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Irrigation of St. Augustinegrass with Soil Moisture Sensor and Evapotranspiration Controllers

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022869/00001

Material Information

Title: Irrigation of St. Augustinegrass with Soil Moisture Sensor and Evapotranspiration Controllers
Physical Description: 1 online resource (329 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Mccready, Mary
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: controller, et, irrigation, landscape, moisture, rain, sensor, soil
Agricultural and Biological Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Agricultural and Biological Engineering thesis, M.E.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: A variety of commercially available technologies for reducing residential irrigation water use are available to homeowners. These technologies include soil moisture sensors, rain sensors and evapotranspiration (ET) based controllers. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of these various technologies based on irrigation applied, turfgrass quality, accuracy of measurements made by the devices and the effect on root growth in St. Augustinegrass (Stenotaphrum secundatum). Soil moisture sensor (SMS) testing was performed on two brands of sensors (LawnLogic and the Acclima Digital TDT RS500) at low, medium, and high soil moisture threshold settings. Mini-Clik rain sensors comprised seven time-based treatments, with three treatments pre-set for 3 mm of rainfall and the remaining 4 rain sensor (RS) treatments had sensors pre-set to bypass irrigation for 6 mm of rainfall. Each rainfall threshold was tested using three different irrigation frequencies; 1, 2 and 7 days-per-week. Each frequency was scheduled to apply the same total depth per week, but the depth was divided over the number of irrigation days-per-week. There was a reduced irrigation schedule treatment (DWRS) which had a rain sensor set for 6 mm and a depth of water applied per irrigation event equal to 60% of the depth of the other 2-day-per-week treatments. Two ET controllers were tested, the Toro Intelli-Sense controller (TORO) and the Rain Bird ET Manager (ETM). The Toro controller scheduled the frequency of irrigation and the depth applied per event, while the RainBird controller was connected to an irrigation timer and only bypassed irrigation events scheduled by the timer. All SMS and ET controllers were limited to two days of irrigation per week. A time-based treatment with two days of irrigation per week and no rain sensor (WOS) was established as a 'homeowner' comparison; water savings reported are based on this treatment. The irrigation schedule for all treatments, with the exception of DWRS and TORO, was based on the net historical irrigation requirement in the area and was adjusted monthly for plant needs (Dukes and Haman, 2002b). While maintaining acceptable turf quality, SMS-based treatments resulted in 0 to 74% reductions in water applied compared to WOS, RS-based treatments (not including DWRS) resulted in 7 to 30% reductions in water applied and ET-based irrigation resulted in 25 to 63% reductions in water use compared to WOS. The SMS treatments, at low threshold settings, resulted in high water savings but poor turf quality. The medium threshold setting SMS-based produced good turfgrass quality while reducing irrigation water use compared to WOS. Savings for the medium SMS-based systems ranged from 11 to 53%. Water savings were achieved with all control technologies, even under the dry conditions of 2006 and 2007. Compared to water use trends in some areas of Florida, the irrigation schedule used to develop these water savings was conservative. Most homeowners do not change their schedule monthly based on historical irrigation requirements. For this reason the water savings achievable in a homeowner setting may be even higher than the water savings found in this research, especially during years with normal rainfall patterns.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Mary Mccready.
Thesis: Thesis (M.E.)--University of Florida, 2008.
Local: Adviser: Dukes, Michael D.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2009-06-30

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2008
System ID: UFE0022869:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022869/00001

Material Information

Title: Irrigation of St. Augustinegrass with Soil Moisture Sensor and Evapotranspiration Controllers
Physical Description: 1 online resource (329 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Mccready, Mary
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: controller, et, irrigation, landscape, moisture, rain, sensor, soil
Agricultural and Biological Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Agricultural and Biological Engineering thesis, M.E.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: A variety of commercially available technologies for reducing residential irrigation water use are available to homeowners. These technologies include soil moisture sensors, rain sensors and evapotranspiration (ET) based controllers. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of these various technologies based on irrigation applied, turfgrass quality, accuracy of measurements made by the devices and the effect on root growth in St. Augustinegrass (Stenotaphrum secundatum). Soil moisture sensor (SMS) testing was performed on two brands of sensors (LawnLogic and the Acclima Digital TDT RS500) at low, medium, and high soil moisture threshold settings. Mini-Clik rain sensors comprised seven time-based treatments, with three treatments pre-set for 3 mm of rainfall and the remaining 4 rain sensor (RS) treatments had sensors pre-set to bypass irrigation for 6 mm of rainfall. Each rainfall threshold was tested using three different irrigation frequencies; 1, 2 and 7 days-per-week. Each frequency was scheduled to apply the same total depth per week, but the depth was divided over the number of irrigation days-per-week. There was a reduced irrigation schedule treatment (DWRS) which had a rain sensor set for 6 mm and a depth of water applied per irrigation event equal to 60% of the depth of the other 2-day-per-week treatments. Two ET controllers were tested, the Toro Intelli-Sense controller (TORO) and the Rain Bird ET Manager (ETM). The Toro controller scheduled the frequency of irrigation and the depth applied per event, while the RainBird controller was connected to an irrigation timer and only bypassed irrigation events scheduled by the timer. All SMS and ET controllers were limited to two days of irrigation per week. A time-based treatment with two days of irrigation per week and no rain sensor (WOS) was established as a 'homeowner' comparison; water savings reported are based on this treatment. The irrigation schedule for all treatments, with the exception of DWRS and TORO, was based on the net historical irrigation requirement in the area and was adjusted monthly for plant needs (Dukes and Haman, 2002b). While maintaining acceptable turf quality, SMS-based treatments resulted in 0 to 74% reductions in water applied compared to WOS, RS-based treatments (not including DWRS) resulted in 7 to 30% reductions in water applied and ET-based irrigation resulted in 25 to 63% reductions in water use compared to WOS. The SMS treatments, at low threshold settings, resulted in high water savings but poor turf quality. The medium threshold setting SMS-based produced good turfgrass quality while reducing irrigation water use compared to WOS. Savings for the medium SMS-based systems ranged from 11 to 53%. Water savings were achieved with all control technologies, even under the dry conditions of 2006 and 2007. Compared to water use trends in some areas of Florida, the irrigation schedule used to develop these water savings was conservative. Most homeowners do not change their schedule monthly based on historical irrigation requirements. For this reason the water savings achievable in a homeowner setting may be even higher than the water savings found in this research, especially during years with normal rainfall patterns.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Mary Mccready.
Thesis: Thesis (M.E.)--University of Florida, 2008.
Local: Adviser: Dukes, Michael D.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2009-06-30

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2008
System ID: UFE0022869:00001


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1 IRRIGATION OF ST. AUGUSTINEGRASS WITH SOIL MOISTURE SENSOR AND EVAPOTRANSPIRATION CONTROLLERS By MARY L. SHEDD A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLOR IDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2008

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2 2008 Mary L. Shedd

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3 To my parents, Steve and Judy Shedd

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4 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS First off, I would like thank m y parents who ha ve always supported me in every endeavor I pursued. Their unconditional love has helped me through many obstacles and provided me with a firm foundation. I also want to thank my friends who have offered words of advice and encouragement, especially my best friend and husband, Steve. I thank the following individuals for their help on this research: Bernard Cardenas, Stacia Davis, Kristen Femminella, Eban Bean, Lincol n Zotarelli, Melissa Haley, Larry Miller, Danny Burch, Brian Owens, Jan Weinbrecht, Mark Kann, Joel Berry, and Dave Carson. I would also like to thank the members of my graduate committee (Dr. Dorota Z. Haman and Dr. Grady L. Miller) for their guidance and assistance in my wo rk. Finally, I would like to thank Dr. Michael D. Dukes for the chance to do this work and the encouragement to finish it. I have greatly enjoyed my time working with Dr Dukes as an irri-gator.

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5 TABLE OF CONTENTS page ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ............................................................................................................... 4 LIST OF TABLES ...........................................................................................................................8 LIST OF FIGURES .......................................................................................................................10 LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS ........................................................................................................ 14 ABSTRACT ...................................................................................................................... .............15 CHAP TER 1 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................. 17 Water Demand .................................................................................................................. ......17 Water Use ...............................................................................................................................20 Current Irrigation Practices .....................................................................................................22 Irrigation Control ....................................................................................................................24 Irrigation Timers ..............................................................................................................24 Rain Sensors ....................................................................................................................25 Soil Moisture Sensors ......................................................................................................27 Evapotranspiration Controllers ........................................................................................30 2 RAIN SENSOR, EVAPOTRANSPIRATION CONTROLLER AND SOIL MOISTURE SENSOR BASED IRRIGATION CONTROL ON ST. AUGUSTINEGRASS ............................................................................................................. 33 Introduction .................................................................................................................. ...........33 Soil Moisture Sensor Controllers ....................................................................................33 Evapotranspiration Controllers ........................................................................................34 Rain Sensors ....................................................................................................................35 Materials and Methods ...........................................................................................................36 Site Description ...............................................................................................................36 Soil physical properties ............................................................................................37 Irrigation distribution uniform ity testing .................................................................. 39 Data Collection ................................................................................................................40 Experimental Design ....................................................................................................... 44 Results and Discussion ........................................................................................................ ...46 Distribution Uniformity Testing ...................................................................................... 46 Rainfall ...................................................................................................................... ......47 Water Savings and Turf Quality in S06 .......................................................................... 48 Soil moisture sensors ................................................................................................49 Rain sensors ..............................................................................................................51

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6 Water Savings and Turf Quality in F06 .......................................................................... 52 Soil moisture sensors ................................................................................................53 Rain sensors ..............................................................................................................54 Evapotranspiration controllers .................................................................................54 Water Savings and Turf Quality in S07 .......................................................................... 55 Soil moisture sensors ................................................................................................56 Rain sensors ..............................................................................................................57 Evapotranspiration controllers .................................................................................58 Water Savings and Turf Quality in F07 .......................................................................... 59 Soil moisture sensors ................................................................................................60 Rain sensors ..............................................................................................................61 Evapotranspiration controllers .................................................................................62 Summary and Conclusions .....................................................................................................62 3 SOIL MOISTURE SENSOR IRRIGATION CONTROL PERFORMANCE AND ACCURACY ...................................................................................................................... ..103 Introduction .................................................................................................................. .........103 Volumetric Soil Moisture Sensors ................................................................................. 103 Tensiometers .................................................................................................................. 106 Materials and Methods .........................................................................................................108 Field Testing ..................................................................................................................108 Laboratory Testing ........................................................................................................ 111 Results and Discussion ........................................................................................................ .112 Field Testing ..................................................................................................................112 Rainfall ................................................................................................................... 112 Sensor performance and accuracy .......................................................................... 113 Laboratory Testing Sensor Pe rformance and Accuracy ................................................119 Conclusions ...........................................................................................................................120 4 EVAPOTRANSPIRATION CO NTROLLER PERFORMANC E AND ACCURACY ...... 148 Introduction .................................................................................................................. .........148 Soil Water Balance ........................................................................................................ 149 Previous Research .........................................................................................................151 Materials and Methods .........................................................................................................153 Site Description .............................................................................................................153 Experimental Design ..................................................................................................... 154 Data Collection ..............................................................................................................156 Results and Discussion ........................................................................................................ .159 Rainfall ...................................................................................................................... ....159 Water Savings and Turf Quality .................................................................................... 160 Evapotranspiration Comparisons ...................................................................................161 Conclusions ...........................................................................................................................164

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7 5 IRRIGATION CONTROL EFFECTS ON TURFGRASS QUALITY AND ROOT GROWTH ........................................................................................................................ .....176 Introduction .................................................................................................................. .........176 Current Irrigation Practices ...........................................................................................177 Rooting Characteristics .................................................................................................177 Turf Quality ...................................................................................................................178 Materials and Methods .........................................................................................................179 Site Description .............................................................................................................179 Experimental Design ..................................................................................................... 180 Data Collection ..............................................................................................................181 Rooting ................................................................................................................... 181 Turf quality ............................................................................................................. 181 Wilting .................................................................................................................... 182 Results ...................................................................................................................................182 Root Sampling ...............................................................................................................182 Water Applied and Turf Quality .................................................................................... 183 Wilt Analysis ................................................................................................................. 185 Conclusions ...........................................................................................................................186 6 CONCLUSIONS .................................................................................................................. 196 Water Applied and Turf Quality ........................................................................................... 196 Control Device Performance and Accuracy ......................................................................... 199 Soil Moisture Sensors ....................................................................................................199 Evapotranspiration Controllers ......................................................................................201 Irrigation Frequency on Turf Quality and Root Growth ...................................................... 201 APPENDIX A CHAPTER 2 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS. ......................................................................... 203 B CHAPTER 3 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS .......................................................................... 274 C CHAPTER 4 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS .......................................................................... 276 D CHAPTER 5 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS .......................................................................... 289 LIST OF REFERENCES .............................................................................................................323 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH .......................................................................................................329

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8 LIST OF TABLES Table page 2-1 Summary of cr op coefficients (Kc) used for calculating ETc. ............................................ 66 2-2 Summary of treatment codes and descriptions. .................................................................67 2-3 Monthly total irrigation depth scheduled in o rder to replace historical net irrigation requirement. .................................................................................................................. .....68 2-4 Summary of input parameters for ET controllers tested. ................................................... 69 2-5 Average DUlq and CU values for each treatment ............................................................... 70 2-6 Summary of average weekly water app lied and water sav ings for each treatment during the four testing periods. ..........................................................................................71 2-7 Average turf quality ratings during the four treatm ent periods. ........................................ 72 2-8 Summary of the percentage of irrigati on events bypassed by the different irrigation control devices. ..................................................................................................................73 2-9 Summary of water applied and turf quality for the four plot s in the AC IR treatm ent. ..... 74 3-1 Irrigation treatment codes and descriptions. .................................................................... 122 3-2 Summary of the percentage of irrigati on events bypassed by the different irrigation control devices. ................................................................................................................122 3-3 Summary of the range in volumetric wa ter con tent over which the soil moisture sensor controllers bypassed irrigation. .............................................................................123 3-4 Summary of laboratory tes ting results for LawnLogic soil m oisture sensors. .............. 124 4-1 Codes and descriptions for the experimental treatments. ................................................ 165 4-2 Summary of inputs used to program the ET controllers. .................................................165 4-3 Average weekly water applied along with water savings for the ET-based treatm ents during testing. ..................................................................................................................166 4-4 Average turf quality ra tin gs for the ET controller treatments during the three treatment periods. ............................................................................................................ .166 4-5 Summary of the percentage of irrigati on events bypassed by the ET controllers. .......... 166 4-6 Comparison of ET readings taken manua lly and supplied by the m anufacturer with values collected using an on-site weather station. ........................................................... 167

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9 5-1 Summary of irrigation treatm ent codes and descriptions along with water applied per irrigation event during the month of May. ....................................................................... 188 5-2 Summary of the root mass collected in 2006 and 2007 at two depths, 0 to 15 cm and from 15 to 30 cm. Irrigation frequency and the year the samples were taken were both analyzed for effects on root ma ss at the two depths of testing. ............................... 188 5-3 Summary of turf quality analysis show ing average turf quality values for the different irrigation fr equencies tested. ............................................................................. 189

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10 LIST OF FIGURES Figure page 2-1 View of experimental plots. ............................................................................................... 75 2-2 Locations within the turf plots wh ere volumetric water contents (VWC; %) measurements were taken for soil TDR testing. ................................................................ 75 2-3 Volumetric water content (VWC; %) meas urements throughout the field before and after irrigation. ...................................................................................................................76 2-4 Locations of soil sampling at the experim ental area. ......................................................... 77 2-5 Water retention curves of soils at research area. ................................................................ 77 2-6 Range of field capacity (FC) and perm anent wilting point (PWP) values found throughout the field site and within blocks. ....................................................................... 78 2-7 Mean values for available wate r based on a 30 cm root depth. .........................................79 2-8 Placement of catch cans for uniformity testing. ................................................................. 79 2-9 Installation of the CS616 W ater Content Reflectometer and the Acclima Digital TDT sensor. ................................................................................................................................80 2-10 Pictures representing typical turf quality ratings of 2, 5 and 8. .........................................81 2-11 Image of 2 control boards installed at research area. ......................................................... 82 2-12 Close-up of SMS and ET controller s along with the irrigation tim ers. ............................. 82 2-13 Plot Plan with DUlq values for each plot shown ................................................................ 83 2-14 Number of days receiving rain events with a depth greater than 2.5 mm and total cumulative rainfall for 2006 and 2007 compared to historical values. .............................. 84 2-15 Comparison of rain and calculated ETc during the four experimental treatment periods. ...................................................................................................................... .........85 2-16 Volumetric water content (VWC; %) and ra infall in a non-irriga ted p lot located in block 2 of the research field during S06. ...........................................................................86 2-17 Cumulative irrigation applied du ring S06 by SMS-based treatm ents. .............................. 87 2-18 Cumulative irrigation water applied dur ing S06 by AC 7 and ACIR treatm ents .............. 88 2-19 Cumulative irrigation applied during S 06 by treatm ents RS-based treatments ................. 89

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11 2-20 Cumulative irrigation applied du ring F06 by SMS-based treatm ents. .............................. 90 2-21 Cumulative irrigation applied during F06 by treatm ents AC 7 and AC IR. ...................... 91 2-22 Cumulative irrigation applied du ring F06 by RS-based treatm ents. .................................. 92 2-23 Cumulative irrigation applied du ring F06 by ET-based treatm ents. ..................................93 2-24 Cumulative irrigation applied du ring S07 by SMS-based treatm ents. .............................. 94 2-25 Cumulative irrigation applied during S07 by treatm ents AC 7 and AC IR. ...................... 95 2-26 Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for RS1-3mm plots before supplem ental irrigation was applied during S07 treatment period. .......................................................... 96 2-27 Cumulative irrigation applied du ring S07 by RS-based treatm ents. .................................. 97 2-28 Cumulative irrigation applied du ring S07 by ET-based treatm ents. ..................................98 2-29 Cumulative irrigation applied du ring F07 by SMS-based treatm ents. .............................. 99 2-30 Cumulative irrigation applied during F07 by treatm ents AC 7 and AC IR. .................... 100 2-31 Cumulative irrigation applied du ring F07 by RS-based treatm ents. ................................ 101 2-32 Cumulative irrigation applied du ring F07 by ET-based treatm ents. ................................102 3-1 Image of set up for laboratory test ing of LawnLogic sensors including. ........................ 125 3-2 Image of the controller and datalogger used for laborat ory testing of the LawnLogic sensors. ...................................................................................................................... .......125 3-3 Water content, after LawnLogic calibra tion, m easured by three tensiometers and by the capacitance based soil moisture sensor. ..................................................................... 126 3-4 Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the plots in the AC IR treatment compared with tim ing of irrigation events in S06. ........................................................................... 127 3-5 Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the low threshold SMS-based treatments com pared with timing of irrigation events in S06. .......................................................... 128 3-6 Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the m edium threshold SMS-based treatments compared with timing of irrigation events in S06. ......................................... 129 3-7 Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the hig h threshold SMS-based treatments compared with timing of irrigation events in S06. .......................................................... 130 3-8 Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the plots in the AC IR treatment compared with tim ing of irrigation events in F06. ........................................................................... 131

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12 3-9 Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the m edium threshold SMS-based treatments compared with timing of irrigation events in F06. ......................................... 132 3-10 Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the hig h threshold SMS-based treatments compared with timing of irrigation events in F06. .......................................................... 133 3-11 Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the LL Low treatm ent at the beginning of the S07 treatment period. ................................................................................................. 134 3-12 Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the plots in the AC IR treatment compared with tim ing of irrigation events in S07. ........................................................................... 135 3-13 Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the low threshold SMS-based treatments com pared with timing of irrigation events in S07. .......................................................... 136 3-14 Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the m edium threshold SMS-based treatments compared with timing of irrigation events in S07. ......................................... 137 3-15 Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the hig h threshold SMS-based treatments compared with timing of irrigation events in S07. .......................................................... 138 3-16 Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the plots in the AC IR treatment compared with tim ing of irrigation events in F07. ........................................................................... 139 3-17 Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the low threshold SMS-based treatments com pared with timing of irrigation events in F07. .......................................................... 140 3-18 Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the m edium threshold SMS-based treatments compared with timing of irrigation events in F07. ......................................... 141 3-19 Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the hig h threshold SMS-based treatments compared with timing of irrigation events in F07. .......................................................... 142 3-20 Summary of the percentage of irrigation events bypassed by the SMS controllers during each experim ental time period. ............................................................................. 143 3-21 Scatter plot of volumetric water cont ent (VWC; %) readings for AC sensors vs. corresponding readings from TDR sensors...................................................................... 144 3-22 Bypass thresholds for LawnLogic se nsors com pared to the corresponding tensiometer readings duri ng laboratory testing. ...............................................................145 3-23 Bypass thresholds for LawnLogic se nsors com pared to the corresponding capacitance based soil moisture content readings during laboratory testing. .................. 146 3-24 Soil water tension during laboratory testing com pared to the corresponding LawnLogic threshold settings. .........................................................................................147 4-1 Quality analysis for data collect ed from onsite weather station in 2006. ........................ 168

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13 4-2 Quality analysis for data collect ed from onsite weather station in 2007. ........................ 169 4-3 Daily ETo values collected manually from the ET controllers compared to the data from the onsite weather station. ....................................................................................... 170 4-4 Linear regression analysis of daily ETo values collected manually from the ET controllers compared to data fr om the onsite weather station. ........................................171 4-5 Cumulative ETo collected manually from the ET contro llers compared to the data from the onsite weather station. ....................................................................................... 171 4-6 Comparisons of ETo data calculated using the ons ite weather station with manufacturer provided data for the ET controllers. ......................................................... 172 4-7 Cumulative ETo data calculated using the onsit e weather station and using manufacturer provided data for the TORO controller. .................................................... 172 4-8 Difference between ETo calculated using on-site weather data and ETo provided by the manufacturer for the TORO treatment by month. ...................................................... 173 4-9 Daily average, maximum, and minimum tem perature data from the onsite weather station and the manufacturer data for the ET Manager controller compared. ................. 174 4-10 Daily solar radiation and wind speed data from the onsite weather station and the manufacturer data for th e ET Manager controller. ..........................................................175 5-1 Mean values for available water are shown for each block in the field based on a 30 cm root depth. ................................................................................................................ ..190 5-2 Sampling device used for collect ing roots in turfgrass plots. ..........................................190 5-3 Root mass collected at two depths in th e soil prof ile, 0 to15 cm and 15 cm to 30 cm, along with average week ly water applied. ....................................................................... 191 5-4 Total water applied compared to average turf grass quality .............................................192 5-5 Weekly water applied compared to average turf grass quality. ........................................ 193 5-6 Box plots comparing frequency of irrigation and turf quality. ........................................ 194 5-7 The effect of volumetric water content (VWC; %) on the presence of wilting in turfgrass............................................................................................................................195

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14 LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS AC Acclima soil moisture sensor AW Available water DWRS 60% reduced irrigation schedule w ith a rain sensor (6 mm setting) ET Evapotranspiration FC Field capacity LL LawnLogic soil moisture sensor NON Non-irrigated PWP Permanent wilting point RAW Readily available water RS Rain sensor RS1-3mm Rain sensor treatment, 1 da y/ week and 3 mm rainfall setting SJRWMD St. Johns River Water Management District SMS Soil moisture sensor SWB Soil water balance TDR Time domain reflectometry sensor VWC Volumetric water content WOS Without rain sensor WRS With rain sensor

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15 Abstract of Thesis Presen ted to the Graduate School of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Engineering IRRIGATION OF ST. AUGUSTINEGRASS WITH SOIL MOISTURE SENSOR AND EVPOTRANSPIRATION CONTROLLERS By Mary L. Shedd December 2008 Chair: Michael D. Dukes Major: Agricultural and Biological Engineering A variety of commercially avai lable technologies for reducing residential irrigation water use are available to homeowners. These technologie s include soil moisture sensors, rain sensors and evapotranspiration (ET) based controllers. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of these various technologies based on irriga tion applied, turfgrass quality, accuracy of measurements made by the device s and the effect on root growth in St. Augustinegrass ( Stenotaphrum secundatum) Soil moisture sensor (SMS) testing was performed on two brands of sensors (LawnL ogic and the Acclima Digital TDT RS500) at low, medium, and high soil moisture threshold settings. Mini-C lik rain sensors comprised seven time-based treatments, with three treatments pre-set for 3 mm of rainfall and the remaining 4 rain sensor (RS) treatments had sensors pre-set to bypass irrigation for 6 mm of rainfall. Each rainfall threshold was tested using three different irrigation fr equencies; 1, 2 and 7 days-per-week. Each frequency was scheduled to apply the same total depth per week, but the depth was divided over the number of irrigation days-per-week. Ther e was a reduced irrigation schedule treatment (DWRS) which had a rain sensor set for 6 mm and a depth of wa ter applied per irrigation event equal to 60% of the depth of the other 2-dayper-week treatments. Two ET controllers were tested, the Toro Intelli-Sense controller (TOR O) and the Rain Bird ET Manager (ETM). The

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16 Toro controller scheduled the frequency of irri gation and the depth applie d per event, while the RainBird controller was connect ed to an irrigation timer and only bypassed irrigation events scheduled by the timer. All SMS and ET controllers were limited to two days of irrigation per week. A time-based treatment with two days of i rrigation per week and no rain sensor (WOS) was established as a homeowner comparison; water savings reported are based on this treatment. The irrigation schedule for all treat ments, with the exception of DWRS and TORO, was based on the net historical irrigation requirement in the area and was adjusted monthly for plant needs (Dukes and Haman, 2002b). While maintaining acceptable turf quality, SMS-based treatments resulted in 0 to 74% reductions in water applied compared to WOS, RS-based treatments (not including DWRS) resulted in 7 to 30% reductions in water applied and ET-based irrigation resulted in 25 to 63% re ductions in water use compared to WOS. The SMS treatments, at low threshold settings, result ed in high water savings but p oor turf quality. The medium threshold setting SMS-based produced good turfgra ss quality while reducing irrigation water use compared to WOS. Savings for the medium SMS-based systems ranged from 11 to 53%. Water savings were achieved with all contro l technologies, even under the dry conditions of 2006 and 2007. Compared to water use trends in some areas of Florida, the irrigation schedule used to develop these water savings was conservative. Most homeowners do not change their schedule monthly ba sed on historical irrigation requi rements. For this reason the water savings achievable in a homeowner settin g may be even higher than the water savings found in this research, especially duri ng years with normal rainfall patterns.

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17 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION Turfgrass is a popular ground cover due to it s aesthetic and recrea tional benefits. In Florida, turf grass covered around 1.8 million hectares in 1991-1992, with residential use accounting for 75% of the area. St. Augustinegrass ( Stenotaphrum secundatum ) accounted for 0.6 million hectares, or 36% of th e total turfgrass area, includi ng residential and non-residential uses. St. Augustinegrass was followed by Bahiagrass ( Paspalum notatum ) which accounted for 19%, mixed grasses with 14% and Bermudagrass ( Cynodon dactylon ) with 10% (Hodges et al., 1994). The turfgrass industry is important to the economy of Florida, providing employment opportunities and sales inputs. Turfgrass i ndustry sales and services accounted for approximately $7 billion value for the period of 1991-1992 (Hodges et al., 1994). Outdoor water use can account for a large amount of the tota l public supply, anywhere from 22% to 67% depending on climate (Mayer et al., 1999). In Florid a, irrigation is necessary due to the sporadic nature of rainfall events and the low water holding capacity of the sandy soils. Demand for water in the residential sector of Florida is increasing rapidly in corr elation with increasing populations. Water conservation is a growing issue and one of the areas with the largest potential for reducing water consumption is residential out door water use. Irrigation control technologies are available that offer the possibi lity of providing more efficient application of i rrigation water. Water Demand Water withd rawal in Florida, along with Calif ornia and Texas, accounted for one-fourth of all water withdrawals in the nation in 2000 (Huts on et al., 2004). Groundwater use in Florida is the highest among the states east of the Mississippi ri ver and ranked sixth for the entire U.S. (Marella, 1992). The population of Florida is in creasing, leading to increases in water demand. The population of Florida increased 11% from 2000 to 2005. In 1990, 2000 and 2005 Florida

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18 ranked as the fourth most populat ed state (USCB, 2007). The populat ion is expected to increase by 79.5% from a population of 16 million people in 2000 to 28.7 million people in 2030. This would make Florida the third mo st populated state in the nation, with the third highest growth rate in the nation (USCB, 2007). Between the years of 1960 and 1987, public supply water use in Florida increased 242% (Marella, 1992). The increase in water use during this time pe riod is due to several factors, increased population, number of people visiting the state and per capita consumption. The population grew from 4.95 million to 12 million dur ing those 27 years, which is a 60% increase in population. There was also an 18% increase in the percentage of homes that relied on public water supply. From 1977 to 1987 there was a 45% increase in visitors to Florida from 18.8 million to 34.1 million (Marella, 1992). These increases account for 122% of the public supply water use between the years of 1960 and 1987. Th e other 120% of the increase in public supply water use must be due to cha nges in water use per person. The St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) has estimated that total water demand will increase in their di strict 20% from the year 2000 to the year 2025 and that 90% of that increase will be due to public supply demand (SJRWMD, 2005a). As Floridas population increases so does th e development of previously undeveloped lands into homes and landscaped areas. Currently almost 13% of new homes being constructed in the U.S. are in Florida (USCB, 2007). Most of these new homes being built have automated irrigation systems. Turfgrass has many benefici al attributes making it highly desirable for homeowners. During the 1960s Cultural Revolution in China all of the tu rfgrass and many trees were removed from the public areas in Beijing and the results were major increases in air pollution from dust, health problems, and temper atures (Carrow, 2006). Functional benefits of

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19 turfgrass include; soil erosion c ontrol, dust stabilization, groundwat er recharge, organic chemical decomposition, soil improvement, temperature mode ration, noise abatement, and glare reduction. Due to its high shoot density and dense root syst em, turfgrass can provide one of the most cost efficient methods for controlling water and wind erosion of soil surfaces. Turfgrass reduces runoff by trapping water, allowing it to infiltrate to the soil. Temperature in urban areas where there is little turfgrass can be up to 5 to 7oC warmer than nearby rural areas that have a higher percentage turf for groundcover. In addition to the environmental benefits turfgrass also provides aesthetic benefi ts (Beard and Green, 1994). The Floridan aquifer is recharged by rainfa ll; however, aquifer recharge areas are decreasing as the development in Florida increa ses. Developed areas have more impervious surfaces such as roofs, sidewalks and street s that impede rainwater from infiltrating and recharging the aquifer (SJRWMD, 2001). There is re duced recharge of the aquifers occurring at the same time as increased withdrawal. Over-p umping of water from Floridas aquifer system can result in saltwater intrusion, the formation of sinkholes, decreased public water supply and can lead to drastic levels of drawdown in wetlands and lakes (SJRWMD, 2005b). Water management districts have already defined some areas where saltwater intrusion has occurred and designated them water res ource caution areas. These cauti on areas are locations where the water source for public supply is not currently ad equate or within 20 years will not be adequate for meeting public supply demands (SJRWMD, 2005b) The rate of groundwater withdrawal in certain areas of the St. Johns River Water Manage ment District is approaching the maximum rate that can be withdrawn before causing advers e effects to the water resources in the area (SJRWMD, 2005a).

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20 In recent years, Florida has faced one of th e worst drought periods on record in the state. During drought conditions water demands genera lly tend to increase from the demands seen during average conditions (FDEP, 2002). This pe riod of drought along wi th population growth and limited water supply, led to the development of a statewide Water C onservation Initiative (WCI) by the Florida Department of Environm ental Protection (FDEP). The WCI examined water use in Florida and made a list of 51 areas where water conservation could be achieved (FDEP, 2002). Included in the lis t was improved irrigation efficienc y. In some areas of Florida, residents are already realizing the need to improve irrigation practices due to lack of water supply compared to demand for water. The WCI examined the possibility of increasing water prices because it is currently thought that water in Florida is undervalued causing it to be misused and wasted (FDEP, 2002). Water Use Water is required for the basic growth and m a intenance of turfgrass along with sustaining the quality and health of a landscape desired by homeowners. All plants, including turfgrass, require water and nutrients to support growth and maintenance (Aldous and G.J. Connellan, 1999). Most cellular functions in plants require water as the medi um in which they take place (Condon et al., 2002). Temperatur e, wind, relative humidity and solar radiation affect the amount of water us ed by the plant. Florida receives an average of 1,300 mm of rainfall per year, but the amount and distribution throughout the st ate and during the year varies (Marella, 1992). Due to the sporadic nature of rainfall events in Fl orida and the low wate r holding capacity of the sandy soils present throughout the state irrigation is n ecessary to maintain plant hea lth. Annual rainfall can vary greatly depending on the season of th e year, the year itself or th e area of the state receiving the rainfall. The trend in Florida is for rainfall to decrease from March to June resulting in an

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21 increase in public water supply demand (Marella, 1992). Sandy soils have a low water holding capacity compared to other soils with high clay or organic matter content. The fine sandy soils in many areas of Florida have a low water hol ding capacity, usually less than 10% of their volume (Morgan et al., 1999). Due to the lo w water holding capacity small changes in soil water content can have large effects on water available for plant need s (Morgan et al., 1999). Turfgrass areas require water to maintain acceptable quality, but could be irrigated more efficiently to enhance both turf quality and increase water savings. In Florida, landscape irrigation accounts for approximately 30 to 70% of the publicly supplied drinking water (FDEP, 2002). In one study by Mayer et al. (1999) outdoor water use attribut ed for a large percentage of total residential water use, with most of the outdoor water used for irrigation purposes. The study showed outdoor water use in humid climates to be around 22 to 38% and in arid climates around 59 to 67%. In a study by Haley et al. (2007), it was seen that in Ce ntral Florida 62% of household water use was for irrigation of the home lawn, which was an average monthly water use of 146 mm/month compared to a national av erage of 77 mm/month (Mayer et al. 1999). Haley et al. (2007) also noted th at scheduling irrigation monthly ba sed on historical net irrigation requirements reduced depth of irrigation wate r applied by 30% over a 30 month study period. Residential irrigation systems that are automa ted have been shown to use 47% more water on average than sprinkler system s that are not automated (Mayer et al., 1999). High water use with automated irrigation systems can be attribut ed to several factors, including the tendency to set irrigation systems and then leave them regardless of weather conditions. Another factor may be that the irrigation system is not uniform a nd/or the system irriga tes all zones similarly regardless of soil and slope conditions.

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22 Studies have shown that the public supports finding more effective methods to conserve water. A recent survey conducted by Tampa Bay Water showed that 87% of those polled agreed that more should be done in order to conserve water, but 93% of those same people believed they were already doing all they could to conserve water (FDEP, 2002). Current Irrigation Practices In Florida, there are five water m anageme nt districts responsible for establishing regulations on water use, includ ing irrigation, within their dist rict. Landscape irrigation is regulated in most, if not all, ar eas in Florida. In the St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) irrigation is restrict ed to a maximum of two days/week between 4 pm and 10 am (SJRWMD, 2008). A study conducted in Colorado l ooked at the effectiveness of day of the week watering restrictions at reducing water use during drou ght conditions. The study found that mandatory watering restric tions along with educational mate rial reduced water use by 13 to 53% with the highest water savings seen in the cities where watering was limited to either one or two days/week (Kenney et al., 2004). However, anecdotal evidence suggests that even though day of the week water restrictions reduce wate r use, over-irrigation can still occur due to the encouragement of watering during limited windows. Over-watering or inefficient irri gation of turfgrass can lead to the presence of weeds and diseases and can reduce the effectiveness of fertilizers and other management practices (Harivandi et al., 1984). Proper irrigation practice is generally thought to be infrequent, deep applications of water in order to encourage deeper rooting of the grass. Rooting characteristics influence the amount of soil moisture availabl e to a plant for growth. The amount of soil moisture available then affects the frequency of irrigation that is nece ssary for optimum plant response. Understanding the rooting characteristics of plants can assist in developing more effective and efficient irrigation practices (P eacock and Dudeck, 1985). One study by Doss et al.

