<%BANNER%>

Ecological Niche Modeling of a Zoonosis

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041674/00001

Material Information

Title: Ecological Niche Modeling of a Zoonosis A Case Study Using Anthrax Outbreaks and Climate Change in Kazakhstan
Physical Description: 1 online resource (150 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Joyner, Timothy
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2010

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: anthrax, bacillus, climate, garp, kazakhstan, surveillance
Geography -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Geography thesis, M.S.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Anthrax, caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis, is a zoonotic disease that persists throughout much of the world in livestock, wildlife, and secondarily infects humans. This is true across much of Central Asia, and particularly the Steppe region, including Kazakhstan. This study employed the Genetic Algorithm for Rule-set Prediction (GARP) to model the current and future geographic distribution of B. anthracis in Kazakhstan based on the A2 and B2 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) climate change scenarios using a 5-variable dataset at 55km2 and 8km2, a 6-variable Bioclimatic (BioClim) dataset at 8km2, and an 8-variable dataset using BioClim and measures of vegetation at 8km2. Additionally, extracting landscape level ecological ranges of B. anthracis may help to better understand the conditions predicted by the models. Two studies have indicated that GARP produces useful biological information and through examining the rule-sets created by GARP, we can develop a more robust explanation as to why the species is present in some areas and absent in others. Through the use of the rule-set writing and mapping application of GARP, the study also examined the ranges of various parameters and how these ranges differed at varying latitudes. Future models suggest large areas predicted under current conditions may be reduced by 2050 with the A2 model predicting 14-16% loss across the three spatial resolutions. There was greater variability in the B2 models across scenarios predicting ~15% loss at 55km2, ~34% loss at 8km2, and ~30% loss with the BioClim variables. Only very small areas of habitat expansion into new areas were predicted by either A2 or B2 in any models. Greater areas of habitat loss are predicted in the southern regions of Kazakhstan by A2 and B2 models, while moderate habitat loss is also predicted in the northern regions by either B2 model at 8km2. Lower temperature ranges were observed in the southern region along with wider precipitation ranges as compared to those in the north. Additionally, the distribution of B. anthracis was defined by a narrow range of mean Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Though much variation was exhibited between rule types and total number of rules used for each model experiment, a consistent environmental envelope that supports B. anthracis survival was identified and spatially visualized. Anthrax disease control relies mainly on livestock vaccination and proper carcass disposal, both of which require adequate surveillance. In many situations, including that of Kazakhstan, vaccine resources are limited, and understanding the geographic distribution of the organism, in tandem with current data on livestock population dynamics, can aid in properly allocating doses. While speculative, contemplating future changes in livestock distributions and suitable environments for B. anthracis can be useful for establishing future surveillance priorities. This study may also have broader applications to global public health surveillance relating to other diseases in addition to B. anthracis.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Timothy Joyner.
Thesis: Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 2010.
Local: Adviser: Blackburn, Jason Kenna.

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2010
System ID: UFE0041674:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041674/00001

Material Information

Title: Ecological Niche Modeling of a Zoonosis A Case Study Using Anthrax Outbreaks and Climate Change in Kazakhstan
Physical Description: 1 online resource (150 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Joyner, Timothy
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2010

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: anthrax, bacillus, climate, garp, kazakhstan, surveillance
Geography -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Geography thesis, M.S.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Anthrax, caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis, is a zoonotic disease that persists throughout much of the world in livestock, wildlife, and secondarily infects humans. This is true across much of Central Asia, and particularly the Steppe region, including Kazakhstan. This study employed the Genetic Algorithm for Rule-set Prediction (GARP) to model the current and future geographic distribution of B. anthracis in Kazakhstan based on the A2 and B2 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) climate change scenarios using a 5-variable dataset at 55km2 and 8km2, a 6-variable Bioclimatic (BioClim) dataset at 8km2, and an 8-variable dataset using BioClim and measures of vegetation at 8km2. Additionally, extracting landscape level ecological ranges of B. anthracis may help to better understand the conditions predicted by the models. Two studies have indicated that GARP produces useful biological information and through examining the rule-sets created by GARP, we can develop a more robust explanation as to why the species is present in some areas and absent in others. Through the use of the rule-set writing and mapping application of GARP, the study also examined the ranges of various parameters and how these ranges differed at varying latitudes. Future models suggest large areas predicted under current conditions may be reduced by 2050 with the A2 model predicting 14-16% loss across the three spatial resolutions. There was greater variability in the B2 models across scenarios predicting ~15% loss at 55km2, ~34% loss at 8km2, and ~30% loss with the BioClim variables. Only very small areas of habitat expansion into new areas were predicted by either A2 or B2 in any models. Greater areas of habitat loss are predicted in the southern regions of Kazakhstan by A2 and B2 models, while moderate habitat loss is also predicted in the northern regions by either B2 model at 8km2. Lower temperature ranges were observed in the southern region along with wider precipitation ranges as compared to those in the north. Additionally, the distribution of B. anthracis was defined by a narrow range of mean Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Though much variation was exhibited between rule types and total number of rules used for each model experiment, a consistent environmental envelope that supports B. anthracis survival was identified and spatially visualized. Anthrax disease control relies mainly on livestock vaccination and proper carcass disposal, both of which require adequate surveillance. In many situations, including that of Kazakhstan, vaccine resources are limited, and understanding the geographic distribution of the organism, in tandem with current data on livestock population dynamics, can aid in properly allocating doses. While speculative, contemplating future changes in livestock distributions and suitable environments for B. anthracis can be useful for establishing future surveillance priorities. This study may also have broader applications to global public health surveillance relating to other diseases in addition to B. anthracis.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Timothy Joyner.
Thesis: Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 2010.
Local: Adviser: Blackburn, Jason Kenna.

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2010
System ID: UFE0041674:00001


This item has the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

1 ECOLOGICAL NICHE MODELING OF A ZOONOSIS: A CASE STUDY USING ANTHRAX OUTBREAKS AND CLIMATE CHANGE IN KAZAKHSTAN By TIMOTHY ANDREW JOYNER A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULF ILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2010

PAGE 2

2 2010 Timothy Andrew Joyner

PAGE 3

3 To my family thank you for the support that you have given to me all of my life

PAGE 4

4 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I thank my family f or all of the support and encouragement that they have given to me over my entire life and specifically during the past six years of my academic life. I also thank my fiance, Jessica Bell, who has endured nearly two long years of being apart while I hav e completed this degree. I am forever grateful for the members of the Spatial Epidemiology and Ecology Research Lab both at California State University, Fullerton and the University of Florida: Ian Kracalik, Shane Foster, Ailam Truong, Pamela Rittelmeyer, and Ann Espejo. They have provided much needed friendship and support throughout the entire graduate school process and that has been invaluable. I would like to thank my thesis advisor, Dr. Jason K. Blackburn, for his constant support of my education o ver the past six years. He has provided an incredible amount of opportunities to me during both my undergraduate career at Louisiana State University and my graduate career at California State University, Fullerton and the University of Florida. I would also like to thank the members of my committee, Dr. Michael Binford and Dr. Andrew Tatem, for their support and guidance during the formation of this thesis. I thank the United States Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) who funded this Cooperative Biolo gical Research project as part of the Biological Threat Reduction Program in Kazakhstan. I thank Yerlan Sansyzbayev and Andrew Curtis who assisted greatly with the development of the original anthrax data set. I also thank Martin Hugh Jones for his assis tance and counsel during my research. Finally, I thank my colleagues in Kazakhstan whom I have worked with extensively over the past several years on multiple projects: Bolat Ospanov, Talgat Tassynov, Vladimir Dubyanskiy, Larissa Lukhnova, Yerlan Pazylov, Gulnara Temiraliyeva, and Alim Aikimbayev.

PAGE 5

5 TABLE OF CONTENTS page ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 4 LIST OF TABLES ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 7 LIST OF FIGURES ................................ ................................ ................................ .......... 8 ABSTRACT ................................ ................................ ................................ ................... 11 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION ................................ ................................ ................................ .... 13 Anthrax ................................ ................................ ................................ ................... 13 Kazakhstan ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 19 Ecological Niche Modeling and Climate Change ................................ .................... 22 The Genetic Algorithm for Rule Set Prediction (GARP) ................................ .......... 26 Thesis Goals ................................ ................................ ................................ ........... 29 2 MODELING THE POTENTIAL DISTRIBUTION OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS UNDER MULTIPLE CLIMATE CHANGE SCENARIOS FOR KAZAKHSTAN ........ 32 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 32 Data and Methods ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 41 Anthrax Occurrence Data ................................ ................................ ................. 41 Current and Future Climate Datasets ................................ ............................... 42 Modeling Scenarios ................................ ................................ .......................... 45 Implementation and Methodology of Desktop GARP and Accuracy Metrics .... 46 Modeling Parameters ................................ ................................ ....................... 48 Analysis of Habitat Change ................................ ................................ .............. 50 Results ................................ ................................ ................................ .................... 51 Accuracy Metrics ................................ ................................ .............................. 51 Current and Future Distributions of B. anthracis ................................ ............... 51 Discussion ................................ ................................ ................................ .............. 55 3 EVALUATING ENVIRONMENTAL PARAMETERS OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS IN KAZAKHSTAN: AN EXAMINATION OF RULE SET WRITING AND MAPPING WITHIN AN ECOLOGICAL NICHE MODELING TOOL ........................ 78 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 78 Data and Methods ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 90 Anthrax Occurrence Data ................................ ................................ ................. 90 Ecological Nic he Modeling ................................ ................................ ............... 91 Modeling Procedures and Methods ................................ ................................ .. 94 Analysis of Environmental Parameters E stablished within GARP Rule Sets ... 95

PAGE 6

6 Results ................................ ................................ ................................ .................... 97 Discussion ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 103 4 CONCLUSION AND FUTURE RESEARCH ................................ ......................... 127 LIST OF REFERENCES ................................ ................................ ............................. 135 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH ................................ ................................ .......................... 149

PAGE 7

7 LIST OF TABLES Table page 2 1 Environmental variables used for G enetic A lgorithm for R ule set P rediction (GARP) models ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 66 2 2 Accuracy Metrics for the current predicted distributions ................................ ..... 66 2 3 A comparison of habitat change (%) between S pecial R eport on E mission s S cenarios (SRES) A2 and B2 climate change scenarios ................................ ... 66 3 1 Accuracy Metrics for the current predicted distributio ns ................................ ... 111 3 2 Dominant rules from one of the 10 best subsets created in GARP using current environmental conditions that included measures of precipitation, temperature, and N ormalized D ifference V egetation I ndex (NDVI) ................. 113 3 3 Commission values for the future GARP model that utilized the A2 climate change scenario ................................ ................................ ............................... 117 3 4 Commission values for the future GA RP model that utilized the B2 climate change scenario ................................ ................................ ............................... 119 3 5 An example of minimum and maximum ranges of two rule sets produced in current scenario one ................................ ................................ ......................... 120 3 6 An example of minimum and maximum ranges of two rule sets produced in current scenario two ................................ ................................ ......................... 121

PAGE 8

8 LIST OF FIGURES Figure page 1 1 Political map of Kazakhstan with oblasts, topography, major cities, rivers, and lakes ................................ ................................ ................................ ................... 31 2 1 Map of Kazakhstan with anthrax locality data ................................ ..................... 68 2 2 Ten 85/15 random subsets with corresponding model runs showing consistency between testing and training point locations as well as predicted distributions. ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 69 2 3 Random 85/15 subsets were created for the northern and southern areas of Kazakhstan (separated at 48N) independently, then added together to construct ten total testing and training subsets. ................................ .................. 70 2 4 Current predicted distribution of B. anthracis using Current Scenario 1 (A) and future predicted distributions based on the A2 climate change scenario (B) and B2 climate change scenario (C) ................................ ............................. 71 2 5 Potential future habitat changes based on the A2 climate change scenario (A) and B2 climate change scenario (B) derived from Current Scenario 1. The differences between these climate change scenarios are shown in (C). ..... 72 2 6 Current predicted distribution of B. anthracis using Current Scenario 2 (A) and future predicted distributions based on the A2 climate change scenario (B) and B2 climate change scenario (C) ................................ ............................. 73 2 7 Potential future habitat changes based on the A2 climate change scenario (A) and B2 climate change scenario (B) derived from Current Scenario 2. The differences between these climate change sc enarios are shown in (C). ..... 74 2 8 Current Scenario 3 (A) and Current Scenario 4 (B) show the current distribution of B. anthracis using different environmental variables. The difference betw een scenarios 3 and 4 is also examined (C). ............................. 75 2 9 Current predicted distribution of B. anthracis using Current Scenario 4 (A) and future predicted distributions based on the A2 climate chang e scenario (B) and B2 climate change scenario (C) ................................ ............................. 76 2 10 Potential future habitat changes based on the A2 climate change scenario (A) and B2 climate change scenario (B) derived from Current Scenario 4. The differences between these climate change scenarios are shown in (C). ..... 77 3 1 G enetic A lgorithm for R ule set P rediction (GARP) models showing the summated best subsets for current scenario one (A) and current scenario tw o (B) ................................ ................................ ................................ .............. 110

PAGE 9

9 3 2 Rules from one of the 10 best subsets in current scenario one (A) and rules form one of the 10 best subsets in current scenario two (B) ............................. 112 3 3 Maps showing the dominant rules (presence red color ramp; absence blue color ramp) of the 10 best subset tasks projected onto the landscape for current scenario one. ................................ ................................ ........................ 114 3 4 Maps showing the dominant rules (presence red color ramp; absence blue color ramp) of the 10 best subset tasks projected onto the landscape for current scenario two. ................................ ................................ ........................ 115 3 5 Maps showing the dominant rules (presence red color ramp; absence blue color ramp) of the 10 best subset tasks projected onto the landscape for the A2 climate change scenario. ................................ ................................ ....... 116 3 6 Maps showing the dominant rules (presence red color ramp; absence blue color ramp) of the 10 best subset tasks projected onto the landscape for the B2 climate change scenario. ................................ ................................ ....... 118 3 7 Median range of variables describing both northern and southern distributions using measures of N ormalized D iffer ence V egetation I ndex (NDVI) (current scenario one) ................................ ................................ ........... 122 3 8 Median range of variables describing both northern and sout hern distributions without using measures of NDVI (current scenario two) ............... 122 3 9 Variable cloud delineated by any area predicted present (light grey) and areas predicted present by all 10 mod els (dark grey) and visualized in dimensions of wettest month precipitation and temperature range ................... 123 3 10 Variable cloud delineated by location and visualized in dimensions of wettest month precipitation and temperature range ................................ ...................... 124 3 11 Variable cloud delineated by any area predicted present (light grey) and areas predicted present by all 10 models (dark grey) and visualized in di mensions of mean NDVI and mean temperature ................................ ........... 125 3 12 Variable cloud delineated by location and visualized in dimensions of mean NDVI and mean temperature ................................ ................................ ............ 126

PAGE 10

10 L IST OF ABBREVIATIONS AUC Area Under the Curve BioClim Bioclimatic CGCM Coupled ocean atmosphere General Circulation Model CSIRO Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation DG Desktop GARP ENFA Ecological Niche Factor Analysis ENM Ecologica l Niche Modeling FSU Former Soviet Union GARP Genetic Algorithm for Rule set Prediction GCM General Circulation Model GIS Geographic Information Systems HadCM3 Hadley Coupled Model version 3 IPCC Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change KSCQZD Kazakh Sci ence Center for Quarantine and Zoonotic Diseases MaxEnt Maximum Entropy MLVA M ultiple L ocus V ariable number tandem repeat A nalysis NDVI Normalized Difference Vegetation Index PCA Principle Components Analysis ROC Receiver Operating Characteristic SNP S ingl e N ucleotide P olymorphism SRES Special Report on Emissions Scenarios STATSGO State Soil Geographic TALA Trypanosomiasis And Land use in Africa USSR Union of Soviet Socialist Republics UV Ultraviolet

PAGE 11

11 Abstract of Thesis Presented to the Graduate School of t he University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science ECOLOGICAL NICHE MODELING OF A ZOONOSIS : A CASE STUDY USING ANTHRAX OUTBREAKS AND CLIMATE CHANGE IN KAZAKHSTAN By Timothy Andrew Joyne r May 2010 Chair: Jason K. Blackburn Major: Geography Anthrax, caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis, is a zoonotic disease that persists throughout much of the world in livestock, wildlife, and secondarily infects humans. This is true across much of Central Asia, and particularly the Steppe region, including Kazakhstan. This study employed the Genetic Algorithm for Rule set Prediction (GARP) to model the current and future geographic distribution of B. anthracis in Kazakhstan based on the A2 and B2 I ntergovernmental P anel on C limate C hange (IPCC) S pecial R eport on Emissions S cenarios (SRES) climate change scenarios using a 5 variable dataset at 55km 2 and 8km 2 a 6 variable Bio c lim atic (BioClim) dataset at 8km 2 and an 8 variable dataset using BioClim and measures of vegetation at 8km 2 Additionally, extracting landscape level ecological range s of B. anthracis may help to better understand the conditions predicted by the models Two studies have indicated that GARP produces useful biological information and through examining the rule sets created by GARP, we can develop a more robust explanati on as to why the species is present in some areas and absent in others. Through the use of the rule set writing and mapping application of GARP, the study also examined the ranges of various parameters and how these ranges differed at varying latitudes.

PAGE 12

12 Future models suggest large areas predicted under current conditions may be reduced by 2050 with the A2 model predicting 14 16% loss across the three spatial resolutions. There was greater variability in the B2 model s across scenarios predicting ~15% loss at 55km 2 ~34% loss at 8km 2 and ~30% loss with the BioClim variables. Only very small areas of habitat expansion into new areas were predicted by either A2 or B2 in any models. Greater areas of habitat loss are predicted in the southern regions of Kaza khstan by A2 and B2 models, while moderate habitat loss is also predicte d in the northern regions by either B2 model at 8km 2 Lower temperature ranges were observed in the southern region along with wider precipitation ranges as compared to those in the n orth. Additionally, the distribution of B. anthracis was defined by a narrow range of mean N ormalized D ifference V egetation I ndex (NDVI) Though much variation was exhibited between rule types and total number of rules used for each model experiment, a consistent environmental envelope that sup ports B. anthracis survival was identified and spatially visualized. Anthrax disease control relies mainly on livestock vaccination and proper carcass disposal, both of which require adequate surveillance. In many situations, including that of Kazakhstan vaccine resources are limited, and understanding the geographic distribution of the organism, in tandem with current data on livestock population dynamics, can aid in properly allocating doses. While speculative, contemplating future changes in livestoc k distributions and suitable environments for B. anthracis can be useful for establishing future surveillance priorities. This study may also have broader applications to global public health surveillance relating to other diseases in addition to B. anthra cis

PAGE 13

13 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION Anthrax Anthrax is considered a disease of antiquity and is thought to have originated from sub Saharan Africa and then subsequently spread by humans to Eurasia, North America, and Australia where it became endemic in ar eas with specific environmental conditions favorable to its survival (Hanson 1959, Hart & Beeching 2002, Keim et al. 199 7, Kolonin 1971, Van Ness & Stein 1956, Van Ness 1971). Anthrax is a bacterial disease that is caused by the organism Baci llus anthracis and it primarily affects ungulates (i.e., both livestock and wildlife) (Bardell 2002, Thappa and Karthikeyan 2001). Infection begins through ingestion or inoculation (biting flies) and can lead to acute gastrointestinal infections or cutane ous infections. Gastrointestinal infections usually lead to acute septicemia, which often results in death (Lindeque & Turnbull 1994, Wallace et al. 2002). Current research suggests that the route of infection is species specific such as cattle becoming infected through the ingestion of contaminated soil and Kudu becoming infected through the ingestion of contaminated leaves (Braack & de Vos 1990, Thappa & Karthikeyan 2001). Not only does the disease decrease the population of a herd of cattle (an econom ic loss for a farmer/herder), but the disease can also be transferred to humans through contact with an infected animal (e.g., handling of a carcass, coming in contact with the hides, etc.) or through inhalation (Woods et al. 2004). In humans, anthrax oft en manifests itself in the cutaneous form, causing skin lesions or other dermatologica l problems that are usually non fatal, but can be if not treated (Woods et al. 2004). Anthrax can also be manifested in humans through two other modes: pulmonary and gas trointestinal (Turnbull et al. 1998).

PAGE 14

14 Pulmonary anthrax is contracted through inhalation and almost always results in death, while gastrointestinal anthrax is contracted through ingestion and causes severe inflammation and intestinal difficulty and approx imately half of all cases result in death. To improve surveillance and vaccination efforts of the disease, we must first understand the underlying organism that causes anthrax: Bacillus anthracis The word shaped that are symptoms of an infection. Bacillu s anthracis is a large, nonmotile, brick shaped, Gram positive organism (2.5 x 10 micrometers) that occurs singly or in pairs in tissue (Lalitha & Kumar 1996). The bacterium may be able to survive in both a vegetative cell form and a spore form. A vegeta tive cell is an actively growing cell while a spore is an endospore that has been released from a cell, but is capable of germinating and producing actively replicating cells. Virulence, the relative ability of a pathogen to cause a disease, must be maint ained in order for an infection to occur regardless of the form in which the bacterium survives. B. anthracis virulence is due to toxic factors from two plasmids: px01 and px02. Virulence factors include the encoding edema factor (EF), lethal factor (LF) and pathogen (or protective) antigen (PA) genes which are located in the px01 plasmid, while the genes involved in biosynthesis of the capsule are located in the px02 plasmid (Hugh Jones & Blackburn 2009, Thappa & Karthikeya n 2001). The PA genes carry t he EF and LF into the target cell and protect the bacterium, while the capsule causes resistance of vegetative forms of the bacterium to phagocytosis (Giagtzoglou & Bellen 2006). If a certain level of virulence is

PAGE 15

15 maintained, then for an infection to occur some form of B. anthracis is ingested and the bacteria is then phagocytosed by macrophages and carried to regional lymph nodes in the body where it can germinate within macrophages and become a vegetative bacterium. The vegetative bacterium is then relea sed from macrophages and finds its way into the blood stream where it multiplies and causes hemorrhagic septicemia (Hugh Jones & Blackburn 2009, Mongoh et al. 2008). Virulence factors that are caused by B. anthracis result in toxemia with systemic effects that cause the host to die (Mongoh et al. 2008, Thappa & Karthikeyan 2001). Symptoms usually include a dark, bloody discharge from the mouth and anus in addition to the swelling of vessels and lymph nodes and an enlarged spleen (Dragon & Elkin 2001, Hugh Jones & de Vos 2002). Sporulation occurs when the vegetative cells are exposed to oxygen and soil can be re contaminated if spores re enter the soil adjacent to a contaminated carcass (Dragon et al. 2005). The spores can then survive for very long peri ods of time under harsh conditions, but evidence suggests that spores begin to lose virulence if successive outbreaks do not occur (Hugh Jones & Blackburn 2009, Mongoh et al. 2008, Moynihan 1963, Sharp & Roberts 2006). Most field research has indicated th at B. anthracis is only maintained in spore form between outbreaks (Dragon & Elkin 2001, Gates et al. 1995, Turnbull et al. 1996). However, the vegetative cell form of B. anthracis may also be able to survive in the soil if it is supported by complex biofi lms that help to maintain virulence between outbreaks by allowing for the replication of the bacterium within the biofilms (Schuch & Fischetti 2009). Regardless of which form the bacteria exist in between outbreaks, it is maintained in specific soil envi ronments. In the mid 20 th century soil and other environmental

PAGE 16

16 conditions were examined and it was discovered that basic mollic or chernozemic soils that are alkaline and rich in organic matter or calcium provide an ideal environment for the organism to survive in spore form ( Van Ness & Stein 1956, Van Ness 1971). Van Ness & Stein (1956) outlined favorable soils for anthrax and created one of the first deterministic spatial distributions of where B. anthracis was likely to exist in the US. The study exa mined where soils exist that are favorable for B. anthracis survival and where anthrax cases had occurred historically. Areas that matched both criteria were considered to be at a higher risk for anthrax outbreaks. Similar soil mapping efforts were also taking place in the Former Soviet Union (FSU) around the same time (Hugh Jones & Blackburn 2009). It has also been suggested through field study that different genetic strains of B. anthracis have different soil preferences (Smith et al. 1999, 2000). A st udy in Kruger National Park revealed that A and B strains of B. anthracis were present in the same year and represented an overlap in their distributions and time of occurrence, but isolate B was generally found in soils with different calcium and pH level s than those coinciding with isolate A indicating unique environmental requirements for each strain (Smith et al. 2000). Field evidence also indicates that genetically unique B. anthracis groups show different soil affinities. At a local scale, the A gro up has a greater tolerance for lower pH and calcium levels (Smith et al. 2000). Despite evidence of the increasing likelihood of a highly complex B. anthracis life cycle and a broad genetic diversity, based on what we know about the epidemiology of anthra x it has a specific environmental reservoir and still occurs in previously researched soil and environmental conditions (Dragon &

