<%BANNER%>

The Rustic Effect in Cicero's Pro Caelio

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0024080/00001

Material Information

Title: The Rustic Effect in Cicero's Pro Caelio A Study in Spatial Value
Physical Description: 1 online resource (73 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Marsh, Samantha
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: antiquity, caelius, cicero, clodia, pastoral, rustic, spatial, value
Classics -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Classical Studies thesis, M.A.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Attitudes toward space in Roman antiquity ranged across a continuum of judgments. Authors and rhetoricians capitalized on such flexibility and used both negative and positive values of city and country to attract audiences, attack opponents, and defend clients. In 56 BC, Cicero spoke on behalf of M. Caelius Rufus, who was accused of borrowing gold from Clodia Metelli in order to kill both the philosopher Dio and Clodia. As a talented orator, Cicero used an arsenal of generic and rhetorical devices to characterize his defendant in a positive light; in particular, he capitalized on his jury's assumed knowledge of a love affair between Clodia and Caelius in order to divert their attention. Above all, Cicero manipulated his jury's positive and negative associations with different spaces to characterize Caelius and Clodia. Cicero takes advantage of the spectrum of values associated with the country and the city. He directs the positive aspects of both places onto Caelius while simultaneously portraying Clodia as a city girl in a negative light. I first examine the political background of, and recent studies on, the Pro Caelio. Rather than focus on Cicero's rhetorical form, comedic elements, and arguments of ethos, this thesis instead studies the speech within its broader ideological context. In the next chapter, I review the Roman evaluations of city and country as seen in comedy, pastoral poetry, and agricultural handbooks. Both the city and the country are negative and positive, each one containing benefits that the other lacks. The rustic figure, likewise, embodies both an ignorant fool and a noble worker. Finally, I examine the Pro Caelio in a close reading to show how Cicero manipulates the city and country, thereby creating a positive persona for Caelius and a negative one for Clodia. Cicero takes advantage of the positive aspects of the rustic figure and channels them into Caelius to create a new type of orator who has both the authority of a farmer and the education of a gentleman. Cicero's use of agricultural diction complements his praise of the young man Caelius. Likewise, his urbane and military diction against Clodia emphasizes her position as the negative city influence. Cicero can direct the jury's attention to the city or the country with the drop of one word, and his constantly changing diction sways them to favor Caelius and scorn Clodia. The spatial values that Cicero employs reflect the surrounding, dominant ideology at Rome. The city could be the place of social advancement or the center for corruption, and the country could be the ever-present utopia or the uncultivated wild. Cicero uses both ends of the spectrum to mould the characters of Caelius and Clodia, thereby winning his case.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Samantha Marsh.
Thesis: Thesis (M.A.)--University of Florida, 2008.
Local: Adviser: Pagan-Wolpert, Victoria E.

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2008
System ID: UFE0024080:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0024080/00001

Material Information

Title: The Rustic Effect in Cicero's Pro Caelio A Study in Spatial Value
Physical Description: 1 online resource (73 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Marsh, Samantha
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: antiquity, caelius, cicero, clodia, pastoral, rustic, spatial, value
Classics -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Classical Studies thesis, M.A.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Attitudes toward space in Roman antiquity ranged across a continuum of judgments. Authors and rhetoricians capitalized on such flexibility and used both negative and positive values of city and country to attract audiences, attack opponents, and defend clients. In 56 BC, Cicero spoke on behalf of M. Caelius Rufus, who was accused of borrowing gold from Clodia Metelli in order to kill both the philosopher Dio and Clodia. As a talented orator, Cicero used an arsenal of generic and rhetorical devices to characterize his defendant in a positive light; in particular, he capitalized on his jury's assumed knowledge of a love affair between Clodia and Caelius in order to divert their attention. Above all, Cicero manipulated his jury's positive and negative associations with different spaces to characterize Caelius and Clodia. Cicero takes advantage of the spectrum of values associated with the country and the city. He directs the positive aspects of both places onto Caelius while simultaneously portraying Clodia as a city girl in a negative light. I first examine the political background of, and recent studies on, the Pro Caelio. Rather than focus on Cicero's rhetorical form, comedic elements, and arguments of ethos, this thesis instead studies the speech within its broader ideological context. In the next chapter, I review the Roman evaluations of city and country as seen in comedy, pastoral poetry, and agricultural handbooks. Both the city and the country are negative and positive, each one containing benefits that the other lacks. The rustic figure, likewise, embodies both an ignorant fool and a noble worker. Finally, I examine the Pro Caelio in a close reading to show how Cicero manipulates the city and country, thereby creating a positive persona for Caelius and a negative one for Clodia. Cicero takes advantage of the positive aspects of the rustic figure and channels them into Caelius to create a new type of orator who has both the authority of a farmer and the education of a gentleman. Cicero's use of agricultural diction complements his praise of the young man Caelius. Likewise, his urbane and military diction against Clodia emphasizes her position as the negative city influence. Cicero can direct the jury's attention to the city or the country with the drop of one word, and his constantly changing diction sways them to favor Caelius and scorn Clodia. The spatial values that Cicero employs reflect the surrounding, dominant ideology at Rome. The city could be the place of social advancement or the center for corruption, and the country could be the ever-present utopia or the uncultivated wild. Cicero uses both ends of the spectrum to mould the characters of Caelius and Clodia, thereby winning his case.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Samantha Marsh.
Thesis: Thesis (M.A.)--University of Florida, 2008.
Local: Adviser: Pagan-Wolpert, Victoria E.