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23 (1960) found that increased soil moisture decreased the effective rooting depth of a warm-season forage species of grass. However, a study c onducted by Peacock and Dudeck (1985) looked at the impact of frequency and depth of irrigation on turfgrass rooting depth of Floratam St. Augustinegrass ( Stenotaphrum secundatum) in sandy soil. The volume of irrigation applied was the same, but the frequency of water application was varied (2, 3, 4 or 6 days-per-week). The study found no treatment effect from the depth an d frequency of irrigati on on rooting depth for the two years the study was conducted. When determining the water needs of a landscape the plant type and microclimate have to be considered (IA, 2005). These microclimates can be influenced by structures or trees, which have an affect on wind speed, wind direction and solar radiation, and also by management practices such as the mowing height and fertilization prac tices (Feldhake et al. 1983). Studies conducted by Doss et al. (1964) found that ET was highest when irrigation water was more frequent (Richie et al ., 2002). The reduction in frequenc y of irrigation and the affect on the turfgrass can differ for different grasses. Peacock and Dudeck (1984) saw that varying irrigation intervals (2, 3, 4 and 6 days/per week) did not affect tu rfgrass quality or density (all treatments received the same total weekly volum e of water). According to a study done by Doss et al. (1960) the rooting depth of five warm-season forage species decreased as soil moisture increased and 76% of the roots on average were in the upper 30 cm (12 inches) of soil. Peacock and Dudeck (1985) studied the rooting re sponse of Floratam St. Augustinegrass (Stenotaphrum secundatum ) to varied irrigation intervals. The te sting was performed under field conditions with loamy siliceous hyperthermic Grosarenic Paleudult soil, simila r to soil conditio ns present in our study. Both root mass and length were examin ed in their study. Total irrigation volume was equal for all treatments; only frequency was varied with irrigation interval s of 2, 3, 4 or 6 days-

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24 per-week. During two growing seasons no treatmen t effect was seen. Total root mass density decreased in the first season while in the second root mass density increased. In the first season over 40% of the root mass occurred below 30 cm ( 12 inches), while in the second only 9% of the root mass was found below 30 cm (12 inches). Overall the study found th at the frequency of irrigation events had no effect on rooting depth or density. Peacock and Dudeck (1984) also examined the effect of frequency of irrigation on turf quality. The testing used irrigati on intervals of every 2, 3, 4 or 6 days each week to cause varying plant stress. All treatments received the same volume of irrigation. Turfgrass quality and density were not affected by the different irrigation intervals app lied. An irrigation interval of every 6 days resulted in a decrease in carbon exchange rates (CER) and ev apotranspiration (ET). After irrigation, both of these values increased. The season average values for CER, ET, leaf water potential components, and transpiration were all lowest for the treatment receiving irrigation every 6 days. Results from a study performed using bermudagrass ( Cynodon dactylon) on golf courses in Turkey showed that ground cover, root weights and color were all better for irrigation based on replacing 75% of ET as opposed to replaci ng 100% of ET (Bastug and Buyuktas, 2003). Feldhake et al. (1984) found that an irrigation schedule leading to a 27% ET deficit in an arid environment on Kentucky bluegrass ( Poa pratensis ) caused a 10% reduction in turfgrass quality. With larger deficits, the resear chers observed larger decreases in turfgrass quality. Temperature of the turfgrass canopy increased 1.7oC with every 10% reduction in water applied. Irrigation Control Irrigation Timers Many hom eowners in Florida have inground automated irrigation systems that are controlled by timers. Irrigation timers control the timing and depth of irrigation events through

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25 the use of a clock unit. The user inputs the length of irrigation events, the days of the week to irrigate, and the start time of the irrigation event into the irrigation timer. The two general types of irrigation control systems are open control loop systems and closed control loop systems. Open control loop systems apply a specified amount or duration of water as directed by the user. Closed control loop systems receive feedback from a sensor and then use that feedback to make irrigation decisions (Z azueta et al., 1993). In a closed control loop system, the user first inputs a genera l strategy for control and then the system uses the feedback from one or more sensors to make more detailed decisions concerning the irrigation. An example would be an irrigation timer connected to a soil moisture sensor. The sensor is wired to the solenoid va lve using the connection between the timer and the valve which provides power to the valve. The sensor then provides feedback concerning the amount of moisture present in the soil and act s as a switch, keeping the circuit open when sufficient soil moisture is present and closing the circuit, which allows power to the valve, when irrigation is needed (Zazueta et al., 1993). Florida law requires the installation of an auto matic rain shut-off device for any irrigation system that is installed after May 1, 1991 (F lorida Statutes, Chapter 373.62, n.d.). In more localized areas laws have been enacted that call for retrofitting of older irrigation systems with rain shut-off devices (SJRWMD, 2005b). Rain Sensors Rain sensors are devices designed to colle ct rainfall and after a certain depth of rainfall is collected the devices will interr upt scheduled irrigation events. These devices open the circuit between the irrigation timer and the irrigation valves (bypassing timed irrigation events) after a specific amount of rainfall has occurred. Rain sensors are attached to exis ting irrigation timers. An initial program is programmed into the timer and this program includes timing and depth of

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26 irrigation. The rain sensor then either bypasse s or allows the programmed irrigation events based on local rainfall (Dukes and Haman, 2002a). There are two methods employed by rain sens ors for measuring rainfall. Some rain sensors use hygroscopic porous disks to collect precipitation (Dukes and Ha man, 2002a). As the disks absorb water they expand in size proportionally to the amount of water abso rbed. When the disks expand to a user adjust able set point a switch is opened and stays open until the disks dry and shrink. These sensors are popular due to the low level of mainte nance necessary and the low cost associated with them. Other rain sensors either weigh or measure th e amount of rainwater collected. The sensors which collect rainfall and weigh the volume collect ed have disadvantages. These sensors need to be emptied after rainfall is co llected and other items aside fr om rainfall can end up in the weighing instrument such as insects, animals a nd debris which can trigger the irrigation system to turn off (Dukes and Haman, 2002a). Advantages of rain sensors include wa ter conservation by preventing unnecessary irrigation events, decreased monthly water bills increased life expectancy of the irrigation system from operating less often, reductions in disease from not over watering, and reduced runoff leading to less pollution of surface and groundwater (Dukes and Haman, 2002a). These sensors need to be installed in a location where they can receive rainfall without obstruction and away from sprinklers to prevent irrigation water from wetting the se nsor. Ideally these sensors are located along a roofline or fence line with no trees or overhangs blocking rainfall from the sensor (Dukes and Haman, 2002a). Testing on rain sensors has shown that under rainy conditions they can produce up to 34% water savings without adversely affecting turfgrass quality (Cardenas-Lailhacar et al., 2008). In

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27 a study conducted in Pinellas County, FL from June 2006 to March 2007, homes with rain sensors resulted in 19% less irriga tion water than homes without a rain sensor (Haley and Dukes, 2007). Soil Moisture Sensors There are both direct and indirect m ethods for measuring soil moisture. Indirect methods include soil moisture sensing or using ET controllers. Direct me thods, such as soil sampling, are not useful to irrigation scheduli ng because they are disruptive to the soil and they dont provide instant information (Muoz-Carpena and Dukes, 2005). The use of soil moisture sensors in irrigation scheduling can make water applicat ion more efficient in both home lawns and agricultural crops. F eedback from a soil moisture sensor is used to bypass time-based irrigation events if the moisture content at the beginning of the irrigation event is higher than a pre-set value for moisture content. A single sensor can be used to set the irrigation for many zones or more than one sensor can be used to irrigate multiple zones. In the case of one sensor for several zones, the zone that is typically driest, or most in need of irrigation, should be selected for placement of the sensor in order to ensure the wh ole turf area is provided with adequate coverage of irrigation water. Moisture sensors are becoming increasingl y popular because th ey require little maintenance and provide measurements rapidly. Sensors measure water content in the soil using one of two methods, tensiometric or vol umetric (Muoz-Carpena and Dukes, 2005). Tensiometric sensors estimate soil water by measur ing the adsorption and capillary effects in the soil. Typically volumetric sensors are designed to estimate soil volumetric water content (VWC) based on the dielectric constant of the soil. Water in the soil profile is the main factor that affects the value of the dielectric constant. Topp et al. in 1980 demonstrated the strength of the relationship between the dielectric constant and the VWC. In their study, factors such as soil

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28 density, texture, and salt content had little effect on the dielectr ic constant. The dielectric constant of water is much larger than other so il constituents, such as air (Muoz-Carpena et al., 2005). Dielectric methods are based on empirical relationships between the volumetric water content and sensor output signal factors such as time, frequency, impedance, and wave phase. TDR (time domain reflectometry), TDT (time do main transmission), ADR (amplitude domain reflectometry), and FDR (frequency domain reflectometry) are all ex amples of sensors that work using dielectric principles (Muoz-Carpena and Dukes, 2005). Time domain reflectometry (TDR) is one techni que that uses the dielectric constant of the soil to find the volumetric water content. In this type of device an el ectromagnetic pulse is transmitted along a pair of parallel transmission lines into the soil. The propagation velocity of electromagnetic pulse along a transmission line th rough the soil is a measure of the apparent dielectric constant of the soil (Topp et al., 1980). The dielectric constant determines how quick ly an electromagneti c pulse can pass through the soil and along the length of the transmission lin e (Friel and Or, 1999). Th e dielectric constant is dependent on the type, composition and the moisture content of the soil. Soil is a composite material consisting of water, air and minerals an d each of these components affect the dielectric constant of the soil. The dielectr ic constant increases as the water content in the soil increases, this is due to the fact that the dielectric constant of water is much larger (Ka = 81) then the other soil components (Ka = 2-5 for minerals and 1 for air) and so the presence of water in the soil profile has a much stronger impact on the dielectric constant compared to other properties of the soil (Muoz-Carpena et al., 2005). This means that measuring the dielectric constant provides a measure of the soil moisture content.

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29 Cardenas-Lailhacar et al. (2008) found that wa ter savings for three commercially available soil moisture sensors ranged from 69% to 92% without adversely affecting turf quality in bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon ). One sensor tested in the st udy did not perform as well as the other three sensors tested savi ng between 27 and 53%. This study was performed in Gainesville, FL in a field setting during two five month peri ods, one in 2004 and the other in 2005, with wet weather conditions. Allen (1997) performed a one-year study in Ut ah looking at soil moisture based control systems in a residential setting. A total of 27 homes had sensors installed and water applied was compared with 39 homes without sensors which we re the control group. The homes with sensors installed used 10% less water than the homes in the control group while maintaining adequate turf quality. The homes with sensor also had a 10% reduction in water use compared to their water use the two years prior to the start of the study (1994 and 1995) Researchers in the project used a hands off approach to observe results when the homeowners were allowed to operate the system on their own. A study conducted in Pinellas County, FL from June 2006 to March 2007 found that homes with soil moisture sensors installed applied 51% le ss water compared to homes that used only a time-clock to c ontrol irrigation (Hal ey and Dukes, 2007). Qualls et al. (2001) noted, during a 1997 study involving homeowners in Colorado, that homeowners and landscape contractors were relu ctant to use soil moisture sensors due to concerns with the possible life expectancy and difficulty of use of the devices. The study was performed using granular matrix soil moisture se nsors which were installe d for three years in 23 sites. Of the 23 sensors installed only two faile d during the three year project and researchers reported time required for the init ial installations was minimal.

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30 Evapotranspiration Controllers Evapotranspiration (ET) based ir rigation controllers are an exam ple of indirect m ethods for measuring soil moisture. These systems ideally apply irrigation according to ET needs of the plant. ET is the water lost from the soil surface by the process of evapor ation and lost from the plant by the process of transpira tion. Since the two processes occu r simultaneously and are very difficult to separate, they are combined into one process (Allen et al., 1998). ET-based irrigation systems may be scheduled based on total ET or based on a percentage of ET. These systems automatically bypass irrigation if ET is not above a pre-set ET value. There are several types of ETbased irrigation controllers an d they differ in how they obtain weather data and how they use that data to impact irrigation schedules. Some systems are based on historical data developed for the site where irrigation is being applied (Center for Irrigation Technology, 2006). Other systems use on-site sensors to measure weather information used to calculate ET, while other systems (signa l-based) receive reference ET information from nearby weather stations (Cen ter for Irrigation Technology, 2 006). ET controllers can be purchased as an addition to an existing irrigati on timer or as a single component to replace the standard timer. Values of ET found by an o ff-site weather stati on may not be closely representative of the area where the irrigation is being applied due to localized environmental changes such as shade cover. For ET to be us ed efficiently, adjustment s should be made to the reference ET (ETo) based on site specific conditions such as soil type, plant type, root depth, and sun exposure. These adjustments to ETo are made using a crop coefficient which is a percentage of the potential evapotranspirati on. Adjustments made for plant t ype are necessary because rates of transpiration for different plants vary greatly. ET controllers have already been tested in the western U.S. but have undergone little research in humid climates like that of Florid a. A study conducted in Florida by Davis et al.

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31 (2007) during the summer (July 1 through August 31) and fall (September 1 through November 30) of 2006 found that three brands of ET contro llers compared to a theoretical two-day-perweek irrigation schedule with no irrigation cont rol devices were capable of reducing water applied. These reductions were between 20 and 60% with the exception of one controller which applied more water than the theoretical depth during the fall of 2006. These water savings were produced while maintaining acceptable turf quality. A study conducted in Irvine, California in 40 single-family homes demonstrated the effectiveness of scheduling irrigation based on localized ET conditions fo r reducing residential water use. The study was conducted by the Irvine Ranch Water District (IRWD). The irrigation schedules in the homes were controlled through a remote signal and adjustments were made weekly based on the ET for the previous wee k. The value for ET was used to develop a percentage change factor which was sent to the individual homes controlle rs and applied to the existing irrigation schedule that was input durin g installation. The baseline irrigation schedule was site specific based on plant type, slope, etc. The controller was able to reduce outdoor water applied by 16%. The results show that the homes selected for the ET controller typically applied less water than homes in the control test group before the study began so the 16% water savings could be higher when installed in other ho mes. All participants in the study believed the automatic ET controller was convenient and 97% reported that they observed either no change or an improvement in the quality of their landscape (IRWD, 2001). Based on the previous study further resear ch was conducted by the Municipal Water District of Orange County (MWDOC) and IR WD to investigate the usefulness of this technology at reducing runoff from residential lawns. The numb er of homes in the study was expanded. The study included five neighborhoo ds, each having their own single point of

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32 discharge for the runoff from the entire neighborhood. The ET based systems produced 10% water reductions in total household water use. During the dry season runoff was reduced by approximately 50% compared to the runoff prio r to installing the ET based system (MWDOC and IRWD, 2004). A study by the Los Angeles Department of Wa ter and Power was conducted to look at the usefulness of ET controllers in settings with medium to large landscapes such as homeowners associations, schools and parks. Two commercia lly available ET controllers, both using signal based technology, were tested. The two contro llers managed to reduce water applied by 17% and 28%. The researchers estimated that in dedi cated turfgrass areas the ET controllers reduced water consumption by 432 mm/year (Bamezai, 2004). Florida has growing water resource issues due to rapidly incr easing populations and development. Various technologies are commercially available to help homeowners make their irrigation practices more efficient. These de vices can possibly decrease water demand, save money for homeowners and resu lt in healthier landscapes.

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33 CHAPTER 2 RAIN SENSOR, EVAPOTRANSPIRATION CONTROLLER AND SOIL MOISTURE SENSOR B ASED IRRIGATION CONTROL ON ST. AUGUSTINEGRASS Introduction Water conservation is a growing issue in th e state of Florida due to increased water dem ands and limited resources. Water withdrawal in Florida, along with California and Texas, accounted for one-fourth of all water withdrawal s in the nation for 2000 (Hutson et al., 2004). The population of Florida increased 11% from 2000 to 2005. In 1990, 2000 and 2005 Florida ranked as the fourth highest popul ated state (United States Census Bureau [USCB], 2007). The population is expected to increase by 79.5% fr om a population of 16 million people in 2000 to 28.7 million people in 2030. As Floridas population increases so does the development of previously undeveloped lands in to homes and landscaped areas. Recently, nearly 13% of new homes being constructed in the U.S. are in Flor ida (USCB, 2007). Many if not most of these new homes being built have automated irrigation sy stems. Studies show that the public supports finding more effective methods to conserve wa ter. A recent survey conducted by Tampa Bay Water showed that 87% of those polled agreed that more should be done in order to conserve water, but 93% of the people polled believed they were already doing all they could to conserve water (Florida Department of Environmenta l Protection [FDEP], 2002) Various irrigation control technologies are comme rcially available to optimi ze landscape irrigation. These technologies are soil moisture sensor cont rollers, ET controllers and rain sensors. Soil Moisture Sensor Controllers Sensors m easure water content in the soil us ing one of two methods tensiometric or volumetric. Typically volumetric sensors are de signed to estimate soil volumetric water content (VWC) based on the dielectric constant of the soil. Topp et al. (1980) demonstrated the strength of the relationship between the di electric constant and the VWC. In this study, factors such as

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34 soil density, texture, and salt cont ent had little effect on the dielec tric constant. The dielectric constant of water is much larger than other so il constituents, such as air (Muoz-Carpena et al., 2005). This means that the measurement of the di electric constant gives a predictable estimation of water content. In a soil moisture based irrigation controller, data from the sensor is used to allow or bypass timed irrigation events. The sensor has an adjustable thre shold setting and if the soil moisture content exceeds that setting the event is bypassed (Dukes, 2005). A single sensor can be used to control the irrigation for many zo nes or more than one sensor can be used to irrigate multiple zones. In the case of one sensor for several zones, the zone that is normally the driest, or most in need of irrigation, is selected for placement of the sens or in order to ensure adequate irrigation in all zones. Cardenas-Lailhacar et al. (2008) found that wa ter savings for three commercially available soil moisture sensor irrigation controllers ranged from 69% to 92% without adversely affecting turf quality in bermudagrass ( Cynodon dactylon ). One sensor tested in the study did not perform as well as the other three sens ors tested saving between 27 and 53%. This study was performed in Gainesville, FL in a field setting during two five month periods, one in 2004 and the other in 2005, with normal to rainy weather conditions. Evapotranspiration Controllers Evapotransp iration (ET)-based irrigation cont rollers ideally allow irrigation according to ET needs of the plant. ET is the water lost fr om the soil and plant su rfaces by evaporation and from the plant by transpiration. Since the tw o processes occur simultaneously and are very difficult to separate, they are combined into one process (Allen et al., 1998). There are various ways in which ET-based irrigation controllers are designed to work. Some systems are based on historical data developed for the site where irrigation is being a pplied. Other systems use on-site sensors to measure weather information then us ed to calculate ET while other systems receive

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35 reference ET information from nearby weather st ations and adjust irrigation accordingly (Center for Irrigation Technology, 2006). ET controllers can generally be programmed for various site specific conditions such as soil t ype, plant type, root depth, sun e xposure, etc. ET controllers can be purchased as an addition to an existing irrigati on timer or as a single component to replace the standard timer. A study conducted in Irvine, California in 40 single-family homes demonstrated the effectiveness of scheduling irrigation based on localized ET conditions fo r reducing residential water use. The study was conducted by the Irvine Ranch Water District (IRWD). The results show that the homes selected for the ET contro ller typically applied less water than homes in the control test group before the study began so the 16% water savings could be higher when installed in other homes. All pa rticipants in the study believed the automatic ET controller was convenient and 97% reported that they observed either no change or an improvement in the quality of their la ndscape (IRWD, 2001). A study conducted in Florida by Davis et al. (2007) during the summer (July 1 through August 31) and fall (September 1 through Novemb er 30) of 2006 found that three brands of ET controllers compared to a tw o-day-per-week irrigation schedu le with no irri gation control devices were capable of reducing water applie d by 20 to 60% with the exception of one controller which applied more water than the two-day-per-week comparis on treatment during the fall of 2006. The water savings were produced while maintaining acceptable turf quality. Rain Sensors Rain sensors are devices designe d to interrupt scheduled irri gation events after a certain depth of rainfall. An irrigation schedule is pr ogrammed into the tim er and this program includes frequency and depth of irrigation events. The ra in sensor then either bypasses or allows the programmed irrigation events based on local rainfall (Dukes and Haman, 2002a).

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36 Some rain sensors use hygroscopic porous di sks to trigger irriga tion bypass (Dukes and Haman, 2002a). As the disks ab sorb water they expa nd in size proportionally to the amount of water absorbed. When the disks expand to a us er adjustable set point a switch is opened and stays open until the disks dry and shrink. Testing on rain sensors has shown that, under no rmal rainfall conditions in Central Florida, they can produce up to 34% water savings w ithout adversely affecting turfgrass quality (Cardenas-Lailhacar et al., 2008). In a study c onducted in Pinellas County, FL from June 2006 to March 2007, homes with rain sensors resulted in 19% less irrigation wa ter than homes without a rain sensor (Haley and Dukes, 2007). The objectives of this experiment were to evaluate the differences in irrigation water application and the resulti ng quality of St. Augustine ( Stenotaphrum secundatum ) turfgrass comparing irrigation control usi ng: i.) two types of SMS-based controllers set at three soil moisture content thresholds; ii.) two types of ET c ontrollers; iii.) one type of rain sensor set for two thresholds of precipitation and three frequenc ies of irrigation events; and iv.) a time-based irrigation system without a rain sensor. Materials and Methods Site Description This study was performed at the Plant Scienc e Research and Education U nit in Citra, Florida. There were four treatment periods during 22 April 2006 to 30 June 2006 (S06), 23 September 2006 to 15 December 2006 (F06) and 1 May 2007 to 31 August 2007 (S07) and 1 September 2007 to 30 November 2007 (F07). The experimental area is shown in Figure 2-1. The three mapped soil types present in the res earch area are Tavares sand, Candler sand, and Arredondo fine sand (Loamy, siliceous, semiactive, hyperthermic Grossarenic Paleudults) (USDA, 2006).

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37 Soil physical properties Two evaluations were conducted to exam ine soil properties in the field. One of these tests was conducted with a TDR300 Soil Moisture Probe (Spectrum Technologies, Inc., Plainfield, IL.). Initial readings were taken on dry soil. Wet condition readings were taken 30 minutes after 25.4 mm of water was applied to the plots. E ach plot had 25 measurements taken for both the dry and wet conditions. The locations of where r eadings were taken in each plot are shown in the Figure 2-2. The data compiled from TDR tests at the field site were pl otted in order to view soil moisture differences (Figure 2-3). Due to th e variation of inherent soil moisture content in the field the treatments were assembled in a randomized block desi gn. The blocks were established from the east end of the field to the west end of the field to account for inherent soil moisture variation across the field. Soil cores were collected on 11 August 2006 usin g a device with a diameter of 54 mm and a length of 60 mm for soil physical properties analysis. Samples we re collected in a total of 16 locations with four locations in each block (Figure 2-4). At each location two samples were taken, one at a depth of 7.5 cm and the other at a depth of 15 cm. Soil samples were used to develop soil water retention curv es according to methods described by Wraith and Or (1998) and to perform a particle size an alysis according to methods desc ribed by Gee and Bauder (1986). Soil testing showed that the soil present at th e field site consisted of 1.7% clay, 1.1% silt and 97.3% sand. The curves can be used to determine soil prop erties such as field capacity and permanent wilting. Field capacity of the soil is the mo isture content at a pressure of 100 cm H2O (10 kPa) and permanent wilting point is moisture content at a pressure of 15,000 cm H2O (1,500 kPa). The water retention curves for the soils in each bl ock of the testing area are shown in Figure 2-5. Figure 2-6 shows the range of field capacities and permanent wilting points within the field and

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38 in each block. Both field capacity and perman ent wilting point values increase moving across the field from west to east (moving from bloc k 1 to block 4) as seen in Figure 2-6. Available water (AW) is the difference between FC and PWP, with FC as the upper limit and PWP as the lower limit. The depth of AW is calculated based on the root depth as follows (Cassel and Nielsen, 1986): 100 ) ( RZPWPFC AW (2-1) where FC = field capacity (% or cm3 of water per cm3 of soil) PWP = permanent wilting point (% or cm3 of water per cm3 of soil) RZ = root zone depth (mm) For this testing, RZ was measured in millim eters and FC and PWP were each measured as a percentage of water content in the soil. Values of AW also increase across the field from block 1 to block 3, with block 3 having th e largest depth of AW (Figure 2-7). The experimental area consists of 72 pl ots of Floratam St. Augustinegrass ( Stenotaphrum secundatum ). In August 2005, sod was laid in the center 1.8 m X 1.8 m of each 4.27 m X 4.27 m plot. The plots are irrigated using four Toro 570 Series (T he Toro Company, Bloomington, MN.) quarter circle pop-up spray heads with a m easured application rate of 51 mm/hr. Rain Bird ESP Modular Irrigation Contro llers (Rain Bird Internationa l, Inc., Glendora, CA) were used for scheduling all of the treatments except where a time-based contro ller was not necessary. A border, 0.61 m wide, was establ ished between all plots and was used for irrigation pipe and control wire burial. This border was kept clear of vegetation by m echanical and chemical means. Plots were mowed once weekly at a height of 10 cm. Chemicals were applied as necessary identically to all plots. Applications included fe rtilizer for healthy growth and pesticides for chinch bug removal. To promote establishment and minimize contaminati on potential, fertilizer

PAGE 39

39 applications were based on Instit ute of Food and Agricultural Sc iences (IFAS) recommendations (Trenholm, 2002). Soluble nitrogen (N) was app lied approximately every 60 days beginning in May 2006 with a total N rate of 196 kg ha-1 yr-1. Phosphorus and potassi um was applied with N fertilizations at 22 and 45 kg ha-1 yr-1, respectively. Irrigation distributio n uniformity testing Prior to establishing treatments, uniformity te sts were performed on the individual plots in the experimental area. Irrigation uniformity tests, using catch cans, measure the variability in the depth of water applied over the area of water ap plication by an irrigation system. Merriam and Keller (1978) described an equation and parame ters for calculating lo w quarter distribution uniformity DUlq. Low quarter distribution uniformity emphasizes the areas which receive less irrigation compared to the total irrigated area. The DUlq was calculated using the following formula: tot lq lqD D DU (2-2) where, totD is the average of the total depth of water applied and lqD is the average depth of the lowest 25% of depths collected. Christiansens coefficient of uniformity (CU) is another measure of uniformity that was assessed for the experimental research plots. The equation fo r CU handles over-irrigation and under-irrigation equally compared to the mean. It is calculated as follows (Christiansen 1942): n i i n i iV VV CU1 11 (2-3) where, Vi is the volume of water coll ected in one catch can and V is the mean volume of all catch cans. Another method to asses the uniformity is to measure the increase in water content

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40 below the soil surface afte r water is applied. The same equati ons can be utilized for this method as a catch can test. Dukes et al. (2006) found that the irrigati on uniformity calculated using the DUlq when measured using soil moisture ranged from 0.7 to 0.8 when catch can uniformity was above 0.5. A total of 25 catch can were placed in each plot in a grid pattern with 0.76 m X 0.76 m spacing. The outer catch cans were placed 0.3 m inside the plot boundaries. They were located in plots using the same design used for TDR te sting (Figure 2-2 and Figure 2-8). The catch cans had a 15.9 cm diameter opening and were 20.3 cm deep. Volumetric soil moisture content readings were taken next to each bucket before and after irrigation us ing a Field Scout TDR300 Soil Moisture Probe (Spectrum Technologies, Inc. Plainfield, IL.) with 20 cm rods. Irrigation was then run for 30 min to apply an average depth of 25 mm. Wind speed during testing was measured using a handheld anemometer and then verified using data from a local weather station. Testing was aborted at wind speeds exceeding 5 m/s according to ASAE standards (ASAE, 2000). Data Collection Water use was monitored using pulse-type di splacement flow meters, specifically AMCO PSMT 20 mm x 190 mm flow meters (E lster AMCO Water, Inc., Ocal a, FL). These flow meters were wired to multiplexers connected to a CR-10X datalogger (Campbell Scientific, Logan, UT.) to monitor daily water use. The meters were also read manually at least every two weeks. Volumetric soil moisture content was recorded hourly using time domain reflectometry (TDR) sensors (CS616 Water Content Reflectom eter, Campbell Scientific, Logan, UT). Measurements made with the TDR probes ar e accurate up to +/-2.5% VWC (Campbell Scientific, Inc., 2006). These sensors were connected to a CR-10X datalogger. The TDR

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41 sensors were buried in the center of every plot with the top of the sensor at a depth of 8 cm and the bottom of the sensor at a depth of 18 cm (Figure 2-9). Weather data was collected using an auto mated weather station (Campbell Scientific, Logan, UT) within 900 m of the experimental s ite. Rainfall data at the weather station was collected with both a tipping bucket rain gauge and with a manual rain gauge located at the research plots. Manual rain gauge data was used to verify depths measured by the tipping bucket rain gauge. Reference ET (ETo) is the rate at which ET occurs from a uniform surface of actively growing vegetation with a specified gr owing height and that is well-watered. ETo was calculated using solar radiation, relative humidity, air temperature, and wind speed collected by the weather station on-site. ETo was calculated using the ASCE standardized method (Allen et al. 2005) as follows: )1( )( 273 )(408.02 2uC uee T C GR ETd ae n n o (2-4) 23.237 3.237 27.17 exp6108.04098 T T T (2-5) nlnsnRRR (2-6) 35.035.114.034.0 24 min, 4 max, so s a K K nlR R e TT R (2-7) s nsR R )1( (2-8) a soRz R510275.0 (2-9) )cos()cos()sin()sin()sin( )60(24 s srsc adG R (2-10)

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42 J dr365 2 cos033.01 (2-11) 39.1 365 2 sin409.0 J (2-12) tantancos ars (2-13) 2minmaxTeTe eo o s (2-14) 2 100 RH )(Te 100 RH )(Temin max o max min o ae (2-15) 3.273 27.17 exp6108.0 T T Teo (2-16) where ETo = standardized reference crop evapotranspiration, (mm day-1) Rn = net radiation at the crop surface, (MJ m-2 day-1) G = soil heat flux density at soil surface, (MJ m-2 day-1) T = mean daily temperature at 1.5 m to 2.5 m height, (oC) u2 = mean daily wind speed at 2 m height, (m s-1) es = mean saturation vapor pressure, (kPa) ea = mean actual vapor pressure, (kPa) = slope of the vapor pressure temperature curve, (kPa oC-1) = psychometric constant, (kPa oC-1) Cn = numerator constant based on refe rence type and time step, (900) Cd = denominator constant based on re ference type and time step, (0.34) Rns = net solar radiation, (MJ m-2 day-1) Rnl = net longwave radiation, (MJ m-2 day-1) = Stefan-Boltzman constant, (4.903 x 10-9 MJ K-4 m-2 day-1) Tmax,K = maximum absolute temperature, (K) Tmin,K = minimum absolute temperature, (K) Rs = solar radiation, (MJ m-2 day-1) Rso = clear sky radiation, (MJ m-2 day-1) = canopy reflection coefficien t, (0.23 for turfgrass) z = station elevation above sea level, (m) Ra = extraterrestrial radiation, (MJ m-2 day-1) Gsc = solar constant, (0.0820 MJ m-2 min-1) dr = inverse relative distance Earth-Sun, = solar declination, (rad)

PAGE 43

43 = latitude, (rad) 1 = solar time angle at beginning of period, (rad) 2 = solar time angle at end of period, (rad) J = Julian day s = sunset hour angle, (rad) eo(Tmin) = saturation vapor pressure at daily minimum temperature, (kPa) eo(Tmax) = saturation vapor pressure at daily maximum temperature, (kPa) RHmin = minimum relative humidity, (%) RHmax = maximum relative humidity, (%) Adjustments to ETo for particular plant types are made using crop coefficients (Kc). A crop coefficient is a percentage of the potential evapotranspiration the product is a value called the crop evapotranspiration (ETc). Adjustments made for plant ty pe are necessary because rates of transpiration vary greatly from plant to pl ant. The equation for crop evapotranspiration according to Allen et al. (2005) is: occETKET (2-17) Monthly values of Kc used in this study are listed in table 2-1 and were calculated using bahiagrass ( Paspalum notatum ) turfgrass at a research site also within 900 m of the research area (Jia et al., 2007). Turfgrass quality was rated at least once ever y two weeks during S06 and F06 and at least once a month during S07 and F07. Quality evaluations were made using the National Turfgrass Evaluation Program (NTEP) proced ures (Shearman and Morris, 1998 ). The ratings were on a 1 to 9 scale, with 1 representing dead or dormant grass and 9 representing grass with good color and density, and without weeds (Morris a nd Shearman, 2006). A quality rating of 5 was considered minimally acceptable for a homeowner lawn. Figure 2-10 shows an example of the appearance of the turfgrass for qua lity ratings of 2 (almost dead), 5 (minimally acceptable) and 8 (nearly perfect quality).