PAGE 17

17 Rennie 1995 Dragon et al. 1999, Dragon et al. 2005, Gates et al. 1995, Hugh Jones & Blackburn 2009 Hugh Jones & de Vos 2002, Van Ness & Stein 1956, Van Ness 1971 ). Many theories about the life cycle of B. anthracis have been proposed. The incubator area theory proposed in Van Ness (1971) stated that an area may contain micro environments and climatic conditions which favor ger mination of spores, subsequent vegetative multiplication and further sporulation. These areas coincided with prime soil conditions and anthrax outbreaks (Van Ness & Stein 1956 Van Ness 19 59 ) The persistent spore theory argued that the vegetative growth cycle of B. anthracis can only occur with a host and that the soil and surrounding environment simply store the spores until a new host arrives (Gates et al. 1995). Another theory, known as the concentrator area theory, also argues that vegetative growth does not occur without a host, but that certain high calcium environments could aid in spore preservation and post dormancy germination (Dragon & Rennie 1995). The incubator area theory has been heavily scrutinized since its proposal and evidence has been lacking to confirm the theory, but other research has also alluded to the possibility of incubation areas (Gates et al. 1995, Prins & Weyerhauser 1987, Rees et al. 1977). Prins & possible areas of higher risk and noted that soil conditions and flooding were contributing factors in these areas. The study stated that climate may effect and even occur after long per iods of dormancy and hypothesized that anthrax bacilli may undergo cycles of propagation in the soil, but the appearance of the disease is limited to periods when the environment has been altered by climatic disturbances or other elements

PAGE 18

18 (Rees et al. 1977 ). Gates et al. (1995) outlined how the incubator area hypothesis may relate to bison outbreaks in northern Canada. Two alternatives were proposed to describe organism survival between outbreaks. The first hypothesis was that a spore is formed when B. a nthracis is exposed to oxygen post infection and that the organism remains dormant in spore form for potentially long periods of time between outbreaks. The second hypothesis was the incubator area theory that B. anthracis undergoes potentially multiple c ycles of spore germination, vegetative cell outgrowth, and resporulation in the soil environment. After much research about the possibility of a spores only survival option versus a repetitive cycle of vegetative multiplication and re sporulation, a recen t laboratory study suggested that B. anthracis may have the ability to vegetate and multiply in the soil through the use of biofilms which could maintain vegetative reservoirs (Schuch & Fischetti 2009). Through laboratory testing, the study indicated that B. anthracis can interact with and colonize invertebrate, soil borne worm populations and can therefore have a more dynamic alternative lifecycle as opposed to sporulation and extended periods of dormancy. Additionally, Saile & Koehler (2006) suggested w ith lab experiments that B. anthracis can germinate and replicate in certain grassland environments by surviving with a plant host. This indicates that plants may play a role in the life cycle of B. anthracis by helping the organism maintain its virulence between outbreak events. Cherkasskiy (1999) also suggested that spore survival alone does not support long term organism survival because of a loss of virulence over time and that soil infectivity is only maintained through repetitive biotic/abiotic cycl es which (1999) infers that a mixture of theories is probably true concerning the life cycle of B.

PAGE 19

19 anthracis because one theory over another has not been confirmed. A n increasing knowledge of the organism has resulted in the belief that B. anthracis has a highly complex life cycle. Kazakhstan The examination of global patterns of disease dispersal and distribution is imperative to the planning and advancement of publ ic health and disease surveillance. Insufficient disease monitoring subsists in most parts of the world, causing undue strain on the public health systems of many nations because of the inability to observe and track the initial stages of potential diseas e outbreaks ( Cherkasskiy 1999, Hugh Jones 1990 Hugh Jones & de Vos 2002 ). Various diseases create immense stresses on a population through direct (human infections) or indirect (e.g., animal infections) means. Central Asia presents a prime area to study how public health systems have responded over the past several decades to disease outbreaks because of the availability of long records over much of the 20 th century (Veatch 1989, Vlassov 2000). Central Asia is primarily composed of the countries of Kaza khstan, Uzbekistan, and Kyrgyzstan which are part of what is collectively called the Former Soviet Union (FSU). The countries were once part of the largest public health surveillance system in the world under the guidance of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). In 1991, the functionality of the system was significantly reduced in coordination with the dissolution of the Soviet Union (Wuhib et al. 2002). Newly independent countries, such as Kazakhstan, were forced to use the fragmented pieces o f the former public health system to build a new public health system a very difficult task when funding is considerably limited (Coker et al. 2004).

PAGE 20

20 The rapid deterioration of public health surveillance in the country of Kazakhstan in the post USSR pe riod is the cause of a multitude of current health issues and problems (Coker et al. 2004). In recent years, the implementation of new monitoring technologies and techniques in Kazakhstan has lead to moderate improvements in public health surveillance, bu t there are still many areas of the system that need to be upgraded. Geographic information systems and spatial and temporal analysis techniques have been integrated into many disease surveillance and monitoring projects and consequently have improved dat abase management efforts. Many diseases that are known to exist in Kazakhstan (e.g., brucellosis, Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever, hanta virus, anthrax, etc.) are currently being monitored with the use of many of the aforementioned new technologies. His torically, surveillance efforts have been employed in the FSU for many decades and some records for Kazakhstan even contain manuscript). Most records were kept on paper and data s haring was difficult, but the introduction of computer technology has helped to create more up to date digital records and has also improved collaboration efforts. Records for anthrax outbreaks in Kazakhstan have been well kept and are quite robust. The records primarily contain reports of livestock infection (i.e., sheep and cattle). Locations of nearly 4,000 cases of anthrax outbreaks have been documented across the country dating back to 1933. The overall size and time span of the records for Kazakh stan make anthrax an ideal disease to study. Previous and current spatial and temporal patterns can be analyzed to better understand the disease. Coincidentally, its interaction with the environment in Kazakhstan may lead to furthering

PAGE 21

21 the overall knowle dge of the disease that can then be applied on a global scale of analysis. However, the FSU and the republics of Central Asia in particular usually have the highest anthrax morbidity in animals and humans compared to other parts of Asia both historically an d currently (Cherkasskiy 1999 ). Anthrax became an even bigger problem after the fall of the USSR because of financial problems and deterioration in the ability to control the disease (Cherkasskiy 1996, Hugh Jones 1990). The region has a history o f epizootics occurring over the past two centuries and many studies are ongoing in an effort to understand various aspects of anthrax that could be integrated into control and management programs ( Aikimbayev et al. 2010 Joyner et al. 201 0 ). Recent efforts in Central Asia have addressed major issues concerning anthrax and B. anthracis by examining genetic diversity of archival strains (Aikimbayev et al. 2010) and spatial clusters ( Aikimbayev et al. unpublished manuscript Kracalik et al. In Review) and predicted distributions (Aikimbayev et al. unpublished manuscript) In an effort to understand the distribution of anthrax outbreaks, we must first examine the geography and climate of Kazakhstan and how they may affect livestock populatio ns and movement. Kazakhstan is the ninth largest country in the world (~2,727,300 km 2 ) and its shape has much greater longitudinal variation than latitudinal variation creating a larger differentiation of types of landscape across the country from west to east (refer to Figure 1 1). Insolation decreases from south to north and atmospheric pressure increases, strongly affecting the soil and vegetation covers (Woodward & Geldyeva 2006). The country is composed of seven main landscape types: plains, lowland s, plateaus, high plains, insular mountains, intermountain troughs, and mountain ranges. Most of Kazakhstan is composed of plain landscapes that

PAGE 22

22 include forest steppe regions, semi arid steppe regions, semi desert regions, and desert regions. The remaini ng landscape of Kazakhstan is composed primarily of mountainous regions where a variation of forest, meadow, steppe, and desert landscapes persist. Plains and forest steppe regions dominate the western and northern areas of Kazakhstan, while semi arid ste ppe and desert regions dominate the central, southern, and eastern areas of Kazakhstan. The extreme southeastern areas of Kazakhstan are dominated by mountainous regions. Overall, arid landscapes make up more than 50% of the landscape of Kazakhstan (Wood ward & Geldyeva 2006). Livestock rangeland is predominantly located in the northern and southeastern regions of Kazakhstan and cattle migration is confined in the area because of political limitations placed on nomadic herdsmen over the past century, but livestock populations and migrational patterns are often dependent on climate (Robinson & Milner Gulland 2003). Robinson & Milner Gulland ( 2003) examined factors that regulated domestic livestock numbers and movement over the past century in Kazakhstan an d determined that the timing and amount of precipitation are the most crucial factors Ecological Niche Modeling and Climate Change To predict where B. anthracis may occur on the landscape of Kazakhstan, we must first understand the niche as a theoretical concept, and then apply this concept in a computer modeling environment Grinnell (1917, 1924) defined the ecological niche as the environmental conditions needed by a species to maintain its population without immigration. The Grinnellian definition of a niche focuses on the range of ecological conditions where a population can be maintained and describes the niche as a limit on geographic distribution (Peterson 2003). Hirzel et al. (2008) outlined the difference between the aforementioned Grinnellian d efinition and the Eltonian definition of a niche.

PAGE 23

23 The Eltonian definition describes a species relationship with other species. The presence of a species indicates that environmental parameters allow for the population to be maintained and that interactio ns with other species allow for the species to survive (Hirzel et al. 2008, Soberon 2007). Because inter and intra specific interactions are difficult to model, f or the purpose of this study the definition of a niche will be expanded and follow the Hutch insonian theory that the niche is an n dimensional hypervolume of ecological parameters that allow a species to maintain its population without immigration (Hutchinson 1957). The geographical and ecological footprint is also referred to as the fundamental niche (Hutchinson 1957). A fundamental niche is the potential maximum suitable environment where a species can inhabit, but a species often does not inhabit many areas of its fundamental niche because of other variables that are not environmental or bioc limatic (e.g., competition, urban development, mobility). The resulting area where the species actually does inhabit is called the realized niche and this area is usually established after analyzing the fundamental niche (Hutchinson 1957, MacArthur 1958) This process of post hoc analysis is highly complex and there is often no method to determining the exact realized niche of a species, but identifying the perceived fundamental and realized niches is at least a starting point. There are many tools avai lable for modeling the potential distribution of a species and ecological niche modeling (ENM) is one such tool (Anderson et al. 2002, Peterson 2001, Soberon & Peterson 2005). ENM predicts the potential geographic distribution of a species on the selected landscape by analyzing the relationships that exist between species locality data and combinations of environmental variables. The Genetic

PAGE 24

24 Algorithm for Rule set Prediction (GARP) is a popular ENM that uses the Hutchinsonian dim definition. Biological variables (such as competition) described by Hutchinson (1957) and MacArthur (1958) cannot be directly accounted for in the ecological niche modeling process as their input en vironmental variables are limited to bioclimatic and abiotic variables. In this sense, it is appropriate to suggest that GARP predictions estimate the geographic space that supports the Grinnellian niche. In essence, GARP predicts the maximum occupiable space based on variables used within the model building process. According to the theory of niche conservatism, which states that a species maintains the same ecological niche over very long periods of time, the ecological relationships that exist today s hould be maintained in the near future (e.g., 2050) (Peterson et al. 1999). The niche requirements, being controlled by various biotic and abiotic factors, will not nic he conserved through time and across the mean phenotype (Holt and Gaines 1992). This has been shown to hold true over long periods of evolutionary time (Peterson et al. 1999) and in the short term GARP can be used in conjunction with the knowledge of nich e conservation to estimate future distributions based on current climatic relationships and future climate predictions (Atzmanstorfer et al. 2007, Huntley et al. 2004, Parra Olea et al. 2005, Pearson et al. 2006, Peterson et al. 2001, Peterson 2003, Thuill er 2004). Despite the potential for relatively rapid evolutionary change in bacteria, and known genetic diversity across the global distribution of B. anthracis (Van Ert et al. 2007), the organism (like all other species) maintains a niche with Grinnellia n and MacArthurian controls. Additionally, recent efforts suggest that GARP experiments can

PAGE 25

25 accurately predict the geographic distribution of areas with repeat outbreaks using landscape level ecological parameters (Blackburn et al. 2007). Some ENMs such a s GARP can project the future distribution of a species, here B. anthracis based on the parameters of the current modeled niche requirements and this may be very useful when implementing surveillance and control strategies since the ecology of B. anthraci s appears to be likely unchanged when we examine endemic anthrax. Many other studies have used a similar approach to predict the future distribution of a species based on climate change scenarios (Atzmanstorfer et al. 2007, Huntley et al. 2004, Parra Olea et al. 2005, Pearson et al. 2006, Peterson 2003, Thuiller 2004). A comparable study was seen in Parra Olea et al. (2005). The study examined the current and future distributions of two species of salamanders found in Mexico. The SRES A2 scenarios for 2045 2055 were used and a projected distribution was created. Drastic habitat contraction was predicted for both species of salamanders. Areas where a suitable habitat was found tended to rapidly recede to higher elevations, causin g an increasingly fragmented ecological footprint. The rapid recession was also alarming because it was at a faster rate than the salamanders were able to move and adapt to, leading to the possibility of extinction for each species of salamander. Because the ecological niche of the salamander is conserved over very long periods of time, the salamander must move to the new areas where environmental parameters will remain the same or face extinction. Adapting to a new ecological niche takes a long time bu t relatively drastic climatic change s are expected to take place over the next 50 to 100 years. While similar studies are becoming more and more common, much uncertainty surrounds the prediction of a

PAGE 26

26 n et al. 2006, Thuiller 2004). Davis et al. (1998) argued appropriately that we have no means of determining the changing interactions between species because of climate change; however the global climate may continue to change in the coming century and t he accuracy of future predictions will be immeasurable until we reach the projected year. The Genetic Algorithm for Rule S et Prediction (GARP) The Genetic Algorithm for Rule set Prediction (GARP) was utilized to develop an ENM of B. anthracis across Kazakhstan. GARP is a presence only modeling tool that uses species locality data and environmental coverage sets that can include such variables as temperature, precipitation, altitude, and measures of vegetation (Stockwell & Peters 1999). GARP determines the relati onships that exist between the locality data and environmental data through a process of IF/THEN rule types developed in an iterative, stochastic process. A total of 50 rules are created from four main rule types (atomic, range, negated range, and logit r ules assuming the user has selected all rule types within a modeling experiment ) for each model run to explain the relationship between locality data and environmental parameters. Once a rule set (i.e., the combination of all 50 rules in each model run) is created, then the relationship is applied to other areas of the landscape that have similar environmental parameters. Each of the four rule types create IF/THEN statements that describe presence or absence parameters for the landscape (Stockwell & Pet ers 1999). The ability to use multiple rule types in an iterative process to create each rule set establishes GARP as a super set algorithm as opposed to many other modeling approaches that may only use range rules or logistic regression singularly. It i s assumed that GARP predicts the fundamental niche of a species due to the lack of biological interactions not modeled,

PAGE 27

27 but if the model is limited by a biased set of occurrence data (or poor fitting relationships between the occurrences and environmental variables) then only a realized portion of the niche is likely to be predicted. GARP can also use rules that were produced for a specific landscape and time period to project distributions on to another landscape or into a different time period based on av ailable and relevant environmental coverage sets (Stockwell & Peters 1999). GARP has been useful and successful in many studies across a range of taxa (Beard et al. 2002, Blackburn et al. 2007, Brotons et al. 2004, Feria & Peterson 2002, Wiley et al. 200 3). It has also been utilized to evaluate the distribution of various disease vectors (Adjemian et al. 2006, Peterson et al. 2002 c Peterson & Shaw 2003, Peterson et al. 2003, Peterson et al. 2004 Peterson et al. 2005, Sweeney et al. 2006 ) and disease or ganisms (Aikimbayev et al. unpublished manuscript, Blackburn et al. 2007, Ron 2005) For example, t he spatial distribution of various flea species implicated as vectors for plague was effectively modeled in California using GARP in conjunction with limite d spatial data for many of the flea species (Adjemian et al. 2006). GARP was also utilized to predict the spatial distribution of triatomine insects in southern Texas in an effort to understand the domestic transmission cycle of chagas disease (Beard et a l. 200 2 ). Peterson et al. (2002c) also utilized GARP to model potential reservoirs for chagas disease in Mexico. Additionally, GARP has been used in previous efforts to model disease organisms such as B. anthracis (Aikimbayev et al. unpublished manuscrip t, Blackburn et al. 2007) and the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Ron 2005).

PAGE 28

28 Potential changes in the future distribution of disease vectors based on climate change scenarios have also been investigated. A study in southern Brazil exp lored the potential effects of climate change on vectors for cutaneous leishmaniasis using GARP (Peterson & Shaw 2003), while another study examined the potential effects of climate change on the reservoirs for tularemia and plague (Nakazawa et al. 2007). Many studies have utilized GARP to predict the ecological and geographical distributions of a species or multiple species (e.g., Anderson et al. 2002, Elith et al. 2006, Parra Olea et al. 2005, Peterson 2001, Peterson et al. 2007), however very few have an alyzed the various IF/THEN rule set statements that are first created by GARP and later projected on to the landscape (Blackburn et al. 2007, McNyset 2005, Wiley et al. 2003) the seemingly inexplicable method that it uses to predict the environmental parameters that support the survival of a species (Stockman et al. 2006). Stockman et al. (2006) there is no way to analyze the respective contributions of individual pre species distribution modeling and ecological niche modeling in the study (Elith et al. 2006). Elith et al. (2006) examined the realized distribution of multiple species on the landscape and therefore constrained the GARP predictions through methodology to perform accordingly. GARP is a superset algorithm meaning that it has the ability to use multiple rule types (atomic, range, negated range, and/or logit) in each rule set (Stockwell & Peters

PAGE 29

29 1999). GARP does not modify each subsequent rule set based on previous rule sets, but rather uses an iterative, stochastic process to create rule sets that produce ecological relationships that match known locality data (i.e., presence data) (Stockwell & Peters 1999). The rule set writing and mapping application available wi thin Desktop GARP v. 1.1.3 writes each rule set to a text file, and then projects each rule set into geographic space. This feature of GARP provides an opportunity to evaluate the biological information contained in the modeling process. Unlike other eff orts (Blackburn 2006, Levine et al. 2007, Peterson et al. 2004, Ron 2005) that attempt to describe only the variable space in which a species exists independent of the modeling process, this thesis will examine spatial patterns in variable space where a sp ecies ( B. anthracis ) exists based on the output of the modeling process. Because variable space is examined after the modeling process, the location on the landscape of where rules are applied can also be examined in variable space to identify differences and similarities. The rules will also be examined to determine if a massive list of truly heterogeneous rules were produced or if the rules were conserved within and between models. Blackburn (2006) showed that GARP rule sets are conservative between in dividual models within a best subset of models used to define a prediction of B. anthracis with US models requiring only a few rules per model to capture the majority of predicted presence or absence on the landscape. Thesis Goals Specifically, this the sis focused on several key research questions. First, the current spatial distribution of known anthrax outbreaks may help determine the environment that supports B anthracis Through the study of anthrax outbreak locations, the potential distribution o f B anthracis in Kazakhstan may be able to be

PAGE 30

30 predicted. Subsequently, if the current potential distribution of B. anthracis can be predicted, then the future potential distribution of B. anthracis may be able to be determined based on various climate ch ange scenarios. It is imperative to predict the future distribution of B. anthracis in order to better inform the public health system of the potential movement and expansion/contraction of areas where anthrax outbreaks are most likely to occur. Next, th e focus will shift to the underlying environmental parameters that support B. anthracis survival which will be examined through the rule set writing and mapping component of Desktop GARP v. 1.1.3 In general, B. anthracis will be used as a case study to o utline the utility of extracting important biological information from the modeling process in GARP and to evaluate variable ranges across rules and models to determine if variable ranges are being conserved. Answering questions about where a disease exist s and why is often the centerpiece of medical geography research. Finally, the necessity of a geographical perspective for the many problems introduced by the following questions outline the geography centric nature of the thesis. The thesis seeks to ans wer four main questions: 1) what is the current distribution of B. anthracis in Kazakhstan ? 2) what will be the future distribution of B. anthracis in Kazakhstan ? 3) what are current environmental parameter combinations (or rule set combinations) that desc ribe the current distribution of B. anthracis across Kazakhstan? and 4) how useful is the rule set writing and mapping application of GARP in providing important biological information about a species? (Refer to Figure 1 1 to view a map of the study area: Kazakhstan)

PAGE 31

31 Figure 1 1. Political map of Kazakhstan with oblasts (equivalent to a province or state) topography, major cities, rivers, and lakes

PAGE 32

32 CHAPTER 2 MODELING THE POTENTI AL DISTRIBUTION OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS UNDER MULTIPLE CLIMATE CHA NGE SCE NARIOS FOR KAZAKHSTA N Introduction Bacillus anthracis is a spore forming bacterium that is endemic to specific soil environments and the causative organism for anthrax, an infectious disease primarily found in herbivorous wildlife and livestock species, an d secondarily in humans (Van Ness 1971). Limited data are available to define the geographic extent of environmental variables that support long term B. anthracis survival, but current literature suggests that B. anthracis likely replicates in the animal host and can then survive for long periods in specific soil environments (Gainer & Saunders 1989, Kaufmann 1990, Smith et al. 1999, 2000). However, new evidence on the potential role of bacteriophages and soil dwelling invertebrates (e.g. worms) suggests a more complicated life cycle for B. anthracis in soil that may or may not require a mammalian host for multiplication and may provide an alternative to a spore only survival mechanism in soil (Schuch & Fischetti 2009). In either case, it is plausible tha t these earlier literature. Hugh Jones & Blackburn (2009) summarize the general soil conditions for B. anthracis survival from a large body of literature as humus rich alkaline soils with pH >6.0 and distributed across the steppe and grassland soils. Until recently, knowledge concerning the distribution of these environments was limited to studies that focused primarily on the distribution of B. anthracis in North Ame rica (e.g., Blackburn et al. 2007, Dragon et al. 1999 Van Ness 1971) and parts of Africa (e.g., Smith et al. 2000), but a recent study in Kazakhstan revealed some of the environmental constraints of B. anthracis on the landscape ( Aikimbayev et al.

