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Wideband Millimeter-Wave Integrated Circuits and Systems for High Speed Point-to-Point Link and Automotive Radar Applications

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041481/00001

Material Information

Title: Wideband Millimeter-Wave Integrated Circuits and Systems for High Speed Point-to-Point Link and Automotive Radar Applications
Physical Description: 1 online resource (146 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Chen, Ying
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2010

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: ads, amplitude, antenna, automotive, balun, bicmos, cadence, chip, circuit, cmos, dhbt, divider, doubler, eband, fmax, frequency, frontend, ft, gbps, gmax, harmonic, hbt, hfss, ic, inp, integrated, linear, lna, measurement, microstrip, millimeterwave, mixer, momemtum, pa, phase, pll, probe, qps, receiver, sige, simulation, sonnet, submillimeterwave, synthesizer, system, technology, thz, transceiver, transmitter, triplet, universal, vco, waveguide, wideband
Electrical and Computer Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Electrical and Computer Engineering thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Until recently, low-cost millimeter-wave (mm-wave) integrated radio systems are emerging thanks to the rapid evolution of advanced SiGe and CMOS technologies. In particular, low-cost SiGe BiCMOS technology has been identified as a technology well-suited for both active and passive imaging applications, such as high-resolution automotive radars and concealed weapon detections due to its excellent high frequency performance, high yield, and high level of integration. To further maintain the low production cost advantage, efficient technology sharing suggests the key components should be universal. Therefore it is worthwhile to integrate multiple standards that include lower E-band 71?76 GHz and higher E-band 81?86 GHz multi-Gbps high speed point-to-point links, 76?77 GHz long-range and 77?81 GHz short-range automotive radars into a single chip. This Ph.D. dissertation demonstrates wideband active and passive components and systems to be utilized for such a universal transceiver. By investigating the circuit architectures and using combined analog and microwave design techniques, these individual circuit blocks, such as low-power linear 77 GHz low-noise amplifier (LNA), down-conversion mixer, passive balun, tunable quadrature power splitter (QPS), and 100 GHz regenerative frequency divider (RFD), and 80 GHz active frequency doubler are independently characterized and optimized for gain, wideband, noise figure (NF) and linearity performance. A 68?82 GHz highly integrated, wideband linear receiver is demonstrated. The receiver achieves a maximum gain of 28.1 dB, a NF of 8 dB, and an input-referred 1 dB gain compression point (IP1dB) of -23.6 dBm at 77 GHz while dissipating 413 mW. The receiver enables applications within the band to share and reuse the same front-end chip. To further explore the opportunity at higher frequency, an 81?92.6 GHz low-noise amplifier is demonstrated with a gain of 21 dB, a NF of 9 dB, and an IP1dB of -18.8 dBm. On the other hand, critical transmitter building blocks, such as an up-conversion mixer has also been investigated. A highly linear double-balanced active up-conversion mixer based upon multi-tanh triplet technique has been validated to show a single sideband (SSB) power conversion gain of 5.1 dB and an output-referred 1 dB gain compression point (OP1dB) of -5.8 dBm at 77 GHz. Finally, a high-power signal generation at submillimeter-wave is demonstrated and fabricated in InGaAs/InP D-HBT technology. The second harmonic push-push oscillator shows an output power of 0 dBm at 200 GHz, which opens a new frontier for applications, such as weather observation radar, chemical, and tumor detections, and next-generation optical systems. By using an even higher order harmonic generation, THz signal sources can be expected in the very near future.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Ying Chen.
Thesis: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2010.
Local: Adviser: Lin, Jenshan.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2012-04-30

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2010
System ID: UFE0041481:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041481/00001

Material Information

Title: Wideband Millimeter-Wave Integrated Circuits and Systems for High Speed Point-to-Point Link and Automotive Radar Applications
Physical Description: 1 online resource (146 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Chen, Ying
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2010

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: ads, amplitude, antenna, automotive, balun, bicmos, cadence, chip, circuit, cmos, dhbt, divider, doubler, eband, fmax, frequency, frontend, ft, gbps, gmax, harmonic, hbt, hfss, ic, inp, integrated, linear, lna, measurement, microstrip, millimeterwave, mixer, momemtum, pa, phase, pll, probe, qps, receiver, sige, simulation, sonnet, submillimeterwave, synthesizer, system, technology, thz, transceiver, transmitter, triplet, universal, vco, waveguide, wideband
Electrical and Computer Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Electrical and Computer Engineering thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Until recently, low-cost millimeter-wave (mm-wave) integrated radio systems are emerging thanks to the rapid evolution of advanced SiGe and CMOS technologies. In particular, low-cost SiGe BiCMOS technology has been identified as a technology well-suited for both active and passive imaging applications, such as high-resolution automotive radars and concealed weapon detections due to its excellent high frequency performance, high yield, and high level of integration. To further maintain the low production cost advantage, efficient technology sharing suggests the key components should be universal. Therefore it is worthwhile to integrate multiple standards that include lower E-band 71?76 GHz and higher E-band 81?86 GHz multi-Gbps high speed point-to-point links, 76?77 GHz long-range and 77?81 GHz short-range automotive radars into a single chip. This Ph.D. dissertation demonstrates wideband active and passive components and systems to be utilized for such a universal transceiver. By investigating the circuit architectures and using combined analog and microwave design techniques, these individual circuit blocks, such as low-power linear 77 GHz low-noise amplifier (LNA), down-conversion mixer, passive balun, tunable quadrature power splitter (QPS), and 100 GHz regenerative frequency divider (RFD), and 80 GHz active frequency doubler are independently characterized and optimized for gain, wideband, noise figure (NF) and linearity performance. A 68?82 GHz highly integrated, wideband linear receiver is demonstrated. The receiver achieves a maximum gain of 28.1 dB, a NF of 8 dB, and an input-referred 1 dB gain compression point (IP1dB) of -23.6 dBm at 77 GHz while dissipating 413 mW. The receiver enables applications within the band to share and reuse the same front-end chip. To further explore the opportunity at higher frequency, an 81?92.6 GHz low-noise amplifier is demonstrated with a gain of 21 dB, a NF of 9 dB, and an IP1dB of -18.8 dBm. On the other hand, critical transmitter building blocks, such as an up-conversion mixer has also been investigated. A highly linear double-balanced active up-conversion mixer based upon multi-tanh triplet technique has been validated to show a single sideband (SSB) power conversion gain of 5.1 dB and an output-referred 1 dB gain compression point (OP1dB) of -5.8 dBm at 77 GHz. Finally, a high-power signal generation at submillimeter-wave is demonstrated and fabricated in InGaAs/InP D-HBT technology. The second harmonic push-push oscillator shows an output power of 0 dBm at 200 GHz, which opens a new frontier for applications, such as weather observation radar, chemical, and tumor detections, and next-generation optical systems. By using an even higher order harmonic generation, THz signal sources can be expected in the very near future.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Ying Chen.
Thesis: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2010.
Local: Adviser: Lin, Jenshan.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2012-04-30

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2010
System ID: UFE0041481:00001


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1 WIDEBAND MILLIMETER-WAVE INTEGR ATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS FOR HIGH SPEED POINT-TO-P OINT LINK AND AUTOMOTIVE RADAR APPLICATIONS By AUSTIN YING-KUANG CHEN A DISSERTATION PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARITAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2010

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2 2010 Austin Ying-Kuang Chen

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3 To my parents

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4 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would first like to express my deepest gratitude to my parents for their unconditional support and caring (when I needed it the most), especially my dad who has always believed in me and never doubted my abilities to excel and achieve, and my mom, who has taken good care of me since I was young. My greatest respect for them cannot be overemphasized. I am profoundly grateful to my academic adv isor at the University of Florida, Dr. Jenshan Lin for his continuous guidance and support. His encouragement and advice throughout my Ph.D. career have been extremely motivating and indispensable. His professional knowledge in the field of research has been invaluable. I would also like to thank my Ph.D. committee members Dr William Eisenstadt, Dr. John Harris, Dr. Loc Vu-Quoc, and Dr. Fan Ren for their helpful comments and insightful opinions. In addition, I would like to thank Dr. Rober t Fox and Dr. Kenneth O for helpful and stimulating discussions. I am also thankful to Dr. Young-Kai Chen, the director of the High Speed Electronics Design Group, Bell Laboratories, Alcatel-Lucent for pr oviding me with the opportunity to work with other top-notch tal ents in the Lab and the resources to perform my Ph.D. research. I am deeply grateful to Dr. Yves Baeyens who was my professor at Columbia University and industrial advisor. Dr. Baeyens is also the technical manager of the High Speed Electronics Design Group during my time at Bell Labs. His remarkable knowledge in microwave/millimeter-wave circuits and high speed optical communication design has certai nly helped in paving the way fo r my research direction. My heartfelt thanks also go to my colleagues at Bell Labs: Dr. Joe Weiner for teaching me how to do layout design when I first started; Dr. Kun-Yii Tu for his continuous

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5 support and encouragement; Dr. Jaesik Lee for his generous design insights on high speed analog-to-digital converters (ADCs ); Pascal Roux for enlightening me in microwave power amplifier designs; Mart a Rambaud for her great patience and measurement support; Dr. Noriaki Kaneda for useful suggestions; Dr. Nils Weimann, Dr. Vincent Houtsma, and Dr. Rose Kopf for chip fabrication; and Dr. Ting-Chen Hu for his helpful suggestions. Dr. Hu has also been a great friend who played basketball with me after works (Of course, he needs more exercise and practice). I am also indebted to the exchange scholars from the Republic of Taiwan, Dr. Hsiao-Bin Barry Liang, Fan-Ren Liao, and Hsien-Ku Chen for sharing some design insights; intern from Columbia University Shih-An Yu for useful discussi ons on phase-locked loop (PLL); UCLA interns Jim Sun and Michael Wu for helpful discu ssions on antenna and metamaterial; and intern from Korea University, Hokyu Lee fo r sharing his knowledge in ADC and op-amp designs. They have all made my life at work much more enjoyable. I want to acknowledge the help that I re ceived from many professors during my memorable time at Columbia University, Dr. Wen-I Wang, Dr. Peter Kinget, Dr. Yannis Tsividis, Dr. Paul Diam ent, and Dr. Irving Kalet. My appreciation also goes to the forme r and current Radio Fr equency Circuits and Systems (RFCSR) Research group members: Dr. Tien-Yu Chang, Dr. Lance Covert, Dr. Zhenning Low, Dr. Changzhi Li, Zivin Park, Mingqi Chen, Xiaogang Yu, Yan Yan, and Te-Yu Kao. I would also like to thank Chun -Ming Tang for his help with my work during my time at UF as well as for being a competitive basketball player. Last but not least, I would especially like to thank my parents and my elder brother once again for their spiritual and financial support, and for always being with me during

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6 the ups and downs. Without their encouragemen t, this dissertation would not even have been started.

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7 TABLE OF CONTENTS page ACKNOWLEDG MENTS.................................................................................................. 4 LIST OF TABLES.......................................................................................................... 10 LIST OF FIGURES........................................................................................................ 11 ABSTRACT................................................................................................................... 15 CHAPTE R 1 INTRODUCTION.................................................................................................... 17 1.1 Moti vati on......................................................................................................... 17 1.2 Objective and Sc ope of Research.................................................................... 20 1.3 Public ations...................................................................................................... 20 1.4 Outline of Dissertat ion....................................................................................... 21 2 MILLIMETER-WAVE ACTIVE AND PASSIVE DEVICES ....................................... 23 2.1 Introdu ction....................................................................................................... 23 2.2 Front-End Technology...................................................................................... 24 2.2.1 Device Figures of Meri t (FoMs) ............................................................... 24 2.2.2 Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor (HBT) Devices.................................... 29 2.2.3 JAZZ 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS Technology............................................... 31 2.3 Back-End-of-Line (BEOL) Te chnology.............................................................. 34 2.4 Design and Modeling of Transmissi on Lines.................................................... 35 3 LOW-NOISE AMPLIF IERS (LNAs)......................................................................... 40 3.1 Introdu ction....................................................................................................... 40 3.2 62 GHz Broadband F eedback Casc ode LNA................................................... 41 3.2.1 Circuit Topol ogy...................................................................................... 41 3.2.2 Stability Anal ysis..................................................................................... 43 3.2.3 Synthesis of Matching Ne tworks............................................................. 45 3.2.4 Experiment al Results............................................................................... 46 3.3 77 GHz Low-Pow er Linear LNA........................................................................ 50 3.3.1 Amplifier Circuit Design........................................................................... 50 3.3.2 Experiment al Results............................................................................... 53 3.4 87 GHz High Gain LNA..................................................................................... 57 3.4.1 Amplifier Circuit Design........................................................................... 57 3.4.2 Experiment al Results............................................................................... 58 3.5 Chapter Summary............................................................................................. 61 4 WIDEBAND MIXED LUMPED-DISTRIBUT ED-ELEMENT POWER SPLITTERS.. 64

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8 4.1 Introdu ction....................................................................................................... 64 4.2 Out-of-Phase Power Splitters Design............................................................... 66 4.2.1 Mixed Lumped-Distributed Wilkinson Po wer Divider............................... 66 4.2.2 and Phase Shifters in 180o and 90o Power Splitters......................... 67 4.3 Implementation and Ex perimental Results........................................................ 69 4.4 Chapter Summary............................................................................................. 76 5 HIGH GAIN DOUBLE-BALANCED ACTIVE FREQUENC Y DOUBLER................. 77 5.1 Introdu ction....................................................................................................... 77 5.2 Highlights of Frequency Do ubler Design Approaches....................................... 77 5.3 Active Frequency Doubler Design.................................................................... 79 5.3.1 Circuit Architecture .................................................................................. 79 5.3.2 St ability.................................................................................................... 81 5.3.3 Design for High Speed, Conv ersion Gain, and Output Power................. 83 5.3.4 Layout Design......................................................................................... 84 5.4 Experimental Results........................................................................................ 84 5.5 Chapter Summary............................................................................................. 91 6 HIGHLY LINEAR DOUBLE-BALANCE D ACTIVE UP-CONVERSION MI XERS..... 92 6.1 Introdu ction....................................................................................................... 92 6.2 Up-Conversi on Mixer Desi gn............................................................................ 93 6.3 Experimental Results........................................................................................ 94 6.4 Chapter Summary............................................................................................. 97 7 INTEGRTATED WIDEBAND LINEAR RE CEIVER............................................... 100 7.1 Introdu ction..................................................................................................... 100 7.2 Circuit Bl ocks De sign...................................................................................... 101 7.2.1 Low-Noise Amplifier............................................................................... 101 7.2.2 Down-Conversion Mix er and Integrated Passive Balun......................... 102 7.2.3 Internal LO Gener ation.......................................................................... 105 7.3 Implem entation and Ex perimental Results...................................................... 105 7.4 Chapter Summary........................................................................................... 111 8 SUBMILLIMETER-WAVE HIGH-POWER HARMONIC SIGNAL GENERATION. 112 8.1 Introdu ction..................................................................................................... 112 8.2 Submicron Indium Phosph ide (InP) D-HB T Technol ogy................................. 113 8.3 Push-Push Oscilla tor Circuit Design............................................................... 116 8.3.1 General Nth Harmonic Oscilla tors Analysis............................................ 116 8.3.2 160 GHz and 200 GHz Push-Push Oscillat ors De sign.......................... 121 8.4 Ex perimental Results...................................................................................... 125 8.5 Chapter Summary........................................................................................... 132 9 SUMMARY AND FU TURE WORKS..................................................................... 134

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9 9.1 Su mmary........................................................................................................ 134 9.2 Future Works.................................................................................................. 135 9.2.1 Wideband Direct -Conversion Transmitter Front-End ............................. 135 9.2.2 Other Opportunities in Bu lk CMOS........................................................ 135 LIST OF RE FERENCES............................................................................................. 137 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH.......................................................................................... 146

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10 LIST OF TABLES Table page 3-1 Performance comparisons of 60 GHz silicon-based s ingle-ended low-noise amplif iers............................................................................................................ 50 3-2 Performance comparisons of 77 GHz silicon HBT-based single-ended lownoise amp lifiers................................................................................................... 56 3-3 Performance of previously reported 85 GHz silicon HBT-based si ngleended low-noise amplifiers................................................................................. 62 4-1 Performance summary of the three power splitters ............................................ 76 5-1 Performance of prio r published frequen cy doublers........................................... 91 6-1 Performance of prior published silicon-based up-conversion mixers .................. 99 7-1 Performance of prior published SiGe HBT/BiCMOS 77 GHz downcovnversio n mix ers........................................................................................... 110

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11 LIST OF FIGURES Figure page 1-1 Atmospheric attenuat ion versus frequenc y......................................................... 18 2-1 Simplifi ed HBT model......................................................................................... 26 2-2 Circuit diagram for maximu m available gai n extraction ...................................... 26 2-3 Circuit diagram for maxi mum stable gain extraction ........................................... 27 2-4 Circuit diagram for Masons unilateral power gain extr action ............................. 28 2-5 Top view of a simp lified HBT dev ice la yout........................................................ 32 2-6 Simulated transit frequency (fT), maximum oscillation frequency (fmax), and maximum power gain (Gmax) of the device.......................................................... 34 2-7 Cross sections of SiGe BiCM OS BEOL.............................................................. 36 2-8 Implementations of th e coplanar waveguide and thin -film microstrip line........... 37 2-9 Simulated loss of quarter-wavelength ( /4) line plotted against characteristic impedance (Zo)................................................................................................... 38 3-1 Circuit schematic of the twostage 62 GHz low-no ise amp lifier.......................... 42 3-2 Stability analysis of a cascode am plifier............................................................. 44 3-3 Chip microphotograph of the two-stage 62 GHz low-noise am plifier.................. 47 3-4 Measured power gain and noise figure of th e 62 GHz LNA................................ 48 3-5 Measured input and output retu rn losses of t he 62 GHz LNA............................ 48 3-6 Measured reverse isolation of the 62 GHz LN A.................................................. 49 3-7 Measured linearity ch aracteristics of Pout and gain of t he 62 GHz LNA.............. 49 3-8 Circuit schematic of the twostage 77 GHz low-no ise amp lifier.......................... 52 3-9 Microphotograph of the two-stage 77 GHz low-noise amplifier.......................... 54 3-10 Simulated and measured power gain (S 21) and noise figure of the 77 GHz LNA.................................................................................................................... 54 3-11 Simulated and measured input and output return losses of the 77 GHz LNA..... 55

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12 3-12 Measured linearity ch aracteristics of Pout and gain of t he 77 GHz LNA.............. 55 3-13 Circuit schematic of the 87 GHz low-nois e amplif ier........................................... 59 3-14 Chip microphotogr aph of the 87 GHz lo w-noise am plifier................................... 59 3-15 Simulated and measured power gains (S21) and noise figures of the 87 GHz LNA.................................................................................................................... 60 3-16 Simulated and measured input and output return losses of the 87 GHz LNA..... 60 3-17 Measured linearity ch aracteristics of Pout and gain of t he 87 GHz LNA.............. 62 4-1 Simplified block diagrams of single sideband (SSB) quadrature architecture. receiver and transmi tter...................................................................................... 65 4-2 Block diagrams of W ilkinson powe r dividers....................................................... 66 4-3 Unit Cells for generating 90 and 45 phase shifts.......................................... 67 4-4 Mixed lumped-distributed-element out-of-phase pow er splitter .......................... 68 4-5 Chip microphotographs of the 180 power splitter and 90 power splitter.......... 70 4-6 Measurement and simulation resu lts of the 180 power sp litter......................... 72 4-7 Measurement and simulation resu lts of the 90 power sp litter........................... 73 4-8 Simulation results of the co mpensated 90 pow ers splitter................................ 75 5-1 Schematic of the double-balan ced active frequency do ubler ............................. 80 5-2 Sources of instabilit y in emitte r followers ............................................................ 82 5-3 Microphotograph of the double-bal anced active frequency doubl er................... 85 5-4 On-wafer measurement setup for the active frequency doubler......................... 86 5-5 Measured conversion gain at inpu t powers of -9 dBm and -8 dBm.................... 86 5-6 Measured fundament al suppr ession................................................................... 88 5-7 Output spectrum of the active frequency doubler at 50 GHz output frequency (not correct ed fo r the losses).............................................................................. 88 6-1 Block diagram and circuit schemat ic of the double-balanced active upconversion mixer................................................................................................ 95 6-2 Microphotograph of the acti ve up-conversi on mixe r........................................... 96

