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A Cross-Cultural Test of Social Learning, Self-Control, Social Bonding and General Strain Theories of Crime and Deviance

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0024636/00001

Material Information

Title: A Cross-Cultural Test of Social Learning, Self-Control, Social Bonding and General Strain Theories of Crime and Deviance
Physical Description: 1 online resource (235 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Meneses, Rohald
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2009

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: bolivia, bonding, control, criminology, deviance, drugs, learning, sociology, strain, theories
Sociology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Sociology thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Deviant criminal behavior has been widely studied in the United States and Europe as well as in many Asian countries. However, there has been much less attention to this problem in South American societies. Theories considered the most viable for explaining deviant behavior, whether serious or minor offending, have been developed, mainly, in America, but the question remains, to what extent are they also applicable to other societies. The main purpose of this study is to determine how well each of four major criminological theories, Social Learning, Strain, Self-Control, and Social Bonding, explains deviant behavior committed in the United States and Bolivia and how they compare to each other in explaining deviant behavior among college students. The research was designed to test the relative explanatory power and cross-cultural generalizability of the four core main criminological theories. The data for this investigation came from a sample of students in two universities located in two metropolitan areas of Bolivia and a sample of students on one large university located in southeastern United States. Self-reports of law violations and other forms of deviant behavior were obtained from 807 respondents. The research instrument used, in all settings, was a 182-item questionnaire for the American sample and 181-item questionnaire for the Bolivian sample, containing questions regarding alcohol, cigarette, marijuana, cocaine, and other drug use, fighting, stealing, use of fake ID, speeding, and other deviant behaviors, and measures of variables as indicators of explanatory concepts from each of the four theories. For the purposes of this project only five dependent variables are used, alcohol, marijuana, other drugs use, hitting, and beating someone. The results indicate that social learning theory is supported as an explanation of substance use and violent behavior in both American and Bolivian samples. Mixed support was also found for social bonding, strain, and self-control theories. However, when placed in the same equation with social learning variables, most of the effects of variables from these theories disappear and do not operate as similarly as social learning variables in both societies. There is some evidence of cultural moderation of the social learning process in deviant behavior, but in an unexpected way.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Rohald Meneses.
Thesis: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2009.
Local: Adviser: Akers, Ronald L.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2010-02-28

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2009
System ID: UFE0024636:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0024636/00001

Material Information

Title: A Cross-Cultural Test of Social Learning, Self-Control, Social Bonding and General Strain Theories of Crime and Deviance
Physical Description: 1 online resource (235 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Meneses, Rohald
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2009

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: bolivia, bonding, control, criminology, deviance, drugs, learning, sociology, strain, theories
Sociology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Sociology thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Deviant criminal behavior has been widely studied in the United States and Europe as well as in many Asian countries. However, there has been much less attention to this problem in South American societies. Theories considered the most viable for explaining deviant behavior, whether serious or minor offending, have been developed, mainly, in America, but the question remains, to what extent are they also applicable to other societies. The main purpose of this study is to determine how well each of four major criminological theories, Social Learning, Strain, Self-Control, and Social Bonding, explains deviant behavior committed in the United States and Bolivia and how they compare to each other in explaining deviant behavior among college students. The research was designed to test the relative explanatory power and cross-cultural generalizability of the four core main criminological theories. The data for this investigation came from a sample of students in two universities located in two metropolitan areas of Bolivia and a sample of students on one large university located in southeastern United States. Self-reports of law violations and other forms of deviant behavior were obtained from 807 respondents. The research instrument used, in all settings, was a 182-item questionnaire for the American sample and 181-item questionnaire for the Bolivian sample, containing questions regarding alcohol, cigarette, marijuana, cocaine, and other drug use, fighting, stealing, use of fake ID, speeding, and other deviant behaviors, and measures of variables as indicators of explanatory concepts from each of the four theories. For the purposes of this project only five dependent variables are used, alcohol, marijuana, other drugs use, hitting, and beating someone. The results indicate that social learning theory is supported as an explanation of substance use and violent behavior in both American and Bolivian samples. Mixed support was also found for social bonding, strain, and self-control theories. However, when placed in the same equation with social learning variables, most of the effects of variables from these theories disappear and do not operate as similarly as social learning variables in both societies. There is some evidence of cultural moderation of the social learning process in deviant behavior, but in an unexpected way.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Rohald Meneses.
Thesis: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2009.
Local: Adviser: Akers, Ronald L.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2010-02-28

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2009
System ID: UFE0024636:00001


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Full Text

PAGE 13

Statement of Problem

PAGE 16

protecting their community

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Purpose of the Study

PAGE 20

The Significance of the Study

PAGE 23

Definitions of Use, Abuse, and Types of Drugs i n Bolivia

PAGE 26

Alcohol

PAGE 28

Cocaine

PAGE 29

Marijuana

PAGE 30

sativa Culture

PAGE 32

Why Do We Need to Explain Criminal and Delinquency Behavior in t he U .S. a nd Bolivia? the behavior varies and the participants are different in characteristics, experiences, and backgrounds

PAGE 33

Social Bonding T heory

PAGE 34

Attachment Commitment Involvement

PAGE 35

Belief

PAGE 37

General Theory of Crime : Self -Control

PAGE 47

S ocial Learning T heory

PAGE 49

Definitions

PAGE 50

Differential Association Differential Reinforcements

PAGE 51

I mitation

PAGE 56

General Strain Theory anomie

PAGE 69

Consideration of Cultural Differences

PAGE 72

Sampling and Data Collection Proce dures

PAGE 76

Dat a Entry, Cleaning, and Coding

PAGE 77

Measurements Dependent V ariables

PAGE 78

= = Socio -D emographic and Control Varia bles

PAGE 80

Independent (Theoretical) Variables

PAGE 81

Social Bonding Variables

PAGE 82

Self -Control Variables

PAGE 83

Strain Variables

PAGE 84

Social Learning Variables

PAGE 86

Statistical Methods

PAGE 89

Socio -Demographic Characteristics of American Respondents

PAGE 92

Socio -Demographic Characteristics of Bolivian Respondents

PAGE 96

The Distribution and Comparison of Substance Use a nd Viol ent Behavior in the American a nd Bolivian Samples

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Substance Use and Violent Behavior By Country Comparison of Gender And Race

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Comparison of Gender and Race Between the Two Samples

PAGE 105

Correlation Analyses

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* Strain, Social Bonding, Self -Control, and Social Learning Theories

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Multiple Regression Analyses Strain and Self -Control Theory Models

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Social Bonding Models

PAGE 121

Social Learning Models

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Combined OLS Models of Strain, Self -Control, Social Bonding, and Social Learning Theories

PAGE 125

Combined OLS Regression Models of Alcohol Use

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Combined OLS Regression Models of Marijuana Use

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Social Learning

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Strain

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Combined OLS Regression Models of Other Drugs Use and Hitting Someone

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Combined OLS Regressions Models of Beating Someone

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Overall Analysis of the OLS Regression Models of Substance Use and Violent Behavior in the United States and Bolivia

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PAGE 168

Limitations of the Study

PAGE 170

Future Research Implications

PAGE 180

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PAGE 223

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PAGE 227

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PAGE 231

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