PAGE 33

33 unpubli shed manuscript ). A second study ( Aikimbayev et al. 2010 ) confirmed that the majority of anthrax cases in Kazakhstan over the last century affected both large (cattle) and small ruminants (sheep and goats). Human anthrax cases in Kazakhstan are primarily c aused by exposure to infected animals usually cattle, sheep, horses, or goats (Woods et al. 2004). Anthrax cases were predominantly cutaneous infections and were most often linked directly to the slaughtering and/or butchering of infected animals and no reports of human to human transmission occurred in the study. People in rural environments were more commonly infected because of a lifestyle that was more involved with livestock management/production Additionally, insufficient vaccination efforts (lac k of access, availability, surveillance, etc.) were the main reason for infection in Kazakhstan and the surrounding central Asian countries (Woods et al. 2004). Since exposure to livestock is a major source of anthrax infections in humans, it is also impo rtant to consider the factors that help to regulate domestic livestock numbers. One such study (Robinson & Milner Gulland 2003) examined factors that regulated domestic livestock numbers over the past century in Kazakhstan and determined that the timing a nd amount of precipitation are the most crucial factors because these factors affect the amount of vegetation available. Recent studies have attempted to understand the geographic distribution of B. anthracis and anthrax outbreaks in Kazakhstan by employ ing G eographic I nformation S ystem s (GIS) spatial analysis, molecular genotyping techniques ( Aikimbayev et al. 2010 ) and spatial statistics and ecological niche modeling (ENM; Aikimbayev et al. unpublished manuscript ). Ecological niche modeling has often been used to model a logical and geographic distribution. Many different ENM approaches have

PAGE 34

34 been utilized for various studies including the presence absence approach and the presence only modeling approach (Brotons et al. 2004). The presence absence modeling approach requir es that presence and absence locality data be provided in order to model the ecological niche of a species. Absence data, however, are often difficult to validate because many areas that may be classified as being absent of a certain species may, in actua lity, provide a suitable habitat (Pearce & Boyce 2006). In some situations, a species may not have been observed in an area where it actually does exist. For example, sampling gear biases may limit the successful capture of live specimens (Carlson & Cort es 2003, Remson & Good 1996) or sampling efforts may not pathogen based studies, proper diagnostics, test sensitivity, and detection thresholds must all be considered when def ining the causative agent as present or absent. The presence only modeling approach requires locality data to create a predicted geographic distribution of a species based on environmental parameters that exist where the species is confirmed to be present (Pearce & Boyce 2006). Pseudo absence data are often generated in this approach to determine areas that do not match the environmental parameters of areas that are known to be present for a particular species (Pearce & Boyce 2006). The presence only ENM approach has been successfully employed to model the potential geographic distribution of a number of taxa (Parra Olea et al. 2005, Peterson et al. 2002a, Peterson et al. 2002b, Terribile et al. 2009, Wiley et al. 2003), incl uding disease vectors (Adjemia n et al. 2006, Peterson et al. 2002 c Peterson & Shaw 2003, Peterson et al. 2003, Peterson et al. 2005, Sweeney et al. 2 006) and disease organisms (Aikimbayev et al. unpublished manuscript Blackburn et

PAGE 35

35 al. 2007, Ron 2005). An ENM constructs a definition of the niche of an individual species in ecological (variable) space and predicts its potential geographic distribution through the analysis of relationships between combinations of environmental variables (e.g., temperature, precipitation, and elevation d erived from digital maps or satellite The ecological niche can be defined as those environmental conditions that allow a species to maintain its population without immigration (Grinell 1917, 1924) That definition was later expanded to state that the presence of a species is correlated to quantifiable environmental and biotic variables that promote its survival, or a region in multi dimensional space that describes states of the environmental vari ables which are suitable for the species to exist (i.e. a hypervolume of parameters; Hutchinson 1957). The complexity of intra and inter specific interactions was recognized and niche space was consequently sub divided into a fundamental niche (maximum extent of environment that can sustain its population) and a realized niche (actual environment that a species inhabits). Theoretically, a species often cannot inhabit its entire fundamental niche because of disturbance (e.g, habitat fragmentation; Parra Olea et al. 2005), inter specific competition (MacArthur 1972), or intra specific limits (e.g. vagility, reproductive success; Peterson & Cohoon 1999). An ENM known as the Genetic Algorithm for Rule set Prediction (GARP), that can be broadly defined as a fundamental niche modeling approach (Soberon & Peterson 2005), was recently used to examine the geographic distribution of B. anthracis in the United States (US) under current (Blackburn et al. 2007) and future ecological conditions (Blackburn 2010 ). Ano ther study from Kazakhstan also used GARP to model

PAGE 36

36 the potential geographic distribution of environments that likely support long term persistence of B. anthracis and confirmed that repeat livestock anthrax epizootics occur within that predicted geographic range of the organism ( Aikimbayev et al. unpublished manuscript ). In that study it was predicted that the northern and southeastern regions of Kazakhstan may provide a suitable habitat for B. anthracis survival, while the interior and western regions of the country are potentially unsuitable for B. anthracis Recent work has advocated for the use of ENM as a method to provide improved surveillance strategies for anthrax across the United States (Blackburn et al. 2007 ). The same is true for Kazakhstan. The geographic potential of B. anthracis covers a very large area in both countries, but vaccination in both cases is usually administered as a reactionary measure in response to outbreaks. However, knowledge of the distribution of B. anthracis can allo w for better monitoring and control measures in areas where the disease (or its causative agent) is predicted to be present (Blackburn et al. 2007). The use of ENM to model the current distribution of B. anthracis in Kazakhstan also produced similar resul ts intended to improve surveillance and target control strategies in an effort to be more proactive in the management of anthrax outbreaks in livestock ( Aikimbayev et al. unpublished manuscript ). This current study employed ENM to examine the environment s that support B. anthracis across Kazakhstan and expands on previous efforts ( Aikimbayev et al. 2010 & unpublished manuscript ) by predicting the potential impact of climate change on the distribution of B. anthracis across the landscape of Kazakhstan, as well as providing an expanded 8 variable niche definition under current environmental conditions. Previously, only a 5 variable niche definition that included total annual precipitation,

PAGE 37

37 average annual temperature, elevation, average N ormalized Difference Vegetation Index (N DVI ) and NDVI amplitude, which measures the amount of seasonal variation of vegetation, was used to predict the current distribution of B. anthracis in Kazakhstan ( Aikimbayev et al. unpublished manuscript ). The 8 variable niche defini tion includes the 5 previous variables and adds temperature annual range, precipitation of wettest month, and precipitation of driest month (Figure 2 1) These variables were used because of previously discovered relationships between B. anthracis and spe cific parameters of precipitation, temperature, NDVI, and elevation (Blackburn 2006, Blackburn et al. 2007). A major advantage of GARP (and other ENMs) is the ability to project the future distribution of a species based on its current relationship to envi ronmental variables and the prediction of climate change that will occur over the geographical area inhabited by the species. The theory of ecological niche conservatism with respect to ENM helps to support this approach (Peterson et al. 1999). It states that a species maintains the same ecological niche over very long periods of time. This allows for the prediction of habitat change for a species based on future climate change scenarios (Atzmanstorfer et al. 2007, Holt et al. 2009, Huntley et al. 2004, P arra Olea et al. 2005, Pearson et al. 2006, Peterson et al. 2001, Peterson 2003, Thuiller 2004). However, some uncertainty Holt et al. 2009, Pearson et al. 2006, Thuiller 2004) It has been argued appropriately that we have no means of determining the changing interactions between species because of climate change (Davis et al. 1998). However, Global Climate Models do provide some measures of confidence and speculation through the use of current and future

PAGE 38

38 Since the release of future climate/emissions scenarios by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), many published studies have predicted future climate change patterns that may occur in central Asia over the next 50 100 years (e.g., Giorgi et al. 2001, Kimoto 2005, Lal & Harasawa 2001, Rosenzweig et al. 2008). Multiple studies have concluded that 1) an increase in annual pre cipitation over most of Asia with 2) an overall rise in temperatures that is most pronounced in the winter months has occurred over the past several decades (Alexander et al. 2006) and may continue to occur in the future (Baettig et al. 2007, Lal & Harasaw a 2001). Annual, inter annual, and decadal trends have also been studied recently to analyze the relationship between atmospheric forcing mechanisms (e.g., teleconnections) and recent Eurasian climate variability (Saito & Cohen 2003, Watanabe & Nitta 1998 ). The importance of snow cover extent changes and its possible role as an amplifier of regional atmospheric patterns has also been examined (Watanabe & Nitta 1998). Snow season lengths, snow depths, and annual snow accumulation variability have also bee n studied in coordination with global sea surface temperature (SST) variability, regional atmospheric changes (increased precipitation and increased temperatures overall), and regional atmospheric oscillation patterns over varying periods of time (Ye 2001 Ye et al. 1998, Ye & Ellison 2003). One study concluded that snow cover depth increased across northern Eurasia (>60N latitude), while a decrease occurred in southern Eurasia (<60N latitude) suggesting that there has been an increase in precipitation a nd temperatures across the region related to surface climate warming in the Arctic region (Ye & Ellison 2003). Another study examined recent changes of the onset date of green up for portions of central Asia and determined that the steppe regions were hig hly

PAGE 39

39 influenced by spring precipitation (Yu et al. 2003). A higher amount of precipitation in the spring has caused these regions to have earlier green up dates than they had previously. Areas of the Mongolian steppe that had particular vegetation types a nd a higher level of spring soil moisture exhibited an overall trend of earlier green up and an overall temperature increase was observed across much of the region as well as a warming trend at the beginning of the growing season. It is important to note that a significant part of interior Kazakhstan is primarily composed of the Kazakh steppe (refer to figure 2 2) which is an extension of the neighboring Mongolian steppe to the east. Because of the similarity and proximity of the steppe regions, the Kaza kh steppe may also exhibit similar green up patterns. Other studies conducted at similar latitudes to Kazakhstan have examined the potential expansion and contraction of rangeland (i.e., grasslands used for the grazing of domestic cattle) and changes in p henological phases based on climate change (Baker et al. 1993, Bradley et al. 1999). One study concluded that the northern latitudes of the US rangeland would experience an increase in growing season and an increase in plant production as well as an incre ase in peak standing crop (Baker et al. 1993). An increase in forage across the northern latitudes resulted in less feed being needed to supplement the winter diet of cattle, potentially resulting in an increase in cattle numbers and an increase in calf w eight (Baker et al. 1993). Models used in this study predicted substantial variation in yearly green up periods indicating an increasing sporadicity related to climate change. Overall, both plant and animal production increased for the northern latitudes according to the study. In addition to being more productive in most locations, rangelands also were predicted to expand into previously more arid locations.

PAGE 40

40 Changes in green up and precipitation sporadicity in conjunction with rangeland expansion could indicate that some changes in the epidemiology of anthrax could occur such as longer anthrax seasons and an exposure of animals to more areas where B. anthracis may exist (Blackburn 2010 ). Because large anthrax epizootics often appear to occur after spec ific rain events (in association with overall hot, dry summer conditions; Parkinson et al. 2003 Turner et al. 1999), the increasingly sporadic rate of precipitation may also create some changes in the epidemiology of anthrax in the US as well as potential ly in Kazakhstan. Changes in phenological phases that have occurred photosynthetic activity were observed for latitudes between 45 N and 65 N (Bradley et al. 1999). While ma ny plants did experience an overall increase in earliness of photosynthetic activity related to climate change, some plants were unaffected because they were more regulated by photoperiods (Bradley et al. 1999). Because anthrax remains a problem in livesto ck in the region and sometimes affects humans, further examination of the spatial ecology and geographic distribution of B. anthracis is imperative. Kazakhstan has limited veterinary services and predominantly rural agricultural practices, thus surveillan ce priorities should be dynamic and readily employed at any moment. The political boundary of Kazakhstan creates a larger amount of longitudinal change than latitudinal change and much of Kazakhstan lies within the upper mid latitudes (Figure 2 2A) Base d on a previous study at similar latitudes (Blackburn 2010 ) we expect that there will be an overall contraction of B. anthracis environments by 2050 in the US with slightly more habitat contraction occurring in the southern latitudes. NDVI is a satellite derived indicator of vegetation

PAGE 41

41 and m easures of NDVI have been important limiting variables in recent studies ( Aikimbayev et al. unpublished manuscript Blackburn et al. 2007) We thus assessed the effect that these measures have on models by comparing tw o current predictions: one that used measures of NDVI and one that did not. Modeling efforts were also utilized to determine if predicted changes in precipitation and temperature can give an indication of potential changes to the geographic distribution o f B. anthracis across the landscape. We also created a more robust 8 variable niche definition as opposed to the previously used 5 variable niche definition. The objective of this study is to determine the current and future potential geographic distrib utions of B. anthracis based on the Hadley Coupled Model version 3 cl imate predictions for 2045 2055 using multiple resolutions. Data and Methods Anthrax Occurrence Data A database totaling 3,947 outbreaks was constructed from historical records between 19 37 and 2006 archived at the Kazakh Science Center for Quarantine and Zoonotic Disease (KSCQZD), Almaty, Kazakhstan. Of those, 3,929 records represented outbreaks in livestock. A total of 1,790 individual locations were reported, with 805 of those reportin g repeat outbreaks (Aikimbayev et al. 2010 ). Outbreak events in domesticated animals, large (cattle) and small (sheep and goats) ruminants, constituted the majority of the dataset. Following a previous ENM effort in Kazakhstan ( Aikimbayev et al. unpublis hed manuscript ), this study utilized data from 1960 2000 to most closely reflect the disease situation in the period after broad vaccination and control strategies had been introduced. A total of 1,181 outbreaks were reported in large ruminants and

PAGE 42

42 1,303 outbreaks were reported in small ruminants across the database from 1960 2000 (Figure 2 2A) A filtering technique was applied to these 2,484 outbreaks to create smaller datasets that contained only spatially unique points for each of two environmental d ataset pixel resolutions, 8 and 55km 2 respectively (Figure 2 2B C) Points were considered pixel. GARP utilizes a single point per grid cell to identify it as present for B. anthracis Presence and absence are the only two categories that GARP uses to separate grid cells and the presence of more than one point in a grid cell could create inflated accuracy metrics if points from the same grid cells are used to test whether or not GARP predicted a grid cell accurately. It would be the equivalent of using the same data for both the training and testing of a GARP model. Because GARP is a presence only modeling approach, only species presence data are needed and pseudo absences are generated from ba ckground areas where no species data occur (Stockwell & Peters 1999). Current and Future Climate Datasets There are four main emissions scenarios produced by the IPCC in its Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) and Third Assessment Report (IPCC 200 0). The first is the A1 scenario which accounts for a low population growth, but very rapid economic growth and globalization. Less focus is placed on sustainability and energy efficiency in this scenario. The second scenario is the B1 scenario which a ccounts for the same low population growth, but development that is more focused on environmental sustainability and accountability. The third is the A2 scenario and it estimates a very rapid population growth due to less convergence of fertility rates (a pproximately 15 billion by 2055) and only minor improvements in emission standards

PAGE 43

43 (increase of 1% of CO 2 ) over that same time period. The fourth scenario is the B2 scenario which estimates a smaller global population growth than A2 (approximately 10 bill ion by 2055), but a higher population growth than both the A1 and B1 scenarios with more improvements in emission standards (increase of 0.5% of CO 2 ) (Arnell 2004, IPCC 2000). We chose to use the HadCM3 (Hadley Coupled Model version 3) ensemble a versio ns of the A2 and B2 climate change scenarios for 2045 2055 (hereafter referred to as 2050) in order to evaluate the effects of both a conservative (B2) and a less conservative (A2) scenario of how climates may change over the next several decades. Other p opular general circulation models (GCMs) such as the CGCM and CSIRO models use flux adjustments to offset and reduce significant climate drift, but it is most desirable to eliminate their use in the coupled models that we use for future climate simulations (Flato & Boer 2001, Gordon & 2002). The HadCM3 model was chosen over other models because of its ability to produce a simulation without the use of flux adjustments (Collins et al. 2001, Johns et al. 2003). Current and futu re climate grid data were freely downloadable ( www.worldclim.org ) on the WORLDCLIM website (Hijmans et al. 2005). The initial interpolation of the grids was scaled to a relatively coarse resolution (~111 km 2 ) before a thin plate smoothing spline algorithm was applied to reduce the surfaces to various finer resolutions Each resolution was validated multiple times against historical weather station data obtained from weather stations around the world to reduce error a ssociated with interpolation (Hijmans et al. 2005). A resolution of 8 km 2 was utilized for this study because village latitude and longitude coordinates were occasionally

PAGE 44

44 estimated to be greater than 1 km away from farms where anthrax outbreaks occurred. Current grids describing monthly precipitation values as well as maximum and minimum temperatures were available along with bioclimatic (BioClim) grids that were created through the manipulation of the aforementioned monthly variables in order to create m ore biologically meaningful variables that represent annual trends, seasonality, and extreme/limiting environmental factors (Hijmans et al. 2005). One apparent advantage of the WORLDCLIM dataset is the availability of BioClim variables which may be biolog ically more meaningful than annual mean, minimum, and maximum temperature and precipitation because they help to capture more specific climatological patterns. Future grids (e.g., for 2050 A2 and B2 climate change scenarios) describing monthly maximum an d minimum temperatures and precipitation totals were also available, but bioclimatic grids were not available for future scenarios. For this reason, bioclimatic grids were calculated for both the A2 and B2 climate change scenarios. Bioclimatic variables w ere derived for current and future conditions following calculations provided on the WORLDCLIM website ( www.worldclim.org ). The calculations were performed with the use of the raster calculator within the Spatial Ana lyst extension of ArcMap 9.2 (ESRI 2007). BioClim variables have been used in a recent study to develop current and future predictions of Yersinia pestis infected ground squirrels, Spermophilus beecheyi in California using the approach described here (Ho lt et al. 2009). Additionally, two measures of NDV I which were calculated based on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer satellite derived data were provided at a scale of 8 km 2 by the T r ypanosomiasis and Land Use in Africa (TALA) research group at Oxfo rd University (Oxford, United Kingdom) (Hay et al. 2006). Once calculations were

PAGE 45

45 complete, a total of eight world environmental variable grids were clipped to represent the spatial extent of Kazakhstan because all anthrax locality data were located within its political boundaries (Table 2 1). Given that the native resolution of climate models is relatively crude, the accuracy of climate data resampled to a high spatial resolution is questionable (Nakazawa et al. 2007). To test for agreement between low an d high resolution datasets, we constructed models using near native resolution climate data directly from the IPCC at 55km 2 Without monthly data at low resolution, we did not calculate BioClim variables at 55km 2 To compare the resolution of 55km 2 and 8 km 2 we used five variables to construct models at both resolutions: elevation, total annual precipitation, mean temperature, minimum annual temperature, and maximum annual temperature. A model using identical variables from the 8km 2 climate dataset was c onstructed in order to make a fair comparison between the two resolutions. C urrent and future climate grids were clipped and resampled to represent the spatial extent of Kazakhstan at this resolution. Modeling Scenarios For this study, four separate mo deling scenarios were employed to examine the current geographic distribution of B. anthracis Current Scenario 1 and Current Scenario 2 contained five non bioclimatic environmental variables that described temperature, precipitation, and elevation. Curr ent Scenario 1 utilized the five variables at a resolution of 55km 2 while Current Scenario 2 utilized the five variables at a resolution of 8km 2 The spatial resolution of climate datasets can be problematic when modeling the potential distribution of a species (Nakazawa et al. 2007) so we have utilized a resolution that is closer to the resolution used by continental climate models (i.e., 55km 2 ) to compare to predictions made using a finer resolution (i.e., 8km 2 ).

PAGE 46

46 Current scenario 3 contained eight envi ronmental variables describing temperature, precipitation, elevation, and measures of NDVI to construct a model of the potential current distribution; see Table 2 1. Measures of NDVI were derived through satellite data and were not obtainable for the futu re. To make a fair comparison of the current distribution of B. anthracis and the future distribution, identical environmental variables had to be used; therefore measures of NDVI were excluded from the fourth current distribution model. Current scenario 4 thus contained only six environmental variables that described temperature, precipitation, and elevation to create a model of the potential current distribution of B. anthracis Current scenarios 3 and 4 were used to create a comparison between two mode ls of current distribution that used different environmental variables. The exclusion of measures of NDVI by current scenario 4 was examined to determine the potential limiting ability of a vegetation measure on the predicted distribution of B. anthracis Two models of the future distribution of B. anthracis were also created for current scenarios 1, 2, and 4 Temperature and precipitation trends predicted for 2050 by the A2 climate change scenario and B2 climate change scenario were used to construct t he models and compare the future potential distributions to the coinciding current distribution Implementation and Methodology of Desktop GARP and Accuracy Metrics The specific ENM chosen for this study was the Genetic Algorithm for Rule set Prediction (GARP; Stockwell & Peters 1999). GARP is a presence only genetic process of training and testing that occurs through resampling and replacement of input data (Stockwell & Peters 1999). A pattern matching process is applied that finds non random relationships between species localities and specific variables that describe the

PAGE 47

47 environment. These relationships are written as a series of if/then logic statements (known as rules) that define whether conditions within the rule are defining presence or as present or absent and the resulting rules are known as a rule set. The rules consist of four specific types: range, negated range, atomic, and logistic regression (Stockwell & Peters 1999). GARP is genetic, meaning that rule development is done through an automated process, whereby rules are randomly generated, tested with internal statisti cal tests, and modified (through the rules of genetics point mutations, crossovers, deletions, insertions, Stockwell & Peters 1999) to determine which rules to keep and delete based on their accuracy at predicting internal testing data. Data splits occur both internally and externally for the purpose of validation and are established by the user. A best subset of models is usually created during an experiment. A best subset is a group of a user defined number of models from an experiment that meet omiss ion and commission criteria established by the user as a means of selecting those models that best balance between low omission and median commission values (Anderson et al. 2003). 2006), or being less precise than more recently developed tools (Elith et al. 2006), recent studies have shown GARP to perform well (McNyset & Blackburn 2006, Blackburn et al. 2007) and it should be noted that this criticism was in part due to evaluations based on an unequal calculation of the accuracy metric used (Peterson et al. 2007, 2008). Part of this confusion is also due to a conflation of ecological niche modeling and species

PAGE 48

48 distribution modeling (Phillips & Dudik 2008). Here we employ the former, while the criticism (Elith et al. 2006) was concerned with the latter. Spatially unique point data were randomly split once into 85% training and 15% testing data subsets prior to model development using SPSS (version 16.0) (Figure 2 2A ). The same 85% training dataset was used within the model building process for all models, while the 15% testing dataset was withheld completely from the modeling experiments to evaluate the predictive accuracy of the models post hoc Ten more 85/15 random splits of th e data were performed to illustrate the spatial consistency between random splits (Figure 2 3 ). Additionally, locality data in Kazakhstan were divided into northern and southern sections separated at 48N latitude. Random 85/15 splits were performed on l ocality data in each section, then added back together to create training and testing datasets using this alternative partitioning approach (Figure 2 4 ). The consistency exhibited between each random subsetting method allows us to only use one random spli t for model building and validation instead of multiple random splits or spatially informed random splits. Maps were then created from the model to identify the potential geographic distribution of B. anthracis based on both the 8 variable and 6 variable niche definition. Because GARP is a two step modeling process, first modeling in variable space and then projecting onto the landscape, it is plausible to project current rule sets onto the potential future conditions of a landscape. This current study em ployed the Desktop GARP version 1.1.6 [DG] software application, an open source modeling program ( http://www.nhm.ku.edu/desktopgarp/ ). Modeling Parameters For all modeling scenarios, the training data were uploaded into DG with a 50/50 internal data split, meaning that 50% of the data were used within GARP to construct

PAGE 49

49 models and the remaining 50% were used for internal accuracy assessment of the rule set and model building process. We employed 200 modeling runs using a convergence limit of .01 and 1000 max iterations using all four rule types. The best subsets procedure was implemented to select optimal models for B. anthracis using an extrinsic omission measure and the selection of 20 models under a hard omission threshold of 10% and a commission threshold of 50%. This produces a 10 model best subset, where the 10 models with an accuracy of 90% or greater and closest to the median commission value are chosen to represent the potential geographic distribut ion. These 10 models were imported into ArcGIS and summated using the raster calculator routine in the Spatial Analyst extension. These maps represent values between 0 and 10, with models from the best subset that predicted that pixel as present; the greater the number, the higher the confidence in the model outcome (Ron 2005). A total of four summated maps were produced for this study. A map of current scenario 2 was developed to compare against current scenario 1 and then two maps of the projected distribution (i.e., A2 and B2 climate change scenarios) were created to show the potential geographic distribution in 2050. The accuracy of current scenarios 1 and 2 was then quantified through the use of accuracy metrics, which utilized the 15% testing data that was withheld from both modeling experiments. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to produce area under the curve (AUC) scores. Additionally, two measure s of omission (i.e., total and average), and two measures of commission (i.e., total and average) were also calculated for the current distribution model output. An AUC score ranges from 0.5

PAGE 50

50 (lowest predictive accuracy completely random) to 1.0 (perfect score points were predicted 100% of the time), but AUC measurements are not ideal for validating the accuracy of GARP because they are subject to an area effect (McNyset 2005, Peterson et al. 2008, Wiley et al. 2003). GARP usually only makes prediction s across a small portion of the ROC plot, but AUC scores are measured across the entire area, not just the area predicted by GARP (Peterson et al. 2008). Consequently ROC measurements should be regarded with caution. A recent study noted that the relati ve poorness of AUC scores is not a failure of GARP to predict an accurate distribution, but rather limitations of the statistics that are currently used to test model accuracy (McNyset 2005). To provide a more robust evaluation of the models we presented AUC scores but along with measures of omission and commission that were based on the 15% testing subset (McNyset 2005). Analysis of Habitat Change Summated maps from the best subset were reclassified to visualize the habitat changes that occurred between e ach of the current predicted distributions and future distributions Grids for the current distributions and the projected A2 and B2 distributions were reclassified as presence (6 or more models agree) or absence (5 or fewer models agree). The six model agreement threshold was selected because this indicates that more than 50% of the models agreed on the areas predicted as present. The raster calculator was then used to subtract the projected distributions from the current distribution. In total, two ma ps were produced representing habitat change (i.e., habitat expansion, habitat loss, no habitat change, unsuitable environment) occurring for the A2 and B2 climate change scenarios at each resolution and modeling scenario