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44 Statistical analyses for irriga tion and turf quality data usi ng Statistical Analysis System software (SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, NC) using the General Linear Model (proc GLM) and the mixed procedure (proc MIXED). Means sepa ration was conducted with Duncans Multiple Range Test. Experimental Design There were 18 treatments with four replic ations arranged in a completely randomized block design (blocks east to west) due to inherent soil moisture differences in the research area. Treatment descriptions and codes are summarized in Table 2-2. Soil moisture sensors were connected to an irrigation time clock to function in bypass mode operation so that a schedul ed irrigation event would be bypa ssed if soil moisture exceeded the soil moisture sensor threshold (Dukes, 2005) The monthly irrigation schedule was based on recommendations for two-day-per-week operation by Dukes and Haman (2002b) and is presented in Table 2-3. The two-day-per-week operation was used to emulate typical day of the week water restrictions in Florida. Two commercially available soil moisture sensors were tested: Acclima Digital TDT RS500 (Acclima Inc., Meridian, ID.) and the LawnLogic LL1004 (Alpine Automation, Inc., Aurora, CO.) (Figure 2-11 and 2-12). Both of the soil moisture sensor (SMS) based system was tested at three different volumetric moisture content thresholds. The three VWC threshold settings were considered low (dry), medium and high (wet) VWC conditions. The settings for the Acclima Digital TDT sensors were 7%, 10%, and 13%. The LawnLogic, which uses site specific calibration methods, was set for relativ e low, medium and high levels of moisture content in the soil. The manuf acturer suggests calibration 24 hours after a significant rainfall or irrigation event that fills the soil profile to fiel d capacity. Once the calib ration is performed, the controller has relative set points from 1 (dry) to 9 (wet). The settings used as experimental

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45 treatments were 2, 5 and 8 for S06 and 4, 5 and 6 for F06 and for all of 2007. Six of the SMS treatments utilized one sensor buried in the driest block (block 2) to control the irrigation for all plots in the treatment. All of these sensors were placed in the same block, which was selected during intensive soil moisture characterization of the site during the uniformity testing. One treatment, AC IR (threshold of 7%), used four sensors, one sens or buried in a plot in each block controlling the irrigation for that individual plot. Acclima sensors were installed horizontally at a depth of 8 cm and the LawnLogic sensors were bur ied with rods placed ve rtically with the top of the sensor buried at a depth of 6 cm. All control sensors (excep t three of the sensors from AC IR) were buried in block 2. After the S06 experiment, ET controllers were in stalled at the test si te (Figure 2-12). Two commercially available controllers were selected for the study: the Toro Intelli-sense (The Toro Company, Bloomington, MN) and the RainBird ET Manager (RainBird Co rporation, Glendora, CA). Both ET controllers utilize paging techno logy to gather reference ET information. The systems perform a daily water balance based on daily ET, depth or presence of rainfall, and other inputs and then use the calculated soil moisture level for making irrigation decisions. The Toro Intelli-sense controller (TORO) calculates irriga tion runtime and has the ability to determine irrigation day if not restricted based on application rate and ot her inputs from the homeowner. The ET Manager (ETM) is connected to an i rrigation time clock in bypass mode. The ET manager does not calculate irrigation run time; it either bypasses or allows irrigation as needed based on the soil moisture balance calculated usin g daily ET, rainfall, application depth and other inputs. The ETM treatment was se t for irrigation depths based on the same methods used for the soil moisture sensor and rain sensor treatments according to Table 2-3. A summary of inputs for

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46 both ET controllers is provided in Table 2-4. Bo th the ET-based treatments were restricted to irrigating twice per week. Rain sensor (RS) treatments we re also connected to a time clock in bypass mode similar to the description presented for soil moisture sens ors. A Mini-Clik (Hunter Industries Inc., San Marcos, CA.) rain sensor was used to establish seven treatments. The rain sensors were set for two depths of rainfall, 6 mm and 3 mm and three different frequencies of irrigation events, 1, 2 and 7 days of irrigation per week. There was one control treatment in the experimental design and two time-based comparisons (Table 2-2). The control was a non-irrigated (NON) treatment. The comparison treatments consisted of time-based without a rain sensor (WOS) and time based with a rain sensor at 6 mm and a deficit replacement schedule that was sc heduled to apply 60% of the possible depth scheduled for WOS a nd the other RS treatments (DWRS). The same total application depth per week was divided over the possible number of days of irrigation per week. Every treatment except fo r the TORO, DWRS and the NON treatments had the same possible total depth of irrigation applica tion. Differences in i rrigation application were due to bypassed irrigation events. Reductions in water applied by TORO and DWRS could be from bypassed irrigation events or from shorter irrigation run times. Results and Discussion Distribution Uniformity Testing Results from uniformity testing varied across the field and are summarized in Table 2-5 and Figure 2-13. The DUlq values ranged from 0.29 to 0.72 but the average DUlq for the entire field was 0.55, which is considered fair by the Irrigation Association (2 005). When using soil moisture uniformity as described by Dukes et al. (2006) the values of DUlq at the research site were between 0.52 and 0.91. The CU of the fiel d ranged from 0.58 to 0.84 with an average value

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47 of 0.75. A uniformity study performed on homes irrigated with spray heads in Central Florida showed that the systems had an average DUlq of 0.41 with a range from 0.12 to 0.67 and an average CU of 0.59 with a range from 0.50 to 0.72 (Baum et al., 2005). Thus, the uniformity of irrigation in this experiment was better than typical homes in Central Florida. In addition, Dukes et al. (2006) showed that catch can DUlq values above 0.50 resulted in soil moisture DUlq of 0.70 to 0.80. The low values for calculation of DUlq came from catch cans placed just inside the edge of the plot. The average DUlq of the center catch cans was 0.86 with a range from 0.74 to 0.99. The CU of the center catch cans was 0.90 with a range of 0.84 to 0.86. The area evaluated for turf quality is the center of the plots, which is the ar ea with the best and most uniform coverage from the irrigation system. Rainfall Three of the four treatment periods were relatively dry compared to historical rainfall for the research area (Figure 2-14) The total rainfall was 138 mm from 16 rainfall events during S06. Historical average rainfall data for the sa me time period as the spri ng treatments is 298 mm (NOAA, 2006). During the F06 experiment, 92 mm from 15 events occurred. For the same duration of time historical average rainfall is 188 mm (NOAA, 2006). Both treatment periods had total rainfall depths less than half that of the historical depths for the area. Figure 2-15 shows the cumulative rainfall depth for the spri ng and fall along with cumulative calculated ETc. Infrequent rainfall events and below average rainfall amounts led to dry conditions for the research site. In the beginning of the S06 the volumetric mois ture content of the soil in nonirrigated plots was as low as 3% to 4% (Figure 2-16), which is lower than or equal to the permanent wilting points at the field site (Figure 2-6).

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48 Rainfall during S07 experiment was 287 mm compared to 636 mm, which is the historical rainfall for the same time period. F07 received 347 mm compared to hist orical averages of 258 mm. The number of days per month where there was a rainfall event with a depth greater than 2.5 mm was fewer than the mont hly historical averages for every time period except in F07 (Figure 2-14). During October 2007 there were 60 percent more ra iny days than the historical average. The total depth receiv ed in October was 178 mm compared to historical values of 61 mm. The F07 time period was also the only one where cumulative rainfall was greater than calculated ETc, with almost all of the rain occurri ng in September and October and only one rainfall event in November (Figure 2-15). Over all the treatment periods S06, F06 and S07 can be considered drier than normal for the testing area both in frequency of rainfall events and total depth received by the area. Water Savings and Turf Quality in S06 Water savings for this testing period ranged from 0% to 63% for all treatments; the treatments with acceptable turf quality had water savings rangi ng from 0% to 36% (Tables 2-6 and 2-7). Rain sensors reduced water applie d by between 21% and 36% while soil moisture sensors reduced water by 0% to 63% (Table 2-6). Cardenas-L ailhacar et al. (2008) achieved water savings of 34% during normal Florida rainfall conditions using a rain sensor set at a 6mm rainfall threshold. That treatment was comparab le to RS 2-6mm in this experiment which during S06 (dry conditions) reduced wate r applied by 20%. The highest water savings achieved without adversely affecting turf quality was in the DW RS treatment (36%). Treatment RS1-3mm had lower water savings (33%) than DWRS but poor turf quality (treatment period average of 4.6 for RS1-3mm and 6.5 or DWRS, Table 2-7). In S06, the total depth was not as important to turf quality as frequency of the depth applied. The RS1-3mm treatment reduced water applied by bypassing irrigation while DWRS reduced irriga tion by both bypassing irrigation events and due

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49 to the reduced depth applied wi th each irrigation event, alth ough DWRS bypassed fewer events than RS1-3mm due to a higher RS threshold se tting of 6 mm (Table 28). Both SMS-based treatments with medium and high thresholds re sulted in better than minimally acceptable turf quality. Some deterioration in tu rf quality across all treatments at the end of th e testing period was due to chinch bug damage at the site. The biggest impact from the chinch bugs occurred in the plots with low water application (LL Low and NON). The experiment was concluded June 30, 2006 before most of the damage from chinch bugs occurred. Soil moisture sensors Both SMS-based treatments with medium and high thresholds resulted in better than minimally acceptable turf quality (between 6.2 and 6.5 averaged during S06). Generally, higher threshold settings for the SMS resulted in highe r water use and increased turf quality in S06. Among the medium and high threshold treatments the water savings were between 0% and 21% (Table 2-6). Figure 2-17 shows the cumulative water use for the SMS-based treatments during the spring. Neither of the high threshold SMS treatments (LL High and AC 13) showed reductions in irrigation water applied. The AC 13 treatment did not save any water since it did not bypass any irrigation events. The LL High tr eatment bypassed two irrigation events but did not result in water savings due to problems with the irrigation control system that caused the irrigation to run longer than pr ogrammed when irrigation was allowed. Average turf quality during S06 for the AC 13 treatment was 6.2 (Table 2-7). The AC 7 treatment reduced irrigation a pplication by 40% and the LL Low had higher water savings of 63%. Weekly water applied was higher for AC 7 (17.9 mm/wk) than for LL Low (11.2 mm/wk) (P<0.001; Table 2-6). These treatments did not main tain acceptable turf quality throughout the entire treatment period. Th e average turf quality rating during the testing period was slightly higher for AC 7, with a rating of 5.1, compar ed to LL Low with a rating of

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50 4.2 (P=0.024) (Table 2-7). The average turf qua lity over the entire te sting period was acceptable for AC 7; however, turf quality at the end of the treatment peri od was only a 4.3. Treatment AC IR (which has a threshold setti ng of 7%) resulted in an averag e 32% reduction of water applied while maintaining an average treatment turf qual ity of 5.7 (Figure 2-18). The range of weekly water applied by these treatments was from16.3 mm/ wk to 23.4 mm/wk (water savings of 22 to 45%). The range in average turf quality during S06 was from 3.8 to 6.6. There was no significant difference between the four plots in the AC IR treatment for weekly water applied (P=0.120), but for turf quality there was a signi ficant difference between the plot in the second block (average turf quality of 3.8) and the other plots in the treatment (P=0.001). Similarly turf quality was lower for the AC 7 treatment (sensor buried in the same block as AC 7.2) than the other SMS-based treatments, with the exception of LL Low. The pl ot in block 4 had the highest turf quality rating (6.6) which was significan tly higher than for block 2 (3.8; P<0.001). Comparing average turf quality ratings for the AC IR (5.7) and AC 7 (5.1) treatments showed a significant difference between the two (P=0.017). Average weekly water applied between the two treatments was similar during the S06 seas on, with AC IR applying only 2.5 mm/wk more water (P=0.151). The medium threshold settings for both sensor s resulted in water sa vings of 11% and 21% for the AC 10 and the LL Med treatments respectively (Figure 2-17). The weekly water application of these two treatments was simila r with 26.5 mm/wk for AC 10 and 23.9 mm/wk for LL Med (P=0.151) (Table 2-6). The LL Med averag e turf quality rating over the entire testing period (6.5) was similar to the AC 10 rating (6.2; P=0.349), and both were above minimally acceptable (Table 2-7). Compared to the me dium and high threshold treatments the low threshold settings for both the LL and AC treatme nts resulted in poor tu rf quality ratings. LL

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51 Low turf quality was 4.2 which was well below ot her treatments such as AC 13 (P<0.001), AC 10 (P<0.001), and LL Med (P<0.001). Over the entire testing period, AC 7 treatment had an average turf quality rating of 5.1 which was higher than LL Low but still lower than the high threshold treatments such as AC 13 (P=0.002), AC 10 (P=0.004), and LL Med (P=0.001). Ultimately, the LL Low treatment had almost comp lete death of the turfgrass in the treatment plots and had to later be re-sodded. Rain sensors Water savings for the rain sensor treatments ranged from 20% to 36% (Table 2-6). The highest water savings occurred in the DWRS treatment, reducing water application by 36% (Figure 2-19). This treatment was set to appl y 60% of the water compared to the other timebased treatments. The DWRS treatment had a lo wer percentage of irrigation events bypassed than the other two-day-per-week rain sensor trea tments by 5%, as seen in Table 2-8, but saved water due to the decreased depth of application per irrigation event. Average turfgrass quality for this treatment was 6.5. The next highest water savings were with the RS1-3mm treatment, applying 33% less water than WOS; however, the turf quality at th e end of the testing period was less than acceptable (4.6; Table 2-7). The RS 1-6mm treatment only redu ced water application by 21%. Both of the 1 day/week treatments had similar low turf quality ratings at the end of the treatment period (P=0.104) but only RS1-3mm was below acceptable. The average weekly depth applied was higher for RS1-6mm (23. 6 mm/wk) than for RS1-3mm (19.9 mm/wk) (P=0.017), but RS1-3mm only bypassed one irrigation event more than RS1-6mm. The timebased treatments set for two and seven days of irrigation per week had similar water savings compared to each other between 20 and 22% an d weekly water applied depths between 23.3 mm/wk and 23.9 mm/wk (P values greater than 0.5). Treatments RS2-3mm and RS2-6mm bypassed the same number of irrigati on events during S06 (Table 2-8).

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52 Frequency of irrigation seemed to have a more direct impact on quality than the rain sensor threshold setting in S06. The poorest turf quali ty ratings were seen in the one-day-per-week irrigation schedules. With little rainfall in S06, turfgrass depended on irrigation water to maintain quality. As seen in Figure 2-14, there were weeks duri ng S06 where no rainfall occurred to supplement irrigation. Both of the one day/week treatments had similar low turf quality ratings at the end of S06, but only RS 1-3mm was below acceptable. Treatment RS1-3 mm bypassed one more irrigation event than the 6 mm setting resulting in a decrease in turf quality. Treatments DWRS and RS7-3mm app lied irrigation water similarly with average weekly depths applied of 19.2 mm/wk and 22.8 mm/wk respectively (P=0.018). Water Savings and Turf Quality in F06 During the F06 period three treatments were added; RS7-6mm, ETM and TORO. The LL Low and the NON treatments were ended in the third week of the experiment due to very low turf quality ratings of 2. Three treatments were excluded (RS1-3mm, RS1-6mm, and RS7-3mm) due to a loss of power to the irrigation timer fo r these treatments. The LL High had an error in the setting of the irrigation schedul e and so the treatment was also excluded. Data collected for treatment AC 7 was not included in this treatme nt period due to imprope r installation of the sensor after re-sodding following S06. The sensor was reinst alled before the S07 and F07 treatment periods. All of the remaining treatments had an average turf quality rating during F06 of 6 or 7, which is above minimally acceptabl e. Water savings during the treatment period ranged from 7% to 63% for all treatments (T able 2-6). TORO produced the highest water savings overall (63%). The lowest water savings (10% or less) were w ith RS2-3mm, RS2-6mm, RS7-6mm and AC 13. Rain sensors reduced wate r applied by between 7% and 42% while soil moisture sensors reduced water by 10% to 54% and ET controllers reduced water applied by

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53 40% and 63% (Table 2-6). Over all, turf quality was better in F06 than S06 due to lower temperatures and more rainfall than the spring (P<0.001; Table 2-7). Davis et al. (2007) found water savings comp ared to a theoretical two-day-per-week irrigation schedule with no irrigati on control devices of 20 to 60%. Specifically the Toro Intellisense controller produced water savings of 40% The water savings were produced while maintaining acceptable turf quality. The rese arch was conducted under dry conditions, where rainfall received was less than the depth of hist orical rainfall for all months of testing except July. In this experiment the ET controllers had water savings of 40% (ET Manager) and 63% (Toro Intelli-sense). Soil moisture sensors During the F06 treatment period two SMS treatme nts were modified based on results from S06. The LL Low and LL High settings were modi fied to less extreme threshold values. In S06 the settings (based on the 1 to 9 scale) were 2 for LL Low and 8 for LL High. These settings were changed to 4 for LL Low and 6 for LL High and were maintained at these thresholds for the remaining testing periods. Treatment AC 10 resulted in a 30% savings of water applied and AC 13 had a 10% savings (Figure 2-20). The LL Me d treatment reduced irrigation applied by 18%, which is lower than the water savings seen fo r the AC 10 treatment (30%) (Table 2-6). The average amount of water applied weekly was less for AC 10 (16.4 mm/wk) than for LL Med (19.5 mm/wk) (P=0.002) (Table 2-6). AC IR had water savings ranging from 24% to 74% and a range in turf quality from 4.8 to 7.3 (Figure 2-21). The lowest turf quality rati ng was seen in the plot with the highest water applied (AC 7.2; Table 2-9). The water applie d and the turf quality for AC 7.2 was the only significantly different plot in the treatment during S06. This plot was located in block 2 of the research area which was considered to be the dr iest block based on TDR te sting (Figure 2-3). If

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54 the soil in the second block has lower water holdi ng capacity irrigation would need to be applied more often to maintain the VWC programmed into the SMS controller. During TDR analysis of the experimental field, block 2 was the driest block with VW C values as low as 5% after irrigation occurred (Figure 2-3). The turf quality ratings for the other three plots (AC 7.1, AC 7.3 and AC 7.4) were all similar (P=0.261) also weekly water applied was similar between the remaining three treatm ent plots (P=0.067). Rain sensors Reductions in water applied for the rain sensor based treatments in F06 ranged from 7% to 42% (Figure 2-22). All of the trea tments had an average turf quali ty of 5.8 or better over the entire testing period. The highest water savi ngs were in the DWRS treatment (42%). The DWRS treatment applied 35% less water than RS2-6mm but it bypassed the same percentage of irrigation events (Table 2-7). During the treatment period DWRS and RS2-6mm only bypassed two irrigation events. The average weekly wate r applied by the DWRS treatment (14.0 mm/wk) was lower than the RS2-6mm treatment (22.1 mm/ wk) (P<0.001) while the average turf quality for the DWRS plots (7.1) was higher than the RS2-6mm plots (5.8) (P<0.001). The remaining time based treatments (RS2-3mm and RS7-6mm) had water savings of 8% and 9%. Weekly water applied by these two treatments were 21.8 mm/wk for RS2-3mm and 21.9 mm/wk for RS7-6mm which were similar to RS2-6mm (P=0. 764 and P=0.915). Treatments RS2-3mm and RS7-6mm had similar turf quality ratings of 6.6 and 6.5 respectively (P=0.722). These ratings were lower than DWRS (P=0.125 and P=0. 059), but higher than RS2-6mm (P=0.019 and P=0.045). Evapotranspiration controllers The ET Manager had a water savings of 36% bypassing 50% of the possible irrigation events, while the Toro IntelliSense controller had a water savings of 59%, bypassing 29% of the

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55 possible irrigation days (Figure 223). Rain sensor treatments with same number of possible irrigation days only bypassed 9% of irrigation events during F06. Events bypassed by the TORO controller, which did not have a rain sensor attached, were due to the rain pause feature. The ETM treatment reduced water applied by irrigating less frequently. The TORO treatment bypassed fewer irrigation events than ETM but ha d smaller depths applied with each event. Average weekly water applied for TORO and ET M were treatments were 8.6 mm and 14.4 mm respectively (P<0.001). Both trea tments had better th an acceptable average turf quality ratings. TORO plots had an average turf quality rating of 6.5 compared to the ETM plots, which had a rating of 7.1 (P=0.082). ETM resulted in water savings higher than the SMS based systems with the exception of the AC IR trea tment (water savings of 54%) a nd the time based systems with the exception of DWRS trea tment (water savings of 42%) (Table 2-6). Water Savings and Turf Quality in S07 During the S07 treatment period the LL Low, RS1-3mm and NON treatments were ended early due to poor turf quality. Treatment LL Low was ended in th e third week of testing, RS13mm was ended in the fourth w eek and the NON treatment was ended at the beginning of the second week of the study. Water savings for the remaining treatments ranged from 0 to 59% (Table 2-6). Treatments with acceptable turf qual ity had water savings ranging from 0% to 49%. The highest water savings with acceptable turf quality averaged over the whole treatment period were from AC 7 (49%) followed closely by DWRS which reduced water applied by 45%. Turf quality was higher for DWRS (6.9) than for AC 7 (5.8) (P<0.001). Rain sensors reduced water applied by between 7% and 45% while soil moistu re sensors reduced water by 0% to 49% and ET controllers reduced water applied by 25% to 59% (Table 2-6).

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56 Soil moisture sensors The highest water savings for SMS treatments were from AC 7 and AC IR, which reduced water applied by 49% and 44% respectively (Fig ures 2-23 and 2-24). The two treatments had similar weekly water applied depths of 19. 8 mm/wk and 21.5 mm/wk respectively (P=0.193) (Table 2-6). Within the AC IR treatment water savings ranged from 32% to 50% (Figure 2-25). The largest difference in water applied was be tween AC 7.2 (17.8 mm/wk) and AC 7.4 (6.3 mm/wk; P=0.046). Similar to the F06 treatment period, the contro ller for AC 7.2 applied most water of the AC IR treatment (Table 2-9). Du ring both the previous treatment periods the AC 7.2 had significantly lower turf quality ratings than the other three plots in the treatment (P<0.001). The turf quality ratings for the other three plots (AC 7.1, AC 7.3 and AC 7.4) were all similar (P=0.667) also weekly water app lied was similar between the remaining three treatment plots (P=0.848). Treatment AC 10 reduced water applied by 18% compared to a 19% reduction in water applied by LL Med (Figure 2-24). The average w eekly water applied was 31.9 mm/wk for AC 10 and 33.8 mm/wk for LL Med (P=0.140) (Table 2-6). These treatments actually bypassed the same number of events and any difference in water applied is due to minor differences in water delivery in the field and timing of bypassed irrigation events si nce depth applied per irrigation event changes monthly (Table 2-8). LL High did not bypass any irrigatio n events in S07 and so produced no water savings. AC 13 produced an 11% reduction in water applied by bypassing four irrigation events. The weekly water applied for AC 13 was 34.4 mm/wk which was lower than LL High at 39.3 mm/wk (P<0.001) (Table 2-6). Average turf quality ratings for the two treatments during S07 were very similar (P=0.860) (Table 2-7). All of the irrigation events bypassed by the AC 13 sensor occurred after receiving large amounts of rainfall (greater than 11 mm).

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57 Rain sensors Treatment RS1-3mm was ended on May 31 (4 weeks after study began) due to poor turf quality. The VWC of this plot before supplem ental irrigation was added is shown in Figure 226. The treatment only bypassed one irrigation even t, which lead to VWC levels in the plots around 4%. Average turf quality for the treatmen t was a 3 with one plot having a rating of 2 before supplemental irrigation was applied. Wate r savings for the remaining rain sensor based treatments ranged from 7% to 45% with DW RS producing the highest and RS1-6mm producing the lowest water savings (Table 2-6). Treatments RS2-3mm and RS2-6mm produced wa ter savings of 14 and 10% respectively (Figure 2-27). These treatments had similar av erage weekly depths of water applied with 33.2 mm/wk for RS2-3mm and 34.9 mm/wk for RS26mm (P=0.054). Treatments RS7-3mm and RS7-6mm had slightly different weekly water depths applied of 31.3 mm/wk and 33.1 mm/wk respectively (P=0.046). The water savings for these treatments was 21% (RS7-3mm) and 16% (RS7-6mm) (Figure 2-22). Trea tment RS1-6mm had the lowest tu rf quality rating of the rain sensor treatments with an aver age rating of 5.8 over the entire testing period. This value was above minimally acceptable but lower than ratings for other treatments su ch as RS2-3mm with a rating of 6.7 (P<0.001), RS7-6mm with a rating of 6.8 (P<0.001), RS 7-3mm with a rating of 6.5 (P=0.005) and RS2-6mm with a rating of 6.0 (P=0.422). Treatment DWRS produced the highest water sa vings applying an average weekly depth of 21.3 mm/wk of water and had the hi ghest average turf quality rating (6.9) of all treatments. This treatment applied less weekly than RS1-6mm (34.5 mm/wk) (P<0.001) and had higher turf quality (P<0.001). DWRS also had lower wate r applied weekly than the RS2-6mm treatment (34.9 mm/wk) (P<0.001) and highe r turf quality (P<0.001). Th ese two treatments bypassed the

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58 same percentage of irrigation events, treatment DWRS simply applied less water per irrigation event (Table 2-8). Evapotranspiration controllers TORO and ETM reduced water applied by 25% and 59% respectively (Figure 2-28). The average weekly water applied was higher for the TORO plots with 29.1 mm/wk compared to the ETM plots with 15.0 mm/wk (P<0.001). While wa ter savings were high for the ETM treatment turf quality for the tr eatment period was less than acceptable (4.5). The average turf quality rating for the TORO treatment (6.1) was higher than ETM (P<0.001). Loss of turf quality in the ETM treatment could be due to the number of irrigation events bypassed. The ETM manager bypassed 57% of the pos sible irrigation events (Table 2-8). The ET Manager uses effective rainfall settings to determine how much rainfall can be stored in the root zone of the pl ant. One effective rain setting is the Saturation Allowance (Table 2-4). According to the manufacturer, this value is the amount of rain required to saturate the soil after irrigation has been applied without causing runoff to occur. It is the maximum amount of water that the ET controller believes can be held in the root zone of the plant in addition to the irrigation water. The value used for the Satu ration Allowance during S07 was too high and caused too many irrigation events to be bypassed during a period of time where little rainfall occurred. The same value was used during th e F06 treatment period, but the treatment only produced water savings of 40% and no damage to tu rf quality was seen. This may have been due to the cooler temperatures and lower values of ETo during the month of November preventing loss of turf quality. During the month of November 2006 the ETM controller only allowed irrigation once. The Toro Inte lli-Sense controller had a water savings of 25% and only bypassed irrigation once.

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59 Water Savings and Turf Quality in F07 The F07 treatment period received a substant ial depth of rainfall both in comparison to three previous testing periods and compared to hi storical average rainfall depths. Average turf quality for the NON treatment was a 5, which is minimally acceptable but lower than most other treatments (Table 2-7). The ETM treatment had a similar average turf quality rating compared to NON of 5.7 (P=0.097). Water savings with SM S treatments ranged from 11% to 75% with every treatment receiving at least acceptable turf quality ratings (Table 2-7). Water savings for rain sensors ranged from 22% to 53% and wate r savings for ET contro llers was 59% and 62% (Table 2-6). There was more rainfall in F07 than the previo us testing periods. It was the only treatment with a cumulative depth of rainfall exceeding hist orical averages and it was the only testing period where the number of days per month where th ere was a rainfall event with a depth greater than 2.5 mm was greater than the monthly histori cal averages (Figure 2-14). Due to the wetter conditions during F07, the results were more comparable to the savings seen by CardenasLailhacar et al. (2008). Even t hough this period had more rainfall than previous testing periods, it was drier than normal for this time of year. Cardenas-Lailhacar et al. (2008) found that soil moisture sensors (set to irrigate 2 days/week) reduced water applied in that experiment by 27 to 88%. Specifically, the Acclima controller had wate r savings of 77%. Using a rain sensor set to replace 100% of the historical ne t irrigation requirement resulted in a water savings of 34% (2 days/week and a 6 mm rainfall threshold) and for a rain sensor treatmen t scheduled to replace 60% of the historical net irri gation requirement they saw water savings of 59%. The AC 7 controller (2 days/week) in this study reduced water applied by 74% and the AC 10 controller reduced water applied by 53%. During F07 the treatment RS 2-6mm reduced water applied 22%

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60 and the DWRS treatment (scheduled to apply 60% of the historical net irrigation requirement) produced water savings of 53%. Soil moisture sensors The highest water savings were seen in the AC 7 and the AC IR treatments with a 75% reduction of water applied by both (Figures 2-28 a nd 2-29). The average weekly depth of water applied for the two treatments was also simila r with 9.1 mm/wk (AC 7) and 8.4 mm/wk (AC IR) (Table 2-6; P=0.665). Water savings for the AC IR treatment ranged fr om 64 to 81% with the lowest water savings seen in the second block of the research area. As seen in the previous testing periods AC 7.2 (located in block 2) ha d the highest water applie d and the lowest turf quality of the four plots in the AC IR treatment (Table 2-9). During F07, the difference between AC 7.2 and the other plots was not as significant as in other tes ting periods for both turf quality and water applied. AC 7.2 and AC 7.4 had sim ilar weekly depths of water applied with 12.1 mm/wk and 8.8 mm/wk respectively (P=0.153). Th e plots for AC 7.2 and AC 7.1 had similar turf quality ratings with 5.3 and 5.7 respectivel y (P=0.574). The only significant difference in turf quality was between AC 7.2 (5.3) and AC 7.4 (7.0) (P=0.025), however the water applied by these two controllers was not si gnificantly different (P=0.153). Treatment LL Low produced a 44% reduction in water applied (F igure 2-29). Weekly water applied for the LL Low treatment (16.3 mm/wk) was significantly high er than that applied by AC 7 and AC IR (P<0.001) (Table 26). Treatment AC 10 produced water savings of 53% which was higher than the water savings by both the LL Low treatment (44% ) and the LL Med treatment ( 31%) (Figure 2-29). Weekly water applied by the AC 10 treatment was lower than the LL Med treatment by 5.5 mm/wk (P=0.001). AC 13 and LL High had water savings of 14 and 11% respectively. The weekly water applied by these treatments was similar wi th depths of 25.6 mm/wk for AC 13 and 26.3

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61 mm/wk for LL High (P=0.656). The AC 13 treatm ent bypassed two more irrigation events than the LL High sensor did, however due to a leak in the irrigation for one plot in the AC 13 treatment water savings look more similar between the two treatments than they should. Without the leaking spray head, AC 13 would have had a water savings of 19%. During this treatment period all of the AC sensors produced higher water savings than the comparable LL treatments (Table 2-6). Rain sensors Water savings for the DWRS treatment was 53% and for all the other rain sensor treatments water savings were between 22 and 30 % (Figure 2-31). The w eekly water applied by the two-day-per-week treatments, RS2-3mm and RS2-6mm, was similar at 21.7 mm and 23.4 mm respectively (P=0.192) (Table 2-6). The turf quality was also similar for these two treatments with a rating of 6.8 for RS2-3mm and a rating of 6.3 for RS2-6mm (P=0.248). Treatment RS1-3mm had a lower weekly water a pplication depth of 18.8 mm/wk compared to RS1-6mm with a depth of 21.8 mm/wk (P=0.017). Average turf quality for RS1-3mm was 6.3 and the rating for RS1-6mm was 6.2 (P=0.847). Treatment RS7-3mm had a weekly application depth of 20.2 mm/wk which was slightly lower than treatment RS7-6mm with a depth of 22.9 mm/wk (P=0.032). The water savings for these two treatments were 30 % and 23%. The turf quality for RS7-3mm was 6.8 and the turf quali ty for RS7-6mm was 6.9 (P=0.699). Treatment DWRS applied substantially less water weekly th an the other rain sensor treatments. DWRS applied 14.2 mm/wk compared to the next lowest rain sensor treatment RS1-3mm which had a weekly depth of 18.8 mm/wk (P<0.001). DWRS ha d the highest turf quali ty rating (7.0) for all treatments in F07.

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62 Evapotranspiration controllers In F07 the saturation allowance parameter fo r the ET Manager was changed from 9.1 mm to 2.5 mm due to loss of turf quality during S07. The new value was selected to ensure adequate irrigation was applied. Treatments ETM a nd TORO had water savings of 59% and 62% respectively (Figure 2-32). The weekly depths of wa ter applied were similar with 12.8 mm/wk for ETM and 11.7 mm/wk for TORO (P=0.261). The turf quality rating for ETM was 5.7 and for TORO a 6.4 (P=0.088). Much of the damage to turf quality for the ETM plots occurred during S07, turf quality from S07 to F07 incr eased from 4.7 to 5.7. The TORO controller bypassed 35% of the possi ble irrigation days and ETM bypassed 58%. A rain sensor treatment with same number of possible irrigation days (RS2-6mm) only bypassed 23% of irrigation events during F07. Summary and Conclusions Even though three of the four testing periods were relatively dry, all of the technologies tested managed to reduce water application compared to the WOS treatment, with most treatments also producing acceptable turf quality. The medium threshold SMS-based treatment s produced water savings and good quality turf during all treatment periods with water sa vings up to 30% (AC) a nd 21% (LL) during dry conditions and 53% (AC) and 31% (LL) during three months with normal rainfall conditions. Low threshold sensor treatments during the S06 produced minimally acceptable turf quality (AC 7) and less than acceptable turf quality (LL Low). In F07, under wetter conditions, the treatments AC 7 and LL Low (which had a higher threshold after S06) reduced water applied by 74% and 44% respectively. High threshold treatments produced li ttle or no savings (between 0 and 14%) during any of the treatment periods. Th e establishment of a proper threshold for the

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63 sensor is extremely important in producing good tu rf quality and water savings at the same time, especially in sandy soil. During three seasons, treatments AC 7 and AC IR had similar weekly water applied. These two treatments had the same threshold se tting; the AC 7 treatment only has one sensor controlling the irrigation for all four plots in the treatment, while AC IR has a separate sensor in each plot. There were differences in turf quality between AC IR and AC 7 during S06 and S07. The average turf quality ratings for the AC 7 tr eatment were a 5.1 (S06) and a 5.8 (S07) while the AC IR plots had an average tu rf quality rating of 6.2 (S06) a nd 6.5 (S07). The range in turf quality for the four plots in the AC 7 treatment we re from 4 to 6 (S06) and from 5 to 7 (S07). To ensure adequate water application the sensor must have the proper threshol d setting for the worst conditions or the driest plot. During F07 the tw o treatments had similar turf quality ratings, but all other treatments during the testing period ha d acceptable turf quality. Utilizing one sensor to control the irrigation for multiple areas can be e ffective as long as the correct location and set point is selected for sensor installation. In this ex ample the driest plot was selected to ensure that adequate irrigation was app lied to all of the plots. The plot for AC 7.2 (located in block 2) had significantly lower turf quality ratings than the other plots during three of the four testing pe riods (S06, F06, and S 07) while applying more water weekly than the other AC IR plots during th ree out of the four testing periods (F06, S07, and F07). In F07, AC 7.2 had the lowest turf quality rating but it wa s not significantly lower than AC 7.1 or AC 7.3. Location attributed to the lower turf quality in the AC 7.2 plot, it was located on the edge of the treatment area, with a non-irrigated area next to it. Turf quality decline in this The turf quality ratings for the ot her three plots (AC 7.1, AC 7.3 and AC 7.4) were all similar during, S06 (P=0.279), F06 (P=0. 261), S07 (P=0.667), and F07 (P=0.055). Also

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64 weekly water applied was simila r among the remaining three trea tment plots for F06 (P=0.067), S07 (P=0.848), and F07 (P=0.163). Rain sensor treatments, excluding DWRS, re duced water by 7% to 24% during the dry treatment periods and by 22% to 30% during F0 7. The RS1-3mm treatment, which had a low threshold on the rain sensor and only one day of the week irrigation scheduling, had less than acceptable turf quality for S06 and in S07 had to be ended early due to loss of turf quality. The RS1-6mm treatment, which only had a 3 mm higher th reshold setting, had acceptable turf quality for all of the treatment periods. Thus, a 6 mm ra in sensor threshold should be considered the minimum for one-day-per-week irrigation frequenc ies. Treatment DWRS consistently had high water savings compared to the other rain sensor treatments, and compared to the medium threshold sensor treatments during every treatment period. Reductions in water applied for this treatment ranged from 36% to 45% for the re latively dry conditions and 53% during F07. ET controllers had water saving ranging from 25% to 63% during F06 and S07. However in S07 treatment ETM produced less than acceptable turf quality due to an inappropriate input parameter setting related to effective rainfall. This input affected the water holding capacity of the soil calculated by the contro ller. This shows the importance of controller set up in enabling the systems to work correctly, both reducing water applied and producing quality turfgrass. During F07, ET controllers had water savings of 59% (ETM) and 62% (TORO) and acceptable turf quality. The water savings for treatments that mainta ined turf quality above a rating of 6 (better than minimally acceptable) during the treatment pe riods when all the technologies were installed are as follows in order from greatest to leas t water savings produced; TORO (25% to 63%), DWRS (42% to 53%), AC 10 (18% to 53%), LL Med (18% to 31%), RS7-3mm (21% to 30%),

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65 RS2-3mm (8% to 28%), RS7-6m m (9% to 23%), AC 13 (10% to 14%) and LL High (0% to 11%). Treatment ETM produced high water savings in S07 (59%) but had poor turf quality (4.5). The low threshold SMS treatments also produced high water savings, but during the S06 period LL Low resulted in an average turf quality rating of 4.2 (63% water savings) and AC 7 had an average turf quality rating of 5. 1 (water savings of 40%). The AC 7 treatment had deteriorating turf quality later in the S06 treatment period. During S07 and F07 the AC 7 treatment had turf quality ratings of 5.8 and 5.9 respective ly along with water savings of 49 and 74%. Overall, the proper installation and set-up of each of the technologies tested here was an important factor in determining the effectiv eness to which each system could reduce water applied and maintain turfgrass quality at a level sufficient for homeowners. Volumetric moisture content threshold was an important factor in co rrectly establishing an ir rigation schedule using an SMS system along with ensuring adequate cont act with soil. For ET controller systems the input parameters affect the amount of water appl ied and the frequency with which it is applied. The input parameters determine things such as wa ter holding capacity of the soil. Rain sensors produced water savings and only one treatment ha d less than acceptable quality. The threshold setting should be set appropriately based on local watering restric tions. With limited allowable days for irrigation the threshold needs to be set adequately so that irrigation is only bypassed when a sufficient amount of water ha s been applied for plant needs.

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66 Table 2-1. Summary of crop coefficients (Kc) used for calculating ETc, developed by Jia et al. (2007). Warm-season turfgrass crop coefficients January 0.35 February 0.37 March 0.57 April 0.83 May 0.90 June 0.77 July 0.73 August 0.72 September 0.69 October 0.65 November 0.60 December 0.46

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67 Table 2-2. Summary of trea tment codes and descriptions. Treatment code Irrigation window frequency (day/week) Treatment description SMS-Based AC 7 2 Acclima set at 7% VWCa AC 10 2 Acclima set at 10% VWC AC 13 2 Acclima set at 13% VWC AC IR 2 Acclima (7%) individually controlled plots LL Low 2 LawnLogic set at low setting b LL Med 2 LawnLogic set at medium setting (#5) LL High 2 LawnLogic set at high settingc ET-Based ETM 2 RainBird ET Manager TORO 2 Toro Intelli-Sense Time-Based RS1-3mm 1 Rain Sensor set at 3mm rainfall threshold RS2-3mm 2 Rain Sensor set at 3mm rainfall threshold RS7-3mm 7 Rain Sensor set at 3mm rainfall threshold RS1-6mm 1 Rain Sensor set at 6mm rainfall threshold RS2-6mm 2 Rain Sensor set at 6mm rainfall threshold RS7-6mm 7 Rain Sensor set at 6mm rainfall threshold DWRS 2 Reduced irrigation sc hedule (60% of RS2-6mm) WOS 2 Without sensor NON 0 Non-irrigated a VWC stands for volumetric water content. b LL Low setting was a #2 for S06 and then changed to #4 for F06, S07 and F07. cLL High had a setting of #8 for S06 and then it was changed to #6 for F06, S07 and F07.