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13 6-3 Measurement setup for active up-conver sion mixe r........................................... 96 6-4 Measured SSB conversion gain and LO to RF isolation..................................... 98 6-5 Measured mixer linearity charac teristics at 77 GHz and 80 GHz........................ 98 7-1 Simplified block diagram of the wideband receiver with on-chip active frequency doubler ............................................................................................. 101 7-2 Circuit schematic of t he 77 GHz two-st age LNA [26]........................................ 102 7-3 Circuit schematic of the standalone down-conver sion mix er............................ 103 7-4 Microphotograph of the wideband re ceiver....................................................... 106 7-5 Measured receiver an d down-conversion mixer conversion gain and noise figure (IF fix ed at 100 MHz) .............................................................................. 106 7-6 Measured mixer conversion gai n and SSB NF vs. LO input power .................. 108 7-7 Measured RF and LO port matching and por t-to-port isol ation of the mixer..... 109 7-8 Measured linearity characte ristics of IF output power and conversion gain of the mixe r and receiver at RF = 77 GH z............................................................ 109 8-1 Dry etched D-HBT befor e planarizati on [92]..................................................... 114 8-2 Extrapolated fT and fmax of 0.5 x 4.0 m2 emitter InP D-HBT measured as a function of collect or current [93]........................................................................ 115 8-3 Current gain (|h21|2) and unilateral Masons gain (GU) plotted against frequency [92]................................................................................................... 116 8-4 Block diagram of the push-push arch itecture with phase coupling network...... 117 8-5 Block diagram of the push-push arch itecture with fundam ental differential oscill ator........................................................................................................... 117 8-6 Schematic of the pushpush oscillator based on differential Colpitts topology. 122 8-7 Equivalent sub-oscillator circuits in differential mode and common mode........ 123 8-8 Inverted thin-film microstrip transmission line cross se c tion............................. 124 8-9 Layout view and microphotograph of the 200 GHz push-push oscillator .......... 125 8-10 Layout view and microphotograph of the 160 GHz push-push oscillator .......... 126 8-11 Push-push oscillator measuremen t setup. ........................................................ 126

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14 8-12 Measured second harmonic frequency and output power as a function of negative supply VEE for 200 GHz push-push osc illator..................................... 127 8-13 Measured second harmonic frequency and output power as a function of negative supply VB for 200 GHz push-push oscillator (VEE fixed at 3.2 V)........ 127 8-14 Downconverted spectrum of 200 GHz push-push oscillator. (Not yet corrected for the lo sses)................................................................................... 129 8-15 Detailed downconverted spectrum of 200 GHz push-push oscillator. (Not yet corrected for the lo sses)................................................................................... 129 8-16 Measured second harmonic frequency and output power as a function of negative supply VEE for 160 GHz push-push osc illator..................................... 130 8-17 Measured second harmonic frequency and output power as a function of negative supply VB for 160 GHz push-push oscillator (VEE fixed at 3.0 V)........ 130 8-18 Downconverted spectrum of 160 GHz push-push oscillator. (Not yet corrected for the lo sses)................................................................................... 131 8-19 Detailed downconverted spectrum of 160 GHz push-push oscillator. (Not yet corrected for the lo sses)................................................................................... 131 9-1 Block diagram of the wideband di rect-conversion transmitter front-end........... 135

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15 Abstract of Dissertation Pr esented to the Graduate School of the University of Florida in Partial Fulf illment of the Requirements for t he Degree of Doctor of Philosophy WIDEBAND MILLIMETER-WAVE INTEGR ATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS FOR HIGH SPEED POINT-TO-P OINT LINK AND AUTOMOTIVE RADAR APPLICATIONS By Austin Ying-Kuang Chen May 2010 Chair: Jenshan Lin Major: Electrical and Computer Engineering Until recently, low-cost millimeter-wav e (mm-wave) integrated radio systems are emerging thanks to the rapid evolution of advanced SiGe and CMOS technologies. In particular, low-cost SiGe BiCMOS technol ogy has been identified as a technology wellsuited for both active and passive imaging applications, such as high-resolution automotive radars and concealed weapon detections due to it s excellent high frequency performance, high yield, and high level of in tegration. To further maintain the low production cost advantage, efficient technol ogy sharing suggests the key components should be universal. Therefore it is worthwh ile to integrate mult iple standards that include lower E-band 71 GHz and higher E-band 81 GHz multi-Gbps high speed point-to-point links, 76 GHz long-r ange and 77 GHz short-range automotive radars into a single chip. This Ph.D. dissertation demonstrates wideband active and passive components and systems to be utilized for such a universal transceiver. By investigating the circuit arch itectures and using combined analog and microwave design techniques, these individual circuit blocks, such as low-power linear 77 GHz low-noise amplifier (LNA), down-conversion mixer, passive balun, tunable quadrature power splitter (QPS), and 100 GH z regenerative frequency divider (RFD),

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16 and 80 GHz active frequency doubler are independ ently characterized and optimized for gain, wideband, noise figur e (NF) and linearity performa nce. A 68 GHz highly integrated, wideband linear receiver is demonstrated. The receiver achieves a maximum gain of 28.1 dB, a NF of 8 dB, and an input-referred 1 dB gain compression point (IP1dB) of -23.6 dBm at 77 GH z while dissipating 413 mW. The receiver enables applications within the band to share and reus e the same front-end chip. To further explore the opportunity at higher frequency, an 81.6 GHz low-noise amplifier is demonstrated with a gain of 21 dB, a NF of 9 dB, and an IP1dB of -18.8 dBm. On the other hand, critical transmitter bu ilding blocks, such as an up-conversion mixer has also been investigated. A highly linear double-balanced active up-conversion mixer based upon multi-tanh triplet technique has been validated to show a single sideband (SSB) power conversion gain of 5.1 dB and an output-referred 1 dB gain compression point (OP1dB) of -5.8 dBm at 77 GHz. Finally, a high-power signal generation at submillimeter-wave is demonstrated and fabricated in InGaAs/InP D-HBT technology. The second harmonic push-push oscillator shows an output power of 0 dBm at 200 GHz, which opens a new frontier for applications, such as weather observation radar, chemical, and tumor detections, and next-generation optical systems. By using an even higher order harmonic generation, THz signal sources can be expected in the very near future.

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17 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Motivation Recently, the IEEE 802.16 Working Group has been de veloping standards for Wireless Metropolitan Area Networks (WMAN) in the 10 GHz frequency range [1]. Much of its development has been dedicate d to encompassing the 60 GHz millimeterwave (mm-wave) band for multi-gigabit short-range personal area networks (PANs) and wireless high-definition multimedia interf aces (wHDMIs). According to Shannons theorem, the maximum capacit y that can provide the hi ghest possible data rate for reliable transmission in bits per second can be expressed by (1.1): )1(log2SNR BWCChannel (1-1) This fact intuitively suggests that, for a given signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the most straightforward way to enhance a high data ra te with even a modest modulation is by increasing the channel bandwidth (BWchannel). With the availability of a 7 GHz bandwidth from the 59 GHz unlicensed band in Europe and Japan, and 57 GHz in the United States, congestion issues at frequency below 10 GHz are ameliorated. The 60 GHz band offers several unique advantages that include: 1) large contiguous bandwidth for high data rate; 2) small wavelength for realizing in tegrated antennas; 3) excellent frequency reuse (less cochannel interference) for more secure wirele ss communication. With the advent of high fT and fmax silicon-based technology processes and their high integration capability, high yield, and low cost, these have aroused stro ng research interests in and demand for silicon millimeter-wave integr ated circuits and systems.

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18 Besides the evolution of the short -range 60 GHz standard, the FCC has also approved the licensed E-band which spans 71 GHz, 81 GHz, and 92 GHz. The promising applications in -band include fiber replacem ent or extension, point-topoint wireless local area net works, and broadband internet a ccess with a data rate of more than 10 Gbps utilizing more spectrally efficient modulation schemes [2]. The transmission range at 70 GHz and 80 GHz can be many miles compared with the 60 GHz counterpart. Figure 1-1 shows atmospheric attenuation versus frequency. A large peak at 60 GHz caused by oxygen molecule s (15 dB/km) has adversely increased the atmospheric attenuation. However, a large window can be seen in which the attenuation has dropped back to 0.5 dB/km and is therefore deemed suitable for wireless communication. Figure 1-1. Atmospheric attenuation versus frequency.

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19 On the other hand, significant resear ch and development efforts have been dedicated to high resolution millimeter-wave ac tive and/or passive imaging for military, biomedical, and automotive applications such as concealed weapon and tumor detections, and collision avoidance radar sensor. Of particular interest, high performance long(76 GHz) and short(77 GHz) range automotive radars have shown steady progress toward commercial success in todays much advanced siliconbased technologies. In automotive radar app lications, the sensors must be able to function in various adverse weather and low-visibility conditions and still accurately detect and position different targets. Ther efore, stringent demands on high linearity and dynamic range are required to meet the specifications. Depending on the channel bandwidth, the high dynamic range requirem ent in narrowband systems can sometimes be relaxed if the distortions and interferers fall out of band. However, for wideband systems such as high speed point-to-point wireless link (71 GHz) and short range automotive radar (77 GHz), special design techniques to boost the input-referred third order intercept point (IIP3) are often required to fulfill the link budget and dynamic range [3]. Silicon Germanium (SiGe) technology has been identified as a suitable semiconductor technology with the capabi lity to fulfill the high frequency demands and the cost aspects, especially with its potential for large scale integration when compared with the exotic III-V compound semiconducto rs such as Indium Phosphide (InP) and Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) [4]. To reduce t he production cost and time-to-market, the design of the key components should be universal. Efficient technology sharing between E-band high speed data communication and automotive radars [5] is one way

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20 to tackle this problem but that requires the front-end circuits to operate within the allocated wide bandwidth. 1.2 Objective and Scope of Research The objective and scope of this research ar e to investigate the crit ical front-end and back-end millimeter-wave building blocks such as low-noise amplifier (LNA), downand upconversion mixers, volt age-controlled oscill ator (VCO), power amplifier (PA), high-speed frequency divider, frequency multiplier, passive balun and quadrature power splitter that are needed to accomplish a mo re complete front-end transmitter and receiver. Combined novel analog and microwave circuit design techniques are used extensively to overcome the difficulties encountered in the design (including a high linearity requirement, low noise perform ance, and high output power) as well as to optimize the individual circuit for the best millimeter-wave performance. Upon successful demonstration of the critical building blocks and front-end integration, a more ambitious effort could be dedicated the development of a high performance phased array transceiver. This transceiver would co nsist of multiple antennas that enable beam and null forming in various directions using el ectronic steering in an effort to eliminate the need for continuous mechanical reorient ation of the antennas. In addition, with multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) as a diversity technique, the system can further improve the link quality. 1.3 Publications [1] A. Y.-K. Chen H.-B. Liang, Y. Baeyens, Y.-K. Ch en, and Y.-S. Lin, A broadband millimeter-wave low-noise amplifier in SiGe BiCMOS technology, in IEEE Silicon Monolithic Integrated Circu its in RF systems (SiRF), Orlando, FL, Jan. 2008, pp. 8689.

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21 [2] A. Y.-K. Chen H.-B. Liang, Y. Baeyens, Y.-K Chen, J. Lin, and Y.-S. Lin, Wideband mixed lumped-distributed-element 90o and 180o power splitters on silicon substrate for millimet er-wave applications, in IEEE Radio Frequency Integrated Circuit (RFIC) Symposium Atlanta, GA, J un. 2008, pp. 449. [3] A. Y.-K. Chen Y. Baeyens, Y.-K. Chen, and J. Lin, A 36 GHz high gain millimeter-wave double-doubled active frequency doubler in SiGe BiCMOS, IEEE Microw. Wireless Compon. Lett., vol. 19, no. 9, pp. 572, Sep. 2009. [4] A. Y.-K. Chen Y. Baeyens, Y.-K. Chen, and J. Lin, A low-power linear SiGe BiCMOS low-noise amplifier for millimeter-wave Active imaging, IEEE Microw. Wireless Compon. Lett., vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 103, Feb. 2010. [5] A. Y.-K. Chen Y. Baeyens, Y.-K. Chen, and J. Lin, A W-band highly linear SiGe BiCMOS double-balanced active up-conversi on mixer using multi-tanh technique, IEEE Microw. Wireless Compon. Lett., vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 220, Apr. 2010. [6] A. Y.-K. Chen Y. Baeyens, Y.-K. Chen, and J. Lin, A 68 GHz integrated wideband linear receiver using 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS, accepted, IEEE Radio Frequency Integrated Circuit (RFIC) Symposium Anaheim, CA, May. 2010. [7] A. Y.-K. Chen Y. Baeyens, Y.-K. Chen, and J. Lin, A 21 dB gain 87 GHz lownoise amplifier using 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS, IEE Electron. Lett. vol 46, no. 5 pp. 332, Mar. 2010. [8] A. Y.-K. Chen Y. Baeyens, Y.-K. Chen, and J. Lin, A W-band high gain doublebalanced active up-conversion mixer using 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS, submitted to IEE Electron. Lett. [9] A. Y.-K. Chen Y. Baeyens, Y.-K. Chen, and J. Lin, A 100 GHz SiGe BiCMOS regenerative frequency divider using inducti ve peaking technique, in preparation for IEE Electron. Lett. [10] A. Y.-K. Chen Y. Baeyens, Y.-K. Chen, and J. Li n, Design and characterization of W-band high gain power amplifiers for high-speed point-to-point link and automotive radar applicatio ns, in preparation for Journal of Solid-State Circuits (JSSC) [11] A. Y.-K. Chen H.-B. Liang, Y. Baeyens, Y.-S. Li n, Y.-K. Chen, and J. Lin, A tunable phase-compensated wideband millimeter-wave quadr ature power splitter on silicon substrate, in preparation for Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques (TMTT) 1.4 Outline of Dissertation This dissertation presents and demonstrat es some of the af orementioned circuit blocks necessary for system inte gration. Chapt er 2 reviews some indispensable figures

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22 of merit (FoMs) to characterize a device technology. Chapter 3 presents three LNAs for various applications at 60 GHz, 70 GHz, and 90 GHz band. Next, in Chapter 4, two 180o and 90o power splitters using the back-end-of -the-line (BEOL) of the technology are demonstrated. Chapter 5 shows a high gain wideband double-balanced frequency doubler while Chapter 6 shows a highly linear up-conversion mixers using multi-tanh triplet technique. Chapter 7 demonstrates an integrated wideband linear receiver. Chapter 8 discusses a method to further ex tend the operating frequen cy of an oscillator implemented with Indium Phos phide (InP) technology. Fi nally, Chapter 9 summarizes the dissertation and discusses the future works.

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23 CHAPTER 2 MILLIMETER-WAVE ACTIVE AND PASSIVE DEVICES 2.1 Introduction In recent years, the considerable advanc es in silicon-based technologies propelled by high performance digital applications such as microprocessors and digital signal processing have been now deemed comparable to the III-V compound semiconductors in many aspects. However, some intrinsic barriers such as low carrier mobility, low resistivity, and non-insulating si licon substrate still present many technical challenges for performance of silicon-based technolog ies. Thanks to the aggressive device geometry scaling in CMOS and SiGe HBT, the millimeter-wave circuit performance which can be quantified by transit frequency (fT), maximum oscillation frequency (fmax), and minimum noise figure (NFmin) are continuously be ing improved. High fT and fmax of 300 GHz in SiGe BiCMOS have been demonstra ted in [6], [7]. These remarkable metrics have enabled the design of millimeter-wave integrat ed circuits with low power and high performance. The ability to integr ate with the digital backend in silicon technologies means high system in tegration is possible, thereby reducing the number of separate modules needed in a traditiona l III-V approach. This research has demonstrated that lower overall system cost can be expected with silicon technologies than with their III-V semiconductors counterpa rt. Moreover, higher yi eld achievable with silicon technologies is also important to reduce the manufacturing cost. In this chapter, different fi gures of merit such as fT, fmax, and different power gain definitions will be introduced to quantify the performance of a given device technology. Several properties of HBT device such as transconductance and NF will be outlined. Next the JAZZ 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS technology used for the millimeter-wave circuit

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24 designs will be presented. Back-end-of-the-li ne (BEOL) technology will be outlined. And finally two types of commonly used transmi ssion lines will be discussed and compared. 2.2 Front-End Technology 2.2.1 Device Figures of Merit (FoMs) For small signal applic ati ons, the transit frequency fT (current-gain-bandwidth product) is a useful figure of merit which is defined as the frequency at which the short circuit current gain becomes unity. It is mainly important for analog design and is typically used to characterize the gain-bandwidth product of a lumped amplifier stage. As each process shrinks, the lateral and vertic al scaling led to lo wer parasitic and thus faster speed for the CMOS and BiCMOS devices. In addition al, the modification of the doping SiGe base layer combined with t he reduction in the graded base width have improved the base transit time, resulting in an increase in device speed. Subsequent reduction in the epi layer thickness also leads to a decrease in the collector transit time, further increasing the fT. This can be derived by conv erting from S par ameters to H parameters h21 which denotes forward current gain as follows: 1221 22 11 21 21)1)(1( 2 SSSS S h (2-1) In normal frequency range, h21 rolls off with -20 dB/decade. At lower frequencies, leakage may lead to flat h21 while inductive parasitic gives resonance in h21 at high frequencies. It is worthwhile to mention t hat de-embedding is crucial to determine the intrinsic fT of the device. In the fi rst order approximation, fT can also be expressed as follows: )(2CC g fm T (2-2)

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25 where C is the sum of the base-emitter junc tion depletion-layer capacitance and the emitter diffusion capacitance while C is the base-collector junction depletion-layer capacitance [8]. Sometimes, fT is also useful to quantify t he speed of large signal digital circuits such as ECL static dividers. Unlike circuit designs at RF < 5 GHz where the operating frequencies are much less than the maximum oscillation frequency fmax in which the device performance can be treated independently of the device lay out, at millimeter-wave, the device performance can be adversely impacted by the layout. fmax is defined as the frequency at which the device becomes passive (or maximum power gain is unity). In many circuits, fmax is considered as a more important FoM than the actual fT which does not take into account the need to push and pull the currents in the circuits through the loads. fmax is not influenced by lossless matching netwo rks applied at input and output or by lossless feedback networks. Additionally, fmax is independent of circuit topologies such as common-base (gate), commonemitter (source), common-co llector (drain). As the name suggests, fmax is the maximum frequency at which the device can be made to oscillate (fundamental). Therefore it gives maximum operating range for oscillators. Losses in resonator, bias, and matching networks in practical applications will reduce the maximum frequency. Additionally, fmax also provides an insight about the maximum frequency and useful power gain the device will have for tuned resonant amplifiers. Figure 2-1 shows a simplified HB T model to characterize fmax. The fmax can be approximated as cbib TCr f f8max (2-3)

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26 CbeCcbi CcbxgmVbeRbeRbbBC E RexRc rb Figure 2-1. Simplified HBT model. Where Ccbi and Ccbx are intrinsic and extrinsic collector-base capacitance, respectively. Note that to obtain a high fmax, the base resistance rb and Ccb should be reduced. Reduced rb can be achieved by selecting a large but fingered device. This also helps reduce the noise contribution of the device. However, large size requires large current drive for peak fT and fmax, and more importantly the junction capacitance also increases with the larger transistors. Therefore compromises have to be made to suit the individual functional block performance. Before getting to the determination of fmax, several gain definitions should be discussed. Figure 2-2 shows the circuit di agram for maximum available gain (MAG) extraction. Vsig Lossless Matching Network Lossless Matching Network RsigRL Figure 2-2. Circuit diagram for ma ximum available gain extraction.

