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Utilization of in Vitro Produced Pasteuria Species Endospores as a Biological Control for Belonolaimus Longicaudatus

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041064/00001

Material Information

Title: Utilization of in Vitro Produced Pasteuria Species Endospores as a Biological Control for Belonolaimus Longicaudatus
Physical Description: 1 online resource (94 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Luc, John
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2009

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: belonolaimus, biocontrol, biological, control, imp, intergrated, management, nematodes, pasteuria, pest, sting
Entomology and Nematology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Entomology and Nematology thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: UTILIZATION OF IN VITRO PRODUCED PASTEURIA SPECIES ENDOSPORES AS A BIOLOGICAL CONTROL FOR BELONOLAIMUS LONGICAUDATUS Management of plant-parasitic nematodes in turf has become increasingly difficult during the last decade due to the limited number of effective post-plant nematicides. The use of in-vitro produced Pasteuria sp. (IVP) as a biological control agent of Belonolaimus longicaudatus (sting nematode) offers an additional management tactic to the chemical and cultural controls currently available. Experiments utilizing IVP endospores were conducted to determine if endospore rate, size, origin, formulation, or placement in the soil profile affect the suppression of B. longicaudatus populations. Growth room experiments revealed that high levels (280,000 endospores/cm3 of soil) of IVP endospores suppressed B. longicaudatus populations by approximately 75%. Another experiment suggested that sporangium size of IVP endospores did not affect the level of nematode suppression. Furthermore, a bionematicide utilizing IVP endospores is likely to be effective against different populations of B. longicaudatus and the original geographical source of IVP endospores does not appear to affect efficacy. Similarly, B. longicaudatus levels at the time of application, does not appear to affect the ability of IVP endospores to suppress nematode populations. Granular and liquid formulations of IVP endospores suppressed nematode populations by 20% and 63%, respectively, compared to the nontreated control. Greenhouse experiments indicate that IVP endospore movement into the turf profile is not hindered by thatch and that large irrigation events can move endospores below the turfgrass root zone, possibly reducing effectiveness. In addition, placement of endospores within the root zone (0 to 10 cm soil depth) with one application of 0.6 cm of irrigation indicates that endospore applications can be achieved relatively easy. These trials have provided a great deal of information; however experiments conducted in a controlled environment do not always correspond to field observations and field tests should be conducted in the future to confirm these results. In the future, biopesticides using IVP may be an important component of integrated pest management for B. longicaudatus on turfgrasses.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by John Luc.
Thesis: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2009.
Local: Adviser: Crow, William T.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2011-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2009
System ID: UFE0041064:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041064/00001

Material Information

Title: Utilization of in Vitro Produced Pasteuria Species Endospores as a Biological Control for Belonolaimus Longicaudatus
Physical Description: 1 online resource (94 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Luc, John
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2009

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: belonolaimus, biocontrol, biological, control, imp, intergrated, management, nematodes, pasteuria, pest, sting
Entomology and Nematology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Entomology and Nematology thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: UTILIZATION OF IN VITRO PRODUCED PASTEURIA SPECIES ENDOSPORES AS A BIOLOGICAL CONTROL FOR BELONOLAIMUS LONGICAUDATUS Management of plant-parasitic nematodes in turf has become increasingly difficult during the last decade due to the limited number of effective post-plant nematicides. The use of in-vitro produced Pasteuria sp. (IVP) as a biological control agent of Belonolaimus longicaudatus (sting nematode) offers an additional management tactic to the chemical and cultural controls currently available. Experiments utilizing IVP endospores were conducted to determine if endospore rate, size, origin, formulation, or placement in the soil profile affect the suppression of B. longicaudatus populations. Growth room experiments revealed that high levels (280,000 endospores/cm3 of soil) of IVP endospores suppressed B. longicaudatus populations by approximately 75%. Another experiment suggested that sporangium size of IVP endospores did not affect the level of nematode suppression. Furthermore, a bionematicide utilizing IVP endospores is likely to be effective against different populations of B. longicaudatus and the original geographical source of IVP endospores does not appear to affect efficacy. Similarly, B. longicaudatus levels at the time of application, does not appear to affect the ability of IVP endospores to suppress nematode populations. Granular and liquid formulations of IVP endospores suppressed nematode populations by 20% and 63%, respectively, compared to the nontreated control. Greenhouse experiments indicate that IVP endospore movement into the turf profile is not hindered by thatch and that large irrigation events can move endospores below the turfgrass root zone, possibly reducing effectiveness. In addition, placement of endospores within the root zone (0 to 10 cm soil depth) with one application of 0.6 cm of irrigation indicates that endospore applications can be achieved relatively easy. These trials have provided a great deal of information; however experiments conducted in a controlled environment do not always correspond to field observations and field tests should be conducted in the future to confirm these results. In the future, biopesticides using IVP may be an important component of integrated pest management for B. longicaudatus on turfgrasses.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by John Luc.
Thesis: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2009.
Local: Adviser: Crow, William T.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2011-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2009
System ID: UFE0041064:00001


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