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68 Table 2-3. Monthly total irri gation depth scheduled in order to replace historical ET values based on information by Dukes and Haman (2002b). Run times are based on an irrigation application rate of 5 cm/hr. Month Irrigation depth (mm) Total run time (min/month) 2 d/wk cycle run time (min/event) January 0 0 0 February 0 0 0 March 0 0 0 April 115 136 17 May 183 216 27 June 142 168 21 July 135 160 20 August 176 208 26 September 135 160 20 October 122 144 18 November 88 104 13 December 88 104 13 Total 1184

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69 Table 2-4. Summary of input parameters for the two ET controllers tested (Toro Intelli-Sense and RainBird ET Manager) Input parameter Input TORO Soil type Sand Sprinkler type Spray head Root depth 15.2 cm Plant type Warm-season turfgrass Sun exposure Sunny all day Slope None Usable rainfall 100% Kc 1 Efficiency 95% ETM Landscape adjustment 70% Max hourly rain 2.1 cm Saturation allowance (F06 and S07) 0.91 cm Saturation allowance (F07) 0.25 cm Irrigation amounta depth changed monthly aThe Irrigation Amount used for ETM is the same depth used for RS and SMS treatments based on Dukes and Haman (2002b). This is the irrigation depth schedul ed in the irrigation timer that the ET Manager is connected to.

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70 Table 2-5. Average DUlq and CU values for each treatment Code Description DUl q CU AC 7 Acclima 7% VWC 0.53 0.72 AC 10 Acclima 10% VWC 0.58 0.77 AC 13 Acclima 13% VWC 0.55 0.76 AC IR Acclima 7% VWC ind rep control 0.56 0.75 LL Low Lawn Logic #2 setting 0.61 0.77 LL Med Lawn Logic #5 setting 0.56 0.75 LL High Lawn Logic #8 setting 0.57 0.76 ETM ET Manager controller 0.63 0.79 TORO Toro Intelli-se nse controller 0.63 0.79 RS1-3mm Rain sensor 1 d/wk 3 mm setting 0.50 0.72 RS2-3mm Rain sensor 2 d/wk 3 mm setting 0.54 0.76 RS7-3mm Rain sensor 7 d/wk 3 mm setting 0.60 0.77 RS1-6mm Rain sensor 1 d/wk 6 mm setting 0.46 0.70 RS7-6mm Rain sensor 7 d/wk 6 mm setting 0.49 0.72 WRS Rain sensor 2 d/wk 6 mm setting 0.58 0.74 DWRS 60% of WRS time setting 0.46 0.69 WOS 2 d/wk no RS 0.52 0.73 NON Non-irrigated 0.51 0.73

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71 Table 2-6. Summary of average weekly wate r applied and water savings for each treatment during the four testing periods. Average water applied (mm/week) Water savings (%) compared to WOS Treatment S06 F06 S07 F07 S06 F06 S07 F07 SMS-based AC IR 20 de 11 d 22 c 8 e 32 54 44 75 AC 7 18 e --* 20 c 9 e 40 --* 49 74 AC 10 27 bc 16 c 32 b 14 d 11 30 18 53 AC 13 31 a 21 b 34 b 26 b 0 10 11 14 LL Low 11 f ~ ~ 16 d 63* ~ ~ 44 LL Med 24 cd 20 b 34 b 20 c 21 18 19 31 LL High --39 a 26 b --0 11 WOS 30 ab 24 a 39 a 30 a 0 0 0 0 CV % 34.9 25.9 23.7 42.5 ET-based ETM NA 14 b 15 c 13 b NA 40 59* 59 TORO NA 9 c 29 b 12 b NA 63 25 62 WOS 24 a 39 a 30 a 0 0 0 CV % 37.7 25.5 26.8 RS-based RS1-3mm 20 cd -~ 19 d 33* -~ 29 RS2-3mm 23 b 22 a 33 b 22 bc 22 8 14 28 RS7-3mm 23 bc -31 c 20 cd 24 -21 30 RS1-6mm 24 b -35 b 22 bc 21 -7 30 RS2-6mm 24 b 22 a 35 b 23 b 20 7 10 22 RS7-6mm NA 22 a 33 b 23 b NA 9 16 23 DWRS 19 d 14 b 21 d 14 e 36 42 45 53 WOS 30 a 24 a 39 a 30 a 0 0 0 0 CV % 29.2 23.0 16.2 30.3 Treatment period comparison 23 b 18 c 30 a 19 c CV % 51.4 Different letters (in columns for compar ison of water applied by treatments and within the row for the treatment period comparison) indicate differences by Duncans multiple range test at the 95% confidence level. Treatments that produced less than acceptable turf quality. ~ Treatments that were ended before the treatment period was over. -Treatment s where the irrigation system was malfunctioning. --* In F06 the AC 7 sensor was installed incorre ctly and so did not function properly. NA Treatments that were not installed during S06

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72 Table 2-7. Average turf quality ratings during the four treatment periods. Turf quality is on a scale of 1 to 9, with a 1 representing d ead turfgrass and a 9 representing perfect turfgrass quality. A rating of 5 wa s considered minimally acceptable for homeowners. Average turf quality Treatment S06 F06 S07 F07 SMS-based AC 7 5.1 c --* 5.8 b 5.9 b AC 10 6.2 ab 7.0 a 6.5 a 6.6 ab AC 13 6.3 ab 6.8 a 6.8 a 6.6 ab AC IR 5.7 abc 6.6 ab 5.7 b 6.2 ab LL Low 4.2 d NA NA 6.2 ab LL Med 6.5 a 7.2 a 6.5 a 6.3 ab LL High --6.8 a 6.8 a WOS 5.6 bc 6.1 b 6.5 a 6.3 ab NON 1.4 e ~ ~ 5.0 c CV % 23.0 14.3 11.3 11.9 ET-based ETM NA 7.1 a 4.5 b 5.7 ab TORO NA 6.5 ab 6.1 a 6.4 a WOS 6.1 b 6.5 a 6.3 a NON ~ ~ 5.0 b CV % 16.4 20.6 17.9 RS-based RS1-3mm 4.6 c -~ 6.3 a RS2-3mm 6.0 ab 6.6 ab 6.7 a 6.8 a RS7-3mm 6.2 ab -6.5 a 6.8 a RS1-6mm 5.3 bc -5.8 b 6.2 a RS2-6mm 6.1 ab 5.8 c 6.0 b 6.3 a RS7-6mm NA 6.5 abc 6.8 a 6.9 a DWRS 6.5 a 7.1 a 6.9 a 7.0 a NON 1.4 d ~ ~ 5.0 b WOS 5.6 ab 6.1 bc 6.5 a 6.3 a CV % 28.0 18.9 14.4 16.5 Treatment period comparison+ 5.4 c 6.7 a 6.3 b 6.3 b CV % 22.3 Different letters in columns indicate differences by Duncans multiple range test at the 95% confidence level. ~ Treatments were ended before the treatment period was over. -Treatments where the irrigation system was malfunctioning. --* Indicates the sensor was installed incorrectly. NA Treatments that were not installed during S06. +Treatment period mean comparison was performed within the row.

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73 Table 2-8. Summary of the per centage of irrigation events by passed by the different irrigation control devices. Irrigation events bypassed (%) Treatment S06 F06 S07 F07 SMS-based AC 7 40 --* 49 77 AC 10 15 35 20 54 AC 13 0 13 11 19 AC IR 33 58 45 75 LL Low 60* ~ ~ 42 LL Med 30 17 20 31 LL High --0 12 ET-based ETM NA 52 57* 58 TORO NA 26 9 35 RS-based RS1-3mm 30* -~ 31 RS2-3mm 20 9 14 27 RS7-3mm 27 -21 33 RS1-6mm 20 -0 31 RS2-6mm 20 9 11 23 RS7-6mm NA 21 17 24 DWRS 15 9 11 23 Treatments that produced less than acceptable turf quality. ~ Treatments that were ended before the treatment period was over. -Treatments where the irrigation system was malfunctioning. --* Sensor was installed incorrectly. NA Treatments that were not installed during S06.

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74 Table 2-9. Summary of wa ter applied and turf quality for the f our plots in the AC IR treatment. Average water applied (mm/week) Turf quality (1 to 9 scale) Plot S06 F06 S07 F07 S06 F06 S07 F07 AC 7.1 23.4 a 10.3 b 20.0 a 7.0 b 6.0 a 7.0 a 6.1 a 5.7 ab AC 7.2 22.3 ab 17.8 a 25.9 a 12.1 a 3.8 b 4.8 b 4.6 b 5.3 b AC 7.3 19.7 ab 9.1 b 20.3 a 5.7 b 6.4 a 7.2 a 6.0 a 6.7 ab AC 7.4 16.3 b 6.3 b 19.7 a 8.8 ab 6.6 a 7.3 a 6.1 a 7.0 a CV % 33.5 47.4 41.3 67.2 14.8 7.5 10.0 11.1 Different letters in columns indicate differences by Duncans multiple range test at the 95% confidence level.

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75 Figure 2-1. View of experimental plots located in Citra, FL at the Plant Science Research and Education Unit on July 7, 2007. Control bo ards and irrigation valves are located behind the turfgrass plots on the west side of the test area. E 2122232425 1617181920 N1112131415S 67910 12345 W 8 Turf Figure 2-2. Locations within the turf plot s where volumetric water contents (VWC; %) measurements were taken for soil TDR testing. Small circles at the corner of the plots represent spray heads. This pattern was repeated throughout all 72 plots in the field. The same placement was used for catch cans during DU testing

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76 Dry Condition Rows Columns 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Wet Condition 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 F E D C B A1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Volumetric Water Content (%) Volumetric Water Content (%) NF E D C B A1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12ColumnsRows N A B Figure 2-3. Volumetric water content (VWC; %) measurements throughout the field A) before irrigation and B) after irrigation. The colo r scale moves from red (dry locations) to dark blue (wet locations).

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77 XXXX XXXX XXXX XXXX Block 1Block 2Block 3Block 4 A B C D E F 123456 1112 N 78910 Figure 2-4. Locations for soil sampling marked with an X throughout th e experimental area. There were four locations in each block. Pressure (cm H20) 100101102103104105 Volumetric water content 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 Block 1 Block 2 Block 3 Block 4 Figure 2-5. Water retention curves of soils throughout research area at two depths in the soil profile A) 7.5 cm and B) 15 cm. A B

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78 0 10 20 30 40 1234 BlockVWC (%) 7.5 cm 15 cm 0 10 20 30 40 1234 BlockVWC (%) 7.5 cm 15 cm Figure 2-6. Range of A) field capacity (FC) and B) permanent wilting point (PWP) values found throughout the field site and w ithin blocks. Columns represent the average value for the parameters at depths of 7.5 cm (dia gonal fill) and 15 cm (g ray fill) respectively and bars represent the extreme values in a block and. A B

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79 Block 1234 Available water (mm) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Figure 2-7. Mean values for available water ar e shown for each block in the field based on a 30 cm root depth. Bars show the maximum a nd minimum range of the values within in each block. Figure 2-8. Placement of catch cans for uniformity testing on 12 plots.

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80 Figure 2-9. Installation of the CS616 Water Content Reflectometer (left) and the Acclima Digital TDT sensor (right).

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81 A B C Figure 2-10. Pictures of turf grass plots at the research si te on 10/5/2006. These three plots represent typical turf quality ra tings of (A) 2 (B) 5 and (C) 8.

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82 Figure 2-11. Image of 2 control boards with irrigation timers, SMS and ET controllers, and rain sensors. A B Figure 2-12. Pictures showing the SMS and ET controllers along with the irrigation timers. Shown in picture A are 1) the Toro Inte lli-Sense ET controller, 2) the LawnLogic SMS controller, 3) the RainBird ET Manager ET controller and 4) an irrigation timer. Shown in picture B are 1) the Acclima SMS controllers and 2) an irrigation timer. 1 2 3 4 1 2

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83 A0.580.540.560.570.580.550.520.610.590.620.630.5 B0.480.590.550.550.550.560.540.550.570.530.470.49 C0.560.520.580.630.390.480.430.470.450.310.290.29 D0.50.550.430.530.540.430.450.560.570.560.50.3 E0.570.560.630.560.560.560.560.630.580.610.50.62 F0.540.630.650.680.690.660.680.710.670.690.670.72 123456789101112 N Block 1 Block 3Block 4 Block 2 Figure 2-13. Plot Plan with DUlq values for each plot shown

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84 JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec 0 5 10 15 Cumulative depth (mm) 0 200 400 600 2007 Hist. Number of days with rain greater than 2.5 cm 5 10 15 200 400 600 2006 Hist. A B Figure 2-14. Number of days receiving ra in events with a depth grea ter than 2.5 mm and total cu mulative rainfall for 2006 and 2007 compared to historical values. The S06 treatment includes the months of May and June of 2006, F06 includes September through December 2006, S07 includes May through August 2007 and F07 includes September through November 2007.

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85 4/24 5/8 5/22 6/5 6/19 Rain events (mm) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Cumulative Depth (mm) 0 100 200 300 400 500 Rain event Cumulative Rain ETc 9/25 10/9 10/23 11/6 11/20 12/4 Rain events (mm) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Cumulative Depth (mm) 0 100 200 300 400 500 month/day 5/7 5/28 6/18 7/9 7/30 8/20 Rain events (mm) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Cumulative Depth (mm) 0 100 200 300 400 500 month/day 9/3 9/24 10/15 11/5 11/26 Rain events (mm) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Cumulative Depth (mm) 0 100 200 300 400 500 A B C D Figure 2-15. Comparison of rain and calculate d ETc during the four experimental treatmen t periods A) S06, B) F06, C) S07 and D ) F07. Dotted lines show the cumulative ETc while the solid lin e indicates cumulative rainfall. Bars represent individual rainfall event

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86 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 4/205/35/165/296/116/24 month/dayVWC (%)0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80Rain (mm) Figure 2-16. Volumetric water content (VWC; %) and rainfall (top of the graph) in a nonirrigated plot located in block 2 of the research field during S06.

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87 150 300 450 RS 2-6mm DWRS WOS 150 300 450 AC 10 LL Med WOS 150 300 450 TORO ETM WOS Month/Day 9/25 10/9 10/23 11/6 11/20 12/4 Cumulative depth (mm) 0 15 30 45 60 75 Daily rainfall (mm) 0 100 200 300 400 Rain events Rain A B C D Figure 2-17. Cumulative irrigati on applied during F06 by treatments A) AC 10 and LL Med, B) TORO and ETM, and C) RS2-6mm and DWRS compared to WOS. Total cumulative rainfall and daily rainfall are also shown (D).

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88 150 300 450 AC 7 AC 7.1 AC 7.2 AC 7.3 AC 7.4 150 300 450 AC 7 ACIR Average Month/Day 4/24 5/8 5/22 6/5 6/19 Cumulative depth (mm) 0 15 30 45 60 75 Daily rainfall (mm) 0 100 200 300 400 Rain events Rain A B C Figure 2-18. Cumulative irrigati on water applied during S06 by trea tments A) AC 7 (sensor in block 2), AC 7.1, AC 7.2, AC 7.3 and AC7.4 and, B) AC 7 and AC IR average. Total cumulative rainfall and daily rainfall are al so shown (C). Treatments AC 7.1 through AC 7.4 are the four plots that constitute the AC IR treatment.

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89 150 300 450 RS 1-3mm RS 2-3mm RS 7-3mm WOS 150 300 450 RS 1-6mm RS 2-6mm WOS DWRS Month/Day 4/24 5/8 5/22 6/5 6/19 Cumulative depth (mm) 0 15 30 45 60 75 Daily rainfall (mm) 0 100 200 300 400 Rain events Rain A B C Figure 2-19. Cumulative irrigati on applied during S06 by treatm ents A) RS1-3mm, RS2-3mm, RS7-3mm and, B) RS1-6mm, RS2-6mm and DWRS. Total cumulative rainfall and daily rainfall are also shown (C).

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90 150 300 450 AC10 AC13 WOS 150 300 450 LL Med WOS Month/Day 9/25 10/9 10/23 11/6 11/20 12/4 Cumulative depth (mm) 0 15 30 45 60 75 Daily rainfall (mm) 0 100 200 300 400 Rain events Rain A B C Figure 2-20. Cumulative irrigati on applied during F06 by treatments A) AC 10 and AC 13 and B) LL Med. Total cumulative rainfall and daily rainfall are also shown (C). Treatment AC 7 was not included due to impr oper installation of the sensor at the beginning of the treatment period. Tr eatment LL Low was excluded because the treatment was ended early sue to poor tu rf quality. The LL High treatment had an error in the setting of the irrigation schedule and so the treatment was also excluded.

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91 150 300 450 AC 7.1 AC 7.2 AC 7.3 AC 7.4 150 300 450 ACIR Average Month/Day 9/25 10/9 10/23 11/6 11/20 12/4 Cumulative depth (mm) 0 15 30 45 60 75 Daily rainfall (mm) 0 100 200 300 400 Rain events Rain A B C Figure 2-21. Cumulative irrigation applied during F06 by treatments A) AC 7.1, AC 7.2, AC 7.3 and AC7.4, and B) AC IR average. Tota l cumulative rainfall and daily rainfall are also shown (C). AC 7.1, AC 7.2, AC 7.3 a nd AC 7.4 are the four plots that constitute the AC IR treatment. Treatment AC 7 wa s not included due to improper installation of the sensor at the beginning of the treatment period.

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92 150 300 450 RS 2-3mm WOS 150 300 450 RS 2-6mm RS 7-6mm WOS DWRS Month/Day 9/25 10/9 10/23 11/6 11/20 12/4 Cumulative depth (mm) 0 15 30 45 60 75 Daily rainfall (mm) 0 100 200 300 400 Rain events Rain A B C Figure 2-22. Cumulative irriga tion applied during F06 by trea tments A) RS2-3mm, B) RS26mm, RS7-6mm and DWRS. Total cumulative rainfall and daily rainfall are also shown (C). Three rain sensor treatmen ts were excluded (RS1-3mm, RS1-6mm, and RS7-3mm) due to a loss of power to the irrigation timer for these treatments

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93 150 300 450 TORO ETM WOS Month/Day 9/25 10/9 10/23 11/6 11/20 12/4 Cumulative depth (mm) 0 15 30 45 60 75 Daily rainfall (mm) 0 100 200 300 400 Rain events Rain A B Figure 2-23. Cumulative irrigati on applied during F06 by treatments A) TORO and ETM. Total cumulative rainfall and daily rainfall are also shown (B).

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94 150 300 450 600 750 AC 7 AC 10 AC 13 WOS 150 300 450 600 750 LL Med LL High WOS Month/Day 5/7 5/28 6/18 7/9 7/30 8/20 Cumulative depth (mm) 0 15 30 45 60 75 Daily rainfall (mm) 0 100 200 300 400 Rain events Rain A B C Figure 2-24. Cumulative irrigati on applied during S07 by treatments A) AC 7, AC 10 and AC 13 and B) LL Med and LL High. Total cumula tive rainfall and daily rainfall are also shown (C). Treatment LL Low was ended ear ly in the treatment period due to poor turf quality.

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95 150 300 450 600 750 AC 7 AC 7.1 AC 7.2 AC 7.3 AC 7.4 6/1 7/1 8/1 150 300 450 600 750 AC 7 ACIR Average Month/Day 5/7 5/28 6/18 7/9 7/30 8/20 Cumulative depth (mm) 0 15 30 45 60 75 Daily rainfall (mm) 0 100 200 300 400 Rain events Rain A B C Figure 2-25. Cumulative irrigati on applied during S07 by treatments A) AC 7 (sensor in block 2), AC 7.1, AC 7.2, AC 7.3 and AC7.4 B) AC 7 and AC IR average. Total cumulative rainfall and daily rainfall are al so shown (C). AC 7.1 through AC 7.4 are the four plots that consti tute the AC IR treatment.

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96 Month/Day 5/7 5/14 5/21 5/28 VWC (%) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 A12 B01 B08 C06 Figure 2-26. Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for RS1-3mm plots before supplemental irrigation was applied during S07 treatment period.

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97 150 300 450 600 750 RS 2-3mm RS 7-3mm WOS 6/1 7/1 8/1 150 300 450 600 750 RS 1-6mm RS 2-6mm RS 7-6mm WOS DWRS Month/Day 5/7 5/28 6/18 7/9 7/30 8/20 Cumulative depth (mm) 0 15 30 45 60 75 Daily rainfall (mm) 0 100 200 300 400 Rain events Rain A B C Figure 2-27. Cumulative irriga tion applied during S07 by trea tments A) RS2-3mm, RS7-3mm B) RS1-6mm, RS2-6mm, RS7-6mm and DWRS Total cumulative rainfall and daily rainfall are also shown (C). Treatment RS 1-3mm was ended early due to poor turf quality.

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98 6/1 7/1 8/1 150 300 450 600 750 TORO ETM DWRS WOS Month/Day 5/7 5/28 6/18 7/9 7/30 8/20 Cumulative depth (mm) 0 15 30 45 60 75 Daily rainfall (mm) 0 100 200 300 400 Rain events Rain A B Figure 2-28. Cumulative irrigation applied du ring S07 by treatments A) TORO, ETM and DWRS. Total cumulative rainfall and daily rainfall are also shown B).

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99 150 300 450 AC 7 AC 10 AC 13 WOS 150 300 450 LL Low LL Med LL High WOS Month/Day 9/3 9/17 10/1 10/15 10/29 11/12 11/26 Cumulative depth (mm) 0 15 30 45 60 75 Daily rainfall (mm) 0 100 200 300 400 Rain events Rain A B C Figure 2-29. Cumulative irrigati on applied during F07 by treatments A) AC 7, AC 10 and AC 13 and B) LL Low, LL Med and LL High. Tota l cumulative rainfall and daily rainfall are also shown C).

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100 150 300 450 AC 7 AC 7.1 AC 7.2 AC 7.3 AC 7.4 150 300 450 AC 7 ACIR Average Month/Day 9/3 9/17 10/1 10/15 10/29 11/12 11/26 Cumulative depth (mm) 0 15 30 45 60 75 Daily rainfall (mm) 0 100 200 300 400 Rain events Rain A B C Figure 2-30. Cumulative irrigati on applied during F07 by treatments A) AC 7 (sensor in block 2), AC 7.1, AC 7.2, AC 7.3 and AC7.4 B) AC 7 and AC IR average. Total cumulative rainfall and daily rainfall are al so shown C). AC 7.1 through AC 7.4 are the four plots that consti tute the AC IR treatment.

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101 150 300 450 RS 1-3mm RS 2-3mm RS 7-3mm WOS 150 300 450 RS 1-6mm RS 2-6mm RS 7-6mm WOS DWRS Month/Day 9/3 9/17 10/1 10/15 10/29 11/12 11/26 Cumulative depth (mm) 0 15 30 45 60 75 Daily rainfall (mm) 0 100 200 300 400 Rain events Rain A B C Figure 2-31. Cumulative irrigati on applied during F07 by treatm ents A) RS1-3mm, RS2-3mm, RS7-3mm B) RS1-6mm, RS2-6mm, RS7-6m m and DWRS. Total cumulative rainfall and daily rainfall are also shown C).

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102 150 300 450 TORO ETM DWRS WOS Month/Day 9/3 9/17 10/1 10/15 10/29 11/12 11/26 Cumulative depth (mm) 0 15 30 45 60 75 Daily rainfall (mm) 0 100 200 300 400 Rain events Rain A B Figure 2-32. Cumulative irrigation applied du ring F07 by treatments A) TORO, ETM and DWRS. Total cumulative rainfall and daily rainfall are also shown B).

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103 CHAPTER 3 SOIL MOISTURE SENSOR IRRIGATION C ONTROL PERFORMANCE AND ACCURACY Introduction There are various ways to measure soil moistu re content including both direct and indirect methods. Direct methods, such as gravimetric measurements obtained by taking soil samples, tend to be more disruptive to the soil and do not provide instantaneous m easurements. Indirect methods, such as soil moisture sensors, can obtain instant information concerning the soil moisture present without disturbing the soil. Soil moisture sensors measure water content in the soil using either tensiometric or volumetric methods. Tensiometric sensors estimate soil water by measuring capillary effects in the soil as wate r moves in and out of th e soil profile. Some volumetric sensors are designed to estimate soil water content based on the dielectric constant of the soil (Muoz-Carpena et al., 2005). Volumetric Soil Moisture Sensors The relationship between the dielectric cons tant and the volumetric water content (VWC; reported as volume of water per volume of sample in this chapter) of soil was demonstrated by Topp et al. (1980). The dielectric constant is dependent on the type, composition and the moisture content of the soil. Soil is a composite material consisting of water, air and minerals and each of these components affect the dielectric constant of the soil as a whole. The dielectric constant of the soil increases as the water content of the soil increases, this is due to the fact that the dielectric constant of water is much larger (Ka = 81) then the other soil components (Ka = 2-5 for minerals and 1 for air) and so the presence of water in the soil profile has a much stronger impact on the dielectric constant compared to ot her properties of the soil (Muoz-Carpena et al., 2005).

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104 Soil moisture sensor irrigation controllers consis t of one or more sensors and a controller. In many brands, the controller is a separate attachment to the time clock. In some brands, the controller is embedded within a si ngle control package that has time clock functionality. In a bypass configuration (Dukes, 2005), soil moisture based irrigation contro llers use the reading from a soil moisture sensor to bypass time-based ir rigation events if the moisture content at the beginning of the irrigation event is higher than a pre-set threshold value for moisture content. A single sensor can be used to set the irrigation for many zones or more than one sensor can be used to irrigate multiple zones. In the case of one sensor for several zones, the zone that is typically driest, or most in need of irrigation, should be selected for place ment of the sensor in order to ensure the entire irrigated area is provided with adequate irrigation. Previous studies have shown that soil moistu re sensors are an eff ective tool for reducing the amount of residential water used for landscape irrigation. Ca rdenas-Lailhacar et al. (2008) found that water savings for three commercially avai lable soil moisture se nsors ranged from 69% to 92% without adversely affecting turf quality in bermudagrass ( Cynodon dactylon ). One sensor tested in the study did not perform as we ll as the other three sensors tested saving between 27 and 53%. This study was performed in Gainesv ille, FL in a field se tting during rainy weather with rainfall frequency that was normal for that region. Soil moisture sensor controllers have show n the potential for water conservation when installed in the field. Allen (1997) performed a one year study in Utah looking at soil moisture based control systems in a reside ntial setting. A total of 27 homes had sensors installed and water applied was compared with 39 homes without sensors. Th e homes with sensors installed used 10% less water than the homes in the contro l group while maintaining adequate turf quality. The homes with sensor also had a 10% reduction in water use compared to their previous water

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105 use in 1994 and 1995. Researchers in the project us ed a hands off approach to observe results when the homeowners were allowed to operate the system on their own. A study conducted in Pinellas County, FL from June 2006 to March 2 007 found that homes with soil moisture sensors installed applied 51% less water compared to homes that used only a time-clock to control irrigation (Haley and Dukes, 2007). Qualls et al. (2001) noted, dur ing a 1997 study involving homeowners in Colorado, that homeowners and la ndscape contractors were reluctant to use soil moisture sensors due to concerns with the possible life expectancy and difficulty of use of the devices. The study was performed using granular matrix soil moisture sensors which were installed for three years in 23 s ites. During the three year proj ect no sensors had to be replaced and researchers reported time required for the initi al installations was minimal. Compared to theoretical water requirement the sensors re duced water applied by an average of 73%. The accuracy of soil moisture sensors affects the ability of the sensor to produce water savings without damage to the turf grass. Ideally, the sensors allow irrigation when soil moisture reaches a specified threshold. If there is erro r present in the VWC reading of the soil this can affect the threshold at which irrigation is allowed. Sensor readings that are lower than actual VWC could lead to excessive water application. If the reading of the sensor is higher than actual conditions this could cause irriga tion to be bypassed too often, po ssibly causing damage to turf quality. The difference between the actual VWC a nd the SMS reading is equal to half the width of the confidence interval of the sensor (Schmitz and Sourell, 2000). Schmitz and Sourell (2000) looked at the vari ability in soil moisture measurements made by three types of soil moisture sensors, TDR, gr anular matrix (GMS), an d electrical conductivity (EC). Twenty five sensors of each type were buried in loamy sand under turf at 15 cm and readings were taken daily for ten weeks. The widt h of the confidence interval for each of the soil

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106 moisture sensors was calculated using the mean absolute deviation of the measurements. The findings showed that the mean absolute deviatio n within the data from the various sensors was up to 16% of the depth of available water, lead ing to the need for multiple sensors to ensure adequate irrigation scheduling. The largest scatte r was seen in the data collected using the EC sensors. A study conducted by Blonquist et al. (2005) comp ared performance characteristics of the Acclima Digital TDT sensor with two TDR sensor s. The study showed that all of the sensors operated within permittivity (or dielectric constant) units of each other, with a testing permittivity range of 9-80. They also saw that the frequency of the TDT sensor was similar to that of the TDRs. In additional testing on th e Acclima Digital TDT, Blonquist et al. (2006) found that plots where irrigation was scheduled based on ET applied 16% more water than plots controlled by the TDT system. The TDT system reduced water applied by 53% when compared to a fixed irrigation rate of 55 mm/month. The researchers also used the HYDRUS-2D numerical simulation model to predict water conten t in the soil. The modeling showed that the TDT system applied water so that there was no drainage below the estimated root zone (30 cm). This study was conducted on Kentucky bluegrass ( Poa pratensis L.) with silt loam soil in Utah over a period of 49 days during th e months of August and Septembe r. The sensor was connected to an Acclima CS3500 controller (Acclima Inc., Meridian, ID) which uses two soil moisture thresholds one to initiate irrigation (during times specified by the user) and one to stop irrigation. Tensiometers Tensiometers estimate the amount of water pr esent in soil by meas uring the energy that would be required by the plant to extract water from the soil. These sensors consist of a porous ceramic cup connected to a vacuum gauge and thes e are attached by rigid tubing which is filled

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107 with water (Or, 2001). Tensiometers have co mmonly been used for agricultural purposes, assisting farmers to make ir rigation scheduling decisions. Some research has been performed concerni ng the use of switching tensiometers for irrigation control purposes on tu rfgrass. One study by Augustin and Snyder (1984) looked at the use of these devices for irriga tion on Tifgreen Bermudagrass ( Cynodon dactylon C. transvaalensis) with sandy soil cond itions. The researchers found th at water savings of between 42 to 95% were achieved in south Florida using th e switching tensiometers compared to turfgrass maintained using typical golf cour se fairway management practices. To measure the moisture content of soil, the porous cup of the tensiometer is buried in the soil at a particular measurement depth. For ir rigation purposes the cup should be placed in the root zone of the plant. The ceramic cup allows water to move through it into unsaturated soil until the pressure in the tensiometer equilibrates with the pressure in the soil. The suction that is formed in the tensiometer due to the movement of water is equal to the matric potential of the soil (Or, 2001). Irrigators using tensiometers usually select a maximum depletion allowed based on the soil water characteristic curve and wh en the soil water conten t reaches the allowed depletion, irrigation is applied. Optimally irriga tion is applied so as to bring the soil moisture content of the soil up to field capacity (FC). Field capacity is the soil water content left in the soil after gravity drainage has occurred and it is based on the texture and st ructure of the soil. Typically field capacity for sandy soils is based on the soil moisture content when the matric potential is 10 kPa (Obreza et al., 1997). The permanent wilting point (PWP) is the soil water c ontent at which no water is available to the plant and is equal to a matric potential of 1,500 kPa (Haman and Izuno, 1993; Paramasivam,

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108 2000). Water-filled tensiometers onl y measure matric poten tials that are in th e range of 0 to -85 kPa (Mullins, 2001). The objective of this research was to eval uate the accuracy and effectiveness of two commercially available soil moisture sensors when considering: i.) the VWC at which the different SMS controllers bypass timed irrigation events compared to the set point used on the controller and ii) the ab solute soil VWC corresponding to readi ngs of a relative soil moisture sensor controller. Materials and Methods Field Testing This study was performed at the Plant Scienc e Research and Education Unit in Citra, Florida. There were four treatment periods during 22 April 2006 to 30 June 2006 (S06), 23 September 2006 to 15 December 2006 (F06) and 1 May 2007 to 31 August 2007 (S07) and 1 September 2007 to 30 November 2007 (F07). The e xperimental area is shown in Figures 2-1, the SMS controllers and the irrigation timer set is shown in Figures 2-10 and 2-11. The three mapped soil types present in the research ar ea are Tavares sand, Candler sand, and Arredondo fine sand (Loamy, siliceous, semiactive, hyperthermic Grossarenic Paleudults) (USDA, 2006). Soil testing was performed at th e research area to develop values for FC and PWP at the research site (see Soil Physical Properties, Ch apter 2). Figure 2-6 s hows the range of field capacities and permanent wilt ing points within the field and in each block. Both field capacity and permanent wilting point values increase mo ving across the field from west to east (moving from block 1 to block 4) as seen in Figure 2-6 (s ee Chapter 2). Due to the variation in soil water holding capacity across the field, the experimental treatments in the field were in a randomized block design. Blocks were established west to ea st, with the easternmost end of the field (block

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109 3 and 4) having the highest soil water holding capacity and the blocks to the west having the lowest water holding capacity (blocks 1 and 2). Two commercially available soil moisture sensors were tested: Acclima Digital TDT RS500 (Acclima Inc., Meridian, ID.) and the LawnLogic LL1004 (Alpine Automation, Inc., Aurora, CO.). Each soil moisture sensor (SMS) based system was tested at three different volumetric moisture content thresh olds. The three VWC threshold settings were considered low (dry), medium, and high (wet) VWC conditions. The settings for the Acclima Digital TDT sensors were 7%, 10%, and 13% VWC. The Lawn Logic, which uses site specific calibration methods, was set for relative low, medium and high levels of moisture cont ent in the soil. The manufacturers suggest calibration 24 hours after a significant rainfall or irrigation event that fills the soil profile to field capacity. Once the calibration is performed, the controller has relative set points from 1 (dry) to 9 (wet). During calibration at field capacity, the sensor measured VWC is equated with a setting of 5 on the controller. The settings used as experi mental treatments were 2, 5 and 8 for S06 and 4, 5 and 6 for all other testing periods. Six of the SMS treatments utilized one sensor buried in the driest plot to control the irrigation for all plots in the treat ment. All of these sensors were placed in the same block, which was selected based on soil moisture testing c onducted previous to the experiment. One treatment, AC IR (threshold of 7%), was set up with each plot having its own sensor controlling the irrigation. These sensors were placed throug hout the field, with one in each block. Acclima sensors were installed horizontally at a depth of 8 cm and the LawnLogic sensors were buried with rods placed vertically with the top of the rods buried at a depth of 6 cm. Soil moisture sensors were connected to an irrigation timer to function in bypass mode operation so that a scheduled irrigation event w ould be bypassed if soil moisture exceeded the

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110 soil moisture sensor threshold. The monthly irrigation schedule was based on recommendations for two-day-per-week operation by Dukes and Hama n (2002b) and is presented in Table 2-3. The two-day-per-week operation was used to emulate typical water restrictions in Florida. An additional treatment, WOS (without sensor) was established to monitor turf quality combined with water applied in plots irrigated twice weekly with the same schedule as the SMS treatments but without any cont rol device. The final treatmen t was NON (non-irrigated) which was established as the control treatment r eceiving no irrigation. Treatment codes and descriptions are summarized in Table 3-1. Water use was monitored using flow meters as discussed in Chapter 2. These flow meters were used to determine daily when irrigation wa s allowed or bypassed. The timing of irrigation events was compared to soil moisture data co llected using time doma in reflectometry (TDR) sensors (CS616 Water Content Reflectometer, Ca mpbell Scientific, Logan, UT). Measurements made with the TDR probes are accurate +/-2.5% VWC (Campbell Scientif ic, Inc., 2006). These sensors were connected to a CR-10X datalogger. The TDR sensors were buried in the center of every plot with the top of the sens or at a depth of 8 cm and the bo ttom of the sensor at a depth of 18 cm. Figure 2-8 shows the burial of sensors in an experimental pl ot (see Chapter 2). Volumetric water content readings were ta ken from the Acclima Digital TDT RS500 controllers three times a week. Date and hour the readings were taken were recorded at the same time. These values were used for later comparisons with TDR data recorded for the plot in which each sensor was buried. Turfgrass quality was rated at least once ever y two weeks during S06 and F06 and at least once a month during S07 and F07 based on NTEP procedures described in Chapter 2.

