation of the Wetted Area

Brown and Caldwell (1996) formalized the calculation of the relative wetted area (RWA):

t2
RWA (t2-t A A(t)dt (2-2)
(tz-tdAn f
tl

where tl = start of time period, and t2 = end of time period. Note that RWA = WA /An. The

RWA was calculated for each individual cell, and area-weighted averages were calculated at

larger spatial scales. The cell areas reported in Pietro et al. (2009) were used for An.

Approximations for the integral portion of Equation ( 2-2 ) can be made by any one of three

methods. The simplest approach, employed by SFWMD (Pietro et al., 2009), uses the operational

status of each cell as a proxy for inundation status on any given day, where online cells are fully

inundated (WA = An) and offline cells are fully dry (WA = 0) and then the values of WA for all

days in the period of interest are summed and then substituted for the integral portion of

Equation ( 2-2 ). Alternatively, WA(t) can be estimated by (Pietro et al., 2010):










0 if hwi < hmean

where h,, = average elevation of water surface (stage) on day i [L] and hmean = mean elevation of

the ground surface [L]. Again, the WA values for all days in the period of interest are summed

and applied to Equation ( 2-2 ). In some STAs, particularly those with wide elevation ranges or

highly pulsed inflows, the methods of SFWMD may not accurately estimate the effective area.

Finally, WA(t) may be estimated from a stage-area curve, a function that relates the flooded

wetland area to the elevation of the water surface. This final method of WA calculation was

selected for this analysis as it quantifies the extent of flooding when hmin < h, < hmax, as opposed

to the flooded/dry dichotomy created by the two other methods. To construct the stage-area

curve for each cell, topographic data from the most recent, or otherwise most reliable, survey of

each STA were interpolated using the kriging method in ArcGIS 9.2 (ESRI, Redlands, CA).

Extreme values (e.g. tops of levees, bottoms of ditches) included in the original survey data were

excluded from interpolation. From the resulting continuous bathymetric map, ArcGIS returned

tabulated frequencies of the elevations in each cell. These frequencies were transformed into

cumulative elevation distributions, the vertical axes of which were multiplied by A,. Sixth-order

polynomial curves were fit to the resulting points to estimate the stage-area curve:

y = ah6 +bh5 +ch4 +dh3 + eh2 +h + g (2-4)

where h = elevation, ft NGVD29, y = area of cell with elevation < x, a-g = constants, unique for

each cell. Sixth-order curves generally provided strong fits to the data, though the large number

of unique coefficients for each cell was somewhat burdensome. Equation ( 2-4 ) was solved for h

= hw,, returning the WA for each day i. The sum of the resulting values served as an estimate of

the integral portion of Equation ( 2-2 ).









The nature of these high-order polynomials dictates that they only describe the stage-area

relationship over a specified domain, unique to each cell. This range of valid elevations (h-values

that produce frequency [y] values between 0 and An and lie within the range of surveyed

elevations) is bounded by the minimum and maximum elevation within each cell.

The effects of the method of RWA and TPALR calculation were examined. These terms

are given the subscript "D" when they were based on the elevation distribution (stage-area

curve), the subscript "M" when they were calculated from the mean elevation, and the subscript

"N" when they relied on the nominal area. The practice of using operational status to estimate

the inundation status was not considered here.

Statistical Analyses

All statistical analyses were conducted with SAS 9.1 (SAS Institute, Cary, NC). Non-

parametric tests were applied as necessary when data failed to meet assumptions of normality.

Results and Discussion

Characterization of Elevation Distribution and Wetted Area in the STAs

The CDF (equivalent to the stage-area curve, normalized for area) of ground elevation

varied among cells in the STAs (Figure 2-1). Qualitatively, the shape and spread of the

distribution of elevation in each cell alone was not correlated with long-term P removal

performance. For example, despite similar elevation CDFs, STA-1W Cell 1 and STA-3/4 Cell

1A have shown very different POR P mass removal effectiveness (7.6% and 44.9%, respectively;

Chimney, 2009). Quantitatively, the standard deviation of the elevation in each STA was not

correlated with the POR P mass removal effectiveness (r2 = 0.036).

The annual RWAD was less than 100% for 74/118 cell-years but was lower than 90% for

only 28 of 118 cell-years (Table 2-1). The POR average RWAD for all STAs was 96%. Most of









the low RWAD cell-years are concentrated in water years 2007 and 2008 (Figure 2-2), a

documented period of drought in South Florida (Pietro et al., 2009).

Changes in RWAD were brought on by intra-annual as well as inter-annual precipitation

cycles. For most cells, the seasonal low RWAD occurs in May (Table 2-2), corresponding with

the end of the South Florida dry season.

Relative Wetted Area and Total Phosphorus Removal Performance

The TP areal settling rate was poorly but significantly correlated to the RWAD across all

cells and all non-screened months (r=0.162, p<0.0001, n=943). The relative lack of variability in

the explanatory term (RWAD was greater than 95% in 89% of months; Figure 2-3) obscured the

influence of RWAD on kTp. Considering only months where RWAD < 1.0 (that is, months when

hw < hmax) increased r to 0.308 (p<0.0001, n=247). The relationship between kTp and RWAD was

strongest among all of the months when RWAM < 1.0, though this filter greatly reduced the

number of included observations (r=0.412, p=0.0408, n=25). This suggests that, on the whole,

the RWAD influenced the TP settling rate in the STAs (months with high RWAD were more

likely to also have high kTp), but the overall impact across the operating history of the whole

project was minimized by the relative infrequency of months with RWAD substantially less than

1.0.

Likewise, there was a weak but significant relationship between the monthly outflow TP

concentration and RWAD across all cells and all non-screened months (r= -0.181, p<0.0001,

n=989). The relationship was only marginally stronger among months where RWAD < 1.0 (r= -

0.211, p=0.0003, n=285). Contrary to the findings for kTP, there was no correlation between

outflow TP concentration and RWAD within months with RWAM < 1 (r=0.078, p=0.6775, n=31).

Apparently the RWAD has little effect on the outflow TP concentration, relative to the variation

caused by all other wetland processes.









Several conditions may have contributed to the relationship between kTp and RWAD. First,

in those cells where deviation from RWAD = 1.0 was augmented by highly variable topography

(e.g. cells in STA-5, Figure 2-1), at any given average depth, the variance on the distribution of

depths would have been higher than in more 'flat-bottomed' cells (e.g. cells in STA-3/4, Figure

2-1). The effect of extreme depths on short- and long-term performance has not been quantified.

Second, dry-out could have caused localized death of SAV or transition of herbaceous emergent

aquatic vegetation (EAV) to less desirable woody shrubs, decreasing treatment capacity upon re-

flooding. The vegetation records in the STAs did not have sufficient temporal or spatial

resolution to test this hypothesis. Finally, the absolute RWA may have had little influence on kTp,

with changes in RWA primarily affecting the apparent settling rate through oxidation and

rewetting of the soil. Non-zero changes in RWA can occur only when the RWA varies from 1.0,

thus the relationship observed above may be only a vestige of a connection between changing

RWA and settling rate.

Interpretation of these correlation coefficients requires caution however. Although the

RWAD is normalized to the An of each cell, the kTp values were not normalized to the cell means.

Because the mean kTP was different in each cell, it is dangerous to compare points of equivalent

RWAD if they came from different cells. Within cells, the strength and sign of the correlation

between kTP and RWAD vary widely and the relationship was significant only in STA-5 Central

Flow-way (CFW; Cells 2A and 2B) and STA-6 Cell 3. Possibly, perennially high RWAD lends

itself to higher kTP values. Additionally, the subsets of observations resulting from each of the

sequential screening criteria were not necessarily representative subsamples of the larger sample

of observations. For example, of the 25 months with RWAM < 1.0 and valid kTP values,









approximately half came from STA-5, which accounted for only 14% of the original 943

observations.

The relationship between kTP and the change in monthly RWAD (ARWAD) tells a more

interesting story. With all cells and all non-screened months included, r= -0.074 (p=0.0241,

n=932). Despite the expected negative coefficient, the strength of the correlation does not

strongly support the hypothesis that kTp would decrease during re-flooding months. The

coefficient of correlation was slightly greater (as was the level of significance) with ARWAM (r=

-0.090, p=0.0059, n=932), likely because the substantial dry-down and re-flooding events

required to shift the stage past mean may have had more of an effect on the settling rate than

small events that could cause ARWAD to be different from 0. As discussed above, the RWAD

infrequently varied far from 1.0. As a result, ARWAD did not often vary far from 0. Removing

from the correlation those cells that never experienced RWAD # 1 improved the strength and

significance of the relationship between kTP and ARWAD only slightly (r= -0.088, p=0.0167,

n=745). Again, kTp was slightly more closely associated with ARWAM (r = -0.105, p=0.0039,

n=745). Of course, the deleterious effects of changing RWA (as explicated in the hypothesis) are

expected only in re-flooding months, or months with ARWAD > 0. Screening out all months that

do not meet this criterion tripled the strength of the co-variation (r= -0.313, p<0.0001, n=159).

This implies that, in months when re-flooding occurred, about 10% of the variability of kTp was

explained by variability in the extent of the re-flooding event. Finally, in the few months of

substantial re-flooding (ARWAD > 0.1), the kTP and ARWAD were remarkably co-variant (r= -

0.605, p<0.0001, n=39). The large amount of variability in kTP explained by ARWAD in these

large re-flood months, suggests that ARWAD may be a useful variable to include in a multiple

linear regression analysis to determine the factors controlling kTP (Chapter 4). The previous









discussion on the caution that must be applied when interpreting data of this nature applies to

these results as well.

Relative Wetted Area and Total Phosphorus Mass Loading Rate

Determining the importance of WA < An on the TPALR in the STAs was a surprisingly

complex task. In absolute terms, the TPALRD and TPALRM must be greater than TPALRn for a

cell in any given month, year, or other period of interest where the WAD < An and WAM < An,

respectively. It is the size of these differences and their implications for other assessments that

require an accurate measure of the TPALR that are of interest.

When the three methods of TPALR calculation were treated as repeated measures on each

unique cell-month (n=1000) the means were statistically, though not substantially, different

(0.275 g/m2/mo, 0.273 g/m2/mo and 0.272 g/m2/mo for TPALRD, TPALRM and TPALRn,

respectively. All pairs of means significantly different atp=0.05). The large number of

observations boosted the significance of these trivial differences. This finding imparts nothing

except the fact that the adjustment for WA makes very little impact on the long-term mean

TPALR; the precision of flow (Q in Equation (2-1 )) measurements does not support the

estimation of the loading rate to thousandths of a gram per m2 per month. Accordingly, when the

repeated measure design was removed from the analysis and the means compared directly, the

calculated TPALR was not significantly influenced by the method of WA calculation when all

STA cells and all months with valid TPALR data (n=1000) were included (Kurskal-Wallis

X2=0.1261, df=2, p=0.9389). In fact, the TPALR adjusted for the WA (regardless of calculation

method) was not statistically different from the TPALRn. The general tendency toward complete

or nearly complete flooding, again, obscured statistical differences between the adjusted TPALR

and the TPALRn because the WA-correction has no effect in months when RWAD = RWAM =

1.0. To isolate the true effects of the WA calculation on the TPALR, the three TPALR rank-sums









were again compared including only months where RWAD < 1.0 (n=280). The Kurskal-Wallis

X2=0.1264 (df=2, p=0.9388) which failed to allow rejection of the null hypothesis that there is no

effect of WA calculation on TPALR. Even considering only the months where RWAM < 1.0

(n=38) there was no effect of the method of WA calculation (X2=2.4048, df=2, p=0.3005).

Finally, the TPALR rank-sums were compared considering all months (regardless of WA value)

only in those cells with POR mean WAD < 0.95 (n=209; X2=0.1985, df=2, p=0.9055). In none of

these cases was there a significant difference between any pair of the TPALR rank-sums.

Apparently, the variation in monthly TPALR due to fluctuations in flow rate and inflow TP

concentration overwhelmed the slight variance contributed by the shifting RWA. This suggests,

that no correction for WA < An was necessary for a sufficiently accurate accounting of the

monthly TPALR in the STAs.

Months with low RWAD tended to coincide with months of low flow (Figure 2-4).

Possibly, the adjustment of TPALR for WA < An was ineffectual in the monthly data because

relatively low loading rates tended to dampen the impact of the adjustment in low-RWAD

months. To estimate the annual TPALR, the sum of the 12 monthly loads is divided by the

average of the 12 monthly WA values. (In adopting this calculation method, the dubious

assumption that the water delivered to a cell in any given month was available for delivery in any

other month, as would be the case if the water was metered out of a reservoir, was accepted). In

this way, a low-RWA month contributes to the calculation (increasing the calculated TPALR)

even if the mass load in that month was low or negligible. However, despite these considerations,

the different methods of TPALR calculation did not lead to significant differences between the

rank-sums.









Despite the lack of significant effect on the mean TPALR, adjustment for the calculated

WA would still be warranted if the correction improved the strength of the correlation between

the TPALR and the outflow TP concentration. The coefficients of correlation (and p-values)

between outflow TP concentration and TPALR are shown for each method of TPALR

calculation over various subsets of the data in Table 2-3. When all months for all cells were

included, the increases in the coefficient of correlation due to WA-correction were trivial. The

largest improvements in r were found among months with RWAD < 1.0 (in all cells) and among

all months in cells with POR mean RWAD < 95% (STA-2 Cell 2, STA-5 NFW, STA-5 CFW),

though in both of these cases the relationship was so weak, regardless of TPALR calculation

method, as to render the slight co-variation valueless. Interestingly, within every subset of

observations, TPALRM was a better co-variable with outflow TP concentration than was

TPALRD. Of course, the relationship between TPALR and outflow TP concentration was not

uniform within each cell. The results and implications of the cell-by-cell analysis are presented

in Chapter 3.

Wetlands integrate, and thus dampen, short-term loading effects through dynamic soil and

macrophyte processes. For example, the vegetation in a healthy wetland may be able to

assimilate a pulse of incoming P through biomass expansion. The excess P may be released over

many more r than the mass of water that carried the initial pulse, as the plants die and

decompose, and a short-term time step (e.g. month) may fail to capture the effect of TPALR on

outflow TP concentration. To that end, annual outflow TP concentration was compared to annual

TPALRn, TPALRM and TPALRD. The value of examining these variables over a longer time step

was immediately apparent from the improvement in r-values compared to the whole population

of cell-months. Once again, the method of WA determination was insignificant: annual outflow









TP concentration was more closely related to TPALRD (r=0.476, p<0.0001, n= 11) than it was

to either TPALRM (r=.475, p<0.0001, n= 11) or TPALRn (r=0.466, p<0.0001, n= 11), though

only trivially.

Conclusions

In the STAs, the interaction of intra-cell topography and time-variable stage occasionally

resulted in the incomplete inundation of some cells, as revealed by the characterization study.

When the actual WA is less than the nominal area, exposed soils and vegetation are subject to

oxidation and desiccation. In addition, the value of the ALR calculated with An will not reflect

the realized ALR of the system, potentially affecting expected relationships between ALR and

wetland treatment performance indices. There existed a weak positive linear relationship

between kTP and RWAD and a weak negative linear relationship between kTP and ARWAD. Both

correlations increased in strength with sequential screening of "unimportant" months, e.g.

months with RWAD = 1.0 or ARWAD = 0. However, the number of months among which these

relationships were important was very limited. Neither the TPALR nor the strength of the

correlation between TPALR and outflow TP concentration was meaningfully altered by

adjusting the calculated TPALR for WA < An.

These non-dramatic results support important conclusions nonetheless. First, the expected

biogeochemical consequences of dry-out and rewetting appear to have been at work in the STAs.

Fortunately, from a treatment point of view, RWA infrequently varied far from 1.0, so the bulk

of the TP processing in the STAs was unaffected by dry-out/re-flooding events. Second, An was a

satisfactory approximation of WA since neither the monthly nor annual TPALR was

significantly different under either alternative calculation scheme. Finally, poor performance in

certain cells (elevated outflow TP concentrations relative to inflow TPALR) was shown not to be









an artifact of the TPALR calculation, validating the need for additional work to diagnose those

factors contributing to performance in the STAs, as presented in the following chapters.









Table 2-1. Average annual relative wetted area by water year for each cell in the Stormwater Treatment Areas.
Area (ha) 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Average
STA-1E 1628 99% 98 98
Cell 3 238 97 93 95
Cell4N 261 99 99 99
Cell 4S 304 99 100 99
Cell 5 231 96 92 94
Cell 6 425 100 100 100
Cell 7 169 100 100 100
STA-1W 2699 100 100 100 100 100 99 77 69 95 96
Cell 1 603 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 69 90 95
Cell 2 381 100 100 100 100 100 100 98 100
Cell 3 415 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 55 85 93
Cell 4 145 100 100 100 100 100 87 100 73 100 96
Cell 5 1155 100 100 100 100 100 80 95 100 97
STA-2 2565 92 100 98 97 96 94 96
Cell 1 728 79 100 100 100 100 97 96
Cell2 919 94 99 94 93 89 87 92
Cell 3 919 100 100 100 100 100 100 100
STA-3/4 6695 99 99 97 98
Cell 1A 1230 99 98 90 96
Cell 1B 1412 99 100 100 100
Cell 2A 1029 100 99 99 99
Cell2B 1171 99 100 100 100
Cell 3A 871 97 93 99 96
Cell 3B 982 99 99 98 98
STA-5 1663 84 91 95 97 91 73 69 72 84
CFW 832 79 88 93 95 94 65 63 75 81
NFW 832 89 93 97 99 87 82 76 69 87
STA-6 352 93 97 94 93 70 74 87
Cell 3 99 87 94 88 88 51 51 77
Cell5 253 96 99 96 95 78 83 91










Table 2-2. Intra-annual trends in relative wetted area.


STA-1E
Cell 3
Cell 4N
Cell 4S
Cell 5
Cell 6
Cell 7
STA-W
Cell 1
Cell 2
Cell 3
Cell 4
Cell 5
STA-2
Cell 1
Cell 2
Cell 3
STA-3/4
Cell 1A
Cell 1B
Cell 2A
Cell 2B
Cell 3
STA-5
CFW
NFW
STA-6
Cell 3
Cell 5
Grand Total


No. Yr. Jan
100%
2 100
2 100
2 100
2 100
2 100
2 100
97
9 93
7 100
9 89
9 100
8 100
97
6 100
6 91
6 100
100
3 100
3 100
3 100
3 100
3 100
81
8 76
8 87
84
6 70
6 89
97


Feb
100
100
100
99
100
100
100
94
91
100
89
100
95
97
98
94
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
76
68
83
82
69
87
95


Mar
99
99
100
99
97
100
100
91
89
100
89
93
88
98
100
95
100
99
100
100
100
100
97
76
73
80
86
75
90
95


May
88
62
95
98
65
100
100
91
89
96
89
84
92
87
81
78
100
91
73
100
97
100
89
65
60
69
56
23
68
87


Jul
100
100
99
100
100
100
100
100
99
100
100
100
100
96
90
97
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
92
91
92
94
84
97
98


Aug
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
98
98
96
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
94
95
93
100
100
100
99


Oct
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
98
100
94
100
99
99
99
99
99
99
96
96
96
100
100
100
99


Nov
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
99
100
94
100
100
98
100
94
100
98
97
97
100
98
99
93
94
93
98
97
99
98


Dec
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
98
97
100
91
100
100
98
100
95
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
90
89
90
93
88
94
98









Table 2-3. Changes in the coefficients of correlation for different subsets of data.
1 2 3 4 5
Months when Months when All months in cells
All cells RWAD < 1.0 RWAM < 1.0 with mean RWAD < 0.95
No. data months 945 248 25 187

0.048
TPALRn 0.266 (<0.0001) 0.099(0.1214) 0.493(0.0122) 0048
(0.5154)
0.067
TPALRD 0.271 (<0.0001) 0.119(0.0614) 0.486 (0.0137) 0.067
(0.3589)
0.083
TPALRM 0.273 (<0.0001) 0.133 (0.0370) 0.516 (0.0083) 0.083
(0.2567)















STA-1E /, ..***" '" "




I *
i
/ ,

I ,'

:~ *#


STA-iW k/l

'; :
ji :



I r I
/I


12 13 14
Feet of elevation NGVD


15 16 17 7


--Cell 3 -----Cell 4N *** Cell 4S
S- Cell 5 ----Cell 6 -- Cell 7


8 9 10 11 12 13
Feet of elevation NGVD

- Cell 1 --Cell 2A -----Cell 2B *.. Cell 3
- Cell4 --- Cell5A Cell 5B


STA-3/4 '

f t


I

1]_


8 9 10 11
Feet of elevation NGVD

-..-. Cell 1 ----- Cell 2


STA-5


12 13 14 7 8 9 10 11
Feet of elevation NGVD

- Cell3 Cell 1A -.- Cell 1B
.....Cell 2B Cell 3A


12 13 14


-----Cell 2A
--- Cell 3B


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
Feet of elevation NGVD Feet of elevation NGVD

Cell 1A -.- Cell 1B ---- Cell 2A **** Cell 2B Cell 3 -----Cell 5



Figure 2-1. Cumulative elevation distribution for each cell in the Stormwater Treatment Areas.
Note that the range of each horizontal axis is the same.


10 11










100% ................. ................. ................. ........- -- -

90% ....0

80%

70%

---1--- STA-1E (100) ...O..* STA-1W (97)
60%
--A-- STA-2 (96) -- STA-3/4 (98)

50% O0- STA-5 (84) -- STA-6 (87) Drought
50%





Figure 2-2. Relative wetted area in each of the Stormwater Treatment Areas. Note that the
vertical axis does not extend to 0. Error bars have been omitted to increase clarity.










100%


80%


60%


40%


20%


0%
0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%
Relative wetted area


Figure 2-3. Histogram of monthly relative wetted area (determined by the elevation distribution)
values across all non-screened months and all included cells.











100% .o o o oo

00
*o







S40% 00
0% -

20%


0% '1 1' '''

0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35

Hydraulic loading rate
(m/mo)

Figure 2-4. Monthly relative wetted area (determined by the elevation distribution) with respect
to monthly hydraulic loading for all non-screened months and all included cells.









CHAPTER 3
ASSOCIATION BETWEEN LOADING RATE AND OUTFLOW CONCENTRATION IN
THE STORMWATER TREATMENT AREAS

Introduction

Several species of SAV, macrophytes with the bulk of their biomass suspended in the

water column, are common in wetlands and other water bodies in South Florida (Dierberg et al.,

2002). Because of their growth habit, the mechanisms of P removal in SAV systems include two

distinct differences from those in EAV wetlands. First, roots of emergent plants can access only

porewater nutrients (with diffusion or mass transfer of nutrients to the sediment mediating uptake

from the water column), whereas SAV obtains nutrients directly from the water column through

the shoots and leaves (Graneli and Solander, 1988). This means that SAV can uptake SRP very

quickly, particularly in the short-term (Pietro et al., 2006). Second, during photosynthesis, SAV

removes carbon dioxide and bicarbonate from the water column, which raises the system pH, and

drives the system towards calcium carbonate (CaCO3) supersaturation, promoting CaCO3

precipitation (McConnaughey et al., 1994). Several studies have proposed co-precipitation with

CaCO3 as a mechanism of P removal in a variety of systems (Scinto, 1997 reviews some of these

works). It has been reasoned that SAV is more suited for P removal in treatment wetlands than

EAV, a hypothesis supported by studies at mesocosm- (Dierberg et al., 2002) prototype-

(Nungesser and Chimney, 2001) and field-scales (Juston and DeBusk, 2006).

SAV systems have generally been successful within the STAs, and now comprise over half

(ca. 10,000 ha) of the STA treatment area, often in downstream positions within serial flow-

trains (Pietro et al., 2010). Most of the cells with the lowest long-term outflow concentrations are

dominated by SAV; of the nine cells with long-term flow-weighted average outflow TP

concentrations below 0.030 mg/L, six are designated SAV.









Though elevated relative to the levels in the historical, unimpacted Everglades, it has been

suggested by way of internal profile studies that these low outflow concentrations approach C*

in some SAV cells (i.e. the concentration profile reaches a plateau some fraction of the way

through the cell, beyond which no additional treatment is observed; Pietro et al., 2010). The

alternative P treatment mechanisms at work in SAV may be responsible for the reduction of TP

to C*, possibly because, given non-limiting calcium and light for photosynthesis, the co-

precipitation process is not subject to 'saturation', as soils (via sorption) and microbial and plant

biomass may be, nor is it rate-limited by biotic uptake.

Excessively loading a wetland with a high settling rate conceptually results in poor

performance (e.g. elevated outflow concentrations, lowered percent removal). Conversely, even

wetlands with low settling rates can conceptually perform well at sufficiently low loading rates.

The interaction of the settling rate and loading rate determines the realized treatment

performance for a wetland (assuming the inflow concentration is well above C*). It is convenient

to employ the Damkohler number, which captures the "treatment potential" of a wetland by

combining the settling rate with the loading rate (Kadlec and Wallace, 1996):

k
Da (3-1)
q

where Da = Damkohler number. By inserting Equation ( 3-1 ) into Equation ( 1-19 ), the k-C*

model suggests that at very high Da, C* controls the outflow concentration:

C2-C*=(Ci-C*) exp (-Da) (3-2)

Internal profile studies are reliable for determining whether a wetland is treating to C*.

They are however, laborious and expensive both in the field and the laboratory. Potentially, the

strength of the correlation between the outflow concentration and the TPALR may be used as a

proxy to estimate if wetland effluent is at C*. Since C* is independent of the short-term TPALR









(Equations ( 1-19 ) and ( 2-1 )), in situations where the outflow TP concentration approaches C*,

the correlation between the outflow TP concentration and the TPALR will be weak or absent.

For example, internal profiles were estimated for a hypothetical wetland with a very high Da

under four different loading scenarios, each with a different ALR (Figure 3-1). In each scenario,

the outflow concentration was equal to C* and outflow concentration and ALR were

uncorrelated. The term 'apparent background concentration' is adapted from Kadlec and Knight

(1996) to describe the outflow TP concentrations from those cells with weak short-term outflow

concentration-TPALR interactions, even when those concentrations were above the range of

commonly described background TP concentrations for South Florida systems of 6-16 [g/L

(Juston and DeBusk, 2006; Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). The hypothesis that alternative P

removal mechanisms elevate Da such that SAV cells tend to produce apparent TP background

concentrations (while EAV cells are less likely to do so) may be tested by comparing the

correlations between outflow TP concentration and TPALR within SAV cells to those in EAV

cells.

It should be noted, however, that even for well performing cells, the outflow concentration

varied, both from cell to cell and over time. In conjunction with the previous discussion, this

implies that the apparent background concentration was not fixed. In a plug-flow wetland, the

real P background concentration is the point of equilibrium between P availability and

biogeochemical P demand. Atmospheric deposition, internal hydraulics (the degree of mixing

within a wetland), TP fractionation, and the internal loading (particularly of PP and DOP) are

known to contribute to the apparent background concentration (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008).

Some of these factors can be easily measured (TP fractionation) and others can be inferred from

easily quantifiable factors (e.g. temperature can be a proxy for seasonal changes in biomass









production and senescence, both of which contribute to autochthonous P loads). In STA cells that

produce outflow TP concentrations independent of the TPALR, understanding and quantifying

the factors that control the apparent background concentration are important for increasing both

realized performance and predictions of that performance.

Objectives

This chapter addresses four primary questions: 1) Were SAV cells in the STAs operating at

apparent background concentrations, as determined by independence of outflow TP

concentration from the TPALR? 2) Were the outflow TP concentration data uncorrelated to the

TPALR in all SAV cells, or only a specific subset? 3) In the case that only certain cells are

exempt from this correlation, what was the underlying cause if not the dominant vegetation? 4)

What determined the outflow TP concentration in cells operating at an apparent background

concentration? The above questions were answered by testing the following hypotheses:

The outflow TP concentration data will be more poorly correlated to the TPALR data in SAV
cells relative to EAV cells.

The outflow TP concentration data will co-vary weakly with TPALR data in most SAV cells,
and will not co-vary at all with TPALR in some SAV cells.

The strength of the co-variation will be negatively correlated to the percent cover of SAV within
cells.

In those cells operating at an apparent C*, the outflow concentration will be a function of one or
more of the variables: TP fractionation, long-term TPALR and temperature.

Methods

Methods regarding the calculation or preparation of TPALR, r, TP fraction, and

temperature data may be found in Chapter 1.

Vegetation

Each STA cell has been classified by dominant vegetation type (SAV/EAV) by SFWMD

(Pietro et al. 2008). While the classifications generally capture the dominant vegetation types,









and reflect the plant communities targeted by SFWMD for each cell, they do not imply 100%

coverage by the indicated vegetation class. The term 'Mixed' was applied to those units

composed of cells of different designations, but for which water quality data was only examined

at the larger scale (e.g. the North Flow-way of STA-5 consists of an EAV- (Cell 1A) and a SAV-

(Cell 1B) designated cell, but flow data were only available at the inflow and outflow of the

flow-way).

To enhance the precision of the vegetation classification, the percent SAV cover was

estimated for each cell in this study using tabulations of vegetation cover based on aerial imagery

and vegetation field survey data provided by the SFWMD. The detailed (often species-level)

designations from the map tabulations were combined into three distinct groups: EAV, SAV and

open water. For this study, the SAV and open water coverages tabulated from vegetation maps

were combined and assumed to approximately represent total SAV cover. The field survey data

available to this project were collected by several different contractors and each employed a

unique reporting system. Briefly, the coverage or abundance data at each survey point, plot or

transect were normalized to a 0 to 1 scale (1 representing 100% cover). The relative coverages of

each SAV species (including algae, when reported) were summed at each survey location. The

nature of field surveys allowed for the distinction of SAV from open water, so open water did

not contribute to the total SAV cover at each site. The values of percent SAV cover were

averaged over all survey locations to estimate the total relative SAV cover for each cell. The

spatial distributions of the survey points were checked to verify representative sampling within

each cell. This study did not attempt to address changes in SAV cover over time. In cells where

more than one estimate of SAV cover was available, the values were simply averaged, with

equal weight given to survey and map data.









Outflow Concentration and Total Phosphorus Areal Loading Rate

The Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (r) between monthly outflow TP

concentration and monthly TPALRM (the best regressor of the three possible TPALR

calculations; see Chapter 2) was determined for the POR for each cell. As r describes only the

strength of the linear relationship between two variables, scatter plots were produced for each

cell and visually inspected for non-linearity. It was noted that the significant (p = 0.05) positive

r-values in several cells resulted entirely from the presence of outliers in the upper-right quadrant

(high outflow concentrations corresponding to high loading events). The practical significance of

these relationships defined by outliers is discussed below. However, in an effort to capture the

"typical" behavior of each cell, r was recalculated after excluding the month with the largest

TPALR value in each cell, and termed r' for convenience. The bulk of this study relies on r'

because approximately one-half of the significant r values were artifacts of single outliers (Table

3-1).