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27 When the device is unconditionally stable, there exists a maximum available gain for the device under test. The matching netwo rks are lossless and are used to achieve simultaneously conjugate i nput and output match. This gain can be expressed as follows: 12 12 21 KK S S MAG (2-4) Where K is Rollet stabilit y factor and should be 1 for stability. When K is less than unity, then MAG is no long valid, inst ead maximum stable gain (MSG) shall be introduced. Figure 2-3 shows the circuit diagram for maximum stable gain (MSG) extraction. Vsig Lossless Matching Network Lossless Matching Network RsigRL Resistive Stabilization Figure 2-3. Circuit diagram for maximum stable gain extraction. Since the device is conditionally stable, the device first needs to be stabilized with resistors. Then the device is simult aneously conjugate input and output matched. The MSG can be expressed as follows: 12 21 12 21S S Y Y MSG (2-5) In MSG, K is exactly equal to unity and this defines the knee frequency where the device is right on the boundary bet ween stability and instability. Note that in the first order, MSG does not depend on fT or rb. For the hybridmodel, MSG rolls off at -10

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28 dB/decade while MAG has no fixed slope. In general, the fmax can be extrapolated from MAG. However, the accuracy of this coul d sometimes be uncertain since the slope changes as a function of frequency (depending on K). A more accurate extraction of fmax can be extrapolated from Masons unilateral power gain (GU). Figure 2-4 shows the circuit diagram for Masons unilateral power gain (GU) extraction. Vsig Lossless Matching Network Lossless Matching Network Rsig Shunt Feedback Series Feedback RL Figure 2-4. Circuit diagram for Mason s unilateral power gain extraction. Lossless reactive feedback networks are us ed to compensate for the device feedback Y12. The device is then stabilized and simu ltaneously conjugat e input and output matched. The GU can be expressed as follows: 1221 2211 2 12214GGGG YY GU )/Re(/ 1/ 2 11221 1221 2 1221SSSSk SS (2-6)

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29 For the hybridmodel, GU rolls off at -20 dB/decade and is independent of all the lossless reactive elements and pad reactance. Therefore the fmax can be more reliably obtained after the extrapolation from Masons gai n. It is interesting to point out that GU remains unchanged regardless of the circuit topology. 2.2.2 Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor (HBT) Devices SiGe BiCM OS processes integrated hi gh-performance heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) with state-of-the-ar t CMOS technology. Bipolar devices are developed for front-end high speed and high frequency operation. Bipolar transistors are preferred for RF designs due to the higher value of gm achievable for a given bias current. MOS devices on the other hand are ma inly being considered for backend digital or high-density DSP functions. In such case the co-existence of both bipolar and MOS devices suggests that SiGe BiCMOS can be a viable candidate to address the individual needs and enhance the circuit performance. When compared to CMOS devices, SiGe HB Ts exhibit lower 1/f noise, higher transconductance (gm), higher output resistance (ro), and higher breakdown voltage for the same device speed. In particular, the intrinsic gain which is set by gmro can help to better justify the technology of choice. Tran sconductance is the ability of the device to source the current due to t he exponential relationship bet ween the output current in response to the input voltage of the bipolar device. Its transconductance is much better than that of an FET where the relationship is only quadratic. To see the difference, gm of the bipolar and FET can be express ed by (2-7) and (2-8) as follows: k T qI gC BJTm, (2-7) D MOSmIconst g ., (2-8)

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30 The transconductance of the bipolar is proportional to the collector current IC while the transconductance of the FE T is only proportional to t he square root of its drain current ID. Besides, by adjusting the Ge concentrati on which modifies the electric field across the base and thus the carrier concent ration, it improves the Early voltage (VA), therefore the output resistance. These advan tages are particularly meaningful for millimeter-wave VCO and power amp lifier designs. In addition, fmax of an HBT is less sensitive to layout parasitic and this further enhances the design robustness. In bipolar transistors, the 1/f noise is mostly generated in the emitter/base junction. MOS devices, on the other hand are surface conduction devices where the current flow is affected by the properties of the Si/SiO2 interface. The qu ality of the p-n junction and the quality of the oxide interface dictate the power of the 1/f noise. The HBT devices these days tend to have a clean Si/SiGe interface and their noise properties, especially 1/f noise are signific antly better than that of MOS devices. Moreover, node-to-node scaling in FETs moves oxide interfaces even closer to the active channel, resulting in a poorer 1/f noise performance. In bipolar, NF depends on the intrinsic base resistance rb, emitter resistance re, internal capacitances and transconductance. However, the addition of Ge implanted into the base changes the band-gap voltage in a way that suppresses revers e hold injection from base to emitter. This allows the base doping to be greatly increased. Heavier doping decreases the base resistance and therefore lowers the the rmal noise of the base. The heavier doped poly emitters also lead to lower emitter resistance. Device matching is another issue to c onsider especially in analog design. The matching of VBE is determined by the doping profile s of the p-n junctions across the

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31 emitter-base. With each technology node sca ling, these doping levels increase and therefore better matching can be expected. Due to constant field scaling, t he optimal current density for peak fT, peak fmax, and NFmin remained unchanged from one technology node to another. This is convenient when porting the design from one node to anot her. However, for HBT with different technology nodes, the optimal current density for peak fT, peak fmax, and NFmin varies. Higher collector current density (JC) at a given fT can be obtained by increasing the collector doping, which delays the onset of the Kirk effect. For a given fmax, the higher current density along with high breakdown voltage in HBTs offers significant advantage over the MOS devices for large signal circuit blocks such as VCO and PA. This high power capability shows that SiGe HBTs are at least competitive with transistors made in III-V semiconductors. 2.2.3 JAZZ 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS Technology All active circuits in this dissertati on are designed and fabricated with JAZZ 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS technology [9], [10]. The effective emitte r width of the HBT is 0.15 m. The breakdown voltages VCEO and VCBO of the HBT are 1. 8 V and 5.8 V, respectively. The low-cost technology is accomplished without employing extra processing steps such as selective epitaxy and raised extrinsic base to further enhance the fT and fmax [6], [7]. In short, having a technol ogy that has a high process uniformity, high reliability, high yield, high design robus tness, and high integration level will be of significant interest. Figure 2-5 shows a top view of a simplified HBT device layout. The SiGe BiCMOS technology also features 0.18 m CMOS transistors with 1.8 V and 3.3 V supply options for digital backend, enabling high system level integration. The

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32 B B B C C ESUB SUB S U B S U B Figure 2-5. Top view of a simplified HBT device layout. passive components available in the design library include rectangular and octagonal spiral inductors with patterned ground shield (PGS) option, vertical metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitors (2 fF/ m2), and thin-film, lowand highdensity poly resistors. Shown in Figure 2-6(a), (b), and (c) are the simulated transit frequency (fT), maximum oscillation frequency (fmax), and maximum power gain (Gmax) plotted against collector current (IC) for different device configurations (CBEB, CBEBC, and CBEBEBC) and emitter lengths (EL) at 1.7 V supply voltage. As can be seen the optimal current density for peak fT and fmax is ~10 mA/ m2. It is also observed that CBEBC configurations with smaller EL achieve highest fT for speed and highest fmax for power gain and noise performance. Note that fmax is strongly dependent on device layout which modulates the base resistance rb and base-collector capacitance Cbc.

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33 05101520253035 50 100 150 200 250 Transit Frequency (GHz)Collector Current IC (mA) CBEB (3 m) CBEBC (3 m) CBEBEBC (3 m) CBEB (8 m) CBEBC (8 m) CBEBEBC (8 m)A 05101520253035 50 100 150 200 250 Max. Oscillation Freq. (GHz)Collector Current IC (mA) CBEB (3 m) CBEBC (3 m) CBEBEBC (3 m) CBEB (8 m) CBEBC (8 m) CBEBEBC (8 m)B Figure 2-6. Simulated A) Transit frequency (fT). B) Maximum oscillation frequency (fmax). C) Maximum power gain (Gmax) against collector current (IC) for different device configurations and emitter lengths.

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34 05101520253035 0 2 4 6 8 10 Maximum Power Gain (dB)Collector Current IC (mA) CBEB (3 m) CBEBC (3 m) CBEBEBC (3 m) CBEB (8 m) CBEBC (8 m) CBEBEBC (8 m)C Figure 2-6. Continued 2.3 Back-End-of-Line (BEOL) Technology The back-end-of-the-line of the technology features six aluminum metal layers. Aluminum material has a lower conductivity which gi ves rise to slightly higher skin depth s compared to copper metal layers. At mm-wave, due to the skin effect, both materials suffer significant loss and which affects the quality factor Q of t he inductor. As the frequency increases, currents start to flow in the substrate through capacitance and magnetic coupling. This loss of energy into t he substrate causes an effective increase in resistance. In addition, the skin ef fect starts to raise the resi stance of the metal traces at high frequencies. For millimeter-w ave dedicated BEOL, 2 to 3 th icker metals are desired. On the other hand, the low resistively substrate allows the field lines to penetrate and induce losses. In fact, as the total dielectr ic height reduces from one technology node to another, the influence of the s ubstrate losses on the propagati on constant increases. The vertical shrink of the BEOL imposes very strict layout design ru les in terms of metal

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35 densities per unit area and also electromigration rules at high temperature. In addition, the stress rule which dictat es the width of the interc onnects allowed implies that cheesed structure is needed to maintain t he homogeneity of the metallization. Figure 27 outlines the cross sections of SiGe BiCMOS BOEL. The top metal 6 is 2.81 m thick and should be used to implement spiral i nductors or transmission lines. The total dielectric height is 10.82 m and this distance is crucial to reduce the loss and increase the inductance per unit length. 2.4 Design and Modeling of Transmission Lines Transmission lines are essential passive el ements at mm-wave si nce there is no ambiguity in defining the reference plane. Th e signal and ground are co-located and as such, it is easy to make connections and tr ansitions. The transmission lines have wellknown char acteristic which avoid degradat ion in analog or digital systems due to reflections, ringing and limited bandwidth. The st ructure provides a well-defined path for return current which reduces magnetic and elec tric field coupling to adjacent structures and lossy substrate. Moreover, all the interconnects can be modeled directly with transmission lines. Unlike the RFIC designs at lower frequencies (physical circuit dimension << electrical wavelength), this modeling is critical especially at mm-wave where any metal traces on the order of a wavelength exhibits distributed effect. The modeling of the interconnect is necessary to correctly transfer the signal power from one point to another. To account for distribut ed effect which causes the voltages and currents to vary in magnitude and phase over its length, impedance matching is therefore required on internal mm-wave nodes within the circuit to ensure maximum power transfer. Transmission lines in this case can be used as circuit elements for

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36 0 0.28 0.49 1.14 1.66 2.46 2.98 3.78 4.3 5.1 5.72 7.72 9.31 11.31 14.12 Substrate FOX poly M1 M6 M5 M4 M3 M2OVC Oxide (Erel=4.2)OVC Nitrie (Erel=7) 14.32 14.92 contZ-Coordinate (um) Via5 Via4 Via3 Via2 Via1 IMD5(Erel=4.2) IMD4(Erel=4.2) IMD2(Erel=4.2) IMD3(Erel=4.2) IMD1(Erel=4.2) ILD(Erel=4.1) (Thickness) 0.6 um 2 um 2 um 0.62 um 2.81 um 1.59 um 0.8 um 0.52 um0.2 um0.8 um 0.52 um 0.52 um 0.8 um 0.65 um 0.21 um 0.28 um Air Figure 2-7. Cross sections of SiGe BiCMOS BEOL. reactive matching which optimize the power transfer and realization of resonators for oscillator design.

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37 Figure 2-8(a) and (b) show two common im plementations of on-chip transmission lines, namely, coplanar waveguide and thin -film microstrip line. The CPW is implemented with one signal li ne surrounded by two adjacent grounds. By varying the signal-to-ground spacing, Zo can be changed. The larger t he gap spacing S, the more fields penetrate into the substrate and caus e additional shunt losses. On-chip CPWs are believed to present higher quality factor Q for an inductor [11]. However, since CPW consists of three unconnected conductor plates, there exit the even mode and odd mode. The undesired odd mode at discontinuity can be converted to an asymmetric slot-line mode which presents wrong characteri stics. Underpasses thus have to be used to force the two ground plates to achieve the same potential. The isolation to the neighboring transmission lines is also achieved due to the two adjacent ground plates. Si Substrate Tox TmetWS Top metal layer Electrical field lines A Si Substrate Tox Top metal layer Bottom metal layer (GND)Electrical field lines W B Figure 2-8. A) Coplanar waveguide. B) Thin-film microstrip line. In this dissertation, all the inductors ar e implemented with thin-film microstrip transmission lines. The line structure provides a better accuracy in attaining the characteristic impedance (Z0) and a well-defined path for the return current In addition, microstrip lines can be reliably and quickly predicted and modeled using EM simulators. This shortens the overall design cycle since te st structures are not necessary to verify the accuracy. More importantly, the equiva lent inductance can be approximated by the equation (2-9) if l << /4.

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38 l f Z Lo o tan 2 (2-9) 2 (2-10) o ef C (2-11) Where Zo is the characteristic impedance, l is the length of the line, is the phase constant, e is the characteristic effective dielectric constant, and C is the speed of light. The approximation can be used for initial bac k-of-envelope calculation to determine the required length of the line for a given inductance. As an addi tional benefit, microstrip lines can be made more compact, therefore affecting the overall chip size. The top metal (M6) is used as signal line and the bottom metal (M1) is used as ground plane to minimize conductor loss. The effective dielec tric height for such a line structure is 9.65 m. The characteristic impedance Zo can be increased by reducing the width at the Figure 2-9. Simulated loss of quarter-wavelength (/4) line plotted against characteristic impedance (Zo).

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39 expense of additional loss. Ther efore the narrower lines give higher inductance per unit length. The full ground plane shielding wa s adopted including the RF I/O pads to minimize the substrate loss and provide good average ground potential [12]. To avoid the crosstalk between the lines, the spaces between the microstr ips are made more than three times the dielectric thickness. The modeling of the thin-film microstrip is done with SONNET EM simulator and then further verified by Agilent ADS Momentum. Both simulators support up to 2.5 D accuracy, which is necessary to correctly capt ure the effect of finite thickness of the metals. Figure 2-9 shows a simulated loss of quarter-wavelength /4 line against characteristic impedance (Zo) using SONNET EM simulator. The length of a quarterwavelength line (/4) is ~600 m at 60 GHz in this technology and the 50 line is achieved with a line width of 16.5 m and has a loss of 0.46 dB per millimeter at 100 GHz.

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40 CHAPTER 3 LOW-NOISE AMPLIFIERS (LNAS) 3.1 Introduction The low-noise amplifier remains to be the most essential building block especially in a millime ter-wave radio design. The ke y requirements in an mm-wave LNA design include low-noise figure, power gain, lin earity, wide matching bandwidth, stability, robustness to PVT variation, and power di ssipation. When the weak signal along with the noise is received at the antenna, the low-noise amplifier must be capable of amplifying the weak signal while adding only minimum noise to it. In fact, the first stage is always being considered as the most critical building block in terms of contribution to noise figure. The power gain presented by the same block can either emphasize or deemphasize the noise figure contribution fr om the subsequent stages such as image reject filter, mixer, and/or ac tive balun. Design for linearity should also be dedicated if the LNA consists of multi-stage because the linearity of the later stages will dominate the overall receiver linearit y, therefore dynamic range. Matching network design is also crucial as it sets the bandwidth of the amplifier, matching for maximum power or minimum noise. The corre ct choice of a network topology could also help reduce the overa ll loss due to the excessive length of the transmission lines which typically render lower power gain of the amplifier, larger chip size, and narrower 3-dB bandwidth. To contrast with the LNA designs below 10 GHz which lumped design approach is valid, the thought process for mm-wave design must take the distributed effect into consideration. All the metal traces and interconnections are now on the order of a wavelength. When this happens, the intercon nections can no longer be treated just like

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41 a trivial node to node connection. In fact, they should be accurately modeled as transmission lines in one way or another. Anot her implication is that the impedance matching is necessary on internal nodes within the circuit to ensure maximum power transfer. At mm-wave, the device is operating at much closer to t he cutoff frequencies, namely, fT and fmax. This gives rise to an amplifier with higher NF and lower power gain. Usually multi-stage is required to meet the gain requirement at cost of power dissipation and linearity. To make things worse, t he parasitic associated with the nodes is significant enough to shift the desired operating frequency. This indicates that a design margin is needed to enhance to robustness and reliability. Therefore, the trade-offs have to be thoughtfully deliberated to achieve the design goal. In this chapter, four LNAs with diffe rent design approaches emphasizing on bandwidth and linearity will be descri bed. Amplifier stability analysis will be presented in section 3.2. Finally the experi mental results will be discussed. 3.2 62 GHz Broadband Feedback Cascode LNA 3.2.1 Circuit Topology Conventional bipo lar-based low-noise amplif iers utilize inductive degeneration at emitter together with base inductor to ac hieve simultaneous power match and noise match [13]. This is true for heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) where the noise sources in,b and in,c can be assumed uncorrelated for design frequencies less than fT/2 [14]. However, due to emitte r degeneration, power gain reduc tion in the initial stage gives rise to signal-noise-ratio degradation in the subsequent stages. More interestingly, the parasitic associated wit h the non-trivial degenerated inductor along with the base inductor and base-emitter capacitor tends to narrow the 3 dB bandwidth and de-stabilize

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42 the amplifier at millim eter-wave. In this section, a wideband LNA based on a simple twoelement input matching network is presented. The schematic of the 62 GHz low-noise am plifier is shown in Figure 3-1. The amplifier consists of two cascode stages, in which the first stage is biased and sized for minimum noise figure (NFmin) and the second stage is optimized for good gain and linearity. Resistors R1 and R2 set the proper quiescent poi nts for the cascode devices Q2 and Q4, respectively. C4 and C5 are used as high frequencies bypass. A shunt resistor-capacitor feedback is used to li nearize the second stage while compromising the gain. The cascode topology was chosen for its high gain, stability, and robustness to process and model variations [15]. Figure 3-1. Circuit schematic of t he two-stage 62 GHz low-noise amplifier.

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43 3.2.2 Stability Analysis Stability design has always been posing many challenges in an amplifier design. A good amplifier design should be unconditionally stable at all frequencies, including DC. Stability design can be decomposed in to low frequency and high frequency. The boundary is typically set by the knee frequen cy, the frequency between maximum stabl e gain (MSG) and maximum available gain (MAG) of an active device or when the stability factor (K) equals to unity. At low frequencies, the device is o ften not stable since it is capable of providing s ubstantial gains. Because of t he feedback capacitor which makes the active device bilateral, the device at these frequencies is very likely to present instability. On the contrary, this is less tr ue at high frequencies especially at mm-wave. However, when inductive degener ation is used in an amplifie r design as part of the matching network, the parasitic capacitance contributed by the inductor needs to be carefully attended and this will be discussed in section 3.3.1. Nevertheless, the overall stability has to be maintained if it is a multistage amplifier design. In which case, all the internal nodes need to be examined more individually. The cascode amplifier provides better stability compared to the common emitter structure because of the reduced f eedback from the Miller capacitance Q1. The cascode topology shields the Miller capac itance from the load and impr oves the isolation, hence S12. However, cascode topology can still pr esent high frequency instability and cause the amplifier to oscillate due to non-optimal layout. Figure 3-2(a) and 3-2(b) show the cascode stage and its small signal equivale nt circuit, respectively [16]. To gain an intuition, the bottom transistor Q1 can be replaced with a capacitor Cout1 to ground at high frequency. Assuming ZCbe << rbe at the frequency of interest, which is

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44 A B Figure 3-2. A) Cascode circuit for stability anal ysis. B) Small signal equivalent circuit of the cascode circuit. valid at millimeter-wave, the input im pedance looking into t he base of the cascode device is out1 be out1be 2 m bin,C 1 C 1 j CC g Z ininXR (3-1) The first term in the equation (3-1) has shown a negative real part which is generated by the capacitive degenerat ion from the bottom device Q1 output impedance. The oscillation is possible if the magnitude of Rin is larger than the loss (RB) of the series

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45 resonant tank formed by CB, LB, where LB is the parasitic inductance of interconnects and CB. Zin,a shows the input impedance including CB and the parasitic inductance B out1 be out1be 2 m ain,C 1 C 1 C 1 j CC g Zj LB (3-2) The oscillation frequency is therefore determined by LB, CB, Cbe, and Cout1. Note the above analysis has ignored the effect of Cbc of the top device Q2. Though it is possible to add an extra series resistance at the base of the cascode device Q2 to damp the oscillation, it is typically not preferr ed for LNA design as the series resistor will worsen the noise performance and also cause gain reduction. The low frequency stability is improved with a series RC network (R4-C7). The small value resistor R4 reduces the gain at low frequencies, and helps the Edwards-Sinsky stability factor to stay above unity [17]. Despite the potential risk of low and high frequency oscillations, with careful design and layout, the amplifier is uncondi tionally stable from DC to 110 GHz, and under all bias conditions. 3.2.3 Synthesis of Matching Networks The input matching network consists of a microstrip transmission line TL1 and an equivalent shunt capacitor C1. The input matching network is designed to synthesize the optimum reflection coefficient, opt, for minimum noise figure from the characteristic impedance (50 ). The solution that yields the shortest TL1 is adopted as any extra line loss especially at the input wil l be detrimental to the noise figure. A small value shunt capacitor C1 is realized equivalently with four capacitors in series. The lumped method has helped reduce the coupling of the lines and t he form size. While it is possible to use a multi-order LC-ladder for wideband matching [ 18], it is not preferred at millimeter-wave

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46 where the losses from the extra passive com ponents at input will directly couple to the overall noise figure and degrade the gain The transmission line TL2 and capacitor C2 are designed for interstage matching. Proper selection of the com ponent values gives the best compromise between gain and linearity. The output is conjugately gain matched to the 50 load. Though the cascode topology used in the design is good for gain and is olation, but it is al so notorious for its narrowband output matching due to the BodeFano criterion [19]. The output impedance looking into the collector of the output cascode Q4 is relative ly high compared to that of a CE stage, making cascode stage harder to achieve wideband matching. A shunt RC feedback (R3-C3) is introduced to broaden the bandwidth at the expense of the gain. The input and output RF pads are modeled as shunt capac itors and series inductors and are used as part of the matching networks. 3.2.4 Experimental Results The chip microphotograph of the LNA is sh own in Figur e 3-3. The resulting dimension of the chip is 560 m x 360 m (0.2 mm2). The measured power gain (S21) is shown in Figure 3-4. The parasitic of the RF pads has been taken into consideration during simulation so no pad de-embedding is performed. The measured maximum transducer gain is 15.8 dB at 62 GHz when bi ased at 2.5 V and reaches 19.2 dB when biased at 3.3 V supply. The 3-dB bandwidth is 54 GHz to 70 GHz. The measured S11 and S22 are both depicted in Figure 35. The output return loss S22 is 18 dB at 62 GHz and is better than 12 dB from 59 GHz to 72 GHz. The i nput return loss S11, however, is 8 dB at 62 GHz. This deviation is prim arily due to the small shunt capacitor C1 needed to synthesize the input matching network. As mentioned in 3.2.3, four equivalent capacitors in series were used to realize the small value capacitor C1. Post simulation

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47 has revealed that the parasitic capacitance associated with the series-connected capacitors has caused such a deviation. Th is small value capacitor may be better realized by an open shunt stub. Therefore, for better accu racy at millimeter-waves, distributed elements could be considered to replace the lumped counterparts. The reverse isolation |S12| show n in Figure 3-6 is better than 40 dB across the 3-dB bandwidth. The LNA is unconditionally st able from DC to 110 GHz. The noise measurement was conducted with a calibrated V-band noise source and a waveguide down-converter. Figure 3-4 shows the measur ed noise figure (NF) when biased at 2.5 V supply. The NF is 6.8 dB at 62 GHz and is 6. 3 dB, the lowest at 64 GHz. An additional loss of ~1 dB was accounted for the input WR-15 waveguide probe while the noise contribution from the loss of the down-converter and the output 1 mm cable were not corrected. The input 1 dB gain compression point (IP1dB) measurement result is shown in Figure 3-7 and is -16.8 dBm at 62 GHz at 2.5 V. The es timated input-referred third order intercept point (IIP3) is believed to be between -7 and -5 dBm. Figure 3-3. Chip microphot ograph of the two-stage 62 GH z low-noise amplifier. RFin RFout DC Bias

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48 50556065707580 0 5 10 15 20 S21 and NF (dB)Frequency (GHz) 3.3 V 2.5 V NF at 2.5 V Figure 3-4. Measured power gain and noise figure of the 62 GHz LNA. 50556065707580 -25 -20 -15 -10 -5 0 S11 and S22 (dB)Frequency (GHz) S11 S22 Figure 3-5. Measured input and output return losses of the 62 GHz LNA.