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111 Statistical analyses were performed on the fiel d collected data using Statistical Analysis System software (SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, NC ) using the General Linear and Mixed models, proc GLM and proc MIXED. Duncans Multip le Range Test was used to perform means separation and the differences between means fo r pairwise comparisons were performed with least-squares means. Water applied was an alyzed weekly for each treatment period. Laboratory Testing Additional testing was performed on the LawnLogic LL1004 (Alpine Automation, Inc., Aurora, CO.) in the Water Resources Lab at the University of Florida Agricultural and Biological Engineering Department Gainesville, Florida. The testing was performed from 2 February 2007 to 8 March 2007. Arredondo fi ne sand (loamy, siliceous, semiactive, hyperthermic Grossarenic Paleudults) (USDA, 2006) soil profiles were collected and were hand packed into three PVC cylinders 0.30 m high and 0.285 m in diameter The total volume of these cylinders was 19.1 L and packing wa s intended to mimic the bulk density of soil in the field. The base of the cylinders was comprised of a ceram ic plate that allowed su ction to be applied to the bottom of the soil column using a vacuum pu mp. All of the buckets were connected using the one suction line. Suction was applie d a maximum of ten minutes at a time. Water content of the soil in the buckets wa s measured using two different methods and used to develop soil water characteristic curves. Three MLT-RSU model tensiometers (Irrometer Company, Inc., Rivers ide, CA) and one capacitance ECH2O probe (Decagon Devices, Inc., Pullman, WA) were used in each bucket. Photos of experimental set up are shown in Figures 3-1 and 3-2. The documented accuracy of the tensiometers used is +/1.2 kPa. Soil moisture content measured by the ECH2O probes was recorded by a HOBO Micro Station data logger (Onset Computer Corporation, Bourne, MA). The ECH2O probes were buried at a depth of 5.0 cm to 8.9 cm horizontally with the thin edge oriented horizontally to prevent pooling of

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112 water on the flat surface of the probe. The tensiome ters were buried vertically with the top of the ceramic cup at depth of 6 cm. Data was collect ed from the tensiometers (Irrometer Company, Inc., Riverside, Calif.). All sens ors were buried so that the center of the sensor was located at a depth of 8 cm ( 0.5 cm). Each PVC cylinder contained one LawnLogic LL1004 (Alpine Automation, Inc., Aurora, CO). LawnLogic sensors were buried at a 45 degree angle with the top of the sensor at 6 cm and the bottom of the sensor was at 10 cm (Figure 3-2). LawnLogic sensor s were calibrated after saturating the buckets and applying a vacuum to each bucket. Soil water tension and VWC in the buckets at the time of calibration are shown in Figure 3-3. After calibration soil profiles were saturated again and readings were taken as the soil profile dried. Suction was applied for ten minutes on 2/2/2007 and for five minutes on 2/5/2007 and 2/6/2007 to bring the soil water content closer to field capacity. No suction was applied after LawnLogi c sensors began reacting to soil moisture conditions. Due to the rela tive calibration and output method of LawnLogic sensors, testing of whether or not the controller w ould bypass irrigation was the only way to evaluate current soil moisture content. These va lues were on the 1 to 9 relative scale or dry to wet. The recordings were then compared to soil moisture content readings measured by the tensiometers and the GMS sensors. Results and Discussion Field Testing Rainfall Three of the four treatment periods were relatively dry compared to historical rainfall for the research area (see Chapter 2, Figure 2-13). Du ring these testing periods total rainfall depths were less than half of the values of the historical rainfall received. Infrequent rainfall events and below average rainfall amounts led to dry conditi ons for the research site. The number of days

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113 per month with a rainfall event with a depth gr eater than 2.5 mm was fewer than the monthly historical averages for every time period except in F07 (see Chapter 2, Figure 2-13). During October 2007 there were 60 percent more rainy days than the hist orical average. Overall the treatment periods S06, F06 and S07 can be consid ered drier than normal fo r the testing area both in frequency of rainfall events and total depth received by the area. Sensor performance and accuracy SMS controllers are designed to be programmed with a threshold and if VWC is above that threshold than irrigation is always bypassed or when VWC is below that threshold the irrigation is always allowed. This would ensure adequate water in the soil for pl ant needs as long as the proper threshold was selected for the soil type. According to TDR collected soil moisture data there is a range in VWC values where SMS contro llers will bypass irrigati on. In this section TDR collected soil moisture data is correlated with the occurrence of irrigation for each plot to determine the range in VWC values over which the soil moisture sensors allowed or bypassed irrigation and with what accuracy and predictabil ity. The range is shown graphically in Figures 3-4 through 3-19 as a shaded region. The uppe r bound of the region is the highest VWC at which the controller allows i rrigation and the lower bound of th e region is the lowest VWC at which the controller bypasses irrigation. Ideal ly, there would be no range or shaded region because the irrigated events occur when VWC is lower than the VWC at which events are bypassed and the delineation between the bypassed and irrigated events will be the programmed threshold of the SMS controller. There is only a value for range when the irrigated event occurs at a VWC greater than the bypassed event. A su mmary of the range for each sensor tested during the four testing periods is provided in Table 3-3. Ten sensors were tested in S06 (7 Acclim a and 3 Lawn Logic). Figure 3-4 shows the volumetric water content and the scheduled irrigation events, both bypassed and allowed, of the

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114 AC IR treatment. The percentage of irrigati on events bypassed by the AC IR sensors ranged from 25 to 40%. TDR data showed that the sens ors bypassed events at similar water contents (67%) even though they produced different water savings ranging from 22 to 45% due to the different number of events bypassed. Differences in the number of irrigation events bypassed by the individual AC IR sensors ar e due to the inherent differences in soil moisture content across the field. Prior to testing, analysis showed th at the soil in the eastern end of the experimental area had higher water holding capacities than the western end of the field. Blocks of treatments were established in the field from west to east. The four replications of the AC IR treatment had similar depths of weekly water application (Table 2-9; P=0.1 12). The AC 7 sensor bypassed 40% of the scheduled irrigation ev ents (Table 3-2). Both the AC 7 controller and all of the AC IR controllers bypassed irrigation when the VWC was within of 7% VWC (Figures 3-4 and 35). Average weekly water applied between the AC 7 and AC IR treatments was similar during the S06 season, with AC IR applying only 2. 5 mm/wk more water (Table 2-6; P=0.151). The AC 10 sensor bypassed three irrigation even ts (Figure 3-6), which all occurred when soil moisture content was at 12% VWC or higher. Conversely, when th e soil moisture content was 11% or lower, irrigation was allowed. AC 13 did not bypass any irrigation events during the testing period; this was due to the fact that VWC in the plot with the sensor was never above 11% at the time of irrigation. The LawnLogic sensors did not bypass irrigatio n as predictably as the Acclima sensors during the S06 testing period. The range of VWC values at whic h the LL treatment sensors did not bypass irrigation was larger than the AC tr eatments. The LL Low sensor bypassed irrigation events when the soil VWC was as low as 5% and allowed irrigation when the VWC was as high as 10%. The range of the LL Low sensor can be seen graphically in Figure 3-5 alongside the

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115 range for the AC 7 sensor. The AC 7 sensor ac ted more predictably; th e highest VWC at which the SMS system allowed irrigation was 9.3% a nd the lowest VWC when irrigation was bypassed was 8.4%. The LL Med sensor bypassed 35% of the irrigation events (Table 3-2). The lowest VWC that sensor bypassed irrigation for was 7% and the highest the VWC at which the sensor allowed irrigation was 10% (Figure 3-6). LL High bypassed 10% of the scheduled irrigation events when the VWC was at 10% or 11% but allowed other irrigation events when the VWC was as high as 13% (Figure 3-7). All of th e LawnLogic treatments bypassed more irrigation events during the S06 treatments than the comparable Acclima treatments. In total, seven sensors were tested over the F06 treatment period (6 Acclima and 1 LawnLogic). The LL Low sensor bypassed all of th e first four irrigation events during the first two weeks of the experiment, and during that tim e the VWC fell as low as 4%. Due to the low VWC, turfgrass quality declined and the treatment was ended in order to prevent total loss of the turfgrass. The threshold setting was adjusted (increased from a 2 to a 4) before F06 due to damage to turf quality during the S06 treatment period. Even after increasing the threshold setting, which should increase the soil moistu re content at which the controller will bypass irrigation, irrigation still had to be applied to prevent death of th e turfgrass. The AC IR sensors produced similar results in F06 compared to S06. The percentage of irrigation events bypassed by these sensors ranged from 30 to 74%, but th ese events were bypassed when VWC was close to 7% (.6%; Figure 3-8). The highest VWC valu e for all four controll ers at which irrigation was allowed was 7.3% and the lowest VWC at which irrigation was bypassed was 6.3%. The medium threshold AC treatment (AC 10) bypassed eight irrigation events (35% of the total number of events) all when the soil VWC was at 12% or higher prior to i rrigation (Figure 3-9). There was no range for this treatment during th e F06 time period, because the irrigated events

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116 never occurred at a VWC higher than that of any events that were bypassed. The AC 10 controller was set to bypass irrigation when VW C was greater than 10% and according to TDR data irrigation was allowed at VWC values of up to 11%. The sensor for treatment AC 13 bypassed three irrigation ev ents (13% of the scheduled irriga tion events) when the soil VWC was at 12% or higher prior to irrigation events (Fig ure 3-10). LL Med bypassed four of the scheduled irrigation events (17% of the total possible ir rigation events) compared to AC 10 which bypassed eight irrigation events. The lowest VWC when irrigation wa s bypassed by LL Med was 8% and there was an irrigation event that was allowed by the controller when VWC was at 10% (Figure 3-9). During S07 nine sensors were tested (7 Acclima and 2 Lawn Logic). The LL Low (setting of 4) treatment was ended on 5/21 due to poor turf quality. From the start of the treatment period (5/2) until 5/21 the sensor had bypassed four ir rigation events and allowed one. With little rainfall the soil VWC dropped as low as 3 to 4% in some of the plots (Figure 3-11). The range in VWC over which the LL Low controller bypassed irrigation for the two weeks where the treatment was allowed to run was 2.0%. The AC IR sensors bypassed between 34 and 49% of the scheduled irrigation events and, considering all the sensors, the lowest VWC at which irrigation was bypassed was 5% and the highest VWC at which the irrigation was allowed was 7.5% (Figure 3-12). Similarly treatment AC 7 (same threshold setting as the AC IR cont rollers) bypassed 49% of the scheduled irrigation events and the range of values over which the events were bypassed wa s 5.9% (lowest bypassed) to 6.9% VWC (highest irrigated; Figure 3-13). Weekly water applied was similar between the AC 7 and the AC IR treatments, with the AC IR treatment applying 1.7 mm/wk more on average (Table 2-6; P=0.193).

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117 Sensor AC 10 bypassed 20% of the possible irri gation events. The lowest VWC where the controller bypassed irriga tion was 10.5% and the highest VWC at which the controller allowed irrigation was 11.4%, resulting in a range of 0.9 % VWC for the AC 10 SMS control system. The LL Med sensor also bypassed 20% of the irri gation events, but the range of the control system was much larger than for the AC 10 treat ment (Figure 3-14). The lowest VWC at which LL Med bypassed irrigation was 6.7% and the highest VWC at which irrigation was allowed was 11.1%, which is a range of 4.4% VWC compared to 0.9% for AC 10. AC 13 bypassed 11% of the irrigation events while LL High did not bypass any irrigation events, ev en when VWC was as high as 16.0% (Figure 3-15). For the F07 testing period all the sensor tr eatments ran the entire length of the testing period so there were a total of 10 sensors tested (7 Acclima and 3 LawnLogic). The AC IR treatment bypassed between 65 and 81% of the irriga tion events, with an av erage of 75% for the entire treatment. The AC 7 treatment bypassed 77% of the possible ir rigation events. The average weekly depth of water applied for the two treatments was similar with 9.1 mm/wk (AC 7) and 8.4 mm/wk (AC IR) (Table 2-6; P=0.665). The highest value of VWC at which irrigation was allowed by the AC IR SMS systems, considering all sensors, was 6.8% and the lowest VWC at which irri gation was bypassed was 4.8%. The AC IR sensors averaged over all four treatment periods had similar VWC values at which they bypassed irrigation. The lowest VWC at which they bypassed irrigation was between 5.5% and 6.5% (P=0.995). The highest VWC at which the SMS controllers irrigated was between 6.4% and 7.3% (P=0.994). AC 7 bypassed 77% of the possible irri gation events and the range of soil VWC values at which irrigation was bypassed was 0.3% VWC (Figure 3-17). The highest value at which the AC IR controller treatment irrigated was 7.2% and the lowest value

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118 seen when irrigation was bypassed was 6.7%. The LL Low sensor bypassed 42% of the irrigation events with a range of 4. The highest value at which the treatment irrigated was 11.1% and the lowest value seen when irrigation was bypassed was 6.7%. A comparison of the ranges over which the LL Low bypassed irrigation and the AC 7 sensor bypassed irrigation can be seen in Figure 3-17. The AC 10 treatment bypassed 54% of the irriga tion events, which is more than the LL Low sensor. The soil VWC values at which the sensor bypassed irrigation were between 10.9% and 11% (Figure 3-18). The LL Med sensor bypasse d 31% of the irrigation events and the range of the soil moisture sensor was 1.7% VWC (F igures 3-18). AC 13 and LL High bypassed 19 and 12% of the irrigation events respectively (Figure 3-19). Th e AC 13 sensor bypassed five irrigation events while the LL High sensor bypassed 3. The range of the AC 13 sensor was 0.2% VWC and the range of the LL High sensor was 2.5% VWC. Figure 3-20 shows a graphical summary of the percentage of i rrigation events bypassed by each sensor during the four testing periods. Data collected from the AC sensors in the fo rm of VWC (%) was compared with readings taken by the TDR sensors buried in the corresponding plots. This data was plotted with AC readings on the x-axis and TDR readings on the y-axis in a scatter plot. Ideally, the linear regression for the data when plotted will be a 1:1 line and all the data points will fall on the line. Figure 3-21 shows the scatter plot s for all seven AC sensors along with the linear regression for each line. The values of r2 for all of the sensors were betw een 0.77 and 0.89 which shows that there was close correlation betw een TDR data and AC data. While there was good precision of the sensors, compared to the TDR every sensor did not have good accuracy. Some of the AC sensors (AC 7.1, AC 7.2, AC 7.3 and AC 7.4) tended to read soil moisture higher than the TDR

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119 sensors. The majority of readings taken with the AC 7, AC 10 and AC 13 sensors matched (majority of differences between readings equa l to 0) the corresponding TDR reading. It is important to note that the most frequent differenc es for all of the sensors were within the range of accuracy of the TDR readings (+/-2.5% VWC). Laboratory Testing Sensor Performance and Accuracy Testing of three LawnLogic sensors showed differences in the performance between the sensors. Table 3-4 shows the threshold at which the sensors bypassed irrigation, values above the threshold would allow irriga tion. Comparing the corresp onding tensiometer and capacitance probe values for soil water content at the ti me of the bypass thres hold reading gives an estimation of the performance of the sensors (Table 3-4). Using the tensiometer data and the capacitance probe data, the LawnL ogic thresholds were plotted ag ainst soil tension (kPa) and VWC (%) in Figures 3-22 and 3-23. One of th e capacitance probes (bucket 2) appears to have malfunctioned during testing and so was excluded from data analysis. Differences in the tensiometer readings for the different threshol d levels of the three LawnLogic sensors were between 0.1 kPa and as high as 4.5 kPa, while the capacitance probes (onl y considering bucket 1 and bucket 3) showed differences of between 1.5% and 2.4% VWC. Some data is unavailable due to a missed reading of the LawnLogic contro ller when it changed from one threshold to another. At higher soil moisture contents there is a smaller ra nge in performance between the three controllers that were tested At the higher water contents the threshol d settings (9 through 6) occurred at similar water contents, varyi ng between sensors by 0 to 0.7 kPa. The lower threshold settings (6 through 1), which correlate with drier soil moisture conditions, had larger differences in the correlating soil moisture contents, varying by 1.4 to 4.5 kPa (Figure 3-24 and Table 3-4).

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120 During laboratory testing it appeared that La wnLogic sensors had an error range that was within the range of the capacitance-ba sed sensors used to measure VWC (+/-2.2%). However, in the field study they appeared to have a larger er ror range (1.7 to 5.4%) than during the laboratory testing. During the field study one sensor had an error range that was larger than the TDR used for measuring VWC (+/-2.5%). Conclusions The range of accuracy of the sensors test ed, or the range over which they bypassed irrigation, was smaller for the AC sensors than the LL sensors. The range is the difference between the highest VWC (i.e. we t conditions) at which the sens or allowed irrigation and the lowest VWC (i.e. dry conditions) at which the se nsor bypassed irrigation. The smallest error range for the AC sensors during all treatment pe riods was 0% and the largest was 3.4% VWC. The LL sensors had a range of between 2.0% and 4.4% VWC. During S06 the LL Low controller bypassed irriga tion when soil VWC was as low as 4. 7% (approximately 0.2 cm or 9% of total available water), leading to a less than acc eptable average turf qual ity rating of 4.2 (Table 2-3). The same controller during the same tes ting period allowed irrigation when soil VWC was 8.6%. Further testing of the Acclima sensors s howed good precision of the sensors and good correlation between TDR and AC VWC data. The VWC data collected from the AC controllers was compared to the TDR data. The trend line for the data from the AC controllers had r2 values between 0.77 and 0.89 indicating that the TDR data explained most of the variability in the AC data. While there was good precision of the sensors, compared to the TDR, accuracy varied. Some of the sensors tended to read VWC higher than the correlating TDR. Sensors for AC IR, AC 7 and AC 13 recorded lower values for VWC than the TDR readings, with average differences with the TDR readings of between 0.1% VWC and 2.3% VWC. One sensor (AC 10)

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121 tended to record soil VWC values lower than th e TDR by only 0.2%. The TDR sensors used in this testing have a published error range of +/-2.5% VWC (C ampbell Scientific, Inc., 2006). This means that the AC sensors th roughout the four seasons of testi ng had an error range that fell within the known range of accuracy of the TDR sensors used in testing. Laboratory testing of the LawnLogic sensor s showed differences in the tensiometer readings (soil water tension) be tween 0.1 kPa and as high as 4.5 kPa for the different threshold levels of the three LawnLogic sensors. At hi gher LawnLogic threshold levels (9 through 6) the corresponding soil water tension va lues varied between sensors by 0 to 0.7 kPa. The lower threshold settings (6 through 1), which correlate with drier soil moisture conditions, had larger differences in the correlating soil water tension, varying by 1.4 to 4.5 kPa. In both laboratory and field testing the LawnLogic SMS systems had wider ranges in accuracy compared to the Acclima SMS systems.

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122 Table 3-1. Irrigation treatm ent codes and descriptions. Treatment code Treatment d escriptio n AC 7 Acclima set at 7% VWC AC 10 Acclima set at 10% VWC AC 13 Acclima set at 13% VWC AC IR Acclima set at 7% VWC individually controlled plots LL Low LawnLogic set at low settinga LL Med LawnLogic set at medium setting (#5) LL High LawnLogic set at high setting b WOS Without sensor NON Non-irrigated aSetting was a #2 for S06 and then changed to #4 for F06, S07 and F07. b Setting was a #8 for S06 and then changed to #6 for F06, S07 and F07. Table 3-2. Summary of the per centage of irrigation events by passed by the different irrigation control devices. Irrigation events bypassed (%) Treatment S06 F06 S07 F07 SMS-based AC 7 40 --* 49 77 AC 10 15 35 20 54 AC 13 0 13 11 19 AC IR 33 58 45 75 LL Low 60* ~ ~ 42 LL Med 30 17 20 31 LL High --0 12 Treatments that produced less than acceptable turf quality. ~ Treatments that were ended before the treatment period was over. -Treatments where the irrigation system was malf unctioning. --*Sensor was installed incorrectly.

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123 Table 3-3. Summary of the ra nge in volumetric water content over which the soil moisture sensor controllers bypassed irrigation. Th e range is the difference between the VWC at which the SMS controller always irrigated and at which it always bypassed irrigation. Threshold range (% VWC) S06 F06 S07 F07 Average AC 7 0.9 /*/ 1.0 0.5 NA AC 10 0.4 0.0 0.9 0.1 0.4 bc AC 13 --* 0.0 0.0 0.2 NA AC 7.1 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.05 c AC 7.2 1.9 0.0 0.5 0.0 0.6 bc AC 7.3 1.5 0.5 1.5 1.5 1.3 b AC 7.4 1.0 0.7 1.3 0.1 0.8 bc LL Low 3.9 4.4 NA LL Med 2.9 2.0 4.4 1.7 2.8 a LL High 5.4 ---* 2.5 NA /*/ Sensor installed incorrect ly. --* Controller did not bypass any irrigation events. Treatments ended early during both F06 and S07 due to poor turf quality. In F06 the treatment did not have a range during the time it was operational because irrigation was never allowed. In S07 the range for the two weeks where the treatment was allowed to run was 2.0. -Excluded in F06 due to malfunctions in the irrigation system. NA Treatments that did not have values duri ng all treatment periods.

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124 Table 3-4. Summary of laboratory testing results for Lawn Logic soil moisture sensors. Threshold at which the sensor bypassed irrigation compared to the corresponding VWC values measured using capacitance base d soil moisture sensors, and the soil water tension values measured using tensiometers. LawnLogic threshold Volumetric water content (in buckets 1 through 3) (%) Soil water tension (in buckets 1 through 3) (kPa) 1 to 9 scale 1 2 3 1 2 3 9 9.1 NA -6.7 6.0 -8 -NA 11.2 -6.3 6.3 7 7.8 NA 10.2 7.5 -6.8 6 7 NA 9.0 8.5 -7.2 5 6.8 NA 8.5 8.8 7.3 7.3 4 5.8 NA -10.6 8.1 -3 5 NA 6.5 12.9 9.0 8.4 2 -NA --9.3 -1 -NA 5.4 -11.7 10.3 VWC and soil water tension values have a possible range of .2% and .05 kPa. NA indicates that values were excluded due to a malfunction in the capacitance based probe. -Reading was missed and is not available for analysis.

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125 Figure 3-1. Image of bucket us ed in laboratory testing of La wnLogic sensors including (1) a LawnLogic sensor, (2) a capacitance based soil moisture sensor and (3) a tensiometer. Figure 3-2. Image of the contro ller and datalogger used for labor atory testing of the LawnLogic sensors. Shown are the (1) LawnLogic c ontroller and the (2) Watermark monitor (datalogger). 1 2 3 1 2

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126 Bucket 123 Tension (kPa) 0 2 4 6 8 10 VWC (%) 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Figure 3-3. Water content, after LawnLogic calib ration, measured by three tensiometers (bars) and by the capacitance based soil moisture se nsor (circles) in each of the buckets used for LawnLogic testing. Tensiometer read ings are in units of kPa and capacitance probe readings are in percent vol umetric water content (VWC; %).

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127 5 10 15 20 25 AC 7.1 Bypassed Irrigated 5 10 15 20 25 AC 7.2 VWC (%) 5 10 15 20 25 AC 7.3 4/24 5/8 5/22 6/5 6/19 5 10 15 20 25 AC 7.4 Month/Day 4/24 5/8 5/22 6/5 6/19 Rainfall (mm) 0 10 20 Rain A B C D E Figure 3-4. Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for plots in the AC IR treatment (A) AC 7.1, (B) AC 7.2, (C) AC 7.3 and (D) AC 7.4 in S06. Triangles mark irrigation events allowed while circles mark bypassed irrigation events. At VWC values above the shaded region irrigation wa s always bypassed and at valu es below, irrigation was always allowed. When no shaded region is present that means bypassed irrigation events always occurred at higher VWC values than irrigated events. Daily rainfall is also shown (E).

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128 5 10 15 20 25 AC 7 Irrigated Bypassed 4/24 5/8 5/22 6/5 6/19 VWC (%) 5 10 15 20 25 LL Low Month/Day 4/24 5/8 5/22 6/5 6/19 Rainfall (mm) 0 10 20 Rain A B C Figure 3-5. Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the treatments A) AC 7 and B) LL Low in S06. Triangles mark irrigation events a llowed by the sensor while circles mark bypassed irrigation events. At VWC values above the shaded re gion irrigation was always bypassed and at values below irrigation was always allowed. As the shaded region gets smaller, the response of the se nsor to certain values of VWC becomes easier to predict. When no shaded region is present that means bypassed irrigation events always occurred at higher VWC values than irrigated events. Daily rainfall is also shown C.

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129 5 10 15 20 25 AC 10 Irrigated Bypassed 4/24 5/8 5/22 6/5 6/19 VWC (%) 5 10 15 20 25 LL Med Month/Day 4/24 5/8 5/22 6/5 6/19 Rainfall (mm) 0 10 20 Rain A B C Figure 3-6. Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the treatments A) AC 10 and B) LL Med in S06. Triangles mark irrigation events a llowed by the sensor while circles mark bypassed irrigation events. At VWC values above the shaded region irrigation was always bypassed and at values below irrigation was always allowed. As the shaded region gets smaller, the response of the se nsor to certain values of VWC becomes easier to predict. When no shaded region is present that means bypassed irrigation events always occurred at higher VWC values than irrigated events. Daily rainfall is also shown (C). .

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130 Month/Day 4/24 5/8 5/22 6/5 6/19 Rainfall (mm) 0 10 20 Rain VWC (%) 5 10 15 20 25 LL High 5 10 15 20 25 AC 13 Irrigated Bypassed A B C Figure 3-7. Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the treatments A) AC 13 and B) LL High in S06. Triangles mark irrigation events a llowed by the sensor while circles mark bypassed irrigation events. At VWC values above the shaded region irrigation was always bypassed and at values below irrigation was always allowed. As the shaded region gets smaller, the response of the se nsor to certain values of VWC becomes easier to predict. When no shaded region is present that means bypassed irrigation events always occurred at higher VWC values than irrigated events. Daily rainfall is also shown (C).

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131 5 10 15 20 25 AC 7.1 Bypassed Irrigated VWC (%) 5 10 15 20 25 AC 7.3 5 10 15 20 25 AC 7.2 5 10 15 20 25 AC 7.4 Month/Day 9/25 10/9 10/23 11/6 11/20 12/4 Rainfall (mm) 0 10 20 Rain A B C D E Figure 3-8. Volumetric water content (VWC; %) fo r the plots in the AC IR treatment A) AC 7.1, B) AC 7.2, C) AC 7.3 and D) AC7.4 in F06. Triangles mark irrigation events allowed by the sensor while circles mark bypassed irrigation events. At VWC values above the shaded region irrigation was always bypassed and at values below irrigation was always allowe d. When no shaded region is present that means bypassed irrigation events always occurred at higher VWC values than irrigated events. Daily rainfall is also shown (E).

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132 VWC (%) 5 10 15 20 25 LL Med 5 10 15 20 25 AC 10 Irrigated Bypassed Month/Day 9/25 10/9 10/23 11/6 11/20 12/4 Rainfall (mm) 0 10 20 Rain A B C Figure 3-9. Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the treatments A) AC 10 and B) LL Med in F06. Triangles mark irrigation events a llowed by the sensor while circles mark bypassed irrigation events. At VWC values above the shaded region irrigation was always bypassed and at values below irrigation was always allowed. As the shaded region gets smaller, the response of the se nsor to certain values of VWC becomes easier to predict. When no shaded region is present that means bypassed irrigation events always occurred at higher VWC values than irrigated events. Daily rainfall is also shown (E).

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133 VWC (%) 5 10 15 20 25 AC 13 Irrigated Bypassed Month/Day 9/25 10/9 10/23 11/6 11/20 12/4 Rainfall (mm) 0 10 20 Rain A B Figure 3-10. Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the treatment A) AC 13 in F06 along with B) daily rainfall. Triangles mark irrigation events allowed by the sensor while circles mark bypassed irrigation events. At VWC valu es above the shaded region irrigation was always bypassed and at valu es below irrigation was alwa ys allowed. There is no shaded region because bypassed irrigation events always occurred at higher VWC values than irrigated events. On 10/25 th ere was a power outage so all treatments went without irriga tion on that day.

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134 VWC (%) 5 10 15 20 25 LL Low Irrigated Bypassed Month/Day 5/2 5/6 5/10 5/14 5/18 Rainfall (mm) 0 2 4 6 8 Rain A B Figure 3-11. Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the LL Low treatment A) at the beginning of the S07 treatment period. Triangles ma rk irrigation events allowed by the sensor while circles mark the irrigation events bypa ssed. Daily rainfall is also shown (B).

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135 5 10 15 20 25 AC 7.1 Irrigated Bypassed 5 10 15 20 25 AC 7.2 VWC (%) 5 10 15 20 25 AC 7.3 5 10 15 20 25 AC 7.4 5/7 5/28 6/18 7/9 7/30 8/20 Rainfall (mm) 0 10 20 Rain A B C D E Figure 3-12. Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the plots in the AC IR treatment A) AC 7.1, B) AC 7.2, C) AC 7.3 and D) AC7.4 in S07. Tria ngles mark irrigation events allowed by the sensor while circles mark bypassed irrigation events. At VWC values above the shaded region irrigation was always bypassed and at values below irrigation was always allowe d. When no shaded region is present that means bypassed irrigation events always occurred at higher VWC values than irrigated events. Daily rainfall is also shown (E).

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136 VWC (%) 5 10 15 20 25 AC 7 Irrigated Bypassed Month/Day 5/7 5/28 6/18 7/9 7/30 8/20 Rainfall (mm) 0 10 20 Rain A B Figure 3-13. Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for treatment A) AC 7 in S07. Triangles mark irrigation events allowed by the sensor while circles mark bypassed irrigation events. At VWC values above the shaded region irrigation was always bypassed and at values below irrigation was always allowed. As the shaded region gets smaller, the response of the sensor to certain values of VWC becomes easier to predict. When no shaded region is present that means bypa ssed irrigation events always occurred at higher VWC values than irrigated events. Daily rainfall is also shown (B).

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137 VWC (%) 5 10 15 20 25 AC 10 Irrigated Bypassed A B Month/Day 5/7 5/28 6/18 7/9 7/30 8/20 Rainfall (mm) 0 10 20 Rain 5 10 15 20 25 LL Med C Figure 3-14. Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the treatments A) AC 10 and B) LL Med in S07. Triangles mark irrigation events allowed by the sensor while circles mark bypassed irrigation events. At VWC values above the shaded re gion irrigation was always bypassed and at values below irrigation was always allowed. As the shaded region gets smaller, the response of the se nsor to certain values of VWC becomes easier to predict. When no shaded region is present that means bypassed irrigation events always occurred at higher VWC values than irrigated events. Daily rainfall is also shown (C).

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138 VWC (%) 5 10 15 20 25 AC 13 Irrigated Bypassed Month/Day 5/7 5/28 6/18 7/9 7/30 8/20 Rainfall (mm) 0 10 20 Rain 5 10 15 20 25 LL High A B C Figure 3-15. Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the treatments A) AC 13 and B) LL High in S07. Triangles mark irrigation events allowed by the sensor while circles mark bypassed irrigation events. At VWC values above the shaded re gion irrigation was always bypassed and at values below irrigation was always allowed. As the shaded region gets smaller, the response of the se nsor to certain values of VWC becomes easier to predict. No shaded region is shown for AC 13 because bypassed irrigation events always occurred at higher VWC valu es than irrigated events, while no shaded region is shown for LL High because irrigation was never bypassed. Daily rainfall is also shown (E).

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139 VWC (%) 5 10 15 20 25 AC 7.3 5 10 15 20 25 AC 7.1 Bypassed Irrigated 5 10 15 20 25 AC 7.2 5 10 15 20 25 AC 7.4 9/3 9/17 10/1 10/15 10/29 11/12 11/26 Rainfall (mm) 0 10 20 Rain A B C E D Figure 3-16. Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the plots in the AC IR treatment A) AC 7.1, B) AC 7.2, C) AC 7.3 and D) AC7.4 in F07. Tria ngles mark irrigation events allowed by the sensor while circles mark bypassed irrigation events. At VWC values above the shaded region irrigation was always bypassed and at values below irrigation was always allowe d. When no shaded region is present that means bypassed irrigation events always occu rred at higher VWC values th an irrigated events. Daily rainfall is also shown (E).

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140 5 10 15 20 25 AC 7 Irrigated Bypassed Month/Day 9/3 9/17 10/1 10/15 10/29 11/12 11/26 Rainfall (mm) 0 10 20 Rain VWC (%) 5 10 15 20 25 LL Low A B C Figure 3-17. Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the treatments A) AC 7 and B) LL Low in F07. Triangles mark irrigation events a llowed by the sensor while circles mark bypassed irrigation events. At VWC values above the shaded region irrigation was always bypassed and at values below irrigation was always a llowed. As the shaded region gets smaller, the response of the se nsor to certain valu es of VWC becomes easier to predict. When no shaded region is present that means bypassed irrigation events always occurred at higher VWC values than irrigated events. Daily rainfall is also shown (C).

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141 5 10 15 20 25 AC 10 Irrigated Bypassed Month/Day 9/3 9/17 10/1 10/15 10/29 11/12 11/26 Rainfall (mm) 0 10 20 Rain VWC(%) 5 10 15 20 25 LL Med A B C Figure 3-18. Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the treatments A) AC 10 and B) LL Med in F07. Triangles mark irrigation events allowed by the sensor while circles mark bypassed irrigation events. At VWC values above the shaded region irrigation was always bypassed and at values below irrigation was always a llowed. As the shaded region gets smaller, the response of the se nsor to certain valu es of VWC becomes easier to predict. When no shaded region is present that means bypassed irrigation events always occurred at higher VWC values than irrigated events. Daily rainfall is also shown (C).

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142 5 10 15 20 25 AC 13 Irrigated Bypassed Month/Day 9/3 9/17 10/1 10/15 10/29 11/12 11/26 Rainfall (mm) 0 10 20 Rain VWC (%) 5 10 15 20 25 LL High A B C Figure 3-19. Volumetric water content (VWC; %) for the treatments A) AC 13 and B) LL High in F07. Triangles mark irrigation events allowed by the sensor while circles mark bypassed irrigation events. At VWC values above the shaded region irrigation was always bypassed and at values below irriga tion was always allowed. As the shaded region gets smaller, the response of the se nsor to certain valu es of VWC becomes easier to predict. When no shaded region is present that means bypassed irrigation events always occurred at higher VWC values than irrigated events. Daily rainfall is also shown (C).

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143 Treatment period S06 F06 S07 F07 Irrigation events bypassed (%) 0 20 40 60 80 AC IR AC 7 AC 10 AC 13 LL Low LL Med LL High Figure 3-20. Summary of the percentage of irrigation events bypa ssed by the SMS controllers in each experimental time period. Gray areas repr esent when data was not available for a treatment because either the treatment wa s ended before the treatment period was over due to poor turf quality (LL Low), or the irrigation system was malfunctioning (LL High in S06 and F06 and AC 7 in F06).