Results and Discussion

Outflow Concentration- Areal Loading Relationship

Effect of vegetation type and cover

The magnitude and significance of r'was not clearly determined by the vegetation

designation reported for each cell in Pietro et al. (2008) (Table 3-1). Of the 7 SAV-classified

cells examined, r'was non-significant in 6 (86%). Similarly, 9 (75%) of the included 12 EAV

cells had non-significant r'. Unexpectedly, one EAV cell (STA-2 Cell 1) reported a weak but

significant negative co-variance between outflow TP concentration and TPALR. Possible causes

for this counter-intuitive relationship were unclear. As a result, data from Cell 1 of STA-2 were

excluded from further analyses in this chapter. Three of the four (75%) 'mixed' units had non-

significant r '. Broadly, EAV and SAV cells were not overwhelmingly differentiated by the









strength of r' (Table 3-1), though the caveats associated with the vegetation designations (see

Methods of this chapter) depreciate the power of this assessment.

To avoid the difficulties and inaccuracies associated with using the SFWMD-assigned

vegetation classifications, r' was plotted against estimates of the actual percent cover of SAV.

The cells clustered into three distinct groups, (Figure 3-2). Group 1 contains cells with low to

moderate SAV coverage and low r'-values. The low- to mid-SAV coverage cells, with relatively

high r'-values comprise Group 2. Group 3 consists of high-SAV cells with non-significant r'.

Immediately apparent from Figure 3-2 are the strictly non-significant r'-values in all high-SAV

cells. Secondly, the unexpected tendency for non-significant r'-values in low- and moderate-

SAV cells is noteworthy. Together these observations do not support any conclusions about the

influence of SAV P processing mechanisms on the uncoupling the short-term outflow TP

concentration from the TPALR in SAV cells, but do suggest that this method may be

inappropriate for testing that hypothesis. Also, importantly, they make clear that some other

factor (or factors) contributed to the disassociation of the outflow TP concentration from the

monthly TPALR.

Effect of areal total phosphorus loading rate

Equation ( 1-19 ) indicates that, at sufficiently light loads, the outflow concentration from a

wetland will converge on the background concentration, C*, and thus approach independence

from the loading rate. This was supported by the findings of Qian and Richardson (1997) (and

reinforced by Richardson and Qualls, 1999) that showed that below POR TPALR of about 1.0

g/m2/yr, the long-term average outflow concentrations from a large number of North American

wetlands were fairly invariant with respect to changes in TPALR. Likewise, among SAV and

select EAV cells with annual TPALR at or below 2.0 g/m2/yr, Juston and DeBusk (2006) noted

"no significant relationships (p>0.05) were identified in the slopes of P-ALR relationships using









either 1 or 2 year average ALRs, thus suggesting no evidence of association of ALR with TP

concentrations in this range." It follows that the areal loads in cells in Groups 1 and 3 were

possibly too low to force the outflow TP concentration above the apparent background

concentration. A one-way analysis of variance was performed on the monthly TPALR to

compare each of the three groups. The F-value was 17.19 (df=2, p<0.0001). A Student-Newman-

Keuls test (p=0.05) found that the mean monthly TPALR was significantly higher in Group 2

(0.42 g/m2/mo) than in either Group 1 or Group 3. The mean monthly TPALR were similar in

Groups 1 and 3 (0.21 and 0.22 g/m2/mo, respectively). The implication, in the spirit of

Richardson and Qualls (1999), is that the TPALR became influential on the outflow TP

concentration once it exceeded some threshold. All cells with average annual TPALRM less than

about 2.0 g/m2/yr showed no significant relationship between short-term outflow TP

concentration and the TPALRM (Figure 3-3), as expected from the work of Juston and DeBusk

(2006). The presence of significant, positive r'-values only in cells loaded with greater than 2.0

g/m2/yr does suggest that the magnitude of the loading rate contributed to the strength of the

TPALR-outflow TP concentration relationship. The fact that some cells also loaded above 2.0

g/m2/yr had non-significant correlations between outflow TP concentration and TPALRM

indicates the action of an additional factor (or factors) restraining r' even under large loads.

Moreover, this additional factor was very likely not the alternative mechanisms of SAV systems,

as the high-TPALRM, low-r' group contained both EAV and SAV cells.

A mention must be made of the substantial difference between r and r' in a few cells

(Table 3-1). The extreme influence that the outliers had on the correlation between the outflow

TP concentration and the TPALR justifies their exclusion for analytical purposes. Nonetheless,

these data imply that, had these cells experienced higher and more variable loading rates on a









monthly basis, than was observed during their recorded operation, the outflow TP concentration

may have actually been influenced by the TPALR. The near-universal tendency for the month of

maximum load to increase the strength and significance of r suggests that, regardless of the

vegetation type or the short-term outflow concentration-TPALR relationship under 'typical'

operating conditions, extreme pulses of P were very likely to produce above-average outflow

concentrations.

Factors Controlling the Apparent Background Concentration

Having established that, in most cells of the STAs, the short-term outflow TP

concentration did not depend strongly on the monthly TPALR, the challenge of identifying the

factors that did determine the short-term outflow concentration arises. Curiously, the POR FWM

outflow TP concentrations from those cells with non-significant r'-values showed the same range

and variability as those cells with moderate to strong TPALR-outflow TP concentration

relationships (Figure 3-4). This chapter considers two possible controls on the long-term mean

outflow TP concentration and one possible regulator of the short-term outflow concentration. A

more thorough exploration of potential factors controlling monthly outflow TP concentrations is

presented in Chapter 4.

Inflow phosphorus fractions

The most chemo- and bioavailable P forms comprise the SRP fraction of the TP pool

(Kadlec and Wallace, 2008; Reddy and DeLaune, 2008). In treatment wetlands, this often leads

to preferential removal of SRP relative to the TP aggregate (Dierberg et al., 2002; Chimney,

2007). Conversely, DOP is thought to be generally less bioavailable and has been found to be

less effectively removed than the bulk TP in treatment wetlands (Reddy and DeLaune, 2008;

Chimney, 2007), though this may be due as much to internal production of DOP as to non-

treatment of influent DOP (Pinney et al., 2000). Therefore, it is proposed that the composition of









the inflow TP potentially contributed to the apparent background concentration in the STAs, with

relative increases in SRP lowering C* and relative increases in DOP elevating C*.

Although the monthly outflow TP concentration from the set of cells of interest was not

correlated to the TPALR, it was weakly but measurably influenced by the inflow TP

concentration: r = 0.353 (p <0.0001, n = 597 considering monthly data among all the cells of

interest). The positive relationship also existed within the monthly data for 4 of the 18 included

individual cells (STA-1E Cell 7, STA-2 Cell 3, STA-3/4 Cell 1B, STA-6 Cell 5). The presence

of this co-variance required that the effects of the TP fractionation on the outflow concentration

be assessed within the effects of the inflow TP concentration. After the variability due to the

inflow TP concentration was removed, neither the relative size of the SRP fraction nor the DOP

fraction had any significant effect on the outflow TP concentration (SRP: F-value = 0.12, p =

0.7298, df = 1; DOP: F-value = 0.03, p = 0.8722, df=l). The effect of the inflow DOP

concentration was significant (F-value = 6.89, p = 0.0089, df = 1), but the additional variability

explained was minor (approx. 1%). The three variables, inflow DOP concentration, inflow DOP

fraction and inflow SRP fraction, had a significant effect on the monthly outflow TP

concentration after accounting for the inflow TP concentration in only 2, 3, and 4 cells,

respectively. In addition, there was no relationship found between the outflow TP concentration

and any of these three variables at either annual or POR averaging periods. In summary, both

across cells and within cells, the composition of the inflow TP played a minor role, at best, in the

determination of the outflow concentration from the cells where the outflow TP concentration

was not related to the TPALR.

Long-term areal loading

Sustained high annual areal P loading is known to increase the soil P concentration. In

South Florida, a well-studied example of this phenomenon is Water Conservation Area 2A









(WCA-2A), where decades of P loading have resulted in elevated soil P concentrations

immediately downstream from the inflows. Reddy and DeLaune (2008) provide an excellent

review of the literature on WAC-2A. As part of a positive feedback cycle with increasing soil P,

primary productivity of wetlands tends to increase with sustained P loads (Lowe and Keenan,

1997; Kadlec and Knight, 1996). As a result, the P-processing "biomachine" grows in response

to increased P loads. The P-sequestering power (in terms of g P/m2/yr) grows as well, until

biomass expansion becomes limited by space-, light- or nutrient-(e.g. N) availability. Biomass

production, senescence and decomposition are known to export dissolved nutrients to the water

column (Pinney et al., 2000; Qualls and Richardson, 2002, Reddy and DeLaune, 2008). It is

conceivable that increasing the size of the "biomachine" would increase the autochthonous P

production and export. Thus, STA cells with high long-term TPALR may be expected to operate

with relatively higher apparent background concentrations, even if in the short term, the outflow

TP concentration is independent of the TPALR.

It has been previously established that the expected positive relationship between outflow

TP concentration and TPALR exists in the STAs when long-term (POR) averaging periods are

considered; among all STA cells, the POR outflow TP concentration was positively, non-linearly

correlated to the POR TPALR through a power function (Pietro et al., 2009). The objective here

is to assess if that relationship holds when considering only those cells in which the short-term

TPALR did not directly control the monthly outflow TP concentration.

Among all the cells operating with non-significant r', the POR FWM outflow TP

concentration was significantly linearly correlated to the average annual TPALR (r = 0.703,

p=0.0011, n = 18; Figure 3-5). A power function (Pietro et al. 2009) described the data only

slightly more accurately (r2 = 0.508; Figure 3-5). The shape of the data cloud in Figure 3-5 was









remarkably similar to the distribution of the wide variety of wetlands studied by Richardson and

Qualls (1999), including an apparent breakpoint near 1.0 g P/m2/yr. Unclear, for both the STA

cells and the wetlands documented by Richardson and Qualls (1999), is why some wetlands are

able to produce low outflow concentrations even under high areal loads (e.g. STA-1E Cell 4N).

At an annual scale, the data demonstrated a similar relationship, although the non-linearity

observed in the POR data was absent (Figure 3-6). Even among cells where the monthly outflow

concentration was independent of the monthly TPALR, years with higher areal loads tended to

also have higher outflow TP concentrations. This may be attributable to the aforementioned

effect of the size of the "biomachine." The non-linearity in the POR data may develop as the

effects of consistent light or heavy loading compound over years of operation.

Seasonality

The bulk of the long-term sustainable P removal in wetland is biologically mediated by

microorganisms, algae and submerged and emergent macrophytes (Kadlec and Knight, 1996;

Kadlec, 1997; Dierberg at al., 2002). The P demand and production from these biomass

compartments varies as their size and activity fluctuate in response to environmental factors (e.g.

temperature and insolation) (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). Seasonal cycles are common in

treatment wetlands, but are minimized, particularly for P, in subtropical wetlands with a year-

round growing season (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). Nonetheless, a distinct intra-annual

temperature cycle is observed in South Florida (Figure 3-6) that may lend itself to seasonal

fluctuations in biological processing sufficient to alter treatment performance. If so, the impacts

ought to be seen as an annual cyclical variation in the outflow concentration, particularly in those

cells producing effluent at an apparent background concentration. Water temperature is known to

control microbial activity (Reddy and DeLaune, 2008) and serves as a good proxy for the

average insolation, a driver of primary productivity (Best and Visser, 1987), so any annual









cyclical variation in outflow TP concentration may be a reflection of the annual water

temperature cycle (Figure 3-6).

Considering only the cells with non-significant r'-values, the monthly outflow TP

concentration did not significantly vary with either the monthly inflow or outflow water

temperature (r < 0.064, n = 578). Likely, the cell-to-cell variation in outflow TP concentration

devalued this assessment. The monthly outflow TP concentration was significantly (p = 0.05)

correlated to the monthly inflow water temperature in only 3 cells (positively in STA-3/4 Cell 3

and STA-5 CFW and negatively in STA-5 NFW), and to the outflow water temperature in only 2

cells (positively in STA-6 Cell 3 and negatively in STA-3/4 Cell 2B). No non-linearity was

found between outflow TP concentration and water temperature in a visual inspection of scatter

plots within each cell.

That the relationship was significant in relatively few cells and that the conditions of the

co-variances were inconsistent (some positively and some negatively correlated), suggest that the

water temperature in the STAs did not play a critical role in determining the apparent

background TP concentration in the STAs. Water temperature was thought to be a satisfactory

surrogate for seasonality because many other variables are expected to be strongly correlated to it

(e.g. insolation, seasonal biomass changes). However, a flaw is recognized in this approach:

because of the sinusoidal nature of temperature over time, each average monthly temperature

occurs twice per year (except for the annual maximum and minimum temperature). The

environmental conditions may be quite different at the two manifestations of a given

temperature. For example, the average water temperature tended to be about 25 C in both April

and October in STA-1W Cell 4 (Figure 3-6), but this fails to capture the obvious biological

differences between the two months (e.g. spring flush vs. fall senescence). In none of the 18 cells









with low r'-values was the outflow TP concentration significantly correlated to the ordinal

month value (e.g. January = 1, February = 2...). Additionally, no regular non-linear patterns

were observed in scatter plots of outflow TP concentration vs. time in months. A more powerful

signal-processing method (e.g. Fourier transform) might be applied to the monthly outflow TP

concentration data to better effect.

Conclusions

Although the POR outflow TP concentration was generally a function of the long-term

average annual TPALR among all cells of the STAs (Pietro et al., 2009), as is common in

treatment wetlands (Qian and Richardson, 1997), in a majority of cells the monthly outflow TP

concentration was statistically independent of the monthly TPALR. Cell-to-cell variability in the

strength of the short-term outflow concentration-TPALR relationship was not explained by the

dominant vegetation type, and unsatisfactorily justified by the long-term TPALR. In the short-

term, the outflow TP concentration from those cells operating at an apparent background

concentration was not determined by the relative fractionation of the inflow TP pool nor did it

vary with season, as approximated by the water temperature. Among these cells in the long-term,

the annual average TPALR accounted for approximately 51% variation in the POR FWM

outflow TP concentration.

Two useful implications arise from this study. First, the apparent uncoupling of the

monthly outflow TP concentration from the TPALR suggests large Da in most STA cells,

independent of the vegetation type. Equation ( 3-2 ) demonstrates that in wetlands with high Da,

the realized outflow TP concentration will be controlled primarily by the apparent background

concentration. Therefore, the ability for k-C* to accurately model outflow TP concentrations in

the STAs may depend heavily on accurate estimates of C*.









Second, the notable lack of powerful descriptive variables for the short-term outflow TP

concentration resulting from this work highlights the limits of both the currently available data

and the body of knowledge of wetland P processing at this time. If minimizing the outflow

concentrations from the STAs remains a political and managerial priority in South Florida,

small-scale (e.g. mesocosm) research ought to be applied to identify additional potential

controllers of the short-term outflow TP concentration, and large-scale (e.g. field) studies will be

needed to define the interactions of these variables under operational conditions.









Table 3-1. Coefficients of correlation between monthly outflow total phosphorus (TP)
concentration and monthly TP areal loading rate (ALR) within each cell before (r)
and after (r') exclusion of the month of maximum TPALR. Non-significant (p = 0.05)
coefficients are reported as 0.0.


Cell
STA-2 Cell 1
STA-1E Cell
STA-1E Cell
STA-1E Cell
STA-1E Cell
STA-1E Cell
STA-1E Cell
STA-1W Cell
STA-3/4 Cell
STA-3/4 Cell
STA-3/4 Cell
STA-3/4 Cell
STA-3/4 Cell
STA-5 CFW
STA-5 NFW
STA-2 Cell 2
STA-2 Cell 3
STA-6 Cell 3
STA-6 Cell 5
STA-1W Cell
STA-1W Cell
STA-1W Cell
STA-1W Cell


Vegetation
Designation
EAV
SAV
SAV
EAV
EAV
SAV
EAV
SAV
EAV
EAV
EAV
SAV
Mixed
Mixed
Mixed
EAV
SAV
EAV
EAV
SAV
EAV
Mixed
EAV


-0.284
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.859
0.648
0.085
0.0
0.0
0.433
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.622
0.433
0.524
0.742
0.692


-0.293
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.292
0.422
0.591
0.707















C Inflow
0 A) ALR= 1.0 HLR ALR
.o cone.

,B) ALR = 1.0
m/yr mg/L g/m2/yr
t-

0 C) ALR = 0.75
c D0 A 15 0.067 1.00
|*" D) ALR = 0.38
o I**.. B 20 0.050 1.00

.****..........::. C 15 0.050 0.75

D 15 0.025 0.38

0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%

Distance through wetland



Figure 3-1. When a wetland treats to background concentration (C*), the areal loading rate
(ALR) does not affect the outflow concentration.















Group 2






Group 3


0% 20% 40%


60% 80% 100%


Percent SAV cover

Figure 3-2. Correlation between outflow total phosphorus (TP) concentration and TP mass
loading rate with respect to submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) coverage. Non-
significant correlations were assigned an r'-value of 0.


*Group 1
AGroup 2
0 Group 3


-m 6- 0 1I0 -1


POR average annual TPALRM
(g/m2/yr)

Figure 3-3. Correlation between outflow total phosphorus (TP) concentration and TP areal
loading rate (ALR) as a function of the average annual TPALR. Non-significant
correlations were assigned an r'-value of 0.


Group 1


"- ~' -"" ~"'










0.25


S0.2
SE
= 0.15
o.
0.1

o0
0- 0 0.05


I.


* Group 1
AGroup 2
o Group 3


A A


I


e-value


Figure 3-4. Outflow total phosphorus (TP) concentration with respect to the correlation
coefficient between the TP areal loading rate (TPALR) and the outflow TP
concentrations.


y = 0.0292x0 9777
R2 = 0.5067


y = 0.0344x 0.0004
R2= 0.4946


* U


U


POR annual average TPALR
(g/m2/yr)

Figure 3-5. Period-of-record (POR) flow-weighted mean outflow total phosphorus (TP)
concentration as a function of the POR average annual TP areal loading rate.


0.25

0.2

0.15

0.1

0.05


4













o Low r'-value

High r-value


y = 0.0165x + 0.0327
R2= 0.2143


0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16

Annual TPALR
(g/m2/yr)


Figure 3-6. Annual flow-weighted mean (FWM) outflow total phosphorus (TP) concentration as
a function of the annual TP areal loading rate (ALR). Data from cells with high r'-
values are differentiated. The regression line considers data from low r'-value cells
only.


o Inflow

Outflow

o



oo


J F M A M J J A S O N D


Figure 3-7. Monthly average temperature (oC) of inflow and outflow water in STA-1W Cell 4.


0 0)
S-j

o r



So
00


E n


0 6
li f 13-


E


E D3


40C





30C





20C





10C












CHAPTER 4
MULTIPLE LINEAR REGRESSION TO DETERMINE FACTORS CONTROLLING
PHOSPHORUS CONCENTRATION AND SETTLING RATE IN THE STORMWATER
TREATMENT AREAS

Introduction

The cardinal performance metric for the STAs is outflow TP concentration. Many studies

evaluating the STAs have investigated the outflow TP concentration with respect to various

wetland characteristics, such as TPALR or vegetation type (e.g. Dierberg et al., 2002; Juston and

DeBusk, 2006; Pietro et al., 2009). Importantly, the enforced and proposed regulations on the

STAs also consider, primarily, the effluent concentration (Pietro et al, 2008). These regulations

obligate STA managers to minimize the outflow TP concentrations. Ensuring the conditions for

high Da-values (high settling rates and low loading rates) is critical to that effort. Chapter 3 of

this work showed that the short-term outflow TP concentration was controlled more by C* than

by TPALR or Da in most STA cells. Therefore, it is important to understand the wetland factors

that contribute to the C*.

Inter-wetland and temporal variations in outflow TP concentration have been well studied

(Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). Likewise, fluctuations in outflow TP concentration have been

documented in the STAs (e.g. Pietro et al., 2008). A stated or implied assumption in almost all

treatment wetland work, and adopted here as well, is that the outflow TP concentration is a

function of various wetland characteristics. That is, the difference in the outflow TP

concentration observed for two different wetlands ought to be due to the variation of some

features) between those wetlands. Similarly, the fluctuations of outflow concentration with time

within a wetland are assumed to have resulted from changes in attributes of that wetland. For

example, holding everything else constant, a wetland with a TP load comprised primarily of SRP









may be expected to demonstrate a lower outflow concentration than an identical wetland

receiving mainly DOP.

In wetland science of course, it is impossible to "hold everything else constant," and so the

effects of a single wetland characteristic are easily confounded. Even wetlands in side-by-side

studies show some disparities in outflow concentrations (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). Such

differences are often ascribed to "stochastic variability," a lumped error term containing all of

the variance due to unaccounted-for wetland properties (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). The

objective of this study was to partition the variability in the short-term outflow TP concentration,

to the maximum extent possible, to quantifiable wetland characteristics. In addition, the outflow

concentration was correlated to TPALR in a few STA cells (Chapter 3), implying that Da was

limiting performance. Therefore, the factors controlling the TP areal settling rate were also

explored here. Being unable to isolate the effects of single variables in the field, this study

attempts to do so via multiple regression using the vast datasets available for the STAs.

Considering the entire pool of non-screened months from all STA cells, the differences in

means from cell to cell accounted for approximately 30% and 20% of the variation in monthly

outflow TP concentrations and TP settling rates, respectively. From a managerial perspective,

identifying the combination of variables responsible for these cell-to-cell differences (as well as

the factors responsible for the substantial intra-cell variability) may possibly allow managers to

better regulate the performance of the STAs by manipulating key attributes in all or some

wetland cells. In addition, understanding which macro-scale wetland characteristics control the

outflow concentration and the k-value in the STAs would provide guidance for future work on

the illumination of poorly-understood process-level P dynamics in all subtropical surface-flow

treatment wetlands.









Objectives

The objective of this chapter was to assess the relative influence of a wide variety of

factors on the outflow TP concentration and the TP areal settling rate in the STAs. Multiple

regression methods were implemented as an initial evaluation. It is recognized that the methods

employed herein were relatively elementary, but were necessary to provide guidance for future

exercises in this vein.

This chapter specifically addresses the question: can variation in STA performance be

adequately explained by variations in the characteristics of the wetlands that comprise the STAs?

Of course, the wetland properties open to investigation were limited to those for which

appropriately spatially- and temporally-resolved, quantitative data were available. After the first

inquiry, a second question naturally follows: which factors did contribute to variation in STA

performance, and are they subject to manipulation by STA managers?

This chapter tested the following hypothesis: variability in the monthly outflow TP

concentration and TP areal settling can be significantly explained by a subset of these factors:

inflow TP concentration, inflow TP composition (fractionation), TPALR, r, soil TP

concentration, mean water depth, wetland age, inflow Ca concentration, Ca ALR, Ca areal

retention, water column pH, and water temperature.

Methods

Multiple Linear Regression

Multiple regression considers linear models of the form:

y, = Po + x+ 2Xi 2 + P3X31 + ... + PnXni + El (4-1 )

where yi = the ith observation of the dependent variable of interest, xl,-Xn, = ith values of

independent variables related to y, Po = estimated value ofy when xl through Xn = 0, 1i-Pn =

parameters (coefficients) estimating the effect of each xi-Xn on y, and F, = ith residual. Multiple









regression procedures seek to select values of Po-Pn which minimize the sum of the squares of the

residuals.

Multiple regression analyses were used to determine the most influential independent

variables (xi-Xn in Equation (4-1 )) on the dependent variables monthly outflow TP

concentration and monthly TP areal settling rate (kTP). Because the absolute value of kTp was not

considered here, but rather the relative differences from cell to cell and month to month (Pietro et

al., 2009), for simplicity, it was calculated with C* = 0:



kTp = (ln() (4-2)


where C1 = inflow concentration [M/L3], C2 = outflow concentration [M/L3], and Qi = flow rate

in [L3/T], Q2 = flow rate out [L3/T], and WAD = wetted area, determined by elevation

distribution [L2]. The assumption of a constant C*-value for all STA cells (in this case C*=0)

presents a special difficulty. This and previous chapters function on the recognition of spatially

and temporally variable C*, meaning that the use of any constant C* is inappropriate.

Unfortunately, the value (or function) that should be used for C* for each STA cell is yet

unclear, though this chapter attempts to clarify the matter.

The multiple regressions were performed using SAS 9.1 (SAS Institute, Cary, NC). Built-

in variable-selection procedures were not viable for this dataset; these routines include only

observations (months) for which a value was present for every possible factor. For example, the

missing inflow Ca concentration value in STA-1W Cell 5 in March 2005 would remove all the

data for that month from consideration even if the inflow Ca concentration was not selected for

the final model. After the extensive screening process (see Methods, Chapter 1), only about 15%

of months had values for each variable. Since it was unlikely that all of the variables would









prove to be useful in the final model, manual incremental construction of the model was deemed

more appropriate. The regression model building approach was similar for both the outflow TP

concentration and the TP areal settling rate. In all instances throughout this chapter, the adjusted

coefficient of determination (r2) is reported, to enforce parsimony and appropriately penalize the

measure of fit for the number of dependent variables included in each model.

The manual variable selection procedure was intended to be straightforward. The r2 was

determined for each univariate model. Next, bivariate models were tested using the top regressor

(variable producing the highest r2) from the single-variable models and iteratively inserting each

other variable. Trivariate models were tested by iteratively introducing each remaining variable

into the best (highest r2) bivariate model. This process was repeated until the marginal gains in

explanatory power (increase in r2 due to each additional variable) were deemed trivial.

Each cell had a different POR mean outflow TP concentration (Figure 3-4) and settling rate

(not shown). The mean value for each cell may be thought of as an estimate of each monthly

value in each cell. The variability in the cell means explained a portion of the overall variability

in the monthly values. It was possible to model the effects of each cell on the dependent

parameters. At each level of complexity, the model was also tested with the cell effects to assess

the extent that each additional variable accounted for cell-to-cell differences in outflow

concentration and settling rate.

Variables Considered

The inclusion of specific variables for consideration was based primarily on data

availability with a focus on wetland attributes commonly thought to influence P processing.

Some wetland characteristics that may be commonly expected to influence wetland P processing

were necessarily omitted for lack of quantitative data in the monthly timescale (e.g. plant

biomass). Altogether, 21 quantitative variables were tested in each regression model.









k-C* model terms

A great deal of research has supported the validity of the k-C* model for application to a

variety of wetlands (Kadlec and Knight, 1996; Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). As discussed

previously (see Chapters 1 and 2), the model captures some intrinsic relationships between

several wetland parameters. For example, as described by the model, increases in the inflow TP

concentration result in elevated outflow TP concentrations. The critical model variables inflow

TP concentration and q were included in the set of variables for regression. The inflow TP

concentration multiplied by q yields of course the TPALR. The intuitive notion that the outflow

TP concentration ought to be correlated to the TPALR has been confirmed by many studies of

long-term data (e.g. Qian and Richardson, 1997; Pietro et al., 2009; Kadlec and Wallace, 2008),

so the nominal (based on the findings of Chapter 2) TPALR was also included in the regression

analysis. Wetlands integrate continuous loads and so outflow concentrations may reflect past

operating conditions as well as recent inflow events (Juston and DeBusk, 2006; Reddy and

DeLaune, 2008), so both the 1-year and 2-year rolling average TPALRN were incorporated in the

variable set.

Inflow phosphorus fractions

Within wetlands, not all P-containing compounds are treated equally. Soluble reactive P is

typically preferentially removed because it is highly bioavailable (Havens et al., 1999, Dierberg

et al., 2002, Pietro et al,. 2006). Particulate P removal may be high if the wetland conditions

promote settling and retention of the suspended solids (e.g Braskerud, 2002a,b). When water

velocities or other turbations inhibit settling, the P associated with particles has to be

enzymatically cleaved before biota can access it, so a portion of the PP may progress through the

wetland, escaping removal (Dierberg and DeBusk, 2008). Finally, DOP may contain molecules

that resist uptake or transformation in the wetland environment. In fact, previous studies of the









Everglades and the STAs have demonstrated poor sequestration of DOP (Proctor et al., 1999;

Chimney, 2007). For these reasons, the nature of the inflow TP pool was expected to affect the

treatment of that TP, and so the relative proportions of each fraction were included in the

regression variable set.

Wetland age and soil phosphorus

A small but growing number of treatment wetlands have been operated for P removal for

time periods longer than a decade (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008), so the longevity of wetlands for

sustained, effective P removal remains a matter of investigation. Two well known examples of

treatment wetlands with long-term performance data, Houghton Lake in Michigan and the

Orlando Easterly Wetland in Florida, provide some insight. Following mesocosm and pilot

studies, full scale discharge of wastewater into the Houghton Lake wetland began in 1978

(Kadlec, 1993). Nearly 30 years later, the former sedge meadow was transformed into Typha

marsh and was still providing positive P removal (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). Kadlec and

Wallace (2008) note that although Richardson and Marshall (1986) predicted P "saturation" of

the wetland following a total loading of 1.0-1.5 g/m2, the wetland still provided P mass removal

exceeding 80% after cumulative loading of 63 g/m2. However, the percent removal was slightly

lower and much more variable in the most recent 10 years of operation than in the previous 20

years. This variation was attributed to changes in site hydrology and hydraulics (Kadlec and

Wallace, 2008).

Similarly, the Orlando Easterly Wetland successfully polished tertiary wastewater from the

city of Orlando, Florida, from 1988 until 2003 (Sees and Jackson, 2001; Kadlec and Wallace,

2008). After 10 years of operation, a strong seasonal trend developed in the outflow TP

concentration, resulting in unacceptably poor P removal effectiveness in some winter months

(Wang et al., 2006). A series of studies identified that both sediment P recycling (White et al.,









2002) and hydraulic inefficiencies (Martinez and Wise, 2003) contributed to the observed

reduction in P removal performance. A rejuvenation project in 2002-2003 that included sediment

removal and earthwork to increase hydraulic efficiency immediately boosted P removal

performance (Wang et al., 2006).

The changes in performance after long-term operation observed in the two preceding

examples justify the inclusion of wetland age in the multiple regression exercises. As Wang et al.

(2006) alluded to by their consideration of a host of studies to diagnose the problems

experienced by the Orlando Easterly Wetland, wetland age is a "lumped" parameter, integrating

the effects of many wetland characteristics that change with time (e.g. soil P, internal hydraulics

and vegetation characteristics). Because soil P, in particular, is known to influence the P

concentration of the overlying water (White et al., 2003; Reddy and DeLaune, 2008), it was

included in the regression analyses in an effort to isolate the integrated effects of age. Data for

internal hydraulics and vegetation in the STAs were not available at a temporal scale useful for

this analysis.

Calcium and pH

Phosphorus is well known to co-precipitate with Ca in aquatic systems and wetlands (e.g.

House and Donaldson, 1986; Diaz et al., 1994; Hartley et al., 1997; Scinto, 1997). In their review

of the literature on the topic, Reddy and DeLaune (2008) state "retention of inorganic

phosphorus by precipitation will be significant in waters with high Ca2+ and alkalinity." Indeed,

in Everglades marsh soils, the accumulation of P was correlated with the accumulation of Ca,

providing possible evidence of Ca-P interactions (Reddy et al., 1993). Therefore, inflow Ca

concentration, Ca ALR, and Ca mass removal (M/L2/T) were added to regression analysis to

investigate the effects of possible differences in Ca supply and processing among the STAs. In









addition, inflow and outflow pH were included in recognition of the pH dependency of Ca

precipitates (Diaz et al., 1994).