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49 50556065707580 -70 -65 -60 -55 -50 -45 -40 -35 S12 (dB)Frequency (GHz) Figure 3-6. Measured reverse isolation of the 62 GHz LNA. -25 -20 -15 -10 -5 0 5 10 15 Gain (dB) Pout GainPin (dBm)Pout (dBm) IP1dB = -16.8 dBm 0 5 10 15 20 Figure 3-7. Measured lineari ty characteristics of Pout and gain of the 62 GHz LNA.

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50 Table 3.1 summarizes the performanc e of the previously reported 60 GHz silicon-based single-ended low-noise amplifie rs operating in a similar frequency range [20], [11] and [21], including the one presented in section 3.2. For fair comparisons, the figure of merit (FoM) computed in (3-3) has accounted for every aspect of the LNA characteristics possible. Note that NFavg is strongly dependent on fT and fmax of the technology. diss dBo LNAPNF IPfG FoM )1( ))((1 max (3-3) Table 3-1. Performance comparisons of 60 GHz silicon-based single-ended low-noise amplifiers Reference [20] [11] [21] THIS WORK 62 GHZ [16] Technology fT/fmax (GHz) 0.13 m SiGe BiCMOS 200/290 0.13 m CMOS N.A/135 0.25 m SiGe HBT 200/200 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS 200/200 Frequency (GHz) 61.5 60 60 62 3 dB Bandwidth and Range (GHz) 11 57-68 14 51-65 9 56-65 16 54-70 S21 (dB) 14.7 12 14 15.8/19.2 S11 (dB) -6 <-15 -15 -8 S22 (dB) -17 <-15 -9 -18 S12 (dB) -40 <-45 N.A <-40 NF (dB) 4.5 8.8 6.8* 6.8 Input P1dB (dBm) -20 -10 N.A -16.8 Pdiss (mW) 11@1.8 54@1.5 36@3.3 24@2.5 FoM 0.91 0.401 0.55 3.3 77 GHz Low-Power Linear LNA 3.3.1 Amplifier Circuit Design The schematic of the twostage LNA is shown in Figure 3-8. The first cascode input stage is chosen for its higher power gai n and improved input-t ooutput isolation at

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51 the expense of higher NFmin (the effect of parasitic capac itance at CB device M2 input ZCpara dominates over 1/gm-M2 at mm-wave) compared to the common emitter. However, the finite contributi on of base-collector capacitance (Cbc-M1) of device M1 at mm-wave frequency could cause signal loss via Cbc-M1 and Cbe-M2 to ground. To mitigate this effect, only two base fingers (CBEBC) are used for the input devices to decrease Cbc-M1, Cbe-M1, and Cbc-M2. By using such configuration, the noise performance (NFmin) and maximum power gain (Gmax) at high frequency are improved when compared with the higher NFmin single-base device (CBE) and larger parasitic capacitance triple-base finger device (CBEBEBC). Simulations have confirmed an improvement in both power gain (S21) and NFmin by at least 1.5 dB and ~0.1 dB respectively, at 80 GHz when double-base finger devices are used for the LN A design instead of triple-base finger devices. Common emitter (CE) with double-base finger device is used in the second stage for its improved linearity and broader output matching bandwidth. Assume the amplifier is first input matched to the 50 source resistance RS, the quality factor of the i nput resonant network Qnetwork (80 GHz) can to first order be approximated by S TL TL Feedo in in networkR LLL Z Z Q ) ( )Re( )Im(21 (3-4) where LFeed is the inductance of the feedline (~10 pH) and the Qnetwork is set to be 1.5 according to the initial choices of transmission line inductors (LTL1 and LTL2) in this design. Next, the LTL1, LTL2, and input pad inductance (Lpad) along with devices M1 and M2 are optimized and sized to achieve wi deband noise matching. This is applicable thanks to the lower Qnetwork (~1.3 after the optimization) which renders the design a favorable wideband characteristic and better robustness to process variation. More

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52 RFout TL6 TL7 C2 VCC2 Bias2 R3 C5 M2 M1 TL3 TL4 TL2 TL1 RFin C1 R1 VCC1 Bias1 M3 TL5 C6 R2 C3 C4190 m/ 80 pH 75 m/ 35 pH 238 m/ 155 pH 70 m/ 40 pH 300 fF 160 m/ 63 pH 235 m/ 140 pH 130 m/ 70 pH 8x0.15 m28x0.15 m26.8x0.15 m2 500 O 2 pF Feed Feed Vcas1 Figure 3-8. Circuit schematic of t he two-stage 77 GHz low-noise amplifier. importantly, the linearity (c haracterized by input P1dB) based on this input resonant network is drastically improved by at least 3 dB at the expense of a slight increase in NFmin by ~0.15 dB. Both inductive degenerations (LTL2 and LTL5) are utilized for linearity, increasing Re(Zin), and low frequency stability. However, it is observed that at mm-wave frequency the non-negligible par asitic capacitances Cpara associated with the degenerated inductors could generate a negative resistance gm/ 0 2CbeCpara to offset the Re(Zin) and de-stabilize the amplif ier. The presence of Cpara not only de-tunes the input matching but also deteriorates the gai n and NF of the amp lifier. Under this consideration, the inductor LTL2 (35 pH) is preferably kept small to reduce the associated parasitic capacit ance and preserve the power gain while satisfying the necessary condition for wideband noise matching as described. The inductor LTL5 that presents a larger inductance ( 70 pH) is chosen to further optimize the linearity of the

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53 second CE stage; theref ore further improving the overall input IP3. The cascode stage is optimally biased for NFmin while the CE stage is biased at a slightly higher collector current density (Jc) for linearity. High frequency inst ability due to the parasitic inductance and resistance of the base inte rconnect is suppressed by placing the capacitor C1 as close as possible to the base of M2 in layout. The interstage matching network is synthesized with LTL3, LTL4, C2, and LTL5, with the component values chosen to compromise among the gain, bandwidth, and linearity. The output stage is conjugately power gain matched to the 50 load with LTL6 and LTL7. The wideband bypass capacitor arrays ar e used to reduce ground bounces at millimeter-wave and internal loop oscillations at low frequencies. 3.3.2 Experimental Results The low-noise amplifier was fabr icated in a low-cost 200 GHz fT and fmax JAZZ 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS process. All the inductors are implemented with th in-film microstrip transmission lines. The top metal is used as signal line and the bottom metal is used as ground plane to minimize the conductor loss. The full ground plane shielding was adopted including the RF I/O pads to minimi ze the substrate loss and provide good average ground potential [12]. The microphotogr aph of the fabricated LNA is shown in Figure 3-9. The dimension of the chip including the pads is 650 m x 630 m. The LNA is unconditionally stable fr om DC to 110 GHz. The simulated and measured S21 and NF are shown in Figure 3-10. The amplifier has a measured peak power gain of 14.5 dB at 77 GHz and a 3 dB bandwidth of 14.5 GH z from 69 to 83.5 GHz. The reverse isolation is better than 33 dB over the 3 dB bandwidth. The simulated and measured input and output return losses shown in Fi gure 3-11 are better than 11 dB and 17 dB at 77 GHz, respectively. The shift in S11 is due in part to the underestimation of the high

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54 Figure 3-9. Microphotograph of the tw o-stage 77 GHz low-noise amplifier. 50556065707580859095100 -5 0 5 10 15 20 Frequency (GHz)S21 and NF (dB) S21(M) NF(M) S21(S) NF(S) Figure 3-10. Simulated and m easured power gain (S21) and noise figure of the 77 GHz LNA. RFin RFout DC DC Bias TL1 TL2 TL4 TL3 TL7 TL6 TL5

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55 50556065707580859095100 -35 -30 -25 -20 -15 -10 -5 0 S11 and S22 (dB)Frequency (GHz) S11(M) S22(M) S11(S) S22(S) Figure 3-11. Simulated and measured input and output return losses of the 77 GHz LNA. -25-20-15-10 -10 -5 0 5 10 15 Gain (dB) Pout GainPin (dBm)Pout (dBm) Input P1dB = -11.4 dBm0 5 10 15 20 Figure 3-12. Measured linear ity characteristics of Pout and gain of the 77 GHz LNA.

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56 Table 3-2. Performance comparisons of 77 GHz silicon HBT-based single-ended low-noise amplifiers Reference [22] [23] [24] [25] This Work [26] Technology fT/fmax (GHz) SiGe:C BiCMOS 200/200 SiGe:C HBT 225/300 0.12 m SiGe8T HBT 205/290 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS 200/200 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS 200/200 Number of Stages 3 2 2 4 2 Frequency (GHz) 79 77 77 77 77 3 dB Bandwidth and Range (GHz) 9 74-83 12 ~75-87 12 ~76-88 10 75-85 14.5 69-83.5 S21 (dB) 21.7 8.3 15 33 14.5 S11 (dB) -25 -26 -10 ~-10 -11 S22 (dB) -9 -19 -21 -6 -17 S12 (dB) -40 -33 -40 -45 -33 NF (dB) 5.5 5.6 (sim) 6.2* 6.9 Input P1dB (dBm) -3 -17 -40 -11.4 Pdiss (mW) 94 121 14.4 224.4 37 *denotes measurement result with 12 dB associated gain. impedance TL1. The measured NF is 6.9 dB at 77 GHz and is lower than 8 dB from 64 to 81 GHz. A slightly higher NF is attr ibuted primarily to larger base resistance Rb (lower fmax) of the device technology, chosen cascode topology as well as the adopted wideband noise matching technique. Note however that the degradation in the NF due to the shift in S11 is negligible, as confirmed in both simulation and measurement. The IP1dB measurement result is shown in Figure 3-12 and is -11.4 dBm at 77 GHz. The estimated IIP3 is believed to be between -2 and 0 dBm. The nominal supply voltages of the first cascode and second CE stage are 3.3 V and 1.5 V, respectively. The circuit draws a total of 15 mA and consumes only 37 mW given the fmax of the device technology.

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57 Table 3.2 summarizes the performance of the previously published ~77 GHz single-ended low-noise amp lifiers [22][25]. It is observed t hat the amplifier in this work [26], compared to the other state-of-the-art silicon HB T-based single-ended low-noise amplifiers, has achieved similar gain, NF, wide bandwidth at W-band, and high linearity (IP1dB) with the lowest power c onsumption of only 37 mW. 3.4 87 GHz High Gain LNA 3.4.1 Amplifier Circuit Design Multi-gigabit-per-second (multi-Gb/s) poi nt-to-point (P2P) wireless links over multiple kilometer transmissions have gained significant momentum in recent years. The spectrum allocation in 71 GHz, 81 GHz, and 92 GHz bands ha ve been deemed suitable for realizing such high-data -rate millimeter-wave systems due to the wide unchannelized bandwidth [27]. These bands in contrast to the 60 GHz band have much lower atmospheric absorption thereby allowing longer trans mission range. Other promising applications incl uding concealed weapon detect ion, medical imaging, and weather observation sensor have also dem anded for higher resolution radars operating at 94 GHz [28]. However, most of the high performance circuits are still being realized by the more expensive Gallium Arseni de (GaAs) and Indium Phosphide (InP) technologies, including those commercially av ailable on the market. So far, very few fully characterized low-noise amplifiers hav e been reported with the more cost efficient and higher yield SiGe BiCMOS processes. In one, a high gain four-stage common emitter (CE) W-band (75 GHz) LNA has been demonstrated for imaging arrays [29] while another single stage cascode LNA based on unilateral gain peaking was achieved with reduced device profile [30], all implemented in IBM 8HP 0.12 m 200/290 fT/fmax SiGe BiCMOS technology. In this section, the performance of a highly competitive

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58 two-stage high gain 87 GHz LNA f abricated in a lo w-cost 200 GHz fT and fmax JAZZ 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS technology. Shown in Figure 3-13, the LNA consists of two cascode stages for high power gain (S21) and improved isolation (S12) at the expense of higher NFmin. To achieve high gain with a cascode at millimeter-wave frequency, only double-base finger devices (CBEBC) are used instead of triple-base finger devices (CBEBEBC) to reduce both intrinsic and extrinsic base-collector capacitance Cbc of device M1 and M2. By doing so, the signal loss via Cbc-M1 and base-emitter capacitance Cbe-M2 to ground can be minimized. The device size of the firs t cascode stage (M1 and M2) is chosen along with LTL1 and LTL2 to synthesize a low quality factor (< 1.5) input resonant network (Qnetwork). The selection helps improve the linearity performance of the LNA and achieve wideband input matching. Price to pay, however, is a slight increase in the overall NF. The first stage was biased to compromise between the gain and NF while the second stage was biased for gain and linearity. The emitter lengths (LE) of the device M1/M2 and M3/M4 are 9 m and 6.8 m, respectively. The interstage matching network was synthesized with LTL3, LTL4, and C2. LTL5 and LTL6 were used to conjugately match the output stage to 50 load. The corresponding inductance values associated with each transmission line are LTL1 = 80 pH, LTL2 = 35 pH, LTL3 = 45 pH, LTL4 = 100 pH, LTL5 = 23 pH, and LTL6 =150 pH. Finally, broadband bypass capacitor arrays are used to reduce supply/ground bounces at millimeter-wave and present resistive loading for low frequency stability. 3.4.2 Experimental Results The chip microphotograph of the LNA is show n in Figur e 3-14. The overall chip size is 635 m x 625 m. Unconditional stability was ensured from DC to 110 GHz for

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59 RFout TL6 TL5 C2 VCC Bias2 M2 M1 TL3 TL4 TL2 TL1 RFin C1 R1 VCC Bias1 M3 R3 C4 C5 Feed Feed M4 C3 R4 C6 C7 Vcas1 R2 Vcas2 Figure 3-13. Circuit schematic of the 87 GHz low-noise amplifier. Figure 3-14. Chip microphotograph of the 87 GHz low-noise amplifier. RFin RFou DC Bias DC Bias TL1 TL2 TL3 TL4 TL5 TL6

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60 7580859095100105110 0 5 10 15 20 25 S21(M) S21(S) NF(M) NF(S)S21 and NF (dB)Frequency (GHz) Figure 3-15. Simulated and measured power gains (S21) and noise figures of the 87 GHz LNA. 7580859095100105110 -25 -20 -15 -10 -5 0 S11(M) S22(M) S11(S) S22(S)S11 and S22 (dB)Frequency (GHz) Figure 3-16. Simulated and measured input and output return losses of the 87 GHz LNA.

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61 the LNA design. The measured and simulated S21 and NF are depicted in Figure 3-15. A very good agreement between the measured and simulated results can be observed. The LNA has a peak power gain of 21 dB at 87 GHz and a 3 dB bandwidth of 11.6 GHz from 81 to 92.6 GHz. A gain of 10.2 dB was also obtained at 100 GHz. Input and output return losses are 17.3 dB and 11.7 dB at 87 GHz, respectively, as shown in Figure 3-16. Wideband input matching with input return loss greater than 10 dB is accomplished across the W-band which is vali dated by the use of low Qnetwork. The reverse isolation is better than 45 dB over the 3 dB bandwidth. The measured NF is 9.1 dB at 87 GHz and is between 8 dB from 80 to 93 GHz. The input P1dB is -18.8 dBm at 87 GHz as shown in Figure 3-17. The LNA draws a total current of 15.2 mA from a nominal 3.3 V supply. For comparison purposes the figure of merit (FoMLNA) in (3.3) is used to account possibly for every characteristic of the LNA. Table 3.3 summarizes the performance of the previously reported silicon HBT-based single-ended low-noise amplifiers operating in a si milar frequency range [29], [30]. T he LNA in this work [31] has demonstrated a better FoM even with the lower fmax of the technology compared to [29]. 3.5 Chapter Summary Three low-noise amplifiers operati ng at 62 GHz, 77 GHz, and 87 GHz are presented. First, a wideband LNA covering the minimum unlicens ed 7 GHz bandwidth from 59 GHz to 66 GHz was presented. It has been demonstrated that the cascode topology, though, posts a limit on the quality of matching due to the high output impedance, is a viable candidate to simult aneously achieve reasonable gain and wide bandwidth using simple feedback at millimete r-wave. The results have shown a 3 dB

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62 -28-26-24-22-20-18-16 10 15 20 25 Gain Pout (dBm) Gain (dB)Pin (dBm) Input P 1dB = -18.8 dBm-10 -5 0 5 Pout Figure 3-17. Measured linear ity characteristics of Pout and gain of the 87 GHz LNA. Table 3-3. Performance of previously reported 85 GHz silicon HBT-based singleended low-noise amplifiers Reference [29] [30] This Work [31] Technology fT/fmax (GHz) 0.12 m SiGe BiCMOS 200/290 0.12 m SiGe BiCMOS 200/290 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS 200/200 Number of Stages 4 1 2 Frequency (GHz) 88 91 87 3 dB BW (GHz) 80-97 84-100 81-92.6 S21 (dB) 19 13 21 S11 (dB) ~-6.3 ~-8 -17.3 S22 (dB) ~-8 ~-13 -11.7 S12 (dB) <-35 ~-20 <-45 NF (dB) ~8.5 5.1 9.1 Input P1dB (dBm) -22 -18.8 Pdiss (mW) @ VDC 25.2@1.5 8.1@N.A 50.2@3.3 Chip Area ( m2) 0.3 0.59 0.4 FoM 0.29 N/A* 0.41

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63 bandwidth of 16 GHz a peak power gain of 15.8 dB from 2.5 V, and an IP1dB of -16.8 dBm at 62 GHz. Next, the design of a lo w-power linear and wideband 77 GHz low-noise amplifier was presented. The techniques for high linearity and wideband design have been demonstrated. The LNA achieves a peak gain of 14.5 dB at 77 GHz with a 3 dB bandwidth of 14.5 GHz from 69 GHz to 83.5 GHz. The measured NF and IP1dB are 6.9 dB and -11.4 dBm, respectively, at 77 GHz. Such characteristics of the LNA are crucial for 71 GHz high speed point to point wireless link, 76 GHz long-range and 77 GHz short-range automotive radar applic ations. Last but not least, the 87 GHz LNA has achieved a respectable peak power gai n of 21 dB at 87 GHz with a measured NF of 9.1 dB and an IP1dB of -18.8 dBm while dissipating a DC power of 50.2 mW from a nominal 3.3 V. The experimental results have shown suitability of this LNA for 81 GHz, 92 GHz high speed wireless point-to-point links and 94 GHz high resolution imaging applications.

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64 CHAPTER 4 WIDEBAND MIXED LUMPED-DISTRIBUT ED-ELEMENT POWER SPLITTERS 4.1 Introduction In 2003, the Federal Communica tions Commission (FCC) has approved three new commercial bands at 71 GHz to 76 GHz, 81 GHz to 86 GHz, and 92 GHz to 95 GHz to be the true multi-gigabit-per-s econd wireless communication for fiber replacement or extension, point-to-point wireless local area network, and broadband wireless internet access [32]. Significant development effo rts have also been dedicated to encompass the 76 GHz to 77 GHz band for automotive ra dar applications. While the oxygen absorption and rain attenuation hinder the transmission dist ance of the 60 GHz band, the approved new bands provide more atmospheric deterioration resistance that enables much longer transmission range (sever al miles). To achieve full-duplex data rates of 10 Gbps, more spectrally effici ent modulation schemes must be adopted; for instance, M-ary phase shift keying (PSK) or quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM). Figure 4-1 shows the simplified single sideband (SSB) quadratur e transmitter and receiver front end to exploit the necessary ( de)modulations. In parti cular, the millimeterwave (mm-wave) 180 power splitters in the RF paths are used as baluns for single ended to differential conversion and vice versa while the 90 power splitters are used for quadrature generation in t he LO paths. Therefore, it is desirable to have power splitters that possess low insertion loss, good amplitude and phase balance, wide bandwidth, and are compact in size. Some favorable experimental results on distributed 180 and 90 hybrids at mmwave have been shown [33]. However, many app lications such as image reject mixers do not need true hybrids [34]. In fact, good voltage coupling is hard to achieve

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65 especially in silicon-based technology at mm-wave. For tight coupling, either the gap between the lines has to be narrow which requires a large Zo,even/Zo,odd ratio, as in a coupled line coupler, or the lines are made narrow which exhibit more loss at coupled port, as in a Lange coupler. These degrade t he amplitude balance between the through port (S21) and the coupled port (S31) that is required for good im age rejection. In this work, the mixed lumped-distribut ed-element power splitters offer alternatives to the true distributed hybrid counterparts. The 180 and 90 power splitters are based on the lumped-distributed Wilkinson divider with phase shifter at the outputs [12]. The lumpeddistributed Wilkinson divider was deriv ed based upon the conventional lumped Wilkinson divider with the inductors replac ed by the distributed thin-film microstrip transmission lines for lower loss and smaller process variations. Additional and phase adjusting networks are attached at t he two output ports for corresponding phase shifts [34][36]. LNA 0/ 180 0/90 RFin I Q A PA 0/ 180 0/90 RFout I Q B Figure 4-1. Simplified block diagrams of single sideband (SSB) quadrature architecture. A) Receiver. B) Transmitter.