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144 y = 1.255x + 0.007 y = 0.847x + 2.825 y = 1.220x 0.234 y = 1.835x 4.307 y = 0.960x + 0.513 y = 1.523x 6.734 y = 1.399x 3.795 TDR VWC (%) 2610141822 AC 13 VWC (%) 2 6 10 14 18 22 TDR VWC (%) 2610141822 AC 10 VWC (%) 2 6 10 14 18 22 TDR VWC (%) 2610141822 AC 7 VWC (%) 2 6 10 14 18 22 TDR VWC (%) 2610141822 AC 7.1 VWC (%) 2 6 10 14 18 22 TDR VWC (%) 2610141822 AC 7.2 VWC (%) 2 6 10 14 18 22 TDR VWC (%) 2610141822 AC 7.3 VWC (%) 2 6 10 14 18 22 TDR VWC (%) 2610141822 AC 7.4 VWC (%) 2 6 10 14 18 22 R 2 = 0.852 R 2 = 0.874 R 2 = 0.845 R 2 = 0.835 R 2 = 0.857 R 2 = 0.794 R 2 = 0.760 A B C D E F G5.00.1 xy 7.65.1 xy 0.44.1 xy 3.48.1 xy 2.02.1 xyxy 3.1 8.28.0 xy Figure 3-21. Scatter plot of volumetric water content (VWC; %) readings for AC sensors vs. corresponding readings from TDR sensors. Treatments shown are A) AC 7, B) AC 10, C) AC 13, D) AC 7.1, E) AC 7.2, F) AC 7.3, and G) AC 7.4. Linear regression lines are shown along with the equation of th e line and the r-squared value of the data to the line. A 1:1 line is shown as a dotted line on each graph for comparison.

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145 6 8 10 12 14 Soil water tension (kPa) 6 8 10 12 14 LawnLogic bypass threshold 0123456789 4 6 8 10 12 14 A B C Figure 3-22. LawnLogic bypass thresholds compar ed to the corresponding tensiometer readings during laboratory testing for A) bucke t 1, B) bucket 2, and C) bucket 3.

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146 0 5 10 15 20 LawnLogic bypass threshold 0123456789 VWC (%) 0 5 10 15 A B Figure 3-23. LawnLogic bypass thresholds compared to the correspond ing capacitance based soil moisture content readings during laborat ory testing for A) bucket 1 and B) bucket 3. The data from bucket 2 was excluded from analysis due to a malfunction of the capacitance based probe.

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147 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Soil water tension (kPa) 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Date (2006) 1/292/52/122/192/263/53/12 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 9 7 6 5 4 3 9 8 5 4 3 2 1 8 7 6 5 3 1 A B C Figure 3-24. LawnLogic bypass thresholds compar ed to the corresponding tensiometer readings during laboratory testing for A) bucke t 1, B) bucket 2, and C) bucket 3.

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148 CHAPTER 4 EVAPOTRANSPIRATION CONTROLLER P ERFORMANCE AND ACCURACY Introduction Evapotranspiration (ET)-based irrigation cont rollers ideally apply irrigation according to plant needs using ET data to make irrigation decisions. Evapotranspiration is the water lost from the soil and plant surface by the process of evapor ation and lost from the plant by the process of transpiration. Since the two processes occur simultaneously and are very difficult to separate, they are combined into one pro cess (Allen et al., 1998). There are several types of ET-based irrigation controllers and they differ in how they obtain weather data and how they use that data to determine irrigation schedules. Some systems are based on historical data developed for the site where irrigation is being applied. Some systems use on-site sensors to measure weather information used to calculate ET, while others (signal-based systems) receive reference ET information from nearby weather stations (Center for Irrigation Technology, 2006) ET controllers can be purchased as an addition to an existing irrigati on timer or as a replacement to the timer. General values of ET may not be closely representative of the area where the irrigation is being applied due to localized environmental conditions such as shade. Controllers use various inputs including soil type, plant type and irrigation application rate to make the irrigation control more site spec ific. These inputs are typically input to the controller during installation. Reference ET (ETo) is the rate at which ET occurs from a uniform surface of actively growing vegetation with a specified growi ng height and that is well-watered. ETo is calculated using weather parameters such as solar radiat ion, relative humidity, air temperature, and wind speed. The ASCE standardized reference evap otranspiration equation is generally used to calculate ETo (Allen et al., 2005).

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149 2 21 273 408.0 uC uee T C GR ETd as n n o (4-1) ETo = reference evapotra nspiration, (mm day-1) Rn = net radiation at the crop surface, (MJ m-2 day-1) G = soil heat flux density at the soil surface, (MJ m-2 day-1) T = mean daily air temperature at 2 m height, (oC) u2 = mean daily wind speed at 2 m height, (m s-1) es = saturation vapor pressure, (kPa) ea = mean actual vapor pressure, (kPa) = slope of the saturation vapor pre ssure-temperature curve, (kPa oC-1) = psychometric constant, (kPa oC-1) Cn = numerator constant that varies with reference type and time step of calculations, (short reference with daily time step = 900 K mm s3 Mg-1 d-1) Cd = denominator constant that varies with reference type and time step of calculations, (short reference with daily time step = 0.34 s m-1) Adjustments to ETo for particular plant types are made using crop coefficients (Kc). A crop coefficient is a fraction of the calculated re ference evapotranspiration. The crop coefficient is used to adjust ETo due to differences such as plant type annual climate cycle, and horticultural differences. The equation for crop evapotranspiration (ETc) according to Allen et al. (2005) is: occETKET (4-2) Soil Water Balance Generally, ET controllers schedule irrigation by using some form of the soil water balance. This equation uses a series of inputs and output s to the soil profile. I nputs for the soil water balance include rainfall and irrigation. Water outputs include drainage, runoff and evapotranspiration. The equation for the soil water balance is: RODETIRSc (4-3) S = change in soil water storage (mm) R = rainfall (mm) I = irrigation depth (mm) ETc = crop evapotranspiration (mm)

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150 D = drainage (mm) RO = surface runoff (mm) Ideally irrigation is scheduled so that there is no drainage and a negligible amount of surface runoff. The maximum amount of water that can be held in the soil profile is related to the soil type and root zone depth. The amount of water in the soil that is available for plant use is called available water (AW) and is calcu lated using the following equation (Cassel and Nielsen, 1986): 100 ) (RZPWPFC AW (4-4) where FC = field capacity (% or cm3 of water per cm3 of soil) PWP = permanent wilting point (% or cm3 of water/cm3 of soil) RZ = root zone depth (mm) The field capacity (FC) of the soil is the water content 2 to 3 days after wetting event has occurred and the downward movement of water due to gravity is negligible (Soil Science Society of America SSSA, 2008). Permanent wilting point (PWP) is the amount of water in the soil where indicator plants wilt and do not recover (C assel and Nielsen, 1986). Soil water should not get as low as PWP before irrigation is applied. When available water is reduced by a certain percentage, the maximum allowable depletion (M AD), irrigation should be applied. The soil water content at the point of maximum allowable depletion is the readily available water (RAW) and is calculated as follow s (Irrigation Association, 2005): AWMAD RAW (4-5) The irrigation depth required to replace the water lost through ETc that has not been replaced by rainfall is the net irrigation requirement. The actual application of water is not perfectly efficient so the net irrigation requirement has to be increased to account for the

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151 inefficiency of the irrigation system. The actua l amount of water that needs to be applied to account for the efficiency of the irrigation sy stem is the gross irrigation. For irrigation scheduling purposes, the low half distribution uniformity (DUlh) has been recommended (IA, 2005) and is calculated as follows: lhDU E100 (4-6) The value for DUlh is calculated based on the equation from the Irrigation Association (2005): lq lhDU DU 614.06. 38 (4-7) DUlq is the low quarter distribution uniformity and is calculated using the following formula: tot lq lqD D DU (4-8) where, totD is the average of the total depth of water applied and lqD is the average depth of the lowest 25% of depths collected (Merriam and Keller,1978). The gross irrigation depth is then calculated by multiplying the net irrigati on requirement by the efficiency factor. Previous Research Evapotranspiration-based contro llers have been tested in the western U.S. but have undergone little research in humid climates like th at of Florida. A study that was conducted in Florida by Davis et al. (2007) during the summer (July 1 through August 31) and fall (September 1 through November 30) of 2006 found that three brands of ET controllers compared to a twoday-per-week irrigation schedule with no irrigation control devi ces were capable of reducing water applied. These reductions were between 20 to 60% with the exception of one controller

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152 which applied more water than the two-day-pe r-week comparison treatment during the fall of 2006. The water savings were produced while maintaining acceptable turf quality. A study conducted in Irvine, California in 40 single-family homes demonstrated the effectiveness of scheduling irrigation based on localized ET conditions fo r reducing residential water use. The study was conducted by the Irvine Ranch Water District (IR WD). The irrigation schedules in the homes were controlled through a remote signal and adjustments were made weekly based on the ET for the previous week The value for ET was used to develop a percentage change factor which was sent to the individual homes controlle rs and applied to the existing irrigation schedule that was input durin g installation. The baseline irrigation schedule was site specific based on plant type, slope, etc. The controller was able to reduce outdoor water applied by 16% compared to water use in the sa me homes prior to installation of the test controller. The results showed that the hom es selected for the ET controller had a predisposition towards water cons ervation. It was concluded that scheduling irrigation based on ET could produce larger water savings in homes th at do not have the same predisposition. All participants in the study believed the automa tic ET controller was convenient and 97% reported that they observed either no change or an improvement in the quality of their landscape (IRWD, 2001). Based on the previous study further resear ch was conducted by the Municipal Water District of Orange County (MWDOC), in Californ ia, and IRWD to investigate the usefulness of this technology at reducing runoff from residential lawns. The number of homes in the study was expanded. The study included five neighborhoods, each having thei r own single point of discharge for the runoff from the entire neighborhood. The ET based systems produced 10% water reductions in total household water use. During the dry season runoff was reduced by

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153 approximately 50% compared to the runoff volum es prior to installing the ET based system (MWDOC and IRWD, 2004). A study by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power was conducted to look at the usefulness of ET controllers in settings with medium to large landscapes such as homeowners associations, schools and parks. Two commercia lly available ET controllers, both using signal based technology, were tested. The two contro llers managed to reduce water applied by 17.4% and 28.3% compared to water use prior to the installation of the ET controllers. Devitt et al. (2008) found that using signal ba sed ET controllers in Las Vegas could reduce water applied by up to 61.6% compared to sites without an ET based controller. The study had 16 ET controller sites and 10 contro l sites. Results showed that 13 out of 16 ET controller sites reduced water applied compared to 4 of 10 site s without ET controllers. In a survey of the homeowners conducted after the experiment, 87% of the study participants stated that their landscape quality either stayed the sa me or improved during the testing. The objective of this research was to evalua te two commercially available ET controllers comparing turf quality, and the accuracy of ET estimates, irrigation scheduling and potential water savings in a humid climate. Materials and Methods Site Description This study was performed at the Plant Scienc e Research and Education Unit in Citra, Florida. There were four treatment periods during 22 April 2006 to 30 June 2006 (S06), 23 September 2006 to 15 December 2006 (F06) and 1 May 2007 to 31 August 2007 (S07) and 1 September 2007 to 30 November 2007 (F07). Experi mental plots were 4. 27 m X 4.27 m in size and irrigated using four Toro 570 Series (T he Toro Company, Bloom ington, MN.) quarter circle pop-up spray heads with an application rate of 51 mm/hr (see Chapter 2, Figure 2-1).

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154 The three mapped soil types present in the research area are Tavares sand, Candler sand, and Arredondo fine sand (Loamy, siliceous, semiactive, hyperthermic Grossarenic Paleudults) (USDA, 2006). Soil analysis methods were used on site to determine more specific values for field capacity and permanent wil ting point (see Soil Physical Prope rties, Chapter 2). Figure 2-6 shows the range of field capacitie s and permanent wilting points within the field and in each block. Both field capacity and permanent wil ting point values increas e moving across the field from west to east (moving from block 1 to bloc k 4) as seen in Figur e 2-6 (see Soil Physical Properties, Chapter 2). Soil testing also showed th at the soil present at the field site consisted of 1.7% clay, 1.1% silt and 97.3% sand. Experimental Design Two commercially available ET controllers were selected for the study: the Toro Intellisense (The Toro Company, Bloom ington, MN) and the ET ManagerTM (Rain Bird Corporation, Glendora, CA). Each ET controller controlled the irrigation for four individually monitored plots. The ET Manager was connected to a Rain Bird ESP Modular Irrigation Controller (Rain Bird International, Inc., Glendora, CA) for scheduling irrigation events. There was one control treatment in the experimental design and one time-based comparison (Table 4-1). The control was a nonirrigated (NON) treatment and the comparison treatment was time-based without a rain sensor (WOS). The irrigati on schedule for the WOS treatment was based on recommendations by Dukes and Haman (2002b) (Table 2-3). Both ET controllers utilize pagi ng technology to receive daily ETo. These controllers perform a soil water balance based on daily ET, rainfall, and other inputs and use the calculated moisture content for irrigation decisions. The To ro Intelli-sense controller (TORO) calculates irrigation runtime based on applicat ion rate and other inputs. A ra in sensor can be connected to the Toro controller; however a rain sensor was not used in this study. Also, the Toro controller

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155 has a rain pause function which allows the cont roller to delay watering when rainfall is measured at a remote weather station. This ra in pause (in days) is sent to the controller along with weather data and prevents irrigation from occurring during the days when the rain pause is activated. The controller assumes the soil water prof ile as full after a rain pause is received. The ET Manager (ETM) is connected to an irrigatio n time clock to function in bypass mode similar to a soil moisture sensor or rain sensor. The ET Manager has a tipping bucket rain gauge attached to the controller that uses measured rainfall depth to adjust the calculated soil water balance. The ETM controller uses historical ET as a backup if the signal to the controller is lost. The ETM treatment was set for irrigation depths based on the same methods used for the timebased comparison treatment WOS. The two ET controllers use different inputs to th e systems and have different approaches to irrigation scheduling. The TORO controller schedules irrigation depth and frequency while the ETM controller is designed to be an add-on device used with an existing timer. The ETM controller does not schedule depth or frequenc y of irrigation events it only bypasses irrigation events scheduled into the irrigation timer. Software provided with the ETM controller uses inputs such as soil type, plant type and application rate of the irrigation system to assist the user in developing an irrigation schedule. The depth of water applied per scheduled irrigation event is then programmed into the ETM controller. The ETM controller us es this depth as the amount of wa ter that can be lost from the soil profile before irrigation is allowed to occur. The manufact urer suggests that the irrigation amount should be equal to half the depth of AW. One input that is programmed into the ETM controller is called the saturation allowance. This value is the amount of water the soil can hold in addition to the irrigation amount without causing runoff to occur. This means the depth of the

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156 irrigation amount plus the depth of the saturation allowance is th e saturation value of the soil. The saturation allowance is equal to the differen ce between FC and saturation. When the depth of water in the soil profile reaches saturation all of this water has to be lost from the soil profile before irrigation is allowed to occur. The ETM controller also uses a landscape adjustment percentage input by the user to modify the ET for localized landscape conditions. The TORO controller uses crop coefficients base d on the plant type selected during set up. Other inputs to the TORO contro ller include plant type, soil type slope, and microclimate. For this experiment the plant type was warm-season turfgrass and the soil type was sandy. The experimental area had a 0 to 5% slope. The microclimate input is for adjusting the irrigation based on the amount of sun exposure in the irrigate d area. In this study the microclimate was set for full sun exposure because there was no shade pr esent at the research site. A summary of inputs for both ET controllers is provided (Tab le 4-2). Both the ET-based treatments were restricted to irrigating twice per week accordi ng to typical Florida day of the week water restrictions. Data Collection Water use for each plot was monitored us ing pulse-type displacement flow meters, specifically AMCO PSMT 20 mm x 190 mm flow me ters (Elster AMCO Water, Inc., Ocala, FL). These flow meters were wired to multiplexers connected to a CR-10X datalogger (Campbell Scientific, Logan, UT.) to monitor daily water use. The meters were also read manually at least every two weeks. ET values (daily) were collected manually from each controller three times per week. The day and time of the last weather signal were also collected to ensure th e ET reading was for the proper day. When there were missing manually colle cted ET data for one of the controllers, only dates when both controllers had data were used for comparisons. Periodically, the manufacturers

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157 supplied the ET signal data that was sent to the controllers daily. These data were compared with the manually collected ET signal data The source of the data provided by the manufacturers was unknown. A FAWN (Florida Automated Weather Network) weather station is located at the research site and is available for public use, whether or not either manufacturer use this data is unknown. Data from the manufac turer for the Toro Inte lli-sense controller was limited to daily ET, while data received for the RainBird ET Manager included maximum and minimum temperature (oC), wind speed (m/s), solar radiation (W/m2), relative humidity (%) and ET (mm). The manufacturers provided data for the two ET controllers was only compared for periods of time when data was available for bot h controllers. The time periods where data was available for both controllers were; 6/13 to 6/18, 7/3 to 7/17, 8/5 to 8/10, 9/2 to 9/7, 10/2 to 10/19 and 10/23 to 10/28 (all in 2007). Local weather data for comparison was collected using an automated weather station (Campbell Scientific, Logan, UT) within 900 m of the experimental site. Rainfall data at the weather station was collected with both a ti pping bucket rain gauge and with a manual rain gauge located at the research plots. Manual rain gauge data was used to verify depths measured by the tipping bucket ra in gauge. Weather station data was used for calculating reference ET (ETo). Solar radiation, relative humidity, air temperature, and wind speed were used in the ETo calculations. The quality of data obtained from the on-site weather station was verified based on procedures outlined by Allen et al. (2005). The verification of the parameters solar radiation, temperature, rela tive humidity and wind speed for both 2006 and 2007 is shown in Figures 4-1 and 4-2. Accord ing to Allen et al. ( 2005) solar radiation (Rs) data can be validated by plotting it against clear sky radiation (Rso) which is calculated using the following equation: aDB soRKKR (4-9)

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158 where KB is a clearness index for di rect beam radiation, KD is a transmissivity index for diffuse radiation and Ra is extraterrestrial radiation (MJ/m2/day). The values for KB were also calculated based on an equation from Allen et al. (2005): 4.0sin 075.0 sin 00146.0 exp98.0 W K P Kt B (4-10) where P is the atmospheric pressure at the site elevation (kPa), Kt is the turbidity coefficient which was assumed to be 1.0 for clean air, is the angle of the sun above the horizon (radians) and W is the precipitable water in the atmosphere (mm). Allen et al. (2005) provided the following equation for calculating W: 1.2 14.0 Pe Wa (4-11) where ea is the actual vapor pressure of the of the air at a he ight of approximately 2 m above the ground (kPa). The angle of the sun av eraged over the daylight period was calculated using latitude ( ) measured in radians, and the day of the year (J) which is unitless, based on the following equation: 2 2442.039.1 365 2 sin3.085.0sinsin J (4-12) When graphed the maximum values of Rs in a data set should lie close to the line indicating Rso. On cloudy days the values for Rs will fall below the Rso data. Minimum daily temperature data (shown in Figures 4-1B and 4-2B) was compared with the dew point temperature calculat ed using (Allen et al., 2005): a a dewe e T ln78.16 ln3.23791.116 (4-13) The maximum and minimum daily values for re lative humidity were pl otted (Figures 4-1C and 4-2C) to look for extreme values. The maxi mum relative humidity should be below 100% or

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159 within 5% of that value and the minimum rela tive humidity in a humid region should be above 30% the majority of the time (Allen et al., 2005). Wind speed was plotted (Figures 4-1D and 4-2D) to look for valu es or trends in the data that were not realistic. Consistently low wi nd speed readings may indicate dirty anemometer bearings. Average daily wind speed readings over an extended period of time that are less than 1.0 m/s may indicate a problem with the anemom eter (Allen et al., 2005). During the testing periods in 2006 and 2007 all weather data was verified and found to be valid. Turfgrass quality was rated at least once ev ery two weeks during F06 and at least once a month during S07 and F07. Quality evaluati ons were made using the National Turfgrass Evaluation Program (NTEP) procedures (Shearman and Morris, 1998). Th e ratings were on a 1 to 9 scale, with 1 representing dead or dormant grass and 9 representing grass with good color and density, and without weeds (Shearman a nd Morris, 1998). A quality rating of 5 was considered minimally acceptable for a homeowner lawn. An example of the appearance of the turfgrass for quality ratings of 2 (almost dead, with some green), 5 (minimally acceptable) and 8 (almost perfect quality) can be seen in Figure 2-9 (see Chapter 2). Results and Discussion Rainfall Three of the four treatment periods were relatively dry compared to historical rainfall for the research area receiving less th an half of the depth received in the area historically (see Chapter 2, Figure 2-13). Rainfall events were infrequent and, combined with the low total volume of rainfall received, led to dry conditions for the research site. The number of days per month with a rainfall event of a depth greater than 2.5 mm was fe wer than the monthly historical averages for every time period except in F07 (s ee Chapter 2, Figure 2-13). During October 2007 there were 60 percent more rainy days than the historical average. Overall the treatment periods

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160 S06, F06 and S07 can be considered drier than no rmal for the testing area both in frequency of rainfall events and total depth received by the area. Water Savings and Turf Quality In F06 and S07 the NON treatment was ende d early by implementing a timed irrigation schedule to prevent complete loss of the turfgras s. During both testing periods where treatments with no irrigation were continued (S06 and F07) it was seen that turf quality ratings for these plots were lower than plots in all other treatments. In F07, sufficient rainfall maintained adequate turf quality in these plots, allowing the treatment to continue throughout the season. In F06 and F07 the two controllers both pr oduced acceptable turf quality and high water savings (Tables 4-3 and 4-4). During F06 th e TORO controller produced higher water savings than the ETM controller (63% compared to 40 %) and applied less wate r weekly. The TORO treatment applied 8.6 mm/wk compared to 14.4 mm/wk (P<0.001). In F06, according to manually collected ETo data, both ET controllers had average ETo measurements that were within 2% (TORO) and 3% (ETM) of the ETo measured on-site. In F07, however, the TORO had ETo measurements that were greater than the on-site values by 36% on average and the ETM was within 11% on average. Even though the TORO overestimated ETo in F07 but not in F06, the controller produced water savings in F07 (62% ) that were close to th e water savings of F06 (63%). In S07, the ETM treatment reduced irriga tion applied by 59% compared to the TORO treatment which reduced water applied by only 25% and only bypassed one irrigation event. This reduction in water applied resulted in loss of turf quality in the ETM treatment plots. The ETM manager bypassed 57% of the possible irrigati on events (Table 4-5). The high number of irrigation events bypassed by the ETM controller may be due to th e effective rainfall setting called the Saturation Allowance (Table 4-2). The value used for the Saturation Allowance

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161 during S07 (9.1 mm) caused too many irrigation ev ents to be bypassed du ring a period of time where little rainfall occurred. The controller us ed the saturation allowanc e as an added depth to the irrigation depth to determine how much water coul d be stored in the root zone of the plant. In S07 the depth for the saturation allowance wa s 9.1 mm, the depth of irrigation applied was approximately 17 mm for the month of July. The controller would estimate that 26.1 mm of water could be stored in the root zone after a rainfall or irrigation event. The average depth of AW for the research site was 12 mm and the av erage depth of RAW was 6 mm (see Chapter 2, Figure 2-7), which is less than a quarter of th e depth the ETM controller used for the saturation depth (irrigation plus the saturati on allowance) that could be held in the soil for plant uses. In F07, the saturation allowance parameter for th e ET Manager was changed from 9.1 mm to 2.5 mm due to loss of turf quality dur ing the previous season. The initial setting for the saturation allowance was suggested by the manufacturer as was the need to decrease the setting. The ETM controller produces water savings by bypassing scheduled irrigation events while the. The water savings were from reducin g depth applied per irrigation event instead of bypassing irrigation altogether. For example, during the F06 testing period the ET Manager had a water savings of 36%, bypassing 50% of the possi ble irrigation events, wh ile the Toro IntelliSense controller had a water savings of 59%, bypassing 29% of the possible irrigation days. Table 4-5 summarizes the percentage of irriga tion events bypassed by each controller during the three testing periods. Evapotranspiration Comparisons Looking at the ETo values collected manually from both controllers compared to the onsite weather station, the TORO overestimated ETo especially during the period from May 2007 to October 2007 (Figure 4-3). It is important to note that the source of the weather data for both controllers is unknown. The increase in ETo values for the TORO controller may be due to a

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162 change in the weather station used or the microz one designation of the controller. The peaks in the data from the TORO and the ETM controll ers did not always match the peaks in the ETo values from the on-site weather station. The average daily ETo value read manually from the ETM controller (3.5 mm) was similar to the value for the on-site weather station (3.5 mm) (P=0.810; Table 4-6). The average daily ETo for the TORO controller (4.1 mm) was higher than the ETo calculated from data collected on-site (P=0.002). Figure 4-4 shows the manually collected ETo values for both controllers plot ted on the y-axis with the ETo calculated based on on-site weather data on the x-axis. The trend lin e for the TORO controller data shows that in general the daily manual ETo readings were higher than the calc ulated values (Figure 4-4). The manual data from the ETM controlle r appeared to have a closer correlation with the on-site data having an r-squared value of 0. 63 while the TORO data had an r-squared value of 0.59 (Figure 44). Cumulatively, ETo collected manually from the ETM contro ller was less than 2% greater than the on-site weather station, while ETo from the TORO controller was 18% greater than the data collected on-site (Figure 4-5). Daily ETo provided by the manufacturer resulted in average values for the ETM controller (3.9 mm) that were similar to the on-site data (4.1 mm) (P=0.465). The ETo values for the TORO controller (4.9 mm) were higher than the on-site values (P<0.001; Table 4-6). Figure 4-6 shows the manufacturer daily ETo values for the two ETo controllers compared to the on-site data. Five weeks with complete data were used to compare average weekly ETo values and there were similar results to the daily ETo results (Table 4-6). The TORO had the highest average weekly ETo value (31.3 mm) compared to the ETM (25. 2 mm) or the on-site value (26.3 mm). Cumulatively there was a 5% difference between the ETM and the on-site values and a 19% difference between the TORO and the on-site ETo values.

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163 Data provided by the manufacturer for the TORO controller over a l onger period of time (14 months) shows that from September 2006 to April 2007 the TORO and the on-site had similar ETo values, but from March 2007 to November 2007 the TORO consistently had higher ETo values than the on-site weather station (Figure 4-7). This trend can also be seen in Figures 4-8 and 4-9, where the ETo values for the TORO were between 19% and 28% (29 mm and 38 mm) higher than the values for the on-site weat her station starting in March 2007. Using the entire 14 months of data to compare cumulative ETo, the TORO overestimated compared to data collected on-site by 14% (Figur e 4-7). Davis et al. (2007) found that TORO weather data provided by the manufacturer overestimated ETo by only 2% during the months of August and September 2006 in South Florida. Other data received for the ET Manager included temperature, solar radiation and relative humidity. In Figure 4-10 the average, maximum and minimum daily temperature values for the ETM are compared to the on-site collected values. The ETM minimum daily temperature was consistently higher than the onsite weather station data, with values that exceeded weather station values by 1.3oC on average over the collection period. All temperature data appeared to have a good linear relationship with the on-site data having r-square d values from 0.90 to 0.95, with minimum temperature having the highest r-squared value. The ETM data for solar radiation and wind speed appear have a lower correlation with the on-site values than the temperature values (Figure 4-11). Solar ra diation provided by the manufacturer for the ETM compared to on-site solar radiation had an r-s quared value of 0.78. The wind speed had the weakest relationship with on-site data; the linear relationship between the two only has an r-squared value of 0.49. The lower correlations with on-site data for these

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164 two parameters could be due to the fact that wind speed and solar radia tion are more localized parameters. Conclusions Even though two of three testing periods received less than half of the normal rainfall depth for the area, both ET controllers tested were able to reduce water applied compared to an irrigation system with no control device. The ETM treatment produced poor turf quality during the S07 treatment period due to an incorrect setting in the contro ller. During the other testing periods the ETM had acceptable turf quality with water savings of 40% and 59% and the TORO plots had acceptable turf quality w ith water savings of 63% and 62%. ETo calculations for the TORO, both supplied by the manufacturer and collected manually from the controller, tended to overestimate ETo compared to data collected onsite. Based on manufacturer data it overestimated by 19% over a 4 month period while values of ETo provided by the manufacturer for the ETM treatment were within 5% over the same 4 month period. Manufacturer provided ETo data for the TORO was within 0.5% and 11% of the on-site data for the months of August 2006 to April 2007, but after the ETo values increased to between 19% and 28% greater than on-site values. This may be due to a change in weather station used to collect data or a malfunction in the weathe r station used by the manufacturer.

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165 Table 4-1. Codes and descriptions for the experimental treatments. Treatment code Irrigation frequency (day/week) Treatment description ET-based ETM 2 RainBird ET Manager TORO 2 Toro Intelli-Sense Time-based WOS 2 Without sensor NON 0 Non-irrigated Table 4-2. Summary of inputs used to program the ET controllers. Input parameter Input TORO Soil type Sand Sprinkler type Spray head Root depth 15 cm Plant type Warm-season turfgrass Sun exposure Sunny all day Slope None Usable rainfall 100% Efficiency 95% ETM Landscape adjustment 70% Max hourly rain 20 mm Saturation allowance 9.0 mm Saturation allowance (F07) 2.5 mm Irrigation amounta depth changed monthly aThe Irrigation Amount used for ETM is the same depth used for RS and SMS treatments based on Dukes and Haman (2002b). This is the irrigation depth sc heduled in the irrigation timer connected to the ET Manager. S ee Table 2-3 for detailed depth of irrigation scheduled monthly.

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166 Table 4-3. Average weekly wa ter applied (mm) along with water savings for the treatments during F06, S07 and F07. Average water applied Water savings (%) Treatment F06 S07 F07 Average F06 S07 F07 Average ETM 14.4 b 15.0 c 12.8 b 10.7 40 59a 59 53 TORO 8.6 c 29.1 b 11.7 b 16.5 63 25 62 50 WOS 23.9 a 38.8 a 29.6 a 30.8 0 0 0 CV % 37.7 25.5 26.8 Different letters in columns indicate differen ces by Duncans multiple range test at the 95% confidence level. aProduced poor turf quality ratings in S07. Table 4-4. Average turf quali ty ratings for the ET controller treatments during the three treatment periods. Season average turf quality Treatment F06 S07 F07 Average ETM 7.1 a 4.5 b 5.7 ab 5.8 TORO 6.5 ab 6.1 a 6.4 a 6.3 WOS 6.1 b 6.5 a 6.3 a 6.3 NON NAa NA 5.0 b CV % 16.4 20.6 17.9 Different letters in colu mns indicate differences by Duncans multiple range test at the 95% confidence level. NA indicates that the treatment was ended before the treatment period was over due to substantial damage to the turfgrass quality. Table 4-5. Summary of the percentage of i rrigation events bypassed by the two ET controllers during the three treatment periods. Irrigation events bypassed (%) Treatment F06 S07 F07 ETM 52 57a 58 TORO 26 9 35 aProduced less than acceptable turf quality during S07.

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167 Table 4-6. Comparison of ET readings taken manually and supplied by the manufacturer with values collected using an on-si te weather station. Manual ETo readings were taken during testing three times per w eek 9/28/2006 and ending on 11/30/2007. Manufacturer data was compared during th e S07 and F07 testing periods between 6/13/2007 and 10/28/2007 when data wa s available for both controllers. Weather Source Manual ETo readings (mm) Manufacturer provided ETo (mm) Weekly average ETo provided by manufacturer (mm) ETM 3.5 b 4.0 c 26.2 b TORO 4.1 a 5.0 a 33.1 a On-Site 3.5 b 4.2 b 27.8 b CV % 21.2 13.2 6.1 Different letters in columns indicate differences by Duncans multiple range test at the 95% confidence level.

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168 Solar radiation (MJ/m2/day) 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Rso Rs Temperature (oC) -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 T dew T min Day of year 060120180240300360 Wind speed (m/s) 0 2 4 6 Wind speed Relative humidity (%) 20 40 60 80 100 120 Maximum Minimum A B C D Figure 4-1. Quality analysis for data collected from onsite weather station in 2006 including: A) solar radiation, B) temperature, C) rela tive humidity and D) wind speed. Shaded regions are periods of experimental testing.

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169 Solar radiation (MJ/m2/day) 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Rso Rs Temperature (oC) -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 T dew T min Day of year 060120180240300360 Wind speed (m/s) 0 2 4 6 Wind speed A B C Relative humidity (%) 20 40 60 80 100 120 Maximum Minimum D Figure 4-2. Quality analysis for data collected from onsite weather station in 2007 including: A) solar radiation, B) temperature, C) rela tive humidity and D) wind speed. Shaded regions are periods of experimental testing.

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170 0 2 4 6 8 10 Weather Station ETM Oct/06 Jan/07 Apr/07 Jul/07 Oct/07 ETo (mm) 0 2 4 6 Weather Station TORO A B Figure 4-3. Daily ETo values collected manually from the A) ET Manager controller and the B) Intelli-Sense controller compared to the data from the onsite weather station.

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171 On-site ET o (mm) 0246810 ETM ET o (mm) 0 2 4 6 8 10 On-site ET o (mm) 0246810 TORO ET o (mm) 0 2 4 6 8 10 A B R 2 = 0.625 R 2 = 0.586 y = 0.85x + 0.59 y = 1.00x + 0.64 Figure 4-4. Daily ETo values collected manually from the A) ET Manager controller and the B) Intelli-Sense controller compared to the da ta from the onsite weather station. The trend lines for the data are shown in black along with the r-squared value. A 1:1 line is shown in gray for comparison. Oct/06 Jan/07 Apr/07 Jul/07 Oct/07 Cumulative ET o (mm) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 Weather Station ETM TORO 520 mm 447 mm 441 mm Figure 4-5. Cumulative ETo collected manually from the ET Manager cont roller (ETM) and the Intelli-Sense controller (TORO) compared to the data from the onsite weather station.

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172 On-site ET o (mm) 0246810 ETM ET o (mm) 0 2 4 6 8 10 On-site ET o (mm) 0246810 TORO ET o (mm) 0 2 4 6 8 10 R 2 = 0.798 R 2 = 0.718 A B y = 0.84x +1.44 y = 0.84x +0.46 Figure 4-6. Comparisons of ETo data calculated using the ons ite weather station with manufacturer provided data for the A) ET Ma nager controller and the B) Intelli-Sense controller. The trend lines for the data are shown as solid black along with the rsquared value. A 1:1 line is shown as a dotted line for comparison. Sep/06 Dec/06 Mar/07 Jun/07 Sep/07 Cumulative ETo (mm) 0 500 1000 1500 2000 Weather Station TORO 2008 mm 1756 mm Figure 4-7. Cumulative ETo data calculated using the onsite weather station and using manufacturer provided data for the TORO controller.

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173 A ug-06 S e p 06 Oct 0 6 N o v-06 De c 0 6 Jan-07 Fe b 07 Mar-07 Ap r-07 May0 7 Ju n 0 7 J ul0 7 A u g0 7 Sep-07 Oc t -07 Difference between on-site and TORO ETo (mm) -20 -10 0 10 20 30 40 Difference between on-site and TORO ET o (%) -20 -10 0 10 20 30 40 Depth Percentage Figure 4-8. Difference between ETo calculated using on-site weather data and ETo provided by the manufacturer for the TORO treatment by month. The differences between values are presented in both percentage s (left y-axis, vertical bars with diagonal lines) and as a depth in millimeters (right y-axis, shaded vertical bars). Negative values show when TORO weather data underestimated ETo compared to data collected on-site.

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174 On-site average temperature (oC) 10152025303540 ETM average temperature (oC) 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 On-site maximum temperature (oC) 10152025303540 ETM maximum temperature (oC) 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 On-site minimum temperature (oC) 10152025303540 ETM minimum temperature (oC) 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 R 2 = 0.947 R 2 = 0.901 R 2 = 0.941 A B C y = 0.85x + 3.82 y = 0.86x + 5.00 y = 0.85x + 4.28 Figure 4-9. Daily temperature data from the onsite weather sta tion and the ET Manager controller. Data includes A) average, B) maximum, and C) minimum temperature values. The trend lines for the data ar e shown in black along with the r-squared value. A 1:1 line is shown in gray for comparison.