Water temperature

The rates of many microbial processes relevant to the wetland P processing are

temperature dependent. For example, rates of decomposition of Everglades histosols increased

dramatically with increasing temperatures (Volk, 1973). Indeed, the release of soluble P from an

organic wetland soil was strongly dependent on temperature (Kadlec and Reddy, 2001). By these

bases it may be expected that P removal in the STAs would also show some temperature

dependence, but previous studies have suggested relatively little influence of temperature on

measured P removal in wetlands (Kadlec and Reddy, 2001; Kadlec and Wallace, 2008).

Nonetheless, inflow and outflow water temperature were incorporated in the multiple regression

to increase the comprehensiveness of this study.

Relative wetted area and water depth

The biogeochemical influences of RWAD are discussed in Chapter 2. In that chapter it was

found that the RWAD was very nearly 1.0 in the STAs, and therefore no significant

biogeochemical impacts of the wetted area were detected. However, RWAD was included in the

regression exercise in the event that it offered some explanatory power when combined with

other wetland characteristics. The findings of Chapter 2 also indicated that, though infrequent,

draw-down/re-flood events were important determinants of the outflow TP concentration. They

were therefore also included in the multiple regression analysis.

Water depth influences the wetland characteristics and processes such as vegetation types,

internal hydraulics and oxygen diffusion (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). Studies on the integrated

effect of water depth on P removal in wetlands associated with the STA project have produced

unclear results; at high P concentrations, depth inhibited removal for cattails (Chimney et al.,









2004) and SAV (Jorge et al., 2002), but did not produce a pronounced deleterious effect at low P

concentrations. Despite this, the individual biogeochemical effects of water depth in wetlands

call for its inclusion in the multiple regression investigation.

Results and Discussion

Outflow Total Phosphorus Concentration: All Cells

The results of the variable-selection procedure are presented in Table 4-1 and Figure 4-1.

Altogether, only about 32% of the total variability in the monthly outflow TP concentration was

explained by the final 5-variable model. The relatively poor explanatory power of this model was

unexpected since factors known to influence treatment wetland outflow concentration (e.g.

inflow TP concentration) (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008) were included in the selection process.

However, this finding was congruent with the very weak connection found between the TPALR

and the outflow TP concentration in most cells (demonstrated in Chapter 3).

The independent variables included in the final model were (in order of selection) inflow

TP concentration, AWAD, r, wetland age and inflow Ca concentration. When added to these five,

one other variable, inflow pH, showed a significant effect on the outflow TP concentration.

However, it did not increase the strength of the model fit to the data, and was excluded for

parsimony. Estimates of the parameters (coefficients) for each explanatory factor in the final

five-variable model are shown in Table 4-2. These values may be interpreted as the number of

units of change in the outflow TP concentration reflecting one unit of change in the subject

variable, holding the other wetland characteristics constant. The precise values of these estimates

are somewhat sample-dependent (i.e. they would change with the inclusion of an additional data

year) and change with the introduction or removal of other variables in the model. The relative

magnitudes (within parameters of similar units) and signs (positive or negative) are of more

value for interpretation.









At every level of complexity, the inclusion of the cell effects contributed a significant

portion of explanatory power to the model. In fact, this additional variability explained in the

outflow TP concentration appeared to be additive with the variance accounted for by the

included wetland attributes. Therefore, the wetland characteristics accounting for observed

differences in outflow concentration across cells were evidently not considered in this study. The

reduction in r2 after the inclusion of the fifth variable was a result of marked co-linearity between

the cell effects and the wetland characteristics, penalized by the adjusted r2.

Among the five variables in the outflow TP concentration model, several findings were of

interest. First, the relationship between inflow concentration and outflow concentration was

positive, as expected from Equation ( 1-19 ). However, the inflow concentration accounted for

only 20% of the variability in the outflow concentration, in agreement with the poor outflow TP

concentration-TPALR correlations found in Chapter 3, and exposing the relative influence of

other wetland attributes. Second, as suggested in Chapter 2, the positive coefficient associated

with changes in WA confirmed that months of re-flooding tended to have higher outflow

concentrations. Third, increases in inflow Ca concentration slightly decreased the outflow TP

concentration, an expected relationship based on many studies of the Ca-P interactions in South

Florida wetlands (e.g. Reddy et al., 1993; Dierberg et al., 2002). However, within this dataset,

the effect of the varying inflow Ca concentrations was minor relative to the influence of the

inflow TP concentration; the relative impact of increasing the inflow Ca concentration 1.0 mg/L

was 3 orders of magnitude less than the effect of a 1.0 mg/L increase in the inflow TP

concentration.

Fourth, outflow concentrations tended to increase with wetland age. This finding, if it can

be satisfactorily corroborated, has undesirable implications for the ability of the STAs to produce









low outflow concentrations over time. For example, P removal in a large municipal treatment

wetland in Orlando, Florida started to flag after 13 years of operation resulting in a massive

rejuvenation project including muck removal and other significant earthworks (Wang et al.,

2006). Indeed, sediment removal projects have also been undertaken in STA-1W, the longest

running STA, though not directly in response to declining P removal (Pietro et al., 2008). If

ultimately necessary in additional STAs as they age, maintenance requirements of this nature

will undoubtedly reduce the cost effectiveness of the STA project. However, wetland age is

likely a lumped term, containing simultaneously the effects soil P concentration and other soil

characteristics, plant biomass P concentration and possibly unknown others. Effectively

combating any deleterious effects associated with aging STAs will require the evaluation of the

isolated effects of each of these factors.

Finally, the positive correlation between r and outflow TP concentration was surprising.

This suggested that months with longer residence times produced relatively higher outflow

concentrations. While contrary to the logic of rate-based reaction models of P reduction (e.g. the

k-C* model), an explanation may lie in the findings of Chapter 3. It was determined that, in the

majority of STA cells, the outflow TP concentration was independent of the TPALR and

therefore, it was proposed, expressed the apparent background concentration. In this case then,

residence times were generally sufficient to accommodate all potential P removal. Thus, it is

hypothesized that any extension of the r beyond that needed to achieve maximum treatment of

inflow P simply expanded the opportunity for autochthonous P production, resulting in the slight

positive relationship between the outflow TP concentration and r.

Outflow Total Phosphorus Concentration: Cells with Non-significant r'-values

The variable selection procedure resulted in a trivariate model that explained about 54% of

the variability in the monthly outflow TP concentration from cells with non-significant r'-values.









The final model included the following factors: change in RWAD, 1-year rolling average

TPALR, and wetland age. The number of variables included was limited to three because no

additional factor explained a significant (p=0.05) portion of the variability in the dependent term.

The regression model considering only the cells with non-significant r'-values was

different from the model for all STA cells in one considerable way. As expected, the inflow TP

concentration was no longer included in the model. The presence of this term in the model for all

cells was due only to the inclusion of those four cells (Cells 1-4 of STA-1W) that had previously

demonstrated a correlation between inflow and outflow TP concentration.

Two important interpretations may be drawn from the three variables selected for this

model. First, the movement of ARWAD to the forefront reinforces earlier findings of its

significance in the STAs. Though infrequent, large re-flood events appear to be one of the most

powerful and predictable biogeochemical processes in the STAs. Second, the inclusion of both

the 1-year rolling average TPALR and wetland age indicates that the long-term operation of

these STAs plays a measurable role in their short-term performance. Both of these terms had

positive coefficients meaning that the monthly outflow TP concentration tended to increase both

in response to large loads throughout the preceding year and as the wetlands aged. Evidently,

even though these wetlands assimilate P quickly enough to disassociate the monthly outflow

from the monthly inflow concentration, the apparent background concentration is still subject to

the influence of longer-term loading. A wetland achieving apparent background concentrations

could presumably receive additional loads without experiencing reciprocal elevations in outflow

concentration. That notion is countered by the apparent dependence of the background

concentration on long-term loads. Therefore, additional loads may be expected to eventually









increase the outflow concentration, even if inflow and outflow concentrations remained

independent.

Outflow Total Phosphorus Concentration: Single Cell

This and other works have clearly established the cell-to-cell variability in performance in

the STAs (e.g. Juston and DeBusk, 2006; Pietro et al., 2008). The multiple regression exercises

in this chapter presumed that variation in a particular wetland characteristic would have the same

relative effect on treatment performance regardless of whether the change was observed between

two different cells, or across time in a single cell. Because the results of the multi-cell

regressions for outflow TP concentration were not wholly satisfying (i.e. the final adjusted r2-

values were not above 0.54 and most included variables explained trivial proportions of the

variance), it was hoped that additional clarity would be gained by regressing the data from a

single cell.

Cell 1 from STA-1W was selected for this exercise because it had the largest number of

data months (n=70) that had observations for each of the 21 tested variables. The final model had

an adjusted r2 of about 0.54 and included only two independent variables, inflow TP

concentration and wetland age (Table 4-5). When added to these two factors, no additional

variable explained a significant portion of the variability in outflow TP concentration.

This single-cell regression provided little additional information. A significant correlation

between inflow and outflow TP concentrations in STA-1W Cell 1 was established in Chapter 3,

so the inclusion of inflow TP concentration was expected in the final model. Not surprisingly,

the inflow TP concentration term contributed much more to this single-cell regression than it did

in the previous exercise that included cells with both significant and non-significant r'-values;

the univariate regression model including only inflow TP concentration had an adjusted r2 of

0.38 for STA-1W Cell 1 data only and an adjusted r2 of 0.20 for data from all cells. Serious









management implications arise when wetland age appears in the regression model with a positive

coefficient, but these are discussed previously in this chapter, as well as Chapter 5.

Total Phosphorus Areal Settling Rate: All Cells

The results of the variable selection procedure are presented in Table 4-3 and Figure 4-2.

Altogether, the final six-variable model explained about 51% of the variability in the monthly TP

areal settling rate. The first variable added to the model, qN, accounted for the first 40% while, in

total, the next five variables, inflow DOP fraction, inflow PP fraction, outflow temperature and

TPALRN, increased the r2 of the model only about 0.10. The importance and influence of qN was

reflected in the relatively high r2 of the single-variable models with TPALRN and Ca ALRN.

Variable-inclusion was stopped after six factors because the addition of the last term, TPALRN,

increased the explanatory power of the model by less than 1%. The r2 of the final model (0.512)

was unsatisfactory, considering the effort invested in collection and compilation of the extensive

dataset. The declining disparity with increasing model complexity between the r2-values of the

models with and without the inclusion of the cell effects suggests that the six wetland attributes

in the final model explained a portion of the variability due to cell-to-cell differences. Each

additional factor accounted for a small portion of this variance, and the settling rate differences

across cells were apparently not due to a single wetland characteristic.

Estimates of the parameters (coefficients) for each explanatory factor in the final six-

variable model are shown in Table 4-4. As with the outflow concentration model, these values

may be interpreted as the number of units of change in the TP areal settling rate reflecting one

unit of change in the subject variable, holding the other wetland characteristics constant. As

before, the relative magnitudes (within parameters of similar units) and signs (positive or

negative) are of primary interest for interpretation.









The set of variables selected for the final model was noteworthy for several reasons. First,

as noted earlier, qN was the primary determinant of the monthly settling rate. Months with high

hydraulic loading tended to have higher kTp-values, holding all else constant. As with the

relatively poor relationship between inflow and outflow TP concentration, this is likely a result

of the Chapter 3 finding that the outflow TP concentration was independent of the TPALR in

most cells. The implication that follows from that independence, that the outflow concentration

reflected an apparent background concentration, and thus that maximum potential removal

occurred in most months, means that the magnitude of the areal mass removal ought to have

been based more or less strictly on the loading rate. This was evidenced by the inclusion of both

qN and TPALRN in the final model.

Second, the negative coefficients associated with both the inflow DOP and PP fractions

confirm, primarily, that of the three P fractions, the STAs most effectively remove SRP. Possibly

the independent effects of DOP and PP were such that the information contributed to the model

by these two fractions was more useful than simply providing the SRP fraction (SRP = TP PP

- DOP).

Third, Pietro et al. (2009) found a negative relationship between POR outflow TP

concentration and POR kTp-value, with lower concentrations generally produced from cells with

higher settling rates. That interaction may have been expressed in these data through the age

term. While increasing wetland age tended to increase the outflow TP concentration, older cells

had a greater likelihood of having lower kTp-values. As with the outflow concentration model,

age likely contains the combined effects of a variety of wetland features that must be separated

for a thorough interpretation and assessment of the implications for the STAs.









Finally, that the TP settling rate was positively related to the outflow water temperature

was expected. Kadlec and Wallace (2008) reviewed the matter and their conclusion closely

matched the result of this study; the TP settling rate tends to be slightly dependent on

temperature, but temperature explains very little variance in the short-term kTp-value.

Total Phosphorus Areal Settling Rate: Single Cell

As was done for outflow TP concentration, a multiple regression model of kTp was

assembled for the monthly data from STA-1W Cell 1. The final model included only the terms

water depth and wetland age and had an adjusted r2 of only 0.18 (Table 4-8). The selection of

depth as the first factor in the model was not expected; this was the only final model in this study

in which it appeared. Apparently, however, this was another expression of the dependence of kTp

on q that was observed in the exercise that included all cells. In STA-1W Cell 1, water depth and

q were highly collinear (r=0.686, p<0.0001, n=94). It is unclear why depth proved to be a better

regressor than q. Once again wetland age was a significant contributor of explained variance.

The negative coefficient indicated that the monthly calculated settling rate declined as this cell

aged, though the poor fit of this model (low r2) undermines the strength of any conclusions

drawn from it. Note the discussion above in this chapter, as well as in Chapter 5 on the

management implications of aging wetlands.

Limitations and Future Application of the Multiple Regression Technique

Multiple regression is attractive for analysis of the deterministic factors in wetlands

because it partitions explanatory power among many variables, allowing the isolation of the

effects of particular wetland characteristics. The STAs are exceptionally well suited for this

technique because of the breadth and quality of the data available. However, the ability to assess

a large number of factors simultaneously introduces a significant limitation to the technique.

Multiple regression can only consider observations for which valid data are available for every









variable included in the model being tested. This can (and in the case of the dataset considered

here, did) result in loss of potentially valuable information. As model complexity increased, so

did the likelihood of encountering a variable, within a given observation, for which the value had

been screened.

Also, the regression techniques as applied here were limited to assessing linear

relationships between the dependent and independent variables. Non-linear relationships

commonly exist among wetland data at different time scales (e.g. between POR outflow TP

concentration and TPALR in Pietro et al., 2009). Potentially this study failed to capture non-

linear, but important, relationships within this dataset.

As mentioned previously, this investigation was intended to serve as a first step toward

identifying wetland characteristics important to P treatment. Future researchers may contemplate

several considerations to advance this technique.

The inclusion of additional wetland attributes as model variables not considered in this

study should be a first priority. The "low-hanging fruit" consist of both unique additional

variables (e.g. herbicide application or dissolved oxygen) and further permutations of the data

included here (e.g. cumulative PP areal loading). Quite possibly though, data for key variables

are not currently being collected altogether or at useful spatial and temporal resolutions.

Undoubtedly, any call for additional data collection at the massive scale of the STAs would need

to be well defended by findings in the literature and potentially even lab- or mesocosm-level

studies.

Second, new and existing data should be investigated at additional time scales. Some

factors (e.g. soil P or plant biomass) may not vary sufficiently over short (monthly) time scales

for their effects on P treatment to be captured by regression techniques. Quarterly, annual and









POR averaging periods are suggested, acknowledging that each reduction in temporal resolution

will reduce the available number of observations.

Finally, it is recommended to use multiple regression to investigate possible interactions

between wetland characteristics. For example, hypothetically, the effect of depth on P treatment

could differ between vegetation types. Including interaction terms complicates regression efforts,

and it is suggested that such an investigation be initiated with expected interactions (e.g. Ca

concentration and pH), and expanded to include unforeseen interactions if necessary.

Conclusions

Within the data available for this analysis, fluctuations in the monthly outflow TP

concentration and the monthly TP areal settling rate were relatively poorly explained by any of

the 21 wetland characteristics tested. In combination, the five variables inflow TP concentration,

AWAD, r, wetland age and inflow Ca concentration accounted for about 32% of the variability in

the monthly outflow TP concentration. About 51% of the variability in the monthly TP areal

settling rate was explained by the linear model containing the six parameters qN, inflow DOP

fraction, inflow PP fraction, wetland age, outflow water temperature and TPALRN. In both cases,

the bulk of the explained variability was accounted for by single wetland characteristics; inflow

TP concentration most strongly controlled outflow TP concentration and the settling rate was

most closely related to the qN. In both models, each of the remaining variables contributed

meagerly to the r2. The guiding hypothesis, that the tested variables would significantly explain

the variance in the outflow TP concentration and the TP areal settling rate was rejected, in spirit

if not in letter, by the findings of this chapter.

The relatively large amounts of unexplained variance and the distributions of the resolved

variability in both tested dependent variables support several important conclusions. First, while









Chapter 3 demonstrated the importance of identifying appropriate values or functions for C* for

each STA cell, this chapter revealed the challenge of doing so. Second, it is likely that additional

wetland characteristics not quantified in this study were and are influential on the short-term

outflow TP concentration and the TP settling rate. Although fully accounting for all the wetland

attributes that cause these performance indices to vary (e.g. r2 = 1.0) is the conceptual goal, all

the error accumulating from measurement, inflow-outflow lag due to positive r, and the

limitations of multiple linear regression will manifest as unexplained variance. The relative

proportions of the unresolved variability in this study contributed by missing variables and other

sources of error remain undetermined. Third, the short-term measured outcomes of wetland P

processing, which are known to be quite complex, may in fact depend on such an array of

wetland attributes that even a majority of the variability may not be explained by only a handful

of measured traits. The small individual contributions of most of the variables examined herein

attests to this conclusion. In this case, the data collection and processing required to substantially

or fully explain the variability in, say, outflow TP concentration, would almost certainly surpass

the usefulness of this information.

Readers interested in practical applications of the interpretations in this chapter regarding

the potential to improve TP removal performance may find the conclusions of this chapter

unsatisfying, particularly with respect to the short-term outflow TP concentration. First, the

factor that explained the majority of the variance in the monthly outflow concentration (inflow

TP concentration) is not reasonably subject to manipulation by STA managers. Conceivably,

inflow concentrations could be lowered by reducing P losses from upstream sources, but this

approach falls outside the realm of improving wetland treatment effectiveness. Second, though

the long-term outflow TP concentration and kTp-value were negatively associated (Pietro et al.,









2009), attempts to increase the settling rate by increasing q (the primary driver of the settling

rate) should not be expected to depress the outflow concentration. Finally, the relative lack of

influence (with regard to improvements in r2) of each of the additional variables that contributed

to the outflow TP concentration and the settling rate suggests that modifying any of them would

be unlikely to result in cost-effective reductions in outflow concentrations.










Table 4-1. Coefficients of determination (r2) of multiple linear regression models explaining the
monthly outflow total phosphorus concentration in all cells. The column heading
indicates the complexity (number of variables included) in the model. For a particular
level of complexity, a given value is the r2 for the model containing that variable and
all the variables indicated by "X". The highest r2-value in each column is boldfaced.


Number of variables included in model
Variable 1 2 3 4 5 6
Inflow TP 0.198 X X X X X


concentration
TPALRA- 0.070 -- 0.287 0.304
nominal
1-yr rolling 0.014 -- 0.279 0.301 --
average TPALR
2-yr rolling -- -- 0.260
average TPALR
Inflow SRPA 0.004 --
fraction
Inflow DOPA -
fraction
Inflow PPA 0.010 0.225 0.268 0.276 --
fraction
Inflow CaA 0.021 0.215 0.266 0.290 0.323 X
concentration
Ca ALR- -- -- -- -- --
nominal
Ca areal mass -- -- -- --
removal rate
Wetland age 0.032 0.212 0.258 0.301 X X
qA nominal -- -- -- --
A -- 0.224 0.281 X X X
Mean water 0.003 --
depth
Soil TP -- -- -- -- -- --
concentration
Inflow pH 0.004 0.212 0.258 0.289 0.303 0.323
Outflow pH -- -- 0.245 -- -- --
Inflow water -- 0.250 --
temperature
Outflow water -- -- 0.243 -- -
temperature
WADA 0.004 0.205 0.253 0.289
Change in WAD 0.028 0.247 X X X X
ATPALR = TP areal loading rate; SRP = soluble reactive P; DOP = dissolved organic P; PP = particulate P; Ca =
calcium; q = hydraulic loading rate; r = hydraulic residence time; WAD = wetted area, determined by the elevation
distribution









Table 4-2. Estimates of parameters for the model explaining monthly outflow total phosphorus
(TP) concentration in all cells.
Variable Units Parameter estimate (0) Probability (p) that 0 = 0
Outflow TP concentration mg/L -- --
Inflow TP concentration mg/L 0.4387 <0.0001
Change in wetted area % 0.2443 <0.0001
Hydraulic residence time d 0.0004 <0.0001
Wetland age yr 0.0051 <0.0001
Inflow Ca concentration mg/L -0.0004 <0.0001










Table 4-3. Coefficients of determination (r2) of multiple linear regression models explaining the
monthly outflow total phosphorus (TP) concentration in all cells with non-significant
r'-values. The column heading indicates the complexity (number of variables
included) in the model. For a particular level of complexity, a given value is the r2 for
the model containing that variable and all the variables indicated by "X". The highest
r2-value in each column is boldfaced.
Number of variables included in model
Variable 1 2 3
Inflow TP concentration 0.056 0.477
TPALRA- nominal 0.014 0.445
1-yr rolling average TPALR -- 0.523 X
2-vr rolling average TPAT.R -- -- --


I- SRPA-- .f-ra --ct-
Inflow SRPA fraction
Inflow DOA fraction
Inflow PPA fraction
Inflow CaA concentration
Ca ALR nominal
Ca areal mass removal rate
Wetland age
q nominal
A
Mean water depth
Soil TP concentration
Inflow pH
Outflow pH
Inflow water temperature
Outflow water temperature
WADA
Change in WAD
ATPALR = TP areal loading rate; SRP
calcium; q = hydraulic loading rate; r =
distribution


0.032
0.019
0.042


0.016
0.093


0.470
0.443


0.537


0.116 0.490
0.133
0.032 0.425 0.459
0.026
0.028
0.024
0.014
0.437 X X
soluble reactive P; DOP = dissolved organic P; PP = particulate P; Ca =
hydraulic residence time; WAD = wetted area, determined by the elevation









Table 4-4. Estimates of parameters for the model explaining outflow total phosphorus (TP)
concentration in all cells with non-significant r'-values.
Variable Units Parameter estimate (0) Probability (p) that 0 = 0
Outflow TP concentration mg/L -- --
Change in wetted area % 0.2080 <0.0001
1-yr rolling average g/m2/yr 0.0365 0.0378
TPALR
Wetland age yr 0.0018 0.0068









Table 4-5. Estimates of parameters for the model explaining outflow total phosphorus (TP)
concentration in STA-1W Cell 1.
Variable Units Parameter estimate (0) Probability (p) that 0 = 0
Outflow TP concentration mg/L -- --
Inflow TP concentration mg/L 0.4254 <0.0001
Wetland age yr 0.0149 <0.0001










Table 4-6. Coefficients of determination (r2) of multiple linear regression models explaining the
monthly total phosphorus (TP) areal settling rate in all cells. The column heading
indicates the complexity (number of variables included) in the model. For a particular
level of complexity, a given value is the r2 for the model containing that variable and
all the variables indicated by "X". The highest r2-value in each column is boldfaced.


Number of variables included in model
Variable 1 2 3 4 5 6
Inflow TP 0.030 0.397 0.446 -- -- 0.506


concentration
TPALRA- 0.277 0.395 0.448 0.474 0.489 0.512
nominal
1-yr rolling 0.041 0.416 0.447 0.478 0.484 --
average TPALR
2-yr rolling 0.044 0.393 -- -- --
average TPALR
Inflow SRPA 0.028 0.422 0.461 --
fraction
Inflow DOPA 0.017 0.432 X X X X
fraction
Inflow PPA 0.026 0.401 0.469 X X X
fraction
Inflow CaA 0.008 0.411 -- --
concentration
Ca ALR 0.346 -- -- -
nominal
Ca areal mass -- 0.401 0.462 -- --
removal rate
Wetland age -- 0.421 0.458 0.481 0.503 X
q -nominal 0.391 X X X X X
TA 0.117 0.387 0.437
Mean water 0.036 -- 0.439 -
depth
Soil TP -- 0.389 0.443 -- --
concentration
Inflow pH 0.026 0.393 0.448 0.476 0.490
Outflow pH -- -- -- -- -
Inflow water 0.038 0.396 0.445 -- 0.489 0.504
temperature
Outflow water 0.058 0.416 0.456 0.486 X X
temperature
WADA -- 0.402 0.447 -- 0.488 --
Change in WAD 0.003 0.395 0.446 0.478 0.495 0.511
ATPALR = TP areal loading rate; SRP = soluble reactive P; DOP = dissolved organic P; PP = particulate P; Ca =
calcium; q = hydraulic loading rate; r = hydraulic residence time; WAD = wetted area, determined by the elevation
distribution









Table 4-7. Estimates of parameters for the model explaining total phosphorus areal settling rate
in all cells.
Variable Units Parameter estimate (3) Probability (p) that 0 = 0

TP areal settling rate m/yr -- --
Hydraulic loading rate /m 6.6
m/mo 6.6940 <0.0001
nominal
Inflow DOP fraction % -33.7914 <0.0001

Inflow PP fraction % -13.2197 0.0012

Wetland age yr -1.8512 <0.0001
Outflow water
OC 0.6224 0.0064
temperature
TP areal loading rate g/m2/yr 11.0970 0.0002
nominal
ATP = total phosphrous; DOP = dissolved organic P; PP = particulate P









Table 4-8. Estimates of parameters for the model explaining monthly total phosphorus (TP) areal
settling rate in STA-1W Cell 1.
Variable Units Parameter estimate (0) Probability (p) that 0 = 0

TP areal settling rate m/yr -- --
Water depth m 50.5583 0.0001
Wetland age yr -1.7433 0.0221














----- -.- --- ---0
,.[71--- *


TP C 1 + WAD


I-


ICell ei lects
--*-- With
Without

T Age Ca C


Number of variables included in model


Figure 4-1. Changes in the coefficient of determination (r2) with increasing complexity of the
model explaining monthly outflow TP concentration in all cells. The models are
shown with and without the effects of the period-of-record cell means. TP Cl =
inflow TP concentration, AWAD = change in monthly wetted area, T = nominal
hydraulic residence time, Age = wetland age, Ca Cl = inflow calcium concentration.


c












0.6 ...-- --------...------
0.5 6

= 0.4
SCell effects
0.3
S--*-- With
0.2 -- Without

0.1
0 q + DOPIR + PP1R + Temp2 + Age + TPALR ,
0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Number of variables included in model


Figure 4-2. Changes in the coefficient of determination (r2) with increasing model complexity of
the model explaining the monthly total phosphorus areal settling rate in all cells. The
models are shown with and without the effects of the period-of-record cell means. q =
hydraulic loading rate, DOP1R = inflow dissolved organic P fraction, PP1R = inflow
particulate P fraction, Temp2 = inflow water temperature, Age = wetland age,
TPALRN = nominal total phosphorus areal loading rate.









CHAPTER 5
CONCLUSIONS

This work attempted to address several important questions regarding the operation and

performance of the Stormwater Treatment Areas in South Florida. The management of these

extensive constructed wetlands is a massive expenditure for the SFWMD and is a major

contributor to the reduction of P loads to the Florida Everglades.

The presence of marked elevation gradients and time-variable water levels in some STA

cells raised concern that estimates of the hydraulic and TP areal loading rates were inaccurate

due to incomplete flooding of the nominal treatment areas. It was demonstrated that the

occasions when the relative wetted area was substantially less than 100% were infrequent, and

did not significantly increase the TPALR in any of the STAs, suggesting that the nominal

treatment area was satisfactory for loading rate calculations. The outflow TP concentration did

show a positive correlation to the magnitude of re-flooding, within the months with large re-

flood events, an effect confirmed to be significant by multiple regression modeling. Maintaining

flooding as to reduce re-wetting events would prevent these occasional pulses of outflow P but

this phenomenon was important in less than 5% of non-screened months. It was also shown that

poor performance in certain cells (elevated outflow TP concentrations relative to inflow TPALR)

was shown not to be an artifact of the TPALR calculation, validating the need for additional

work to diagnose those factors contributing to performance in the STAs.

The monthly outflow TP concentration was shown to be uncorrelated to the monthly

TPALR (r') in most cells. This independence was not a function of vegetation type or the

magnitude of the TPALR. It was hypothesized that the Damkohler number (Da = k/q) was

sufficiently high as to remove this correlation, implying that the outflow concentration was

controlled primarily by the background concentration. The monthly outflow TP concentration









from the cells with non-significant r' was not determined by the composition of the inflow TP

pool nor by the outflow water temperature. More extensive efforts to isolate the factors

controlling the apparent background concentrations were justified because accurate estimates of

C* appeared necessary for the successful employment of the k-C* model in wetlands (i.e. most

STA cells) with high Da-values.

Regression Variables

Each of the 21 factors was specifically included because either mathematical reasoning (in

the case of those terms related by the k-C* model) or previously documented studies suggested

their relevance to wetland P cycling (e.g. Ca, pH and temperature). Therefore, it is important to

consider the conditions that led to inclusion or rejection of each in the models assembled in this

work.

Inflow Total Phosphorus Concentration

The k-C* model (Kadlec and Knight, 1996), introduced in Chapter 2, has been found by

many investigators to satisfactorily describe pollutant reduction in wetlands. When using that

model to consider the outflow TP concentration, the inflow TP concentration is an important

input term (which makes sound intuitive sense). Chapter 3 showed that in the majority of the

cells in the STAs, the outflow TP concentration in any given month was unrelated to the

conditions of the inflow water in that month. This situation suggests that P removal in the most

of the STAs is not limited by residence time (discussed further in Chapter 3), but does imply that

the inflow TP concentration ought not to be useful in describing the short-term outflow TP

concentration. Indeed, the inflow TP concentration was only important to the regression model

that considered outflow TP concentration data from cells that were known to have positive

correlations between inflow and outflow TP concentrations. Clearly, the short-term inflow TP









concentration will not be an important determinant of the outflow TP concentration in any

wetland system whose P reduction is not limited by residence time.

Hydraulic and Total Phosphorus Loading Rates

The hydraulic (q) and total phosphorus loading rates came to bear in interesting ways in

the final regression models established in Chapter 4. First, both the monthly q and TPALRN

contributed positively to the monthly areal settling rate when all cells of the STAs were

considered together, suggesting that kTp is, in the STAs, a measure of P removal power rather

than efficiency. This idea is in line with the previously discussed notion that the observed

outflow TP concentrations are limited more by the apparent background concentration than by

insufficient contact time. In this case, a hypothetical additional packet of water (thus additional

P) does not increase the outflow concentration, but does lead to increased P mass removed.

Second, the 1-year rolling average TPALR was the second most important factor in determining

the monthly outflow TP concentration from those cells with non-significant r'-values. That is,

even when the short-term outflow concentration was apparently independent of the short-term

inputs, the long-term loading still influenced the short-term outflow concentration. This is simply

a different perspective on the well-understood connection between long-term loading and

performance (e.g. Qian and Richardson, 1997; Pietro et al. 2009), but deserves consideration by

treatment wetland managers. Increasing loading rates to maximize mass removal in response to

the independence of short-term inflow and outflow concentrations may result in a long-term

increase in outflow concentrations, visible even in short-term data.