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66 4.2 Out-of-Phase Power Splitters Design For analysis purposes, a lumped-distributed out-of-phase power splitter is decomposed into an in-phase lumped-distri buted Wilkinson power divider and two phase shifters attached at the output ports. 4.2.1 Mixed Lumped-Distributed Wilkinson Po wer Divider The conventional lumped Wilkinson power di vider shown in Figure 4-2(a) uses capacitors and inductors to mimic the quarte r-wave transmission lines. However, at mm-wave lumped spiral inductors exhibit hi gher loss than the distributed transmission lines. Minimizing the loss is of particular importance especially at mm-wave when high power gain from the LNA and high output power from the VCO are hard to obtain. Therefore, on-chip microstrip transmission lines shown in Figure 4-2(b) are used to realize all the lumped inducto rs because they are more resi stant to process variations and can be reliably and quickly modeled. A B Figure 4-2. Block diagrams of Wilkinson power dividers. A) Lumped-element equivalent. B) Lumped-distributedelement equivalent. The component values LW, CW, and RW of the Wilkinson power divider can be obtained via ABCD matrix [34][ 36] and are shown as follows:

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67 0 02 2 f Z LW (4-1) 0022 1 fZ CW (4-2) 02ZRW (4-3) where 02 Zand0fare the required characteristic impedance and center frequency for quarterwave transmission lines in the divider, respectively. 4.2.2 and Phase Shifters in 180o and 90o Power Splitters The phase shifters of the 180 splitter c onsist of a high-pass filter and a low-pass filter each generating ei ther a positive or negative 90 phase difference. To synthesize the low-pass and high-pass networks depicted in Figure 4-3(a) and 4-3(b), respectively, (4-1) and (4-2) can be used with the term 2Z0 replaced by Z0 [34], [35]. LRpCRpCRpA CLTCLTLLTB Figure 4-3. Unit Cells for generating 90 and 45 phase shifts. A) RH network. B) LH network. For the phase shifters in 90 splitte r, the right-handed (R H) and left-handed (LH) unit cells approach in Fig. 3 is introduced. The detailed analysis can be found in [34] [36] and are not discussed here. The closed-form design equat ions are treated in [34] and are shown in (4-4)(4-7). The RH and LH networks are chosen for their compact

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68 size and electrical characteristics. The co mponent values of the phase shifters are restricted by the condition ( RH LH) = 90, resulting in a positive and negative 45 phase shift in RH and LHT networks, respectively. RH Rf Z L sin 20 0 (4-4) RH RH RfZ C sin cos1 2 100 (4-5) LH LTf Z Lsin 1 20 0 (4-6) LH LH LTfZ C cos1 sin 2 100 (4-7) It is observed that the 90 phase shifters in the 180 splitter are the special case of (4-4) (4-7) when RH = 90 = LT. With the lumped-distributed Wilkinson power divider described and the proper phase shifte rs, the out-of-phase power splitter is synthesized and shown in Figure 4-4. Port 1 Port 2 Port 3 TL1 TL2, LWTL3, LRpTL5 TL5 TL4,LLT 2CWCWCWTL2, LWCRpCRpCLTCLTRW Figure 4-4. Mixed lumped-distributed-element out-of-phase power splitter.

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69 4.3 Implementation and Experimental Results The two power splitters were fabricated in SiGe BiCMOS 0.18 m technology. The back-end-of-the-line (BEOL) of the technology features six metal layers with aluminum used as the thick top metal. The sub-100 pH inductors in both splitters are implemented with thin-film microstrip transmission lines. All the lines are im plemented with the top metal (M6) as the signal line and the bo ttom metal (M1) as the ground plane. The chosen implementation ensures the maximum SiO2 dielectric height to minimize the conductor loss which is proportional to squar e root of frequency. The full ground plane shielding has been adopted to isolate the conductive substrate and provide good average ground potential. The short interc onnects have been modeled and accounted for. The spaces between the lines are more t han four times the dielectric thickness to avoid mutual couplings. All the capacitors used are MIM provided by the technology. The chip photos of 180 and 90 power spli tters are shown in Figure 4-5(a) and 45(b), respectively. The overall dimens ions of the core splitters are 240 m x 440 m and 220 m x 400 m, respectively. A two-port 110 GH z vector network analyzer (VNA) is used to measure the two-por t S-parameters with the other output port terminated with an on-chip 50 resistor. Therefore, two versions of each power splitter are required to fully characterize the three-port networks. The measurement and simulation results of the 180 and 90 power splitters are shown in Figure 4-6 and Figure 4-7, respectively. For the 180 power splitter, the amplitude balance (A23) is better than 0.05 dB while the phase difference ( 23) is within 0.1 at 77 GHz. The input and output return losses are better than 10 dB from 60 GHz to 100 GHz. Good amplitude balance within 0.5 dB is achieved from 66 GHz to 87 GHz and the phase difference is within 2 from 70 GHz to

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70 A B Figure 4-5. Chip microphotograph of A) 180 power splitter. B) 90 power splitter. 84 GHz. The 90 power splitter exhi bits amplitude balance better than 0.25 dB at 77 GHz and is within 0.5 dB from 67 GHz to 110 GHz. The input and output return losses are better than 10 dB from 60 GHz to 95 GHz. However, a ~5 phase error is observed at 77 GHz. The mismatch is primar ily due to the small capacitor CR needed to synthesize the RH network at output port 2. The post simu lation has revealed that the parasitics associated with the four series-co nnected capacitors used to realize CR have not been properly modeled, therefore causing such deviation.

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71 60708090100 -6 -5 -4 -3 S21 and S31 (dB)Frequency (GHz) S21(meas.) S31(meas.) S21(sim.) S31(sim.)A 405060708090100 -40 -35 -30 -25 -20 -15 -10 -5 0 S11, S22, and S33 (dB)Frequency (GHz) S11(meas.) S22(meas.) S33(meas.) S11(sim.) S22(sim.) S33(sim)B Figure 4-6. Measured (symbols) and simulated (lines) A) Tr ansmission. B) Reflection. C) Amplitude and phase difference of the 180 power splitter.

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72 60708090100 155 160 165 170 175 180 185 190 195 200 -5.0 -4.5 -4.0 -3.5 -3.0 -2.5 -2.0 -1.5 -1.0 -0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 Amplitude Difference (dB) Phase Difference (Degree)Frequency (GHz) C Figure 4-6. Continued. 60708090100 -6 -5 -4 -3 S21 and S31 (dB)Frequency (GHz) S21(meas.) S31(meas.) S21(sim.) S31(sim.)A Figure 4-7. Measured (symbols) and simulated (lines) A) Transmission. B) Reflection. C) Amplitude and phase difference of the 90 power splitter.

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73 405060708090100 -40 -35 -30 -25 -20 -15 -10 -5 0 S11, S22, and S33 (dB)Frequency (GHz) S11(meas.) S22(meas.) S33(meas.) S11(sim.) S22(sim.) S33(sim.)B 60708090100 75 80 85 90 95 100 105 110 -5.0 -4.5 -4.0 -3.5 -3.0 -2.5 -2.0 -1.5 -1.0 -0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 Phase Difference (Degree)Frequency (GHz) Amplitude Difference (dB)C Figure 4-7. Continued.

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74 To enhance the design robustness and flexibil ity, the phase deviation of the 90 power splitter could be compensated by pl acing a MOS varactor in shunt with CR at output port 2. Figure 4-8 show s the simulation results of the compensated 90 power splitter with various DC biases. An improvement in the phase error can be seen in Figure 4-8(c) when the varactor is DC biased at 0 V. The compensation technique adds an additional degree of freedom to the design and also provides more resistance to process variation and parasitic while not a ffecting the transmission and reflections. Nevertheless, the phase difference is within 2 from 64 GHz to 104 GHz before the compensation. The performanc e of the 180, 90, and compens ated 90 power splitters are summarized in Table 4.1. 405060708090100 -6 -5 -4 -3 S21 and S31 (dB)Frequency (GHz) S21 VDC = 2V S21 VDC = 0 V S21 VDC = -2V S31 VDC = -2, 0, and 2VA Figure 4-8. Simulated A) Transmission. B) Reflection. C) Amplitude and phase difference of the compensated 90 powers splitter.

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75 405060708090100 -35 -30 -25 -20 -15 -10 -5 0 S11, S22, and S33 (dB)Frequency (GHz) S11 VDC = 2V S11 VDC = 0V S11 VDC = -2V S22 VDC = 2V S22 VDC = 0V S22 VDC = -2V S33 VDC = -2, 0, and 2VB 60708090100 85 90 95 100 105 110 -3.0 -2.5 -2.0 -1.5 -1.0 -0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 VDC= -2V VDC= 2V VDC= 0V Phase difference (Degree)Frequency (GHz) VDC= -2V VDC= 0V VDC= 2V Amplitude difference (dB)C Figure 4-8. Continued.

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76 Table 4-1. Performance summary of the three power splitters 77 GHz 180o Power Splitter 77 GHz 90o Power Splitter 77 GHz Compensated 90o Power Splitter S21 [dB] -4.93 -4.15 -4.4 S 31 [dB] -4.88 -4.36 -4.4 Amplitude Error [dB] 0.05 0.21 0 Phase Error [o] 0.1 ~5 0.1 Bandwidth [GHz] 70 84 64 104 63 100 23 180 85 90 *denotes simulation results with varactor biased at 0 V. 4.4 Chapter Summary In this chapter, wideband mixed lumped-distributed-element 180 and 90 power splitters were presented. Distributed thin-f ilm microstrip transmission lines were used instead of lumped inductors to reduce inserti on loss and to combat process variations. This approach offers alternatives to true hybrid designs for r ealizing the equal signal power divisions and the necessary phase shifts in baluns and I/Q (de)modulators. Improved port-to-port amp litude balance is demonstrated in the design where at millimeter-wave good voltage coupling is hard to achieve in true hybrids. To the best of authors knowledge, this is the first millimet er-wave power splitters design with mixed lumped-distributed techniques atte mpted in silicon-based technology

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77 CHAPTER 5 HIGH GAIN DOUBLE-BALANCED ACTIVE FREQUENCY DOUBL ER 5.1 Introduction The design for high spectral purity, stab ility, and high power signal source at mmwave has always been difficult and crucial. In fact, as the design frequency increases, it becomes more challenging to phase-lock the fundamental VCO and meet the stringent phase noise and jitter requirement mainly due to the limited tank quality factor Qtank (dominated by Q of the varact or), minimum noise figure (NFmin), and maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) of the device technology. Alternatively, integrated high frequency signal generation using a low and stable frequency source or low frequency PLL synthes izer with a frequency doubler can relax the performance specifications [37][39]. In addition, the power-speed tradeoff of the fundamental VCO and pre-scaler can be significantly reduced, thus the overall system power budget. Therefore, it is attractive to exploit a high power and high conversion gain frequency doubler that can effectively oper ate at a high and over a wide range of frequencies. In this chapter, highlights of different doubler design approaches will first be presented in Section 5.2. Section 5. 3 addresses the frequency doubler design techniques, optimizations, and tradeoffs. Experimental results and high frequency measurement techniques are discussed in detail in Section 5.4. 5.2 Highlights of Frequenc y Doubler Design Approaches The conventional active doublers based on the reflector approach use /4 and /2 transmission lines extensively at the fundamental and second harmonic ( /4 at fo = /2 at 2fo) [40], [41]. This not only increases t he chip size, but also limits the doubler

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78 bandwidth. In addition, the required i nput power drive is high, typically0 dBm. The fundamental suppression is al so degraded due to the bandwidth of the high Q bandpass filter. Besides, the losses incurred by the l ong transmission lines together with the single active device usually give conversion losse s and low output powers at mm-wave [42]. To further increase the output bandwidth, frequency diplexer which consists of a bandpass filter (BPF) and a bandstop filter (B SF) may be employed at the doubler output [43]. Although this technique has been validated for bandw idth extension, it has been rendered impractical because the required filters even at 2fo will occupy tremendous real estate. The length of a quarter-wave transformer is ~600 m at 60 GHz in todays state-of-the-art SiGe BiCMOS te chnology. The overall stability of the single device across the bandwidth is also difficult to maintain, and generally resistive terminations or shunt RC networks are needed especially for LF stability. More importantly, fully differential interface with the preceding and following differential stages is only possible with additional comb iners and/or baluns, making such approach unattractive. Harmonic generations using di ode circuits are also widely employed at microwave frequencies. Reactive doublers based on varact ors or step-recovery diodes (SRDs) that make use of the diodes non-linear junction capacitance often exhibit good conversion efficiency (theoretically 100% according to Manley-Rowe relations [44]) and low noise performance. However, such doublers are notoriously unstable, sensitive to slight mistuning, and inherently narrowband [45]. Re sistive frequency doublers generating fullwave-rectified sine wave from quad diodes (typically Schottky-barrier diodes) have demonstrated wide usable bandwidth and reasonab le fundamental rejections [46], [47].

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79 However, they suffer greatly from the conv ersion loss (typically from -12 to -15 dB) owing to the large series resistance. Larger size diodes can be used to improve the performance at the expense of the parasitic which limits the high frequency response. It has also been shown quantit atively and experimentally that the resistive frequency doubler is less efficient compared with its reactive counterpart and the maximum conversion efficiency is typically less than 25%. Therefore the drawbacks of the passive doubler can be summarized by its high conv ersion loss, mediocre output power, and high input power drive, typically 10 dBm. The availability of broadband baluns is also necessary to provide fully differential operat ion across the bandwidth. Moreover, special devices like Schottky-barrier diodes (SBD s) may not be available in the standard process; the added options further increase the manufacturing costs. In this chapter, the double-balanced active frequency doubler based on Gilbert cell design was chosen for its fully differential si gnaling, high gain, high output power, and wide bandwidth. The heterojunction bipolar tr ansistors (HBTs) have been considered as the most suited technology of choice for this topology due to their superior transconductance (gm) when compared with todays 65 nm or 45 nm CMOS transistors counterpart. 5.3 Active Frequenc y Doubler Design 5.3.1 Circuit Architecture The schematic of the doubl e-balanced active frequency doubler is shown in Figure 5-1. The frequency doubler design is based on the Gilbert cell multiplier which operates by injecting identical signals to both input ports. The non-linear signal current from the transconductor (M9M10) is modulated by the switch ing transistor quad (M5M8), which operates as commutating analog s witches. The frequency doubler generates a

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80 IN VCC + + OUT Vbias Input Buffers Doubler Core Output Buffers M1 M2 M3 M4 M5 M6M7M8 M9M10 M11M12 TL1TL2 R1R2 R3R4R5R6 R7 R8R9 Figure 5-1. Schematic of the double-balanced active frequency doubler. DC term and a second harmonic of the input signal due to the non-linear characteristics of the switching transistor quad. This des ired non-linearity comes from the switching action of the transistor quad which is defined by the nonlinear exponential characteristics of the devices. In cases when the signal current is not fully steered from one branch to another due to imper fect switching, a portion of the signal will flow to base-emitter capacitance Cbe and base resistance rb for charging and discharging, which gives rise to undesired non-linearity. It is worth noting that the desired second harmonic are attributed to the mixing effects (N x M). The conversion gain of the circuit is to first order determined by the constructi ve and destructive interference of the mixing terms. Therefore, it is imperative that t he number of harmonics be set sufficiently large to ensure accuracy in Harmonic Balance simulation.

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81 The resonant loads, formed by the tr ansmission line inductors along with the capacitances from the devices are tuned to pick up the second harmonic while filtering out the undesired spurs. The input double emitter followers (M1M4) are used to present low impedance to drive the two i nput ports and provide DC level-shift and broadband matching. The output st age emitter followers (M11M12) serving as buffers are used to isolate the doubler core from the 50 load and provides output matching. No output amplifier is added after the output emitter followers for this wideband design due to the higher generation of unwanted harmonics, resu lting in degraded fundamental rejection. 5.3.2 Stability The stability issue remains to be one of the main challenges especially in an active frequency doubler design. Thus, it is worthwhile to re visit some of the fundamentals to gain an intuitive insight. Heuristically, emitter followers are well-known for isolation, wideband matching, and are popularly used for DC level shift in many high speed circuit designs. However, the on-chip ringing behavior and undamped oscillation could render unpleasant surprise if multip le cascaded EFs are used [48]. The reasons can be explained by the following two scenarios. Figure 5-2 (a) and (b) show sources of instability due to capacitive loading and indu ctive output impedance, respectively. From Figure 5-2 (a), it is observed that when t he output of M1 is loaded capacitively by Cbe of M2, the input impedance Zin contains a negative resistance which can be first-order approximated by gm/ CBE1(CCS+CBE2). It is obvious that a la rger device size provides better current driving capability. However, the increased capacitance associated with M2 along with the parasitic inductance from the interconnects can form a parasitic

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82 Colpitts oscillator. Furthermore, from Figure 5-2 (b), the output impedance Zout of the M1 could appear inductive over a range of frequency if 1/gm1 < Rs + rb. This could cause resonance with the capacitor of the followi ng stage or an unmatched transmission line to Cpad and 50 load [49]. However, with proper sele ction of the devices quiescent points, dimensions, and length of interconnects; the problem of potential instability can be resolved. M1 CBE1 LparaLpara M2 CBE2 CCS VCC GND -R + jX Lpara M1CBE1 Lpara GNDCBE2 + CCS VCCParasitic Oscillator ColpittsCS CSA M1 GND VCCCBE1 rb Cpad50O Zo, l CparaCS IC1Rs + jXsTline Interconnect Inductive if 1/gm1 < Rs + rboutput B Figure 5-2. Sources of instability in emitter followers due to A) C apacitive loading. B) Inductive output impedance.

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83 5.3.3 Design for Speed, Conver sion Gain, and Output Power All the devices in the active frequency doubler are optimized for the RF performance up to 80 GHz due to the measurem ent limitation. To achieve good driving capability, the double emitter followers at th e input should be sized to accommodate the large DC current for large gm. This is useful to avoid signal loss from the LO to the first EF (M1M2) and second (M3M4) EF pairs. It also helps to minimize the impact on the switching time of the transistor quad. In or der to increase the switching speed of the transistor quad and achieve high conversion gai n, small transistor quad devices should be used to reduce the base-emitter capacitance Cbe, base-collector capacitance Cbc, and the associated parasitic capacitance. At mm-wave, employing large devices could cause signal to leak via the parasitic. Howe ver, small devices tend to incur more rb which could potentially increase the charge and discharge time constant. In addition, since the collector current is proportional to the emitter area, small devices could also result in incomplete switching for current steering, which degrades t he conversion gain. A reasonable compromise therefore must be made to achieve the optimal RF performance. In this design, the device configuration CBEBC was chosen for the transistor quad to reduce rb despite with a slight increase in Cbc. It can be seen from Chapter 2 that this configuration achieves the highest fT. Nevertheless, the fT of the transistor quad is set to at least twic e the maximum operating frequency to guarantee fast switching. The output stage emitter fo llowers are sized for and biased at high fT and fmax for output power while maintaining good output matching to the load. A transmission line inductor of 60 pH was chosen as t he load to boost the conversion gain at the second harmonic and optimize t he output frequency response.