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2008
System ID: UFE0024080:00001


This item has the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

PRO CAELIO

PAGE 5

PRO CAELIO Pro Caelio PRO CAELIO

PAGE 6

PRO CAELIO Pro Caelio

PAGE 7

Pro Caelio

PAGE 8

Lex Plotia Lex Lutatia de vi .Cat. cursus honorum Lex Plotia de vi Lex Lutatia

PAGE 9

Pro Caelio

PAGE 10

meretrix Pro Caelio Pro Caelio mos maiorum

PAGE 11

Pro Caelio

PAGE 12

PRO CAELIO Politics and People latifundia Pro Caelio

PAGE 13

tirocinium fori ambitus Cael. de seditionibus Neapolitanis de Alexandrinorum pulsatione Puteolana de bonis Pallae de Dione de veneno in Clodiam parato

PAGE 14

plebs ex hac domo progressa Cael. Pro Caelio

PAGE 15

The Speech ludi Megalenses exordium adulescent em inlustri ingenio, industria, gratia oppugnari autem opibus meretriciis exordium ludi Megalenses In Clodium et Curionem Pro Caelio exordium narratio

PAGE 16

exordium praemunitio pietas hic forensis labor vitaeque ra tio v ideor mihi iecisse fundamenta defensiosis meae pudicitia maledicta Pro Caelio urbanitas

PAGE 17

cum domus patris a foro longe abesset Medea pulchellum Iasonem Pelia Cincinnatus

PAGE 18

prosopopoeia severe et graviter et prisce agere malit, an remisse et leniter et urbane urbanius

PAGE 19

prosopopoeia argumentatio totum crimen profertur ex inimica, ex infami, ex crudeli, ex facinerosa, ex libidinosa domo argumentation mulier potens quadrantaria illa Pro Caelio

PAGE 20

imperatrix Approaches to the Pro Caelio Comedy in the Pro Caelio Pro Caelio

PAGE 21

Medea prosopopoeiae Pro Caelio meretrix videor In Clodium et Curionem Cael

PAGE 22

Pro Caelio rustici In Curionem et Clodium Pro Caelio Trials of Character: The Eloquence of Ciceronian Ethos post reditum

PAGE 23

Pro Caelio exordium patroni praemunitio severitas ludus disciplina voluptas prosopopoeiae meretrix

PAGE 24

argumentatio mer etrix spoliatrix imperatrix Pro Caelio Pro Caelio Form as Argument in Ciceros Speeches: A Study of Dilemma

PAGE 25

Pro Caelio meretrix peroratio Pro Caelio prosopopoeiae

PAGE 26

mulier potens quadrantaria

PAGE 27

Representations: Images of the World in Ciceronian Oratory hostis De Signis In V errem

PAGE 28

topos Pro Roscio Pro Caelio rusticus bonus Pro Caelio exordium meretrix humanitas

PAGE 29

Pro Caelio Pro Caelio Pro Caelio meretrix Pro Caelio

PAGE 30

City, Countryside, and the Spatial Organization of Value in Classical Antiquity

PAGE 31

Satire Epistles City, Countryside, and the Spatial Organization of Value in Classical Antiquity Works and Days Inst. Epistles otium

PAGE 32

pomerium

PAGE 33

On Airs, Waters, Places Bellum I urgurthinum BI

PAGE 34

Bellum Gallicum BG pomerium The Generic Rustic Figure

PAGE 35

Epistles Ab urbe condita atura Priapea agroikos Vidularia Mostellaria Truculentus

PAGE 36

Priapea Idylls

PAGE 37

Theogony I liad Odyssey De Agri Cultura novus homo lex Oppia cursus honorum

PAGE 38

De Agri Cultura vilicus Agr Praef.