PAGE 51

51 The percentages of area occupied for each of the four categories of h abitat change were tabulated. Results Accuracy Metrics Accuracy metrics were performed only on the model s of current distribution because the location of future outbreak events is unknown and therefore unavailable for validation The modeling processes for each of the four scenarios reached convergence of accuracy (0.01) prior to the maximum iteration setting of 1,000 meaning that less than a 0.01 increase in accuracy occurred between successive rules Current scena rio 1 received an AUC score of 0.7045 from the ROC analysis and was significantly different from a line of no information (p < 0.01). The model had a total omission of 0.0 % and average omission of 5.5 % meaning that 100.0 % of the independent (testing) loc ality data were predicted correctly by at least one model and 94.5% of the independent locality data were predicted correctly by all models in the best subset Current scenario 2 received an AUC score of 0.6502 (p < 0.01). The model had a total omission of 5.1% and average omission of 10.2%. Current scenario 3 had an AUC score of 0.7312 (p < 0.01). The model had a total omission of 2. 6% and average omission of 7.3%. Current scenario 4 received an AUC score of 0.6995 ( p < 0.01). The model had a total o mission of 5.1 % and average omission of 10.0%. All accuracy metrics for the current predictions are summarized in Table 2 2. Current and Future Distributions of B. anthracis Current and future climate grid data were examined at the near native resolutio n to verify if broad agreement occurred between 55km 2 outputs and the higher resolution 8km 2 climate data using non bioclimatic variables. At the 55km 2 resolution (Current

PAGE 52

52 Scenario 1) areas of northern and southeastern Kazakhstan were predicted to be suit able for B. anthracis survival, while the A2 (drastic population increase and 1% increase in CO 2 ) and B2 (average population increase and 0.5% increase in CO 2 ) climate change scenarios predicted smaller geographic distributions in southeastern Kazakhstan a s well as slightly smaller geographic distributions in interior and western Kazakhstan (Figure 2 5 ). Overall the predicted current distribution of B. anthracis stretches across the northern tier, eastern quarter, and southeastern regions of Kazakhstan. I t is predicted that these areas are potentially maintaining suitable environments for B. anthracis The northern predictions follow a line of latitude approximately 48 N from West Kazakhstan to the eastern area of the Karaganda oblast near Lake Balkhash where the predictions then extend southward to the oblast of Aktobe. Model agreement decreases south of 48 N latitude in the southern half of the Karaganda oblast where no model predicts suitable habitat for B. anthracis From eastern Karaganda oblast, habitat suitability expands farther to the south to encompass the eastern oblasts of Kazakhstan including nearly all of the Pavlodar, Almaty, and East Kazakhstan oblasts with slightly less suitability in the higher altitudes of the Altay Mountains in far e astern East Kazakhstan and the Tian Shan Mountains in the southern and southeastern regions of the Almaty oblast. The southern half of the Zhambyl and South Kazakhstan oblasts are also areas of high suitability with less model agreement in the north close r to their borders with the Karaganda oblasts and the Kazakh Steppe. Only the extreme southeastern areas of the Kyzylorda oblast provide potentially suitable habitat for B. anthracis while areas in the Kazakh Steppe and around both the Aral and Caspian Se as are not predicted to support B. anthracis When considering the A2 and

PAGE 53

53 B2 climate change scenarios, a noticeable change occurs in many areas of Kazakhstan including parts of West Kazakhstan and Aktobe where a suitable environment for spore survival rec edes to only the northern most reaches of each oblast. While the southern half of Kostanay exhibits a contracting suitable environment, the northern half of the oblast and most of Akmola, North Kazakhstan, and Pavlodar, which border Siberian Russia, retai n a suitable environment for B. anthracis spore survival. Contraction also occurs in the southern areas of Almaty, Zhambyl, and South Kazakhstan bordering Kyrgyzstan, China, and Uzbekistan. The predicted changes were more easily discernible in Figure 2 6 where areas of predicted habitat expansion and contraction were delineated for each climate change scenario and the percentages of habitat change were summarized in Table 2 3. At the 8km 2 resolution (Current Scenario 2) areas of northern and southeaster n Kazakhstan were predicted to be suitable for B. anthracis survival, while the A2 climate change scenario predicted a smaller geographic distribution in southeastern and eastern Kazakhstan and the B2 climate change scenario predicted a smaller geographic distribution in southeastern, northeastern, and central Kazakhstan (Figure 2 7, Figure 2 8 ). The models suggest that there are significant areas of southeastern and northwestern Kazakhstan where a suitable environment for B. anthracis will cease to exist, while most of the habitat will remain intact across the northern tier with marginal habitat losses closer to the interior of the country. Northeastern Kazakhstan may also experience drastic habitat loss, but only the B2 scenario predicts this response. The oblasts of West Kazakhstan, Aktobe, Almaty, Zhambyl, and South Kazakhstan could lose nearly all areas that were previously predicted to be suitable habitats for B.

PAGE 54

54 anthracis under current climatic conditions. There are also several very small areas of expanded habitat scattered across portions of interior and eastern Kazakhstan in Karaganda, East Kazakhstan, and Almaty. The percentages of expanded habitat, unchanged habitat, unsuitable habitat, and contracted habitat occurring across Kazakhstan for ea ch climate change scenario at each resolution were summarized in Table 2 3. Current geographic distributions were also produced using BioClim variables from WORLDCLIM ( www.worldclim.org ) (Current Scenarios 3 and 4) The predicted geographic distribution for B. anthracis in Kazakhstan using current scenario 3 (which included measures of NDVI) is shown in Figure 2 9a while the predicted geographic distribution produced by current scenario 4 is shown in Figure 2 9 b. T he two models of current distribution were then combined to better determine differences and similarities between each of the two predicted current distributions of B. anthracis (Figure 2 9 c). Current scenario 3 predicted potentially more suitability acro ss portions of the southern extent of the northern predictions, while current scenario 4 predicted potentially more suitability on the northern fringe of the southeastern predictions. The models show minor differences across the landscape, but overall the predicted current distribution of B. anthracis stretches across the northern tier, eastern quarter, and southeastern regions of Kazakhstan in both models. Future potential distributions were also created using Current Scenario 4. A reas of northern and southeastern Kazakhstan were predicted to be currently suitable for B. anthracis survival, while the A2 climate change scenario predicted a smaller geographic distribution in southeastern and eastern Kazakhstan and the B2 climate change

PAGE 55

55 scenario predicted a smaller geographic distribution in southeastern, northeastern, and central Kazakhstan (Figure 2 10, Figure 2 11 ). The environmental parameters that allow for B. anthracis survival occur in only the northern most section of West Kazakhstan and Aktobe in 2050 according to the B2 climate change scenario. Much of Akmola, Pavlodar, and East Kazakhstan are predicted to no longer maintain environments suitable for B. anthracis A smaller geographic distribution is also predicted for the southeastern oblasts o f Kazakhstan. The environments of interior Kazakhstan remain unsuitable for B. anthracis under the B2 scenario. Discussion The similarity in accuracy metrics for each of the current scenarios indicates that GARP successfully predicted actual outbreak loc ations withheld from the model building process. Very low total and average omission scores for each scenario indicate a high predictive accuracy for each best subset presented Additionally, an evaluation of individual test locations that were omitted i n any of the current modeling scenarios shows that at least some of those are in areas unlikely to support B. anthracis in soils anyway based on the low frequency of such cases in a rather extensive time series of anthrax outbreaks. AUC scores were also r easonable for each scenario suggesting that our models are significantly better than random at identifying B. anthracis environments. As AUC directly reflects the relationship between omission and commission rates in its calculation (McNyset 2005), curren t scenario 3 performed best of all in this study. While current scenario 4 had a higher AUC than current scenario 2, it also predicted a smaller geographic extent of presence, so we would expect the AUC score to be higher. Given that both had equal total and average omission rates, it is unrealistic to consider any significant difference in performance of these two scenarios overall. While future

PAGE 56

56 changes in the distribution of B. anthracis are purely speculative, current models appear to be accurate regar dless of resolution and climate datasets for 2050 show a broad level of overall agreement with habitat expansion in the north and contraction in the south. From this, it is arguable that B. anthracis has established a natural ecology across many regions o f Kazakhstan, primarily the northern half, eastern quarter, and southeastern regions along the borders with Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, and China. A comparison of current scenarios 3 and 4 showed that measures of NDVI may be an important limiting variable in modeling the distribution of B. anthracis as was suggested in a previous study in the US (Blackburn et al. 2007). Current scenario 3 predicted a smaller area of potential habitat on the landscape of Kazakhstan than did current scenario 4 (38.21% of the landscape compared to 46.88% of the landscape). Current scenario 3 also received a slightly higher AUC score than scenario two (refer to Table 2 2). A study in the US also assumed that soil moisture and pH would not change substantially between the prese nt day and 2050 and thus used them as variables when projecting future distributions of B. anthracis in the continental United States using the B2 climate change scenario (Blackburn 2010 ). Slower responses in soil content to climate change have also been noted in similar latitudes of Europe (Emmett et al. 2004) supporting the argument that a lack of soils data in Kazakhstan may lead to overly liberal predictions of habitat loss and/or gain. The use of soils data has been shown to create a more conservativ e estimate of habitat change that may occur by 2050 in the US (Blackburn 2010 ). However, it is important to note that those estimates may also be related to the geographic setting of the US and the effects of global increases of CO 2 and temperature to that region.

PAGE 57

57 To examine the rate that soil conditions may change based on future climate change scenarios, Emmett et al. (2004) specifically analyzed changing soil conditions based on changing temperature and precipitation that were predicted by climate change scenarios. The study determined that a very gradual change in soil content could occur because of an increase in sporadic climate events (i.e., more wet/dry years than cont ent changes (because of changes in vegetation growth and type), but since climate change often manifest itself with an increase in abnormal or extreme climatic events (or yea r may offset or balance the changes that may have occurred in the previous future US models was likely an ideal approach (Blackburn 2010 ). However, Blackburn (In Press) e mployed the high resolution STATSGO soils database ( http://soils.usda.gov/survey/geography/statsgo/ ) to generate soils variables for the US, for which no contemporary data set was available for Kazakhstan. While future changes in the distribution of B. anthracis are speculative, current models appear to make similar predictions regardless of resolution and all climate datasets for 2050 show a similar level of overall agreement. S outh central and southeast regions of Kazakhstan that are now considered suitable environments for B. anthracis (and where a significant group of anthrax outbreaks have occurred over the past 70 + years ( Aikimbayev et al. 2010 & unpublished manuscript) may no longer have environmental conditions that support the long term survival of B. anthracis according to projections from the A2 and B2 climate change scenarios at both resolutions

PAGE 58

58 A comparison between 55km 2 and 8km 2 climate data found that there was broad agreement a cross modeling experiments for the northern regions of Kazakhstan for the A2 climate change scenario. The southern areas of the Almaty, Zhambyl, and South Kazakhstan oblasts were predicted to experience drastic habitat loss (i.e., near total) at both reso lutions, but drastic habitat loss in northern Kazakhstan was only predicted by the B2 climate change scenario at a resolution of 8km 2 (both current scenario 2 & 4). The actual reasons for major differences in the predicted distribution by each resolution are uncertain, but a lack of data points, a relatively steep change in elevation, the calculation of bioclimatic variables, and/or the splining technique used to downscale WORLDCLIM data may be possible explanations. There is still a great amount of uncer tainty in future climate predictions even at a crude resolution and all future estimates should be regarded with caution. More guidance from climatologists in selecting climate datasets is warranted when considering how various climatic or bioclimatic var iables may affect the potential distribution of a species. Currently, much anthrax surveillance is focused on the south central and southeast regions of Kazakhstan because many anthrax cases have occurred there in an area of high human population density, i.e. observation bias. Based on future bioclimatic data alone there may be a reduction in anthrax cases reported for this region. Future changes in temperature and precipitation may also cause geographic contraction of rangeland in the southern regions w here livestock currently graze, while causing geographic expansion of rangeland in the northern regions. This would subsequently allow more animals to graze in environments that are predicted to be suitable for B. anthracis in the north, while less grazin g in the south in conjunction with a

PAGE 59

59 less suitable environment for B. anthracis may also lead to further reduction in epizootics for this region. While climatic conditions may have changed between 1960 and 2000, current climatic variables were averaged bet ween 1960 and 1990 thus we assume that locality data collected over the past several decades accurately reflect environmental parameters needed for B. anthracis presence on the landscape. Overall, the hypothesis of predicted habitat loss in the south, bu t gain in the north was partially disproven. While a very small area of expanded habitat was consistently predicted in the northeastern regions of Kazakhstan, habitat loss was predicted in nearly every part of the country except the extreme northern regio ns bordering Russia There was far more predicted habitat contraction in the southern regions of Kazakhstan than anticipated. Projected changes may reflect over predictions of future habitat loss due to a lack of soils data, but nonetheless the southeas t region should expect to observe some reduction in B. anthracis habitat. The results of this current study agree with the results of similar continental scale studies where southern habitat reduction was also predicted due to the potential effects of clim ate change on other bacterial zoonoses (Blackburn 2010 Holt et al. 2009, Nakazawa et al. 2007) and we have documented this pattern in all four climate datasets used at both 55km 2 and 8km 2 resolutions. In the US, parts of the southern range of B. anthraci s were predicted to contract by 2050, while some parts of the northern range were predicted to expand (Blackburn 2010 ). Nakazawa et al. (2007) investigated the effects of climate change on tularemia and plague in the US with ENM and multiple climate chang e scenarios and predicted similar trends with more contraction occurring in the southern habitats than in the northern habitats for 2050. Similarly, a recent study

PAGE 60

60 that modeled the future distribution of plague carrying ground squirrels in California usin g 1km 2 BioClim variables suggested a subtle geographic shift to higher latitudes and altitudes with a limited reduction at lower latitudes (Holt et al. 2009). Collectively, these trends were not as drastic as the trends predicted for Kazakhstan, but contr action of a southern range was suggested for all three diseases. The more extreme changes in predicted distribution for Kazakhstan may be a result of the region potentially experiencing a more severe climatic change between now and 2050. However, it is n ot implausible that variables, such as soil conditions that were unavailable for this study, might limit the habitat reduction to smaller portions of the Kazakh landscape. Research over the past several decades has indicated that sporadic vegetation growth occurred from year to year based on rainfall amounts in the desert and steppe regions of Kazakhstan (Robinson & Milner Gulland 2003). This may infer that an increase in rainfall variability (as predicted in the region of central Asia by climate change sce narios) from year to year in desert and semi arid steppe climates could equate to a more sporadic occurrence of anthrax outbreaks. While models may have predicted a complete disappearance of habitat for B. anthracis in certain regions, anthrax outbreaks m ay simply become increasingly sporadic, but not disappear altogether in these regions as the A2 and B2 climate change scenarios suggested. Changes in the landscape could limit (if desertification occurs) or increase (if an increase in rangeland occurs) th e ability for cattle to migrate (Robinson & Milner Gulland 2003). These potential changes in migratory patterns could help to spread or limit the range of anthrax outbreaks and subsequent B. anthracis introduction and survival. Cattle migration is alread y confined because of limitations placed on nomadic

PAGE 61

61 herdsmen over the past century (Robinson & Milner Gulland 2003). Overall, cattle now graze on smaller areas than they did previously (Robinson & Milner Gulland 2003) and in areas where outbreaks have occ urred, we would expect a possible increase in outbreak potential if population densities are high (Dobson 2004). The current spatial distribution of B. anthracis follows similar latitudinal patterns as those predicted by a study in the United States with l arger areas of the northern regions predicted to be endemic for B. anthracis compared to smaller areas predicted to be endemic for B. anthracis in the southern region (Blackburn et al. 2007). This also closely follows the predicted current distribution of B. anthracis on the landscape of Kazakhstan ( Aikimbayev et al. unpublished manuscript ). The predicted areas of southern Kazakhstan traverse the foothills and mountain ranges of the Tian Shan and Altay Mountains, which have climates that are somewhat comp arable to climates farther north. In maps of the projected distribution, it can also be determined that the suitable environments for B. anthracis (specifically in the southern regions) may move to areas of higher elevation greatly limiting its dispersal based on cattle grazing limitations (Robinson & Milner Gulland 2003). Sheep, however, may not have similar grazing limitations because they are often transported either by foot or by truck/train to summer grazing areas in more mountainous regions (Wilson 1997). Because of their mobility, sheep may be able to adapt to climate changes in the south more so than cattle and may subsequently remain in environments that continue to be suitable for B. anthracis Rainfall has dictated livestock numbers and migrat ory patterns over the past several decades (Robinson & Milner Gulland 2003) so this could in turn limit the contact that cattle may have with an environment where B. anthracis exist in the soil. The opposite

PAGE 62

62 may also be true if rainfall increases across m any parts of Kazakhstan, more land could be available for grazing (similar to increases in forage in the northern latitudes of the United States (Baker et al. 1993)) thus allowing livestock to possibly move to more areas where they could come in contact wi th B. anthracis An inverse relationship could potentially be created based on rainfall estimates that allow for livestock range expansion and B. anthracis range contraction. It is also important to consider the differences between the climate of Kazakhs tan (continental with minimal influence from oceans) and the climate of the United States (surrounded by the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans as well as the Gulf of Mexico) when comparing the distribution of B. anthracis across the landscape of each. Potential changes in seasonal vegetation patterns should also be examined in conjunction with typical seasonal patterns of anthrax outbreaks to determine if these patterns may coincide. Anthrax has a distinct seasonality and is primarily a summertime (May October in northern latitudes) disease in both wild and domestic ruminants that is usually associated with wet springs and hot, dry summers followed by a rain event (Dragon et al. 2001, Gates et al. 1995). The predicted rise in temperatures and potential for in creasingly sporadic rain events across much of central Asia (Lal & Harasawa 2001) could lead to spatial and temporal changes in where and when anthrax outbreaks occur in Kazakhstan. Rangeland expansion and contraction as well as changes in rangeland produ ction in Kazakhstan could lead to a higher population of livestock in the northern regions, where B. anthracis is predicted to remain in 2050, and subsequently a potentially greater number of anthrax outbreaks. A rise in temperatures in the southern regio ns of Kazakhstan could create an environment that B. anthracis

PAGE 63

63 and/or livestock may not be able to survive in, thus potentially decreasing the number of anthrax outbreaks t here. It has been shown in the US that areas supporting B. anthracis survival do ov erlap with livestock distributions, however they are not identical (Blackburn 2010 ). Livestock may graze in areas that are unsuitable for B. anthracis and likewise, B. anthracis may exist in areas that are either unsuitable or not used for livestock grazi ng. It is also interesting to consider the possible evolutionary implications of these climate change scenarios. While the genetic understanding of B. anthracis in Kazakhstan is incomplete, recent efforts ( Aikimbayev et al. 2010 ) have provided insights in to the spatial distribution of Kazakh specific genotypes for the country. Employing the 8 primer M ultiple L ocus V ariable number tandem repeat A nalysis ( MLVA ) typing developed by Keim et al. (2000), a recent study described 92 culture isolates from several historical outbreaks. The majority of these isolates b elong to the A1.a genetic cluster and the majority of that diversity was located in the southern regions of Kazakhstan, predicted to no longer support B. anthracis in 2050 by all both resolutions and climate scenarios This might suggest that a reduction in suitable habitats in southern Kazakhstan may also correspond with a reduction in genetic diversity but i t is difficult to estimate changes in diversity in the northern most extent of Kazakhstan, as no cultures were available for typing ( Aikimbayev et a l. 2010 ). However, six of the 92 isolates from the existing data set represented a distinct member of the A3b sublineage. Interestingly, the B2 scenarios derived from current scenarios 2 and 4 suggest the northeastern region where these strains were isola ted will no longer support B. anthracis in 2050.

PAGE 64

64 When comparing climate change scenarios at a resolution of 8km 2 more habitat loss was predicted by the B2 climate change scenario supposedly the more conservative (or optimistic) of the two scenarios. The B2 scenario delineates that more habitat loss may occur in the northern interior areas of Kazakhstan as well as the northeastern areas of Kazakhstan. Conversely, several small areas in southeastern and northwestern Kazakhstan that were classified as a reas of habitat loss actually are predicted to retain their habitats in the B2 climate change scenario. While variations in the predicted precipitation and temperature changes for 2050 may have been the main reasons for distributional differences seen bet ween the A2 and B2 scenarios, GARP used a combination of variables to create rule sets that determined the environmental parameters that support B. anthracis For example, a warmer and wetter environment in the north may create a mor e suitable environment for B. anthracis survival, but a warmer and drier environment in the south may also create a more suitable environment for B. anthracis survival in previously uninhabitable areas (e.g. in the higher elevations of the Tian Shan Mountains). Previous studie s allude to the importance of examining specific rules within GARP rule sets to evaluate changing relationships between variables across the landscape (Blackburn et al. 2007, McNyset 2005) and variable combinations for this study should also be examined to further understand environmental constraints on the habitat of B. anthracis Temperature and precipitation changes will not be uniform across the vast landscape of Kazakhstan. For this reason, the internal rule sets need to be examined to determine whic h variables and combination of variables were most important in predicting the ecological niche of B. anthracis A closer examination of individual variables and variable combinations

PAGE 65

65 derived through rule sets may also help to reveal the potential driving mechanism(s) of the predicted habitat change for B. anthracis across many areas of Kazakhstan. Population growth and urbanization may also alter future predictions, but land cover use change may affect future predictions more if rangelands expand/contrac t in certain areas. Based on trends during the past century, Kazakhstan is not expected to experience drastic population growth or urbanization that would greatly modify future predictions.

PAGE 66

66 Table 2 1 Environmental variables used for G enetic A lgorithm for R ule set P rediction (GA RP) models Environment al Variables Name Source Annual Mean Temperature BIO1 WorldClim (www. worldclim.org) Temperature Annual Range BIO7 WorldClim (www. worldclim.org) Annual Precipitation BIO12 WorldClim (www. worldclim.org) Precipitation of Wettest Month BIO13 WorldClim (www. worldclim.org) Precipitation of Driest Month BIO14 WorldClim (www. worldclim.org) Elevation (Altitude) ALT WorldClim (www. worldclim.org) Mean NDVI WD1014A0 TALA (Hay et al. 2006) NDVI Annual Amplitude WD1014A1 T ALA (Hay et al. 2006) Table 2 2 Accuracy Metrics for the current predicted distribution s Metric Scenario One Scenario Two Scenario Three Scenario Four N to build models 125 218 N to test models 22 39 39 39 Total Omission 0.0 5.1 2.6 5.1 Average Omission 5.5 10..2 7.3 10.0 Total Commission 50.27 51.71 40.67 35.91 Average Commission 59.59 62.33 53.31 53.44 AUC* 0.7045 (z=7.7 § SE=0.06) 0.6502 (z=9.8 § SE=0.05) 0.7312 (z=9.9§, SE=0.05 ) 0.6995 (z=9.0§, SE=0.05 ) AUC = area under curve N was divided into 50% training/50% testing at each model iteration § p < 0.001 Note: Independent data used for accuracy metrics appear in figure 2 2 (yellow points) Table 2 3 A comparison of habitat change (%) between S pecial R eport on E missions S cenarios (SRES) A2 and B2 climate change sc enarios Habitat Change A2 Scenario (55km 2 ) B2 Scenario (55km 2 ) A2 Scenario (8km 2 ) B2 Scenario (8km 2 ) A2 Scenario (BioClim) B2 Scenario (BioClim) Expanded Habitat 4.15% 3.63% 0.71% 0.89% 0.20% 0.52% No Change 43.85% 44.67% 40.94% 29.28% 36.81% 22.54% No t Suitable 37.04% 37.56% 36.12% 35.94% 46.72% 46.76% Habitat Loss 14.96% 14.15% 22.22% 33.88% 16.27% 30.18%

PAGE 67

67 Figure 2 1. Environmental variables used during model building process

PAGE 68

68 Figure 2 2 Map of Kazakhstan with anthrax locality data. Traini ng data (green) were used to build models while independent data (yellow) were used to validate the accuracy of models. Inset A shows where all anthrax outbreaks occurred between 1960 and 2000. Inset B shows training and independent data used for buildin g models at a resolution of 8km 2 Inset C shows training and independent data used for building models at a resolution of 55km 2

PAGE 69

69 Figure 2 3. Ten 85/15 random subsets with corresponding model runs showing consistency between testing and training point locations as well as predicted distributions.