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84 5.3.4 Layout Design The back-end-of-the-line (BEOL) of the SiGe BiCMOS technology provides six metal layers. The 60 pH inductive loads in the frequency doubler were synthesized with thin-film microstrip transmission lines. The t op metal is used as signal line and the bottom metal is used as ground plane to minimize the conductor loss. The full ground plane shielding has been adopted to isolate the conductive substrate and provide good average ground potential [12]. The symmetry of the frequency doubler layout is highly desirable and emphasized for common-mode noi se rejection. The lengths of the interconnects are kept as short as possibl e to avoid additional signal loss. The dimensions of the inpu t and output transmission lines are chosen for impedance matching. Note that a careful optimization of the matched output transmission line is needed to avoid ringing or resonance. 5.4 Experimental Results The microphotograph of the double-balanced ac tive frequency doubler is shown in Figure 5-3. The dimension of t he chip including the pads is 640 m x 425 m (0.272 mm2). The on-wafer measurement setup consists of two parts: (1) output frequency Fout < 50 GHz and (2) output frequency Fout from 50 GHz. Firs t, the losses due to cabling and probe tips were corrected by measuring from the input cable, 180 hybrid junction, input probe (GSSG ), thru-substrate, and output probe (GSSG) with a synthesized sweeper (Agilent/HP 83650A), pow er meter (Anritsu ML 2437A) and 50 GHz power sensor (Anritsu MA 2445A). Next the output cable loss was considered alone by feeding the power from the sweepe r and measuring the output power with a 50 GHz spectrum analyzer (Agilent E4448A) and/or 50 GHz power sensor.The same measurement was repeated for verification using Anritsu vector signal generator

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85 (E8267D). Since the losses at the fundamental and second harmonic are different at both input and output, the two-step calibration method ensures accurate extraction of the loss due to cabling and probes at the fundamental and 2nd harmonic, respectively. Figure 5-3. Microphotograph of the double-balanced active frequency doubler. Synthesized Sweeper or Vector Signal Generator 1800 Hybrid G S S G DUT P G P Spectrum Analyzer G S G S G A Figure 5-4. On-wafer measurement setup for A) Fout 50 GHz. B) 50 GHz Fout 80 GHz. RFin RFout Bias

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86 Synthesized Sweeper or Vector Signal Generator 1800 Hybrid G S S G DUT P G P G S GWR-15 WR-10 V-Band or W-Band Power Sensor HP Power Meter B Figure 5-4. Continued. 30405060708090 -5 0 5 10 15 Conversion Gain (dB)Output Frequency (GHz) -9 dBm -8 dBm (Single) -8 dBm (Differential) Figure 5-5. Measured conv ersion gain at input powers of -9 dBm and -8 dBm.

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87 Figure 5-4 (a) shows the measurement setup for Fout 50 GHz. The measurement was conducted with the Anritsu vector signal generator (E8267D), 10 GHz 180 hybrid junction (HY1040-180), differential GSSG input probe, and differential GSGSG output probes. Single-ended output is connected to the spectrum analyzer (PSA E4448) while the complementary output is terminated with 50 Figure 5-4 (b) shows the measurement setup for 50 GHz Fout 80 GHz. The measurem ent was conducted with the Anritsu vector signal generator (E8267D), 10 GHz 180 hybrid junction (HY1040-180), differential GSSG probe, WR -10 or WR-15 GSG waveguide probes and V-band (V8486A) or W-band (W8486A) power sens ors connected to the power meter. Note that the waveguide probes are singleended and the complementar y output is left unconnected. To minimize the measurement uncertainty, a W-band differential GSGSG (Beryllium-Copper) with second output terminated with 50 is used to repeat the measurement from 74 GHz. Nevertheless, an additional 3 dB is accounted for single-ended to differential operation. Figure 5-5 depicts the measur ed conversion gain for input powers of -8 dBm (either single-ended or differential probes at output) and -9 dBm. The optimal input power levels to maximize conversion gain at lower frequency band and higher frequency band are slightly differ ent. Therefore -9 dBm and -8 dBm are used for output frequencies below and above 50 GHz, respectively. The peak conversion gain is 10.2 dB at 66 GHz at -8 dBm input power and is better than 0 dB from 36 GHz. The conversion gain of 0.83 dB is observed at 80 GHz for an input power of -8 dBm with singleended measurement. An increase in the conversion gain to 2.34 dB is observed when the W-band InP differential probe is us ed. Therefore the actual performance of the frequency doubler is better when the complementary port is

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88 30405060708090 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 Fundamental Suppression (dB)Output Frequency (GHz) Figure 5-6. Measured fundamental suppression. Figure 5-7. Output spectrum of the active frequency doubler at 50 GHz output frequency (not corrected for the losses).

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89 properly terminated. Note that due to the amplitude (.2 dB) and phase imbalance () of the 10 GHz 180 hybrid junction, the measurement beyond 80 GHz should be corrected. In order to obtain the fundamental suppression beyond 50 GHz, the output power at the second harmonic was measured wit h the V-band and W-band power sensor while the power at the fundamental was displayed with spectrum analyzer. Figure 5-6 shows the fundamental suppression versus output frequency. It is seen that the maximum fundamental suppression of 36 dB is achieved at 60 GHz and is better than 20 dB from 36 GHz. Figure 5-7 shows the output spec trum of the doubler at 50 GHz with fundamental suppression of 30.5 dB when the input power is -9 dBm. The measured output power versus input power at 3.3 V and 4.0 V supply voltages are shown in Figure 5-8. The maximum output power of 1.7 dBm is observed at 66 GHz with 3.3 V supply at input power of -7 dBm. The maximum output powers of -3.9 dBm at 3.3 V supply and -2.4 dBm at 4 V supply at 80 GHz are both ac hieved with input power of 1 dBm. The doubler draws 41.6 mA from a nominal 3.3 V supply. T he accuracy of the frequency doubler measurement is estimat ed to be within 1 dB for Fout 80 GHz. 5.5 Chapter Summary In this chapter, a high conversion gain double-balanced active frequency doubler operating from 36 to at least 80 GHz (performance limited by 10 GHz 180o hybrid at input in measurement) is validated and demonstrated. The double r has achieved a maximum conversion gain of 10.2 dB at 66 GHz and 0.83 dB at 80 GHz using singleended measurement. The maximum output power at 80 GHz is -3.9 dBm at 3.3 V supply and -2.4 dBm at 4 V supply. The f undamental suppression is better than 20 dB across the operable output bandwidth. The doubler draws 41.6 mA from a nominal

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90 -25-20-15-10-505 -25 -20 -15 -10 -5 0 5 Output Power (dBm)Input Power (dBm) 50 GHz 60 GHz 66 GHz 70 GHz 74 GHz 80 GHzA -25-20-15-10-505 -25 -20 -15 -10 -5 0 5 Output Power (dBm)Input Power (dBm) 50 GHz 60 GHz 80 GHzB Figure 5-8. Measured output pow er versus input power for di fferent output frequencies at A) 3.3 V supply. B) 4.0 V supply.

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91 Table 5-1. Performance of prior published frequency doublers Ref Technology fT/fmax (GHz) Type Topology Input Output Operable Output BW (GHz) Output Frequency (GHz) Peak Conv. Gain (dB) Fundamental Suppression (dB) Max. Pout (dBm) Pdiss (mW) @ VDC [46] HBT N.A. Passive Differential Differential 14 40 N.A. -12 >20 2 0 [47] 0.18 m CMOS N.A. Passive Differential Differential 25 75 38 -11 ~ -15.5 32 59 3 0 [42] 90 nm CMOS 140/100 Active Single Single 50 69 60 -15.3 ~18 N.A. 4@1 [50] 90 nm CMOS 140/160 Active Single Single 26.5 28.5 27 1.5 >11.2 ~-1.5 10@1.25 [51] 0.4 m S i Ge HBT 85/128 Active Differential Differential 18 42* 30 5.6 22 0 185@5 [52] 0.5 m SiGe HBT 80/90 Active Differential Differential N.A. 14 17 30 -1 130@2.7 [53] 0.8 m SiGe HBT 80/N.A. Active Differential Single 34.6 37.6 36 3 4.5 35 9 10.5 95 114 @4 [55] 0.12 m AlGaAs/InGaAs pHEMT 110/>200 Active Single Single N.A. 76.5 1 30 9 N.A. [56] 0.15 m GaAs HEMT 95/N.A. Active Single Single 48 60 60 4 30 9 275@3 [57] 0.2 m InP HBT 180/220 Active Differential Single DC 10060 1 30 -10 150@-4.5 This work [54] 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS 200/200 Active Differential Differential 36 80* 66 80 10.2 0.83 33 20 1.7 -3.9 137@3.3 *denotes the operable output BW defined as the fr equency range in which the conversion gain is larger than 0 dB. 3.3 V supply. Table 5.1 summarizes t he performance of prior published frequency doublers. The double balanced active frequency doubler in this work [54] has, to the best of authors knowledge, achieved the highest conversion gains and output powers at operating frequencies of 66 GHz and 80 GHz among all other silicon-based technologies reported up to date. The performance of th is frequency doubler is also comparable with some of the state-of-the-art active frequen cy doublers implemented in III-V semiconductor technologies such as Gallium Arsenide (GaA s) [55], [56] and Indium Phosphide (InP) [57] as shown in Table 5.1.

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92 CHAPTER 6 HIGHLY LINEAR DOUBLE-BALANCE D ACTIVE UP-C ONVERSION MIXERS 6.1 Introduction The rapid emergence of advanced silicon-based semiconductor devices with excellent RF characteristics have initia ted many research works in 71 GHz and 81 86 GHz high-data-rate millimeter-wave r adios, 76 GHz long and 77 GHz short range automotive radars. Thes e state-of-the-art technol ogies present an unprecedented opportunity to realize millimeter-wave systems with high level of integration, high reliability, and low manufacturing cost. In modern wireless transmitter designs where up-conversion is inevitable, a mixer is usual ly required to conver t signals from baseband to RF. Several V-band active up-conversion mixers based on the conventional Gilbert multiplier design [58][61] and Micromixer [62] with improved LO rejection and conversion gain were reported. Active mixers using dual-gate topology [63] at K-band and series-connected triplet [64] at Ka-band have been demonstrated. A V-band passive mixer design in attempt to im prove the linearity at the expense of high LO drive was also reported [65]. These up-conversion mixe rs, when used in a direct conversion transmitter, have aimed to achi eve high LO rejection and low required LO power while maintaining an acceptable conversion gain. Particularly, special emphasis is laid on mixer linearity characterized by OP1dB and output-referred third-order intercept point (OIP3) to reduce the intermodulation products that in turn produce adjacent and alternate channel leakages. More critically for a millimeter-wave system, the requirement for gain or driver stages for ex pensive power amplificat ion can be relaxed. So far, however, no progress on W-band up-c onversion mixer has yet been reported.

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93 In this chapter, a W-band double-balanced active up-conversion mixer based on a well-established multi-tanh triplet linearizati on principle [66] is implemented to demonstrate high OP1dB with conversion gain. Besides, we also address the technical challenges faced in the high frequency characterization [67]. 6.2 Up-Conversion Mixer Design A linearization technique based on multitanh employs N differential pairs in parallel in which an input voltage offset is intentionally introduced to each pair according to the mismatched transistor ratio and bias current. By superimposing the distinct nonlinear transconductance characteristics cont ributed by the individua l differential pair, it is possible to extend the linear range of a transconductance stage by maintaining a maximally flat Gm response over an input voltage range. The block diagram of the double-balanced ac tive up-conversion mixer is shown in Figure 6-1(a). The mixer core consists of a Gilbert switching transistor quad, multi-tanh triplet (N=3) transconductance stage, and i nductive loads. The output buffers are included to provide the isolation and impedance matching before balanced-tounbalanced conversion. In addition, to complete the mixer operation, an integrated 80 GHz active frequency doubler [57] with a LO buffer are incor porated to drive the LO port and an on-chip balun [12] is used to combine the up-converted RF out puts. Figure 6-1(b) shows the circuit schematic of the multi-tanh triplet transconductance stage, which is composed of three asymmetric differential pai rs. The linearity performance of the multitanh triplet transconductance stage is determined by the number of di fferential pairs (N) employed, transistor ratio (A) between the out er devices M1 to the inner devices M2, and the bias current ratio (K) between I1 and I2. The choice of these two design parameters A and K involves trade-offs among the conversion gain, layout complexity,

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94 and flatness in the overall Gm, which plays a major role in the linearity of the mixer. In addition, to achieve high OP1dB at mixer output to drive t he driver amplifier, the upconversion mixer typically has to be desig ned to give more than marginal conversion gain at millimeter-wave frequency. Taking these design metrics into consideration, an iterative optimization is performed to determi ne the transistor ratio A and current ratio K to be 8 and 3/4, respectively. The transistor ratio A in the triplet design is realized by sizing the total emitter area (AE) of M1 with respect to M2. The current ratio K can be accomplished easily with different emitter degener ation resistors in the current sources. Next, to minimize the unwant ed nonlinear effects from the switchi ng quad which would otherwise impact on the overall linearity of the mixer, the emitter length (LE) of the transistor quad is chosen to be 2.5 m and is biased at peak fT to achieve fast switching. The device layout configuration CBEBC for the best RF performance along with the chosen switch device geometry not only hel ps improve LO suppression, conversion gain, and output power but also eases the loca l oscillator (LO) design at high frequency, thereby reducing the over all power consumption. 6.3 Experimental Results The up-conversion mixer was fabricated in a low-cost 200 GHz fT and fmax JAZZ 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS process. Thin-film micros trip transmission lines with full ground plane shielding are adopted to maintain g ood continuous ground potential [12]. The microphotograph of the fabricated mixer is show n in Figure 6-2. The dimension of the chip, including the pads, is 820 m x 810 m (0.664 mm2). The on-wafer measurement setup is shown in Figure 6-3. The LO signal is generated with the Ag ilent vector signal generator (E8267D) and external 10 GHz 180o hybrid junction (HY1040). The on-chip frequency doubler and LO buffer provide adequate LO power up to around 80

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95 VCC TL1 TL2 On Chip Balun RFout LO Buffer Gilbert Switching Quad X2Multi-Tanh Gm Stage LOin+ + -IFin Iout+ Iout-Output BuffersA M1 M2 R1IFin+ VIF M2 M2 M2 M1 IFinVIF R2 GNDI1 I2I1 IoutB Figure 6-1. A) Block diagram of the double-balanced acti ve up-conversion mixer. B) Circuit schematic of the multi-tanh triplet (N=3) transconductance stage.

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96 Figure 6-2. Microphotograph of t he active up-conversion mixer. G S S G G S GWR-15 or WR-10 E4448 Spectrum AnalyzerDownconverted RFout HP 83650B Synthesized Sweeper 180o Hybrid 180o Splitter Agilent E8267D Vector Signal Generator IF LO RF DC DC HP 83650A Synthesized Sweeper DGSSGD DDDD HY1040-180 10-40 GHz ZFSCJ-2-4+ X4 or X6V-band/ W-band Mixer Composite Figure 6-3. Measurement setup for active up-conversion mixer. IF+ DC Bias LOin+ RF Balun IFX2 and Buffer Mixer Core LOin-

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97 GHz. The IF signal is generated by the synthesized sweeper (HP 83650A) and converted from single-ended to di fferential using the 50 MHz 180o power splitter (ZFSCJ-2-4+). Due to the limitation of the spectrum analyzer (PSA E4448), the upconverted RF output is fed to the external V/W-band down-converter which is driven by the multiplier (X4/X6) and synthesized sweeper (HP 83650B). The losses due to the input/output probes, cables, and external V/W-band down-converter modules are calibrated. To account for the different conv ersion losses of the external down-converter modules at upper sideband (USB) and lower sideband (LSB), a small IF frequency of 10 MHz is used to keep the output powers of the two sidebands nearly identical. The measured SSB power conversion gain is 5.1 dB and 3.8 dB at 77 GHz and 80 GHz, respectively as shown in Figure 6-4. The calibrated LO drive level at the on-chip frequency doubler input is between -8.5 dBm to -4 .2 dBm from 70 to 82 GHz. The LO to RF isolation is better than 20 dB from 70 to 84 GHz and is limited by the off-chip measurement setup which includes the 10 GHz 180o hybrid junction, 180o power splitter at IF input, and cables. The actual LO rejection should be better. Figure 6-5 shows the measured OP1dB is -4.2 dBm at 77 GHz and -5.8 dBm at 80 GHz. Note that the measurement results beyond 80 GHz are limited by the 10 GHz 180o hybrid junction and available LO driv e. The active up-conversion mixer including the output buffer draws 32.5 mA from a nominal 3.3 V s upply while it dissipates a total DC power of 365 mW including the on-chip LO generation. 6.4 Chapter Summary In this chapter, a W-band highly li near double-balanced active up-conversion mixer implemented in a low-cost 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS technology was presented. By applying multi-tanh triplet technique, the up-conversion mixer has achieved high OP1dB

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98 707274767880828486 -6 -4 -2 0 2 4 6 8 10 5 10 15 20 25 Conversion Gain LO to RF Isolation (dB) SSB Conversion Gain (dB)RF Output Frequency (GHz) Limited by LO drive Rejection Figure 6-4. Measured SSB conversi on gain and LO to RF isolation. -20-18-16-14-12-10-8-6-4-202 -6 -4 -2 0 2 4 6 -16 -14 -12 -10 -8 -6 -4 -2 0 77 GHz 80 GHzRF Pout (dBm) SSB Conversion Gain (dB)Baseband Pin (dBm) Figure 6-5. Measured mixe r linearity characteristics at 77 GHz and 80 GHz.

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99 Table 6-1. Performance of prior published silicon-based up-conversion mixers Ref Technology fT/fmax (GHz) Type Topology IF Input RF Output On-Chip Balun LO/RF Output Frequency (GHz) Conversion Gain (dB) LO to RF Isolation (dB) OP1dB (dBm) Pdiss (mW) @ VDC [65] 65 nm CMOS N.A./N.A. Passive Differential Single Yes/No 60 -13.5 34 -19 0 [63] 130 nm CMOS N.A./N.A. Active Differential Differential No/No 18 -2 ~ -0.7 30 -7 ~ -5.2 8@1.2 [64] 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS 150/180 Active Differential Differential No/No 28 1.2 ~20 -5.6 38@3.3 [58] 90 nm CMOS 150/N.A. Active Differential Differential Yes/Yes 51 -11 26.5 -10 13.5@1.2 [59] 130 nm CMOS 90/140 Activ e Differential Differential No/No 59 -0.7 ~ 4 37 -5.6a 24@1.6 [60] 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS 120/130 Active Differential Differential Yes/Yes 35 -7 40 -16b 14@4 [61] 65 nm CMOS 230/N.A. Active Differential Differential No/No 60 -6.5 30c -5 29@1.2 [62] 0.25 m SiGe HBT 200/200 Active Single Differential Yes/Yes 60 -6.5 33 -6 82.5 @3.3 This work [67] 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS 200/200 Active Differential Differential Yes/Yes 77 80 5.1 3.8 21.7 21.1 -4.2 -5.8 107@3.3d adenotes double sideband (DSB) output power. bdenotes measurement result at RF=41 GHz. cdenotes measurement result at 50 GHz. ddenotes Pdiss of the mixer including output buffers. of -4.2 dBm and -5.8 dBm at 77 GHz and 80 GH z, respectively. The mixer has achieved SSB power conversion gain of 5.1 dB at 77 GH z and 3.8 dB at 80 GHz. To the best of authors knowledge, this is the first Wband active up-conversion mixer based on multitanh triplet that has demons trated the highest characterized operating frequency and shown better OP1dB performance compared to t he prior published silicon-based upconversion mixers reported to date as shown in Table 6-1.

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100 CHAPTER 7 INTEGRTATED WIDEBAND LINEAR RECEIVER 7.1 Introduction Until recently, low-cost millimeter-wav e (mm-wave) integrated radio systems are emerging thanks to the rapid evolution of advanced SiGe and CMOS technologies. In particular, SiGe technology has been identif ied as a well-suited technology for both active and passive imaging applications such as high-resolution automotive radars and concealed weapon detections due largely to its superior performance in gain, NF, output power, phase noise, and variability over temperature compared even with todays CMOS. To further maintain the low produc tion cost advantage, efficient technology sharing suggests the key component s should be universal. Therefore, it is an attractive effort to integrate multiple standards that include lower E-band 71 GHz high speed point-to-point links, 76 GHz long-r ange and 77 GHz short-range automotive radars into a single chip. Moreover, high dynamic range performance is essential as these systems are required to operate under all-weather conditi ons. To date, numerous research efforts have been undertaken to realize SiGe HBT/BiCMOS automotive phased array radar [68], [69], r adar transceivers [70], [71], i ndividual receivers [72][76] and down-converter [77] at ~77 GHz. Howe ver, no integrated receiver front-end addressing the complete 71 GHz band has been reported. In this paper, we present the first fully integrated, universal, wideband, and linear receiver covering the entire 71 GHz band t hat can be used in a direct-conversion zero-IF or low-IF architecture. The simplified block diagram of the wideband receiver with on-chip active frequency doubler is shown in Figure 7-1.