Inflow Phosphorus Fractions

Despite appearing in the final regression model for kTp (data from all cells) the composition

of the inflow TP pool did little to affect the measured performance of the STAs. Possibly, the

internal transformation and production of the various forms was so substantial as to make the









initial P composition irrelevant. This hypothesis gains some support from the finding that

residence time did not limit P reduction in most STAs. Regardless of the inflow P composition,

additional contact time would not support additional removal of the less-bioavailable DOP and

PP. Therefore, the outflow DOP pool, for example, is likely not composed primarily of the same

DOP particles that entered the wetland.

Wetland Age and Soil Phosphorus

Wetland age was the only term included in all the final regression models for both outflow

TP concentration and kTp. In all cases, the sign on the coefficient indicated decreasing

performance (i.e. increasing outflow TP concentrations and decreasing kTp-values) with

increasing age. Of course, there are precedents for such a scenario including the Orlando Easterly

Wetland in central Florida (Wang et al., 2006) and the impacted zones of WAC-2A in south

Florida (DeBusk et al., 2004). Wetland age was such a prominent factor in determining STA

performance probably because it is a lumped term, containing simultaneously multiple wetland

characteristics that change over time, such as soil P and plant biomass and tissue P. Though

wetland managers should anticipate changes in performance as treatment wetlands age, this

information is only of real value if the individual variables pooled in the age term can be

extracted and evaluated individually. For example, soil P, a wetland parameter expected to

change as the wetland ages, was included in the regression analyses, but was not selected for any

of the final models. (This analysis should not be taken as conclusive, as the soil P data were ill-

suited for evaluation at a monthly time-step.) Therefore, some other characteristic of the STAs

was changing with time and caused the broad age term to contribute more information to the

regression than the soil P term.









Calcium and pH

Generally, none of the calcium terms included in the multiple regression exercises (inflow

Ca concentration, Ca ALR, and Ca mass removal) contributed any explanatory power regarding

either outflow TP concentration or TP areal settling rate. The sole exception was the selection of

inflow Ca concentration as the fifth variable in the regression model for outflow TP

concentration among all cells. Likewise, neither inflow nor outflow pH was selected for

inclusion in any model. The chemistry of Ca and P interactions (and the influence of pH) is

moderately well understood (e.g. Diaz et al., 2004; Scinto, 1997) and associations between Ca

and P have been demonstrated in the field (Reddy et al., 1993). Connecting the process-level

dynamics to the field-scale effects has been challenging. Two factors may have contributed to

the relative lack of influence of Ca on P observed in this study. First, the amount of P removed

from the water column due to interaction with Ca actually may be minimal relative to biological

and physical processes. The probability of this being the case is unclear; Ca-P interaction is

apparently important in some wetlands (Reddy et al., 1993) but has not been quantified in the

STAs. Second, the data possibly failed to capture the Ca-P association. The relatively small

proportions of variance explained by most of the considered factors suggest that some of the

tested datasets were not suited to analysis at a monthly time-step.

Water Temperature

Kadlec and Wallace (2008) suggest an Arrhenius temperature coefficient of about 1.005

for total P in warm climate wetlands. (Arrehenius coefficients greater than 1.0 indicate

improvement in removal performance with increases in temperature and values less than 1.0

denote loss of performance with temperature increases. Values very close to 1.0 imply relatively

little temperature dependence.) This value for TP indicates that P removal tends to improve very

slightly with increases in water temperature. A temperature term (both inflow and outflow water









temperature were considered) was included in the final regression model only for the monthly TP

areal settling rate that included all cells. Most likely, the weak temperature dependence of P

processing expected for the STAs was obscured by other wetland characteristics.

Relative Wetted Area and Water Depth

The RWAD was expected to influence P processing primarily by altering the realized

loading rates applied to the STAs. Chapter 2 established that the nominal wetted area provided a

satisfactory estimate of the actual wetted area for most applications in the STAs. Therefore, the

relative unimportance of RWAD in the regression analyses was anticipated; RWAD was not

selected for any of the final models assembled in this study. Of much more interest from the

outset was ARWAD, since great biogeochemical action was expected to associate with dry-down

and re-flood events. Indeed, ARWAD was the second variable included in the regression model

for outflow TP concentration from all cells and was the factor of primary importance in the

explaining variance in the outflow TP concentration from cells with non-significant r'-values.

Because large re-flood events were fairly infrequent in the STAs (see Chapter 2), these findings

indicate that the flushing of P associated with re-flood events is one of the most powerful and

predictable biogeochemical processes active in the STAs.

Depth affects the biogeochemistry (and thus P processing) of surface-flow wetlands by

regulating oxygen diffusion and changing the hydraulics. However, it was selected for only one

regression model developed in this study, where it explained about 14% of the variability in the

monthly kTp-value of STA-1W Cell 1. A correlation between q and depth aligned that model with

the dependence of the settling rate on the hydraulic loading rate found among all cells. It appears

that the other biogeochemical effects of water depth were apparently relatively unimportant to









STA performance, based on the monthly data. The longer-term role of influencing vegetation

communities played by water depth was likely not captured by the monthly data.

Future Work

Following the results presented in this work, two major avenues of investigation remain.

First, C* needs further elucidation in the STAs. Chapter 3 suggests that the monthly outflow TP

concentration from the STAs was more strongly controlled by C* than kTp. This implies the need

for accurate estimates of C* when modeling P removal performance in the STAs. Although the

outflow concentrations from those cells operating at apparent background concentrations did

very with time, it remains unclear whether a function or value will best predict C*.

Second, multiple linear regression was successful in identifying some wetland

characteristics that were uniquely important to P processing in the STAs. However, the overall

proportions of variance in the dependent variables (monthly outflow TP concentration and

monthly TP areal settling rate) that were explained by the regression efforts were unsatisfactory.

It is recommended that future multiple regression efforts for the STAs consider non-linearity

among the data, as well include additional variables not tested in this study. In particular, 12 of

the 21 tested variables concerned water chemistry and hydrology and hydraulics accounted for

another five terms. Only one term (soil P) was related to the soil properties and no vegetation

data was incorporated. Owing to the relative importance of plants and soil to wetland functions,

it is likely that variables regarding these characteristics would be particularly helpful in

explaining observed STA performance.









APPENDIX
DATA SCREENING CRITERIA


Variable
Inflow TP
concentration
Outflow TP
concentration
Inflow SRP
concentration
Outflow SRP
concentration
Inflow DOP
concentration

Outflow DOP
concentration


Inflow PP concentration


Outflow PP
concentration

Inflow SRP fraction

Outflow SRP fraction

Inflow DOP fraction

Outflow DOP fraction

Inflow PP fraction

Outflow PP fraction
Areal TP settling rate
(k)
TP areal loading rate -
nominal
TP areal loading rate -
distribution adjusted
TP areal loading rate -
mean adjusted
Inflow Ca concentration


Not reported if:


Inflow volume = 0

Outflow volume = 0

Inflow volume = 0

Outflow volume = 0
-Inflow SRP concentration or inflow TDP concentration blank
-Inflow volume < 0
-Inflow SRP concentration > inflow TPD concentration
-Outflow SRP concentration or outflow TDP concentration blank
-Outflow volume < 0
-Outflow SRP concentration > outflow TDP concentration
-Inflow TP concentration or inflow TDP concentration blank
-Inflow volume < 0
-Inflow TP concentration > inflow TPD concentration
-Outflow TP concentration or outflow TDP concentration blank
-Outflow volume < 0
-Outflow TP concentration > outflow TDP concentration
-Inflow SRP concentration or inflow TP concentration blank or < 0
-Inflow SRP concentration > inflow TP concentration
-Outflow SRP concentration or outflow TP concentration blank or < 0
-Outflow SRP concentration > outflow TP concentration
-Inflow SRP concentration or inflow TDP concentration blank or < 0
-Inflow SRP concentration > inflow TDP concentration
-Outflow SRP concentration or outflow TDP concentration blank or < 0
-Outflow SRP concentration > outflow TDP concentration
-Inflow TP concentration or inflow TDP concentration blank or < 0
-Inflow TP concentration < inflow TDP concentration
-Outflow TP concentration or outflow TDP concentration blank or < 0
-Outflow TP concentration < outflow TDP concentration
Inflow volume, inflow TP concentration, outflow TP concentration or
WAD blank or < 0
-Inflow TP mass blank
-Inflow volume < 0
-Inflow TP mass blank
-Inflow volume or WAD < 0
-Inflow TP mass blank
-Inflow volume or WAN < 0
-Inflow Ca mass or inflow volume blank or < 0
-Inflow Ca concentration <= 1









Outflow Ca
concentration
Ca areal loading rate -
nominal
Ca areal loading rate -
distribution adjusted
Ca areal mass removal
rate
Hydraulic loading rate
- nominal
Hydraulic loading rate
- distribution adjusted
Hydraulic residence
time


-Outflow Ca mass or outflow volume blank or < 0
-Outflow Ca concentration <= 1
-Inflow Ca mass blank
-Inflow volume < 0
-Inflow Ca mass blank
-Inflow volume or WAD < 0
Inflow Ca mass, outflow Ca mass or WAD blank or < 0

Inflow volume blank or < 0

Inflow volume or WAD blank or < 0
-Inflow volume or outflow volume < 0
-Hydraulic residence time < 0
-Hydraulic residence time > 150









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growth and nutrient uptake of eight emergent species. Ecol. Eng. 7:59-83.

Turner, B.L. and S. Newman. 2005. Phosphorus cycling in wetland soils: The importance of
phosphate diesters. J. Environ. Qual. 34:1921-1929.

Turner, B.L., S. Newman and J.M. Newman. 2006. Organic phosphorus sequestration in
subtropical treatment wetlands. Environ. Sci. Technol. 40:727-733.

Volk, B.G. 1973. Everglades histosol subsidence 1: CO2 evolution as affected by soil type,
temperature, and moisture. Soil Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 32:132-135.

Vymazal, J. 2007. Removal of nutrients in various types of constructed wetlands. Sci. Total
Environ. 380:48-65.

Wang, H.G., J.W. Jawitz, J.R. White, C.J. Martinez and M.D. Sees. 2006. Rejuvenating the
largest municipal treatment wetland in Florida. Ecol. Eng. 26:132-146.

White, J.R., K.R. Reddy, W.F. DeBusk, W.R. Wise, T. Crisman. 2002. Phosphorus removal
capacity of the Orlando wetland treatment system: final report. Soil and Water Science
Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.









BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

Mike Jerauld's passion for the environment, which inspired the undertaking of this

advanced degree, was fostered by his experiences fishing, camping and traveling as a child with

his parents. His formal education in the field began with the Jupiter Environmental Research and

Field Studies Academy at Jupiter High School, in South Florida. Impressed with the urgency of

the need to respond to the ever-declining condition of the natural world, Mike earned his

Bachelor's degree in Environmental Science from the University of Florida in 2004. His

undergraduate studies introduced and developed his awareness of the intimate connection

between human and environmental well-being. In 2008, he enrolled in the Soil and Water

Science Department at the University of Florida to pursue a Master of Science that would enable

him to employ wetlands for the treatment of wastewater. The quality of all aspects of Mike's

term in Gainesville was marked best, perhaps, by the four national titles won by the University of

Florida football and men's basketball teams, collectively, during his tenure there. In 2009, he

married his extraordinary wife, Sarah. After 19 years of education, he now plans to leave

academia and try his hand in "the real world."





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FACTORS CONTROLLING PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL IN LARGE CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS IN SOUTH FLORIDA By MICHAEL JERAULD A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLOR IDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2010 1

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2010 Michael Jerauld 2

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To the people and places in this world in need of our mercy 3

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Without a doubt, my first and sincerest thanks are due to my parents. Only with their unending support has the success of my last 24 year s been possible. I owe the same debt of gratitude to my extraordinar y wife, Sarah, who forfeited countless evenings, weekends and getaways with me, to see my completion of this degree. I recognize also th at this degree would not have been possible without the lavish love of my God. My advisor, Dr. James Jawitz, deserves no le ss than the highest praise, not only for his keen scientific eye, but for his unwavering patie nce and faultless advice as I progressed through my studies. His ability to unify cr iticism, instruction, and praise is unmatched in my experience. His influence magnified the value of all other as pects of my education at the University of Florida and all my future work will testify to the quality of his guidance. He has earned my deepest respect. Each of the members of my advisory comm ittee contributed signifi cantly and uniquely to my training. Dr. K. Ramesh Reddy generously offered his extensive understanding of wetland biogeochemistry though both his l ecture course and his critique s of my work throughout my tenure here. It was a pleasure to work closely with Dr. Reddy on the project with which I began this degree. It was perhaps Dr. Mark Clarks passion and enthusia sm for wetlands that drew me into the field. I will long measure myself agains t his remarkable energy and his drive to affect real change in this world. Dr. Mike Anna ble provided me a firm foundation in wetland hydrology that was indispensible to my work. I would be amiss to exclude my excellent fr iends and colleagues, with whom I exchanged many insightful conversations over lunches eaten on the lawn. I am indebted to Rupesh Bhomia, for his overwhelming kindness (and excellent cooking) ; to R.J. Sindelar for being ever ready for 4

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racquetball and cycling; to Luke Gommermann for the constant assistance he provides to those around him; to Moshe Doron for many laughs and hi s unique perspective on the world; to Davie Kadyampakeni for his undying and infectious cheerfulness; and to Alex Cheesman for demonstrating his friendship by bearing too many j okes about lift and tor ch. Each of these, and many more not mentioned here, deserves much credit for lightening the burden of graduate school. Much gratitude is also due Rajendra Pa udel and Rupesh Bhomia, once more, for their GIS and soils analyses, respectively, that enabled much of this work. Finally, I was fortunate enough to interact with several pr ofessional wetla nd scientists, each of whom was instrumental in my graduate education. Dr. Robert Knight, of Wetland Solutions Inc., graciously shared his advice and expertise and hi s passion for treatment wetlands. Any success I achieve in the field will be due, in large part, to his mentoring. Mike Korvela and Dr. Mike Chimney, of the South Florida Water Ma nagement District went to great lengths to collate and provide the vast datasets investigated in this thesis a nd offered their invaluable advice without hesitation. 5

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TABLE OF CONTENTS page ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ............................................................................................................... 4TABLE OF CONTENTS ............................................................................................................. ....6LIST OF TABLES ...........................................................................................................................9LIST OF FIGURES .......................................................................................................................10LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS ........................................................................................................1 1ABSTRACT ...................................................................................................................... .............12 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... ..14Phosphorus Cycling in Wetlands ............................................................................................14Methods ..................................................................................................................................18Site Description ...............................................................................................................18Data Sources ....................................................................................................................19Calculations .....................................................................................................................20Hydraulic flows ........................................................................................................20Water column chemical and physical properties ......................................................21Wetland chemical and physical properties ...............................................................23Wetland performance models ...................................................................................23Time-Step Selection ........................................................................................................24Data Screening .................................................................................................................262 INFLUENCE OF WETTED AREA ON PHOSPHORUS DYNAMICS IN THE STORMWATER TREATMENT AREAS .............................................................................31Introduction .................................................................................................................. ...........31Objectives .................................................................................................................... ...........33Methods ..................................................................................................................................34Calculation of the Wetted Area .......................................................................................34Statistical Analyses .......................................................................................................... 36Results and Discussion ........................................................................................................ ...36Characterization of Elev ation Distribution and We tted Area in the STAs .....................36Relative Wetted Area and Total P hosphorus Removal Performance ..............................37Relative Wetted Area and Total P hosphorus Mass Loading Rate ..................................40Conclusions .............................................................................................................................433 ASSOCIATION BETWEEN LOADING RATE AN D OUTFLOW CONCENTRATION IN THE STOR MWATER TREATMENT AREAS ............................52 6

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Introduction .................................................................................................................. ...........52Objectives .................................................................................................................... ...........55Methods ..................................................................................................................................55Vegetation .................................................................................................................... ....55Outflow Concentration and Total Phosphorus Areal Loading Rate ................................57Results and Discussion ........................................................................................................ ...57Outflow ConcentrationAr eal Loading Relationship .....................................................57Effect of vegetation type and cover ..........................................................................57Effect of areal total phosphorus loading rate ...........................................................58Factors Controlling the Appare nt Background Concentration ........................................60Inflow phosphorus fractions .....................................................................................60Long-term areal loading ...........................................................................................61Seasonality ...............................................................................................................63Conclusions .............................................................................................................................65 4 MULTIPLE LINEAR REGRESSION TO DETERMINE FACTORS CONTROLLING PHOSPHORUS CONCENTRATIO N AND SETTLING RATE IN THE STORMWATER TREATMENT AREAS .............................................................................72Introduction .................................................................................................................. ...........72Objectives .................................................................................................................... ...........74Methods ..................................................................................................................................74Multiple Linear Regression .............................................................................................74Variables Considered .......................................................................................................76k-C* mode l terms .....................................................................................................77Inflow phosphorus fractions ............................................................................................77Wetland age and soil phosphorus ....................................................................................78Calcium and pH ...............................................................................................................79Water temperature ...........................................................................................................80Relative wetted area and water depth ..............................................................................80Results and Discussion ........................................................................................................ ...81Outflow Total Phosphorus Concentration: All Cells .......................................................81Outflow Total Phosphorus Concentra tion: Cells with Non-significant r -values ...........83Outflow Total Phosphorus Concentration: Single Cell ...................................................85Total Phosphorus Areal Se ttling Rate: All Cells .............................................................86Total Phosphorus Areal Se ttling Rate: Single Cell .........................................................88Limitations and Future Application of the Multiple Regression Technique ...................88Conclusions .............................................................................................................................90 5 CONCLUSIONS ................................................................................................................ ..103Inflow Total Phosphorus Concentration ........................................................................104Hydraulic and Total Phosphorus Loading Rates ...........................................................105Inflow Phosphorus Fractions .........................................................................................105Wetland Age and Soil Phosphorus ................................................................................106Calcium and pH .............................................................................................................107Water Temperature ........................................................................................................107 7

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Relative Wetted Area and Water Depth ........................................................................108APPENDIX: DATA SCREENING CRITERIA ..........................................................................110LIST OF REFERENCES .............................................................................................................112BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH .......................................................................................................117 8

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LIST OF TABLES Table page 2-1 Average annual relative wetted area by wa ter year for each cell in the Stormwater Treatment Areas. ................................................................................................................452-2 Intra-annual trends in relative wetted area. ........................................................................462-3 Changes in the coefficients of corre lation for different subsets of data. ...........................473-1 Coefficients of correlation between monthly outflow total phosphorus (TP) concentration and monthly TP areal lo ading rate (ALR) within each cell. .......................674-1 Coefficients of determination ( r2) of multiple linear regression models explaining the monthly outflow total phosphorus concentration in all cells. ............................................934-2 Estimates of parameters for the model explaining monthly outfl ow total phosphorus (TP) concentration in all cells. ...........................................................................................944-3 Coefficients of determination ( r2) of multiple linear regression models explaining the monthly outflow total phosphorus concentr ation in all cells with non-significant r values. ................................................................................................................................954-4 Estimates of parameters for the m odel explaining outflow total phosphorus (TP) concentration in all cel ls with non-significant r -values. ...................................................964-5 Estimates of parameters for the mode l explaining outflow total phosphorus (TP) concentration in STA-1W Cell 1. ......................................................................................974-6 Coefficients of determination ( r2) of multiple linear regression models explaining the monthly total phosphorus (TP) area l settling rate in all cells ............................................984-7 Estimates of parameters for the model explaining the monthly total phosphorus areal settling rate in all cells. ................................................................................................... ...994-8 Estimates of parameters for the m odel explaining monthly total phosphorus (TP) areal settling rate in STA-1W Cell 1. ...............................................................................100 9

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LIST OF FIGURES Figure page 1-1 Phosphorus (P) cycle in surface flow wetlands.. ...............................................................281-2 Map showing the locations of the si x Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs), the Everglades Agricultural Area and the Everglades Protection Area in South Florida ........291-3 Schematics of the configuration of th e treatment cells within each Stormwater Treatment Area (STA) .......................................................................................................302-1 Cumulative elevation dist ribution for each cell in the St ormwater Treatment Areas.. ......482-2 Relative wetted area in each of the Stormwater Treatment Areas .....................................492-3 Histogram of monthly relative wetted area (determined by the el evation distribution) values across all non-screened months and all included cells. ..........................................502-4 Monthly relative wetted ar ea (determined by the elevation distribution) with respect to monthly hydraulic loading for all non-sc reened months and all included cells. ...........513-1 When a wetland treats to background c oncentration (C*), the areal loading rate (ALR) does not affect the outflow concentration. .............................................................683-2 Correlation between outflow total ph osphorus (TP) concentration and TP mass loading rate with respect to submerge d aquatic vegetation (SAV) coverage ....................693-3 Correlation between outfl ow total phosphorus (TP) c oncentration and TP areal loading rate (ALR) as a functi on of the average annual TPALR ......................................693-4 Outflow total phosphorus (TP) concentration with respect to the correlation coefficient between the TP areal loading rate (TPALR) and the outflow TP concentrations. ............................................................................................................... ....703-5 Period-of-record (POR) flow-weighted mean outflow total phosphorus (TP) concentration as a function of the POR average annual TP areal loading rate ..................703-6 Monthly average temperature (C) of in flow and outflow water in STA-1W Cell 4. .......714-1 Changes in the coefficient of determination ( r2) with increasing complexity of the model explaining monthly outflow TP concentration in all cells ....................................1014-2 Changes in the coefficient of determination ( r2) with increasing model complexity of the model explaining the monthly total phosphorus settling rate in all cells ...................102 10

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LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS ALR Areal loading rate Ca MR Calcium mass retention CDF Cumulative distribution function CFW Central Flow-way DIP Dissolved inorganic phosphorus DOP Dissolved organic phosphorus EAA Everglades Agricultural Area EAV Emergent aquatic vegetation NFW North Flow-way P Phosphorus PIP Particulate inorganic phosphorus POP Particulate organic phosphorus POR Period of record PP Particulate phosphorus RWA Relative wetted area SAV Submerged aquatic vegetation SFWMD South Florida Wate r Management District SRP Soluble reactive phosphorus STA Stormwater treatment area TDP Total dissolved phosphorus TP Total phosphorus TPALR Total phosphorus areal loading rate WA Wetted area 11

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12 Abstract of Thesis Presen ted to the Graduate School of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science FACTORS CONTROLLING PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL IN LARGE CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS IN SOUTH FLORIDA By Michael Jerauld August 2010 Chair: James Jawitz Major: Soil and Water Science The Florida Everglades is an oligotrophic, subtropical wetland extremely susceptible eutrophication from anthropogenic phosphorus (P) inputs. Six large treatment marshes (total effective treatment area 18,000 ha), called Stormw ater Treatment Areas (STAs), have been constructed over the last fifteen years to remove P from agricultural runoff before it enters the Everglades. Because of the massive investment to build and maintain these wetlands, it is important to evaluate the factor s that contribute to th eir performance. Naturally, each STA had a different performance record. This study attempted to account for those differences by investigating 1) the relative wett ed area (RWA), 2) the relationship between the total P (TP) areal loading rate (ALR) and the outflow TP concentr ation and 3) the wetland characteristics covariant with the outflow TP concentration and the TP areal settling rate. The RWA was determined by subtracting the elevation distribution function from the average water level (stage). The RWA was less than 1.0 in 230 out of 1044 (22%) of months. The TPALR was not statistically different when calculated with the RWA rather than the nominal area; the nominal area was deemed suffici ent for most loading ra te calculations. Among months with substa ntial re-flooding ( n = 39), the TP areal settling rate was negatively correlated with the magnitude of the re-flooding event ( r = -0.605, p < 0.0001).

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In most of the STAs, the monthly outflow TP concentration was uncorrelated to the monthly TPALR. The vegetation type (submerged vs. emergent) and the magnitude of the loading rate were hypothesized to contribute to this uncoupling, but neither played a quantifiable role. The cause of this independence remains unclear. Possibly, the Damkhler number (areal settling rate divided by hydrauli c loading rate) was sufficiently high in most STAs such that wetland factors other than the lo ading rate and settling rate te nded to control the outflow TP concentration. Through multiple linear regression, five variab les (inflow TP concentration, change in monthly wetted area, hydraulic residence time, wetland age and inflow Ca concentration) were found to explain 32% of the variability in the monthly outflow TP concentration. Six factors (hydraulic loading rate, inflow dissolved orga nic P fraction, inflow particulate P fraction, wetland age, outflow water temperature and TPALR) accounted for 51% of the variation in the monthly TP areal settling rate. The proportion of explained variability may be improved in future analyses by including variab les not considered herein. Additional research is needed to confidently identify the factors that control the outflow TP concentration. 13

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CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION Phosphorus (P) is a naturally occurring, abundant element required by all forms of life. In the natural environment, the bi osphere obtains P weathered fro m minerals. Typically, hydrologic flows transport P from uplands to aquatic environments, often via wetland ecotones. Excess P applied to the landscape (often as fertilizer) can jo in this migration and frequently contributes to eutrophication of downstream wate r bodies. In the landscape, medi ating wetlands can serve as P sinks, dampening the transfer of P into aquatic systems (Richardson, 1999) and natural wetlands have long been used as receiving sites for point discharges of wastewater (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). From this insight, it follo wed that wetlands could be employed to reduce P loads to downstream ecosystems, and many wetlands have been restored or constructed for the purpose of water treatment (Kadlec a nd Wallace, 2008). Treatment wetlands as a technology have progressed from being first a novelty, past trial pi lot systems, to a point where optimization and diversity of application has beco me the focus (e.g. Mitsch et al., 1995; Kadlec and Knight, 1996; Higgins et al., 2000; Braskerud, 2002a; Turner et al., 2006; Vymazal, 2007; Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). Understanding and quantifying the internal P processing mechanisms are essential to maximizing treatment wetland P removal and retention. Phosphorus Cycling in Wetlands Phosphorus is found in wide variety of biol ogical molecules beyond the notable examples including DNA and ATP (Turner and Newman, 2005). Phosphorus is also chemically active and may be found in myriad minerals in association with Ca, Mg, Fe, Al (Reddy et al, 1999). It is convenient to classify these many forms of P by their physical, chemical or operational characteristics. Many taxonomic schemes ex ist, but four broad P pools are commonly conceptualized: dissolved inorgani c P (DIP), dissolved organic P (DOP), particulate inorganic P 14

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(PIP) and particulate organic P (POP) (Reddy and DeLaune, 2008). In each of these terms, dissolved and particulate distinguish par ticles that do and do not pass through a filter membrane (pore size typically, but not always, 0.45 m), respectiv ely. For methodological convenience, the following pools are often determin ed for water-column P: soluble reactive P (SRP), dissolved organic P (DOP) and particulate P (PP). These groups are somewhat operationally defined (i.e. the boundaries of thes e groups depend more on analytical technique than the chemical or physical properties of th e compounds). Soluble reac tive P is composed mainly of orthophosphate (PO4-P) (Reddy and DeLaune, 2008) but may include some readily hydrolysable organic P (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008) Particulate P encompasses all P-containing molecules larger than 0.45 m. Commonly, P is not limiting in wetlands, alt hough the Florida Everglades are a wellknown exception. Phosphorus enters wetlands th rough surface water, groundwater, wet and dry atmospheric deposition, and biological tran sfers (e.g. guano production). Surface water flow dominates the P budget in many treatment we tlands (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). Within wetlands, P is cycled between various storag e compartments at rates which depend on the physical, chemical and biological conditions ( Figure 1-1 ). The net effect of these P transformations determines the status of a given wetland as a source or sink of P. Wetlands have been successful as a P treatment technology because often the P processing results in net storage or P within the system. Four broad processes that contribute to P retenti on in wetlands: sorption to soil solids, sedimentation, co -precipitation and biological uptake. Various physical, chemical and biological characteristics i nhibit or enhance each of these processes in a given wetland. The movements of P on and off charged site s on the surface of so il solids are called adsorption and desorption, respectively (Re ddy and DeLaune, 2008). Froe lich (1988) described 15

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two steps in the sorption process. First, following changes in pore water P concentration (e.g. in response to novel anthropogenic P loads) adsorption/desorption e quilibria are reached within minutes or hours (Froelich, 1988). Reddy and De Laune (2008) note The balance between P adsorption and desorption maintains the equilib rium between solid phases and P in soil pore water. Second, absorption, the solid-state diffu sion of adsorbed phosphate from the surface into the interior of particles occurs over days to months (Froelich, 1988). Generally, sorption is limited to SRP and some reactive components of DOP (Anderson and Magdoff, 2005). The net direction of the flux (on or off the soil) is controlled by the pore water P concentration and the affinity of the soil particles for P ions. In wetland s, the amount of P that can be adsorbed to the soils is often related to the amount of iron and aluminum in the soil (Lijklema, 1977). In South Florida wetlands, soil calcium is an important determinant of soil P sorption capacity (Reddy et al., 1998). Soil adsorption is not considered a sustainable P removal mechanism in treatment wetlands due to the relatively fast reaction tim e and the finite sorption capacity (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). The inflow water to wetlands often contains suspended solids, some of which contain P. The aggregate of suspended solids often includes eroded soil particles, macrophyte detritus, and algae or other plankton cells (Stuck et al., 2001). Wetlands function to remove suspended particles primarily by reducing wa ter velocity (by low elevation gradients and drag caused by dense plant stems) such that gravity allows the particles to settle out. This removal is enhanced by the trapping of particles within benthic litter and on biofilms (Schmid et al., 2005). Sedimentation of suspended solids can account for a significant portion of total phosphorus (TP) removal, and sustainability is constrained only by changes in bo ttom elevation (due to sediment accretion) that prevent surface wate r flows (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). 16

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An additional pathway of removal is the precip itation of P with Ca, Fe, Al or Mg cations (Reddy and DeLaune, 2008). It may be difficult to quantify precipita tion separately from adsorption, since the precipitates often form on the surfaces of soil particles. Reddy and DeLaune (2008) provided a thorough discussion of P co-p recipitation in wetlands, particularly regarding the conditions that promote P co-precipitation wi th each of the identified cations. Generally, acidic conditions promote the co-p recipitation of P with Fe and Al, and alkaline environments support the formation of P-Ca and P-Mg pr ecipitates. In wetlands, both apatite (Ca5(Cl)(PO4)3) and hydroxylapatite (Ca5(OH)(PO4)3) are notable precipitates (R eddy and DAngelo, 1994). Coprecipitation with Ca may be pa rticularly important for P dynami cs in the Everglades; Reddy et al. (1993) found a linear correlation between P and Ca accumulation in Everglades soils. Apparently promoted by the consumption of carb onate ions by submerged photosynthesizers, the precise mechanism of the P-Ca interaction may be either adsorption of P onto the surface of CaCO3 precipitates or the formati on of mixed crystals during co-precipitation (Otsuki and Wetzel, 1972; Scinto, 1997). The P requirement of all organisms comb ined with the high productivity of wetland primary producers makes biological uptake an important mechanism of wetland P removal. Algae and other microorganisms can consume significant amounts of P very rapidly; for example, a diverse algal community reduced me socosm water column P concentrations from 1,100 g/L to 50 g/L in 28 days (Havens et al., 1999). Plants and microor ganisms typically can utilize only SRP directly. Other forms of P must first be hydrolyzed before they can be taken up biologically. In wetlands, much of this SRP is promptly transformed into PP (Noe et al., 2003). Many studies have investigated the P uptake pot ential of wetland plants (e.g. Reddy and DeBusk, 1985; Tanner, 1996). Nearly all of the P incorporated into microbial biomass and most of the 17