PAGE 70

70 Figure 2 4. Random 85/15 subsets were created for the northern and southern areas of Kazakhstan (separated at 48N) independently, then added together to construct ten total testing and training subsets. Co nsistency is shown between point locations and predicted distributions.

PAGE 71

71 Figure 2 5. Current predicted distribution of B. anthracis using Current Scenario 1 (A) and future predicted distributions based on the A2 climate change scenario (B) and B2 cl imate change scenario (C) Current 2050 (A2) 2050 (B2) Current 2050 (A2) 2050 (B2)

PAGE 72

72 Figure 2 6. Potential future habitat changes based on the A2 climate change scenario (A) and B2 climate change scenario (B) derived from Current Scenario 1 The differences between these climate change scenarios are shown in (C). Current 2050 (A2) 2050 (B2)

PAGE 73

73 Figure 2 7. Current predicted distribution of B. anthracis using Current Scenario 2 (A) and future predicted distributions based on the A2 climate change scenario (B) and B2 climate change scenario (C) Current 2050 (A2) 2050 (B2)

PAGE 74

74 Figure 2 8. Potential future habitat c hanges based on the A2 climate change scenario (A) and B2 climate change scenario (B) derived from Current Scenario 2 The differences between these climate change scenarios are shown in (C). Current 2050 (A2) 2050 (B2)

PAGE 75

75 Figure 2 9. Current S cenario 3 (A) and Current Scenario 4 ( B) show the current distribution of B. anthracis using different environmental variables. The difference between scenarios 3 and 4 is also examined (C). Current Current

PAGE 76

76 Figure 2 10. Current predicted distribution of B. anthracis using Current Scenario 4 (A) and futu re predicted distributions based on the A2 climate change scenario (B) and B2 climate change scenario (C) Current 2050 (A2) 2050 (B2)

PAGE 77

77 Figure 2 11 Potential future habitat changes based on the A2 climate change scenario (A) and B2 climate change scenario (B) derived from Curren t Scenario 4 The differences between these climate change scenarios are shown in (C). Current 2050 (A2) 2050 (B2)

PAGE 78

78 CHAPTER 3 EVALUATING ENVIRONME NTAL PARAMETERS OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS IN KAZAKHSTAN: AN EXAMI NATION OF RULE SET WRITING AND MAPP ING WITHIN AN ECOLOGICAL NICHE MODELING TOO L Introduction ecological and geographic distribution across space (Brotons et al. 2004, Huntley et al. 2004, Parra Olea et al. 2005, Peterson 2001). Environmental parameter s are often environmental parameters often produces a more robust explanation of why a species is present in one place, but absent in another (Pearson et al. 2006, Soberon & Peterson 2005). Specifically, the ecological parameters of Bacillus anthracis the spore forming bacterium that causes anthrax, have been the focus of many studies ( Aikimbayev et al. unpublished manuscript Blackburn et al. 2007, Cherkasskiy et al. 1999, Joyner et al. 2010, Smith et al. 2000, Van Ness & Stein 1956 ). B. anthracis has a very specific set of environmental parameters that must be present in order for the organism to be endemic to a landscape (Cherkasskiy 1999, Dragon et al. 1999, Smith et al. 2000, Van Ness 1971, Van Ness & Stein 1956). Van Ness & Stein (1956) outlined favorable soils for anthrax and created one of the first deterministic spatial distributions of where B. anthracis was likely to exist in the U nited S tates (US) The study examined where soil s exists that are favorable for B. anthracis survival and where anthrax cases had occurred historically. Areas that matched both criterions were considered to be at a higher risk for anthrax outbreaks. It has also been suggested through field study that different genetic strains of B. anthracis have different soil preferences (Smith et al. 1999, 2000). A study in Kruger National Park revealed that A and B strains of B. anthracis were

PAGE 79

79 present in the same year and represented an overlap in their distributi ons and time of occurrence, but isolate B was generally found in soils with different calcium and pH levels than those coinciding with isolate A indicating unique environmental requirements for each strain (Smith et al. 2000). Blackburn et al. (2007) stud ied the distribution of B. anthracis in the US and suggested that a better understanding of the distribution of the bacteria would increase eradication and prevention efforts, while Aikimbayev et al. ( unpublished manuscript ) examined the distribution of B. anthracis on the landscape of Kazakhstan and conveyed similar conclusions. Spores are often found in calcium rich environments where they can be sustained between outbreaks (Gates et al. 1995, Hugh Jones & de Vos 2002, Hugh Jones & Blackburn 2009). Van Ness (1971) indicated that basic mollic or chernozemic soils provide an ideal environment for resilient anthrax spores to survive and replicate, while Dragon & Rennie (1995) indicated that climate also plays an important role in spore survival and anthrax outbreak potential. The rapidity of sporulation increases with increasing environmental temperature and spores have been known to survive for more than 20 years in the soil (Thappa & Karthikey an 2001). The threat of infection is generally more serious d uring drought conditions when herds must graze on vegetation close to the ground thereby risking accidental ingestion. The vegetation may also be coarser during a drought causing cuts on lips thus making the animals more susceptible to infection (Thappa & Karthikeya n 2001). When abundant rainfall is preceded by a prolonged drought, it is suspected that spores may rise to the surface (Laforce 1994) and many studies in Canada have found that heavy rainfall events often preceded

PAGE 80

80 outbreaks (Dragon & Elkin 200 1 Dragon & Rennie 1995, Dragon et al. 1999, Gates et al. 1995). Many species distribution modeling and spatial modeling techniques have been used to determine the geographic and ecological space where a species can exist. The Bioclimatic Prediction Sys tem ( BIOCLIM ) is one of the most simplistic tools used to create models of ecological niches (Nix 1986). It develops a model by intersecting the ranges where a species exist along environmental axes (e.g., annual temperature range of 39 51C by total preci pitation of 146 680mm by mean N ormalized D ifference V egetation I ndex (NDVI) of 0.04 0.36, etc.). Regression tree analyses, general linear models, and distance based algorithms are also common approaches, but each of these approaches and BIOCLIM try to find a single rule or small set of rules tha t describe the niche of a species instead of a complex set of rules that may more closely et al. 2003). Another common algorithm used to identify a species distribution i s the logistic regression model which is a type of generalized linear model that identifies the probability of presence or absence on a landscape by modeling it as a linear function of all possible explanatory environmental variables (Manel et al. 2001 ). Ecological Niche Factor Analysis ( ENFA ) is an example of a modeling algorithm that uses presence only data to quantify a realized portion of the niche of a species (Hirzel et al. 2002). ENFA uses ecogeographical variables that describe an entire study ar ea and compares locality data to global values in order to determine where the species is most likely to be present on the landscape (Hirzel et al. 2002). Factors are extracted that analyze the distance between optimum conditions for the species and the

PAGE 81

81 m ean habitat within the study area as well as the ratio of ecological variance in mean habitat compared to that observed for the species (Basille et al. 2008). A statistical approach to ecological modeling called discriminant analysis has also been explore d (Rogers 2000, Rogers 2006) The approach encompasses a range of methods that develop rules for classifying previously unclassified species to groups that have been defined (Estrada Pea & Thuiller 2008). The discriminant function uses presence and abse nce data to assign a species to a group by multiplying a vector of locality data by a vector of coefficients to produce a value that is used to place the species in a group. Discriminant function can also use abundance data if available. To identify area s of absence, random regions that are no closer than 0.5 and no farther than 10 from presence locations are sampled. Both linear and non linear discriminant functions can be used. A study detailing the distribution of tsetse flies used a non linear dis criminant analysis which identified the covariance characteristics of species presence and absence (Rogers et al 1996). During discriminant analysis, the corrected Akaike information criterion in conjunction with other criteria is used to identify subseq uent variables to add to each model as a form of step wise inclusion (Rogers 2006). This approach helps to identify how well the current model fits the data. A habitat modeling method that has recently gained increased attention is the Bayesian modeling a pproach which can be employed in many platforms The Bayesian approach has been used in some form for several decades (Williams et al. 1978). It is and combines frequencies of association between the presence of a species and valu es in each environmental dataset with pre modeling probabilities of occurrence to estimate post modeling probabilities of a species being

PAGE 82

82 present on the landscape (Hepinstall & Sader 1997). A recent study used a Bayesian framework to create statistical mo distribution as well as the effects of outside disturbances (Latimer et al. 2006). The study argued that this approach may minimize certain problems that have been found with single level regression mod els that are more widely used by ecologists such as irregular sampling intensity and spatial dependence. The evolution of a Bayesian approach to species distribution modeling is ongoing, but may hold a promising future. Maximum Entropy ( MaxEnt ) is a very common modeling ap plication used today. MaxEnt estimates the potential distribution of a species by finding the distribution of maximum entropy (i.e., close to uniform) that is limited by the expected value of each feature matching its empirical average (Phillips et al. 20 04). Basically, the goal of Maxent is to estimate the probability distribution of a species that is the most expansive while at the same time being constrained by actual species presence data. It is a presence only modeling approach that uses entropy to generalize species locality data and it defines suitability by estimating a probability distribution over every pixel in the study area. A recent study by Phillips & Dudik (2008) inferred that the output produced by Max E nt most closely resembles a realize d niche model or species distribution model. The Genetic Algorithm for Rule set Prediction (GARP) is another popular modeling application and it is a fundamental niche model and therefore seeks to model the maximum potential distribution of a species, wh ich consequently usually includes areas of unknown occurrence and areas where the species may not exist because of competition, human influence or other external influences (McNyset 2005, Peterson et al. 2008). GARP is a presence only modeling tool that u ses species locality data and

PAGE 83

83 environmental coverage sets to determine ecological relationships through a process of IF/THEN rule types developed in an iterative, stochastic process. GARP is also considered to be a super set algorithm because of its abili ty to use multiple rule types (i.e., range, negated range, atomic, logit) to create potential geographic distributions as opposed to other modeling approaches that may only use range rules or logistic regression singularly. Recent studies have employed a spatial version of Principle Components Analysis (PCA) where the probability of harbor porpoise occurrence in each grid cell was calculated by taking total eigen scores for each principal component and then dividing by its eigen value to visualize which a reas were most likely to contain a suitable habitat (MacLeod et al. 2008, Mandleberg 2004). Each study used the PCA statistical approach which is normally, but not always, aspatial to predict the habitat suitability of harbor porpoises in Scotland. The pr eviously mentioned modeling approaches are intended to produce a geographic distribution of presence and absence of a species on a landscape. However, investigators are often interested in which environmental relationships are constructed within models and exploratory methods to visualize the ecological space where a species exist. It is often difficult to gain an understanding of the ecological space or biological information associated with the geographic prediction of presence and absence, thus it is of ten useful to use PCA to explore potential relationships between variable space and geography. Two studies have used PCA in conjunction with the GARP ecological niche modeling approach (Blackburn 2006, Ron 2005). Ron (2005) used PCA to construct an envir onmental envelope of where Batrachochytrium

PAGE 84

84 dendrobatidis occurred in ecological space and to analyze the relative importance of certain variables. For example, principle component I in Ron (2005) was positively correlated with precipitation indicating th at it was an important variable in the prediction of B. dendrobatidis Blackburn (2006) used PCA to help visualize where within ecological space anthrax cases occurred in the US and to evaluate clustering of anthrax cases in ecological space. Another metho d of examining niche models in ecological space is through the construction of variable clouds (Peterson et al. 2004). Niche models of the Ebola virus in areas of Africa were constructed using GARP and then the values of selected environmental variables w here the virus was present were visualized in 2 dimensional space (Peterson et al. 2004). This method was highly useful in identifying the ecological space of a disease because when visualized in dimensions of precipitation and temperature, it was evident that Ebola was concentrated in hot, wet climates. Jackknifing and bootstrapping are useful approaches that do not necessarily help to visualize the ecological space where a species exists, but help to refine or filter the number of environmental coverages on which predicted distributions are based. When used within GARP, a jackknife manipulation provides all possible examples of analysis with the subtraction of one coverage set for each model run to eliminate each coverage set systematically (Peterson & C ohoon 1999). For example, if ten coverages were used, then ten possible examples would be provided with nine coverages each. Likewise, each coverage is also included systematically in single coverage analyses. A bootstrap manipulation is used in conjunc tion with jackknifing so that combinations of coverages can be analyzed through a process of sampling with replacement (Peterson

PAGE 85

85 et al. 2008). Levine et al. (2009) examined the statistical significance of ecological parameters by comparing individual maps that were constructed using the jackknife process. To analyze the relative importance of each ecological parameter in the development of the model, the individual jackknife maps were compared to the comprehensive map pixel by pixel and the study found th at this statistical technique had a capacity to explore subtle differences among ecological parameters as well as extremes in the importance of individual environmental factors. Another method used to determine the importance of individual variables used within a model building process extracts results from bootstrap models and sorts them according to their Akaike information criterion values (Rogers 2006). Variables are plotted and color coded according to their importance as a predictor variable and the most consistently chosen variable(s) in each model are recognizable by a continuous, or near continuous, line. The examination of both the ecological and geographical space suitable for the survival of a species can be highly useful and GARP provides us w ith the ability to examine both. inability of the user to examine the internal functions and methods of the model building was reached because only one accuracy metric (Area Under the Curve) was used to compare GARP with other models. Ecological niche models (ENMs) and species distribution models differ greatly across platforms and are too complex for only on e accuracy statistic to be used to make comparisons because the goals of each modeling system may be different (e.g., fundamental vs. realized niche prediction) There are different methods used to measure each tool. The Area Under the Curve (AUC)

PAGE 86

86 statis tic has been shown to be imprecise in measuring the true accuracy of GARP models in recent studies because the statistic examines the entire curve instead of the location on the curve where occurrence data exists (Peterson et al. 2007). For this reason, i t is more informative to use multiple measures of accuracy in conjunction with AUC scores. A conflation of niche theory also occurred in Elith et al. (2006) and differences between fundamental and realized niche models as well as species distribution mode ls were not indicated. The ability of GARP to describe nonrandom relationships between locality data and environmental variables with the use of multiple rules that can be output as IF/THEN statements and projected onto a map indicates that & McNyset 2005, Wiley et al. 2003). Various IF/THEN statements are created to describe the presence or absence of a species on the landscape and these rules can be viewed and analyzed to determine which variables and ranges of v ariables are indicative of the niche of a species (Blackburn et al. 2007 Kluza & McNyset 2005, McNyset 2005 ). Other modeling techniques only examine one or two rule types when estimating the distribution of a species (Box et al. 1993, Carpenter et al. 19 93, Manel et al. 2001), but GARP is a superset algorithm that combines multiple types of rules (atomic, range, negated range, and/or logit rules) to construct a prediction of the distribution of a species on the studied landscape (McNyset 2005, Peterson et al. 2002 a Stockwell & Peters 1999). McNyset (2005) was the first paper that listed the rules produced from a single model run to illustrate their structure within a GARP model. McNyset (2005) indicated that the interactions between variables were more important than only examining single variables when predicting the distribution of a species.

PAGE 87

87 Other methods of measuring the influence that single variables may impose on the distribution of a species in ecological space have also been examined (Bauer & Pe terson 2005, Costa et al. 2002). Bauer & U across geography. Grid cells that are inside and outside of a predicted geographi c distribution are compared for each environmental variable by using a Mann Whitney U test. The tool helps to detect and visualize environmental range edges to better understand environmental correlates. Costa et al. (2002) analyzed the ecological space that contained four populations of Triatoma brasiliensis by comparing the relationship found between annual mean minimum temperature and annual mean precipitation as described by GARP model outputs. Charts describing the ecological requirements of each sp ecies showed narrow environmental ranges of minimum temperature and mean precipitation that represent the niche of the species. Costa et al. (2002) alluded to the complexity of niche requirements when examining the varying environmental ranges that were n eeded by each species. McNyset (2005) also concluded that niche requirements were complex, but that examining multiple parameters within each rule set could help to identify a large portion of the ecological niche of a species. A major problem in ecologic al modeling is the occurrence of spatial autocorrelation. Spatial autocorrelation is the tendency of nearer objects to be more or less closely related than expected for random groups of observations and it is an inherent species modeling issue because of behavioral processes of a species and the tendency of neighboring locality data to exhibit similar environmental conditions due to spatial proximity (Legendre 1993). Some modeling approaches have tried to reduce the

PAGE 88

88 effects of spatial autocorrelation. Fo r example, in a study that used Bayesian modeling and GAP analysis to predict the distribution of 28 different bird species, measured variables that reached an asymptote at buffer strips between 51 200 meters from an occurrence point indicated that a spati al limit to the autocorrelation of agreement measures had potentially been reached (H e pinstall & Sader 1997). Despite efforts to reduce the effect of spatial autocorrelation, it is a very difficult issue that confronts ecological niche and species distrib ution modeling. While spatial autocorrelation most likely does exist amongst variables and locality data to an extent, it does not occur in the model building process of GARP because GARP is a heuristic pattern matching algorithm and not a traditional stat istical modeling approach. GARP creates rules based on relationships between locality data and environmental variables. These rules are then applied to the landscape pixel by pixel and therefore surrounding pixels have no impact on each other because the rule application process starts over at each pixel. There are also other approaches to reducing the effect that spatial autocorrelation has when modeling the distribution of a species. A recent study used an autologistic regression approach that approxim ated the strength of species habitat relationships and the strength of dependence between neighboring areas (Klute 1999, Klute et al 2000). This helped to describe the factors that influenced the distribution of a specific species. Essentially, spatial d ependence does occur in natural ecosystem s and spatial autocorrelation may affect model outputs in some approaches more so than in other approaches, but there are methods and approaches that seek to minimize its effect.

PAGE 89

89 Predicting areas of a landscape that highly useful and the central goal of ecological niche modeling applications. In addition to predicting the potential geographic distribution of a species, the rule set writing and mapping application of Desktop GARP v 1.1.3 also provides the geographic location of where modeled environmental ranges (i.e., rules) exist on a landscape. McNyset (2005) was the first study to present a complete rule set that showed each rule that was created in a single model run. The study showed that the relationship between distributions and variables included in the model is intricate and concluded that interactions between variables are commonly more meaningful than a value derived from a single variable. Blackburn (2006) exam ined the distribution of B. anthracis in the US and showed the dominant rules from the GARP 10 best subset projected onto the landscape. The maps produced illustrated that only a few rules dominate a best subset with usually between 2 and 4 presence rules per model and the study was the first illustration of the rule set and resulting rule maps. Blackburn et al. (2007) utilized multiple environmental variables including measures of temperature, precipitation, soil, and vegetation to establish a potential distribution model of B. anthracis in the United States based on the relationship between known occurrence data and environmental variables in proximity to the data. The study also produced a rule set showing the primary presence and absence rules from a single best subset model experiment to demonstrate the value of examining biological information described within the GARP model output. Blackburn et al. (2007) found that specific ranges (or envelopes) of mean NDVI, precipitation, and elevation most ofte n characterized the ecological niche of B. anthracis in the United States. The study emphasized the utility of being able to identify

PAGE 90

90 environmental parameters that support B. anthracis survival in order to delineate areas that may be at a higher risk of h aving an anthrax outbreak. Additional research by Blackburn et al. ( 2009 ) found that an anthrax outbreak in the fall of 2008 at a ranch near Bozeman, Montana occurred in an area that had never reported an anthrax outbreak, but was predicted to be within t he endemic zone of the disease as described in Blackburn et al. (2007). This study will describe the utility of the rule set writing and mapping application of GARP in identifying distinct environmental parameters for a species as well as delineat ing the u nderlying environmental parameters that determine the predicted current and future potential distributions of the bacterium B anthracis in the central Asian country of Kazakhstan in an effort to expand on previous research by Aikimbayev et al. ( unpublishe d manuscript ) and Joyner et al. ( 2010 ). More specifically, the study will seek to answer the following questions: 1) What environmental parameter s describe the current distribution of B. anthracis across Kazakhstan? and 2) How useful is the rule set writi ng and mapping application of GARP in providing important biological information about a species? Data and Methods Anthrax Occurrence Data B. anthracis locality data were produced from a historical record of anthrax outbreaks across Kazakhstan that occurre d between 1937 and 2006. Most outbreaks occurred in the livestock population and locality data were most often reported as the farm location or nearest village location of the outbreak. Only outbreaks in livestock occurring between 1960 and 2000 were exa mined because of the implementation of wide spread vaccination efforts around 1960. To make the data spatially unique at

PAGE 91

91 8km 2 (i.e., the spatial resolution of the environmental variables used in the model ), a further reduction of the data resulted in a sm all subset that contained 257 outbreaks of the original 3,947. The subset of 257 was then split into training (218 point locations) and testing (39 point locations) subsets (refer to figure 2 2) For modeling purposes, a cell only needs to be identified as present or absent for a species. The training subset was used for model building and the testing subset was used for measuring model accuracy after the model building process. Bioclimatic (BioClim) data (both current and future) were freely downloadable ( www.worldclim.org ) on the WorldClim website (Hijmans et al. 2005) and satellite derived environmental data were provided by the Typanosomiasis and Land Use in Africa (TALA) research group at Oxford University (Oxford, Unite d Kingdom) (Hay et al. 2006). The Had ley C oupled M odel Version 3 (HadCM3) A2 and B2 climate change scenarios for 2050 were used to predict the future potential distribution of B. anthracis across Kazakhstan as well as examine variance amongst rule set combinations (Arnell 2004, Collins e t al. 2001, Gordon et al. 2000). All data were available at a resolution of approximately 8 kilometers and were used to produce environmental variables representing only the spatial extent of Kazakhstan. Resolutions of the TALA data and bioclimatic data were slightly different so a resampling procedure was also applied to produce environmental grids with identical cell sizes. Ecological Niche Modeling The study utilized the Genetic Algorithm for Rule Set Prediction (GARP) to generate ecological niche m odel s for B. anthracis in Kazakhstan. The rule set writing and mapping application of Desktop GARP v 1.1.3 was employed for all GARP model production. Desktop GARP v 1.1.3 allows for the examination of the actual rule sets

PAGE 92

92 written during the model buildi ng process and the location on the landscape where these rules apply, while Desktop GARP v 1.1.6 does not provide this output. GARP is a presence only modeling tool that analyzes the relationship between locality data and the parameters of environmental v ariables in the same location. A total of 50 rules are created from four main rule types (atomic, range, negated range, and logit rules) for each model run to explain the relationship between locality data and environmental parameters. Once a rule set (i .e., the combination of all 50 rules in each model run) is created, then the relationship is applied to other areas of the landscape that have similar environmental parameters. Each of the four rule types create IF/THEN statements that describe presence o r absence parameters for the landscape (Stockwell & Peters 1999). Atomic rules use only single values of each variable to describe average annual NDVI is 0.63 then the specific range of multiple variables in space that need to exist in order for a species to and 540 millimeters AND annual average temperature is between 5 C and 15 C AND range rules are similar to range rules except they describe the variable ranges that a e total annual precipitation is NOT between 110 millimeters and 200 millimeters AND annual average temperature is NOT between 3 C and 4 C AND annual average NDVI is NOT between 0.98 and 0.53 then the species is cations of a species fit to a logistic regression model that examines the environmental variables (Stockwell & Peters 1999). The

PAGE 93

93 logistic regression gives an output probability ( p ) that verifies if a rule should apply to a particular part of the landscape where p is calculated. Presence is predicted by the logit rule if p is greater than 0.75 (Stockwell et al. 2006). The ability to use multiple rule types in an iterative process to create each rule set establishes GARP as a super set algorithm as opposed to many other modeling approaches that may only use range rules or logistic regression singularly. The GARP modeling approach is stochastic, or random, and consequently produces different outputs with each model run. Because of the variance between each model run output, it is important to produce multiple runs and utilize the best subset technique of selecting the 10 best models out of the original 50 that meet certain optimization parameters. Omission and commission thresholds are defined by the user t o obtain a set of models that find a balance between sensitivity (absence of omission error) and specificity (absence of commission error) (Anderson et al. 2003). Omission is a measure of how much locality data are excluded from the area that is predicted to be present for a species, while commission is a measure of how much of the landscape was predicted present for a species including areas where no locality data exists. The best subset procedure selects optimal output grids from all model runs and subs equently allows the user to examine the grids individually or simultaneously in a geographic information system (GIS). The grids can be summated to reveal different levels of model certainty. For example, some areas may be predicted present by only one m odel whereas other areas may be predicted present by all ten models. More model agreement infers more certainty when examining the fundamental niche of a species.