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101 Balun Ext. LO RFin IF+ IF-X2Buffer LNA On-ChipIFAmp Int. LO Figure 7-1. Simplified block diagram of the wideband receiver with on-chip active frequency doubler. 7.2 Circuit Blocks Design The architecture chosen for the low-noise amplifier (LNA) and mixer combination is crucial in determining the overall RF bandwidth of the receiver front-end. Between these two important buildi ng blocks, the mixer generally gives better bandwidth performance; therefore optimizing the LNA design becomes the remaining key option to simultaneously achieve the wideband operat ion and low noise upon integration. 7.2.1 Low-Noise Amplifier The schematic of the two-st age LNA is shown in Figure 7-2. The amplifier has an input cascode stage for higher power gain and be tter isolation at the expense of higher NFmin. Common emitter was used for the sec ond stage for improved linearity and wider output matching bandwidth. Device layout configurations with two base fingers (CBEBC) were used throughout the LNA design to miti gate the signal loss via device parasitic capacitance (CBC and CBE) to ground, thereby improvin g the overall power gain and NF. Wideband noise input matching technique with low quality factor Q network (~1.3 after optimization) was employed to achieve hi gh linearity and enhance robustness to PVT simultaneously. Inductive degeneration at the second stage further improves the

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102 linearity of the overall LNA. A standal one version of the LNA has also been characterized and has a measured peak S21 of 14.5 dB and NF of 6.9 dB at 77 GHz with a 3 dB bandwidth spanning from 69 to 83 .5 GHz [26]. The measured NF is lower than 8.4 dB from 64 to 84 GHz while the measured input-referred 1 dB compression point (IP1dB) is -11.4 dBm at 77 GHz. Note the output matching of the standalone LNA has been modified slightly to facilitate the integration of the receiver front-end. TL6 TL7 C2 VCC2 Bias2 R3 C5 M2 M1 TL3 TL4 TL2 TL1 RFin C1 R1 VCC1 Bias1 M3 TL5 C6 R2 C3 C4 Feed Vcas1 RFout Feed Figure 7-2. Circuit schematic of the 77 GHz two-stage LNA [26]. 7.2.2 Down-Conversion Mixer a nd Integrated Passive Balun The schematic of the standalone mixer s hown in Figure 8-3 consists of two integrated wideband passive baluns at LO and RF port, a mixer core, emitter followers, and an IF amplifier. The passive balun f eatures an insertion loss of 1.5.2 dB, amplitude imbalance of <0.27 dB, phase imbalance 180oo from 70 GHz, and port return losses better than 10 dB from 60 GHz, as reported in [12]. The mixer core

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103 RFin VCC Vbias Down-Conversion Mixer Core IF Buffers M1 M2 M3 M4 M5M6 M7 M8 TL1 R2 R7 R8R9 R1 On Chip Balun VLO LOin VRF R3 R4 On Chip Balun TL3TL4 + IFOUTM9M10 R11 R14 TL2 R5R6 R10 R12R13IF Amplifier Figure 7-3. Circuit schematic of the standalone down-conversion mixer. design is based on the Gilbert cell fo r double-balanced structure for broadband performance. The selection of the device sizes involves trade-offs among conversion gain, NF, and linearity. In fact, linearity of the receiver front-end is primarily determined by the performance of the mixer. There are three main factor s to consider for linearity design. First, large DC bias current therefore large gm is usually required from transconductor (gm) stage to reduce the noise and the 3rd order intermodulation product (IM3). However, considering the fmax of the technology and Gmax at operating frequency range, device sizes cannot be made arbitrar ily large so that the gain of the gm stage can be conserved. Second, small device geometry (CEBEC) which presents the highest fT in this technology was chosen for fast switch ing quad. This configuration reduces the charging and discharging times for complete current steering, thereby reducing the mixer quads contribution to the overall non linearity. Moreover, it also relaxes the

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104 required LO drive and reduce the overall syst em power budget. Additionally, for a small size device the required DC bias current to achieve peak fT is smaller, this allows lower current noise arising from the switching qua d. Note however that this goes against the large bias current for gm stage necessary for linearity an d NF. As an additional benefit, power conversion gain and LO-to-IF isolation can be improved. During current steering, the peaking transmission line inductors T L1 and TL2 (60 pH) inserted between CE and CB stage resonate out the parasitic capacitance associated with collector node of gm stage (M5 & M6 with emitter length = 7 m) and emitter node of switching quad (M1M4 with emitter length = 2.5 m), thus improving mixers power gain, NF, isolation, and bandwidth all at once. The emitter length of M5 and M6 are intentionally scaled more than twice the size of M1M4 such that the gm stage can be biased at the optimal current density for high linearity while the switching quad is biased close to peak fT. The selection shows excellent linearity with minimal performance deg radation in gain and NF, with nominal 3.3 V supply. Inductive degeneration transmission lines (TL3 & TL4, 25pH each) further improve the design bandwidth and linearity. The mixer resistive loads (R5 & R6) are 240 optimized for conversion gai n while satisfying the lowvoltage headroom requirement. Third, in order to interface with the 50 testing environment and provide adequate gain and output drive to the following circuitry, an IF buffer amplifier is usually unavoidable after t he mixer core. The IF differential amplifier core comprises large size devices (M9 & M10 with emitter length = 2 x 6 m) along with a pair of degeneration resistors (R12 & R13, 27 each) to increase th e overall linearity. A major part of the current drained in the mi xer design comes from the IF amplifier in which the individual device has a current density of 6.5 mA/ m2. Two 75 resistors

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105 R10 and R11 are used as IF loads for output matching. As a final note, linearity performance (IP1dB) is usually better without an IF am plifier. The mixer draws a total current of 36 mA. 7.2.3 Internal LO Generation The internal LO signal is generated by an on-chip active by an on-chip active frequency doubler with a power output buffer to relax fundamental signal source phase noise requirement. The frequency doubler based on Gilbert cell was chosen for its fully balanced operation, high conv ersion gain, high output power, and wide bandwidth. The doubler highlights a wide operable bandw idth from 36 GHz with gain and Pout of 0.8 dB and -3.9 dBm, respectively at 80 GHz. More design insights are available in [57]. A power output buffer consisting of a diffe rential cascode stage was added to further increase the output power of the doubler and ensure fast swit ching of the mixer quad as described in Section 7.2.2. 7.3 Implementation and Experimental Results The receiver was fabricated in a low-cost 200/180 GHz fT/fmax 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS process. The emitte r width of the HBT is 0.15 m. All the inductors in the design were implemented using thin-film mi crostrip transmission lines with full ground plane shield to isolate them from the conductive substr ate and maintain continuous ground potential. All interconnects were mo deled and accounted for at both design and layout phases. The microphotograph of the wideband receiver is shown in Figure 8-4. The overall chip size is 1350 m x 990 m (1.34 mm2). All the measurements were characterized on-wafer. For t he receiver conversion gain and lin earity test setup, the RF signals were generated with the external multiplier modules (X4 and X6) with synthesized sweeper (HP 83650B). The external LO signal was generated with Agilent

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106 Figure 7-4. Microphotograph of the wideband receiver. 6570758085 10 15 20 25 30 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Noise Figure (dB) Conversion Gain (dB)Frequency (GHz) Receiver Mixer Figure 7-5. Measured receiver and downconversion mixer conversion gain and noise figure (IF fixed at 100 MHz). LNA Balun Mixer & IFAmp X2 and LO Buffer DC Bias RFin IF+ IFLOinLOin+

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107 vector signal generator (VSG) (E8267D) and external 10 GHz 180o hybrid junction (HY1040). The on-chip active frequency doubler and LO buffer together provide adequate LO power up to about 80 GHz. T he IF outputs were fed through a 50 MHz 180o power combiner. The standalone mixer char acterization has a similar setup except that the LO signal is generated by a Vor W-band source module and VSG. Port matching and port-to-port isolation of the mixer were measured with Agilent 110 GHz mm-wave network analyzer (PNA series). T he noise figure measurement was done with the calibrated Vand/or W-band noise source in conjunction with spectrum analyzer (PSA E4448). All the off-chip losses were corrected and de-embedded from the measurement results. As shown in Figure 7-5, the receiver achieves a measured power conversion gain of 28.1 dB and NF of 8 dB at 77 GHz with at least 14 GHz 3 dB RF bandwidth from 68 to 82 GHz. The NF of the receiver is between 8 and 10 dB across the 3 dB BW. Note that all the measurements were performed with IF fixed at 100 MHz unless otherwise specified. The measured power conversion gain and single sideband (SSB) NF of the mixer are 13.7 dB and 15.5 dB respectively, at 77 GHz. The SSB NF is 16.5 dB over the frequency range from 67 to 82 GHz. Both gain and NF measurements of the mixer include the loss of passive balun. The calibrated LO drive level at the input of active frequency doubler is between -9.5 dBm and -4.5 dBm from 67 GHz to 82 GHz. The measurement results beyond 80 GHz are limited by the 10 GHz 180o hybrid and available LO drive, therefor e the actual 3 dB RF BW of the receiver is expected to be even larger.

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108 -16-14-12-10-8-6-4-2024 0 5 10 15 20 25 Conv. Gain and SSB NF (dB)LO Input Power (dBm) Conversion Gain SSB NFRF = 77 GHz LO = 76.9 GHz IF = 100 MHz Figure 7-6. Measured mixer conversi on gain and SSB NF vs. LO input power. Figure 7-6 shows conversion gain and SSB NF of the mixer versus LO input power at 77 GHz. The mixer gain saturates at about -2 dBm LO input drive while the SSB NF reached its minimum at 2 dB m. Degradation in both gain and NF performance can be observed when the LO power level is dropped to below -4 dBm. Both RF and LO port return losses are better than 10 dB while LO -to-RF and RF-to-LO isolation are better than 40 dB and 30 dB, respectively over the tar get BW as shown in Figure 7-7. Figure 8-8 depicts the measured linearit y characteristics of the mixer and receiver described by input P1dB. At RF = 77 GHz and IF = 100 MHz, t he mixer and receiver feature an input P1dB of -10.3 dBm and -23.6 dBm, respectively. The measured input return loss of the receiver is better than 9 dB across the 3 dB BW. The total power consumption is 413 mW. Table 7.1 and Table 7.2 outli ne the performance of this work and several recently

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109 102030405060708090100110 -60 -50 -40 -30 -20 -10 0 Port Matching and IsolationFrequency (GHz) RF LO LO-to-RF RF-to-LO Figure 7-7. Measured RF and LO port matching and port-to-por t isolation of the mixer. -30-25-20-15-10-5 5 10 15 20 25 30 IP1dB = -23.6 dBm IF Output Power (dBm)RF Input Power (dBm)Conversion Gain (dB)RF = 77 GHz LO = 76.9 GHz IF = 100 MHz IP1dB = -10.3 dBm -20 -15 -10 -5 0 5 10 Receiver Mixer Figure 7-8. Measured linearity characteristics of IF output power and conversion gain of the mixer and receiver at RF = 77 GHz.

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110 published state-of-the-art 77 GHz down-conversion mixers and ~77 GHz receivers realized in SiGe HBT/BiCMOS technologie s. The mixer FoM defined in equation (8-1) has been computed for comparison. Besides, more than 14 GHz 3 dB RF bandwidth achieved by this receiver is the largest among all. PWR LIN MIXERMixer NF Mixer NFCG FoM ) ()( (8-1) 7.4 Chapter Summary In this Chapter, a highly integrated wideband linear receiver with a 3 dB RF bandwidth from 68 GHz to 82 GHz was presented. The receiver, fabricated in a low-cost 200/180 GHz fT/fmax SiGe BiCMOS process, achieved a maximum gain of 28.1 dB, a NF of 8 dB, and an input P1dB of -23.6 dBm at 77 GHz and dissipates 413 mW. The distinct advantage of wideband operation along wit h excellent linear ity performance accomplished in this radio receiver allows applications within the band, such as 71 GHz high speed point-to-point links, 76 GHz long-range and 77 GHz short-range radar sensors to share and reuse the same front-end chip. Table 7-1. Performance of prior published SiGe HBT/BiCMOS 77 GHz downcovnversion mixers Ref Technology fT/fmax (GHz) Topology IF Freq (MHz) Conv. Gain (dB) NF (dB) IP1 dB (dBm) IF Amp. Pdiss (mW) @ VCC Chip Area (mm2) FoM [78]* 0.13 m SiGe BiCMOS 200/240 Single-Balanced 8800 20 12.8 -14.7 Yes 360@3 3.63 N.A [79]** 0.18 m SiGe:C HBT 200/275 DoubleBalanced Gilbert 10 11.5 15.8 -0.3 No 413@5.5 0.63 -78.5 [80] 0.18 m SiGe:C HBT 200/200 DoubleBalanced Gilbert 500 22 14 -30 Yes 300@-5 0.25 -93.6 [81]** 0.14 m SiGe:C HBT 200/275 DoubleBalanced Gilbert 1 15 11.2 2.5 No 335@5.5 0.68 -60.2 [82]** 0.14 m SiGe :C HBT 225/330 Micromixer 10 15 16 -3 No 187@5.5 0.53 -72.21 [73] 0.13 m SiGe BiCMOS 200/290 DoubleBalanced Gilbert N.A. 26 12-14 -26 Yes 67@N.A N.A. -79.3 [83] 0.25 m SiGe BiCMOS 180/200 Micromixer 100 13.4 18.4 -12 Yes 176@4.5 0.28 -89.07 This work [84] 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS 200/180 DoubleBalanced Gilbert 100 13.7 15.5 -10.3 Yes 113@3.3 0.58 -78.4 *denotes superheterodyne down-converter. ** denotes down-conversion mixer with no IF buffer.

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111 Table 7-2. Performance of prior published SiGe HBT/ BiCMOS 77 GHz receivers Ref. Technology fT/fmax (GHz) 3 dB RF BW (GHz) RX Gain (dB)@ Freq. (GHz) RX NF (dB) IP1dB (dBm) Pdiss (mW) Chip Area (mm2) Receiver Integration Levl [68], [69] 0.13 m SiGe BiCMOS 200/290 76 35@ 77 GHz 8 -27.5 161 2.25 LNA/Mixer/IF Amp/VCO (4X Array) [70] 0.13 m SiGe BiCMOS 170/200 76 25.6@ 78 GHz 9 -24 740 1.17 LNA/Mixer/IF Amp/VCO [71] 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS 200/180 76 31@ 79 GHz 7.5.5 -30.7 601 7.4 LNA/ Quadrature Mixer/PLL [72] 0.18 m SiGe:C HBT 200/275 75 ~32@ 77 GHz 11 (SSB) -16 1073 1.1 LNA/Quadrature Mixer/Branchline Coupler/LO Buffer [73] 0.13 m SiGe BiCMOS 200/290 73 46@ 77 GHz 7.5 -38 195 1.7 LNA/Mixer/IF Amp/VCO [74] 0.13 m SiGe BiCMOS 220/250 68 24@ 77 GHz 4.8 -21.7 120 0.23 LNA/Mixer/IF Amp/VCO [75] 0.25 m SiGe BiCMOS 180/200 79 21.7@ 79 GHz 10.2 (sim)-35 595 1. 26 LNA/Mixer/VCO [76] 0.14 m SiGe:C HBT 225/330 75.5.5 30@ 77 GHz 11.5 (SSB) -26 440 1.16 LNA/Active Balun/Mixer This work [84] 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS 200/180 68 28.1@ 77 GHz 8 -23.6 413 1.34 LNA/Passive Balun/Mixer/ /IF Amp/Doubler/LO Buffer

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112 CHAPTER 8 SUBMILLIMETER-WAVE HIGH-POWER HARMONIC SIGNAL GENERATION 8.1 Introduction Submillimeter-wave voltage-controlled osci llators (VCOs) with high output power, wide tuning range, and low phase-noise are essential building blocks for ultra-high resolution imaging, remote sensing, biological, chemical sensors, and next-generation optical communication systems. Several techniques for signal generations at submillimeter-wave regime include fundamental oscillator design, integrated VCO and frequency doubler, or harmonic o scillator design. The first approach, as mentioned in Chapter 5, typically limited by the margi nal device power gain and maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) is hard to produce stable oscill ation and good output power at submillimeter-wave. Further the phase noise is usua lly restricted by the NFmin of the device as well as quality fact or Q of the varactor, this indicates that having a high spectral purity signal source with this tec hnique is impractical. The second approach using VCO and frequency doubler architecture seems to be a better option provided that the power consumption of the active frequency doubler can be kept small. If, however power consumption is a concern, passive frequency doublers can also be used instead at the cost of higher input drive. Note that high Q filters are sometime s needed to further enhance the suppression of the undesired harmonic tones [85]. A more practical approach that can significantly relax the aforementioned tec hnical challenges can be realized with the harmonic VCO. The push-push topology (2nd harmonic oscillator), in which the outputs of two suboscillators coupled in anti-phase are combined to yield a strong second harmonic output [86]-[89]. By using push-push design technique which extends the useful frequency

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113 range of the available active device technologies even beyond fmax, the two fundamental sub-oscillators only oscillate at half of the desired output frequency [90]. Owing to this, the requirements on Q of the resonators are also relaxed therefore low phase-noise designs become more feasible It is also understood that the tuning r ange of a pushpush VCO is also doubled compared to t he fundamental counterpart. Furthermore, a frequency locked source can be realized by locki ng the oscillator in a phase-locked loop (PLL) using a static or dynamic divider operating at the fundamental frequency instead of at the second harmonic output frequency, reducing divi der speed requirements by half. In addition, the loading pulling is suppressed effectively due to the separation of internal and external frequency. However, large signal non-linear analys is for odd-mode operation of the suboscillators is needed, which makes the design complicated. The bias network also has to be properly designed with respect to two critical frequencies associated with the even and odd modes of operation [91]. The output of a push-push VCO is single-ended; therefore single-ended to diffe rential conversion is needed if the circuit is to drive a subsequent fully differential stage, e.g. double-balanced mixer. In this Chapter, section 8.2 first pr esents the submicron InP HBT device technology. Section 8.3 addresses push-pus h oscillator design including the generalized Nth harmonic oscillators analysis. Exper imental results and high frequency measurement techniques will be discussed in section 9.4. 8.2 Submicron Indium Phosphide (InP) D-HBT Technology InP/InGaAs double-heterojunction bipolar tr ansistors (D-HBTs) have demonstrated impressive cutoff frequencies while maintain ing a high breakdown vo ltage with a large band gap collector. HBTs have been considered as the most suited technology due to

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114 its inherently superior low fr equency 1/f characteristic. The push-push oscillators were fabricated in a scaled iline stepper-defined 0.5 m InP D-HBT technology developed inhouse at Bell Laboratories, Alcatel-Lucent Technologies [92]. Dry-etched mesas are used to replace the wet etched emitter, base and collector definition to ensure accurate submicron emitter geometry and to enhance t he device yield and uniformity. A narrowbase layout is used to reduce the par asitic base-collector capacitance (Cbc). The backend integration of the InP D-HBT MMIC process includes thin-film capacitors and resistors, as well as three levels of gol d interconnect with low k inter-layer planarizing dielectric layers [93]. Figure 8-1 shows the SEM of a dry-etched D-HBT before planarization. Figure 8-1. Dry etched D-HB T before planarization [92]. The HBTs fabricated on the same wafer have maximum extrapolated fT and fmax of 405 GHz and 335 GHz, respectively at current density of 600 kA/cm, as shown in Figure 8-2. The measured device breakdown voltage (VCEO) is 3.5 V.

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115 Figure 8-2. Extrapolated fT and fmax of 0.5 x 4.0 m2 emitter InP D-HBT measured as a function of collector current [93]. Maximum oscillation frequency (fmax), being one of the mo st important design metrics, can be extrapolated fr om maximum transducer gain, GT,max. However, the slope of GT,max changes depending on the stability factor K, decreases at a rate of 10 dB/decade when K < 1 and 20 dB/decade when K > 1. An alternative way to characterize the fmax of the device is by extrapolating from unilateral Masons gain (GU) which is defined as the maximum gain that c an be obtained by unilateralizing the device by compensating Y21 with a lossless feedback network. GU is also used as a good indicator of the speed of the transistor. Figure 9-3 shows current gain (|h21|2) and unilateral Masons gain (GU) plotted against frequency. As can be observed, the Masons gain GU drops at a rate of 20 dB/decade and is ~11 dB and ~5 dB at 100 GHz and 200 GHz, respec tively. As frequency increases, the gain becomes marginal to sustain oscillation. The push-push oscillator topology takes the advantage of the additional 6 dB gain from the device to osc illate at the fundamental

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116 Figure 8-3. Current gain (|h21|2) and unilateral Masons gain (GU) plotted against frequency [92]. while producing twice the frequency at t he output. This makes submillimeter-wave oscillators practical and possible. 8.3 Push-Push Oscillator Circuit Design 8.3.1 General Nth Harmonic Oscillators Analysis Figure 8-4 shows the block diagram of the push-push arch itecture with phase coupling network. Qualitativel y, the push-push oscillator (N = 2) operates as a second harmonic oscillator in which two fundament al sub-oscillators are operating antisymmetrically at half of the desired frequency 2fo. When the two out-of-phase fundamental signals which are achieved with the phase coupling network are combined through the output network, the fundamental components are destructively cancelled out while the second harmonic components are enhanced constructively at the load ZLoad. The phase coupling network maintains the necessary phase difference between the two sub-oscillators to facilitate harmonic generation. The phase coupling networks can be realized by double-sided microstrip resonators, dielec tric resonator (DRs), and transmission lines with appropriate electrical length.

