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Hearing Monkeys through the Trees

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0024092/00001

Material Information

Title: Hearing Monkeys through the Trees An Acoustic Evaluation of Branches as a Medium for Capuchin Communication
Physical Description: 1 online resource (75 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Anderson, John
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: acoustic, america, apella, bashing, capuchin, cebus, communication, mechanical, percussion, primate, raleighvallen, sound, south, suriname
Interdisciplinary Ecology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Interdisciplinary Ecology thesis, M.S.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Bashing, striking of food objects on hard substrates during foraging, occurs species-wide in brown capuchins (Cebus apella), but may have signaling functions for brown capuchins living in the dense habitat of Raleighvallen in the Central Suriname Nature Reserve. Preliminary data from 2000-2003 revealed that hard-husked fruits of Phenakospermum guyannense (Strelitziaceae) were the items most commonly bashed by male capuchins. P. guyannense also accounted for the greatest number of strikes per episode by adult males (median=65; range=450). Impact sounds generated by strikes are perceived at estimated distances of greater than 400 meters, raising the possibility that P. guyannense percussion allowed males to broadcast signals of their location, alliance size, individual strength, and skill level. Hypotheses that bashing events have a communicative function were tested by comparing acoustic features of branch sites actually bashed (primary sites) to nearby control sites, selected for similarity in plant structural characteristics (criterion sites). Percussive strikes were produced on 18 primary sites within 16 trees located up to 6.6 meters above the ground using a custom-built apparatus. The apparatus used a baseball bat that fell through a fixed travel path under its own weight, and thereby struck a horizontal substrate with standardized force. Analyses indicated that trends in relative amplitude values, approach statistical significance in adult branch site comparisons, supporting hypotheses related to both bashing proficiency and potential for acoustic signaling. Subadult branch site comparisons produced opposite trends in relative amplitude values contrary to predictions, suggesting new directions for future research. Implications for communication and bash site selection in brown capuchins are discussed.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by John Anderson.
Thesis: Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 2008.
Local: Adviser: Boinski, Sue.

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2008
System ID: UFE0024092:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0024092/00001

Material Information

Title: Hearing Monkeys through the Trees An Acoustic Evaluation of Branches as a Medium for Capuchin Communication
Physical Description: 1 online resource (75 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Anderson, John
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: acoustic, america, apella, bashing, capuchin, cebus, communication, mechanical, percussion, primate, raleighvallen, sound, south, suriname
Interdisciplinary Ecology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Interdisciplinary Ecology thesis, M.S.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Bashing, striking of food objects on hard substrates during foraging, occurs species-wide in brown capuchins (Cebus apella), but may have signaling functions for brown capuchins living in the dense habitat of Raleighvallen in the Central Suriname Nature Reserve. Preliminary data from 2000-2003 revealed that hard-husked fruits of Phenakospermum guyannense (Strelitziaceae) were the items most commonly bashed by male capuchins. P. guyannense also accounted for the greatest number of strikes per episode by adult males (median=65; range=450). Impact sounds generated by strikes are perceived at estimated distances of greater than 400 meters, raising the possibility that P. guyannense percussion allowed males to broadcast signals of their location, alliance size, individual strength, and skill level. Hypotheses that bashing events have a communicative function were tested by comparing acoustic features of branch sites actually bashed (primary sites) to nearby control sites, selected for similarity in plant structural characteristics (criterion sites). Percussive strikes were produced on 18 primary sites within 16 trees located up to 6.6 meters above the ground using a custom-built apparatus. The apparatus used a baseball bat that fell through a fixed travel path under its own weight, and thereby struck a horizontal substrate with standardized force. Analyses indicated that trends in relative amplitude values, approach statistical significance in adult branch site comparisons, supporting hypotheses related to both bashing proficiency and potential for acoustic signaling. Subadult branch site comparisons produced opposite trends in relative amplitude values contrary to predictions, suggesting new directions for future research. Implications for communication and bash site selection in brown capuchins are discussed.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by John Anderson.
Thesis: Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 2008.
Local: Adviser: Boinski, Sue.

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2008
System ID: UFE0024092:00001


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PAGE 5

Cebus Cebus

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Cebus apella Phenakospermum guyannense F ...................... T ....................... 3 T...................... S ...... M T ................................. T .................................