PAGE 94

94 Modeling Procedures and Methods Environmental variables were combined within the Desktop GAR P Dataset Manager to create environmental coverage sets. Four different coverage sets were produced for the study: 1) coverage set for current scenario one (including altitude, bioclimatic variables, and measures of NDVI), 2) coverage set for current scen ario two (including altitude and bioclimatic variables, but excluding measures of NDVI), 3) future coverage set (including altitude and bioclimatic variables predicted using the A2 climate change scenario), 4) future coverage set (including altitude and bi oclimatic variables predicted using the B2 climate change scenario). Current scenario one was t he first model run and it used a 50/50 training split with to 1000 and all rule types were applied. A best subset was selected with an extrinsic the distributi on. Locality data were analyzed using the coverage set created for current scenario one The 10 best models subset was output along with rule set grids that showed the spatial extent of all rule set combinations on the landscape for each model run produ ced by the model. A text file detailing rule statements) for each model run was also produced. Rule set grids that described each of the 10 best models were projected onto maps within ArcMap 9.3 (ESRI 2008) and recoded in accord ance with the dominant rule sets within each model (Blackburn 2006). Dominant rule sets were determined when a combination of rule sets covered approximately 90% of the landscape of Kazakhstan (e.g., sometimes only 4 rule sets

PAGE 95

95 predicted presence/absence a cross 90% or more of Kazakhstan, while at other times up to 10 rule sets were needed to predict presence/absence across 90% or more of Kazakhstan). Presence rules were displayed using a red color ramp, while absence rules were displayed using a blue color ramp. Once dominant rules were determined, they were also extracted from the text file that contained rule set combinations. The rule sets were organized in a table and delineated by model number (task number) and rule type (i.e., atomic, range, negated range, or logit rule) similar to McNyset (2005). Current scenario two was t he second model run and it used identical parameters that were used previously within the Desktop GARP environment. Locality data were analyzed using the second coverage set creat ed for current scenario two Both future coverage sets (A2 and B2 climate change scenarios) were also used to project the future potential distribution of B. anthracis on the landscape of Kazakhstan in 2050. Best model subsets were created for each of th e three projections along with rule set grids that showed which rules predicted varying parts of the landscape. Ten maps were produced for each of the three projections that showed where the dominant rules predicted presence and absence of B. anthracis in Kazakhstan. Analysis of Environmental Parameters established within GARP Rule Sets In GARP, m inimum and maximum environmental values (i.e., rainfall, temperature, NDVI) of range rules that described presence on the landscape were extracted from the model output and entered into a database. Zonal statistics were applied for areas described as being present by a logit rule to extract minimum and maximum environmental values of the area. These values were also input into a database. Since various rules de scribed different regions of Kazakhstan seemingly based on latitude the rules were divided into northern and southern rules whereas northern rules

PAGE 96

96 predominantly described the environmental parameters north of 4 8 N latitude, while southern rules predominan tly described the environmental parameters south of 4 8 N latitude. Some rules that were present in both the northern and southern regions were labeled as indeterminable. Once the database was complete, median values for each minimum and maximum environme ntal variable were calculated and input into a separate database where a bar chart was created showing the ranges of each environmental variable in the northern region and each environmental variable in the southern region. A chart was created for each cu rrent scenario to illustrate potential changes in environmental parameters when measures of NDVI were utilized in the model building process versus when measures of NDVI were not utilized. Additionally, centroids were created for each 8 kilometer grid ce ll across Kazakhstan. The centroids were then clipped by areas that were predicted to be present by one or more models. Next, a random sample of 1500 centroids from the clipped area was created and zonal statistics were used to identify the values of tem perature range and wettest month precipitation at these locations. A second clip of the centroids was then performed for areas where only total model agreement occurred (i.e., all 10 models). Zonal statistics were used again to identify the values of tem perature range and wettest month precipitation at these locations. The resulting values for temperature range and wettest month precipitation were then plotted against each other and delineated by areas predicted present by at least one model and areas pr edicted present by all models. The locations of these variables were then visible in dimensional space.

PAGE 97

97 Centroids were then separated into three categories that represented areas where 1) dominant northern rules occurred, 2) dominant southern rules occurr ed, and 3) at least one model predicted presence. Zonal statistics were utilized to identify the values of temperature range and wettest month precipitation in each of these three areas. The results were plotted against each other in dimensional space an d delineated by the three categories to visualize the differences and similarities in values by location on the landscape. The process was repeated for mean temperature and mean NDVI. Results Overall, every model created 50 rules, but not all 50 were alwa ys used When a best subset of 10 models was chosen for each of the current distribution predictions ( current scenario one and current scenario two ) and future distribution predictions ( A2 and B2 scenarios ), then a total of 500 rules explained presence an d absence for each of the four predictions. In concurrent GARP research (e.g., Anderson et al. 2003), a summation of the 10 model best subset is usually created to show where high and low model agreement occurred on the landscape. Therefore, a summation of the 10 model best subset was created for each of the current scenarios (Figure 3 1). Accuracy metrics including Area Under the Curve ( AUC ) total and average omission, and total and average commission were also calculated for each of the current scenar ios using the testing subset ( Table 3 1 ). A total omission of 2.6 and average omission of 10.4 were reported, while a total commission of 38.18 and average commission of 54.48 were also reported for current scenario one The model also received an AUC sc ore of 0.7046. For current scenario two, a total omission of 2.6 and average omission of 8.6 were reported, while a total commission of 3 7 71 and average commission of 5 3 .4 2 were also reported. The model also received an AUC score of 0.7 1 4 8

PAGE 98

98 The summat ed 10 model best subset and concomitant accuracy metrics are normally the only GARP outputs that are shown in many studies, but this study chose to delve deeper in order to obtain the maximum amount of information currently possible from a GARP model. A t ext file was written that contained all 50 rules for each model run and all of these rules were then projected onto the landscape (Figure 3 2). The resulting maps are complicated, but highly informative and illustrative of where the landscape embodies eac h of the rules created by GARP. To simplify the rule sets and were selected that described at least 90% of the landscape. An example of a dominant rule set from curr ent scenario one is given in Table 3 2. The rule set contains 3 different rule types (logit, range, negated range) and a total of 8 dominant rules. Of the 8 dominant rules, 6 are rules that describe presence on the landscape and the remaining 2 describe absence on the landscape. These 8 rules can be visualized in figure 3 3 inset A. Of the 500 rules created for the 10 model best subset in current scenario one only 72 were needed to explain over 90% of the landscape. These rules were subsequently label ed as dominant rules. Current scenario two needed 75 rules out of the original 500 to explain over 90% of the landscape. The A2 prediction needed 58 rules out of the original 500 to explain over 90% of the landscape, while the B2 prediction needed 60 ru les to explain over 90% of the landscape. A range of three to nine rule set combinations predicted the presence or absence of B. anthracis on 90% or more of the landscape of Kazakhstan in each of the 10 best models for the four different projections. Ma ps showing the spatial extent of presence and absence rules for current scenario one were produced ( Figure 3 3 ). Overall, the

PAGE 99

99 maps aided in visualizing the dominant rule set combinations that predicted the presence or absence of B. anthracis in specific r egions of Kazakhstan. A difference in rules that described the northern limits of B. anthracis in Kazakhstan and the southern limits was also evident and a demarcation of approximately 49N latitude most often separated these varying rules. Between two a nd four rule set combinations were used to predict the presence of B. anthracis in the northern tier of Kazakhstan, while between one and three different rule set combinations were used to predict the presence of B. anthracis in the southeastern region. T he rules were representative of various variables that must be present for B. anthracis survival according to Desktop GARP v 1.1.3 In current scenario one a total of 28 range rul es were used to predict areas of presence considered to be in the northern regions of Kazakhstan, while only 9 range rules were used to predict areas of presence considered to be in the southern regions. Conversely, 4 logit rules were used to describe are as of presence in the southern regions, while only 3 logit rules were used to describe areas of presence in the northern regions. No negated range rules were considered to be dominant presence rules, but a similar number of negated range (6) and range rul es (5) were used to describe absence on the landscape while 16 logit rules were used to describe absence. All rule types were used to describe presence and absence on the landscape, but dominant presence rules were composed of only range and logit rules a nd dominant absence rules were composed of negated range, range, and logit rules. Several model runs showed more variance in the amount of rules that were needed to predict up to 90% of the landscape. Task 17 (Figure 3 3 Inset B ) utilized nine different presence and absence rules, while

PAGE 100

100 task 62 (Figure 3 3, Inset J) needed only five presence and absence rules to describe most of the potential distribution of B. anthracis Maps were also created that describe d areas of Kazakhstan that were predicted to currently be present or absent of B. anthracis using current scenario two ( Figure 3 4 ). Between one and two rules were used to describe most of the southern limits of B. anthracis while between one and four rules were used to describe most of the norther n limits of B. anthracis A total of 21 range rules were used to describe most of the northern areas of Kazakhstan that were predicted to be present, while only 1 logit rule was uti lized. Rules describing the future potential distribution of B. anthracis using the A2 climate change scenario were also mapped onto the landscape ( Figure 3 5 ). The prediction determined that a smaller geographic space would be suitable for B. anthracis survival based on future climate projections. Generally, fewer rules were used to determine presence and absence on at least 90% of the landscape in most model runs. Individual model commission was calculated for each task in addition to total and average commission for the entire best subset in order to determine how much of the landscape was predicted to be suitable for B. anthracis and how much variance in commission existed between each model run ( Table 3 3 ). A wide range of variance in individual model commission existed with task 16 only reporting a commission of 36.7, w hile task 71 reported a commission of 50.1. A total commission value of 26.60 and average commission value of 42.03 were reported. The B2 climate change scenario was also used to predict the future potential distribution of B. anthracis in Kazakhstan ba sed on climate change predictions that were

PAGE 101

101 dissimilar from those of the A2 climate change scenario and the rules were also mapped onto the landscape (Figure 3 6 ). Individual model commission was calculated for each task in addition to total and average c ommission for the entire best subset in order to determine the amount of landscape predicted present for B. anthracis in each model run and how much variance in commission existed between each model run ( Table 3 4 ). A wide range of variance in individual model commission existed with task 32 only reporting a commission of 25.3, while task 20 reported a commission of 50.6. A total commission value of 14.12 and average commission value of 31.92 were reported. The minimum and maximum values of all dominant presence rules for each of the between certain minimum and maximum values found in eac h rule set (Table 3 5). precipitation values were nearly identical between rule number 4 and rule number 24 in absolutely values were also very similar in six out of the seven rules that the variable was used in and the driest month values were nearly equal in each of the seven rules that it two was also shown to disclose similarities in minimum and maximum values found in each rule set (Table 3 6). Precipitation values were similar in each rule a nd identical values were comparable in five out of the six rules that the variable was used in. In

PAGE 102

102 particular, the maximum average temperature value varied less than half a degree between all six rules. The driest month values were uniform in each of the three rules that used the variable. The rules were also ascribed as being predominantly found in either the northern tier of Kazakhstan or the southern tier of Kazakhstan a nd values of rules describing B. anthracis presence in the each tier were also similar. Specifically, temperature range maximum values in the northern tier were mostly higher than maximum values found in the southern tier. A bar chart was created to bette r visualize the overall environmental parameters in the northern and southern ranges of predicted B. anthracis distribution i n current scenario one ( Figure 3 7). R anges of most environmental variables were similar with the exception of a lower temperature range and wider precipitation ranges (total and wettest month) identified in the chart. A bar chart was again created to better visualize the overall environmental parameters in the nort hern and southern ranges of predicted B. anthracis distribution i n current scenario two ( Figure 3 8). R anges of most environmental variables were similar region. Lowe r temperature ranges were again observed in the southern region along with wider precipitation ranges (total and wettest month) Temperature range and wettest month precipitation totals showed the widest variance between northern and southern rule types so these variables were plotted against each other in dimensional space as another way to visualize the disparity in variable ranges for the two regions (Figure 3 9). The variables were initially delineated

PAGE 103

103 by whether they were in areas predicted by at le ast one model or only areas predicted by all 10 models (Figure 3 9). The variables were then delineated by northern and southern regions in the areas that were predicted by all 10 models (Figure 3 10). Variable ranges for each of the two variables within the best subset covered the entire spectrum of environmental parameters that were suitable for B. anthracis survival (shown in grey). The environmental parameters in the north exhibited a narrow range of wettest month precipitation and a narrow and high temperature range when compared to maximum range found in the best subset (shown in red). The environmental parameters in the south exhibited a wide range of wettest month precipitation and a wide and relatively low temperature range when compared to the maximum range found in the best subset (shown in orange). Mean NDVI and mean temperature were also plotted against each other in dimensional space and initially delineated by whether they were in areas predicted by at least one model or only areas predicte d by all 10 models (Figure 3 11). The variables were then delineated by northern and southern regions in the areas that were predicted by all 10 models (Figure 3 12). Variable ranges for each of the two variables within the best subset covered the entire spectrum of environmental parameters that were suitable for B. anthracis survival (shown in grey). The environmental parameters in the north exhibited a very narrow and mostly compact range of mean temperature and mean NDVI (shown in red). The environme ntal parameters in the south exhibited a narrow range of NDVI, but scattered range of mean temperature. Discussion This study performed an in depth analysis on the actual rules and rule sets written by GARP during the modeling process in an effort to quant ify the environmental

PAGE 104

104 variables that were used to model the potential geographic distribution of B. anthracis in Kazakhstan The study also revealed the importance of being able to use rule sets to discern between models that use different variables and m odels that are projected into the future. An examination of the complex rule sets written by GARP affirmed the usefulness of obtaining biological data from the GARP modeling process as described in previous research efforts (Blackburn et al. 2007, Kluza a nd McNyset 2005, McNyset 2005). GARP adapted by changing the range of some variables (e.g., annual precipitation total) to account for the loss of others (e.g., measures of NDVI) when comparing models that used different variables. It was also useful t o project the current environmental parameters onto the future landscape to determine the geography of future rules. In GARP, a tomic rules were not considered to be dominant presence or absence rules in any model run indicating that they can only be used t o predict a very small, of species distribution. A range of parameters in variable was a better descriptor of habitat suitability which has also been supported by H olt and Gaines (1992), which supports the mean phenotype of the population The model of current distribution that used measures of NDVI (i.e., current scenario one) produc ed a slightly more constrained distribution than the model of current distribution that did not use measures of NDVI (i.e., current scenario two) suggesting that NDVI was a limiting variable in the B. anthracis models for Kazakhstan Blackburn et al. (200 7) described mean NDVI as one of the main limiting variables to the predicted distribution of B. anthracis in the

PAGE 105

105 United States and this study confirms that the same is true of the predicted distribution in Kazakhstan. A slightly less constrained distribu tion was produced by current scenario two possibly because many land surface vegetation nuances were not as evident when only examining measures of precipitation and temperature although these factors are often associated with concurrent NDVI values. Dif ferent rule sets for the northern and southern/southeastern regions of Kazakhstan indicate d that there was apparent variation in relationships between environmental parameters (rules) written for the predicted northern and southern regions. Differences in annual temperature range between the northern and southern regions seemed to be one of the most apparent parameter variations b etween the rules. It is important to remember that the goal of GARP (and other ENMs) is to produce a robust and accurate predi ction of the spatial distribution of a target species. Because of this, the 10 best subset is still highly useful in displaying the spatial distribution of model agreement. However, when using the geographic area predicted by any given level of model agre ement to display that region in variable space, it homogenized the landscape and did not show the heterogeneity that actually existed in the northern and southern rules. The disparity in ranges between the northern and southern regions showed that the env ironmental envelope for B. anthracis shifted across latitude. This did not indicate that different niche requirements exist or infer that two different sub species of B. anthracis exists on the landscape, but rather that the northern and southern regions fulfill ed different parts of the niche requirements of B. anthracis Modeling at the regional level allowed us to examine realized portions of a s niche.

PAGE 106

106 The use of NDVI in current scenario one showed that a narrow envelope of mean NDVI exist s wher e B. anthracis is predicted as being present on the landscape, while a fairly large envelope of NDVI amplitude also described the presence of B. anthracis (Figure 3 8) The narrower envelope of mean NDVI may help to explain some of the variation in commis sion between the two models of current distribution, but much of the area that was predicted using ranges of NDVI was also predicted in the subsequent model of current distribution that did not use measures of NDVI indicating that measures of precipitation and temperature capture d most of the ecological variability that measures of NDVI also capture d Similar areas (although not identical) of the northern and southern regions of Kazakhstan were predicted to be present for B. anthracis while interior and w estern regions were again predicted to be absent in the second model of current distribution. In current scenario one, a reas that were predicted to be present tended to expand slightly more into interior Kazakhstan from the southern and northern regions. A wider range of annual precipitation totals may have been used to account for the lack of NDVI variables. Also, when comparing ranges of variables in the northern and southern regions, noticeably narrower wettest month precipitation values were observed for the north as well as narrower and overall higher temperature range values (Figure 3 9). The ability to visualize this disparity through examining bar charts that were created using median maximum and minimum values as well as creating a variable clou d that showed the disparity in dimensional space was a major advantage of the GARP rule set writing and mapping application. Individual commission of each task in the A2 and B2 climate change scenarios showed a wide range of v ariance, indicating that the re wa s a high amount of

PAGE 107

107 disagreement between the f uture prediction models (Table 3 3 and 3 4 ). Individual commission varied between 36.7 and 50.1 for the A2 prediction, whereas individual commission varied between 25.3 and 50.6 for the B2 prediction. Thi s indicates a high degree of uncertainty in future predictions of the geographic distribution of B. anthracis although both models reported lower total and average commissions than are reported in present conditions. A contraction of suitable habitat cont inues to be suggested by both the A2 and B2 predictions, but variance among commission values should not be ignored. Commission values also indicate that the B2 climate change scenario predicts a greater amount of habitat contraction than does the A2 clim ate change scenario. Various rules predicted onto the future landscape also indicate where current ranges of environmental parameters that are suitable for B. anthracis survival will exist in the future. The same variable ranges that were identified in t he current distribution were projected into the future to show where these ranges expand and contract. Generally, range rules were predominantly used to describe presence in the northern regions (above 4 8 N latitude), while logit rules were predominantly u sed to describe presence in the southern regions (below 4 8 N latitude) in all four models (current (2), A2 prediction, and B2 prediction). However, some overlap where presence rules were predicted on the landscape did occur between the two regions. In bo th models of current distribution, a combination of range and logit rules were used to describe most of the southern range of B. anthracis while almost no logit rules were used to explain the northern range. An even combination of negated range rules and range rules described absence in current scenario one while more negated range rules descr ibed absence in current scenario two

PAGE 108

108 The disparity in rule types used to predict the southern and northern regions was also evident in both future prediction mod els. Only range rules were used to describe most of the presence in the northern regions in both the A2 and B2 predictions, while only logit rules were used to describe most of the presence in the southern regions predicted by the A2 and B2 scenarios. Ru les that predicted absence in both future prediction models were almost entirely negated range rules while few range rules predicted absence in each model. Though much variation was exhibited between rule types and total number of rules used for each mod el experiment, a consistent environmental envelope was identified and spatially visualized. Additionally, the actual variation between rules within models and even between models is minimal (Refer to Table 3 5 & Table 3 6). Many rules produced in each mo del showed similar variable ranges thereby reducing the actual number of unique rules to less than 10 in most model subsets from an original total of 500 rules. The ability of GARP to visualize changes in variable relationships as defined by geography is a major advantage along with its ability to apply rules to the landscape pixel by pixel although it is difficult and labor intensive to extract this information from a GARP output. Recent studies conducted by McNyset (2005) and Blackburn et al. (2007) ou tlined the importance of examining rule sets to extract vital biological data that delineate the range of a species in ecologic al space and this study further confirms the utility of identifying important rule set combinations that predict areas of a lands cape to be present or absent of a s pecies. The study also produced a complete rule set for the entire best model subset along with corresponding maps that showed where the rules

PAGE 109

109 were applied to the landscape consequently concluding that GARP is not a blac k box, but rather a useful and explanatory ecological niche modeling tool. The ability of GARP to describe complex environmental requirements makes if very useful for a multitude of applications including modeling the current and future potential distrib utions of invasive species (Arriaga et al. 2004) and targeting conservation endeavors for endangered species (Peterson & Robins 2003). More research on modeling techniques is needed to expand on the utility of their outputs and to unlock even more biologi cal data that may potentially be found by modeling the ecological niche of a species.

PAGE 110

110 Figure 3 1. G enetic A lgorithm for R ule set P rediction (GARP) models showing the summated best subsets for current scenario one (A) and current scenario two (B)

PAGE 111

111 Table 3 1. Accuracy Metrics for the current predi cted distribution s Metric Scenario One Scenario Two N to build models N to test models 39 39 Total Omission 2.6 2.6 Average Omission 10.4 8.6 Total Commission 38.18 37.71 Average Commission 54.48 53.4 2 AUC* 0.7 046 (z=9. 232 §, SE=0.04 7 ) 0. 714 8 (z=9. 399 §, SE=0.047) AUC = area under curve N was divided into 50% training/50% testing at each model iteration § p < 0.001 Note: Independent data used for accuracy metrics appear in figure 2 2 (yellow points)

PAGE 112

112 Figure 3 2. Rules from one of the 10 best subsets in current scenario one (A) and rules form one of the 10 best subsets in current scenario two (B) Rules Rules

PAGE 113

113 Table 3 2. Dominant rules from one of the 10 best subsets created in GARP using current environmental conditions th at included measures of precipitation, temperature, and N ormalized D ifference V egetation I ndex (NDVI) *****Task 11 (Figure 3 4 Insert A) 1 negated range rule IF NOT altitude=[ 34.85,2821.49] AND wettest month=[21.21,127.55] AND driest month=[0.00 ,23.91] AND temperature range=[37.59,50.75] A ND mean NDVI=[ 1.00 ,0.42] THEN sp = ABSENCE 2 range rule IF altitude=[4.02 ,1480.76] AND mean temperature=[2.82,15.26] AND precipitation=[322.85,687.99] AND wettest month=[23.46,110.88] AND driest month=[0.00 ,23.91] AND NDVI amplitude=[0.06,0.33] THE N sp = PRESENCE 10 logit rule IF mean temperature*0.0000 + precipitation*0.0078 driest month*0.0039 temperature range*0.0039 + NDVI amplitude*0.0039 THEN sp = PRESENCE 15 range rule IF precipitation=[166.78,658.54] AND wettest month=[20.31, 103.67] AND temperature range=[37.73,45.42] AND mean NDVI=[0.10,0.34] AND NDVI amplitude=[0.03,0.36] THEN sp = PRESENCE 30 logit rule IF mean temperature*0.0039 + precipitation*0.0039 + wettest month*0.0039 driest month*0.0000 temperature rang e*0.0039 + mean NDVI*0.0039 THEN sp = PRESENCE 33 logit rule IF + altitude*0.0039 mean temperature*0.0000 precipitation*0.0273 + wettest month*0.0039 + mean NDVI*0.0039 NDVI amplitude*0.0000 THEN sp = ABSENCE 41 range rule IF altitude=[586 .94,1500.19] AND mean temperature=[1.07,15.26] AND driest month=[0.89,22.89] AND temperature range=[39.23,51.46] AND mean NDVI=[0.10,0.34] AND NDVI amplitude=[0.06,0.33] THEN sp = PRESENCE 46 range rule IF mean temperature=[1.07,15.36] AND precipitatio n=[146.17,658.54] AND wettest month=[19.86,102.77] AND driest month=[0.89 ,22.89] AND temperature range=[39.44,50.18] AND NDVI amplitude=[0.06,0.33] THEN sp = PRESENCE

PAGE 114

114 Figure 3 3. Maps showing the dominant rules (presence red color ramp; absence blue color ramp) of the 10 best subset tas ks projected onto the landscape for current scenario one. A) Task 11; B) Task 17; C) Task 21; D) Task 30; E) Task 35; F) Task 44; G)Task 49; H) Task 54; I) Task 56; J) Task 62. An inset of each task showing pres ence (red) and absence (grey) is also shown within each map.