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macrophyte-P is returned to the P cycle thr ough decomposition (Reddy et al., 1995; Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). However, the anaerobic conditi on resulting from flooding slows decomposition and promotes organic matter accumulation. The P stored in refractory biomass compounds contributes to the long-ter m sustainable P removal by bur ial in accrued sediments. The conditions supporting and enhancing each of these P removal mechanisms vary from wetland to wetland depending in large part on soil characteristics, vegetation type and density and water column chemistry, incl uding cation availabil ity and the distribution of the TP pool among the various functional P forms. Maximizing P treatment in wetlands requires an understanding and quantification (and manipulation) of the relative co ntributions of each of these processes to net P removal. Methods Site Description Over the past 15 years, 6 treatment marshes, called Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs) have been constructed in South Florida to captur e P from agricultural runoff before it enters the Florida Everglades, an oligotrophic wetland susceptible to anthropogenic eutrophication (Chimney and Goforth, 2001). Many investigations have demonstrated P enrichment and the associated disruption of the existing ecosystem s in the Everglades (see Reddy and DeLaune, 2008, for a comprehensive review of these works). In particular, most notable to the lay observer, is the shift from saw grass ( Cladium jamaicense Crantz) prairies to dense monotypic cattail ( Typha spp.) stands. The Everglades Agricu ltural Area (EAA), comprising 280,000 ha and approximately 27% of the original Everglades expanse, is a rich producer of sugarcane and winter vegetable crops (Reddy and DeLaune, 2008), and the primary source of P to the Everglades and to the STAs (Pietro et al., 2009). 18

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The STAs are strategically located, spatially and hydrologically, between the EAA and the remnants of the Everglades now broadly defined by the Everglades Protection Area ( Figure 1-2 ). Altogether, the 6 STAs have a total foot print of over 26,000 ha, with more than 18,000 ha of effective treatment area, subdivided into 35 cells ( Figure 1-3 ; Pietro et al., 2009). The balance of the land area is consumed by roads, levees, pu mp stations and other in frastructure. As of 2009, the STAs had retained over 1,200 metric tons of P since the inception of the Everglades Nutrient Removal Project (the forerunner to the STA project) in 1994 (Pietr o et al., 2010). Over the same time period, flow-weighted mean TP concentrat ion was reduced from 0.143 mg/L to 0.040 mg/L (Pietro et al., 2010). This report took advantage of the water and P mass balance data compiled by Chimney (2009). It was therefore constraine d to the cells for which data were reported in Chimney (2009). Excluded cells are indicated in Figure 1-3 Some currently subdivided cells were treated as combined larger units (e.g. Cell 1A and Cell 1B of STA-5 were considered together as the North Flow-way (NFW)). This was necessary to main tain longer records in cells that had been subdivided after startup or in cases where data were not available at the levee between sub-cells. Data Sources South Florida Water Management District ( SFWMD) staff collect daily flow and weekly or biweekly water quality data for all STA cells The data were retrie ved from the publiclyaccessible, online database, DBH YDRO, maintained by SFWMD. Data from topographic surveys of ea ch STA cell were provided by SFWMD. Vegetation coverage data, incl uding maps generated from aer ial images and field survey results were produced and collected, respectivel y, by various contractor s hired by SFWMD. The data were made available to this project by SFWMD. 19

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Calculations Several physical and chemical characteristics of the STAs were important to multiple aspects of this study. For convenience, the me thods employed to calculate each relevant parameter are described here. Hydraulic flows Daily inflow and outflow volumes were summed to determine the total flows for each period of interest: Q 1= Q 1t t 2t1 ( 1-1 ) Q 2= Q 2t t 2t1 ( 1-2 ) where t1 = starting date of the period of interest, t2 = end date of the period of interest, Q 1 = total inflow volume in the period of interest[L3/T], Q 2 = total outflow volume in the period of interest[L3/T], Q 1t = inflow volume on day t [L3/T] and Q 2t = outflow volume on day t [L3/T]. The hydraulic loading rate ( q) is the rainfall equivalent [L/T] of the inflow volume: q= Q 1 A ( 1-3 ) where A = wetland area [L2]. Chapter 2 provides a discussion of methods for calculating A The nominal hydraulic residence time ( ) is an estimate of the travel time [T] required for an average packet of water to pass through the wetland: = Ah Q 1 = h q ( 1-4 ) where h = mean water depth [L]. 20

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Water column chemical and physical properties Weekly and bi-weekly composite samples were linearly interpolated to estimate daily TP concentrations. Similarly, weekly and bi-weekly grab samples were linearly interpolated to estimate daily SRP, total dissolved P (TDP) and Ca concentrations. These daily values were flow-weighted to calculate average inflow and out flow concentrations for larger time steps. The same method of flow-weighting wa s employed for all constituents: C 1= Q 1tC 1t t 2t1 Q 1t t2t1 ( 1-5 ) C 2= Q 2tC 2t t 2t1 Q 2t t2t1 ( 1-6 ) where C 1 = flow-weighted mean inflow concentr ation in the period of interest [M/L3], C 2 = flow-weighted mean outflow concentra tion in the period of interest [M/L3], C 1t = estimated inflow concentration on day t [M/L3] and C 2t = estimated outflow concentration on day t [M/L3]. In cells with multiple inflow or outflow stations concentration values were again flow-weighted by station to estimate a single average value for each cell. Inflow and outflow concentrations of th e P forms DOP and PP were calculated by difference using measured TP, TDP and SRP values: C 1DOP= C 1TDPC 1SRP ( 1-7 ) C 2DOP= C 2TDPC 2SRP ( 1-8 ) C 1PP= C 1TPC 1TDP ( 1-9 ) C 2PP= C 2TPC 2TDP ( 1-10 ) where C 1DOP = inflow DOP concentration [M/L3], C 1PP = inflow PP concentration [M/L3], C 1SRP = inflow SRP concentration [M/L3], C 1TDP = inflow TDP concentration [M/L3], C 1TP = inflow TP concentration [M/L3], C 2DOP = outflow DOP concentration [M/L3], C 2PP = outflow PP 21

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concentration [M/L3], C 2SRP = outflow SRP concentration [M/L3], C 2TDP = outflow TDP concentration [M/L3] and C 2TP = outflow TP concentration [M/L3]. The relative proportions of each of these forms within the TP pool were calculated using the inflow and outflow concentrations: SRP1R= C 1SRPC 1TP ( 1-11 ) SRP2R= C 2SRPC 2TP ( 1-12 ) DOP1R= C 1DOPC 1TP ( 1-13 ) DOP2R= C 2DOPC 2TP ( 1-14 ) PP1R= C 1PPC 1TP ( 1-15 ) PP2R= C 2PPC 2TP ( 1-16 ) where SRP1R = inflow SRP fraction, SRP2R = outflow SRP fraction, DOP1R = inflow DOP fraction, DOP2R = outflow DOP fraction, PP1R = inflow PP fraction and PP2R = outflow PP fraction. The same procedure was used to calculate ar eal loading rates (ALR) for both TP and Ca: ALR= Q 1tC 1t t 2t1A ( 1-17 ) Chapter 2 provides a discussion of methods for calculating A The mass retention rate of Ca was calculated for each STA cell: CaMR= Q 1tC 1t t 2t1Q 2tC 2t t 2t1A ( 1-18 ) where CaMR = Ca mass retention rate [M/L2/T]. 22

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Weekly and bi-weekly inflow and outflow temperature and pH readings were linearly interpolated to estimate daily values of each. The daily values were averaged arithmetically (not flow-weighted) to generate monthly figures. Wetland chemical and physical properties Wetland age for any given time period was cal culated as the numb er of whole years between the date of the time period of interest an d the initiation of operation. That is, the current age of each wetland was not reflected back to the beginning of the period of record (POR), but rather the actual age of the we tland at each time step was used. Soil TP concentrations from each sampling event were assumed to be spatially representative of each cell, so th e values were arithmetically aver aged to obtain a single value for each cell for each sampling event. The resulting valu e was applied to the entire year in which the sampling occurred. Annual values were linearly interpolated across years in which sampling events did not take place. Estimates were not ex trapolated to years before the first sampling event or to years after the last sample collection in each cell. The daily average water depth was estimated by subtracting the elevation cumulative distribution function (CDF) from the daily mean water surface elevation (stage). A detailed description of the process by wh ich the elevation CDF was obtaine d for each cell is available in Chapter 2. The resulting function descri bes the continuous cumulative distribution of depths in the wetland and was compartmenta lized into 0.5 ft depth increments for convenience. The mean water depth was the area-weighted av erage of these depth increments. Wetland performance models The k-C* model is commonly used to predict the outflow concentra tion of contaminants from wetlands (Kadlec and Knight, 1996): 23

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C2C*=( C1C*) exp ( k A Q ) ( 1-19 ) where A = wetland area [L2], C1 = inflow concentration [M/L3], C2 = outflow concentration [M/L3], C = background concentration [M/L3], k = contaminant areal settling rate [L/T], and Q = flow rate [L3/T]. Equation ( 1-19 ) can be configured to include depth, such that it considers the volume rather than the surface area of the wetland (Kadlec and Knight, 1996): C2C*=( C1C*) exp ( A Q ) =( C1C*) exp (kv ) ( 1-20 ) where kv = contaminant volumetric rate constant [T-1]. Kadlec and Wallace (2008) noted that most wetland contaminant removal processes are typically apportioned to wetland area to a great er extent than to wetland water volume. Further, they found that kv decreased with increasing depth, and advise that the areal settling rate is more appropriate for most situations. Thus, the area-based form of the k-C* model (Equation ( 1-19 ) ) is considered throughout this document. The selection of k over kv has an additional implication. Because of the negative depth dependence of kv, the increases in associated with increases in depth do not result in commiserate improvements in performance. Therefore, only the changes in associated with changes in q (Equation ( 1-4 ) ) effect changes in wetland performance, so q may be considered as a proxy for Time-Step Selection With respect to the ultimate purpose of the STAs, to reduce the P load to downstream ecosystems, it is the long-term outfl ow TP concentration that is jus tly of interest to regulators on behalf of the Everglades. Practice has shown that the long-term outflow TP concentrations varied 24

PAGE 25

among cells over the history of the project. Nu merous studies have been undertaken to understand the root of these differences and to explore options fo r improving treatment effectiveness and decreasing outflow concentrati ons. In this and other studies comparing the STAs to one another, (POR) averages are valuable but limiting in that the number of values is restrained by the number of cells (or STAs, depending on the design of the study). Frequently, the characteristics that potentially differentiate STA cells from one another also vary over time within cells (e.g. depth, Ca con centration, hydraulic lo ading, etc). By incr easing the temporal resolution of the data, the number of data values available to explore correlative trends expands. In addition, many of the wetland biogeochemical m echanisms relevant to P processing occur at short time scales (minutes to days), suggesti ng that shorter periods of time averaging might elucidate valuable pro cess-level information. Conversely, the non-zero observed in all wetlands dictate that at any instant, the outflow water is independent of the inflow water. Al so, due to the imperfect hydraulics ubiquitous in wetlands, the outflow water at any instant compri ses a mixture of water that entered the wetland a range of previously, thereby preventing the simple comparison of inflow waters with waters exiting precisely one mean later. These two phenomena ne cessitate an upper limit on the resolution of the time step. Kadlec and Wallace ( 2008) suggested an averaging period of at least three nominal to ensure that the bulk of the outflow water considered in a given data value entered the wetland during that same period. For the reasons presented above, many analyses throughout this work aimed to assess the workings of the STAs in the short-term. De termining the appropriate time step required striking a balance between the aforementioned comp eting considerations fo r shortversus longterm averaging, while maintaining data manageabili ty. All of the data included in this study were 25

PAGE 26

provided by SFWMD, either directly or th rough the publicly-accessibl e, online database, DBHYDRO, which SFWMD populates and maintains. The flow and water quality data were organized by cell at a monthly time step s o, given the data at hand, the minimum possible averaging period was 30 d by default. Followi ng the prescription of Kadlec and Wallace (2008), the monthly calculated from this data were examined. The average monthly was 23 d. In only 44% of the non-screened months was the less than 10 d. The was less than 30 d in only 77% of months. Together, these findings suggest th at the monthly time step was too fine. The additional finding that 95% of months had s less than 90 d suggested that a quarterly (90 d) averaging period was more appropriate. However, upon the initial conversion of select data to the quarterly time step, it was f ound that the correlations between the outflow TP concentration and both the inflow TP concentration and the TP ALR were slightly stronger among the monthly data than the quarterly values. Ultimately, it is the physical connection between the inflow and outflow water, as measured by the solutes in that water, which must be maintained by selecting a sufficiently long averaging period. Because the 90 d time step failed to measurably strengthen the inflow-outflow relationshi p, the 30 d averaging period was selected. Throughout this work, each use of the phrase short-term i ndicates the use of monthly data. Data Screening When analyzing data for relationships betw een known dependent variables and possible independent variables, it is common practice to screen data points generated by unusual operating conditions in the system of interest. For example, within treatment wetland science, convention calls for the exclusion of data from the start-up period, th e time immediately after initiation of treatment, when temporary nutri ent sinks (plant biomass expansion and soil sorption) may exaggerate observed treatment performance (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). Also, some authors elect to omit periods of internal maintenance (e. g. Pietro et al., 2008; Juston and 26

PAGE 27

DeBusk, 2006). Within this analysis, the former etiquette was observed implicitly; the POR for each cell was selected to corre spond with the data range included in Chimney (2009), who omitted start-up years therein. Extremely low flow events created difficulties for the data analysis required by this study. For example, very low hydraulic loading causes the calculated to become very large (exceeding tens of thousands of days in some cases). Li kewise, exceptionally low flows (in or out) can generate extreme calculated TP mass removal valu es. In an effort to suppress such extravagant values (which, being outliers, have unique power to disrupt correlation a nd regression analyses), while simultaneously maintaining a large number of data points, all months in which neither the inflow nor outflow volume was at least 10% of the respective long-term average were screened. Of the original 1419 data months, 1050 (74%) remained after this criteria was applied. Some variables required a dditional special considerati on. The appendix lists these variables and the conditions that resulted in the omissi on of individual values. 27

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Figure 1-1. Phosphorus (P) cycle in surface flow wetlands. DIP = particulate inorganic P, DOP = dissolved organic P, PIP = particulate i norganic P, POP = part iculate organic P. Image: Reddy and DeLaune, 2008. 28

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29 Figure 1-2. Map showing the loca tions of the six Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs), the Everglades Agricultural Area and the Ever glades Protection Area in South Florida. Image: Pietro et al., 2008.

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Figure 1-3. Schematics of the configuration of the treatment cells within each Stormwater Treatment Area (STA). The dominant vegetatio n type in each cell is also indicated. Cells marked with X were not included in this study. Image: Pietro et al., 2010. 30

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CHAPTER 2 INFLUENCE OF WETTED AREA ON PHOSPHORUS DYNAMICS IN THE STORMWATER TREATMENT AREAS Introduction Performance, measured by any metric (outfl ow concentration, concentration reduction, or settling rate) varied across the STAs, with some cells and STAs having removed P less effectively than their peers (P ietro et al., 2009). The total expe nditures on the STA project are difficult to estimate, but the construction, monitoring and management of treatment wetlands with a combined footprint of over 26,000 ha (Pie tro et al., 2009) is an enormous financial undertaking. As such, poor P removal performance by an STA is unaffordable by the SFWMD as well as unacceptable for the preservation of downstream ecosystems. As part of a larger diagnostic exercise to elucidate the control ling factors behind measured performance (and ultimately to advise SFWMD on management st rategies to improve performance in trouble STAs), the relationship between TP areal loading rate (TPALR) and outflow TP concentration was explored. Terms A C1, and Q from Equation ( 1-19 ) are related by: ALR = C 1* Q A ( 2-1 ) where ALR = areal loading rate [M/L2/T]. It can easily be seen that in the k-C* model, any change in A C1, or Q that would cause ALR to increase, would correspondingly cause the outflow concentration ( C2) to increase. In other words, the outflow concentration of a contaminant is directly proportional to the ALR of that contaminant. It is common for C1 and Q to vary over the daily, monthl y and even annual operation of a treatment wetland. Less preval ent are changes in the treatment ar ea. As a result, ALR is typically calculated for the nominal area ( An), that is, the design or built wetland area. However, in certain 31

PAGE 32

circumstances, the actual wetted area (WA) may not be equal to An. All wetlands have a distribution of elevations arising from both macro-scale ground slope and micro-scale topographic heterogeneity. The size of the STAs enha nces this variation on both scales, and also precludes grading, which, in many constructed wetlands, minimizes topographic heterogeneity. Most wetlands, including the STAs experience temporal variability in flow, driven primarily by regional rainfall patterns. During times of low flow, particularly during seasonal or regional drought, insufficient water may be delivered to the wetland to maintain the stage above the maximum ground elevation. When this occurs, WA will be less than An. The interaction of the spatial elevation distribution and the temporal stage distribution controls the WA in the STAs. Often, estimates of k are derived from Equation ( 1-19 ) when the other variables are known, so that treatment performance can be co mpared across wetlands with diverse inputs. Clearly, when WA < An, the use of A = An in Equation ( 2-1 ) would result in suppressed estimates of k. Some STA cells did experience periodic dry-down conditions in whole or in part (Pietro et al., 2008) due to variability in weather conditions in the tributary basi ns, therefore previous estimates of k and ALR (of specific relevance to this study, kTP and TPALR) that incorporated An may have been inaccurate. It was hypothesized th at poor performance (specifically as measured by the outflow TP concentration relative to the in flow TPALR), was, in so me circumstances, an artifact of imprecise calculations. For example, hypothetical wetlands A and B have nominal TPALR of 1 g/m2/yr and observed outflow TP concentrations of 0.075 and 0.10 mg/L, respectively. Investigation reveal s that only half of the nominal area of wetland B was actually flooded, due to topographic and stage variability The revised TPALR in wetland B becomes 2 g/m2/yr, and it becomes evident that some porti on of the poor performance (high outflow 32

PAGE 33

concentration relative to loadi ng rate) of wetland B was a product of the data used in the ALR calculation. If the hypothesis held tr ue, an extension of that logi c would suggest that realized performance (absolute outflow concentration, rega rdless of inlet loading) could be improved by increasing the flooded area of candi date wetlands (while maintain ing historical flow rates) through earthwork to reduce th e topographic variability. Accurate estimation of the changes in WA over time is important beyond assuring correct k and ALR calculations. The drying of portions of cells is of pa rticular concern for submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) which may die if desi ccated (Harwell, 2003). However, White et al. (2006) subjected SAV mesocosms to 1-month periods of dry out (the condition of the vegetative communities upon re-flooding was not reported), and found net treatment of TP (outflow concentration lower than inflow concentration) to resume 0-3 weeks following re-flooding. Nonetheless, it may be difficult to maintain SAV in treatment cells that regularly or intermittently dry out. Additionally, re-flooding of exposed sediments re sults in a flux of P out of the sediments into the water column (Olila et al., 1997, White et al., 2006; Bostic and White, 2007; Pietro et al., 2008 and 2009). Thus, the changing WA due to stage and topographic interaction would be expected to reduce treatment effectiveness. Objectives This chapter attempts to answer three primar y questions: 1) Was the RWA, or changes in RWA, significantly correlated to kTP? 2) Did WA < An significantly alter the TPALR realized by any cell in the STAs? If so, does the use of A = WA, rather than A = An, in Equations ( 1-19 ) and ( 2-1 ) usefully improve the correlation between out flow TP concentration and TPALR? 3) Is there significant value added by calculating WA vi a the elevation distribution, as compared to simpler methods? The following hypotheses were tested to address the questions above: 33

PAGE 34

The long-term TP removal performance will be ne gatively correlated with variation in elevation within cells. The short-term TP removal performance will be positively correlated with RWA, and negatively correlated with monthly RWA, in months when RWA was positive. The STA-wide TPALR calculated by substituting A = WA into Equation ( 2-1 ) will be significantly higher than the TPALR calculated using A = An. The correlation between the monthly TPALR and th e monthly outflow TP concentration will be usefully higher when Equation ( 2-1 ) is evaluated using A = WA derived from the stagearea curve, than when Equation ( 2-1 ) is solved using either A = WA derived from the mean elevation or A = An. Methods Calculation of the Wetted Area Brown and Caldwell (1996) formalized the calc ulation of the relative wetted area (RWA): RWA = 1 (t2-t1) A dt t 2t1 ( 2-2 ) where t1 = start of time period, and t2 = end of time period. Note that RWA WA / An. The RWA was calculated for each individual cell, and area-weighted averages were calculated at larger spatial scales. The cell areas reported in Pietro et al. (2009) were used for An. Approximations for the integral portion of Equation ( 2-2 ) can be made by any one of three methods. The simplest approach, employed by SFWM D (Pietro et al., 2009), uses the operational status of each cell as a proxy for inundation stat us on any given day, where online cells are fully inundated (WA = An) and offline cells are fully dry (WA = 0) and then the values of WA for all days in the period of interest are summed and then substituted for the integral portion of Equation ( 2-2 ) Alternatively, WA(t) can be estimated by (Pietro et al., 2010): 34

PAGE 35

WA(t) = Anif hwi hmean0if hwi < hmean ( 2-3 ) where hwi = average elevation of water surface (stage) on day i [L] and hmean = mean elevation of the ground surface [L]. Again, the WA values for al l days in the period of interest are summed and applied to Equation ( 2-2 ) In some STAs, particularly those with wide elevation ranges or highly pulsed inflows, the methods of SFWMD ma y not accurately estimate the effective area. Finally, WA(t) may be estimated from a stage-area curve, a function that relates the flooded wetland area to the elevation of the water surf ace. This final method of WA calculation was selected for this analysis as it qu antifies the extent of flooding when hmin < hw < hmax, as opposed to the flooded/dry dichotomy created by the tw o other methods. To c onstruct the stage-area curve for each cell, topographic da ta from the most recent, or othe rwise most reliable, survey of each STA were interpolated using the kriging method in ArcGIS 9.2 (ESRI, Redlands, CA). Extreme values (e.g. tops of levees, bottoms of ditches) included in the original survey data were excluded from interpolation. From the resulti ng continuous bathymetric map, ArcGIS returned tabulated frequencies of the elevations in each cell. These frequencies were transformed into cumulative elevation distributions, the vertical axes of which were multiplied by An. Sixth-order polynomial curves were fit to the resulting poin ts to estimate the stage-area curve: y = ah6 + bh5 + ch4 + dh3 + eh2 +fh + g ( 2-4 ) where h = elevation, ft NGVD29, y = area of cell with elevation x a-g = constants, unique for each cell. Sixth-order curves generally provided strong fits to the data, though the large number of unique coefficients for each cell was somewhat burdensome. Equation ( 2-4 ) was solved for h = hwi, returning the WA for each day i The sum of the resulting valu es served as an estimate of the integral portion of Equation ( 2-2 ). 35

PAGE 36

The nature of these high-order polynomials dict ates that they only describe the stage-area relationship over a specified domain, unique to eac h cell. This range of valid elevations ( h-values that produce frequency [y ] values between 0 and An and lie within the range of surveyed elevations) is bounded by the minimum and maximum elevation within each cell. The effects of the method of RWA and TPAL R calculation were examined. These terms are given the subscript D when they were based on the elevation di stribution (stage-area curve), the subscript M when they were calculated from the mean elevation, and the subscript N when they relied on the nominal area. The pr actice of using operation al status to estimate the inundation status was not considered here. Statistical Analyses All statistical analyses were conducted w ith SAS 9.1 (SAS Institute, Cary, NC). Nonparametric tests were applied as necessary when data failed to meet assumptions of normality. Results and Discussion Characterization of Elevation Distri bution and Wetted Area in the STAs The CDF (equivalent to the stage-area curv e, normalized for area) of ground elevation varied among cells in the STAs (Figure 2-1). Qualitatively, the shape and spread of the distribution of elevation in each cell alone was not correlat ed with long-term P removal performance. For example, despite similar elevation CDFs, STA-1W Cell 1 and STA-3/4 Cell 1A have shown very different POR P mass remo val effectiveness (7.6% and 44.9%, respectively; Chimney, 2009). Quantitatively, the standard deviation of the elevati on in each STA was not correlated with the POR P mass removal effectiveness ( r2 = 0.036). The annual RWAD was less than 100% for 74/118 cellyears but was lower than 90% for only 28 of 118 cell-years ( Table 2-1 ). The POR average RWAD for all STAs was 96%. Most of 36

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the low RWAD cell-years are concentrated in wa ter years 2007 and 2008 (Figure 2-2), a documented period of drought in Sout h Florida (Pietro et al., 2009). Changes in RWAD were brought on by intra-annual as well as inter-annual precipitation cycles. For most cells, the seasonal low RWAD occurs in May ( Table 2-2 ), corresponding with the end of the South Florida dry season. Relative Wetted Area and Total Phosphorus Removal Performance The TP areal settling rate was poorly but significantly corre lated to the RWAD across all cells and all non-screened months ( r =0.162, p<0.0001, n=943). The relative lack of variability in the explanatory term (RWAD was greater than 95% in 89% of months; Figure 2-3 ) obscured the influence of RWAD on kTP. Considering only months where RWAD < 1.0 (that is, months when hw < hmax) increased r to 0.308 ( p<0.0001, n=247). The relationship between kTP and RWAD was strongest among all of the months when RWAM < 1.0, though this filter greatly reduced the number of included observations ( r =0.412, p=0.0408, n=25). This suggests that, on the whole, the RWAD influenced the TP settling rate in the STAs (months with high RWAD were more likely to also have high kTP), but the overall impact across the operating history of the whole project was minimized by the relative infrequency of months with RWAD substantially less than 1.0. Likewise, there was a weak but significant re lationship between the monthly outflow TP concentration and RWAD across all cells and al l non-screened months ( r = -0.181, p<0.0001, n=989). The relationship was only margina lly stronger among months where RWAD < 1.0 ( r = 0.211, p=0.0003, n=285). Contrary to the findings for kTP, there was no correlation between outflow TP concentration and RWAD within months with RWAM < 1 ( r =0.078, p=0.6775, n=31). Apparently the RWAD has little effect on the outflow TP co ncentration, relative to the variation caused by all other wetland processes. 37

PAGE 38

Several conditions may have contri buted to the relationship between kTP and RWAD. First, in those cells where deviation from RWAD = 1.0 was augmented by hi ghly variable topography (e.g. cells in STA-5, Figure 2-1), at any given average depth, the variance on the distribution of depths would have been higher than in more flat-bottomed cells (e.g. cells in STA-3/4, Figure 2-1). The effect of extreme depths on shorta nd long-term performance has not been quantified. Second, dry-out could have caused localized death of SAV or transition of herbaceous emergent aquatic vegetation (EAV) to less desirable woody shrubs, decreasing treatment capacity upon reflooding. The vegetation records in the STAs di d not have sufficient temporal or spatial resolution to test this hypothesis. Finally, the absolute RWA ma y have had little influence on kTP, with changes in RWA primarily affecting the appare nt settling rate through oxidation and rewetting of the soil. Non-zero changes in RWA can occur only when the RWA varies from 1.0, thus the relationship observed above may be only a vestige of a connection between changing RWA and settling rate. Interpretation of these correlation coefficients requires caution however. Although the RWAD is normalized to the An of each cell, the kTP values were not normalized to the cell means. Because the mean kTP was different in each cell, it is dange rous to compare points of equivalent RWAD if they came from different cells. Within cells, the strength and sign of the correlation between kTP and RWAD vary widely and the relationship wa s significant only in STA-5 Central Flow-way (CFW; Cells 2A and 2B) and ST A-6 Cell 3. Possibly, perennially high RWAD lends itself to higher kTP values. Additionally, the subsets of obs ervations resulting from each of the sequential screening criteria were not necessarily representative subsamples of the larger sample of observations. For example, of the 25 months with RWAM < 1.0 and valid kTP values, 38

PAGE 39

approximately half came from STA-5, which accounted for only 14% of the original 943 observations. The relationship between kTP and the change in monthly RWAD ( RWAD) tells a more interesting story. With all cells a nd all non-screened months included, r = -0.074 ( p=0.0241, n=932). Despite the expected negative coefficien t, the strength of th e correlation does not strongly support th e hypothesis that kTP would decrease during re-flooding months. The coefficient of correlation was slightly greater (as was the level of significance) with RWAM ( r = -0.090, p=0.0059, n=932), likely because the substantia l dry-down and re-flooding events required to shift the stage past hmean may have had more of an e ffect on the settling rate than small events that could cause RWAD to be different from 0. As discussed above, the RWAD infrequently varied far from 1.0. As a result, RWAD did not often vary far from 0. Removing from the correlation those cells that never experienced RWAD 1 improved the strength and significance of the re lationship between kTP and RWAD only slightly ( r = -0.088, p=0.0167, n=745). Again, kTP was slightly more closely associated with RWAM ( r = -0.105, p=0.0039, n=745). Of course, the deleterious effects of cha nging RWA (as explicated in the hypothesis) are expected only in re-flooding months, or months with RWAD > 0. Screening out all months that do not meet this criterion tripled the strength of the co-variation (r = -0.313, p<0.0001, n=159). This implies that, in months when re-floodi ng occurred, about 10% of the variability of kTP was explained by variability in the extent of the re-flo oding event. Finally, in the few months of substantial re-flooding ( RWAD > 0.1), the kTP and RWAD were remarkably co-variant ( r = 0.605, p<0.0001, n=39). The large amount of variability in kTP explained by RWAD in these large re-flood months, suggests that RWAD may be a useful variable to include in a multiple linear regression analysis to determine the factors controlling kTP (Chapter 4). The previous 39

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discussion on the caution that must be applied when interpreting data of th is nature applies to these results as well. Relative Wetted Area and Total Phosphorus Mass Loading Rate Determining the importance of WA < An on the TPALR in the STAs was a surprisingly complex task. In absolute terms, the TPALRD and TPALRM must be greater than TPALRn for a cell in any given month, year, or ot her period of interest where the WAD < An and WAM < An, respectively. It is the size of these differences and their implications for other assessments that require an accurate measure of th e TPALR that are of interest. When the three methods of TPALR calculation were treated as repeated measures on each unique cell-month (n=1000) the means were statisticall y, though not substantially, different (0.275 g/m2/mo, 0.273 g/m2/mo and 0.272 g/m2/mo for TPALRD, TPALRM and TPALRn, respectively. All pairs of m eans significantly different at p=0.05). The large number of observations boosted the significan ce of these trivial differences. This finding imparts nothing except the fact that the adjustment for WA ma kes very little impact on the long-term mean TPALR; the precision of flow ( Q in Equation ( 2-1 ) ) measurements does not support the estimation of the loading rate to thousandths of a gram per m2 per month. Accordingly, when the repeated measure design was removed from the analysis and the means compared directly, the calculated TPALR was not signifi cantly influenced by the method of WA calculation when all STA cells and all months with valid TPALR data ( n=1000) were included (Kurskal-Wallis =0.1261, df=2, p=0.9389). In fact, the TPALR adjusted for the WA (regardless of calculation method) was not statistically different from the TPALRn. The general tendency toward complete or nearly complete flooding, again, obscured sta tistical differences between the adjusted TPALR and the TPALRn because the WA-correction has no effect in months when RWAD = RWAM = 1.0. To isolate the true effects of the WA calculation on the TPALR, the three TPALR rank-sums 40