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9 Abstract of Thesis Presen ted to the Graduate School of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Master of Science HEARING MONKEYS THROUGH THE TR EES: AN ACOUSTIC EVALUATION OF BRANCHES AS A MEDIUM FOR CAPUCHIN COMMUNICATION By John David Anderson IV December 2008 Chair: Sue Boinski Major: Interdisciplinary Ecology Bashing, striking of food objects on hard subs trates during foraging, occurs species-wide in brown capuchins ( Cebus apella ), but may have signaling functi ons for brown capuchins living in the dense habitat of Raleighvallen in the Central Suriname Nature Reserve. Preliminary data from 2000-2003 revealed that hard-husked fruits of Phenakospermum guyannense (Strelitziaceae) were the items most commonly bashed by male capuchins. P. guyannense also accounted for the greatest number of strikes per episode by adult males (median=65; range=450). Impact sounds generated by strikes are perceived at estimated distances of greater than 400 meters, raising the possibility that P. guyannense percussion allowed males to broadcast signals of their location, alliance size, indi vidual strength, and skill level. Hypotheses that bashing events have a comm unicative function were tested by comparing acoustic features of branch sites actually bashed (primary sites) to nearby control sites, selected for similarity in plant structural characteristics (c riterion sites). Percussi ve strikes were produced on 18 primary sites within 16 trees located up to 6.6 meters above the ground using a custombuilt apparatus. The apparatus used a baseball bat that fell through a fixed travel path under its own weight, and thereby struck a horizontal substrate with standardiz ed force. Analyses indicated that trends in relative amplitude values, approach statistic al significance in adult branch

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Cebus apella C. apella Cebus Bashing Behavior

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C. apella ad libitum C. apella ad libitum C. apella C. apella C. apella

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C. apella C. apella Phenakospermum guyannnense Maximiliana maripa Tabernaemontana undulata Strychnos tomentosa Heteropsis flexuosa Phenakospermum guyannense P. guyannense P. guyannense C. apella Mechanical Sounds in Animal Communication Hygrolycosa rubrofasciata

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Probosciger aterrimus

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Pan troglodytes Gorilla gorilla Cebus spp. Macaca fuscata M. sylvanus Pan troglodytes

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Sphyrapicus varius Cebus Bashing as an Acoustic Signal Cebus apella

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C. apella C. apella P. guyannense P. guyannense C. apella P. guyannense P. guyannense

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P. guyannense Habitat Covaries with Bashing, Predation Risk, and Foraging Bonasa umbellus C. apella Harpia harpyja Morphnus guianensis C. apella

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C. apella P. guyannense Bashing as a Sexual Signal P. guyannense C. apella C. apella

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Signal Characteristics C. apella Percussion Acoustics

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C. apella P. guyannense C. apella C. apella P. guyannense

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Hypotheses and Predictions C. apella Male Site Selection Hypothesis C. apella

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Predictions of the Male Si te Selection Hypothesis

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Age Difference Hypothesis C. apella C. apella Predictions of the Age Difference Hypothesis

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Cebus apella Phenakospermum guyannense

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F

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Phenakospermum guyannense P. guyannense P. guyannense

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Field Site Description Saimiri sciureus Cebus apella Guadua latifolia

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Field Data Collection Research Design Primary Branch Sites C. apella ad libitum ad libitum

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Phenakospermum guyannense C. apella P. guyannense Criterion Branch Site

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C. apella Testing Apparatus Description

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Testing Apparatus Protocol Acoustic Analyses Amplitude Envelope Analyses

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Site Resonance Analyses

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Statistical Analyses

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T

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T

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S

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Descriptive: Ad Libitum Quantitative: Categorical: Spatial:

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Cebus apella

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P. guyannense P. guyannense P. guyannense.

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Repeated Measures MANOVA Multivariate Tests U U Univariate Tests

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Site Characteristics ANOVA

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M

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T

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T

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U p

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p

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Cebus apella Phenakospermum guyannense P. guyannense P. guyannense Interactions of Branch Site and Age Factors C. apella P. guyannense

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Listener Sensitivity and Response Cebus apella

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Cebus apella C. apella C. apella

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C. apella Long-Distance Transmission of Bash Sounds C. apella

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Cebus apella C. apella Cebus apella

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Trial Factor Interactions Among Branch Site, Age, and Trial Factors

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C. apella

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C. apella P. guyannense C. apella P. guyannnense ad libitum

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Branch Characteristics C. apella C. apella Inga Pourouma

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Conclusions C. apella C. apella

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39 45 33 in 140 102 117 52 206 309 61

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31 17 55 60 3 13 53 142 99 13 70 26 105

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55 16 145 281A 114 46 25 2 in 36 25

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306 261 62 59 40 in 10 in 23 33 118 55 67 115

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in 9 69 14 27 20 104 15 15 77 15 399 138 70

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8 53

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Propithecus spp.