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Framing Immigration

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042003/00001

Material Information

Title: Framing Immigration The Impact of 9/11 and the London Train Bombings on the Portrayals of Immigrants and Immigration in the Print Media
Physical Description: 1 online resource (226 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Niles, Beau
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2010

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Sociology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Sociology thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Abstract of Dissertation Presented to the Graduate School Of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy FRAMING IMMIGRATION: THE IMPACT OF 9/11 AND THE LONDON TRAIN BOMBINGS ON THE PORTRAYALS OF IMMIGRANTS AND IMMIGRATION IN THE PRINT MEDIA By Beau Niles August 2010 Chair: Alin Ceobanu Major: Sociology The terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in the U.S. and the London train bombings in Great Britain increased the salience of immigration in those countries (Esses, Dovidio, and Hodson 2002). It has been proposed that this increased attention, to the extent that it was largely negative, would decrease the relatively high level of tolerance toward immigrants that characterized the 1990s (Esses, Dovidio, and Hodson , 2002). Building on these ideas, this project uses frame analysis to investigate the impact of 9/11 and the London train bombings on the portrayal of immigration and immigrants in the print media of both the United States and Great Britain. Two newspapers from the U.S. (i.e., the New York Times and USA Today) and two from Britain (i.e., The Sun and The Daily Mail) were chosen for analysis based on their large circulation. A total of 659 articles were examined: 221 in the New York Times, 256 in USA Today, 68 in The Sun, and 314 in the Daily Mail. The articles were selected from the time periods six months before and after 9/11 and six months before the London train bombings. As Scheufele (2000) notes, changes in the description of a situation might affect how audience members interpret the situation. Thus, it is important to analyze the changes in the framing of immigration and immigrants in order to understand the potential impact on how the public views the issue. The analysis found a sharp change in the frames used after 9/11 in both the U.S. and Britain, with immigrants more likely to be connected to terrorism as well as a call, particularly in Britain, for increased border security. The London train bombings did not have an impact in the U.S. portrayal of immigration or immigrants, but in Britain, there was an increase in labeling immigrants as terrorists and/or criminals.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Beau Niles.
Thesis: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2010.
Local: Adviser: Ceobanu, Alin.

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2010
System ID: UFE0042003:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042003/00001

Material Information

Title: Framing Immigration The Impact of 9/11 and the London Train Bombings on the Portrayals of Immigrants and Immigration in the Print Media
Physical Description: 1 online resource (226 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Niles, Beau
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2010

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Sociology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Sociology thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Abstract of Dissertation Presented to the Graduate School Of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy FRAMING IMMIGRATION: THE IMPACT OF 9/11 AND THE LONDON TRAIN BOMBINGS ON THE PORTRAYALS OF IMMIGRANTS AND IMMIGRATION IN THE PRINT MEDIA By Beau Niles August 2010 Chair: Alin Ceobanu Major: Sociology The terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in the U.S. and the London train bombings in Great Britain increased the salience of immigration in those countries (Esses, Dovidio, and Hodson 2002). It has been proposed that this increased attention, to the extent that it was largely negative, would decrease the relatively high level of tolerance toward immigrants that characterized the 1990s (Esses, Dovidio, and Hodson , 2002). Building on these ideas, this project uses frame analysis to investigate the impact of 9/11 and the London train bombings on the portrayal of immigration and immigrants in the print media of both the United States and Great Britain. Two newspapers from the U.S. (i.e., the New York Times and USA Today) and two from Britain (i.e., The Sun and The Daily Mail) were chosen for analysis based on their large circulation. A total of 659 articles were examined: 221 in the New York Times, 256 in USA Today, 68 in The Sun, and 314 in the Daily Mail. The articles were selected from the time periods six months before and after 9/11 and six months before the London train bombings. As Scheufele (2000) notes, changes in the description of a situation might affect how audience members interpret the situation. Thus, it is important to analyze the changes in the framing of immigration and immigrants in order to understand the potential impact on how the public views the issue. The analysis found a sharp change in the frames used after 9/11 in both the U.S. and Britain, with immigrants more likely to be connected to terrorism as well as a call, particularly in Britain, for increased border security. The London train bombings did not have an impact in the U.S. portrayal of immigration or immigrants, but in Britain, there was an increase in labeling immigrants as terrorists and/or criminals.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Beau Niles.
Thesis: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2010.
Local: Adviser: Ceobanu, Alin.

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2010
System ID: UFE0042003:00001


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PAGE 3

I would like to thank my committee c hair Dr. Alin Ceobanu for his support and guidance through the process developing this project. I would also like to thank the rest of my supervisory committee for their encouragement and insights that helped improve this project. In addition, my parents, who encouraged me with love and emotional support. My wife Sara provided me with both the encouragement and the support t hat kept me going through every (difficult) step. Finally, my children, Jacob, Alana, and Taylor who provided the type of encouragement that only chil dren can, smiles, laughter, and breaks for playtime.

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1.1 A Brief History of Immigration to the United States and Great Britain

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1.2 Race and Ethnicity in the New Immigration

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1.3 The Impact of Terrorist Attacks on Opinion and Media Coverage

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1.4 Research Questions and Hypotheses

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1.5 The Next Steps

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2.1 Media and Democracy

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2.2 The Power of the Press

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2.3 Media and Public Opinion

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2.4 The Relevance of Public Opinion

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2.5 The Internet age and the Potent ial Democratization of the News

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2.6 Concluding Thoughts

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3.1 Study Design

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3.2 Framing

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3.3 The Data and Analyzing the Data

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IR = 2M/(N1 + N2)

PAGE 70

3.4 Potential Problems and Solutions

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3.5 Conclusion

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4.2 Newspaper Portrayals in Britain

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4.3 Comparisons

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4.4 Conclusions

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5.1 U.S. Comparisons

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5.2 British Comparison

PAGE 122

5.3 Comparisons

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6.1 U.S. Po rtrayals

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6.2 British Portrayals

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6.3 Comparisons

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7.1 U.S. Portrayals

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7.2 British Portrayals

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7.3 Comparisons and Conclusions

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8.1 Discussing the Differences

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8.2 Examining the Hypotheses

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8.3 Media, Framing, and Immigration

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8.4 Concluding Thoughts

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Voice/Standing Diagnosis Prognosis Call for Action