PAGE 115

115 Figure 3 4. Maps showing the dominant rules (presence red color ramp; absence blue color ramp) of the 10 best subset tas ks projected onto the landscape for current scenario two. A) Task 1 ; B) Task 16; C) Task 20; D) Task 21; E) Task 32; F) Task 56; G)Task 65; H) Task 66; I) Task 70; J) Task 71. An inset of each task showing presence (red) and absence (grey) is also shown within each map.

PAGE 116

116 Figure 3 5. Maps showing the dominant rules (pre sence red color ramp; absence blue color ramp) of the 10 best subset tas ks projected onto the landscape for the A2 climate change scenario. A) Task 1 ; B) Task 16; C) Task 20; D) Task 21; E) Task 32; F) Task 56; G)Task 65; H) Task 66; I) Task 70; J) Ta sk 71. An inset of each task showing presence (red) and absence (grey) is also shown within each map.

PAGE 117

117 Table 3 3 Commission values for the future GARP model that utilized the A2 climate change scenario Model (Task) Individual Commission Total Commission Average Commission Task 01 49.2 26.60 42.03 Task 16 36.7 Task 20 48.5 Task 21 37.1 Task 32 38.6 Task 56 39.5 Task 65 37.0 Task 66 39.5 Task 70 44.1 Task 71 50.1

PAGE 118

118 Figure 3 6 Maps showing the dominant rules (presence re d color ramp; absence blue color ramp) of the 10 best subset tas ks projected onto the landscape for the B2 climate change scenario. A) Task 1 ; B) Task 16; C) Task 20; D) Task 21; E) Task 32; F) Task 56; G)Task 65; H) Task 66; I) Task 70; J) Task 71. A n inset of each task showing presence (red) and absence (grey) is also shown within each map.

PAGE 119

119 Table 3 4. Commission values for the future GARP model that utilized the B2 climate change scenario Model (Task) Individual Commission Total Commission Average Co mmission Task 01 37.9 14.12 31.92 Task 16 25.7 Task 20 50.6 Task 21 26.8 Task 32 25.3 Task 56 27.4 Task 65 26.5 Task 66 29.8 Task 70 31.7 Task 71 37.6

PAGE 120

120 Table 3 5 An example of minimum and maximum ranges of two rule sets prod uced in current scenario one. Precipitation is in millimeters, temperature is in degrees Celsius, and altitude is in meters. Model Number 11 11 11 11 11 17 17 17 17 17 Rule Number 2 10 15 30 41 4 24 25 46 47 Rule Type range logit range logit range range range range range range Mean NDVI Min 0.10 0.19 0.10 0.14 0.96 0.13 0.13 Mean NDVI Max 0.34 0.42 0.34 0.34 0.40 0.33 0.33 NDVI Amplitude Min 0.06 0.05 0.03 0.06 0.01 0.05 0.03 0.03 0.06 NDVI Amplitude Max 0.33 0.44 0.36 0.33 0.42 0.33 0.35 0.35 0.35 Precipitation Min 322.85 241.00 166.78 288.00 146.17 146.17 296.35 Precipitation Max 687.99 796.00 658.54 487.00 646.76 652.65 749.83 Wettest Month Min 23.46 20.31 49.00 14.45 16.70 20.76 20.76 Wettest Month Max 110.88 103.67 74.00 127.10 103.67 98.71 98.71 Dri est Month Min 0.00 1.00 0.89 0.00 0.89 0.89 0.89 Dri est Month Max 23.91 24.00 22.89 31.87 21.00 21.00 21.00 Average Temperature Min 2.82 1.20 1.07 1.29 1.29 1.07 11.80 Average Temperature Max 15.26 2.70 15.26 14.82 14.82 15.26 15.80 Temperature Range Min 39.40 37.73 45.90 39.23 35.67 35.17 35.17 39.44 Temperature Range Max 47.30 45.42 48.90 51.46 42.29 53.10 53.17 50.75 Altitude Min 4.02 586.94 4.02 664.66 132.00 4.02 Altitude Max 1480.76 1500.19 1422.47 1985.96 4784.00 1208.73 Location South South South North North South North North North North

PAGE 121

121 Table 3 6 An example of minimum and maximum ranges of two rule sets produced in current scenario two. Precipitation is in millimeters, temperature is in degrees Celsius, and altitude is in meters. Model Number 66 66 66 66 66 70 70 70 70 Rule Number 1 2 30 38 46 5 6 40 45 Rule Type range logit range Range range logit logit range range Precipitation Min 281.62 178.56 178 .56 284.00 287.51 184.45 Precipitation Max 682.10 620.26 620.26 617.00 667.38 646.76 Wettest Month Min 14.45 17.00 14.45 30.67 18.00 31.00 18.96 Wettest Month Max 128.45 128.00 110.88 96.91 128.00 81.00 105.92 Dri est Month Min 0.89 0.89 0.89 Dri est Month Max 20.87 21.00 21.00 Average Temperature Min 12.58 0.36 0.36 0.36 0.36 1.15 Average Temperature Max 14.78 14.89 14.56 14.56 14.89 14.89 Temperature Range Min 39.70 35.40 39.48 39.27 35.30 42.60 39.48 Temp erature Range Max 41.86 46.20 51.28 51.28 46.80 51.60 50.85 Altitude Min 28.19 30.00 508.76 8.17 6.00 8.17 Altitude Max 2611.25 3721.00 4493.48 2491.11 2141.00 2491.11 Location South South North North North South North North North

PAGE 122

122 Figure 3 7. Median range of variables describing both northern and southern distributions using measures of N ormalized D ifference V egetation I ndex (NDVI) (current scenario one) Figure 3 8. Median r ange of variables describing both no rthern and southern distributions without using measures of NDVI (current scenario two) 4.0 m 2044.3m 39.3 C 51.3 C 1.2 C 14 .8 C 0.9mm 22.9mm 20.9mm 98.7mm 172.7mm 640.9mm 4.0m 2530.0m 38.3 C 44.7C 4.4C 15.3 C 0.0mm 24.0mm 21.2mm 107.3mm 177.1mm 673.3mm 0.06 0.35 0.13 0.34 0.04 0.35 0.10 0.34 8.2m 2491.1 m 39. 3 C 50.9 C 1.2 C 14.9 C 0.9mm 21.8mm 21 .2mm 99.4mm 184.5mm 640.9mm 28.2m 2611.3m 35.9C 46.3C 1.2C 14.8 C C 0.0mm 23.1mm 19.4m m 118.5mm 191.0mm 718.6mm

PAGE 123

123 Figure 3 9. Variable cloud delineated by any area predicted present (light grey) and areas predicted present by all 10 models (dark grey) and visualized in dimension s of wettest month precipitation and temperature range

PAGE 124

124 Figure 3 10. Variable cloud delineated by location and visualized in dimensions of wettest month precipitation and temperature range

PAGE 125

125 Figure 3 11. Variable cloud delineated by any area predicted present (light grey) and areas predicted present by all 10 models (dark grey) and visualized in dimensions of mean NDVI and mean temperature

PAGE 126

126 Figure 3 12. Variable cloud delineated by location and visualized in dimensions of mean NDVI and mean temperature

PAGE 127

127 CHAPTER 4 CONCLUSION AND FUTUR E RESEARCH The goals of this thesis were to predict the current and future potential distributions of Bacillus anthracis in Kazakhstan and to examine the environmental parameters produced by the Genetic Algorithm for Rule set Prediction ( GARP ) in the model building process. I t is expected that the potential habitat for B. anthracis will contract in most regions of the country, especially the southeastern regions where the majority of anthrax outbreaks have occurred. Information on the future pot ential changes in distribution is of particular importance when identifying areas where there is an increased or decreased possibility that B. anthracis could be present on the landscape especially when supplies and resources are limited. Additionally, th e output produced by GARP provided a better understanding of how GARP constructs rule sets and projects presence and absence onto the landscape and the output was important in understanding the geographical and ecological space where B. anthracis exist in Kazakhstan. A comparison of models in chapter 2 (i.e., current scenario one and current scenario two ) concluded visually that measures of vegetation did effect the modeled ecological niche of B. anthracis (Figure 2 9). Less interior areas of Kazakhstan were predicted to provide suitable habitat for B. anthracis when modeled using measures of N ormalized D ifference V egetation I ndex (NDVI) and chapter 3 later confirmed that m ean NDVI was the most limiting variable for B. anthracis in Kazakhstan with a very narrow envelope indicating the range of m ean NDVI where B. anthracis can survive (Figure 3 7)

PAGE 128

128 There were also slightly different regional environmental parameter preferences that delineated the northern and southern distributions of B. anthracis Different genetic strains of B. anthracis exis t across the landscape of Kazakhstan and the areas in the south appear to be dominated by the A1a and A3b strains ( Aikimbayev et al. 2010 ). The predicted contraction of suitable habitat in the southern regions of Kazakhstan may lead to the eventual disapp earance of these strains or at least a significant contraction of their current habitat. Much of the predicted contraction in B. anthracis habitat may also depend on where cattle production may shift in the future based on climate change in the region. C limate change is expected to affect precipitation and temperature patterns in central Asia and these changes may expand rangeland in some areas and reduce rangeland in other areas. More importantly from an anthrax control and management standpoint, since the disease is density dependent it will be vitally important to monitor changes in cattle distribution as cattle may be moved to new areas that have not previously reported anthrax outbreaks but where B. anthracis is present in the soil. Conversely, catt le may also be moved to areas that previously exhibited a high survival. Predictions based on f uture climate change simulations should be repeatedly tested and monitored to insure that they most accurately reflect expected changes. Future climate change scenarios are hypothetical and are merely predictions based on our current knowledge of climatic processes. The models and algorithms used to predict future changes in c limate can and most likely will change as the technology used to create climate change scenarios evolves. Actual climate change will also fluctuate

PAGE 129

129 and evolve based on an intricate combination of atmospheric processes as well as political and cultural cha nges, however advanced planning that seeks to identify areas of potentially expanded or contracted B. anthracis habitat may serve to start a discussion about potential changes that researchers may need to make about how surveillance can adapt to geographic changes of the distribution of the disease. Anthrax outbreaks must be continually monitored to distinguish whether or not a shift is occurring. If a trend of fewer outbreaks in the southern region and more outbreaks in the northern region appears to be t ranspiring, then control and surveillance measures must be enacted accordingly. The results of current modeling endeavors also indicate that further modeling efforts should be employed to improve upon our current knowledge of environmental parameter s for B. anthracis and also to confirm and/or update future climate change predictions. Similar studies could also be implemented in other regions at various latitudes around the world to examine if comparable reductions on the landscape are predicted for the f uture in additional areas where B. anthracis is endemic. More research on the environmental requirements of B. anthracis will only add to recent findings about what is needed for B. anthracis survival and GARP has provided a valuable window into these nic he constraints. The Genetic Algorithm for Rule set Prediction was utilized extensively in both studies, but the second study was as much a foray into the prediction of environmental parameters that support B. anthracis survival as it was an examination of the inner workings of an ecological niche modeling (ENM) system. GARP is a popular niche modeling approach, but the actual process that is used to define the landscape where a species may or may not exist is not often discussed

PAGE 130

130 GARP is a superset algorithm t hat uses a stochastic and iterative approach during the model building process, therefore repetition or similarity in rule set outcomes indicates if a set of environmental ranges are conserved within and across models. The similarity in variable ranges ac ross models also made it less difficult to define the approximate environmental parameters that GARP established to predict the ecological and geographical distribution of B. anthracis Through the use of the rule set writing and mapping application of GA RP v. 1.1.3 a repetition in similar environmental ranges was observed and the rules created by GARP were projected on the landscape and spatially visualized. The study showed that GARP has the ability to identify environmental parameters, write rules abou t these parameters, and then project the rules onto the appropriate area of the landscape. The ability to deconstruct the output produced by GARP in a step by step approach was a major advantage that facilitated the capacity to obtain biologically useful information about B. anthracis and explain why it is predicted in certain parts of Kazakhstan and not in others. This advantage also alludes to the ability of GARP to obtain biologically useful information about other species while at the same time addres (Elith et al. 2006 Stockman et al. 2006 ). Both of these current studies concluded that the GARP modeling process is highly useful and can be used to model countless other flora, fauna, and diseases, but un derstanding the process that GARP uses and the outputs that GARP produces is the key to interpreting the distributions that GARP produces. Many other modeling approaches also identify environmental ranges and should be explored more

PAGE 131

131 extensively in future studies, but this thesis has emphasized that a great amount of biological data can potentially be obtained from GARP if used appropriately. There are many avenues for future research that not only involve expanded modeling efforts, but also further explora tion of the robust anthrax dataset from Kazakhstan. The dataset not only contains the locations of anthrax outbreaks over a 70 year period, but also the monthly occurrences of outbreaks in conjunction with the total number of animals that were affected du ring each occurrence. The temporal component of the dataset was not explored in previous studies, but anthrax is a seasonal disease that normally occurs in spring and summer months and depends on many preceding climatic events to align. Many studies have concluded that conditions resulting from a wet spring followed by a dry summer and than a heavy rain event have historically coincided with anthrax outbreaks (Dragon et al. 1999, Hugh Jones & Blackburn 2009, Parkinson et al. 2003, Smith et al. 2000, Van N ess 1971). Weather patterns that preceded an anthrax outbreak that occurred in Alberta, Canada in 1999 were examined and it was determined that the outbreak occurred after a prolonged period of warm, dry weather followed by a heavy rain event (Parkinson e t al. 2003). Parkinson et al. (2003) revealed that abnormally high temperatures in May and June may have facilitated spore growth and multiplication and that the heavy rain event potentially made the spores more accessible to livestock that incidentally i ngested contaminated soil during the period. Potential patterns between outbreaks and atmospheric forcing mechanisms should also be examined to determine if anthrax outbreaks in Kazakhstan have been historically affected by one or more teleconnections. In other areas of the world,

PAGE 132

132 atmospheric patterns such as the El Nino Southern Oscillation have been significantly correlated to disease outbreaks (Harvell et al. 2002, Rodo et al. 2002, Stapp et al. 2004). Specifically, the changes in the intensity and loc ation of the Siberian High should be investigated more. Panagiotopoulos et al. (2005) examined the intensity of the Siberian High over multiple decades and concluded that the strength of the high However, the Siberian High continues to be the most dominant pressure system in central Asia and has a far reaching influence on the regions climate (Sahsamanoglou et al. 1991). It has the greatest intensity and densest air masses of any northern hemisph eric pressure system (Ding & Krishnamurti 1987). Multiple relationships between the Siberian High and central Asian climate have been identified with the pressure system having a far reaching impact on the East Asian Winter Monsoon, Aleutian Low, and temp erature disease outbreak variability in the region is rarely discussed, but could be explored as a part of future research efforts. While preceding regional climatic condi tions have often been associated with anthrax outbreaks, other climatic conditions may help to minimize or even end an outbreak altogether. The relationship between cold air arrival and the slowing of an epidemic has been noted in previous studies. Drago n & Rennie (1995) hypothesized that an influx of colder and more humid air could decrease the amount of sporulation in the soil and slow down and eventually end an anthrax outbreak epidemic. Consequently, knowledge of climatic drivers that could potential ly signal an end to epidemics could be equally as useful as knowledge of climatic drivers that potentially

PAGE 133

133 signal a beginning to epidemics. Further research of both signals would be useful to public health agencies as they plan and prepare for potential o utbreaks. It is important to understand the multiple aspects of climatic patterns, changes, phases, and modes in order to better understand the underlying epidemiology of anthrax outbreaks not only in Kazakhstan, but in all regions of the world. Suprayogi et al. (2007) emphasized the need for more research on climatic changes and patterns that impact anthrax and other disease outbreaks. Knowledge of the driving mechanisms behind anthrax outbreaks is paramount to forecasting an increase or decrease in risk s for disease outbreaks. The ability to forecast an increased likelihood of outbreaks is crucial to disease prevention and vaccination. Blackburn et al. (2007) indicated that further understanding of anthrax will aide in efforts to prevent and potentiall y eradicate the disease from specific landscapes and Suprayogi et al. (2007) advocated for the implementation of an early warning system. Further research on outbreaks and related climatic patterns is warranted to possibly create a reliable warning system for Kazakhstan that could be efficient and economically feasible and that could reduce the risk of anthrax infection in both the livestock and human populations. To effectively implement many of the previously discussed disease surveillance and warning sy stems in Kazakhstan and elsewhere in central Asia applicable training and resources must be provided to improve the current public health system. The dissolution of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics ( USSR ) left much of the regions public health infrastructure in disrepair, but many tech nological disadvantages are currently being eroded. Over the past several years, G eographic I nformation S ystem

PAGE 134

134 (GIS) technology has been implemented in disease surveillance stations throughout central Asia to help create digital spatial databases and streamline monitoring and tracking e fforts ( Aikimbayev et al. 2010 & unpublished manuscript ). Scientists around the globe have assisted in GIS training efforts in central Asia and this has increased the ability to obtain, process, analyze, and share data and results. Newly emerging GIS, mo deling, and remote sensing technologies will provide much needed tools that may aid the public health systems potentially develop and sustain near real time disease surveillance. Additionally, the implementation of new technologies may increase the abilit y of the Kazakhstan public health system to monitor and respond to outbreak situations Through the exploration of ecoenvelopes, evolutionary patterns, and spatial distributions of B. anthracis GARP may aid in providing important information to public he alth officials. This thesis may also lay the groundwork for future research with GARP and other modeling tools on B. anthracis which may subsequently provide more information to public health officials about the disease.

PAGE 135

135 LIST OF REFERENCES Adjemian JCZ, Girvetz EH, Beckett L, Foley JE (2006) Analysis of genetic algorithm for rule set production (GARP) modeling approach for predicting distributions of fleas implicated as vectors of plague, Yersinia pestis in California. Journal of Medical Entomology 43 93 103. Aikimbayev A, Luhknova L, Temiraliyeva G, et al. (2010) Historical distribution and molecular diversity of Bacillus anthracis in Kazakhstan. Emerging Infectious Diseases In Press. Alexander LV, Zhang X, Peterson TC, et al. (2006) Global obs erved changes in daily climate extremes of temperature and precipitation. Journal of Geophysical Research 111 Anderson RP, Gomez Laverde M, Peterson AT (2002) Geographical distributions of spiny pocket mice in South America: insights from predictive mod els. Global Ecology and Biogeography 11 131 141. distributions: criteria for selecting optimal models. Ecological Modeling 162 211 232. Arnell NW (2004) Climate change and global water resources: SRES emissions and socio economic scenarios. Global Environmental Change 14 31 52. Arriaga L, Castellanos AE, Moreno E, Alarcon J (2004) Potential ecological distribution of alien invasive species and risk assessment: a ca se study of buffel grass in arid regions of Mexico. Conservation Biology 18 1504 1514. Atzmanstorfer K, Oberthuer T, Laederach P, et al. (2007) Probability modeling to reduce decision uncertainty in environmental niche indentification and driving facto r analysis: CaNaSTA case studies I n: GeoInformation for Development Bridging the Divide through Partnerships (eds Zeil P, Keinberger S) pp. 11 Wichmann Verlag Press, Heidelberg, Germany Baettig MB, Wild M, Imboden DM (2007) A climate change index: where climate change may be mos t prominent in the 21 st century. Geophysical Research Letters 34 Baker BB, Hanson JD, Bourdon RM, Eckert JB (1993) The potential effects of climate change on ecosystem processes and cattle production on U.S. rangelands. Climatic Change 25 97 117. Bar dell D (2002) Bacillus anthracis (Anthrax) has a unique place in the history of microbiology. Bios 73 133 136.

PAGE 136

136 Basille M, Calenge C, Marboutin E, Anderson R, Gaillard JM (2008) Assessing habitat selection using multivariate statistics: some refinements of the ecological niche factor analysis. Ecological Modelling 211 233 240. Bauer JT, Peterson AT (2005) Visualizing environmental correlates of species geographical range limits. Diversity and Distributions 11 275 278. Beard CB, Pye G, Steurer FJ et al. (2002) Chagas disease in a domestic transmission cycle in southern Texas, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases 9 103 105. Blackburn JK (2006) Evaluating the spatial ecology of anthrax in North America: examining epidemiological components across multiple geographic scales using a GIS based approach. PhD thesis, Louisiana State University, Graduate Faculty. Blackburn JK (2010) Integrating geographic information systems and ecological niche modeling into disease ecology: a case study of Bacillus an thracis in the United States and Mexico. In Skowronski E. Emerging and Endemic Pathogens: Advances in Surveillance, Detection, and Identification Science for Peace and Security Series, NATO. In Press. Blackburn JK, Hugh Jones ME, Hunter D, McNyset KM, Hadfield T ( 2009 ) Field validation of fundamental niche predictions of Bacillus anthracis for the U.S. Bacillus ACT 2009, 30 August 3 September 2009, Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Blackburn JK, McNyset KM, Curtis A, Hugh Jones ME (2007) Modeling the geog raphic distribution of Bacillus anthracis the causative agent of anthrax disease, for the contiguous United States using predictive ecologic niche modeling. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 77 1103 1110. Box EO, Crumpacker DW, Hardin ED (1993) A climatic model for location of plant species in Florida, U.S.A. Journal of Biogeography 20 629 644. Braack LE, de Vos V (1990) Feeding habits and flight range of blow flies (Chrysomyia spp.) in relation to anthrax transmission in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research 57 141 142. Bradley NL, Leopold AC, Ross J, Huffaker W (1999) Phenological changes reflect climate change in Wisconsin. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science 96 9701 9704. Brotons L, Thuiller W, Araujo MB, Hirzel AH (2004) Presence absence versus presence only modelling methods for predicting bird habitat suitability. Ecography 27 437 448.

PAGE 137

137 Carlson JK, Cortes E (2003) Gillnet selectivity of small coastal sharks of f the southeastern United States. Fisheries Research 60 405 414. Carpenter G, Gillison AN, Winter J (1993) DOMAIN: a flexible modelling procedure for mapping potential distributions of plants and animals. Biodiversity and Conservation 2 667 680. Ch erkasskiy BL (1996) Anthrax in Russia. Salisbury Medical Bulletin Special Supplement 87 6 7. Cherkasskiy BL (1999) A national register of historic and contemporary anthrax foci. Journal of Applied Microbiology 87 192 195. Coker RJ, Atun RA, McKee M (2004) Health care system frailties and public health Lancet 363 1389 1392. Collins M, Tett SFB, Cooper C (2001) The internal climate variability of HadCM3, a version of the Hadley Centre coupled model without flux adjustments. Climate Dynamics 17 61 81. Costa J, Peterson AT, Beard CB (2002) Ecologic niche modeling and differentiation of populations of Tr iatoma brasiliensis neiva, 1911, the most important chagas disease vector in northeastern Brazil (Hemiptera, Reduviidae, Triatominae). American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 67 516 520. ) A reconstructed Siberian High index since A.D. 1599 from Eurasian and North American tree rings. Geophysical Research Letters 32 L05705, doi:10.1029/2004GL022271. Davis AJ, Jenkinson LS, Lawton JH, Shorrocks B, Wood S (1998) Making mistakes when predic ting shifts in species range in response to global warming. Nature 391 783 786. Ding Y, Krishnamurti T ( 1987 ) Heat budget of the Siberian High and the winter monsoon. Monthly Weather Review 115 2428 2449. Dobson A (2004) Population dynamics of path ogens with multiple host species. The American Naturalist 164 S64 S78. Dragon DC, Bader DE, Mitchell J, Woollen N (2005) Natural dissemination of Bacillus anthracis spores in northern Canada. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 71 1610 1615.