PAGE 41

were again compared incl uding only months where RWAD < 1.0 ( n=280). The Kurskal-Wallis =0.1264 (df=2, p=0.9388) which failed to allow rejection of the null hypothesis that there is no effect of WA calculation on TPALR. Even considering only the months where RWAM < 1.0 ( n=38) there was no effect of the method of WA calculation ( =2.4048, df=2, p=0.3005). Finally, the TPALR rank-sums were compared cons idering all months (regardless of WA value) only in those cells with POR mean WAD 0.95 ( n=209; =0.1985, df=2, p=0.9055). In none of these cases was there a significant difference between any pair of the TPALR rank-sums. Apparently, the variation in monthly TPALR due to fluctuations in flow rate and inflow TP concentration overwhelmed the slight variance cont ributed by the shifting RWA. This suggests, that no correction for WA < An was necessary for a sufficiently accurate accounting of the monthly TPALR in the STAs. Months with low RWAD tended to coincide with months of low flow ( Figure 2-4 ). Possibly, the adjustment of TPALR for WA < An was ineffectual in the monthly data because relatively low loading rates tended to dampen the impact of the adjustment in low-RWAD months. To estimate the annual TPALR, the sum of the 12 monthly loads is divided by the average of the 12 monthly WA values. (In adopting this calculation method, the dubious assumption that the water delivered to a cell in any given month was available for delivery in any other month, as would be the case if the water was metered out of a reservoir, was accepted). In this way, a low-RWA month contributes to the calculation (incr easing the calculated TPALR) even if the mass load in that month was low or negligible. However, despite these considerations, the different methods of TPALR calculation did no t lead to significant differences between the rank-sums. 41

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Despite the lack of significant effect on the mean TPALR, adjustment for the calculated WA would still be warranted if the correction im proved the strength of the correlation between the TPALR and the outflow TP concentration. Th e coefficients of correlation (and p-values) between outflow TP concen tration and TPALR are show n for each method of TPALR calculation over various s ubsets of the data in Table 2-3 When all months for all cells were included, the increases in the coefficient of corr elation due to WA-correct ion were trivial. The largest improvements in r were found among months with RWAD < 1.0 (in all cells) and among all months in cells with POR mean RWAD < 95% (STA-2 Cell 2, STA-5 NFW, STA-5 CFW), though in both of these cases th e relationship was so weak, rega rdless of TPALR calculation method, as to render the slight co-variation valu eless. Interestingly, within every subset of observations, TPALRM was a better co-varia ble with outflow TP c oncentration than was TPALRD. Of course, the relationship between TPAL R and outflow TP concentration was not uniform within each cell. The results and implica tions of the cell-by-cell analysis are presented in Chapter 3. Wetlands integrate, and thus dampen, shortterm loading effects through dynamic soil and macrophyte processes. For example, the vegeta tion in a healthy wetland may be able to assimilate a pulse of incoming P through biomass expansion. The excess P may be released over many more than the mass of water that carried the initial pulse, as the plants die and decompose, and a short-term time step (e.g. mont h) may fail to capture the effect of TPALR on outflow TP concentration. To th at end, annual outflow TP concen tration was compared to annual TPALRn, TPALRM and TPALRD. The value of examining these va riables over a longer time step was immediately apparent from the improvement in rvalues compared to the whole population of cell-months. Once again, the method of WA dete rmination was insignific ant: annual outflow 42

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43 TP concentration was more closely related to TPALRD ( r =0.476, p<0.0001, n=111) than it was to either TPALRM ( r =.475, p<0.0001, n=111) or TPALRn ( r =0.466, p<0.0001, n=111), though only trivially. Conclusions In the STAs, the interaction of intra-cell topography and time-variable stage occasionally resulted in the incomplete inundation of some cells, as revealed by th e characterization study. When the actual WA is less than the nominal ar ea, exposed soils and vegetation are subject to oxidation and desiccation. In addition, the value of the ALR calculated with An will not reflect the realized ALR of the system potentially affecting expected relationships between ALR and wetland treatment performance indices. There existed a weak positive linear relationship between kTP and RWAD and a weak negative lin ear relationship between kTP and RWAD. Both correlations increased in streng th with sequential screening of unimportant months, e.g. months with RWAD = 1.0 or RWAD = 0. However, the number of months among which these relationships were important was very limited. Neither the TPALR nor the strength of the correlation between TPALR and outflow TP concentration was meani ngfully altered by adjusting the calculated TPALR for WA < An. These non-dramatic results support important co nclusions nonetheless. First, the expected biogeochemical consequences of dr y-out and rewetting appear to have been at work in the STAs. Fortunately, from a treatment point of view, RW A infrequently varied far from 1.0, so the bulk of the TP processing in the STAs was una ffected by dry-out/re-flooding events. Second, An was a satisfactory approximation of WA since neither the monthly nor annual TPALR was significantly different under eith er alternative calculation sche me. Finally, poor performance in certain cells (elevated outflow TP concentrations relative to inflow TPALR) was shown not to be

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44 an artifact of the TPALR calculation, validating the need for additional work to diagnose those factors contributing to performance in the ST As, as presented in the following chapters.

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Table 2-1. Average annual relative wetted area by water year for each cell in the Stormwater Treatment Areas. Area (ha) 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Average STA-1E 1628 99% 98 98 Cell 3 238 97 93 95 Cell 4N 261 99 99 99 Cell 4S 304 99 100 99 Cell 5 231 96 92 94 Cell 6 425 100 100 100 Cell 7 169 100 100 100 STA-1W 2699 100 100 100 100 100 99 77 69 95 96 Cell 1 603 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 69 90 95 Cell 2 381 100 100 100 100 100 100 98 100 Cell 3 415 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 55 85 93 Cell 4 145 100 100 100 100 100 87 100 73 100 96 Cell 5 1155 100 100 100 100 100 80 95 100 97 STA-2 2565 92 100 98 97 96 94 96 Cell 1 728 79 100 100 100 100 97 96 Cell 2 919 94 99 94 93 89 87 92 Cell 3 919 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 STA-3/4 6695 99 99 97 98 Cell 1A 1230 99 98 90 96 Cell 1B 1412 99 100 100 100 Cell 2A 1029 100 99 99 99 Cell 2B 1171 99 100 100 100 Cell 3A 871 97 93 99 96 Cell 3B 982 99 99 98 98 STA-5 1663 84 91 95 97 91 73 69 72 84 CFW 832 79 88 93 95 94 65 63 75 81 NFW 832 89 93 97 99 87 82 76 69 87 STA-6 352 93 97 94 93 70 74 87 Cell 3 99 87 94 88 88 51 51 77 Cell 5 253 96 99 96 95 78 83 91 45

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46 Table 2-2. Intra-annual trends in relative wetted area. No. Yr. Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec STA-1E 100% 100 99 95 88 96 100 100 100 100 100 100 Cell 3 2 100 100 99 82 62 94 100 100 100 100 100 100 Cell 4N 2 100 100 100 100 95 95 99 100 100 100 100 100 Cell 4S 2 100 99 99 100 98 99 100 100 100 100 100 100 Cell 5 2 100 100 97 81 65 85 100 100 100 100 100 100 Cell 6 2 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 Cell 7 2 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 STA-W 97 94 91 89 91 98 100 100 100 100 99 98 Cell 1 9 93 91 89 89 89 98 99 100 100 100 99 97 Cell 2 7 100 100 100 100 96 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 Cell 3 9 89 89 89 89 89 91 100 100 100 100 94 91 Cell 4 9 100 100 93 80 84 91 100 100 100 100 100 100 Cell 5 8 100 95 88 87 92 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 STA-2 97 97 98 96 87 92 96 98 99 98 98 98 Cell 1 6 100 98 100 100 81 85 90 98 100 100 100 100 Cell 2 6 91 94 95 90 78 88 97 96 97 94 94 95 Cell 3 6 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 STA-3/4 100 100 99 97 91 96 100 100 100 99 98 100 Cell 1A 3 100 100 100 93 73 87 100 100 100 99 97 100 Cell 1B 3 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 99 97 100 Cell 2A 3 100 100 100 97 97 100 100 100 100 99 100 100 Cell 2B 3 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 99 98 100 Cell 3 3 100 99 97 95 89 95 100 100 100 99 99 100 STA-5 81 76 76 70 65 80 92 94 96 96 93 90 CFW 8 76 68 73 64 60 77 91 95 96 96 94 89 NFW 8 87 83 80 76 69 83 92 93 96 96 93 90 STA-6 84 82 86 79 56 75 94 100 100 100 98 93 Cell 3 6 70 69 75 64 23 50 84 100 100 100 97 88 Cell 5 6 89 87 90 85 68 85 97 100 100 100 99 94 Grand Total 97 95 95 92 87 93 98 99 99 99 98 98

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Table 2-3. Changes in the coefficients of correlation for different subsets of data. 1 2 3 4 5 All cells Months when RWAD < 1.0 Months when RWAM < 1.0 All months in cells with mean RWAD < 0.95 No. data months 945 248 25 187 TPALRn 0.266 (<0.0001) 0.099 (0.1214) 0.493 (0.0122) 0.048 (0.5154) TPALRD 0.271 (<0.0001) 0.119 (0.0614) 0.486 (0.0137) 0.067 (0.3589) TPALRM 0.273 (<0.0001) 0.133 (0.0370) 0.516 (0.0083) 0.083 (0.2567) 47

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48 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 7891011121314 Feet of elevation NGVD Cell 3 Cell 5 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 7891011121314 Feet of elevation NGVD Cell 1A Cell 1B Cell 2A Cell 2B Cell 3A Cell 3B 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 7891011121314 Feet of elevation NGVD Cell 1 Cell 2A Cell 2B Cell 3 Cell 4 Cell 5A Cell 5B 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 1011121314151617 Feet of elevation NGVD Cell 3 Cell 4N Cell 4S Cell 5 Cell 6 Cell 7 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 7891011121314 Feet of elevation NGVD Cell 1 Cell 2 Cell 3 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 910111213141516 Feet of elevation NGVD Cell 1A Cell 1B Cell 2A Cell 2B STA-1E STA-1W STA-2 STA-3/4 STA-5 STA-6 Figure 2-1. Cumulative elevation distribution for each cell in th e Stormwater Treatment Areas. Note that the range of each horizontal axis is the same.

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50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Drough t ST A1 E ( 1 0 0 ) ST A1 W ( 9 7 ) ST A2 ( 9 6 ) ST A3 / 4 ( 9 8 ) ST A5 ( 8 4 ) ST A6 ( 8 7 ) Figure 2-2. Relativ e wetted area in each of th e Stormwater Treatm ent Areas. Note that the vertical axis does not ex tend to 0. Err o r bars hav e been om itted to inc r ease clar ity. 49

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50 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 0%20%40%60%80%100% Relative wetted area Figure 2-3. Histogram of monthly relative wetted area (determine d by the elevation distribution) values across all non-screened months and all included cells.

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0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 05101520253035Relative wetted areaHydraulic loading rate (m/mo) Figure 2-4. Monthly relative wetted area (determined by the elevati on distribution) with respect to monthly hydraulic loading for all non-sc reened months and all included cells. 51

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CHAPTER 3 ASSOCIATION BETWEEN LOADING RATE AND OUTFLOW CONCENTRATION IN THE STORMWATER TREATMENT AREAS Introduction Several species of SAV, macr ophytes with the bulk of thei r biomass suspended in the water column, are common in wetlands and other water bodies in South Florida (Dierberg et al., 2002). Because of their growth habit, the mechan isms of P removal in SAV systems include two distinct differences from those in EAV wetlands. First, roots of emergent plants can access only porewater nutrients (with diffusion or mass transfer of nutrients to the sediment mediating uptake from the water column), whereas SAV obtains nu trients directly from the water column through the shoots and leaves (Granli and Solander, 198 8). This means that SAV can uptake SRP very quickly, particularly in the s hort-term (Pietro et al., 2006). Second, during photosynthesis, SAV removes carbon dioxide and bicarbonate from the wa ter column, which raises the system pH, and drives the system towards calcium carbonate (CaCO3) supersaturation, promoting CaCO3 precipitation (McConnaughey et al ., 1994). Several studies have pr oposed co-precipitation with CaCO3 as a mechanism of P removal in a variety of systems (Scinto, 1997 reviews some of these works). It has been reasoned that SAV is more suited for P removal in treatment wetlands than EAV, a hypothesis supported by studies at mesocosm(Dierber g et al., 2002) prototype(Nungesser and Chimney, 2001) and fieldscales (Juston and DeBusk, 2006). SAV systems have generally been successful wi thin the STAs, and now comprise over half (ca. 10,000 ha) of the STA treatment area, often in downstream positions within serial flowtrains (Pietro et al., 2010). Most of the cells with the lowest long-term outflow concentrations are dominated by SAV; of the nine cells with long-term flow-weighted average outflow TP concentrations below 0.030 mg/L, six are designated SAV. 52

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Though elevated relative to the levels in the hi storical, unimpacted Everglades, it has been suggested by way of internal pr ofile studies that these low outfl ow concentrations approach C* in some SAV cells (i.e. the concentration prof ile reaches a plateau some fraction of the way through the cell, beyond which no additional treatment is observed; Pietro et al., 2010). The alternative P treatment m echanisms at work in SAV may be responsible for the reduction of TP to C*, possibly because, given non-limiting cal cium and light for photosynthesis, the coprecipitation process is not subject to saturation as soils (via sorption) and microbial and plant biomass may be, nor is it rate-limited by biotic uptake. Excessively loading a wetland with a high sett ling rate conceptually results in poor performance (e.g. elevated outflow concentratio ns, lowered percent remo val). Conversely, even wetlands with low settling rates can conceptually perform well at sufficiently low loading rates. The interaction of the settling rate and loading rate determ ines the realized treatment performance for a wetland (assuming the inflow con centration is well above C*). It is convenient to employ the Damkhler number, which capture s the treatment potential of a wetland by combining the settling rate with the lo ading rate (Kadlec and Wallace, 1996): Da = k q ( 3-1 ) where Da = Damkhler number. By inserting Equation ( 3-1 ) into Equation ( 1-19 ) the k-C* model suggests that at very high Da, C* controls the outflow concentration: C2C*=( C1C*) exp ( Da) ( 3-2 ) Internal profile studies are reliable for de termining whether a wetland is treating to C*. They are however, laborious and expensive both in the field and the laboratory. Potentially, the strength of the correla tion between the outflow concentrati on and the TPALR may be used as a proxy to estimate if wetland effluent is at C*. Si nce C* is independent of the short-term TPALR 53

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(Equations ( 1-19 ) and ( 2-1 ) ), in situations where the outflo w TP concentration approaches C*, the correlation between the outflow TP concentration and the TPALR will be weak or absent. For example, internal profiles were estimated for a hypothetical wetland with a very high Da under four different loading scenarios, each with a different ALR (Figure 3-1). In each scenario, the outflow concentration was equal to C* and outflow concentration and ALR were uncorrelated. The term apparent background concen tration is adapted from Kadlec and Knight (1996) to describe the outflow TP concentrations from those cells with weak short-term outflow concentration-TPALR interactions, even when those concentrations were above the range of commonly described background TP concentrations for South Florida systems of 6-16 g/L (Juston and DeBusk, 2006; Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). The hypothesis that alternative P removal mechanisms elevate Da such that S AV cells tend to produce apparent TP background concentrations (while EAV cells are less likely to do so) may be tested by comparing the correlations between outflow TP concentration and TPALR within SAV cells to those in EAV cells. It should be noted, however, that even for we ll performing cells, the outflow concentration varied, both from cell to cell a nd over time. In conjunction with the previous discussion, this implies that the apparent background concentr ation was not fixed. In a plug-flow wetland, the real P background concentration is the point of equilibrium between P availability and biogeochemical P demand. Atmospheric deposition, internal hydraulics (t he degree of mixing within a wetland), TP fractionation, and the inte rnal loading (particularly of PP and DOP) are known to contribute to the apparent backgr ound concentration (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). Some of these factors can be eas ily measured (TP fractionation) a nd others can be inferred from easily quantifiable factors (e.g. temperature can be a proxy for seasonal changes in biomass 54

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production and senescence, both of which contribute to autochthonous P loads) In STA cells that produce outflow TP concentrations independent of the TPALR, understanding and quantifying the factors that control the apparent background concentration are important for increasing both realized performance and predictions of that performance. Objectives This chapter addresses four primary questions: 1) Were SAV cells in the STAs operating at apparent background concentrations, as de termined by independence of outflow TP concentration from the TPALR? 2) Were the outf low TP concentration data uncorrelated to the TPALR in all SAV cells, or only a specific subset ? 3) In the case that only certain cells are exempt from this correlation, what was the under lying cause if not the do minant vegetation? 4) What determined the outflow TP concentratio n in cells operating at an apparent background concentration? The above quest ions were answered by testing the following hypotheses: The outflow TP concentration data will be more poorly correlated to the TPALR data in SAV cells relative to EAV cells. The outflow TP concentration data will co-vary weakly with TPALR data in most SAV cells, and will not co-vary at all with TPALR in some SAV cells. The strength of the co-variation wi ll be negatively correlated to the percent cover of SAV within cells. In those cells operating at an apparent C*, the out flow concentration will be a function of one or more of the variables: TP fractiona tion, long-term TPALR and temperature. Methods Methods regarding the calculati on or preparation of TPALR, TP fraction, and temperature data may be found in Chapter 1. Vegetation Each STA cell has been classified by do minant vegetation type (SAV/EAV) by SFWMD (Pietro et al. 2008). While the cl assifications generally capture the dominant vegetation types, 55

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and reflect the plant communities targeted by SFWMD for each cell, they do not imply 100% coverage by the indicated vegetation class. Th e term Mixed was applied to those units composed of cells of different designations, bu t for which water quality data was only examined at the larger scale (e.g. the Nort h Flow-way of STA-5 consists of an EAV(Cell 1A) and a SAV(Cell 1B) designated cell, but flow data were on ly available at the infl ow and outflow of the flow-way). To enhance the precision of the vegetati on classification, the percent SAV cover was estimated for each cell in this study using tabulati ons of vegetation cover based on aerial imagery and vegetation field survey data provided by the SFWMD. The detailed (often species-level) designations from the map tabula tions were combined into thre e distinct groups: EAV, SAV and open water. For this study, the SAV and open wa ter coverages tabulated from vegetation maps were combined and assumed to approximately repr esent total SAV cover. The field survey data available to this project were collected by se veral different contractors and each employed a unique reporting system. Briefly, th e coverage or abundance data at each survey point, plot or transect were normalized to a 0 to 1 scale (1 representing 100% cover). Th e relative coverages of each SAV species (including algae, when reporte d) were summed at each survey location. The nature of field surveys allowed for the distinct ion of SAV from open water, so open water did not contribute to the total SAV cover at each site. The values of percent SAV cover were averaged over all survey locations to estimate the total relative SAV cover for each cell. The spatial distributions of the survey points were checked to verify representative sampling within each cell. This study did not attempt to address changes in SAV cover over time. In cells where more than one estimate of SAV cover was availa ble, the values were simply averaged, with equal weight given to survey and map data. 56

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Outflow Concentration and Total Phosphorus Areal Loading Rate The Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient ( r ) between monthly outflow TP concentration and monthly TPALRM (the best regressor of the three possible TPALR calculations; see Chapter 2) was determined for the POR for each cell. As r describes only the strength of the linear relationship between two variables, scatter plot s were produced for each cell and visually inspected for non-linearity. It was noted that the significant ( p = 0.05) positive r -values in several cells resulted entirely from the presence of outliers in the upper-right quadrant (high outflow concentrations corresponding to high lo ading events). The pract ical significance of these relationships defined by outliers is discussed below. However, in an effort to capture the typical behavior of each cell, r was recalculated after excluding the month with the largest TPALR value in each cell, and termed r for convenience. The bulk of this study relies on r because approximately one-half of the significant r values were artifact s of single outliers ( Table 3-1 ). Results and Discussion Outflow ConcentrationA real Loading Relationship Effect of vegetation type and cover The magnitude and significance of r was not clearly determined by the vegetation designation reported for each cell in Pietro et al. (2008) ( Table 3-1 ). Of the 7 SAV-classified cells examined, r was non-significant in 6 (86%). Sim ilarly, 9 (75%) of the included 12 EAV cells had non-significant r Unexpectedly, one EAV cell (STA-2 Cell 1) reported a weak but significant negative co-variance between outflow TP con centration and TPALR. Possible causes for this counter-intuitive relationship were unclear As a result, data from Cell 1 of STA-2 were excluded from further analyses in this chapter. Three of the four (75%) mixed units had nonsignificant r Broadly, EAV and SAV cells were not overwhelmingly differentiated by the 57

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strength of r ( Table 3-1 ), though the caveats asso ciated with the vege tation designations (see Methods of this chapter) depreciate the power of this assessment. To avoid the difficulties and inaccuracies associated with using the SFWMD-assigned vegetation classifications, r was plotted against estimates of the actual percen t cover of SAV. The cells clustered into three distinct groups, ( Figure 3-2 ). Group 1 contains cells with low to moderate SAV coverage and low r -values. The lowto mid-SAV coverage cells, with relatively high r -values comprise Group 2. Group 3 consists of high-SAV cells with non-significant r Immediately apparent from Figure 3-2 are the strictly non-significant r -values in all high-SAV cells. Secondly, the unexpected tendency for non-significant r -values in lowand moderateSAV cells is noteworthy. Togeth er these observations do not s upport any conclusions about the influence of SAV P processing mechanisms on the uncoupling the short-term outflow TP concentration from the TPALR in SAV cells but do suggest that this method may be inappropriate for testing that hypothesis. Also, importantly, they make clear that some other factor (or factors) contributed to the disassociation of the outfl ow TP concentration from the monthly TPALR. Effect of areal total phosphorus loading rate Equation ( 1-19 ) indicates that, at sufficiently light loads, the outflow concentration from a wetland will converge on the background concentr ation, C*, and thus approach independence from the loading rate. This was supported by the findings of Qian and Richardson (1997) (and reinforced by Richardson and Qualls, 1999) th at showed that below POR TPALR of about 1.0 g/m2/yr, the long-term average outflow concentra tions from a large number of North American wetlands were fairly invariant with respect to changes in TPALR. Likewise, among SAV and select EAV cells with annual TPALR at or below 2.0 g/m2/yr, Juston and DeBusk (2006) noted no significant relationships ( p>0.05) were identified in the slopes of P-ALR relationships using 58

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either 1 or 2 year average ALRs, thus suggesti ng no evidence of association of ALR with TP concentrations in this range. It follows that the areal loads in cells in Groups 1 and 3 were possibly too low to force the outflow TP concentration a bove the apparent background concentration. A one-way analysis of vari ance was performed on th e monthly TPALR to compare each of the three groups. The F-value was 17.19 (df=2, p<0.0001). A Student-NewmanKeuls test ( p =0.05) found that the mean monthly TPAL R was significantly higher in Group 2 (0.42 g/m2/mo) than in either Group 1 or Group 3. The mean monthly TPALR were similar in Groups 1 and 3 (0.21 and 0.22 g/m2/mo, respectively). The implication, in the spirit of Richardson and Qualls (1999), is that the TPALR became influential on the outflow TP concentration once it exceeded some thresh old. All cells with av erage annual TPALRM less than about 2.0 g/m2/yr showed no significant relationshi p between short-term outflow TP concentration and the TPALRM ( Figure 3-3 ), as expected from the work of Juston and DeBusk (2006). The presence of significant, positive r -values only in cells loaded with greater than 2.0 g/m2/yr does suggest that the magnitude of the loading rate contributed to the strength of the TPALR-outflow TP concentration relationship. The fact that some cells also loaded above 2.0 g/m2/yr had non-significant correlations betw een outflow TP con centration and TPALRM indicates the action of an additiona l factor (or factors) restraining r even under large loads. Moreover, this additional factor was very likely not the alternative mechanisms of SAV systems, as the high-TPALRM, lowr group contained both EAV and SAV cells. A mention must be made of the substantial difference between r and r in a few cells ( Table 3-1 ). The extreme influence that the outliers had on the correlation between the outflow TP concentration and the TPALR justifies their exclusion for analytical purposes. Nonetheless, these data imply that, had these cells experien ced higher and more vari able loading rates on a 59

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monthly basis, than was observed during their recorded operation, the outflow TP concentration may have actually been influenced by the TPALR. The near-universal tendency for the month of maximum load to increase the strength and significance of r suggests that, regardless of the vegetation type or the short-term outflow concentration-TPALR re lationship under typical operating conditions, extreme pulses of P were very likely to produce above-average outflow concentrations. Factors Controlling the Apparent Background Concentration Having established that, in most cells of the STAs, the short-term outflow TP concentration did not depend strongly on the monthly TPALR, the challenge of identifying the factors that did determine the short-term outflow concentrati on arises. Curiously, the POR FWM outflow TP concentrations from those cells with non-significant r -values showed the same range and variability as those cells with moderate to strong TPALR-outflow TP concentration relationships ( Figure 3-4 ). This chapter considers two possi ble controls on the long-term mean outflow TP concentration and one possible regulator of the shor t-term outflow concentration. A more thorough exploration of poten tial factors controlling monthly outflow TP concentrations is presented in Chapter 4. Inflow phosphorus fractions The most chemoand bioavailable P forms comprise the SRP fraction of the TP pool (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008; Reddy and DeLaune, 2008). In treatment wetlands, this often leads to preferential removal of SR P relative to the TP aggregat e (Dierberg et al., 2002; Chimney, 2007). Conversely, DOP is thought to be generall y less bioavailable and has been found to be less effectively removed than the bulk TP in treatment wetlands (Reddy and DeLaune, 2008; Chimney, 2007), though this may be due as much to internal production of DOP as to nontreatment of influent DOP (Pinney et al., 2000). Th erefore, it is proposed that the composition of 60

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the inflow TP potentially contributed to the appa rent background concentration in the STAs, with relative increases in SRP lowering C* and re lative increases in DOP elevating C*. Although the monthly outflow TP concentration fr om the set of cells of interest was not correlated to the TPALR, it was weakly but measurably influenced by the inflow TP concentration: r = 0.353 ( p <0.0001, n = 597 considering monthly data among all the cells of interest). The positive relationshi p also existed within the monthly data for 4 of the 18 included individual cells (STA-1E Cell 7, STA-2 Cell 3, STA-3/4 Cell 1B, STA-6 Cell 5). The presence of this co-variance required that the effects of the TP fractionation on the outflow concentration be assessed within the effects of the inflow TP concentration. After the variability due to the inflow TP concentration was removed, neither th e relative size of the SRP fraction nor the DOP fraction had any significant effect on the outflow TP concentration (SRP: F -value = 0.12, p = 0.7298, df = 1; DOP: F -value = 0.03, p = 0.8722, df=1). The effect of the inflow DOP concentration was significant ( F -value = 6.89, p = 0.0089, df = 1), but the additional variability explained was minor (approx. 1%). The three vari ables, inflow DOP con centration, inflow DOP fraction and inflow SRP frac tion, had a significant effect on the monthly outflow TP concentration after accounting for the inflow TP concentration in only 2, 3, and 4 cells, respectively. In addition, there was no relationship found between the outflow TP concentration and any of these three variables at either annu al or POR averaging periods. In summary, both across cells and within cells, the composition of the inflow TP played a minor role, at best, in the determination of the outflow concentration from the cells where the outflow TP concentration was not related to the TPALR. Long-term areal loading Sustained high annual areal P loading is known to increase the soil P concentration. In South Florida, a well-studied example of this phenomenon is Water Conservation Area 2A 61

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(WCA-2A), where decades of P loading have re sulted in elevated soil P concentrations immediately downstream from the inflows. Reddy and DeLaune (2008) provide an excellent review of the literature on WAC-2A. As part of a positive feedback cycle with increasing soil P, primary productivity of wetlands tends to increas e with sustained P loads (Lowe and Keenan, 1997; Kadlec and Knight, 1996). As a result, the P-processing biomachine grows in response to increased P loads. The P-sequestering power (in terms of g P/m2/yr) grows as well, until biomass expansion becomes limited by space-, light or nutrient-(e.g. N) availability. Biomass production, senescence and decomposition are known to export dissolved nutrients to the water column (Pinney et al., 2000; Qualls and Richardson, 2002, Reddy and DeLaune, 2008). It is conceivable that increasing the size of the b iomachine would increase the autochthonous P production and export. Thus, STA cells with high long-term TPALR may be expected to operate with relatively higher apparent background concentrations, even if in the short term, the outflow TP concentration is independent of the TPALR. It has been previously established that the expected positive relationship between outflow TP concentration and TPALR exists in the STAs when long-term (POR) averaging periods are considered; among all STA cells, the POR outflow TP concentration wa s positively, non-linearly correlated to the POR TPALR through a power func tion (Pietro et al., 2009). The objective here is to assess if that relationship holds when cons idering only those cells in which the short-term TPALR did not directly control the monthly outflow TP concentration. Among all the cells operating with non-significant r the POR FWM outflow TP concentration was significantly linearly co rrelated to the average annual TPALR ( r = 0.703, p=0.0011, n = 18; Figure 3-5 ). A power function (Pietro et al. 2009) described the data only slightly more accurately ( r2 = 0.508; Figure 3-5 ). The shape of the data cloud in Figure 3-5 was 62

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remarkably similar to the distribution of the wi de variety of wetlands studied by Richardson and Qualls (1999), including an a pparent breakpoint near 1.0 g P/m2/yr. Unclear, for both the STA cells and the wetlands documented by Richardson and Qualls (1999), is why some wetlands are able to produce low outflow concentrations ev en under high areal loads (e.g. STA-1E Cell 4N). At an annual scale, the data demonstrated a similar relationship, although the non-linearity observed in the POR data was absent ( Figure 3-6 ). Even among cells where the monthly outflow concentration was independent of the monthly TPALR, years with higher areal loads tended to also have higher outflow TP concentrations. Th is may be attributable to the aforementioned effect of the size of the biomachine. The nonlinearity in the POR data may develop as the effects of consistent light or heavy loading compound over years of operation. Seasonality The bulk of the long-term sustainable P rem oval in wetland is biol ogically mediated by microorganisms, algae and submerged and em ergent macrophytes (Kadlec and Knight, 1996; Kadlec, 1997; Dierberg at al., 2002). The P demand and production from these biomass compartments varies as their si ze and activity fluctuat e in response to envi ronmental factors (e.g. temperature and insolation) (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). Seas onal cycles are common in treatment wetlands, but are minimi zed, particularly for P, in s ubtropical wetlands with a yearround growing season (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008) Nonetheless, a distinct intra-annual temperature cycle is observed in South Florida ( Figure 3-6 ) that may lend itself to seasonal fluctuations in biological proces sing sufficient to alter treatment performance. If so, the impacts ought to be seen as an annual cyc lical variation in the outflow con centration, particularly in those cells producing effluent at an apparent background concentration. Water temperature is known to control microbial activity (Reddy and DeLaune, 2008) and serves as a good proxy for the average insolation, a driv er of primary productivity (Best and Visser, 1987), so any annual 63