PAGE 39

Politics Life of Cato ,

PAGE 40

OdysseyTheogony, Works and Days Oeconomicus Odyssey Theogony Works and Days Oeconomicus polis

PAGE 41

disertus rusticus bios

PAGE 42

agroikia Ethics Politics Ethics Politics Politics exordium Pro Caelio

PAGE 43

Pro Caelio Pro Caelio

PAGE 44

PRO CAELIO Pro Caelio Pro Caelio Arguments and Counter A r guments for the City exordium ludi Megalenses libidinem muliebrem comprimendam putet

PAGE 45

exordium exordium exordium exordium libido muliebris era errans Medea pulchellum Iasonem Pelia Cincinnatus

PAGE 46

Palatinam Medeam Medea

PAGE 47

imperatrix ab impertrice mulier ingeniosa miles gloriosus oppugnatur tela iaciuntur

PAGE 49

qui nullum convivium renuerit, qui in hortis fuerit, qui unguenta sumpserit, qui Baias viderit mulier prosopopoeiae severe et graviter et prisce agere malit, an remisse et leniter et urbane imagines

PAGE 50

calcitrat, respuit, repellit, non putat tua dona esse tanti prosopopoeiae

PAGE 51

prosopopoeiae Inst.

PAGE 52

In Curionem et Clodium novus homo Pro Caelio urbanitas urbanissimus pusio humanissimo

PAGE 53

humanissimi doctissimi rectissimis studiis optimis artibus praediti doctrinae studio humanitatis sanct issimum hominem gravissimum testem illa humanitate praeditus illis studiis illis artibus doctrina humanitas accusator OLD

PAGE 54

humanitas humanitas accusator

PAGE 55

humanitas urbanitas urbanitas humanitas urbanitas maledictio quisque istam effugere potest, praesertim in tam mal edica civitate urbanitas

PAGE 56

humanitas urbanitas Anti City / Pro Country meretrix

PAGE 57

fontibus fons urbanitas maledicta pudicitiaaetatis flos

PAGE 58

aetati s flos meretrix

PAGE 59

sed mihi videbare ex communi infamia iuventutis al iquam invidiam Caelio velle conflare

PAGE 60

Flagrabant vigebant

PAGE 61

domus libidinosa domus

PAGE 62

mater familias

PAGE 63

ex hac igitur domo progressa ista mulier de veneni celeritate dicere audebit aetatis ac temporum vitia

PAGE 64

Caelius the Orator

PAGE 65

urbanitas urbanitas Pro Caelio

PAGE 66

telos telos Pro Caelio cultura cultura animi, Tusc.

PAGE 67

fons frugem bonam efflorescit

PAGE 68

humanitas

PAGE 69

Ludi Megalenses vicinitas libidinosa domus fons flos frux bona Pro Caelio Eclogues Georgics

PAGE 70

Epode Satire Epistles Pro Caelio Epode De Agricultura

PAGE 71

Cato the Censor M. Tulli Ciceronis Pro M. Caelio Oratio Satire and Society in Ancient Rome Classical Outlook Suada Roman Eloquence: Rhetoric in Society and Literature Roman Eloquence: Rhetoric in Society and Literature TAPA Form as Argument in Ciceros Speeches: A Study of Dilemma CJ City, Countryside, and the Spatial Organization of Value in Antiquity The Ancient Concept of Progress and Other Essays on Greek Literature and Belief G&R The Nature of Roman Comedy Arethusa Sallust: The Jugurthine War/The Conspiracy of Catiline AJP Comedy in the Pro Caelio

PAGE 72

Theocritus Pastoral Analogies Brills Compa nion to Greek and Latin Pastoral The Humanism of Cicero Pro Caelio CJ Violence in Republican Rome Trials of Character: The Eloquence of Ciceronian Ethos City, Countryside, and the Spatial Organization of Value in Classical Antiquity Plutarchs Lives Urbanitas: Ancient Sophistication and Refinement City, Countryside, and the Spatial Organization of Value in Classical Antiquity From the Gracchi to Nero: A History of Rome 133 B.C. to A.D. 68 TAPA Lands and Peoples in Roman Society Representations: Images of the World in Ciceronian Oratory JugurthaG&R Catullus and His World: A Reappraisal Ciceros Social and Political Thought

PAGE 73

cum laude