PAGE 138

138 Dra gon DC, Elkin BT (2001) An overview of early anthrax outbreaks in northern Canada: field reports of the health of animals branch, agriculture Canada, 1962 71. Arctic 54 32 40. Dragon DC, Elkin BT, Nishi JS, Ellsworth TR (1999) A review of anthrax in Ca nada and implications for research on the disease in northern bison. Journal of Applied Microbiology 87 208 213. Dragon DC, Rennie RP (1995) The ecology of anthrax spores: tough but not invisible. Canadian Veterinary Journal 36 295 301. Dragon DC, Rennie RP, Elkin BT (2001) Detection of anthrax spores in endemic regions of northern Canada. Journal of Applied Microbiology 91 435 441. Earth Systems Research Institute (ESRI) (2007) ArcGIS 9.2 http://www.esri.com/ Earth Systems Research Institute (ESRI) (200 8 ) ArcGIS 9. 3 http://www.esri.com/ Elith J, Graham CH, Anderson RP, et al. (2006) Novel methods improve prediction of Ecograp hy 29 129 151. Emmett BA, Beier C, Estiarte M, et al. (2004) The response of soil processes to climate change: results from manipulation studies of shrublands across and environmental gradient. Ecosystems 7 625 637. Estrada Pea A, Thuiller W (2008 ) An assessment of the effect of data partitioning on the performance of modeling algorithms for habitat suitability for ticks. Medical and Veterinary Entomology 22 248 257. Feria TP, Peterson TA (2002) Prediction of bird community composition based on point occurrence data and inferential algorithms: a valuable tool in biodiversity assessments. Diversity and Distributions 8 49 56. Flato GM, Boer GJ (2001) Warming asymmetry in climate change simulations. Geophysical Research Letters 28 195 198. Gainer RS, Saunders R (1989) Aspects of the epidemiology of anthrax in Wood Buffalo National Park and environs. Canadian Veterinary Journal 30 953 956. Gates CC, Elkin BT, Dragon DC (1995) Investigation, control and epizootiology of anthrax in a geogra phically isolated, free roaming bison population in northern Canada. Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research 59 256 264. Giagtzoglou N, Bellen HJ (2006) Fighting anthrax with flies. PNAS 103 3013 3014.

PAGE 139

139 Giorgi F, Whetton PH, Jones RG, et al. (2001) Emerging patterns of simulated regional climatic changes for the 21 st century due to anthropogenic forcings. Geophysical Research Letters 28 3317 3320. Gordon C, Cooper C, Senior CA, et al. (2000) The simulation of SST, sea ice extents and ocean heat t ransports in a version of the Hadley Centre coupled model without flux adjustments. Climate Dynamics 16 147 168. with dynamic sea ice. Monthly Weather Review 125 875 907. Gordon HB, Rotstayn LD, McGregor JL, et al. (2002) The CSIRO Mk3 climate system model. CSIRO Atmospheric Research Technical Paper No. 60. Grin n ell J (1917) The niche relationships of the California thrasher. The Auk 34 427 433. Grinell J (1924) Geography and evolution. Ecology 5 225 229. Guisan A, Zimmermann NE (2000) Predictive habitat distribution models in ecology. Ecological Modelling 135 147 186. Hanson RP (1959) The earliest account of anthrax in man and animals in North America. Jo urnal of the American Medical Association 135 463 465. Hart CA, Beeching NJ (2002) A spotlight on anthrax. Clinical Dermatology 20 365 375. Harvell CD, Mitchell CE, Ward JR, et al. (2002) Climate warming and disease risks for terrestrial and marine biota. Science 296 2158 2162. Hay SI, Tatem AJ, Graham AJ, Goetz SJ, Rogers DJ (2006) Global environment data for mapping infectious disease distribution. In: Global Mapping of Infectious Diseases: Methods, E xamples, and Emerging Application (eds Hay S I Graham A J Rogers D J ) pp. 3 8 79 A cademic Press, London, United Kingdom Hepinstall JA, Sader SA (1997) Using Bayesian statistics, thematic mapper satellite imagery, and breeding bird survey data to model bird species probability of occurrence in Maine. Photogr ammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing 63 1231 1237. Hijmans RJ, Cameron SE, Parra JL, Jones PG, Jarvis A (2005) Very high resolution interpolated climate surfaces for global land areas. International Journal of Climatology 25 1965 1978.

PAGE 140

140 Hirzel AH Hausser J, Chessel D, Perrin N (2002) Ecological niche factor analysis: how to compute habitat suitability maps without absence data? Ecology 83 2027 2036. Hirzel AH, Le Lay G, Helfer V, Randin C, Guisan A (2006) Evaluating the ability of habitat sui tability models to predict species presences. Ecological Modelling, 199 142 152. Holt RD, Gaines MS ( 1992 ) The analysis of adaptation in heterogeneous landscapes: Implications for the evolution of fundamental niches. Evolutionary Ecology 6 433 447. Holt AC, Salkeld DJ, Fritz CL, Tucker JR, Gong P (2009) Spatial analysis of plague in California: niche modeling predictions of the current distribution and potential response to climate change. International Journal of Health Geographics 8 38. Hugh Jo nes ME (1990) Global trends in the incidence of anthrax. Salisbury Medical Bulletin Special Supplement 68 2 4. Hugh Jones M, Blackburn J (2009) The ecology of Bacillus anthracis Molecular Aspects of Medicine 30 356 367. Hugh Jones ME, de Vos V (20 02) Anthrax and wildlife. Revue Scientifique et Technique de L Office International des Epizooties 21 359 383. Huntley B, Green RE, Collingham YC, et al. (2004) The performance of models relating species geographical distributions to climate is indepen dent of tropic level. Ecology Letters 7 417 426. Hutchinson GE (1957) Concluding Remarks. Coldspring Harbor Symposia Quantitative Biology 22 415 427. IPCC (2000) Emissions scenarios. In: A special report of working group II of the Intergovernmental Pan el on Climate Change pp. 3 11 Cambridge Unversity Press, Cambridge United Kingdom Johns TC, Gregory JM, Ingram WJ, et al. (2003) Anthropogenic climate change for 1860 to 2100 simulated with the HadCM3 model under updated emissions scenarios. Climate Dynamics 20 583 612. Ka ufmann AF (1990) Observations on the occurrence of anthrax as related to soil type and rainfall. Salisbury Medical Bulletin Supplement 68 16 17. Keim P, Kalif A, Schupp J, et al. (1997) Molecular evolution and diversity in Bacillus anthracis as detecte d by amplified fragment length polymorphism markers. Journal of Bacteriology 179 818 824.

PAGE 141

141 Keim P, Price LB, Kevytska AM, et al. (2000) Multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis reveals genetic relationships within Bacillus anthracis Journa l of Bacteriology 182 2928 2936. Kimoto M (2005) Simulated change of the East Asian circulation under global warming scenario. Geophysical Research Letters 32 L16701, doi:10.1029/2005GL023383. Klute DS (1999) Modeling habitat relationships for Ameri can woodcock in Pennsylvania: effects of spatial autocorrelation and spatial scale. PhD dissertation, Pennsylvania State University, University Park. Klute DS, Lovallo MJ, Tzilkowski WM, Storm GL (2000) Determining multi scale habitat and landscape associ ations for American woodcock in Pennsylvania. In : Proceedings of the Ninth American Woodcock Symposium ( ed s McAnley DG, Bruggnik JG, Sepik GF ) pp. 42 49 U S Department of Interior, USGS, Washi ngton, D.C Kluza DA, McNyset KM (2005) Ecological niche modeling of aquatic invasion species. Aquatic Invaders 16 1 7. Kolonin GV (1971) Evolution of anthrax. Report II. History of spread of the disease (English translation). Zhurnal Mikrobiology Epidemiolo gy 48 118 122. Laforce FM (1994) Anthrax state of the art clinical article. Clinical Infectious Diseases 19 1009 1013. Lal M, Harasawa H (2001) Future climate change scenarios for Asia as inferred from selected coupled atmosphere ocean global cli mate models. Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan 79 219 227. Lalitha MK, Kumar A (1996) Anthrax a continuing problem in southern India. Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology 14 63 72. Latimer AM, Wu S, Gelfand AE, Silander JA (2006) Building statistical models to analyze species distributions. Ecological Applications 16 33 50. Legendre P (1993) Spatial autocorrelation: trouble or new paradigm? Ecology 74 1659 1673. Levine RS, Peterson AT, Yorita KL, et al. (2007) Ecological ni che and geographic distribution of human monkeypox in Africa. PLoS ONE 2 : e176.

PAGE 142

142 Levine RS, Yorita KL, Walsh MC, Reynolds MG (2009) A method for statistically comparing spatial distribution maps. International Journal of Health Geographics 8 1 7. Lindeq ue PM, Turnbull PC (1994) Ecology and epidemiology of anthrax in the Etosha National Park, Namibia. Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research 61 71 83. MacArthur RH (1958) Population ecology of some warblers of northeastern coniferous forests. Ecolog y 39 599 619. MacLeod CD, Mandleberg L, Schweder C, Bannon SM, Pierce GJ (2008) A comparison of approaches for modeling the occurrence of marine animals. Hydrobiologia 612 21 32. Mandelberg L (2004) A comparison of the predictive abilities of four ap proaches for modelling the distribution of cetaceans. MSc Thesis, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, U nited K ingdom Manel S, Williams HC, Ormerod SJ (2001) Evaluating presence absence models in ecology: the need to account for prevalence. The Journal of Applied Ecolo gy 38 921 931. McNyset KM (2005) Use of ecological niche modelling to predict distributions of freshwater fish species in Kansas. Ecology of Freshwater Fish 14 243 255. McNyset KM, Blackburn JK (2006) Does GARP really fail miserably? A response to St ockman et al. (2006). Diversity and Distributions 12 782 786. Mongoh MN, Dyer NW, Stoltenow CL, Hearne R, Khaitsa ML (2008) A review of management practices for the control of anthrax in animals: the 2005 anthrax epizootic in North Dakota Case Study. Zoonoses in Public Health 55 279 290. Moynihan WA (1963) Anthrax in Canada. Canadian Veterinary Journal 4 283 287. Nakazawa Y, Williams R, Peterson AT, et al. (2007) Climate change effects on plague and tularemia in the United States. Vector Borne an d Zoonotic Diseases 7 529 540. Nix HA (1986) A biogeographic analysis of Australian elapid snakes. In: Atlas of Australian elapid snakes pp. 4 15. Bureau of Flora and Fauna, Canberra Austra lia

PAGE 143

143 Panagiotopoulos F, Shahgedanova M, Hannachi A, Stephenson DB (2005) Observed trends and teleconnections of the Siberian High: a recently declining center of action. Journal of Climate 18 1411 1422. Parkinson R, Rajic A, Jenson C (2003) Investigation of an anthrax outbreak in Alberta in 1999 using a geographic informat ion system. Canadian Veterinary Journal 44 315 318. Parra Olea G, Martinez Meyer E, Perez Ponce de Leon G (2005) Forecasting climate change effects on salamander distribution in the highlands of central Mexico. Biotropica 37 202 208. Pearce JL, Boyce MS (2006) Modelling distribution and abundance with presence only data. Journal of Applied Ecology 43 405 412. Pearson RG, Thuiller W, Araujo MB, et al. (2006) Model based uncertainty in species range prediction. Journal of Biogeography 33 1704 1711. niche modeling. The Condor 103 599 605. modeling. The Quarterly Review of Biolog y 78 419 433. Peterson AT, Ball LG, Cohoon KP (2002 a ) Predicting distributions of Mexican birds using ecological niche modelling methods. Ibis 144 E27 E32. Peterson AT, Bauer JT, Mills JN (2004) Ecologic and geographic distribution of filovirus disea se. Emerging Infectious Diseases 10 40 47. Peterson AT, Cohoon KP (1999) Sensitivity of distributional prediction algorithms to geographic data completeness. Ecological Modelling 117 159 164. Peterson AT, Martnez Campos C, Nakazawa Y, Martnez Meyer E (2005) Time specific ecological niche modeling predicts spatial dynamics of vector insects and human dengue cases. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 99 647 655. Peterson AT, Ortega Huerta MA, Bartley J, et al. (2002 b ) Future projections for Mexican faunas under global climate change scenarios. Nature 416 626 629. Peterson AT, Papes M, Eaton M (2007) Transferability and model evaluation in ecological niche modeling: a comparison of GARP and Maxent. Ecography 30 550 560.

PAGE 144

14 4 Peterson AT, Papes M, Kluza DA (2003) Predicting the potential invasive distributions of four alien plant species in North America. Weed Science 51 863 868. Peterson AT, Papes M, Soberon J (2008) Rethinking receiver operating characteristic analy sis applications in ecological niche modeling. Ecological Modeling 213 63 72. Peterson AT, Robins CR (2003) Using ecological niche modeling to predict barred owl invasions with implications for spotted owl conservation. Conservation Biology 17 1161 11 65. Peterson AT, Sanchez Cordero V, Beard CB, Ramsey JM (2002 c ) Ecologic niche modeling and potential reservoirs for chagas disease, Mexico. Emerging Infectious Diseases 8 662 667. Peterson AT, Sanchez Cordero V, Soberon J, et al. (2001) Effects of glo bal climate change on geographic distributions of Mexican Cracidae. Ecological Modelling 144 21 30. Peterson AT, Shaw JJ (2003) Lutzomyia vectors for cutaneous leishmaniasis in southern Brazil: Ecological niche models, predicted geographic distributions and climate change effects. International Journal of Parasitology 33 919 931. Peterson AT, Soberon J, Sanchez Cordero V (1999) Conservation of ecological niches in evolutionary time. Science 285 1265 1267. Phillips SJ, Dudik M (2008) Modeling of sp ecies distributions with Maxent: new extensions and a comprehensive evaluation. Ecography 31 161 175. Phillips SJ, Dudik M, Schapire RE (2004) A maximum entropy approach to species distribution modeling. In: Proceed ings of the 21 st International Conference on Machine Learning (eds Greiner R Schuurmans D ) pp. 655 662 ACM P ress New York, New York Prins HHT, Weyerhauser FJ (1987) Epidemics in populations of wild ruminants: anthrax and impala, rinderpest and buffalo in Lake Manyara National Park, Tanzania. O ikos 49 28 38. Rees HB, Smith MA, Spendlove JC, et al. (1977) Epidemiologic and laboratory investigations of bovine anthrax in two Utah counties in 1975. Public Health Reports, 92 176 186. Remson JV, Good DA (1996) Misuse of data from mist net capture s to assess relative abundance in bird populations. Auk 113 381 398.

PAGE 145

145 Robinson S, Milner Gulland EJ (2003) Political change and factors limiting numbers of wild and domestic ungulates in Kazakhstan. Human Ecology 31 87 110. Rodo X, Pascual M, Fuchs G, Faruque ASG (2002) ENSO and cholera: a nonstationary link related to climate change. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 99 12901 12906. Rogers DJ (2000) Satellites, space, time and the African trypanosomiases. Advances in Parasitology 47 128 171. Rogers DJ (2006) Models for vectors and vector borne diseases. Advances in Parasitology 62 1 35. Rogers DJ, Hay SI, Packer MJ (1996) Predicting the distribution of tsetse flies in West Africa using temporal fourier processed meteorological sa tellite data. Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology 90 225 241. Ron RS (2005) Predicting the distribution of the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in the New World. Biotropica 37 209 221. Rosenzweig C, Karoly D, Vicarelli M, et al. (2008) Attributing physical and biological impacts to anthropogenic climate change. Nature 453 Sahsamanoglou HS, Makrogiannis TJ, Kallimopoulos PP (1991) Some aspects of the basic characteristics of the Siberian anticyclone. International Journal o f Climatology 11 827 839. Saile E, Koehler TM (2006) Bacillus anthracis multiplication, persistence, and genetic exchange in the rhizosphere of grass plants. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 72 3168 3174. Saito K, Cohen J (2003) The potential r ole of snow cover in forcing interannual variability of the major Northern Hemisphere mode. Geophysical Research Letters 30 1302 1305. S c huch R, Fischetti VA (2009) The secret life of the anthrax agent Bacillus anthracis : bacteriophage mediated ecologic al adaptations. PLoS ONE 4 e6532. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0006532 Sharp RJ, Roberts AG (2006) Anthrax: th e challenges for decontamination. Journal of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology 81 1612 1625. Smith KL, d e Vos V, Bryden HB, Hugh Jones ME, Klevytska A (1999) Meso scale ecology of anthrax in southern Africa: a pilot study of diversity and clustering Journal of Applied Microbiology 87 204 207.

PAGE 146

146 Smith KL, d e Vos V, Bryden H, et al. (2000) Bacillus anthracis diversity in Kruger National Park. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 38 3780 3784. Soberton J (2007) Grinnellian and Eltonian niches and geogr aphic distributions of species. Ecology Letters 10 1115 1123. Soberon J, Peterson AT (2005) Interpretation of models of fundamental ecological Biodiversity Informatics 2 1 10. Stapp P, Antolin MF, Ball M (200 4) Patterns of extinction in prairie dog metapopulations: plague outbreaks follow El Ni o events. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 2 235 240. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) (2008) SPSS v. 16.0. http://www.spss.com/ Stockman AK, Beamer DA, Bond JE (2006) An evaluation of a GARP model as an approach to predicting the spatial distribution of non vagile invertebrate species. Diversity and Distributions 12 81 89. Stockwell DRB, Beach JH, Stewa rt A, et al. (2006) The use of the GARP genetic algorithm and internet grid computing in the lifemapper world atlas of species biodiversity. Ecological Modelling 195 139 145. Stockwell DRB, Peters D (1999) The GARP modelling system: problems and solutio ns to automated spatial prediction. International Journal of Geographical Information Science 13 143 158. Suprayogi A, Setijanto H, Wibawan IWT, Satrija F, Surya WD ( 2007 ) A view of Bogor climatology related to the emerging anthrax and avian influenza d iseases since January 2004 to February 2005: importance for early warning system. Journal of Agriculture and Rural Development in the Tropics and Subtropics (eds Priosoer yanto BP, Tiuria R ) pp. 139 149. K a ssel University Press, Wi tzenhausen, Germany. Sweeney AW, Beebe NW, Cooper RD, Bauer JT, Peterson AT (2006) Environmental factors associated with distribution and range limits of malaria vector Anopheles farauti in Australia. Journal of Medical Entomology 43 1068 1075. Terribile LC, Diniz Filho JAF (2009) Spatial patterns of species richness in New World coral snakes and the metabolic theory of ecology. Acta Oecologica 35 163 173. Thappa DM, Karthikeyan K (2001) Anthrax: an overview within the India subcontinent. International Journal of Derma tology 40 216 222.

PAGE 147

147 change. Global Change Biology 10 2020 2027. Thuiller W, Araujo MB, Lavorel S (2003) Generalized models vs. classification tree analysis: predicting spatial distributions of plant species at different scales. Journal of Vegetation Science 14 669 680. Turnbull P (2008) Anthrax in humans In : A nthrax in Humans and Animals pp. 36 52 World Health Organization Press Geneva, Swizterland Turnbull PCB, Bowen J, Mann J (1996) Stu bborn contamination with anthrax spores. Environmental Health 104 171 173. Turnbull PCB, Lindeque PM, Roux JL, Bennett AM, Parks SR (1998) Airborne movement of anthrax spores from carcass sites in the Etosha National Park, Namibia. Journal of Applied Mi crobiology 84 667 676. Turner AJ, Galvin JW, Rubira RJ, Condron RJ, Bradley T (1999) Experiences with vaccination and epidemiological investigations on an anthrax outbreak in Australia in 1997. Journal of Applied Microbiology 87 294 297. Van Ert MN, Easterday WR, Huynh LY, et al. ( 2007 ) Global genetic population structure of Bacillus anthracis PLoS ONE 2 e461. Van Ness GB (1959) Anthrax a soil borne disease. Soil Conservation 21 206 208. Van Ness GB (1971) Ecology of Anthrax. Science 172 1 303 1307. Van Ness G, Stein CD (1956) Soils of the United States favorable for anthrax. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association 128 7 12. Veatch RM (1989) Medical ethics in the Soviet Union. Hastings Center Report 19 11 14. Vlassov V (2000) Is there epidemiology in Russia? Journal of Epidemiology C ommunity Health 54 740 744. Wallace MR, Hale BR, Utz GC et al. (2002) Endemic Infectious Diseases of Afghanistan. Clinical Infectious Diseases 34 S171 S207. Watanabe M, Nitta T (1998) Decadal changes in the atmospheric circulation and associated surface climate variations in the northern hemisphere winter. Journal of Climate 12 494 510.

PAGE 148

148 Wiley EO, McNyset KM, Peterson AT, Robins CR, Stewart AM (2003) Niche modeling and geographic ran ge predictions in the marine environment using a machine learning algorithm. Oceanography 16 120 127. Williams GL, Russell KR, Seitz WK (1978) Pattern recognition as a tool in the ecological analysis of habitat. In : Classification, inventory, and analysi s of fish and wildlife habitat: The proceedings of a national symposium ( ed Marmelstein A ) pp. 521 531. US Department of the Interior, US Fish and Wildlife Service, W ashington, D.C. Wilson RT (1997) Livestock, past ures, and the environment in the Kyrgyz Republic, central Asia. Mountain Research and Development 17 57 68. Woods CW, Ospanov K, Myrzabekov A, et al. (2004) Risk factors for human anthrax among contacts of anthrax infected livestock in Kazakstan. Americ an Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 71 48 52. Woodward DB, Geldyeva GV (2006) The landscape method of analysis and assessment of ecotourism destinations in the Republic of Kazakhstan. In: Exploring the Nature of Management: 3 rd International Confere nce on Monitoring and Management of Visitor Flows in Recreational and Protected Areas (eds Siegrist D, Clivaz C, Hunziker M, Iten S), pp. 2 86 29 1 University of Applied Sciences, Rapperswil Switzerland. Wuhib T, Chorba TL, Davidiants V, Mac WR, McNabb SJ (2002) Assessments of the infectious disease surveillance system of the Republic of Armenia: an example of surveilla nce in the Republics of the former Soviet Union. BMC Public Health 2 1 8. Ye H (2001) Quasi biennial and quasi decadal variations in snow accumulation over northern Eurasia and their connections to the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Journal of Climate 14 4573 4584. Ye H, Cho HR, Gustafson PE (1998) The changes in Russian winter snow accumulation during 1936 83 and its spatial patterns. Journal of Climate 11 856 863. Ye H, Ellison M (2003) Changes in transitional snowfall season length in northern Eur asia. Geophysical Research Letters 30 1252 1254. Yu F, Price KP, Ellis J, Peijun S (2003) Response of seasonal vegetation development to climatic variations in eastern central Asia. Remote Sensing of Environment 87 42 54.

PAGE 149

149 BIOGRAPHICAL SKE TCH Timothy Andrew Joyner was born in 1985 in Waxhaw, North Carolina. He graduated summa cum laude from Parkwood High School in May 2004. In the fall of 2004, Joyner began undergraduate studies at Louisiana State University where he was a me mber of the Honors College and the College of Arts and Sciences. In August 2004, he was employed as a student research assistant in the World Health Organization Collaborating Center (WHOCC) for GIS and Remote Sensing for Public Health within the Departme nt of Geography and Anthropology. While with the lab, Joyner collaborated on multiple projects including a study of mosquitoes transmitting West Nile in East Baton Rouge Parish, animating a historical yellow fever outbreak in New Orleans, database managem ent of the Kazakhstan anthrax dataset, database management of Red Cross data for Hurricane Katrina, and media research for Hurricane Katrina. Joyner also provided technical support for a GIS teaching seminar in Almaty, Kazakhstan in July 2006. He graduat ed cum laude in s pring 2008 with a Bachelor of Science in g eography. In the fall of 2008, Joyner enrolled in California State University, Fullerton to he became a graduate research assistant in the Spatial Epidemiology and Ecology Research (SEER) Laboratory where he collaborated on numerous projects in Kazakhstan pertaining to multiple diseases and potenti al disease reservoirs/vectors, d eveloped training materials and conducted several GIS and ecolo gical niche modeling training seminars in Kazakhstan and Rhode Island, and p resented research at multiple conferences In the summer of 2009, Joyner transferred to the University of Florida to continue working in

PAGE 150

150 the SEER Lab which had also moved to the University of Florida. He received his Master of Science from the University of Florida in spring 2010.