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cyclical variation in outflow TP concentra tion may be a reflection of the annual water temperature cycle ( Figure 3-6 ). Considering only the cells with non-significant r -values, the monthly outflow TP concentration did not significantly vary with either the monthly inflow or outflow water temperature (r 0.064, n = 578). Likely, the cell-to-cell vari ation in outflow TP concentration devalued this assessment. The monthly outfl ow TP concentration was significantly (p = 0.05) correlated to the monthly inflow water temperatur e in only 3 cells (positively in STA-3/4 Cell 3 and STA-5 CFW and negatively in STA-5 NFW), and to the outflow water temperature in only 2 cells (positively in STA-6 Cell 3 and negativel y in STA-3/4 Cell 2B). No non-linearity was found between outflow TP concentration and water temperature in a visual inspection of scatter plots within each cell. That the relationship was significant in relativ ely few cells and that the conditions of the co-variances were inconsistent (some positively and some negatively correlated), suggest that the water temperature in the STAs did not play a critical role in determining the apparent background TP concentration in the STAs. Water temperature was thought to be a satisfactory surrogate for seasonality because many other variables are expected to be strongly correlated to it (e.g. insolation, seasonal biomass changes). However, a flaw is recognized in this approach: because of the sinusoidal nature of temperatur e over time, each average monthly temperature occurs twice per year (except for the a nnual maximum and minimum temperature). The environmental conditions may be quite differe nt at the two manife stations of a given temperature. For example, the average water temperature tended to be about 25 C in both April and October in STA-1W Cell 4 ( Figure 3-6 ), but this fails to capt ure the obvious biological differences between the two mont hs (e.g. spring flush vs. fall sene scence). In none of the 18 cells 64

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with low r -values was the outflow TP concentrati on significantly correlat ed to the ordinal month value (e.g. January = 1, February = 2) Additionally, no regular non-linear patterns were observed in scatter plots of outflow TP c oncentration vs. time in months. A more powerful signal-processing method (e.g. Fourier transform) might be applied to the monthly outflow TP concentration data to better effect. Conclusions Although the POR outflow TP concentration was generally a function of the long-term average annual TPALR among all cells of the ST As (Pietro et al., 2009), as is common in treatment wetlands (Qian and Richardson, 1997), in a majority of cells the monthly outflow TP concentration was statistically independent of th e monthly TPALR. Cell-to-cell variability in the strength of the short-term outflow concentra tion-TPALR relationship was not explained by the dominant vegetation type, and uns atisfactorily justifie d by the long-term TPALR. In the shortterm, the outflow TP concentration from thos e cells operating at an apparent background concentration was not determined by the relative fractionation of the infl ow TP pool nor did it vary with season, as approximated by the water te mperature. Among these cells in the long-term, the annual average TPALR accounted for appr oximately 51% varia tion in the POR FWM outflow TP concentration. Two useful implications arise from this study. First, the apparent uncoupling of the monthly outflow TP concentration from the TP ALR suggests large Da in most STA cells, independent of the vegetation type. Equation ( 3-2 ) demonstrates that in wetlands with high Da, the realized outflow TP concen tration will be controlled primarily by the apparent background concentration. Therefore, the ability for k-C* to accurately model outflow TP concentrations in the STAs may depend heavily on accurate estimates of C*. 65

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Second, the notable lack of powerful descriptiv e variables for the s hort-term outflow TP concentration resulting from this work highlights the limits of both the currently available data and the body of knowledge of wetland P processi ng at this time. If minimizing the outflow concentrations from the STAs remains a political and managerial priority in South Florida, small-scale (e.g. mesocosm) research ought to be applied to identif y additional potential controllers of the short-term outfl ow TP concentration, a nd large-scale (e.g. fiel d) studies will be needed to define the interactions of these variables under operational conditions. 66

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Table 3-1. Coefficients of correlation betw een monthly outflow total phosphorus (TP) concentration and monthly TP areal loadi ng rate (ALR) within each cell before ( r ) and after ( r ) exclusion of the month of ma ximum TPALR. Non-significant (p = 0.05) coefficients are reported as 0.0. Cell Vegetation Designation r r STA-2 Cell 1 EAV -0.284 -0.293 STA-1E Cell 4N SAV 0.0 0.0 STA-1E Cell 4S SAV 0.0 0.0 STA-1E Cell 3 EAV 0.0 0.0 STA-1E Cell 5 EAV 0.0 0.0 STA-1E Cell 6 SAV 0.859 0.0 STA-1E Cell 7 EAV 0.648 0.0 STA-1W Cell 5 SAV 0.085 0.0 STA-3/4 Cell 1A EAV 0.0 0.0 STA-3/4 Cell 1B EAV 0.0 0.0 STA-3/4 Cell 2A EAV 0.433 0.0 STA-3/4 Cell 2B SAV 0.0 0.0 STA-3/4 Cell 3 Mixed 0.0 0.0 STA-5 CFW Mixed 0.0 0.0 STA-5 NFW Mixed 0.0 0.0 STA-2 Cell 2 EAV 0.0 0.0 STA-2 Cell 3 SAV 0.0 0.0 STA-6 Cell 3 EAV 0.0 0.0 STA-6 Cell 5 EAV 0.622 0.0 STA-1W Cell 4 SAV 0.433 0.292 STA-1W Cell 1 EAV 0.524 0.422 STA-1W Cell 2 Mixed 0.742 0.591 STA-1W Cell 3 EAV 0.692 0.707 67

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A) ALR = 1.0 B) ALR = 1.0 C) ALR = 0.75 D) ALR = 0.38 C* 0%20%40%60%80%100%Water column concentrationDistance through wetland ScenarioHLR Inflow conc. ALR m/yrmg/Lg/m2/yr A150.0671.00 B200.0501.00 C150.0500.75 D150.0250.38 Figure 3-1. When a wetland treats to background concentration (C*), the areal loading rate (ALR) does not affect the outflow concentration. 68

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0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0%20%40%60%80%100%r '-valuePercent SAV coverGroup 2 Group 1 Group 3 Figure 3-2. Correlation between outflow total phosphorus (TP) concentration and TP mass loading rate with respect to submerge d aquatic vegetation (SAV) coverage. Nonsignificant correlations were assigned an r -value of 0. 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 012345r '-valuePOR average annual TPALRM (g/m2/yr) 6 Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Figure 3-3. Correlation between out flow total phosphorus (TP) concentration and TP areal loading rate (ALR) as a function of th e average annual TPALR. Non-significant correlations were assigned an r -value of 0. 69

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70 0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 00.20.40.60.81POR FWM outflow TP concentration (mg/L)r'-value Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Figure 3-4. Outflow total phosphorus (TP) concen tration with respect to the correlation coefficient between the TP areal loading rate (TPALR) and the outflow TP concentrations. y = 0.0344x -0.0004 R = 0.4946 y = 0.0292x0.9777R = 0.5067 0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.1 1 10POR FWM outflow TP concentration ( mg/L)POR annual average TPALR (g/m2/yr) Figure 3-5. Period-of-record (P OR) flow-weighted mean outflow total phosphorus (TP) concentration as a function of the POR average annual TP areal loading rate.

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y = 0.0165x + 0.0327 R = 0.2143 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 0246810121416Annual FWM outflow TP concentration (mg/L)Annual TPALR (g/m2/yr) Low r'-value High r'-value Figure 3-6. Annual flow-weighted mean (FWM) out flow total phosphorus (TP) concentration as a function of the annual TP areal loading rate (ALR). Data from cells with high r values are differentiated. The regre ssion line considers data from low r -value cells only. 10C 20C 30C 40C JFMAMJJASOND Inflow OutflowFigure 3-7. Monthly average temper ature (C) of inflow and out flow water in STA-1W Cell 4. 71

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CHAPTER 4 MULTIPLE LINEAR REGRESSION TO DETERMINE FACTORS CONTROLLING PHOSPHORUS CONCENTRATION AND SETTLING RATE IN THE STORMWATER TREATMENT AREAS Introduction The cardinal performance metric for the STAs is outflow TP concentration. Many studies evaluating the STAs have investigated the outfl ow TP concentration with respect to various wetland characteristics, such as TPALR or vegeta tion type (e.g. Dierberg et al., 2002; Juston and DeBusk, 2006; Pietro et al., 2009). Importantly, the enforced and proposed regulations on the STAs also consider, primarily, the effluent concentration (Pietro et al, 2008). These regulations obligate STA managers to minimize the outflow TP concentrations. Ensuring the conditions for high Da-values (high settling rates and low loading rates) is critical to that effort. Chapter 3 of this work showed that the shor t-term outflow TP concentration was controlled more by C* than by TPALR or Da in most STA cells. Therefore, it is important to understand the wetland factors that contribute to the C*. Inter-wetland and temporal variations in outfl ow TP concentration have been well studied (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). Likewise, fluctuatio ns in outflow TP concentration have been documented in the STAs (e.g. Pietro et al., 2008). A stated or implied assumption in almost all treatment wetland work, and adopted here as well, is that the outflow TP concentration is a function of various wetland characteristics. That is, the difference in the outflow TP concentration observed for two different wetlands ought to be due to the variation of some feature(s) between those wetlands. Similarly, the fluctuations of outflow concentration with time within a wetland are assumed to have resulted from changes in attributes of that wetland. For example, holding everything else co nstant, a wetland with a TP lo ad comprised primarily of SRP 72

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may be expected to demonstrate a lower outfl ow concentration than an identical wetland receiving mainly DOP. In wetland science of course, it is impossible to hold everythi ng else constant, and so the effects of a single wetland char acteristic are easily confounded. Even wetlands in side-by-side studies show some disparitie s in outflow concentrations (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). Such differences are often ascribed to stochastic vari ability, a lumped error term containing all of the variance due to unaccounted-for wetland properties (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). The objective of this study was to partition the variabi lity in the short-term out flow TP concentration, to the maximum extent possible, to quantifiable wetland character istics. In addition, the outflow concentration was correlated to TPALR in a few STA cells (Chapter 3), implying that Da was limiting performance. Therefore, the factors cont rolling the TP areal settling rate were also explored here. Being unable to isolate the effects of single va riables in the field, this study attempts to do so via multiple regression using the vast datasets available for the STAs. Considering the entire pool of non-screened m onths from all STA cells, the differences in means from cell to cell accounted for approximately 30% and 20% of the variation in monthly outflow TP concentrations and TP settling rates, respectively. Fr om a managerial perspective, identifying the combination of variables responsib le for these cell-to-cell differences (as well as the factors responsible for the s ubstantial intra-cell va riability) may possibly allow managers to better regulate the performance of the STAs by manipulating key attributes in all or some wetland cells. In addition, unders tanding which macro-scale wetla nd characteristics control the outflow concentration and the k-value in the ST As would provide guidance for future work on the illumination of poorly-understood process-le vel P dynamics in all subtropical surface-flow treatment wetlands. 73

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Objectives The objective of this chapter was to assess th e relative influence of a wide variety of factors on the outflow TP concentration and the TP areal settling rate in the STAs. Multiple regression methods were implemente d as an initial evaluation. It is recognized that the methods employed herein were relatively elementary, but were necessary to provide guidance for future exercises in this vein. This chapter specifically addresses the quest ion: can variation in STA performance be adequately explained by variations in the characteristics of the wetlands that comprise the STAs? Of course, the wetland properties open to i nvestigation were limited to those for which appropriately spatiallyand tempor ally-resolved, quantitative data were available. After the first inquiry, a second question natu rally follows: which factors did contribute to variation in STA performance, and are they subjec t to manipulation by STA managers? This chapter tested the following hypothesis: variability in the monthly outflow TP concentration and TP areal settling can be significantly explained by a subset of these factors: inflow TP concentration, inflow TP composition (fractionation), TPALR, soil TP concentration, mean water dept h, wetland age, inflow Ca con centration, Ca ALR, Ca areal retention, water column pH and water temperature. Methods Multiple Linear Regression Multiple regression considers linear models of the form: yi = 0 + 1x1 i + 2x2 i + 3x3 i + + nxn i + i ( 4-1 ) where yi = the i th observation of the dependent variable of interest, x1 i-xn i = i th values of independent variables related to y, 0 = estimated value of y when x1 through xn = 0, 1n = parameters (coefficients) estimating the effect of each x1-xn on y, and i = i th residual. Multiple 74

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regression procedures seek to select values of 0n which minimize the sum of the squares of the residuals. Multiple regression analyses were used to determine the most influential independent variables (x1-xn in Equation ( 4-1 ) ) on the dependent variables monthly outflow TP concentration and monthly TP areal settling rate (kTP). Because the absolute value of kTP was not considered here, but rather the re lative differences from cell to cell and month to month (Pietro et al., 2009), for simplicity, it was calculated with C* = 0: kTP = Q1+ Q22 WAD ln C2C1 ( 4-2 ) where C1 = inflow concentration [M/L3], C2 = outflow concentration [M/L3], and Q1 = flow rate in [L3/T], Q2 = flow rate out [L3/T], and WAD = wetted area, determined by elevation distribution [L2]. The assumption of a constant C*-value for all STA cells (in this case C*=0) presents a special difficulty. This and previous chapters function on the recognition of spatially and temporally variable C*, m eaning that the use of any c onstant C* is inappropriate. Unfortunately, the value (or func tion) that should be used for C* for each STA cell is yet unclear, though this chapter atte mpts to clarify the matter. The multiple regressions were performed using SAS 9.1 (SAS Institute, Cary, NC). Builtin variable-selection procedures were not viable for this dataset; these routines include only observations (months) for which a value was present for every possible factor. For example, the missing inflow Ca concentration value in STA1W Cell 5 in March 2005 would remove all the data for that month from consider ation even if the inflow Ca concentration was not selected for the final model. After the extensive screening process (see Methods, Chapter 1), only about 15% of months had values for each variable. Since it was unlikely that all of the variables would 75

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prove to be useful in the final model, manual incremental construction of the model was deemed more appropriate. The regression model building approach was similar for both the outflow TP concentration and the TP areal settling rate. In all instances throughout this chapter, the adjusted coefficient of determination ( r2) is reported, to enfo rce parsimony and appropr iately penalize the measure of fit for the number of dependent variables included in each model. The manual variable selecti on procedure was intended to be straightforward. The r2 was determined for each univariate model. Next, bivari ate models were tested using the top regressor (variable producing the highest r2) from the single-variable models and iteratively inserting each other variable. Trivariate models were tested by iteratively introducing each remaining variable into the best (highest r2) bivariate model. This process was repeated until the marginal gains in explanatory power (increase in r2 due to each additional variable) were deemed trivial. Each cell had a different POR m ean outflow TP concentration ( Figure 3-4 ) and settling rate (not shown). The mean value for each cell may be thought of as an estimate of each monthly value in each cell. The variability in the cell m eans explained a portion of the overall variability in the monthly values. It was possible to m odel the effects of each cell on the dependent parameters. At each level of complexity, the model was also tested with the cell effects to assess the extent that each additional variable account ed for cell-to-cell differences in outflow concentration and settling rate. Variables Considered The inclusion of specific variables for c onsideration was based primarily on data availability with a focus on wetland attributes commonly thought to influence P processing. Some wetland characteristics that may be comm only expected to influence wetland P processing were necessarily omitted for lack of quantitat ive data in the monthly timescale (e.g. plant biomass). Altogether, 21 quantitative variable s were tested in each regression model. 76

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k-C* model terms A great deal of research has supported the vali dity of the k-C* model for application to a variety of wetlands (Kadlec and Knight, 1996; Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). As discussed previously (see Chapters 1 and 2), the model captures some intrinsic relationships between several wetland parameters. For example, as desc ribed by the model, increas es in the inflow TP concentration result in elevated outflow TP con centrations. The critical model variables inflow TP concentration and q were included in the set of vari ables for regression. The inflow TP concentration multiplied by q yields of course the TPALR. The intuitive notion that the outflow TP concentration ought to be correlated to th e TPALR has been confirmed by many studies of long-term data (e.g. Qian and Richardson, 1997; Pietro et al., 2009; Ka dlec and Wallace, 2008), so the nominal (based on the findings of Chapter 2) TPALR was also included in the regression analysis. Wetlands integrate continuous loads and so outflow concentrations may reflect past operating conditions as well as recent inflow events (Jus ton and DeBusk, 2006; Reddy and DeLaune, 2008), so both the 1-year and 2-year rolling average TPALRN were incorporated in the variable set. Inflow phosphorus fractions Within wetlands, not all P-containing compounds are treated equally. So luble reactive P is typically preferentially removed be cause it is highly bioavailable (Havens et al., 1999, Dierberg et al., 2002, Pietro et al,. 2006). Particulate P removal may be high if the wetland conditions promote settling and retention of the suspended solids (e.g Braskerud, 2002a,b). When water velocities or other turbations inhibit settling, the P associated with particles has to be enzymatically cleaved before biota can access it, so a portion of the PP may progress through the wetland, escaping removal (Dierberg and DeBus k, 2008). Finally, DOP may contain molecules that resist uptake or transforma tion in the wetland environment. In fact, previous studies of the 77

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Everglades and the STAs have demonstrated poor sequestration of DOP (Proctor et al., 1999; Chimney, 2007). For these reasons, th e nature of the inflow TP pool was expected to affect the treatment of that TP, and so the relative proportions of each fraction were included in the regression variable set. Wetland age and soil phosphorus A small but growing number of treatment wetlands have been operated for P removal for time periods longer than a decade (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008), so the longevity of wetlands for sustained, effective P removal remains a matter of investigation. Two well known examples of treatment wetlands with long-te rm performance data, Houghton Lake in Michigan and the Orlando Easterly Wetland in Florida, provide some insight. Following mesocosm and pilot studies, full scale discharge of wastewater into the Hought on Lake wetland began in 1978 (Kadlec, 1993). Nearly 30 year s later, the former sedge m eadow was transformed into Typha marsh and was still providing positive P rem oval (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). Kadlec and Wallace (2008) note that although Richardson and Marshall (1986) predicted P saturation of the wetland following a total loading of 1.0-1.5 g/m2, the wetland still provided P mass removal exceeding 80% after cumulative loading of 63 g/m2. However, the percent removal was slightly lower and much more variable in the most recen t 10 years of operation than in the previous 20 years. This variation was attributed to changes in site hydrology and hydraulics (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). Similarly, the Orlando Easterly Wetland successfully polished tertiary wastewater from the city of Orlando, Florida, from 1988 until 2003 (Sees and Jackson, 2001; Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). After 10 years of operation, a strong seas onal trend developed in the outflow TP concentration, resulting in unacceptably poor P re moval effectiveness in some winter months (Wang et al., 2006). A series of st udies identified that both sediment P recycling (White et al., 78

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2002) and hydraulic inefficiencies (Martinez and Wise, 2003) contributed to the observed reduction in P removal performance. A rejuvena tion project in 2002-2003 that included sediment removal and earthwork to increase hydrauli c efficiency immediately boosted P removal performance (Wang et al., 2006). The changes in performance after long-t erm operation observed in the two preceding examples justify the inclusion of wetland age in the multiple regression exercises. As Wang et al. (2006) alluded to by their consideration of a host of studies to diagnose the problems experienced by the Orlando Easterly Wetland, wetla nd age is a lumped parameter, integrating the effects of many wetland characte ristics that change with time (e.g. soil P, internal hydraulics and vegetation characteristics). Because soil P, in particular, is known to influence the P concentration of the overlying water (White et al., 2003; Reddy and DeLaune, 2008), it was included in the regression analyses in an effort to isolate the integrated effects of age. Data for internal hydraulics and vegetation in the STAs were not available at a temporal scale useful for this analysis. Calcium and pH Phosphorus is well known to co-precipitate w ith Ca in aquatic systems and wetlands (e.g. House and Donaldson, 1986; Diaz et al., 1994; Hartle y et al., 1997; Scinto, 1997). In their review of the literature on the topi c, Reddy and DeLaune (2008) st ate retention of inorganic phosphorus by precipitation will be significant in waters with high Ca2+ and alkalinity. Indeed, in Everglades marsh soils, the accumulation of P was correlated with the accumulation of Ca, providing possible evidence of Ca-P interactions (Reddy et al., 1993). Therefore, inflow Ca concentration, Ca ALR, and Ca mass removal (M/L2/T) were added to regression analysis to investigate the effects of possible differences in Ca supply and processing among the STAs. In 79

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addition, inflow and outflow pH were included in recognition of the pH dependency of Ca precipitates (Diaz et al., 1994). Water temperature The rates of many microbial processes re levant to the wetland P processing are temperature dependent. For example, rates of de composition of Everglades histosols increased dramatically with increasing temp eratures (Volk, 1973). Indeed, the release of soluble P from an organic wetland soil was strongly dependent on temperature (Kadlec and Reddy, 2001). By these bases it may be expected that P removal in the STAs would also show some temperature dependence, but previous studies have suggested relatively little infl uence of temperature on measured P removal in wetlands (Kadl ec and Reddy, 2001; Kadlec and Wallace, 2008). Nonetheless, inflow and outflow water temperatur e were incorporated in the multiple regression to increase the comprehensiveness of this study. Relative wetted area and water depth The biogeochemical influences of RWAD are discussed in Chapter 2. In that chapter it was found that the RWAD was very nearly 1.0 in the ST As, and therefore no significant biogeochemical impacts of the wetted area were detected. However, RWAD was included in the regression exercise in the event that it offere d some explanatory power when combined with other wetland characteristics. The findings of Chapter 2 also indicated that, though infrequent, draw-down/re-flood events were important determ inants of the outflow TP concentration. They were therefore also included in the multiple regression analysis. Water depth influences the wetla nd characteristics and processe s such as vegetation types, internal hydraulics and oxygen diffusion (Kadlec and Wallace, 2008) Studies on the integrated effect of water depth on P removal in wetlands associated with the STA project have produced unclear results; at high P concen trations, depth inhibited remova l for cattails (Chimney et al., 80

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2004) and SAV (Jorge et al., 2002), but did not produce a pronounced deleterious effect at low P concentrations. Despite this, the individual bioge ochemical effects of water depth in wetlands call for its inclusion in the multiple regression investigation. Results and Discussion Outflow Total Phosphorus Concentration: All Cells The results of the variable-selec tion procedure are presented in Table 4-1 and Figure 4-1 Altogether, only about 32% of the total variability in the monthly outflow TP concentration was explained by the final 5-variable model. The re latively poor explanatory power of this model was unexpected since factors known to influence treatment wetland outflow concentration (e.g. inflow TP concentration) (Kad lec and Wallace, 2008) were included in the selection process. However, this finding was congruent with the very weak connection found between the TPALR and the outflow TP concentration in most cells (demonstrated in Chapter 3). The independent variables included in the final model were (in order of selection) inflow TP concentration, WAD, wetland age and inflow Ca concentration. When added to these five, one other variable, inflow pH, showed a significant effect on the out flow TP concentration. However, it did not increase the strength of the model fit to the da ta, and was excluded for parsimony. Estimates of the parameters (coefficien ts) for each explanatory factor in the final five-variable model are shown in Table 4-2 These values may be inte rpreted as the number of units of change in the outflow TP concentratio n reflecting one unit of change in the subject variable, holding the other wetland characteristics constant. The prec ise values of these estimates are somewhat sample-dependent (i .e. they would change with the inclusion of an additional data year) and change with the introduction or remova l of other variables in the model. The relative magnitudes (within parameters of similar units) and signs (positive or negative) are of more value for interpretation. 81

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At every level of complexity, the inclusion of the cell effects c ontributed a significant portion of explanatory power to the model. In f act, this additional variability explained in the outflow TP concentration appeared to be a dditive with the variance accounted for by the included wetland attributes. Therefore, the we tland characteristics accounting for observed differences in outflow concentration across cells were evidently not considered in this study. The reduction in r2 after the inclusion of the fifth variable was a result of marked co-linearity between the cell effects and the wetland character istics, penalized by the adjusted r2. Among the five variables in the outflow TP concentration model, several findings were of interest. First, the relationship between inflow concentration and outflow concentration was positive, as expected from Equation ( 1-19 ) However, the inflow concentration accounted for only 20% of the variability in the outflow concen tration, in agreement w ith the poor outflow TP concentration-TPALR correlations found in Chapter 3, and exposing the re lative influence of other wetland attributes. Sec ond, as suggested in Chapter 2, the positive coefficient associated with changes in WA confirmed that months of re-flooding tended to have higher outflow concentrations. Third, increases in inflow Ca co ncentration slightly decreased the outflow TP concentration, an expected relatio nship based on many studies of th e Ca-P interactions in South Florida wetlands (e.g. Reddy et al ., 1993; Dierberg et al ., 2002). However, within this dataset, the effect of the varying inflow Ca concentratio ns was minor relative to the influence of the inflow TP concentration; the re lative impact of incr easing the inflow Ca concentration 1.0 mg/L was 3 orders of magnitude less than the eff ect of a 1.0 mg/L increase in the inflow TP concentration. Fourth, outflow concentrations tended to increase with wetland age. This finding, if it can be satisfactorily corroborated, has undesirable implicati ons for the ability of the STAs to produce 82

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low outflow concentrations over time. For exampl e, P removal in a large municipal treatment wetland in Orlando, Florida started to flag afte r 13 years of operation resulting in a massive rejuvenation project including muck removal a nd other significant earthworks (Wang et al., 2006). Indeed, sediment removal projects have also been undertaken in STA-1W, the longest running STA, though not directly in response to declining P removal (Pietro et al., 2008). If ultimately necessary in additional STAs as they age, maintenance requirements of this nature will undoubtedly reduce the cost effectiveness of the STA project. However, wetland age is likely a lumped term, containing simultaneously the effects soil P concentration and other soil characteristics, plant biomass P concentration and possibly unknown others. Effectively combating any deleterious effects associated with aging STAs will require the evaluation of the isolated effects of each of these factors. Finally, the positive correlation between and outflow TP concentration was surprising. This suggested that months with longer resi dence times produced rela tively higher outflow concentrations. While contrary to the logic of rate-b ased reaction models of P reduction (e.g. the k-C* model), an explanation may lie in the findings of Chapter 3. It was determined that, in the majority of STA cells, the outflow TP concentration was independent of the TPALR and therefore, it was proposed, expre ssed the apparent background concentration. In this case then, residence times were generally sufficient to acco mmodate all potential P removal. Thus, it is hypothesized that any extension of the beyond that needed to achieve maximum treatment of inflow P simply expanded the opportunity for au tochthonous P production, resulting in the slight positive relationship between the outflow TP concentration and Outflow Total Phosphorus Concentration: Cells with Non-significant r -values The variable selection procedur e resulted in a trivar iate model that explained about 54% of the variability in the monthly outflow TP c oncentration from cells with non-significant r -values. 83

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The final model included the following factors: change in RWAD, 1-year rolling average TPALR, and wetland age. The number of variab les included was limited to three because no additional factor explained a significant ( p=0.05) portion of the variability in the dependent term. The regression model considering on ly the cells with non-significant r -values was different from the model for all STA cells in one considerable way. As expected, the inflow TP concentration was no longer included in the model. The presence of this term in the model for all cells was due only to the inclusion of those four cells (Cells 1-4 of STA-1W) that had previously demonstrated a correlation between infl ow and outflow TP concentration. Two important interpretations may be drawn fr om the three variables selected for this model. First, the movement of RWAD to the forefront reinforces earlier findings of its significance in the STAs. Though infrequent, large re -flood events appear to be one of the most powerful and predictable biogeochemical processe s in the STAs. Second, the inclusion of both the 1-year rolling average TPAL R and wetland age indicates that the long-term operation of these STAs plays a measurable role in their s hort-term performance. Both of these terms had positive coefficients meaning that the monthly outflow TP concentration tended to increase both in response to large loads throughout the precedin g year and as the wetlands aged. Evidently, even though these wetlands assimilate P quick ly enough to disassociat e the monthly outflow from the monthly inflow concentration, the appare nt background concentration is still subject to the influence of longer-term loading. A wetland achieving apparent b ackground concentrations could presumably receive additional loads without experiencing reciprocal elevations in outflow concentration. That notion is countered by the apparent dependence of the background concentration on long-term loads. Therefor e, additional loads may be expected to eventually 84

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increase the outflow concentra tion, even if inflow and outflow concentrations remained independent. Outflow Total Phosphorus Concentration: Single Cell This and other works have clearly established the cell-to-cell variability in performance in the STAs (e.g. Juston and DeBusk, 2006; Pietro et al., 2008). The multiple regression exercises in this chapter presumed that variation in a particular wetland ch aracteristic would have the same relative effect on treatment performance regardle ss of whether the change was observed between two different cells, or across time in a singl e cell. Because the results of the multi-cell regressions for outflow TP concentration were not wholly satisfying (i.e. the final adjusted r2values were not above 0.54 and most included variables explained trivial proportions of the variance), it was hoped that additional clarity w ould be gained by regressing the data from a single cell. Cell 1 from STA-1W was selected for this ex ercise because it had the largest number of data months ( n=70) that had observations for each of the 21 tested variables. The final model had an adjusted r2 of about 0.54 and included only two independent variables, inflow TP concentration and wetland age ( Table 4-5 ). When added to these two factors, no additional variable explained a significant portion of th e variability in outflow TP concentration. This single-cell regression provi ded little additional informa tion. A significant correlation between inflow and outflow TP concentrations in STA-1W Cell 1 was established in Chapter 3, so the inclusion of inflow TP concentration was expected in the final model. Not surprisingly, the inflow TP concentration term contributed much more to this single-cell regression than it did in the previous exercise that included cel ls with both significant and non-significant r -values; the univariate regression model including only inflow TP concentration had an adjusted r2 of 0.38 for STA-1W Cell 1 data only and an adjusted r2 of 0.20 for data from all cells. Serious 85

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management implications arise when wetland age appears in the regression model with a positive coefficient, but these are discussed previous ly in this chapter, as well as Chapter 5. Total Phosphorus Areal Settling Rate: All Cells The results of the variable sel ection procedure are presented in Table 4-3 and Figure 4-2 Altogether, the final six-variable model explained about 51% of the variabili ty in the monthly TP areal settling rate. The first variable added to the model, qN, accounted for the first 40% while, in total, the next five variables, inflow DOP fraction, inflow PP fraction, outflow temperature and TPALRN, increased the r2 of the model only about 0.10. The importance and influence of qN was reflected in the relatively high r2 of the single-variable models with TPALRN and Ca ALRN. Variable-inclusion was stopped after six factors because the addition of the last term, TPALRN, increased the explanatory power of the model by less than 1%. The r2 of the final model (0.512) was unsatisfactory, considering the effort invested in collection a nd compilation of the extensive dataset. The declining disparity with increasing model complexity between the r2-values of the models with and without the incl usion of the cell effects suggests that the six wetland attributes in the final model explained a portion of the variability due to cell-to-cell differences. Each additional factor accounted for a small portion of this variance, and the se ttling rate differences across cells were apparently not due to a single wetland characteristic. Estimates of the parameters (coefficients) fo r each explanatory fact or in the final sixvariable model are shown in Table 4-4 As with the outflow concentration model, these values may be interpreted as the number of units of ch ange in the TP areal settling rate reflecting one unit of change in the subject variable, holding the other wetla nd characteristics constant. As before, the relative magnitudes (within paramete rs of similar units) and signs (positive or negative) are of primary in terest for interpretation. 86