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175 On-site solar radiation (W/m2) 0100200300400 ETM solar radiation (W/m2) 0 100 200 300 400 On-site wind speed (m/s) 01234 ETM wind speed (m/s) 0 1 2 3 4 A B R 2 = 0.784 R 2 = 0.486 y = 0.80x + 40.55 y = 0.90x 0.01 Figure 4-10. Daily A) solar radiation and B) wi nd speed data from the onsite weather station and the manufacturer data for the ET Manager controller. The trend lines for the data are shown in black along with the r-squared va lue. A 1:1 line is shown in gray for comparison.

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176 CHAPTER 5 IRRIGATION CONTROL EFFECTS ON TURF GRASS QUALITY AND ROOT GROW TH Introduction Turfgrass has many beneficial attributes making it highly desirable for homeowners. Functional benefits of turfgrass include; soil er osion control, dust stabilization, groundwater recharge, organic chemical decomposition, soil improvement, temperature moderation, noise abatement, and glare reduction. Due to its hi gh shoot density and dense root system, turfgrass can provide one of the most cost efficient methods for controlling water and wind erosion of soil surfaces. Turfgrass reduces runoff by trapping wate r, allowing it to infilt rate to the soil. Temperature in urban areas where there is little turfgrass can be up to 5 to 7oC warmer than nearby rural areas that have a higher percentage turf for gr oundcover. In addition to the environmental benefits turfgrass also provide s aesthetic benefits (Beard and Green, 1994). Water is required for the basic growth and ma intenance of turfgrass along with sustaining the quality and health of a landscape desired by homeowners. All plants, including turfgrass, require water and nutrients to support growth and maintenance (Aldous and G.J. Connellan, 1999). Temperature, wind, relative humidity and so lar radiation affect th e amount of water used by the plant. When a sufficient amount of water is not present for plant needs, the plant may go into stress. Florida receives an average of 1,300 mm of rainfall per year, but the average amount throughout the state and during the year varies (Marella, 1992). Howe ver, in Florida irrigation is still necessary due to the sporadic nature of these rainfall events and the low water holding capacity of the sandy soils pres ent throughout the state. Annual rainfall can vary greatly depending on the season of the year, the year itself or the area of the state receiving the rainfall.

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177 Higher water demands mean a need to increase the efficiency of current practices that require water. A better understa nding of plant water needs, both the total volume and the timing of delivery can lead to more efficient irrigation practices. Current Irrigation Practices In Florida, there are five water manageme nt districts responsible for establishing regulations on water use, includi ng irrigation, in the counties locat ed within the water district. Landscape irrigation is regulated in most, if not all, areas in Florida due to water shortages. In the SJRWMD irrigation is restricted to a maxi mum of two days-per-week between 4 pm and 10 am (SJRWMD, 2008). A study conducted in Colorado looked at the effectiv eness of day of the week watering restrictions at reducing water use during drou ght conditions. The study found that mandatory watering restric tions along with educational mate rial reduced water use by 13 to 53% with the highest water savings seen in the cities where watering was limited to either one or two days-per-week (K enney et al., 2004). Over-watering or inefficient irri gation of turfgrass can lead to the presence of weeds and diseases and can reduce the effectiveness of fertilizers and other management practices (Harivandi et al., 1984). Proper irrigation practice is generally thought to be infrequent, deep applications of water in order to en courage deeper rooting of the grass. Rooting Characteristics Rooting characteristics influence the amount of soil moisture available to a plant for growth. The amount of soil moisture available th en affects the frequency of irrigation that is necessary for optimum plant res ponse. Understanding th e rooting characterist ics of plants can assist in developing more effective and effici ent irrigation practices (Peacock and Dudeck, 1985).

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178 In one study performed by Peacock and Dudeck (1985) the rooting response of Floratam St. Augustinegrass (Stenotaphrum secundatum) to varied irrigation inte rvals was studied. The testing was performed under field conditions wi th loamy siliceous hyperthermic Grosarenic Paleudult soil, similar to soil cond itions present in this study. Both root mass and root lengths were examined. Total irrigation volume was equa l for all treatments; only frequency was varied with 2, 3, 4 or 6 days of irrigation per week The study was conducted over two growing periods in 1980 and 1981. During both growing seasons no treatment effect was seen. While irrigation interval had no effect on root length, applying irrigation increa sed root mass. In 1980 over 40% of the root mass occurred below 30 cm, while in 1981 only 9% of the root mass was found below 30 cm. According to a study reported by Doss et al. (1960) the rooting depth of warm-season forage species was decreased as soil moisture wa s increased indicating th at deeper rooting is encouraged by watering less frequently and that deeper rooting may be a drought avoidance mechanism (Peacock and Dudeck, 1985). Turf Quality Peacock and Dudeck (1984) used varying irriga tion intervals of 2, 3, 4 or 6 days to simulate different plant stress condi tions. All treatments received the same volume of irrigation. This study found that turfgrass quality and density were not affected by the different irrigation intervals applied. The measur ed parameters of the study were ; carbon exchange rates (CER), ET, plant water potential component changes, leaf diffusive resistan ce, transpiration and turfgrass quality. An irrigation interval of ever y 6 days resulted in a decrease in CER and ET. After irrigation, both of these values increased. The season average values for CER, ET, leaf water potential components, and transpiration were all lowest for the treatment receiving irrigation every 6 days.

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179 The objectives of this experiment were to evaluate the differences in irrigation water application, rooting depth and turfgrass qual ity of St. Augustinegrass comparing irrigation scheduled for 1, 2 and 7 days-per -week and to correlate the presen ce of wilt in the turfgrass with corresponding soil VWC values. Materials and Methods Site Description This study was performed at the Plant Scienc e Research and Education Unit in Citra, Florida. There were four treatment peri ods from 22 April 2006 to 30 June 2006 (S06), 23 September 2006 to 15 December 2006 (F06) and 1 May 2007 to 31 August 2007 (S07) and September 2007 to 30 November 2007 (F07). In August 2005, Floratam St. Augustinegrass (Stenotaphrum secundatum [Walt.] Kuntze.) sod was laid in the cente r 1.8 m X 1.8 m (5.9 ft) of each 4.3 m X 4.3 m (14 ft) plot. The three soil types present in the research area are Tavares sand, Candler sand, and Arredondo fine sand. Ar redondo fine sand has a field capacity (FC) of 10% (soil water content expressed as a volumetric basis in this manuscript), a permanent wilting point (PWP) of 3% and is 94% sand, 2% silt a nd 4% clay. Candler sand has a field capacity of 6%, a permanent wilting point of 1% and is 96% sand, 2% silt a nd 2% clay. Tavares sand has a field capacity of 5%, a permanent wilting point of 1% and is 97% sand, 1% silt, and 2% clay (Carlisle et al., 1989). Further so il testing was performed on the soil at the research site to develop more appropriate values for the parameters FC and PWP. Soil testing was performed on A ugust 11, 2006 to develop more si te specific values of FC and PWP. The values of FC in the experi mental field vary across between 6% and 28% volumetric water content (VWC). Values for ava ilable water in each block, based on a 30 cm root zone, are shown in Figure 5-1. Due to variations in soil mo isture across the research site treatments were arranged in a completely randomized block design.

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180 Experimental Design Rain sensor (RS) treatments were connected to an irrigation time clock to function in bypass mode operation so that a scheduled irriga tion event would be bypassed if rainfall depth exceeded the rainfall threshold. A Mini-Clik (H unter Industries Inc., San Marcos, CA.) rain sensor was used to establish seven treatments. The rain sensors were set for two depths of rainfall, 6 mm and 3 mm and three di fferent frequencies of irrigation events, 1, 2 and 7 days of irrigation per week. The same total applicati on depth per week was divided over the possible number of days of irrigation per week. An example of the difference in irrigation depth per event for different frequencies of irrigation duri ng the month of May is shown in Table 5-1. Additionally there were seven soil moisture sens or (SMS) controlled treat ments using two brands of soil moisture sensors; the Acclima Digita l TDT RS500 (Acclima Inc., Meridian, ID.) and the LawnLogic LL1004 (Alpine Automation, Inc., Aurora, CO.). These were attached to the irrigation timer in bypass mode similar to the rain sensors. Two ET contro ller treatments (ET) were also used in testing; the ET ManagerTM (Rain Bird Corporation, Glendora, CA) and the Toro Intelli-sense (The Toro Company, Bloomington, MN). The ET Manager (ETM) was attached in bypass mode like the rain sensors a nd the Toro Intelli-Sense (TORO) was used to schedule depth and frequency of irrigation. Al l of the ET and SMS treatments were limited to two days of irrigation per week. Data from the SMS and ET controlled plots was used for analysis of the effect of water applied on turf quality and rooting depth along with the effect of VWC on wilting presence, treatment effects were not considered in statistical analysis. Analysis of the correlation between freque ncy and turf quality was perfor med using only rain sensor and non-irrigated treatments. There was one control treatment in the experimental design and two time-based comparisons (Table 5-1). The control was a non-irrigated (NON) treatment. The comparison

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181 treatments consisted of a time-based schedule w ithout a rain sensor (WOS), time-based schedule with a rain sensor at 6 mm (WRS) and a deficit replacement schedule (DWRS) that was scheduled to apply 60% of the possible depth scheduled for WOS and the other RS treatments. Every treatment except for the DWRS and the NON treatments had the same possible total depth of irrigation application. Diffe rences in irrigation applicati on were due to bypassed irrigation events. Reductions in water a pplied by DWRS could be from bypa ssed irrigation events or from a shallower depth being a pplied during irrigation. Data Collection Rooting Root samples were collected from every plot on 22 June 2006 and from the plots of nine selected treatments on 25 July 2007. Selection of treatments in 2007 was conducted to provide a range of irrigation frequencies and total depths of water applied. Samples were taken in a corner of the plots away from edges where turfgra ss was well established. A sampling device was constructed out of a 5 cm diameter metal pipe (Figure 5-2). Samples were analyzed at two depths: 0 to 15 cm, and 15 to 30 cm. Samples were rinsed over an 18 gauge soil sieve to remove soil from roots, which were then placed in an oven and dried at a temp of 55oC for 48 hours. All root samples were then weighed. Statistical analyses were performed on the data using Statistical Analysis System software (SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, NC) using the General Linear Model, proc GLM comparing the mass of roots at the two sampling depths with total water applied, average weekly water applied, frequenc y of irrigation scheduling and year samples were collected. Turf quality Turfgrass quality was rated at least once ever y two weeks during S06 and F06 and at least once a month during S07 and F07. Quality evaluations were made using the National Turfgrass

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182 Evaluation Program (NTEP) procedures (Shearman and Morris, 1998). Th e ratings were on a 1 to 9 scale, with a 1 representing dead or dormant grass and a 9 representing grass with good color and density, and without weeds (Shearman and Morris, 1998). A quality rating of 5 was considered minimally acceptable for a homeowner lawn. Statistical analyses for turf quality data was performed with Statistical Analysis System software (SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, NC) using the General Linear Model (proc GLM) and the mixed procedure (proc MIXED). Comparisons were made between the total amounts of water applied and average weekly water applied (cons idering irrigation and rainfall), frequency of irrigation, and treatment period. Means se paration was conducted with Duncans Multiple Range Test. Wilting Measurements of the area of wilted turfgrass were taken daily during 2007 over a period from 20 May 2007 to 29 May 2007 with the exception of 21 May 2007. Measurements were taken in the afternoon when the areas with wilt were easy to distinguish. These measurements were then analyzed in comparison to volumetric water content of the soil which was recorded hourly using time domain reflectometry (TDR) se nsors (CS616 Water Content Reflectometer, Campbell Scientific, Logan, UT). The TDR sensors were buried in the center of every plot with the top of the sensor at a depth of 8 cm and the bottom of the sensor at a depth of 18 cm. A two piecewise linear regression was performed on wilt data using SigmaPlot graphing software (Systat Software, Inc., San Jose, CA.). Results Root Sampling Compared to 2006, root samples in 2007 on av erage showed increased root mass at both sampling depths. Average root mass, for all pl ots tested, increased by 37% from 2006 to 2007.

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183 In 2007, root mass in the top 15 cm of soil increased by 16% and root mass from 15 to 30 cm increased by 163%. From 2006 to 2007 the root mass in the top 15 cm increased from 3.26 to 3.77 mg/cm3 and from 0.54 to 1.43 mg/cm3 for the 15 to 30 cm depth. In 2006, 86% of the total root mass was in the top 15 cm of the soil. In 200 7, the percentage of roots in the top 15 cm was 73%. Total and weekly water applied showed no corr elation with root mass at a depth of 0 to15 cm in 2006 (P=0.270 and P=0.428) or in 2007 (P=0.219 and P=0.176; Figure 5-3). There was also no relationship between the to tal and weekly water applied and root mass at a depth of 15 to 30 cm in 2006 (P=0.644 and P=0.065; Figure 5-3) or in 2007 (P=0.880 and P=0.837). The root mass collected for the various irrigation frequencie s is shown in Table 5-2. Root mass at both the 0 to 15 cm and 15 to 30 cm sampling depth showed no response to irrigation frequency in 2006 (P=0.138 and P=0.379) or in 2007 (P=0.254 and P=0.139; Table 5-2). Water Applied and Turf Quality In F06 and S07 the NON treatment was ende d early by implementing a timed irrigation schedule to prevent death of the turfgrass and the need to re-sod the plots. In F06, turf quality was a 2 for plots with an irrigation frequency of 0 by the third week of te sting. In S07 this treatment was ended at the end of the first week due to loss of turf quality. During both testing periods where treatments with no irrigation were continued (S06 and F07) it was seen that turf quality ratings for these plots were lower than plots in all other treatments. In F07, sufficient rainfall maintained adequate turf quality in th ese plots, allowing the treatment to continue throughout the testing period. The plots receivin g irrigation 1 day/week had lower turf quality ratings compared to the plots rece iving 2 and 7 day/week irrigation. Analyzing total water applied and turfgrass quality data for S06 showed no relationship between the two (P=0.409; Figure 5-4), but there was a trend betw een weekly water applied and

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184 turf quality (P<0.001; Figure 5-5). Between de pths applied of 0 and 20 mm per week the trend in turf quality is linearly increasing and betw een 20 and 30 mm applied weekly the relationship becomes less apparent. Poor turf quality for plot s receiving more than 30 mm of water was most likely due to factors other than the volume of water applied. While all three frequencies of irrigation (1, 2 and 7 days-per-week) had plots with turf quality ratings of 8 at some point during S06, the 7 day/week treatment never had a turf quality rating below 4 while the 1 day/week treatments had ratings as low as 2. Also, the stan dard deviation in turf qu ality for the 7 day/week plots was smaller than the other irrigation frequencie s tested in S06 (Figure 5-6). Both of the one day/week treatments had similar low turf quality ratings at the end of S06 (P=0.087) but only RS1-3mm (rain sensor set at 3 mm) was below acc eptable. The other one day/week treatment had a rain sensor set at 6 mm. In this example, the 3 mm threshold rain sensor bypassed 1 more irrigation event than the 6 mm setting resu lting in a decrease in turf quality. No relationship was seen between turf quality and weekly water applied (P=0.150) during F06 (Figure 5-5B) or between tu rf quality and total water applied (P=0.593; Figure 5-4B). Frequency of irrigation applied also had no effect on turf quality in F06 (P=0.409). Turf quality ratings in general were hi gher in F06 than in S06. A correlation during S07 was seen between both total water applied and turf quality (P=0.014) and water applied week ly and turf quality (P<0.001; Figure 5-4C and 5-5C). This treatment period had the strongest relationship between total wa ter applied and turf quality. There was an effect of frequency on turf quality during S07 (P=0.002). Plots in the 2 and 7 day/week irrigation frequency treatments tended to have higher turf qualit y than the 1 day/week irrigation plots (Table 5-3).

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185 In F07, there was a relationship between turf quality and water app lied weekly (P=0.027) but not between turf quality a nd total water applied (P=0.485). This period received more rainfall than the other treatment periods. This was the only treatment period with rainfall depths greater than historical averag es for the area. It received a total of 347 mm compared to a historical average of 258 mm. This was also the only treatment period with days of rainfall exceeding the historical number of days receiving a depth of rain greater than 2.5 cm. The other three treatment periods had rainfall depths that were less than ha lf the historical depth. The response of the turfgrass to varying frequency of irrigation was strong in F07 (P<0.001; Figure 5-6D). The effect was enhanced by the fact that the treatment NON was operated the entire time period. While turf quality ratings in these pl ots were high enough to allow the treatment to operate, they were lower than the plots with irrigation 1, 2 or 7 days/week. Wilt Analysis Analysis of data collected during S07 demons trated the volumetric water content where different percentages of turfgrass area showed signs of wilt. Measurements of the percentage of area displaying signs of wilt along with the volumetri c water content of the plot at the time of the measurement, separated by block, are shown in Figure 5-7. Soil analysis showed that the soils in these blocks had very different water holding ch aracteristics and so were separated in this analysis. A two piecewise linear equation was used in this analysis to show the trend of wilt with VWC (Figure 5-7). The data showed that wilt tended to increase slowly with decreasing VWC below FC but below some value of VWC the ar ea with wilt started to increase much more rapidly. The point at which the wilt began to increase rapidly is demonstrated as the inflection point of the piecewise linear equation. The values of R2 for these lines varied between 0.38 and 0.67. The lowest correlation (0.38) was in block 1 of the field and the highest (0.67) was in

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186 block 2. For blocks 1, 2 and 3 the inflection poi nt occurred at a VWC close to 7%. In Block 4 the inflection point was at 11% VWC. Conclusions Rooting depth was not affected by frequency of irrigation or water applied during either year of testing. Total root mass increased be tween the two years of testing by 35%. The largest increase was seen in the 15 to 30 cm depth, with an increase of 156% from 2006 to 2007. In both 2006 and 2007 large percentages, 87% and 75% respectively, of the total root mass were seen in the top 15 cm of the soil profile. During the spring and summer months of testin g in both years, frequency of irrigation appeared to have an effect on turf quality with 2 and 7 day/w eek irrigation schedules producing better turf quality than 1 day/week. In F07 th ere was no significant difference in turf quality between the 1, 2 or 7 day/week frequencies of irrigation. Non-irrigated plots produced turf quality significantly lower than the other plots in F07. Rain sensor setting was an important factor in turf quality for 1 da y/week irrigation schedule. The threshold setting needs to ensure adequate water is applied to th e turfgrass before bypassing the onl y irrigation event for the week. Water applied appeared to have a correlation wi th turf quality in S06 and S07, as weekly water applied increased, turf quality increased Plots receiving less than 20 mm/week during these treatment periods tended to have decreased turf quality. Testing periods F06 and F07 both had higher average turf quality ratings than S06 and S07, with no correlation between turf quality and water applied. F07 received enough rainfall th at non-irrigated plots maintained adequate turf quality throughout the treatment period. Wilting analysis data showed that, in a sa ndy soil, wilt tended to increase slowly with decreasing soil water content until some value of VWC (inflection point) where the wilt began to

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187 increase rapidly. For this experiment three ou t of four blocks in the research site had an inflection point of 7% VWC and the f ourth had an inflection point of 10%.

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188 Table 5-1. Summary of irrigation treatment codes and descrip tions along with water applied per irrigation event during the month of May. Treatment Code Irrigation frequency (days/week) Depth per irrigation event (mm) Treatment description RS1-3mm 1 46 Rain sensor set at 3 mm rainfall threshold RS2-3mm 2 23 Rain sensor set at 3 mm rainfall threshold RS7-3mm 7 7 Rain sensor set at 3 mm rainfall threshold RS1-6mm 1 46 Rain sensor set at 6 mm rainfall threshold RS2-6mm 2 23 Rain sensor set at 6 mm rainfall threshold RS7-6mm 7 7 Rain sensor set at 6 mm rainfall threshold DWRS 2 14 Reduced irrigation schedule 60% of RS2-6mm WOS 2 23 No rain sensor attached NON 0 0 No irrigation applied Table 5-2. Summary of the root mass collected in 2006 and 2007 at two de pths, 0 to 15 cm and from 15 to 30 cm. Irrigation frequency and the year the samples were taken were both analyzed for effects on root ma ss at the two depths of testing. Irrigation frequency (days/week) Root mass from 0 to 15 cm (mg/cm3) Root mass from 15 to 30 cm (mg/cm3) 2006 2007 Both 2006 2007 Both 0 2.44 b NAa NA 0.2 a NA NA 1 4.24 a 3.12 a 3.67 a 0.81 a 0.98 a 0.88 a 2 3.16 ab 3.97 a 3.40 a 0.54 a 1.63 a 0.88 a 7 3.33 ab 3.16 a 3.26 a 0.41 a 0.88 a 0.58 a CV % 34.1 26.7 34.1 99.4 68.6 99.3 Year comparison 3.26 b 3.77 a 0.54 b 1.43 a CV % 31.9 85.8 Different letters in columns indicate differences by Duncans multiple range test at the 95% confidence level. NA indicates soil sampling analysis was not available for an irrigation frequency of 0 during 2007 because plots for the nonirrigated treatment received supplemental irrigation prior to root sampling.

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189 Table 5-3. Summary of turf quali ty analysis showing average turf quality values for each of the four treatment periods S06, F06, S07 and F07. Irrigation frequency and treatment period were both analyzed for effects on average turf quality. Irrigation frequency (days/week) Average turf quality (1 to 9 scale) S06 F06 S07 F07 0 1.4 c NAa NA 5.0 b 1 4.9 b NA 5.8 c 6.2 a 2 5.9 a 6.7 a 6.2 b 6.4 a 7 6.2 a 6.5 a 6.7 a 6.8 a CV % 27.7 18.4 18.6 17.1 Treatment period comparison 5.5 c 6.7 a 6.3 b 6.3 b CV % 22.4 Different letters in columns i ndicate differences by Duncans multiple range test at the 95% confidence level. aTreatments were ended due to poor turf quality in F06 and S07. In F06, turf quality was a 2 for plots with an irrigation frequency of 0 by the third week of testing. In S07, th is treatment was ended at the end of the first week due to loss of turf quality. The 1 day/week treatments had a malfunction in the irrigation timer for a period of 20 days causing no irrigation to be applied. Therefore averages could not be analyzed fo r the plots receiving irrigation 1 day/week.

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190 Location in the field (Block) 1234 Available water (mm) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Figure 5-1. Mean values for available water are shown for each block in the field based on a 30 cm root depth. Bars show the maximum and minimum range of the values within in each block. Figure 5-2. Sampling device used for collecting roots in turfgrass plots.

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191 Root mass (mg/cm3) 0 2 4 6 0 to 15 cm depth 15 to 30 cm depth Weekly water applied (mm) 01 02 03 04 0 0 2 4 6 A B Figure 5-3. Root mass collected (mg/cm3) at two depths in the soil profile, 0 to15 cm (circles) and 15 cm to 30 cm (triangles), along with average weekly water applied in A) 2006 and B) 2007.

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192 0100200300400500 Turfgrass quality (1 to 9 scale) 0 2 4 6 8 0100200300400500 0 2 4 6 8 Total water applied (mm) 0200400600800 0 2 4 6 8 0100200300400 0 2 4 6 8 A B C D Figure 5-4. Average turfgrass quality compared to total water applied during A) S06, B) F06, C) S07 and, D) F07.

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193 020406080100120 0 2 4 6 8 020406080100120 0 2 4 6 8 020406080100120 Turfgrass quality (1 to 9 scale) 0 2 4 6 8 Weekly water applied (mm) 020406080100120 0 2 4 6 8 A B C D Figure 5-5. Average turfgrass quality compared to weekly water applied in (A) S06, B) F06, C) S07 and, D) F07.

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194 01234567 0 2 4 6 8 Irrigation frequency (days of the week) 01234567 0 2 4 6 8 01234567 0 2 4 6 8 01234567 Turfgrass quality (1 to 9 scale) 0 2 4 6 8 A B C D Figure 5-6. Box plots comparing frequency of irrigati on and turf quality during the A) S06, B) F06, C) S07, and D) F07 treatment periods Black dots represent the average turf quality rating. Error bars represent standard deviation. Irrigation frequency of 0 may contain fewer observations.

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195 Block 1 24681012141618 Area with signs of wilt (%) 0 20 40 60 80 100 Block 2 24681012141618 0 20 40 60 80 100 Block 3 24681012141618 0 20 40 60 80 100 Block 4 VWC (%) 24681012141618 0 20 40 60 80 100 R2 = 0.38 R2 = 0.67 R2 = 0.59 R2 = 0.57 A B C D Figure 5-7. The effect of volumetric water content (VWC; %) on the presence of wilting in turfgrass. The scatter plot is the percentage area of turfgrass with the presence of wilt compared to the corresponding volumetric wa ter content for the block the turfgrass was located in. A) Block 1. B) Bl ock 2. C) Block 3. D) Block4.

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196 CHAPTER 6 CONCLUSIONS Water Applied and Turf Quality Even though most of the te sting on soil moisture sensor irrigation controllers, evapotranspiration irrigation controllers, and ra in sensors was performed during relatively dry conditions, with the experimental area receiving less than half the historical rainfall depth, all of the technologies tested managed to reduce water application compared to a time clock irrigation schedule without a sensor to bypass irrigation cycles due to climatic conditions and most managed to maintain acceptable tu rf quality during all testing. The medium threshold SMS-based treatment s produced water savings and good quality turf during all treatment periods. Water savings for these treatments were up to 30% (AC) and 21% (LL) during dry conditions and 53% (AC) and 31% (LL) dur ing three months with normal rainfall conditions. Low threshold sensor setti ngs produced minimally acceptable (AC) and less than acceptable turf quality (LL) during the dry conditions of the spring of 2006. The LL Low treatment only managed to maintain acceptable tu rf quality during the fall of 2007, which was the only testing period where rainfa ll depths were greater than hist orical averages for the area. During October 2007, rainfall was three times the historical amount; the other fall months of testing during 2007 received rainfall depths that did not exceed hi storical averages. Overall the fall of 2007 was relatively wetter than the previous testing pe riods, but close to normal for Florida. Under the relatively wetter condi tions of the fall of 2007 the low threshold SMS settings reduced water applied by 74% (AC) and 44% (LL). High threshold settings for the SMS controllers produced little or no savings (bet ween 0 and 14%) during any of the testing. During the dry testing periods, the weekly water applied using one SMS controller for all plots (AC 7) was similar to the weekly water applied using a separate sensor for each of the four

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197 plots in the treatment (AC IR). The threshold settings for the tw o treatments were the same, but the difference was the individually monitored ir rigation for each plot compared to irrigation monitored with only one sensor burie d in the driest plot. There were differences in turf quality between AC IR and AC 7 during the spring testin g periods. The average turf quality ratings for the AC 7 treatment were a 5.1 (2006) and a 5.8 (2 007) while the AC IR plots had higher average turf quality ratings of 6.2 (2006) and 6.5 (2007) To ensure adequate water application the sensor must have the proper threshold setting for th e driest plot which will need more water to be applied. Utilizing one sensor to control the irrigation for multiple areas can be effective for reducing water applied and while maintaining acceptable turf qua lity as long as the correct location and set point is selected for sensor inst allation. In this example the driest plot was selected to ensure that adequate irri gation was applied to all of the plots. During fall 2007, which had relatively wetter co nditions, the AC 7 and AC IR treatments had similar turf quality ratings. It is important to note that all of the treatments during this testing period had at least minimally acceptable tu rf quality, even the non-irrigated plots. Rain sensor treatments, excluding DWRS, reduced wate r by 7 to 24% during the dry treatment periods and by 22 to 30% during the wetter conditions in the fall of 2007. A one-day-per-week irrigation sche dule with a rain sensor set for 3 mm of rainfall resulted in less than acceptable turf quality during the sp ring of 2006. A similar treatment that also received irrigation only once a week but had a rainfall threshold of 6 mm had acceptable turf quality during the same season. Also, in th e spring of 2007 the one-d ay-per-week irrigation treatment with a 3 mm rain sensor threshold had to be ended early due to loss of turf quality. The RS1-6mm treatment, which had a higher rain fall threshold setting, had acceptable turf

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198 quality for all of the testing periods. Thus, a 6 mm rain sensor threshold should be considered the minimum for one-day-per-w eek irrigation frequencies. Simply reducing the water applied per ir rigation event by 40% (treatment DWRS) consistently produced higher wate r savings during all of the treatment periods compared to the other rain sensor treatments and the medium th reshold SMS treatments. Reductions in water applied for this treatment ranged from 36 to 45% for the relatively dry conditions and 53% during wetter conditions. The turfgrass quality for the reduced irrigation schedule was always better than minimally acceptable, ranging fr om 6.5 to 7.1 for all testing periods. ET controllers had water savings ranging from 25 to 63% during the fall of 2006 and the spring of 2007; both were considered dry testi ng periods. However in the spring of 2007 the ETM controller produced less than acceptable tu rf quality due to an inappropriate input parameter setting related to effectiv e rainfall. This input resulted in a water holding capacity that was greater than actual value; therefore, the controller bypassed irriga tion longer than other treatments. The controller estimated that water wa s still in the profile and available to the plant that was never actually in the soil profile. This shows the importance of controller set up in enabling the systems to work correctly, bot h reducing water applie d and maintaining good quality turfgrass. During the relatively wetter conditions of the fall of 2007, ET controllers had high water savings of (59% for the ETM and 62% for the TORO and both had acceptable turf quality. The average water savings for treatments that maintained turf quality above a rating of 6 (better than minimally acceptable) during the trea tment periods when all the technologies were installed are as follows in order from greates t to least water savings produced; TORO (50%),

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199 DWRS (47%), AC 10 (34%), LL Med (23%), RS7-3mm (26%), RS2-3mm (17%), RS7-6mm (16%), AC 13 (12%) and LL High (6%). Overall, the proper installation and set-up of each of the technologies tested here was an important factor in determining the effectiv eness to which each system could reduce water applied and maintain turfgrass quality at a level sufficient for homeowners. Volumetric moisture content threshold was an important factor in co rrectly establishing an irrigation schedule using an SMS system along with ensuring adequate cont act between the soil and the sensor. For ET controller systems the in put parameters affect the amount of water applied and the frequency with which it is applied. The input parameters determine things such as water holding capacity of the soil. Rain sensors produced water savi ngs and only one treatment had less than acceptable quality. The water savings achieved using rain sensors was approximately half that of those achieved using soil moisture sensors (medium threshold AC sensor) and ET controllers, with the exception of DWRS. The threshold setting shoul d be set appropriately based on local watering restrictions. With limited allowable days for ir rigation the rainfall threshold needs to be set adequately to ensure that irrigation is only bypa ssed when a sufficient amount of water has been applied for plant needs. Control Device Performance and Accuracy Soil Moisture Sensors The variability of performance of the sensors tested, or the range over which they bypassed irrigation, was smaller for the AC sensors than the LL sensors. The range is the difference between the highest VWC (i.e. we t conditions) at which the sens or allowed irrigation and the lowest VWC (i.e. dry conditions) at which the sensor bypassed irrigation. With a smaller variability of performance, the response of the co ntroller to certain dept hs of soil water content becomes more predictable. The smallest erro r range for the AC sensors during all treatment

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200 periods was 0% and the largest was 3.4% VWC. The LL sensors had a range of between 2.0% and 4.4% VWC. During the spring of 2006, the LL Low controller bypasse d irrigation when soil VWC was as low as 4.7% (approximately 0.2 cm or 9% of total available water) and allowed irrigation when soil VWC was 8.6%. Bypassing irri gation events at low values of soil water content lead to a decrease in turf quality, with an average turf quality rating of 4.2. The same controller during the same testing period a llowed irrigation when soil VWC was 8.6%. Further testing showed that the Acclima sensors had good precision and the VWC data collected from the sensors had a good correlati on compared to the data collected using TDR sensors in the experimental plots. The TDR data was used as a standard of comparison. The trend line for the data from the AC controllers and the TDR data had valu es of r-squared between 0.77 and 0.89 indicating that the TD R data explained most of the variability in the AC data. While there was good precision of the sensors, comp ared to the TDR, accuracy varied. Some of the sensors tended to read VWC higher than the correlating TDR. Seven of the 8 AC sensors tested recorded lower values for VWC than the TDR readings, with average differences with the TDR readings of between 0.1% VWC and 2.3% VWC. One sensor (AC 10) tended to record soil VWC values lower than the TDR by only 0.2%. The TDR sensors used in this testing have a published error range of +/-2.5% VWC (Campbell Scientific, Inc ., 2006). This means that the AC sensors throughout the four seasons of testin g had an error range that fell within the known range of accuracy of the TDR sensors used in testing. Laboratory testing of the LawnLogic sensors showed soil water tension for the various threshold settings varied by between 0.1 kPa and 4.5 kPa. At hi gher LawnLogic threshold levels (9 through 6) the corresponding soil water tension values varied be tween sensors by only 0 to 0.7 kPa. The lower threshold settings (6 through 1), which correlate with drier soil moisture

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201 conditions, had larger differences in compared to the soil water tension, varying by 1.4 to 4.5 kPa. Evapotranspiration Controllers ETo calculations for the TORO, both supplied by the manufacturer and collected manually from the controller, tended to overestimate ETo compared to data collected onsite. Based on manufacturer data it overestimated ETo by 19% over a 4 month period while the ETo data for the ETM were within 5% over the same 4 mont h period. Manufacturer provided monthly ETo data for the TORO on average was with in 6% of the on-site data for the months of August 2006 to April 2007, but after April 2007 the average monthly ETo values increased to 23% greater than on-site values. This may be due to a change in weather station used to collect data or a malfunction in the weather station used by the manufacturer. Irrigation Frequency on Turf Quality and Root Growth Rooting depth was not affected by frequency of irrigation or water applied during 2006 or 2007. Overall total root mass increased be tween 2006 and 2007 by 37%. The largest increase was seen at a depth of 15 to 30 cm, with an in crease of 163% in 2007 compared to 2006. In both 2006 and 2007 large percentages, 86% and 73% respectively, of the to tal root mass were seen in the top 15 cm of the soil profile, compar ed to the total sample depth of 30 cm. During the spring and summer months of testin g in both years, frequency of irrigation appeared to have an effect on turf quality with 2 and 7 day/w eek irrigation schedules producing better turf quality than 1 day/w eek. During the relatively wette r conditions in the fall of 2007, there was no significant difference in turf quali ty between the 1, 2 or 7 day/week irrigation frequencies. Non-irrigated pl ots had a minimally acceptable turf quality rating (5.0) during these wetter conditions, but the turf quali ty was significantly lower than any other treatments. The fall of 2007 was the only testing period where turf quality in the nonirrigated plots was acceptable.

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202 Water applied appeared to have a correlation wi th turf quality in spring months of testing in both 2006 and 2007. As weekly water applie d increased, turf quality increased. Plots receiving less than 20 mm/week during these trea tment periods tended to have lower turf quality ratings. In general turf quality ratings were better in the fall months than the spring months for both years of testing. During the fall months there was no correlation between turf quality and water applied. Wilting analysis data showed that, in the sandy soil present at the res earch site, wilt tended to increase slowly with decreasing soil water c ontent until some value of VWC where the wilt increased rapidly. The soil water content at wh ich the wilt began to in crease rapidly was called the inflection point. For this experiment three out of four blocks in th e research site had an inflection point of 7% VWC and the fourth had an inflection point of 10%. This inflection point is site and soil specific and a general recommenda tion for sandy soils can not be made from this study alone.

