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A Geohydrological Investigation of Gold Head Branch State Park, Clay County, Florida

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0025117/00001

Material Information

Title: A Geohydrological Investigation of Gold Head Branch State Park, Clay County, Florida
Physical Description: 1 online resource (113 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Hermansen, Glenn
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2009

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: aquifer, branch, ccc, deer, floridan, geohydrology, gold, goldhead, head, lake, park, ravine, recharge, sheeler
Geography -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Geography thesis, M.S.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The Gold Head Branch State Park in Clay County, Florida contains an unusual geomorphological feature termed a steephead ravine that has been formed and advanced through undercutting of the headwall, eroding the sandy soil as water is discharged from the shallow subsurface. The Gold Head Branch stream is formed from this clear water and other springs and seeps along the ravine sidewalls. The local region is a recharge zone for the Floridan aquifer and most precipitation infiltrates into the soil and is subsequently transported within the subsurface. Theories regarding the origin of steephead ravines often contend that a relatively impermeable or semi-permeable stratigraphic layer restricts downward percolation of infiltrating precipitation, thereby causing discharge of subsurface water at the headwall and sidewalls of the ravine. Test borings drilled at two other steephead headwalls in the Florida panhandle (Schumm, 1995) found no stratigraphic control of groundwater discharge and this study also found that groundwater was discharging at the headwall without downward restriction. Additionally, the longitudinal profile of Gold Head Branch stream does not have significant slope breaks that would indicate stratigraphic control. The geohydrology of the ravine was investigated by drilling at the steephead headwall, hand augering within the ravine, testing soil infiltration, surveying, and by synthesizing and interpreting lake levels, well levels, and climatic data in the region. Findings of this study may have implications for the Floridan aquifer and its connection to surface water in the area. Based on the surveyed elevation difference between the top of the headwall and base of the headwall, and depth of the surficial aquifer encountered during drilling of the test boring at the top of the headwall, there is approximately a three foot mounding effect as groundwater is focused and subsequently discharged at the base of the steephead headwall. The largest mature trees in the headwall area of the Gold Head ravine are predominately sweetgum, southern magnolia, and pignut hickory and several were cored during this study utilizing an increment borer. Tree-ring width residuals from pignut hickory (carya glabra) tree cores obtained near the headwall were related to independent variables including lake levels, precipitation, temperature, and seasonal combinations using ordinary least squares regression. This study found that temperature during three key months, (June, July, August), had a more significant relationship than most precipitation variables and a combination of weighted (June, July, August) rain and temperature with August temperature and August precipitation produced the best model to interpret the climatic signal stored within the hickory trees. Southeastern pignut hickory is shade tolerant and develops a deep tap root so growing within the ravine where shallow groundwater is abundant, rain and sunshine availability in the competitive ravine environment is less important than temperature.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Glenn Hermansen.
Thesis: Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 2009.
Local: Adviser: Mossa, Joann.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2011-08-31

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2009
System ID: UFE0025117:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0025117/00001

Material Information

Title: A Geohydrological Investigation of Gold Head Branch State Park, Clay County, Florida
Physical Description: 1 online resource (113 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Hermansen, Glenn
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2009

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: aquifer, branch, ccc, deer, floridan, geohydrology, gold, goldhead, head, lake, park, ravine, recharge, sheeler
Geography -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Geography thesis, M.S.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The Gold Head Branch State Park in Clay County, Florida contains an unusual geomorphological feature termed a steephead ravine that has been formed and advanced through undercutting of the headwall, eroding the sandy soil as water is discharged from the shallow subsurface. The Gold Head Branch stream is formed from this clear water and other springs and seeps along the ravine sidewalls. The local region is a recharge zone for the Floridan aquifer and most precipitation infiltrates into the soil and is subsequently transported within the subsurface. Theories regarding the origin of steephead ravines often contend that a relatively impermeable or semi-permeable stratigraphic layer restricts downward percolation of infiltrating precipitation, thereby causing discharge of subsurface water at the headwall and sidewalls of the ravine. Test borings drilled at two other steephead headwalls in the Florida panhandle (Schumm, 1995) found no stratigraphic control of groundwater discharge and this study also found that groundwater was discharging at the headwall without downward restriction. Additionally, the longitudinal profile of Gold Head Branch stream does not have significant slope breaks that would indicate stratigraphic control. The geohydrology of the ravine was investigated by drilling at the steephead headwall, hand augering within the ravine, testing soil infiltration, surveying, and by synthesizing and interpreting lake levels, well levels, and climatic data in the region. Findings of this study may have implications for the Floridan aquifer and its connection to surface water in the area. Based on the surveyed elevation difference between the top of the headwall and base of the headwall, and depth of the surficial aquifer encountered during drilling of the test boring at the top of the headwall, there is approximately a three foot mounding effect as groundwater is focused and subsequently discharged at the base of the steephead headwall. The largest mature trees in the headwall area of the Gold Head ravine are predominately sweetgum, southern magnolia, and pignut hickory and several were cored during this study utilizing an increment borer. Tree-ring width residuals from pignut hickory (carya glabra) tree cores obtained near the headwall were related to independent variables including lake levels, precipitation, temperature, and seasonal combinations using ordinary least squares regression. This study found that temperature during three key months, (June, July, August), had a more significant relationship than most precipitation variables and a combination of weighted (June, July, August) rain and temperature with August temperature and August precipitation produced the best model to interpret the climatic signal stored within the hickory trees. Southeastern pignut hickory is shade tolerant and develops a deep tap root so growing within the ravine where shallow groundwater is abundant, rain and sunshine availability in the competitive ravine environment is less important than temperature.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Glenn Hermansen.
Thesis: Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 2009.
Local: Adviser: Mossa, Joann.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2011-08-31

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2009
System ID: UFE0025117:00001


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Full Text

PAGE 11

1.1 Background

PAGE 14

1.2 History and Land Use

PAGE 27

2.1 Geologic Setting and Geohydrology

PAGE 32

2.2 Geomorphology and Fluvial Processes

PAGE 37

2.3 Soils and Plant Community

PAGE 57

3.1 Soil Borings

PAGE 58

3.2 Lake Levels and Hydrology

PAGE 59

3.3 Tree Rings

PAGE 66

4.1 Geohydrology and Lakes

PAGE 72

4.2 Trees and Climate

PAGE 99

5.1 Contributions of Study

PAGE 100

5.2 Limitations of Investigation

PAGE 101

5.3 Future Research

PAGE 102

STANDARD PENETRATION TEST

PAGE 103

STANDARD PENETRATION TEST