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117 Fundamental Sub-Oscillator 1 Fundamental Sub-Oscillator 2 Phase Coupling Network Output Network Vout(t), Push-PushZLoadV1(t), FundamentalV2(t), Fundamental I1(t), FundamentalI2(t), Fundamental Differential (Odd) Mode Common (Even) Mode Common (Even) ModeLine of Symmetry Figure 8-4. Block diagram of the push-push architecture with phase coupling network. The push-push oscillator can also be described by Figure 9-5 using a fundamental differential oscillator instead of phase coupl ing network. The funda mental differential oscillator produces two 180o out-of-phase signal currents, upon combining through the output network, the fundamental is cance lled and the push-push out put is enhanced at the load. In this design, the push-push oscillator can be more easily and clearly perceived as described. Fundamental Differential Oscillator Output Network Vout(t), Push-PushZLoadV1(t), FundamentalV2(t), Fundamental I1(t), FundamentalI2(t), Fundamental Differential (Odd) Mode Common (Even) Mode Common (Even) ModeLine of Symmetry Figure 8-5. Block diagram of the push-push architecture with fundamental differential oscillator. Due to the symmetry of pushpush configuration, the line of symmetry observed in Figure 8-4 and Figure 8-5 clear ly defines the boundary for two modes of operations, namely, differential (odd) mode and co mmon (even) mode. At fundamental fo, the

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118 undesired common mode oscillation should be s uppressed while the desired differential mode should be supported to in order to enhance the sec ond harmonic oscillation at 2fo. The half circuit common mode and differentia l mode equivalent circuits will be discussed in Chapter 8.3.2. Quantitatively, the two time-v arying signals of the two suboscillators are given by n tjn n tjtjtjtj tjn no o o o o oeA eAeAeAeAeAtV ... )(4 4 3 3 2 2 1 )( 1 (8.1) )(3 3 )(2 2 )( 1 )( 20 0 0 0)(ttj ttj ttj n ttjn neA eAeA eAtV )( )(4 40 0...ttjn n ttjeA eA (8.2) n ttjn n n tjn n outo oeAeAtVtVtV)]([ 2 1)()()( (8.3) ...]1[]1[]1[)(0 0 03 3 3 2 2 2 1 tj tj tj tj tj tj outeeAeeAeeAtVo o o (8.4) If the phase difference at the fundamental between V1(t) and V2(t) is to (8.5) The push-push output becomes ... 222)( )(2 1 6 6 4 4 2 20 0 0 n tj tj tj n PushPush outeAeAeAtV tV (8.6) Equation 9.6 shows the cancellation of all the odd harmonics including the fundamental while the even harmonics are added constructively. The higher order harmonic terms (4 o and 6 o...) are filtered out. Alternatively, the mathemat ical analysis can also be presented in another form in terms of sinusoidal function. The two signals from the sub-oscillat ors can be expressed as 0 1) sin( )(n no ntnatV (8.7) 0 2) sin( )(n no nntnatV (8.8)

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119 Note that V1(t) and V2(t) are differ by n where n is the harmonic index. The output signal is the superposition of V1(t) and V2(t) at the load and is given by ...4,2) sin(2 )(n no n PushPush outtna tV (8.9) It is shown V1(t) and V2(t) are cancelled out when n = odd harmonics (1, 3, 5) while Vout(t)Push-Push is obtained when n = even harmonics (2, 4, 6). For triple-push oscillator (N = 3), the time-varying signals of each sub-oscillator can be given by n tjn n tjtjtjtj tjn no o o o o oeA eAeAeAeAeAtV ... )(4 4 3 3 2 2 1 )( 1 (8.10) n tj tj tj tjn no o o oeA eAeA eAtV) 3 2 (3 3 ) 3 2 (2 2 ) 3 2 ( 1 ) 3 2 ( 2)( ) 3 2 ( ) 3 2 (4 4... tjn n tjo oeA eA (8.11) n tj tj tj tjn no o o oeA eAeA eAtV) 3 4 (3 3 ) 3 4 (2 2 ) 3 4 ( 1 ) 3 4 ( 3)( ) 3 4 ( ) 3 4 (4 4... tjn n tjo oeA eA (8.12) The output of the triple-push oscillator is given by ... )( )(3 1 9 9 6 6 3 30 0 0 n tj tj tj n Push Triple outeKeKeKtV tV (8.13) Equation (9.13) shows the constructive addi tion of the third harmonic while the higher order harmonic terms (6 o and 9 o...) are filtered out. Similarly, for quadruple-push oscillator (N = 4), the time-varyi ng signals of each sub-oscillator can be given by n tjn n tjtjtjtj tjn no o o o o oeA eAeAeAeAeAtV ... )(4 4 3 3 2 2 1 )( 1 (8.14) n tj tj tj tjn no o o oeA eAeA eAtV) 2 (3 3 ) 2 (2 2 ) 2 ( 1 ) 2 ( 2)( ) 2 ( ) 2 (4 4... tjn n tjo oeA eA (8.15) n tj tj tj tjn no o o oeA eAeA eAtV)(3 3 )(2 2 )( 1 )( 3)(

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120 )( )(4 4... tjn n tjo oeA eA (8.16) n tj tj tj tjn no o o oeA eA eA eAtV) 2 3 (3 3 ) 2 3 (2 2 ) 2 3 ( 1 ) 2 3 ( 4)( ) 2 3 ( ) 2 3 (4 4... tjn n tjo oeA eA (8.17) ... )( )(4 1 12 12 8 8 4 40 0 0 n tj tj tj n Push Quadruple outeKeKeKtV tV (8.18) Equation (8.18) shows the constructive addition of the fourth harmonic while the fundamental, second, and third harmonics are suppressed due to the phase relations. The higher order harmonic terms (8 o and 12 o...) are filtered out. The analysis of the relative improvement in phase noise of the fundamental oscillator, oscillator with frequency doubler, and Nth harmonic oscillator can be found in [94] and can be highlighted as follows: 1. The phase noise of the fundament al oscillator operating at double the oscillating frequency 2fo would incur additional 12 dB/octave degradation with respect to the fundamental oscillator operating at fo. 2. The phase noise of the integrated osci llator and frequency doubler is degraded by 6 dB/ octave with respec t to the fundamental frequency. 3. The phase noise of the push-push oscillat or has a relative improvement of 9 dB with respect to the fundamental oscillator oscillating at twice the operating frequency. It is only degraded by 3 dB when compared to t he fundamental oscillator operating at fo. For Nth harmonic oscillator, there is an improvement in phase noise in comparison with the single oscillator by a fact or of 10log (N) where N is t he number of sub-oscillators. However, the analysis is based on the a ssumption that the active device, low frequency equivalent circuit is approximatel y constant in the low frequency noise

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121 frequency range. In practice, the improvement may not be all that optimistic due to the Q of the varactor and layout of the device, therefore the power gain and NFmin of the device. 8.3.2 160 GHz and 200 GHz Push-Push Oscillators Design The push-push oscillator based on differential Colpitts topology in this work focuses on the signal output extraction from the base node instead of from the emitter or collector node. Upon comparing among the three different push-push topologies, the single-ended push-push output extr action from the emitter or collector node results in a higher available power than that from the base node. In fac t, the highest power is shown to be extracted from the collector node [95 ], [96]. However, topology with the output taken from the base node allows simultaneo us the single ended push-push output and differential fundamental output s which enable phase locking at fundamental, making the integrated high speed PLL system possible. Figure 8-6 shows the schematic of the pus h-push oscillator in this design. As mentioned in 8.3.1, due to t he symmetry of push-push confi guration, there exist two modes of operation: one in-phase co mmon (even) mode and one out-of-phase differential (odd) mode. In co mmon mode, the currents and voltag es at each node are in phase while in differential mode, the currents and voltages are 180o out of phase. For the circuit to work, the undesired even mode oscillation should be quenched; only the wanted odd mode should be excited so that the fundamental odd m ode currents cancel out while the second harmonic is constructive ly combined in phase. Figure 8-7(a) and (b) show the equivalent sub-oscillator circuits of the push-push oscillator in differential mode and common mode, respectively.

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122 The sub-oscillator core is based on the co mmon collector Colpitts oscillator as shown in Figure 8-7(a). Large signal virtual grounds are stemmed from the differential operation of the circuit, and they are pres ent for odd harmonics. The bypass capacitor CB shunting CBE of M1 is used to bypass the base-emit ter diode and limit s the non-linear upconversion of noise at the base node. The value of it is typically larger than CBE to see the improvement in phase noise. The negative re sistance in this Colpitts is generated by CB and a fixed capacitance CE. The resonant tank and oscillation frequency to first order are set by CBE, CB, CE, and the base inductor LB. The emitter inductor LE provides large impedance when looking in to the emitter of M1 and is mainly used for biasing. -VEEM1 LCREE M2 RBLCLELELBLBCECECBCBPush-Push Output -VBias Fundamental Differential Output RLoad Figure 8-6. Schematic of th e push-push oscillator based on di fferential Colpitts topology.

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123 However, it still contributes to the resonance if the impedance is not large enough. Finally, inductive load LC is used to maintain the loop gain at high frequencies. The LC gives another degree of freedom to optimize the fundamental differential output power and second harmonic output power. However, the value of LC to first order has negligible effect on oscillation frequency since it is not cons idered as part of the core. Resistor REE is used instead of current mirror to improve common mode rejection at submillimeter-wave. The push-pu sh output is extracted at the differential large signal ground at the base which is also biased with the resistor RB. Negative power supplies are used in the design to facilitate a cl eaner and more accurate signal ground. LC LB CBDifferential Mode Output M1 CE LE IBias Large Signal Virtual Ground Large Signal Virtual Ground Large Signal Virtual GroundA -VEELC LELBCECBCommon Mode Output 2RLoad2REE OpenM1B Figure 8-7. Equivalent sub-oscillator circui ts in A) Differential mode. B) Common mode (Bias not shown). In the common mode operation, the push-push oscillator can be represented by its half circuit equivalence. The output of t he push-push is now terminated with twice the

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124 load impedance RLoad which damps out the unwanted in-phase oscillation at the fundamental frequency. Therefor e the sub-oscillator should oscillate in the odd mode while it should remain stable in the even mode. All the inductors in the design are impl emented by inverted thin-film microstrip transmission lines with top metal acting as ground plane and bottom metal as signal conductor. Figure 8-8 shows t he cross section of the inverted thin-film microstrip transmission line. The inverted thin-film micros trip is chosen over the regular one since there are no breaks in ground plane. This allows excellent average ground potential throughout the chip. However, as a drawback, it suffers from substrate radiation and losses. Figure 8-8. Inverted thin-film micros trip transmission line cross section. Two push-push oscillators operating at 160 GHz and 200 GHz were designed in which the component values are scaled proportionally. Non-linear large signal Harmonic Balance simulation is necessary to accura tely obtain the output power and oscillation frequency. As an additional benefit of the push-push architec ture, the accuracy of the device model up to the fundamental (up to 100 GHz in this design) is sufficient.

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125 8.4 Experimental Results The layout view and chip microphot ograph of the 200 GHz and 160 GHz pushpush oscillator are shown in Figure 8-9 and Figure 8-10, respectively. As discussed, since the transmission lines are implemented by inverted thin-film microstrip, majority of the chip layout cannot be seen. For proprietary purpose, this could be a good way to prevent the design from revealing. On-w afer measurement at these frequencies is challenging. Figure 8-11 s hows the on-wafer measurem ent setup for push-push oscillators. The downconvert ed output spectrum of the 200 GHz push-push oscillator is measured using a GGB Industries Model 220 WR-05 waveguide probe and a Millitech 170 GHz downconverter block, consisting of an active multiplier (X6) feeding a second harmonic mixer. The external LO is set at 15.62 GHz and the effective LO frequency of 187.44 GHz is then mixed with the push-push output. The device under test (DUT) in the setup serves as the RF source which completes the downconversion. Figure 8-9. Layout view and microphotograp h of the 200 GHz push-push oscillator. Push-Push Output

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126 Figure 8-10. Layout view and microphotograph of the 160 GHz push-push oscillator. Ext LO From VSG X6 DUT Spectrum AnalyzerDCG S G WR-05 P G P K cable X2 Subharmonic Mixer K cable LO RF IF Figure 8-11. Push-push oscillator measur ement setup. Push-Push Output

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127 2.02.53.03.54.0 194 196 198 200 202 Corrected Output Power (dBm) Oscillation Frequency Output PowerNegative Supply Voltage -VEE (V)Oscillation Frequency (GHz)-8 -6 -4 -2 0 Figure 8-12. Measured sec ond harmonic frequency and output power as a function of negative supply VEE for 200 GHz push-push oscillator. 1.01.21.41.61.82.0 199 200 201 202 203 Corrected Output Power (dBm) Oscillation Frequency Output PowerNegative Supply Voltage -VB (V)Oscillation Fr equency (GHz)-4 -2 0 Figure 8-13. Measured sec ond harmonic frequency and output power as a function of negative supply VB for 200 GHz push-push oscillator (VEE fixed at 3.2 V).

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128 The conversion loss of the mixer alone varies between 10 dB to 12 dB. The additional losses due to the waveguide pr obe, downconverter and cabling are estimated to be about 15 dB in this frequen cy range. Figure 8-12 and Figure 8-13 show the measured second harmonic frequency and corrected output power of the 200 GHz push-push oscillator as a function of VEE and VB, respectively. As shown, the oscillation frequency can be tuned from about 194 GHz to 202 GHz by varying VEE from -2.1V to -4 V, showing a tuning range of 6 GHz. The measured output power varies from -7.5 dBm to a ma ximum of -0.8 dBm which is achieved at VEE = -3.2 V. By fixing VEE at -3.2 V while sweeping VB, it is found that the maximum output power is achieved at VB = 1.35 V which draws a total cu rrent of 14.6 mA giving the corresponding power consumpt ion of 46.7 mW. The downconv erted spectrum of the 200 GHz push-push oscillator is shown in Figure 8-14. The detailed downconverted spectrum of the same oscillat or is shown Figure 8-15. As can been seen from the 400 MHz detailed spectrum, a relatively clean ou tput spectrum is obt ained. Unfortunately, accurate phase noise measurements usi ng a spectrum analyzer are difficult. Same measurement setup is used to measure the 160 GHz push-push oscillator except the 140 170 GHz downconverter block is used instead. The external LO for this measurement is set at 13 GHz with an effective LO of 156 GHz. The conversion loss of the mixer alone varies between 11 dB to 17.5 dB. The estimated losses due to the waveguide probe, cabling, and mixer are between 13 dB to 20.5 dB. Figure 8-16 and Figure 8-17 show the measured second harmonic frequency and corrected output power the 160 GHz push-push oscillator as a function of VEE and VB, respectively. The tuning range of about 9 GHz is achieved by varying VEE from -1.5 V to -3.2 V. The

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129 Figure 8-14. Downconverted spectrum of the 200 GHz pushpush oscillator. (Not yet corrected for the losses). Figure 8-15. Detailed downconverted spectr um of the 200 GHz pus h-push oscillator. (Not yet corrected for the losses).

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130 1.52.02.53.0 158 160 162 164 166 168 Corrected Output Power (dBm) Oscillation Frequency Output PowerNegative Supply Voltage -VEE (V)Oscillation Frequency (GHz)-10 -8 -6 -4 -2 0 2 Figure 8-16. Measured sec ond harmonic frequency and output power as a function of negative supply VEE for 160 GHz push-push oscillator. 1.01.21.41.61.82.0 158 159 160 161 Corrected Output Power (dBm) Oscillation Frequency Output PowerNegative Supply Voltage -VB (V)Oscillation Frequency (GHz)-2 0 2 Figure 8-17. Measured sec ond harmonic frequency and output power as a function of negative supply VB for 160 GHz push-push oscillator (VEE fixed at 3.0 V).

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131 Figure 8-18. Downconverted spectrum of the 160 GHz pushpush oscillator. (Not yet corrected for the losses). Figure 8-19. Detailed downconverted spectr um of the 160 GHz pus h-push oscillator. (Not yet corrected for the losses).

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132 measured output power from -9 dBm to the maximum of 2 dBm which is accomplished at VEE = -3 V. From Figure 8-17, the maximum output power is found at VB = -1.6 V. The oscillator draws 9.84 mA and the corres ponding power consumptio n of 29.5 mW. The downconverted spectrum of t he 160 GHz push-push oscillator is shown in Figure 8-18. The 300 MHz detailed downconverted spectrum of the same oscillator is shown Figure 8-19. A relatively clean downconverted spectrum is again observed. 8.5 Chapter Summary In this chapter, two push-push oscillators operating at 160 GHz and 200 GHz are reported. The two oscillators were realized in a 0.5 m emitter InGaAs/InP D-HBT with a fmax of 335 GHz and a breakdown voltage (V CEO) of 4 V. T he common collector based Colpitts push-push oscillator with the output taken at the base node allows simultaneous single ended seco nd harmonic output and differential fundamental output, simplifying the PLL design. The push-push oscillator has been shown to perform better than the fundamental oscillator at the same frequency in te rms of robustness, output power, phase noise, and tuning range. The ex perimental results of both push-push oscillators have exhibited very impressive output powers of 2 dBm and close to 0 dBm at 160 GHz and 200 GHz, respectively. While push-push oscillator designs were also reported in 130 nm and 90 nm CMOS techno logy [97], [98], however, due to the reduced breakdown voltage of the highly sc aled silicon CMOS technologies, a significant reduction in output power is obs erved for oscillators beyond 100 GHz. The lack in the output power might not be suffic ient for many millimeteror submillimeterwave source applications such as high performance imaging, remote sensing and next generation optical systems.

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133 The simulations indicate that by further reducing the length of the resonator and the capacitor size, harmonic oscillators with higher operating frequencies and even beyond the device fmax are possible. This implies the high power THz signal generations can be expected in the very near future.

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134 CHAPTER 9 SUMMARY AND FUTURE WORKS 9.1 Summary In this Ph.D. dissertation, new circuit architectures and combined analog and microwave design techniques were studied. T he individual circuit blocks such as, lowpower linear 77 GHz low-noise amplifier (LNA ), down-conversion mixer, passive balun, tunable quadrature power spli tter (QPS), and 100 GHz regener ative frequency divider (RFD), and 80 GHz active frequency doubler were independently characterized and fabricated in a low-cost 0.18 m SiGe BiCMOS technology. A 68 GHz highly integrated, wideband linear rece iver is experimentally demonstrated. The receiver achieves a maximum gain of 28.1 dB, a NF of 8 dB, and an input-referred 1 dB gain compression point (IP1dB) of -23.6 dBm at 77 GHz while dissipating 413 mW. This integrated receiver enables applications within the band to share and reuse the same front-end chip. To further explore the opportunity at higher frequency, an 81.6 GHz low-noise amplifier is dem onstrated with a gain of 21 dB, a NF of 9 dB, and an IP1dB of -18.8 dBm. On the other hand, critical transmitter bu ilding blocks, such as an up-conversion mixer has also been investigated. A highly linear double-balanced active up-conversion mixer based upon multi-tanh triplet technique has been validated to show a single sideband (SSB) power conversion gain of 5.1 dB and an output-referred 1 dB gain compression point (OP1dB) of -5.8 dBm at 77 GHz. Finally, a high power signal generation at subm illimeter-wave is demonstrated and fabricated in InGaAs/InP D-HBT technology. The second harmonic push-push oscillator shows an output power of 0 dBm at 200 GHz which opens a new frontier for

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135 applications such as weather observation radar, chemical, and tumor detections, and next generation optical system. By using even higher order harmonic generation, THz signal sources can be expected in the very near future. 9.2 Future Works 9.2.1 Wideband Direct-Conversion Transmitter Front-End The block diagram of a wideband direct-conversion tr ansmitter front-end is shown in Figure 9-1. By making use of the tunable quadrature generati on along with other wideband building blocks in the transmitter design, wideband operation could be achieved. The transmitter front-end consists of two tunable quadrature power splitters, two up-conversion mixers, an 180o power combiner, a power co mbined power amplifier, and an active frequency doubler with a power buffer. Power Buffer PA 0/ 180 0/90 RFout X2 Ext LO 0/90 LOI+ LOILOQ+ LOQIFI+IFIIFQ+IFQFigure 9-1. Block diagram of the wide band direct-conversion transmitter front-end. 9.2.2 Other Opportuni ties in Bulk CMOS Millimeter-wave wideband active balun with enhanced common-mode rejection The active balun first proposed and later pat ented by Dr. Jenshan Lin was designed at 1.5 GHz and fabricated in 0.25 m CMOS for proof-of-concept. The enhanced common-

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136 mode rejection ensures that excellent am plitude and phase balance over a very wide bandwidth. Compared to the trad itional passive baluns which are implemented by lossy transformer, power splitter, or rat-race, it is noticed that this acti ve balun technique at mm-wave is favorable because it can provi de gain which is sacred at mm-wave. In addition, the circuit size can be made much more compact. Furt her, the impact on NF of the overall receiver could be improved depending on the circuit and system design. The design tradeoffs among noise, linearity, and bandwidth shall be investigated.

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146 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH Austin Ying-Kuang Chen was born in Taip ei, Republic of Taiwan in December 1982. He received the Bachelor of Sci ence degree in electrical and computer engineering from Purdue Universi ty, West Lafayette, Indiana. in May 2003. He received the Master of Science and Prof essional degrees in electrical engineering fr om Columbia University, New York City, New York, in May 2004 and May 2007, respectively. In May 2010, he was awarded his Ph.D. degree in el ectrical and computer engineering from University of Florida, Gainesville, Flor ida. His broad research interests include RF/microwave/millimeter-wave integrated active and passive components and Gb/s wireless transceivers, high speed mixed-si gnal electronics, THz signal generations, and on-chip antenna designs using CMOS, SiGe BiCMOS, and InP HBT technologies. His experience also includes the design and development of millimeter-wave power amplifiers and high speed PLL synthesizers. In addition, he enjoys all kinds of water sports including surfing, kiteboarding, stand-up paddle boarding (SUP), wakeboarding, kneeboarding, and scuba diving.