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The set of variables selected for the final m odel was noteworthy for several reasons. First, as noted earlier, qN was the primary determinant of the monthly settling rate. Months with high hydraulic loading tended to have higher kTP-values, holding all else constant. As with the relatively poor relationship between inflow and outflow TP concentration, this is likely a result of the Chapter 3 finding that the outflow TP concentration was independent of the TPALR in most cells. The implication that follows from th at independence, that the outflow concentration reflected an apparent background concentrati on, and thus that maximum potential removal occurred in most months, means that the magni tude of the areal mass removal ought to have been based more or less strictly on the loading rate. This was evidenced by the inclusion of both qN and TPALRN in the final model. Second, the negative coefficients associated with both the inflow DOP and PP fractions confirm, primarily, that of the three P fractions, the STAs most effectively remove SRP. Possibly the independent effects of DOP and PP were such that the information contributed to the model by these two fractions was more useful than simp ly providing the SRP fraction (SRP = TP PP DOP). Third, Pietro et al. (2009) found a negativ e relationship between POR outflow TP concentration and POR kTP-value, with lower concentrations generally produced from cells with higher settling rates. That interaction may have been expres sed in these data through the age term. While increasing wetland age tended to incr ease the outflow TP con centration, older cells had a greater likeli hood of having lower kTP-values. As with the outflow concentration model, age likely contains the combined effects of a vari ety of wetland features th at must be separated for a thorough interpretation and assessmen t of the implications for the STAs. 87

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Finally, that the TP settling rate was positively related to the outflow water temperature was expected. Kadlec and Wallace (2008) review ed the matter and their conclusion closely matched the result of this study; the TP settl ing rate tends to be slightly dependent on temperature, but temperature explains ve ry little variance in the short-term kTP-value. Total Phosphorus Areal Settling Rate: Single Cell As was done for outflow TP concentra tion, a multiple regression model of kTP was assembled for the monthly data from STA-1W Cell 1. The final model included only the terms water depth and wetland age and had an adjusted r2 of only 0.18 ( Table 4-8 ). The selection of depth as the first factor in the model was not expected; this was the only final model in this study in which it appeared. Apparently, however, th is was another expressi on of the dependence of kTP on q that was observed in the exercise that includ ed all cells. In STA-1W Cell 1, water depth and q were highly collinear (r =0.686, p<0.0001, n=94). It is unclear why de pth proved to be a better regressor than q. Once again wetland age was a significan t contributor of explained variance. The negative coefficient indicated that the monthl y calculated settling rate declined as this cell aged, though the poor fit of this model (low r2) undermines the strength of any conclusions drawn from it. Note the discussion above in this chapter, as well as in Chapter 5 on the management implications of aging wetlands. Limitations and Future Application of the Multiple Regression Technique Multiple regression is attractive for analysis of the deterministic factors in wetlands because it partitions explanatory power among many variables, allowing the isolation of the effects of particular wetland characteristics. The STAs are exceptionally well suited for this technique because of the breadth and quality of the data available. However, the ability to assess a large number of factors simultaneously introdu ces a significant limitation to the technique. Multiple regression can only consider observations for which valid data are available for every 88

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variable included in the model being tested. This can (and in the case of the dataset considered here, did) result in loss of potentially valuable information. As model complexity increased, so did the likelihood of encountering a variable, within a given obser vation, for which the value had been screened. Also, the regression techniques as applie d here were limited to assessing linear relationships between the dependent and independent variables. N on-linear relationships commonly exist among wetland data at different time scales (e.g. between POR outflow TP concentration and TPALR in Piet ro et al., 2009). Potentially th is study failed to capture nonlinear, but important, relationshi ps within this dataset. As mentioned previously, this investigation wa s intended to serve as a first step toward identifying wetland characteristics important to P treatment. Future researchers may contemplate several considerations to advance this technique. The inclusion of additional wetland attributes as model variables not considered in this study should be a first priority. The low-hanging fruit consist of both unique additional variables (e.g. herbicide application or dissolved oxygen) and further permutations of the data included here (e.g. cumulative PP areal loading) Quite possibly though, data for key variables are not currently being collected altogether or at useful spat ial and temporal resolutions. Undoubtedly, any call for additional data collection at the massive scale of the STAs would need to be well defended by findings in the literature and potentially even labor mesocosm-level studies. Second, new and existing data should be investigated at additional time scales. Some factors (e.g. soil P or plant biomass) may not vary sufficiently over short (monthly) time scales for their effects on P treatment to be captured by regression techniques. Quarterly, annual and 89

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POR averaging periods are sugge sted, acknowledging that each re duction in temporal resolution will reduce the available nu mber of observations. Finally, it is recommended to use multiple regr ession to investigate possible interactions between wetland characteristics. For example, hypot hetically, the effect of depth on P treatment could differ between vegetation type s. Including interaction terms complicates regression efforts, and it is suggested that such an investigation be initiated with expected interactions (e.g. Ca concentration and pH), and expanded to incl ude unforeseen interactions if necessary. Conclusions Within the data available for this analysis fluctuations in th e monthly outflow TP concentration and the monthly TP areal settling rate were rela tively poorly explained by any of the 21 wetland characteristics tested. In combination, the five variables inflow TP concentration, WAD, wetland age and inflow Ca concentration accounted for about 32% of the variability in the monthly outflow TP concentration. About 51% of the variability in the monthly TP areal settling rate was explained by the linear model containing the six parameters qN, inflow DOP fraction, inflow PP fraction, wetland age, outflow water temperature and TPALRN. In both cases, the bulk of the explained variability was accounted for by single wetland ch aracteristics; inflow TP concentration most strongly controlled outflo w TP concentration and the settling rate was most closely related to the qN. In both models, each of the re maining variables contributed meagerly to the r2. The guiding hypothesis, that the tested variables would significantly explain the variance in the outflow TP concentration and th e TP areal settling rate was rejected, in spirit if not in letter, by the find ings of this chapter. The relatively large amounts of unexplained vari ance and the distributions of the resolved variability in both tested dependent variables su pport several important co nclusions. First, while 90

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Chapter 3 demonstrated the importance of identifying a ppropriate values or functions for C* for each STA cell, this chapter revealed the challenge of doing so. Second, it is likely that additional wetland characteristics not quantified in this st udy were and are influential on the short-term outflow TP concentration and the TP settling rate. Although fully account ing for all the wetland attributes that cause these pe rformance indices to vary (e.g. r2 = 1.0) is the conceptual goal, all the error accumulating from measurement, inflow-outflow lag due to positive and the limitations of multiple linear regression will manifest as unexplained variance. The relative proportions of the unresolved vari ability in this study contributed by missing variables and other sources of error remain undetermined. Third, th e short-term measured outcomes of wetland P processing, which are known to be quite comple x, may in fact depend on such an array of wetland attributes that even a ma jority of the variability may not be explained by only a handful of measured traits. The small individual contribu tions of most of the variables examined herein attests to this conclusion. In this case, the data collection and processing required to substantially or fully explain the variability in, say, outflow TP concentration, would almost certainly surpass the usefulness of this information. Readers interested in practical applications of the interpretations in this chapter regarding the potential to improve TP removal performance may find the conclusions of this chapter unsatisfying, particularly with respect to the short-term outflow TP concentration. First, the factor that explained the major ity of the variance in the monthl y outflow concentration (inflow TP concentration) is not reasonably subject to manipulation by STA managers. Conceivably, inflow concentrations could be lowered by re ducing P losses from upstream sources, but this approach falls outside the realm of improving wetland treatment effectiveness. Second, though the long-term outflow TP concentration and kTP-value were negatively associated (Pietro et al., 91

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2009), attempts to increase th e settling rate by increasing q (the primary driver of the settling rate) should not be expected to depress the outfl ow concentration. Finally, the relative lack of influence (with regard to improvements in r2) of each of the additional variables that contributed to the outflow TP concentration and the settling rate suggests that modifying any of them would be unlikely to result in cost-effective reductions in outflow concentrations. 92

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Table 4-1. Coefficients of determination ( r2) of multiple linear regression models explaining the monthly outflow total phosphor us concentration in all cells. The column heading indicates the complexity (number of variables included) in the model. For a particular level of complexity, a given value is the r2 for the model containing that variable and all the variables indicated by X. The highest r2-value in each column is boldfaced. Number of variables included in model Variable 1 2 3 4 5 6 Inflow TP concentration 0.198 X X X X X TPALRAnominal 0.070 --0.287 0.304 -1-yr rolling average TPALR 0.014 -0.279 0.301 --2-yr rolling average TPALR ---0.260 --Inflow SRPA fraction 0.004 -----Inflow DOPA fraction ------Inflow PPA fraction 0.010 0.225 0.268 0.276 --Inflow CaA concentration 0.021 0.215 0.266 0.290 0.323 X Ca ALR nominal ------Ca areal mass removal rate ------Wetland age 0.032 0.212 0.258 0.301 X X qA nominal ------A -0.224 0.281 X X X Mean water depth 0.003 -----Soil TP concentration ------Inflow pH 0.004 0.212 0.258 0.289 0.303 0.323 Outflow pH --0.245 ---Inflow water temperature --0.250 ---Outflow water temperature --0.243 ---WAD A 0.004 0.205 0.253 0.289 --Change in WAD 0.028 0.247 X X X X ATPALR = TP areal loading rate; SRP = soluble reactive P; DOP = dissolved organic P; PP = particulate P; Ca = calcium; q = hydraulic loading rate; = hydraulic residence time; WAD = wetted area, determined by the elevation distribution 93

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Table 4-2. Estimates of parameters for the m odel explaining monthly out flow total phosphorus (TP) concentration in all cells. Variable Units Parameter estimate ( ) Probability ( p) that = 0 Outflow TP concentration mg/L --Inflow TP concentration mg/L 0.4387 <0.0001 Change in wetted area % 0.2443 <0.0001 Hydraulic residence time d 0.0004 <0.0001 Wetland age yr 0.0051 <0.0001 Inflow Ca concentration mg/L -0.0004 <0.0001 94

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Table 4-3. Coefficients of determination ( r2) of multiple linear regression models explaining the monthly outflow total phosphorus (TP) concen tration in all cells with non-significant r -values. The column heading indicates the complexity (number of variables included) in the model. For a particular level of complexity, a given value is the r2 for the model containing that variable and all the variables indicated by X. The highest r2-value in each column is boldfaced. Number of variables included in model Variable 1 2 3 Inflow TP concentration 0.056 0.477 -TPALRAnominal 0.014 0.445 -1-yr rolling average TPALR -0.523 X 2-yr rolling averag e TPALR ---Inflow SRPA fraction 0.032 --Inflow DOPA fraction 0.019 --Inflow PPA fraction 0.042 --Inflow CaA concentration ---Ca ALR nominal ---Ca areal mass removal rate 0.016 --Wetland age 0.093 0.470 0.537 qA nominal -0.443 -A ---Mean water depth 0.116 0.490 -Soil TP concentration 0.133 --Inflow pH 0.032 0.425 0.459 Outflow pH 0.026 --Inflow water temperature 0.028 --Outflow water temperature 0.024 --WAD A 0.014 --Change in WAD 0.437 X X ATPALR = TP areal loading rate; SRP = soluble reactive P; DOP = dissolved organic P; PP = particulate P; Ca = calcium; q = hydraulic loading rate; = hydraulic residence time; WAD = wetted area, determined by the elevation distribution 95

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Table 4-4. Estimates of parameters for the model explaining outflow total phosphorus (TP) concentration in all cel ls with non-significant r -values. Variable Units Parameter estimate ( ) Probability ( p) that = 0 Outflow TP concentration mg/L --Change in wetted area % 0.2080 <0.0001 1-yr rolling average TPALR g/m2/yr 0.0365 0.0378 Wetland age yr 0.0018 0.0068 96

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Table 4-5. Estimates of parameters for the model explaining outflow total phosphorus (TP) concentration in STA-1W Cell 1. Variable Units Parameter estimate ( ) Probability ( p) that = 0 Outflow TP concentration mg/L --Inflow TP concentration mg/L 0.4254 <0.0001 Wetland age yr 0.0149 <0.0001 97

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Table 4-6. Coefficients of determination ( r2) of multiple linear regression models explaining the monthly total phosphorus (TP) areal settling rate in all cells. The column heading indicates the complexity (number of variables included) in the model. For a particular level of complexity, a given value is the r2 for the model containing that variable and all the variables indicated by X. The highest r2-value in each column is boldfaced. Number of variables included in model Variable 1 2 3 4 5 6 Inflow TP concentration 0.030 0.397 0.446 --0.506 TPALRAnominal 0.277 0.395 0.448 0.474 0.489 0.512 1-yr rolling average TPALR 0.041 0.416 0.447 0.478 0.484 -2-yr rolling average TPALR 0.044 0.393 ----Inflow SRPA fraction 0.028 0.422 0.461 ---Inflow DOPA fraction 0.017 0.432 X X X X Inflow PPA fraction 0.026 0.401 0.469 X X X Inflow CaA concentration 0.008 0.411 ----Ca ALR nominal 0.346 -----Ca areal mass removal rate -0.401 0.462 ---Wetland age -0.421 0.458 0.481 0.503 X qA nominal 0.391 X X X X X A 0.117 0.387 0.437 ---Mean water depth 0.036 -0.439 ---Soil TP concentration -0.389 0.443 ---Inflow pH 0.026 0.393 0.448 0.476 0.490 -Outflow pH ------Inflow water temperature 0.038 0.396 0.445 -0.489 0.504 Outflow water temperature 0.058 0.416 0.456 0.486 X X WAD A -0.402 0.447 -0.488 -Change in WAD 0.003 0.395 0.446 0.478 0.495 0.511 ATPALR = TP areal loading rate; SRP = soluble reactive P; DOP = dissolved organic P; PP = particulate P; Ca = calcium; q = hydraulic loading rate; = hydraulic residence time; WAD = wetted area, determined by the elevation distribution 98

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Table 4-7. Estimates of parameters for the mode l explaining total phosphorus areal settling rate in all cells. Variable Units Parameter estimate ( ) Probability ( p) that = 0 TP areal settling rate m/yr --Hydraulic loading rate nominal m/mo 6.6940 <0.0001 Inflow DOP fraction % -33.7914 <0.0001 Inflow PP fraction % -13.2197 0.0012 Wetland age yr -1.8512 <0.0001 Outflow water temperature C 0.6224 0.0064 TP areal loading rate nominal g/m2/yr 11.0970 0.0002 ATP = total phosphrous; DOP = dissolved organic P; PP = particulate P 99

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Table 4-8. Estimates of parameters for the mode l explaining monthly tota l phosphorus (TP) areal settling rate in STA-1W Cell 1. Variable Units Parameter estimate ( ) Probability ( p) that = 0 TP areal settling rate m/yr --Water depth m 50.5583 0.0001 Wetland age yr -1.7433 0.0221 100

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TP C1 WAD Age Ca C1 ++++ 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 012345r2-valueNumber of variables included in model With WithoutCell effectsFigure 4-1. Changes in the coefficient of determination ( r2) with increasing complexity of the model explaining monthly outflow TP concen tration in all cells. The models are shown with and without the effects of the period-of-record cell means. TP C 1 = inflow TP concentration, WAD = change in monthly wetted area, = nominal hydraulic residence time, Age = wetland age, Ca C 1 = inflow calcium concentration. 101

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q DOP1RPP1RTemp2AgeTPALRN+++++ 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0123456r2-valueNumber of variables included in model With WithoutCell effectsFigure 4-2. Changes in the coefficient of determination ( r2) with increasing model complexity of the model explaining the monthly total phospho rus areal settling rate in all cells. The models are shown with and without the eff ects of the period-of-record cell means. q = hydraulic loading rate, DOP1R = inflow dissolved organic P fraction, PP1R = inflow particulate P fraction, Temp2 = inflow water temperature, Age = wetland age, TPALRN = nominal total phosphorus areal loading rate. 102

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CHAPTER 5 CONCLUSIONS This work attempted to address several im portant questions regarding the operation and performance of the Stormwater Treatment Areas in South Florida. The management of these extensive constructed wetlands is a massive expenditure for the SFWMD and is a major contributor to the reduction of P loads to the Florida Everglades. The presence of marked eleva tion gradients and time-variable water levels in some STA cells raised concern that estimat es of the hydraulic and TP areal loading rates we re inaccurate due to incomplete flooding of the nominal tr eatment areas. It was demonstrated that the occasions when the relative wetted area was s ubstantially less than 100% were infrequent, and did not significantly increase the TPALR in a ny of the STAs, suggesting that the nominal treatment area was satisfactory for loading rate calculations. The outflow TP concentration did show a positive correlation to the magnitude of re-flooding, within the months with large reflood events, an effect confirmed to be signifi cant by multiple regression modeling. Maintaining flooding as to reduce re-wetting events would prev ent these occasional pulses of outflow P but this phenomenon was important in less than 5% of non-screened months. It was also shown that poor performance in certain cells (elevated outflow TP concentrati ons relative to inflow TPALR) was shown not to be an artifact of the TPAL R calculation, validating the need for additional work to diagnose those factors contributing to performance in the STAs. The monthly outflow TP concentration was shown to be uncorrelated to the monthly TPALR ( r ) in most cells. This independence was not a function of vegetation type or the magnitude of the TPALR. It was hypothesized that the Damkhler number (Da = k / q ) was sufficiently high as to remove this correlati on, implying that the outflow concentration was controlled primarily by the background concentration. The monthly outflow TP concentration 103

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from the cells with non-significant r was not determined by the composition of the inflow TP pool nor by the outflow water te mperature. More extensive efforts to isolate the factors controlling the apparent background concentrations were justified because accurate estimates of C* appeared necessary for the successful employment of the k-C* model in wetlands (i.e. most STA cells) with high Da-values. Regression Variables Each of the 21 factors was specifically include d because either mathematical reasoning (in the case of those terms related by the k-C* mode l) or previously documented studies suggested their relevance to wetland P cyc ling (e.g. Ca, pH and temperature). Therefore, it is important to consider the conditions that led to inclusion or rejection of each in the models assembled in this work. Inflow Total Phosphorus Concentration The k-C* model (Kadlec and Kni ght, 1996), introduced in Chapter 2, has been found by many investigators to satisfactorily describe po llutant reduction in wetlands. When using that model to consider the outflow TP concentration, the inflow TP concentration is an important input term (which makes sound intuitive sense). Chapter 3 showed that in the majority of the cells in the STAs, the outflow TP concentra tion in any given month was unrelated to the conditions of the inflow water in that month. This situation suggests that P removal in the most of the STAs is not limited by reside nce time (discussed further in Chapter 3), but does imply that the inflow TP concentration ought not to be us eful in describing the short-term outflow TP concentration. Indeed, the inflow TP concentrat ion was only important to the regression model that considered outflow TP concentration data from cells that were known to have positive correlations between inflow and outflow TP con centrations. Clearly, the short-term inflow TP 104

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concentration will not be an important determin ant of the outflow TP concentration in any wetland system whose P reduction is not limited by residence time. Hydraulic and Total Phosphorus Loading Rates The hydraulic ( q) and total phosphorus loading rates came to bear in interesting ways in the final regression models established in Chapter 4. First, both the monthly q and TPALRN contributed positively to the monthly areal settling rate when all cells of the STAs were considered together, suggesting that kTP is, in the STAs, a measure of P removal power rather than efficiency. This idea is in line with th e previously discussed no tion that the observed outflow TP concentrations are limited more by the apparent background concentration than by insufficient contact time. In this case, a hypotheti cal additional packet of water (thus additional P) does not increase the outflow concentrati on, but does lead to increased P mass removed. Second, the 1-year rolling averag e TPALR was the second most impor tant factor in determining the monthly outflow TP concentration fr om those cells with non-significant r -values. That is, even when the short-term outflow concentration was apparently independent of the short-term inputs, the long-term loading still influenced the short-term outflow concentration. This is simply a different perspective on the well-understood connection between long-term loading and performance (e.g. Qian and Richardson, 1997; Pietro et al. 2009), but deserves consideration by treatment wetland managers. Increasing loading ra tes to maximize mass removal in response to the independence of short-term inflow and outflow concentrations may result in a long-term increase in outflow concentrations, visible even in short-term data. Inflow Phosphorus Fractions Despite appearing in the final regression model for kTP (data from all cells) the composition of the inflow TP pool did little to affect the measured perfor mance of the STAs. Possibly, the internal transformation and producti on of the various forms was so substantial as to make the 105

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initial P composition irrelevant This hypothesis gains some support from the finding that residence time did not limit P reduction in most STAs. Regardless of the inflow P composition, additional contact time would not support additional removal of the less-bioavailable DOP and PP. Therefore, the outflow DOP pool, for example, is likely not composed primarily of the same DOP particles that entered the wetland. Wetland Age and Soil Phosphorus Wetland age was the only term included in all the final regression models for both outflow TP concentration and kTP. In all cases, the sign on the co efficient indicated decreasing performance (i.e. increasing outflow TP concentrations and decreasing kTP-values) with increasing age. Of course, there are precedents for such a scenario including the Orlando Easterly Wetland in central Florida (Wang et al., 2006) an d the impacted zones of WAC-2A in south Florida (DeBusk et al., 2004). Wetland age was su ch a prominent factor in determining STA performance probably because it is a lumped term, containing simultaneously multiple wetland characteristics that change over time, such as soil P and plant biomass and tissue P. Though wetland managers should anticipate changes in performance as treatment wetlands age, this information is only of real valu e if the individual variables po oled in the age term can be extracted and evaluated individually. For example, soil P, a wetland parameter expected to change as the wetland ages, was in cluded in the regression analyses but was not selected for any of the final models. (Thi s analysis should not be taken as conc lusive, as the soil P data were illsuited for evaluation at a monthly time-step.) Ther efore, some other char acteristic of the STAs was changing with time and caused the broad age term to contribute more information to the regression than the soil P term. 106

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Calcium and pH Generally, none of the calcium terms included in the multiple regression exercises (inflow Ca concentration, Ca ALR, and Ca mass removal) contributed any explanatory power regarding either outflow TP concentration or TP areal set tling rate. The sole exception was the selection of inflow Ca concentration as the fifth variab le in the regression model for outflow TP concentration among all cells. Likewise, neither inflow nor outflow pH was selected for inclusion in any model. The chemistry of Ca a nd P interactions (and th e influence of pH) is moderately well understood (e.g. Di az et al., 2004; Scinto, 1997) and associations between Ca and P have been demonstrated in the field (R eddy et al., 1993). Connec ting the process-level dynamics to the field-scale effects has been ch allenging. Two factors may have contributed to the relative lack of influence of Ca on P observe d in this study. First, the amount of P removed from the water column due to interaction with Ca actually may be minimal relative to biological and physical processes. The probability of this being the case is unclear ; Ca-P interaction is apparently important in some wetlands (Reddy et al., 1993) but has not been quantified in the STAs. Second, the data possibly failed to capture the Ca-P association. The relatively small proportions of variance expl ained by most of the considered factors suggest that some of the tested datasets were not suited to analysis at a monthly time-step. Water Temperature Kadlec and Wallace (2008) suggest an Arrhen ius temperature coefficient of about 1.005 for total P in warm climate wetlands. (Arrehe nius coefficients grea ter than 1.0 indicate improvement in removal performance with increases in temperature and values less than 1.0 denote loss of performance with te mperature increases. Values very close to 1.0 imply relatively little temperature dependence.) This value for TP indicates that P removal tends to improve very slightly with increases in water temperature. A temperature term (both in flow and outflow water 107

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temperature were considered) was included in th e final regression model only for the monthly TP areal settling rate that included all cells. Most likely, the weak temperature dependence of P processing expected for the STAs was obs cured by other wetland characteristics. Relative Wetted Area and Water Depth The RWAD was expected to influence P proces sing primarily by alte ring the realized loading rates applied to the STAs. Chapter 2 established that the nominal wetted area provided a satisfactory estimate of the actual wetted area for most applications in the STAs. Therefore, the relative unimportance of RWAD in the regression analyses was anticipated; RWAD was not selected for any of the final models assembled in this study. Of much more interest from the outset was RWAD, since great biogeochemical action was expected to associate with dry-down and re-flood events. Indeed, RWAD was the second variable incl uded in the regression model for outflow TP concentration from all cells a nd was the factor of primary importance in the explaining variance in the out flow TP concentration from cells with non-significant r -values. Because large re-flood events were fairly infrequent in the STAs (see Chapter 2), these findings indicate that the flushing of P associated with re-flood events is one of the most powerful and predictable biogeochemical processes active in the STAs. Depth affects the biogeochemistry (and thus P processing) of surf ace-flow wetlands by regulating oxygen diffusion and changing the hydraul ics. However, it was selected for only one regression model developed in th is study, where it explained about 14% of the variability in the monthly kTP-value of STA-1W Cell 1. A correlation between q and depth aligned that model with the dependence of the settling rate on the hydraulic loading rate f ound among all cells. It appears that the other biogeochemical effects of water de pth were apparently relatively unimportant to 108

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STA performance, based on the monthly data. The longer-term role of influencing vegetation communities played by water depth was lik ely not captured by the monthly data. Future Work Following the results presented in this work, two major avenues of investigation remain. First, C* needs further elucida tion in the STAs. Chapter 3 suggest s that the monthly outflow TP concentration from the STAs was mo re strongly controlled by C* than kTP. This implies the need for accurate estimates of C* when modeling P removal performance in the STAs. Although the outflow concentrations from those cells operati ng at apparent backgr ound concentrations did very with time, it remains unclear whether a function or value will best predict C*. Second, multiple linear regression was successful in iden tifying some wetland characteristics that were uniquely important to P processing in the STAs. However, the overall proportions of variance in the dependent vari ables (monthly outflow TP concentration and monthly TP areal settling rate) that were explained by the regres sion efforts were unsatisfactory. It is recommended that future multiple regression efforts for the STAs consider non-linearity among the data, as well include additional variables not tested in this study. In particular, 12 of the 21 tested variables concerned water chemistry and hydrology and hydraulics accounted for another five terms. Only one term (soil P) wa s related to the soil prop erties and no vegetation data was incorporated. Owing to the relative impor tance of plants and soil to wetland functions, it is likely that variables regarding these char acteristics would be particularly helpful in explaining observed STA performance. 109

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110 APPENDIX DATA SCREENING CRITERIA Variable Not reported if: Inflow TP concentration Inflow volume = 0 Outflow TP concentration Outflow volume = 0 Inflow SRP concentration Inflow volume = 0 Outflow SRP concentration Outflow volume = 0 Inflow DOP concentration -Inflow SRP concentration or in flow TDP concentration blank -Inflow volume 0 -Inflow SRP concentration > inflow TPD concentration Outflow DOP concentration -Outflow SRP concentration or outflow TDP concentration blank -Outflow volume 0 -Outflow SRP concentration > outflow TDP concentration Inflow PP concentration -Inflow TP concentration or inflow TDP concentration blank -Inflow volume 0 -Inflow TP concentration > inflow TPD concentration Outflow PP concentration -Outflow TP concentration or outflow TDP concentration blank -Outflow volume 0 -Outflow TP concentration > outflow TDP concentration Inflow SRP fraction -Inflow SRP concentration or infl ow TP concentration blank or 0 -Inflow SRP concentration > inflow TP concentration Outflow SRP fraction -Outflow SRP concentration or outflow TP concentration blank or 0 -Outflow SRP concentration > outflow TP concentration Inflow DOP fraction -Inflow SRP concentration or infl ow TDP concentration blank or 0 -Inflow SRP concentration > inflow TDP concentration Outflow DOP fraction -Outflow SRP concentration or out flow TDP concentration blank or 0 -Outflow SRP concentration > outflow TDP concentration Inflow PP fraction -Inflow TP concentration or infl ow TDP concentration blank or 0 -Inflow TP concentration < inflow TDP concentration Outflow PP fraction -Outflow TP concentration or outflow TDP concentration blank or 0 -Outflow TP concentration < outflow TDP concentration Areal TP settling rate (k) Inflow volume, inflow TP concentr ation, outflow TP concentration or WAD blank or 0 TP areal loading rate nominal -Inflow TP mass blank -Inflow volume 0 TP areal loading rate distribution adjusted -Inflow TP mass blank -Inflow volume or WAD 0 TP areal loading rate mean adjusted -Inflow TP mass blank -Inflow volume or WAN 0 Inflow Ca concentration -Inflow Ca mass or inflow volume blank or 0 -Inflow Ca concentration <= 1

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Outflow Ca concentration -Outflow Ca mass or outflow volume blank or 0 -Outflow Ca concentration <= 1 Ca areal loading rate nominal -Inflow Ca mass blank -Inflow volume 0 Ca areal loading rate distribution adjusted -Inflow Ca mass blank -Inflow volume or WAD 0 Ca areal mass removal rate Inflow Ca mass, outflow Ca mass or WAD blank or 0 Hydraulic loading rate nominal Inflow volume blank or 0 Hydraulic loading rate distribution adjusted Inflow volume or WAD blank or 0 Hydraulic residence time -Inflow volume or outflow volume 0 -Hydraulic residence time 0 -Hydraulic residence time 150 111

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116 Stuck, J.D., F.T. Izuno, K.L. Campbell, A.B. Bo ttcher and R.W. Rice. 2001. Farm-level studies of particulate phosphorus transport in the Ever glades Agricultural Ar ea. Trans. ASAE 44:11051116. Tanner, C.C. 1996. Plants for constructed wetl and treatment systems A comparison of the growth and nutrient uptake of eight emergent species. Ecol. Eng. 7:59-83. Turner, B.L. and S. Newman. 2005. Phosphorus cycling in wetland soils: The importance of phosphate diesters. J. En viron. Qual. 34:1921-1929. Turner, B.L., S. Newman and J.M. Newma n. 2006. Organic phosphorus sequestration in subtropical treatment wetlands. Environ. Sci. Technol. 40:727-733. Volk, B.G. 1973. Everglades histosol subsidence 1: CO2 evolution as affected by soil type, temperature, and moisture. Soil Cr op Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 32:132-135. Vymazal, J. 2007. Removal of nutrients in variou s types of constructe d wetlands. Sci. Total Environ. 380:48-65. Wang, H.G., J.W. Jawitz, J.R. White, C.J. Ma rtinez and M.D. Sees. 2006. Rejuvenating the largest municipal treatment wetla nd in Florida. Ecol. Eng. 26:132-146. White, J.R., K.R. Reddy, W.F. DeBusk, W.R. Wise, T. Crisman. 2002. Phosphorus removal capacity of the Orlando wetland treatment syst em: final report. Soil and Water Science Department, University of Fl orida, Gainesville, Florida.

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117 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH Mike Jeraulds passion for the environment, which inspired the undertaking of this advanced degree, was fostered by his experiences fishing, camping and traveling as a child with his parents. His formal educati on in the field began with the J upiter Environmental Research and Field Studies Academy at Jupite r High School, in South Florida. Impressed with the urgency of the need to respond to the ever-declining condi tion of the natural wo rld, Mike earned his Bachelors degree in Environmental Science from the University of Florida in 2004. His undergraduate studies introduced and develope d his awareness of the intimate connection between human and environmental well-being. In 2008, he enrolled in the Soil and Water Science Department at the University of Florida to pursue a Master of Science that would enable him to employ wetlands for the treatment of wast ewater. The quality of all aspects of Mikes term in Gainesville was marked best, perhaps, by the four national titles won by the University of Florida football and mens basketball teams, coll ectively, during his tenure there. In 2009, he married his extraordinary wife, Sarah. After 19 years of education, he now plans to leave academia and try his hand in the real world.