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The Perceived Coherence Level of Support between the Central Office and District Schools

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041279/00001

Material Information

Title: The Perceived Coherence Level of Support between the Central Office and District Schools
Physical Description: 1 online resource (84 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Todd, Michael
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2010

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: administrators, central, perceptions, resources, school, structures, support, systems, teachers
Human Development and Organizational Studies in Education -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Educational Leadership thesis, Ed.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: THE PERCEIVED COHERENCE LEVEL OF SUPPORT BETWEEN THE CENTRAL OFFICE AND DISTRICT SCHOOLS The purpose of this study was to explore the coherence between central office administrators, school based administrators, and teachers in regards to their perceptions of central office support and school achievement. Three focus groups, homogenously grouped by central office administration, school based administration, and teacher were conducted to discover coherence levels in the categories of systems, resources, and structures. From an inductive analysis of the data eight themes emerged; needs-based resource allocation, progress monitoring, professional development planning and delivery, consultant professional development, collegial professional development, technology for data analysis, formal structure, and informal structure. Progress monitoring had the highest level of coherence between all groups and resource allocation showed more coherence between central office administration and teachers than school administrators and the central office administration. Coherence levels in the category of human resources were inconsistent. While central office and school-based administrators were aligned in the area of professional development planning and development, teacher?s coherence levels were low when compared to both central office and school based administrator groups. Conversely, coherence levels of reliance on technological tools for data analysis were higher between teachers and school-based administrators than teachers and central office administrators. With respect to formal and informal structures, teachers favored the use of informal structures, although central office and school based administrators preferred formal. Lacking in the research of central office functions is the coherence or connections made between central office administrations, school based administration, and teachers regarding their meaning making and understanding of the systems, resources, and structures that affect school achievement. This study illuminates that when participants are willing to share their views, a greater understanding of the relationships between systems, resources and structures directed towards school achievement can result.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Michael Todd.
Thesis: Thesis (Ed.D.)--University of Florida, 2010.
Local: Adviser: Behar-Horenstein, Linda S.

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2010
System ID: UFE0041279:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041279/00001

Material Information

Title: The Perceived Coherence Level of Support between the Central Office and District Schools
Physical Description: 1 online resource (84 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Todd, Michael
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2010

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: administrators, central, perceptions, resources, school, structures, support, systems, teachers
Human Development and Organizational Studies in Education -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Educational Leadership thesis, Ed.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: THE PERCEIVED COHERENCE LEVEL OF SUPPORT BETWEEN THE CENTRAL OFFICE AND DISTRICT SCHOOLS The purpose of this study was to explore the coherence between central office administrators, school based administrators, and teachers in regards to their perceptions of central office support and school achievement. Three focus groups, homogenously grouped by central office administration, school based administration, and teacher were conducted to discover coherence levels in the categories of systems, resources, and structures. From an inductive analysis of the data eight themes emerged; needs-based resource allocation, progress monitoring, professional development planning and delivery, consultant professional development, collegial professional development, technology for data analysis, formal structure, and informal structure. Progress monitoring had the highest level of coherence between all groups and resource allocation showed more coherence between central office administration and teachers than school administrators and the central office administration. Coherence levels in the category of human resources were inconsistent. While central office and school-based administrators were aligned in the area of professional development planning and development, teacher?s coherence levels were low when compared to both central office and school based administrator groups. Conversely, coherence levels of reliance on technological tools for data analysis were higher between teachers and school-based administrators than teachers and central office administrators. With respect to formal and informal structures, teachers favored the use of informal structures, although central office and school based administrators preferred formal. Lacking in the research of central office functions is the coherence or connections made between central office administrations, school based administration, and teachers regarding their meaning making and understanding of the systems, resources, and structures that affect school achievement. This study illuminates that when participants are willing to share their views, a greater understanding of the relationships between systems, resources and structures directed towards school achievement can result.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Michael Todd.
Thesis: Thesis (Ed.D.)--University of Florida, 2010.
Local: Adviser: Behar-Horenstein, Linda S.

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2010
System ID: UFE0041279:00001


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PAGE 11

Transforming Schools: Creating a Culture of Continuous Improvement

PAGE 13

Purpose of the Study Research Questions

PAGE 14

Definition of Key Terms

PAGE 15

Significance of the Study

PAGE 17

Limitations

PAGE 18

Darling Hammond, Hightower, Husbands, LaFors & Young

PAGE 21

District Strategic Planning Systems

PAGE 22

Resource allocation

PAGE 24

Progress m onitoring

PAGE 26

Resources

PAGE 27

Human resources Learning First Alliance

PAGE 29

Stanford 9

PAGE 30

Technological resources

PAGE 32

Structures

PAGE 33

Formal

PAGE 34

Informal

PAGE 36

Setti ng

PAGE 37

Participants Theoretical Framework

PAGE 38

Instrumentation

PAGE 39

Data Collection

PAGE 41

Data Analysis Researcher Subjectivity Statement

PAGE 44

Corollary research question 1. Systems

PAGE 45

Needs Based Resource Allocation

PAGE 46

close the gap Progress Monitoring 360 degree model ThinkLink

PAGE 48

. Accountability

PAGE 51

close the gap close the gap Corollary research question 2.

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Resources Human Resources Professional development planning and de livery

PAGE 53

Consultant professional development

PAGE 54

Collegial professional development

PAGE 56

Technological Resources Technology for Data Analysis

PAGE 58

Corollary research question 3.

PAGE 59

Structures Formal Structure

PAGE 60

360degree model.

PAGE 61

360degree model 360degree model

PAGE 62

Informal Structure

PAGE 63

360degree

PAGE 66

Summary of Findings

PAGE 67

Implications of the Findings

PAGE 70

Recommendations for Future Research

PAGE 71

Conclusion

PAGE 72

Initial Focus Group Questions C entral Office Administrator School Administrator Teacher

PAGE 73

Followup Focus Group Questions Central Office Administrator, School Based Administrator, and Teacher Reviewed Documents

PAGE 74

Protocol Title: Please read this consent document carefully before you decide to participate in this study. Purpose of the research study: What you will be asked to do in the study: Time required: Risks and Benefits: Compensation: Confidentiality: Voluntary participation: Right to withdraw from the study:

PAGE 75

Whom to contact if you have questions about the study: Whom to contact about your rights as a research participant in the study: Agreement:

PAGE 76

1. TITLE OF PROTOCOL: 2. PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR(s): 3. SUPERVISOR (IF PI IS STUDENT): (Name, campus address, phone #, e mail & fax) 4. DATES OF PROPOSED PROTOCOL: 5. SOURCE OF FUNDING FOR THE PROTOCOL: 6. SCIENTIFIC PURPOSE OF THE INVESTIGATION: 7. DESCRIBE THE RESEARCH METHODOLOGY IN NONTECHNICAL LANGUAGE. 8. POTENTI AL BENEFITS AND ANTICIPATED RISK. 9. DESCRIBE HOW PARTICIPANT (S) WILL BE RECRUITED, THE NUMBER AND AGE OF THE PARTICIPANTS, AND PROPOSED COMPENSATION (if any

PAGE 77

10. DESCRIBE THE INFORMED CONSENT PROCESS. INCLUDE A COPY OF THE INFORMED CONSENT DOCUMENT (if applicable).

PAGE 78

Teachers College Record 105 Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk 11 Teaching as the Learning Profession s The Educational Forum 68 Creating a positive school culture: How principals and teac hers can solve problems together The ethical dimensions of school leadership Handbook of instructional leadership: How successful principals promote teaching and learning Focus groups in social research Teacher College Record 108 Powerful ideas, modest gains: Five years of systemic reform in Philadelphia middle schools. Interactions between central office language arts administrators and exemplary English teachers, and the impact on student performance. Supportive supervision: Becoming a teacher of teachers The limits and contradictions of systemic reform: The Philidelphia story

PAGE 79

Educational research: Planning, conducting, and evaluating quantitative and qualitative research Qualitative inquiry and research design: Choosing among five traditions Foundations of social research: Meaning and perspective in the research process. Thousand Oaks, CA: The reflective educators guide to professional development. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Building instructional quality : Inside -out, bottom-up, and topdown perspectives on San Diegos school reform. Harvard Educational Review 76 Superintendent and principal perceptions of superintendent instructional leadership practices in improving school districts Shaping school culture: The heart of leadership Teachers College Record, 104 The focus group research handbook Building a new structure for school leadership Teaching as the le arning profession: Handbook of policy and practice Educational Administration Quarterly 41

PAGE 80

Contradictions and control in systemic reform: The ascendancy of the central office in Philadelphia Schools. School Science and Mathematics 107 Leading in a culture of change Getting real: A different perspective on the relationship between school resources and student outcomes 33 Educational Administration Quarterly, 38 Holding high hopes: How high schools respond to state accountability policies Education125 American School Board Journal 195 San Diegos big boom: District bureaucracy supports culture of learning School districts and instructional renewal. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis 28 Educational Researcher 33 Leader to Leader 13 Lack of school supplies, m aterials and r esources as an e lementary cause of frustration and burnout in south Texas special education t eachers 33

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. American Journal of Education112 Facilitating instructional leadership: Effects of central office support on principal instructional leadership 32 International Journal of Science Education 29 Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk 9 Including at-risk students in standards based reform Brining the district back in: The role of the central office in improving instruction and student achievement The promises and perils facing todays school superintendent Educational Research and Evaluation11 International Journal of Educational Reform, 11 School instructional program coherence: Benefits and challenges.

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Handbook 5: Providing leadership at the district level Making schools work: A revolutionary plan to get your children the education they need. Handbook of Research on School Supervision Educational Leadership46 Resource allocation does matter in improving student performance The shaping school culture fieldbook School Psychology International, 20 Focus group practice Urgency, responsibility, efficacy: Preliminary findings of a study of high-performing texas school districts. Qualitative interviewing: The art of hearing data Key ideas in educ ational research. Interviewing as qualitative research: A guide for researchers in education and the social sciences Teachers College Record 102 Equity-driven achievement -focused school districts

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Disseminating Success for All: Lessons for policy and practice School leadership and reform: Case studies of Philadelphia principals Computers in the Schools 24 Learning along the way: Professional development by and for teachers Eviden ce -based practice in education Leadership33 Wang, J., Odell, S. J., & Schwille, S. A. (2008). Journal of Teacher Education59 Teaching and Teacher Education17 American Journal of Education112 How teach ing matters: Bringing the classroom back into discussions of teacher quality Systemwide efforts to improve student achievement Transforming schools: Creating a culture of continuous improvement