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203 APPENDIX A CHAPTER 2 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS. Soil Moisture Sensor Treatments Water Applied and Turf Quality SMS data SMS; input year$ season$ month$ week$ tmt$ rep mm type$ TQ; cards; 2006 S06 Apr06 1 NON 1 2006 S06 May06 2 NON 1 2006 S06 May06 3 NON 1 1 2006 S06 May06 4 NON 1 1 2006 S06 May06 5 NON 1 1 2006 S06 June06 6 NON 1 2006 S06 June06 7 NON 1 1 2006 S06 June06 8 NON 1 2006 S06 June06 9 NON 1 1 2006 S06 June06 10 NON 1 2006 S06 Apr06 1 NON 2 2006 S06 May06 2 NON 2 2006 S06 May06 3 NON 2 2 2006 S06 May06 4 NON 2 1 2006 S06 May06 5 NON 2 1 2006 S06 June06 6 NON 2 2006 S06 June06 7 NON 2 1 2006 S06 June06 8 NON 2 2006 S06 June06 9 NON 2 1 2006 S06 June06 10 NON 2 2006 S06 Apr06 1 NON 3 2006 S06 May06 2 NON 3 2006 S06 May06 3 NON 3 3 2006 S06 May06 4 NON 3 1 2006 S06 May06 5 NON 3 1 2006 S06 June06 6 NON 3 2006 S06 June06 7 NON 3 1 2006 S06 June06 8 NON 3 2006 S06 June06 9 NON 3 2 2006 S06 June06 10 NON 3 2006 S06 Apr06 1 NON 4 2006 S06 May06 2 NON 4 2006 S06 May06 3 NON 4 4 2006 S06 May06 4 NON 4 1 2006 S06 May06 5 NON 4 1 2006 S06 June06 6 NON 4 2006 S06 June06 7 NON 4 1 2006 S06 June06 8 NON 4 2006 S06 June06 9 NON 4 2 2006 S06 June06 10 NON 4 2007 F07 Sep07 18 NON 1 2007 F07 Sep07 19 NON 1 2007 F07 Sep07 20 NON 1 5 2007 F07 Sep07 21 NON 1 2007 F07 Oct07 22 NON 1 2007 F07 Oct07 23 NON 1 2007 F07 Oct07 24 NON 1 4 2007 F07 Oct07 25 NON 1 2007 F07 Oct07 26 NON 1

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204 2007 F07 Nov07 27 NON 1 2007 F07 Nov07 28 NON 1 3 2007 F07 Nov07 29 NON 1 2007 F07 Nov07 30 NON 1 2007 F07 Sep07 18 NON 2 2007 F07 Sep07 19 NON 2 2007 F07 Sep07 20 NON 2 5 2007 F07 Sep07 21 NON 2 2007 F07 Oct07 22 NON 2 2007 F07 Oct07 23 NON 2 2007 F07 Oct07 24 NON 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 NON 2 2007 F07 Oct07 26 NON 2 2007 F07 Nov07 27 NON 2 2007 F07 Nov07 28 NON 2 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 NON 2 2007 F07 Nov07 30 NON 2 2007 F07 Sep07 18 NON 3 2007 F07 Sep07 19 NON 3 2007 F07 Sep07 20 NON 3 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 NON 3 2007 F07 Oct07 22 NON 3 2007 F07 Oct07 23 NON 3 2007 F07 Oct07 24 NON 3 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 NON 3 2007 F07 Oct07 26 NON 3 2007 F07 Nov07 27 NON 3 2007 F07 Nov07 28 NON 3 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 NON 3 2007 F07 Nov07 30 NON 3 2007 F07 Sep07 18 NON 4 2007 F07 Sep07 19 NON 4 2007 F07 Sep07 20 NON 4 3 2007 F07 Sep07 21 NON 4 2007 F07 Oct07 22 NON 4 2007 F07 Oct07 23 NON 4 2007 F07 Oct07 24 NON 4 5 2007 F07 Oct07 25 NON 4 2007 F07 Oct07 26 NON 4 2007 F07 Nov07 27 NON 4 2007 F07 Nov07 28 NON 4 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 NON 4 2007 F07 Nov07 30 NON 4 2006 S06 Apr06 1 AC10 1 27 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 AC10 1 26 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 AC10 1 27 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 4 AC10 1 40 SMS 6 2006 S06 May06 5 AC10 1 27 SMS 6 2006 S06 June06 6 AC10 1 33 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 AC10 1 17 SMS 5 2006 S06 June06 8 AC10 1 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 AC10 1 32 SMS 5 2006 S06 June06 10 AC10 1 17 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 AC10 2 27 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 AC10 2 27 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 AC10 2 27 SMS 6 2006 S06 May06 4 AC10 2 40 SMS 6

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205 2006 S06 May06 5 AC10 2 27 SMS 5 2006 S06 June06 6 AC10 2 33 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 AC10 2 16 SMS 5 2006 S06 June06 8 AC10 2 16 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 AC10 2 32 SMS 5 2006 S06 June06 10 AC10 2 16 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 AC10 3 28 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 AC10 3 27 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 AC10 3 28 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 4 AC10 3 40 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 5 AC10 3 28 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 6 AC10 3 34 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 AC10 3 17 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 8 AC10 3 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 AC10 3 34 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 10 AC10 3 17 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 AC10 4 27 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 AC10 4 27 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 AC10 4 27 SMS 6 2006 S06 May06 4 AC10 4 40 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 5 AC10 4 27 SMS 6 2006 S06 June06 6 AC10 4 33 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 AC10 4 17 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 8 AC10 4 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 AC10 4 33 SMS 6 2006 S06 June06 10 AC10 4 16 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 AC13 1 28 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 AC13 1 27 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 AC13 1 28 SMS 6 2006 S06 May06 4 AC13 1 41 SMS 5 2006 S06 May06 5 AC13 1 28 SMS 5 2006 S06 June06 6 AC13 1 34 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 AC13 1 33 SMS 5 2006 S06 June06 8 AC13 1 34 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 AC13 1 34 SMS 4 2006 S06 June06 10 AC13 1 33 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 AC13 2 28 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 AC13 2 28 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 AC13 2 27 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 4 AC13 2 39 SMS 6 2006 S06 May06 5 AC13 2 28 SMS 6 2006 S06 June06 6 AC13 2 34 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 AC13 2 34 SMS 6 2006 S06 June06 8 AC13 2 33 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 AC13 2 34 SMS 6 2006 S06 June06 10 AC13 2 34 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 AC13 3 27 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 AC13 3 26 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 AC13 3 27 SMS 6 2006 S06 May06 4 AC13 3 37 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 5 AC13 3 27 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 6 AC13 3 32 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 AC13 3 32 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 8 AC13 3 33 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 AC13 3 32 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 10 AC13 3 32 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 AC13 4 26 SMS

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206 2006 S06 May06 2 AC13 4 27 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 AC13 4 27 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 4 AC13 4 40 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 5 AC13 4 27 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 6 AC13 4 33 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 AC13 4 33 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 8 AC13 4 33 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 AC13 4 33 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 10 AC13 4 32 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 ACIR 1 14 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 ACIR 1 27 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 ACIR 1 27 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 4 ACIR 1 38 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 5 ACIR 1 27 SMS 6 2006 S06 June06 6 ACIR 1 34 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 ACIR 1 17 SMS 5 2006 S06 June06 8 ACIR 1 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 ACIR 1 17 SMS 5 2006 S06 June06 10 ACIR 1 16 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 ACIR 2 14 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 ACIR 2 27 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 ACIR 2 28 SMS 4 2006 S06 May06 4 ACIR 2 41 SMS 5 2006 S06 May06 5 ACIR 2 27 SMS 4 2006 S06 June06 6 ACIR 2 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 ACIR 2 18 SMS 3 2006 S06 June06 8 ACIR 2 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 ACIR 2 17 SMS 3 2006 S06 June06 10 ACIR 2 17 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 ACIR 3 35 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 ACIR 3 24 SMS 6 2006 S06 May06 4 ACIR 3 30 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 5 ACIR 3 23 SMS 5 2006 S06 June06 6 ACIR 3 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 ACIR 3 34 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 8 ACIR 3 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 ACIR 3 17 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 10 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 ACIR 4 19 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 ACIR 4 24 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 4 ACIR 4 18 SMS 6 2006 S06 May06 5 ACIR 4 27 SMS 6 2006 S06 June06 6 ACIR 4 33 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 ACIR 4 8 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 8 ACIR 4 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 ACIR 4 17 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 10 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 AC7 1 0 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 AC7 1 27 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 AC7 1 14 SMS 8 2006 S06 May06 4 AC7 1 26 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 5 AC7 1 27 SMS 4 2006 S06 June06 6 AC7 1 33 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 AC7 1 17 SMS 6 2006 S06 June06 8 AC7 1 17 SMS

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207 2006 S06 June06 9 AC7 1 17 SMS 5 2006 S06 June06 10 AC7 1 0 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 AC7 2 0 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 AC7 2 27 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 AC7 2 14 SMS 4 2006 S06 May06 4 AC7 2 24 SMS 5 2006 S06 May06 5 AC7 2 27 SMS 3 2006 S06 June06 6 AC7 2 34 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 AC7 2 17 SMS 3 2006 S06 June06 8 AC7 2 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 AC7 2 18 SMS 3 2006 S06 June06 10 AC7 2 0 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 AC7 3 0 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 AC7 3 27 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 AC7 3 15 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 4 AC7 3 27 SMS 6 2006 S06 May06 5 AC7 3 29 SMS 5 2006 S06 June06 6 AC7 3 35 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 AC7 3 17 SMS 5 2006 S06 June06 8 AC7 3 19 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 AC7 3 17 SMS 4 2006 S06 June06 10 AC7 3 0 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 AC7 4 0 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 AC7 4 27 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 AC7 4 14 SMS 6 2006 S06 May06 4 AC7 4 24 SMS 6 2006 S06 May06 5 AC7 4 26 SMS 5 2006 S06 June06 6 AC7 4 31 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 AC7 4 17 SMS 4 2006 S06 June06 8 AC7 4 16 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 AC7 4 17 SMS 5 2006 S06 June06 10 AC7 4 0 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 LL2 1 14 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 LL2 1 14 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 LL2 1 27 SMS 5 2006 S06 May06 4 LL2 1 28 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 5 LL2 1 14 SMS 6 2006 S06 June06 6 LL2 1 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 LL2 1 0 SMS 4 2006 S06 June06 8 LL2 1 0 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 LL2 1 0 SMS 4 2006 S06 June06 10 LL2 1 0 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 LL2 2 13 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 LL2 2 14 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 LL2 2 27 SMS 4 2006 S06 May06 4 LL2 2 27 SMS 5 2006 S06 May06 5 LL2 2 14 SMS 5 2006 S06 June06 6 LL2 2 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 LL2 2 0 SMS 4 2006 S06 June06 8 LL2 2 0 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 LL2 2 0 SMS 4 2006 S06 June06 10 LL2 2 0 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 LL2 3 14 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 LL2 3 14 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 LL2 3 27 SMS 4 2006 S06 May06 4 LL2 3 27 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 5 LL2 3 14 SMS 5

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208 2006 S06 June06 6 LL2 3 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 LL2 3 0 SMS 3 2006 S06 June06 8 LL2 3 0 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 LL2 3 0 SMS 4 2006 S06 June06 10 LL2 3 0 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 LL2 4 13 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 LL2 4 14 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 LL2 4 26 SMS 2 2006 S06 May06 4 LL2 4 27 SMS 4 2006 S06 May06 5 LL2 4 13 SMS 3 2006 S06 June06 6 LL2 4 16 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 LL2 4 0 SMS 2 2006 S06 June06 8 LL2 4 0 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 LL2 4 0 SMS 2 2006 S06 June06 10 LL2 4 0 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 LL5 1 14 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 LL5 1 26 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 LL5 1 41 SMS 4 2006 S06 May06 4 LL5 1 40 SMS 6 2006 S06 May06 5 LL5 1 40 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 6 LL5 1 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 LL5 1 45 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 8 LL5 1 0 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 LL5 1 17 SMS 6 2006 S06 June06 10 LL5 1 0 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 LL5 2 14 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 LL5 2 26 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 LL5 2 41 SMS 5 2006 S06 May06 4 LL5 2 40 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 5 LL5 2 40 SMS 8 2006 S06 June06 6 LL5 2 16 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 LL5 2 46 SMS 6 2006 S06 June06 8 LL5 2 0 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 LL5 2 17 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 10 LL5 2 0 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 LL5 3 14 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 LL5 3 27 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 LL5 3 41 SMS 4 2006 S06 May06 4 LL5 3 40 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 5 LL5 3 41 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 6 LL5 3 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 LL5 3 46 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 8 LL5 3 0 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 LL5 3 17 SMS 6 2006 S06 June06 10 LL5 3 0 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 LL5 4 13 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 LL5 4 25 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 LL5 4 38 SMS 5 2006 S06 May06 4 LL5 4 38 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 5 LL5 4 40 SMS 8 2006 S06 June06 6 LL5 4 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 LL5 4 45 SMS 8 2006 S06 June06 8 LL5 4 0 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 LL5 4 16 SMS 8 2006 S06 June06 10 LL5 4 0 SMS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 AC10 1 32 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 2 AC10 1 33 SMS 6

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209 2006 F06 Oct06 3 AC10 1 28 SMS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 AC10 1 15 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 AC10 1 28 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 AC10 1 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 AC10 1 9 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 AC10 1 10 SMS 6 2006 F06 Nov06 9 AC10 1 10 SMS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 AC10 1 0 SMS 6 2006 F06 Dec06 11 AC10 1 10 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 12 AC10 1 10 SMS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 AC10 2 33 SMS 8 2006 F06 Oct06 2 AC10 2 32 SMS 8 2006 F06 Oct06 3 AC10 2 29 SMS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 AC10 2 15 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 AC10 2 28 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 AC10 2 9 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 AC10 2 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 AC10 2 10 SMS 8 2006 F06 Nov06 9 AC10 2 10 SMS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 AC10 2 0 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 11 AC10 2 10 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 12 AC10 2 10 SMS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 AC10 3 33 SMS 8 2006 F06 Oct06 2 AC10 3 34 SMS 8 2006 F06 Oct06 3 AC10 3 29 SMS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 AC10 3 15 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 AC10 3 29 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 AC10 3 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 AC10 3 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 AC10 3 10 SMS 7 2006 F06 Nov06 9 AC10 3 10 SMS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 AC10 3 0 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 11 AC10 3 10 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 12 AC10 3 10 SMS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 AC10 4 33 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 2 AC10 4 33 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 3 AC10 4 28 SMS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 AC10 4 15 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 AC10 4 28 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 AC10 4 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 AC10 4 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 AC10 4 10 SMS 7 2006 F06 Nov06 9 AC10 4 10 SMS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 AC10 4 0 SMS 6 2006 F06 Dec06 11 AC10 4 10 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 12 AC10 4 10 SMS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 AC13 1 34 SMS 4 2006 F06 Oct06 2 AC13 1 34 SMS 4 2006 F06 Oct06 3 AC13 1 29 SMS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 AC13 1 29 SMS 4 2006 F06 Oct06 5 AC13 1 29 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 AC13 1 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 AC13 1 11 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 AC13 1 10 SMS 6 2006 F06 Nov06 9 AC13 1 22 SMS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 AC13 1 10 SMS 6 2006 F06 Dec06 11 AC13 1 21 SMS 6

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210 2006 F06 Dec06 12 AC13 1 21 SMS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 AC13 2 33 SMS 8 2006 F06 Oct06 2 AC13 2 33 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 3 AC13 2 29 SMS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 AC13 2 28 SMS 8 2006 F06 Oct06 5 AC13 2 29 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 AC13 2 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 AC13 2 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 AC13 2 10 SMS 8 2006 F06 Nov06 9 AC13 2 21 SMS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 AC13 2 10 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 11 AC13 2 21 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 12 AC13 2 21 SMS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 AC13 3 32 SMS 8 2006 F06 Oct06 2 AC13 3 32 SMS 8 2006 F06 Oct06 3 AC13 3 28 SMS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 AC13 3 28 SMS 8 2006 F06 Oct06 5 AC13 3 28 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 AC13 3 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 AC13 3 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 AC13 3 9 SMS 7 2006 F06 Nov06 9 AC13 3 21 SMS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 AC13 3 9 SMS 8 2006 F06 Dec06 11 AC13 3 21 SMS 8 2006 F06 Dec06 12 AC13 3 20 SMS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 AC13 4 33 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 2 AC13 4 33 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 3 AC13 4 28 SMS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 AC13 4 29 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 AC13 4 28 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 AC13 4 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 AC13 4 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 AC13 4 10 SMS 7 2006 F06 Nov06 9 AC13 4 21 SMS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 AC13 4 10 SMS 6 2006 F06 Dec06 11 AC13 4 20 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 12 AC13 4 21 SMS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 ACIR 1 17 SMS 8 2006 F06 Oct06 2 ACIR 1 17 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 3 ACIR 1 15 SMS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 ACIR 1 15 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 ACIR 1 29 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 ACIR 1 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 ACIR 1 0 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 ACIR 1 0 SMS 7 2006 F06 Nov06 9 ACIR 1 0 SMS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 ACIR 1 10 SMS 6 2006 F06 Dec06 11 ACIR 1 0 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 12 ACIR 1 11 SMS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 ACIR 2 34 SMS 5 2006 F06 Oct06 2 ACIR 2 33 SMS 5 2006 F06 Oct06 3 ACIR 2 29 SMS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 ACIR 2 29 SMS 5 2006 F06 Oct06 5 ACIR 2 29 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 ACIR 2 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 ACIR 2 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 ACIR 2 10 SMS 5

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211 2006 F06 Nov06 9 ACIR 2 10 SMS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 ACIR 2 0 SMS 4 2006 F06 Dec06 11 ACIR 2 10 SMS 5 2006 F06 Dec06 12 ACIR 2 10 SMS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 ACIR 3 17 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 2 ACIR 3 17 SMS 6 2006 F06 Oct06 3 ACIR 3 15 SMS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 ACIR 3 15 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 ACIR 3 15 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 ACIR 3 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 ACIR 3 0 SMS 8 2006 F06 Nov06 9 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 ACIR 3 10 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 11 ACIR 3 0 SMS 8 2006 F06 Dec06 12 ACIR 3 10 SMS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 ACIR 4 0 SMS 8 2006 F06 Oct06 2 ACIR 4 16 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 3 ACIR 4 15 SMS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 ACIR 4 13 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 ACIR 4 22 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 ACIR 4 0 SMS 8 2006 F06 Nov06 9 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 ACIR 4 0 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 11 ACIR 4 0 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 12 ACIR 4 10 SMS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 LL5 1 32 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 2 LL5 1 33 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 3 LL5 1 15 SMS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 LL5 1 14 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 LL5 1 28 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 LL5 1 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 LL5 1 21 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 LL5 1 10 SMS 7 2006 F06 Nov06 9 LL5 1 20 SMS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 LL5 1 10 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 11 LL5 1 21 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 12 LL5 1 20 SMS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 LL5 2 33 SMS 8 2006 F06 Oct06 2 LL5 2 33 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 3 LL5 2 15 SMS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 LL5 2 15 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 LL5 2 28 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 LL5 2 9 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 LL5 2 21 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 LL5 2 10 SMS 8 2006 F06 Nov06 9 LL5 2 20 SMS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 LL5 2 10 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 11 LL5 2 20 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 12 LL5 2 21 SMS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 LL5 3 32 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 2 LL5 3 33 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 3 LL5 3 15 SMS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 LL5 3 15 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 LL5 3 28 SMS

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212 2006 F06 Nov06 6 LL5 3 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 LL5 3 20 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 LL5 3 10 SMS 7 2006 F06 Nov06 9 LL5 3 21 SMS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 LL5 3 10 SMS 6 2006 F06 Dec06 11 LL5 3 21 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 12 LL5 3 20 SMS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 LL5 4 32 SMS 8 2006 F06 Oct06 2 LL5 4 32 SMS 8 2006 F06 Oct06 3 LL5 4 14 SMS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 LL5 4 14 SMS 8 2006 F06 Oct06 5 LL5 4 28 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 LL5 4 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 LL5 4 20 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 LL5 4 10 SMS 8 2006 F06 Nov06 9 LL5 4 21 SMS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 LL5 4 10 SMS 6 2006 F06 Dec06 11 LL5 4 20 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 12 LL5 4 21 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 AC10 1 43 SMS 7 2007 S07 May07 2 AC10 1 42 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 AC10 1 50 SMS 7 2007 S07 May07 4 AC10 1 43 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jun07 5 AC10 1 42 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 AC10 1 39 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 AC10 1 17 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 AC10 1 17 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 AC10 1 17 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 10 AC10 1 16 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 AC10 1 8 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 AC10 1 31 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 AC10 1 32 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 AC10 1 20 SMS 8 2007 S07 Aug07 15 AC10 1 42 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 AC10 1 41 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 AC10 1 41 SMS 8 2007 F07 Sep07 18 AC10 1 21 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 AC10 1 37 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 AC10 1 16 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 AC10 1 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 AC10 1 31 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 AC10 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 AC10 1 29 SMS 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 AC10 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 AC10 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 AC10 1 15 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 AC10 1 10 SMS 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 AC10 1 9 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 AC10 1 0 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 AC10 2 42 SMS 7 2007 S07 May07 2 AC10 2 42 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 AC10 2 49 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 4 AC10 2 43 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 AC10 2 42 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 AC10 2 38 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 AC10 2 16 SMS 5 2007 S07 Jun07 8 AC10 2 17 SMS

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213 2007 S07 Jul07 9 AC10 2 17 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 AC10 2 16 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 AC10 2 9 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 AC10 2 31 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 AC10 2 31 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 AC10 2 20 SMS 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 AC10 2 41 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 AC10 2 41 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 AC10 2 41 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 AC10 2 20 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 AC10 2 37 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 AC10 2 16 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 AC10 2 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 AC10 2 31 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 AC10 2 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 AC10 2 28 SMS 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 AC10 2 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 AC10 2 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 AC10 2 15 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 AC10 2 10 SMS 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 AC10 2 10 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 AC10 2 0 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 AC10 3 43 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 2 AC10 3 44 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 AC10 3 50 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 4 AC10 3 44 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 AC10 3 43 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 AC10 3 39 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 AC10 3 17 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 AC10 3 17 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 AC10 3 18 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 10 AC10 3 16 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 AC10 3 4 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 AC10 3 32 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 AC10 3 31 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 AC10 3 21 SMS 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 AC10 3 42 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 AC10 3 42 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 AC10 3 42 SMS 8 2007 F07 Sep07 18 AC10 3 21 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 AC10 3 38 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 AC10 3 16 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 AC10 3 17 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 AC10 3 33 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 AC10 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 AC10 3 31 SMS 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 AC10 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 AC10 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 AC10 3 16 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 AC10 3 14 SMS 7 2007 F07 Nov07 29 AC10 3 10 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 AC10 3 0 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 AC10 4 43 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 2 AC10 4 43 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 AC10 4 49 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 4 AC10 4 43 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 AC10 4 43 SMS

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214 2007 S07 Jun07 6 AC10 4 39 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 AC10 4 17 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 AC10 4 17 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 AC10 4 17 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 AC10 4 16 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 AC10 4 10 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 AC10 4 32 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 AC10 4 32 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 AC10 4 21 SMS 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 AC10 4 42 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 AC10 4 42 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 AC10 4 42 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 AC10 4 20 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 AC10 4 38 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 AC10 4 16 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 AC10 4 17 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 AC10 4 32 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 AC10 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 AC10 4 28 SMS 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 AC10 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 AC10 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 AC10 4 16 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 AC10 4 10 SMS 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 AC10 4 10 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 AC10 4 0 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 AC13 1 44 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 2 AC13 1 44 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 AC13 1 51 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 4 AC13 1 44 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jun07 5 AC13 1 44 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 AC13 1 40 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 AC13 1 33 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jun07 8 AC13 1 17 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 AC13 1 18 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 AC13 1 32 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 AC13 1 26 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 AC13 1 33 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 AC13 1 33 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 AC13 1 22 SMS 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 AC13 1 43 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 AC13 1 43 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 AC13 1 43 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 AC13 1 43 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 AC13 1 38 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 AC13 1 33 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 AC13 1 17 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 AC13 1 33 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 AC13 1 15 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 AC13 1 29 SMS 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 AC13 1 30 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 AC13 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 AC13 1 29 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 AC13 1 26 SMS 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 AC13 1 22 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 AC13 1 10 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 AC13 2 43 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 2 AC13 2 43 SMS

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215 2007 S07 May07 3 AC13 2 51 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 4 AC13 2 43 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jun07 5 AC13 2 43 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 AC13 2 38 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 AC13 2 33 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 AC13 2 17 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 AC13 2 17 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 10 AC13 2 31 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 AC13 2 24 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 AC13 2 32 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 AC13 2 31 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 AC13 2 21 SMS 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 AC13 2 41 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 AC13 2 42 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 AC13 2 41 SMS 8 2007 F07 Sep07 18 AC13 2 41 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 AC13 2 35 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 AC13 2 30 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 AC13 2 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 AC13 2 30 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 AC13 2 15 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 AC13 2 27 SMS 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 AC13 2 27 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 AC13 2 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 AC13 2 28 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 AC13 2 24 SMS 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 AC13 2 19 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 AC13 2 10 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 AC13 3 41 SMS 7 2007 S07 May07 2 AC13 3 41 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 AC13 3 48 SMS 7 2007 S07 May07 4 AC13 3 41 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jun07 5 AC13 3 41 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 AC13 3 35 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 AC13 3 31 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jun07 8 AC13 3 16 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 AC13 3 16 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 AC13 3 29 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 AC13 3 21 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 AC13 3 28 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 AC13 3 28 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 AC13 3 19 SMS 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 AC13 3 35 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 AC13 3 35 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 AC13 3 42 SMS 8 2007 F07 Sep07 18 AC13 3 40 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 AC13 3 35 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 AC13 3 31 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 AC13 3 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 AC13 3 30 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 AC13 3 15 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 AC13 3 63 SMS 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 AC13 3 62 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 AC13 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 AC13 3 45 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 AC13 3 25 SMS 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 AC13 3 20 SMS

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216 2007 F07 Nov07 30 AC13 3 10 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 AC13 4 43 SMS 7 2007 S07 May07 2 AC13 4 43 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 AC13 4 50 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 4 AC13 4 43 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jun07 5 AC13 4 42 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 AC13 4 39 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 AC13 4 32 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 AC13 4 17 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 AC13 4 17 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 10 AC13 4 31 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 AC13 4 26 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 AC13 4 31 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 AC13 4 31 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 AC13 4 21 SMS 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 AC13 4 41 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 AC13 4 41 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 AC13 4 41 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 AC13 4 41 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 AC13 4 37 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 AC13 4 31 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 AC13 4 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 AC13 4 31 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 AC13 4 15 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 AC13 4 28 SMS 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 AC13 4 28 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 AC13 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 AC13 4 29 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 AC13 4 25 SMS 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 AC13 4 22 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 AC13 4 10 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 ACIR 1 42 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 2 ACIR 1 22 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 ACIR 1 50 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 4 ACIR 1 21 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 ACIR 1 21 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 ACIR 1 39 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 ACIR 1 16 SMS 5 2007 S07 Jun07 8 ACIR 1 0 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 ACIR 1 17 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 ACIR 1 16 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 ACIR 1 3 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 ACIR 1 16 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 ACIR 1 16 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 ACIR 1 20 SMS 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 ACIR 1 20 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 ACIR 1 21 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 ACIR 1 0 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 ACIR 1 20 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 ACIR 1 16 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 ACIR 1 15 SMS 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 ACIR 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 ACIR 1 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 ACIR 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 ACIR 1 14 SMS 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 ACIR 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 ACIR 1 0 SMS

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217 2007 F07 Nov07 27 ACIR 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 ACIR 1 10 SMS 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 ACIR 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 ACIR 1 0 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 ACIR 2 44 SMS 4 2007 S07 May07 2 ACIR 2 22 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 ACIR 2 29 SMS 4 2007 S07 May07 4 ACIR 2 43 SMS 4 2007 S07 Jun07 5 ACIR 2 44 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 ACIR 2 39 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 ACIR 2 17 SMS 4 2007 S07 Jun07 8 ACIR 2 0 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 ACIR 2 17 SMS 4 2007 S07 Jul07 10 ACIR 2 17 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 ACIR 2 8 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 ACIR 2 17 SMS 4 2007 S07 Jul07 13 ACIR 2 16 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 ACIR 2 21 SMS 6 2007 S07 Aug07 15 ACIR 2 43 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 ACIR 2 42 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 ACIR 2 22 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 ACIR 2 21 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 ACIR 2 37 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 ACIR 2 17 SMS 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 ACIR 2 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 ACIR 2 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 ACIR 2 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 ACIR 2 15 SMS 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 ACIR 2 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 ACIR 2 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 ACIR 2 15 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 ACIR 2 10 SMS 4 2007 F07 Nov07 29 ACIR 2 10 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 ACIR 2 0 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 ACIR 3 22 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 2 ACIR 3 22 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 ACIR 3 28 SMS 4 2007 S07 May07 4 ACIR 3 44 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 ACIR 3 21 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 ACIR 3 39 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 ACIR 3 17 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 ACIR 3 17 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 ACIR 3 16 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 ACIR 3 3 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 ACIR 3 16 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 ACIR 3 17 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 ACIR 3 0 SMS 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 ACIR 3 41 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 ACIR 3 21 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 ACIR 3 21 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 ACIR 3 17 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 ACIR 3 0 SMS 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 ACIR 3 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 ACIR 3 0 SMS

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218 2007 F07 Oct07 24 ACIR 3 15 SMS 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 ACIR 3 15 SMS 7 2007 F07 Nov07 29 ACIR 3 11 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 ACIR 4 11 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 2 ACIR 4 33 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 ACIR 4 29 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 4 ACIR 4 21 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 ACIR 4 22 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 ACIR 4 39 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 ACIR 4 17 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 ACIR 4 17 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 ACIR 4 17 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 ACIR 4 30 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 ACIR 4 17 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 ACIR 4 0 SMS 6 2007 S07 Aug07 15 ACIR 4 41 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 ACIR 4 21 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 ACIR 4 20 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 ACIR 4 21 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 ACIR 4 16 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 ACIR 4 17 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 ACIR 4 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 ACIR 4 14 SMS 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 ACIR 4 10 SMS 7 2007 F07 Nov07 29 ACIR 4 21 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 AC7 1 28 SMS 7 2007 S07 May07 2 AC7 1 43 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 AC7 1 28 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 4 AC7 1 21 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 AC7 1 21 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 AC7 1 39 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 AC7 1 17 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 AC7 1 0 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 AC7 1 17 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 10 AC7 1 16 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 AC7 1 8 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 AC7 1 16 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 AC7 1 16 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 AC7 1 0 SMS 8 2007 S07 Aug07 15 AC7 1 21 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 AC7 1 21 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 AC7 1 21 SMS 8 2007 F07 Sep07 18 AC7 1 20 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 AC7 1 21 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 AC7 1 17 SMS 7

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219 2007 F07 Sep07 21 AC7 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 AC7 1 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 AC7 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 AC7 1 15 SMS 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 AC7 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 AC7 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 AC7 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 AC7 1 15 SMS 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 AC7 1 10 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 AC7 1 0 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 AC7 2 29 SMS 5 2007 S07 May07 2 AC7 2 43 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 AC7 2 28 SMS 5 2007 S07 May07 4 AC7 2 22 SMS 5 2007 S07 Jun07 5 AC7 2 21 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 AC7 2 39 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 AC7 2 16 SMS 5 2007 S07 Jun07 8 AC7 2 0 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 AC7 2 17 SMS 4 2007 S07 Jul07 10 AC7 2 16 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 AC7 2 9 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 AC7 2 16 SMS 5 2007 S07 Jul07 13 AC7 2 16 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 AC7 2 0 SMS 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 AC7 2 21 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 AC7 2 21 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 AC7 2 20 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 AC7 2 21 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 AC7 2 20 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 AC7 2 16 SMS 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 AC7 2 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 AC7 2 17 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 AC7 2 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 AC7 2 14 SMS 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 AC7 2 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 AC7 2 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 AC7 2 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 AC7 2 15 SMS 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 AC7 2 10 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 AC7 2 0 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 AC7 3 31 SMS 5 2007 S07 May07 2 AC7 3 44 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 AC7 3 31 SMS 5 2007 S07 May07 4 AC7 3 23 SMS 5 2007 S07 Jun07 5 AC7 3 25 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 AC7 3 40 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 AC7 3 17 SMS 5 2007 S07 Jun07 8 AC7 3 0 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 AC7 3 19 SMS 4 2007 S07 Jul07 10 AC7 3 17 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 AC7 3 8 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 AC7 3 17 SMS 5 2007 S07 Jul07 13 AC7 3 19 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 AC7 3 0 SMS 6 2007 S07 Aug07 15 AC7 3 21 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 AC7 3 21 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 AC7 3 23 SMS 6

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220 2007 F07 Sep07 18 AC7 3 23 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 AC7 3 23 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 AC7 3 19 SMS 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 AC7 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 AC7 3 19 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 AC7 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 AC7 3 17 SMS 5 2007 F07 Oct07 25 AC7 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 AC7 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 AC7 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 AC7 3 21 SMS 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 AC7 3 13 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 AC7 3 0 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 AC7 4 27 SMS 5 2007 S07 May07 2 AC7 4 42 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 AC7 4 28 SMS 5 2007 S07 May07 4 AC7 4 21 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 AC7 4 21 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 AC7 4 37 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 AC7 4 17 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 AC7 4 0 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 AC7 4 16 SMS 5 2007 S07 Jul07 10 AC7 4 16 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 AC7 4 7 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 AC7 4 16 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 AC7 4 16 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 AC7 4 0 SMS 6 2007 S07 Aug07 15 AC7 4 20 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 AC7 4 21 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 AC7 4 20 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 AC7 4 20 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 AC7 4 20 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 AC7 4 16 SMS 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 AC7 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 AC7 4 15 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 AC7 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 AC7 4 15 SMS 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 AC7 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 AC7 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 AC7 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 AC7 4 15 SMS 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 AC7 4 9 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 AC7 4 0 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 LL5 1 67 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 2 LL5 1 44 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 LL5 1 50 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 4 LL5 1 43 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 LL5 1 44 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 LL5 1 38 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 LL5 1 33 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 LL5 1 17 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 LL5 1 17 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 LL5 1 17 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 LL5 1 40 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 LL5 1 0 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 LL5 1 33 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 LL5 1 21 SMS 6

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221 2007 S07 Aug07 15 LL5 1 42 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 LL5 1 41 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 LL5 1 42 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 LL5 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 LL5 1 37 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 LL5 1 33 SMS 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 LL5 1 17 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 LL5 1 32 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 LL5 1 15 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 LL5 1 29 SMS 5 2007 F07 Oct07 25 LL5 1 29 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 LL5 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 LL5 1 30 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 LL5 1 26 SMS 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 LL5 1 22 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 LL5 1 0 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 LL5 2 66 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 2 LL5 2 42 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 LL5 2 50 SMS 7 2007 S07 May07 4 LL5 2 42 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 LL5 2 42 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 LL5 2 37 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 LL5 2 32 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jun07 8 LL5 2 17 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 LL5 2 17 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 10 LL5 2 15 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 LL5 2 33 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 LL5 2 0 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 LL5 2 31 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 LL5 2 19 SMS 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 LL5 2 40 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 LL5 2 40 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 LL5 2 40 SMS 8 2007 F07 Sep07 18 LL5 2 0 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 LL5 2 34 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 LL5 2 30 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 LL5 2 15 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 LL5 2 30 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 LL5 2 14 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 LL5 2 26 SMS 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 LL5 2 27 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 LL5 2 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 LL5 2 28 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 LL5 2 24 SMS 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 LL5 2 21 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 LL5 2 0 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 LL5 3 67 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 2 LL5 3 42 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 LL5 3 50 SMS 5 2007 S07 May07 4 LL5 3 42 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 LL5 3 43 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 LL5 3 38 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 LL5 3 32 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 LL5 3 17 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 LL5 3 17 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 LL5 3 16 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 LL5 3 41 SMS

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222 2007 S07 Jul07 12 LL5 3 0 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 LL5 3 30 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 LL5 3 20 SMS 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 LL5 3 41 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 LL5 3 41 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 LL5 3 41 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 LL5 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 LL5 3 35 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 LL5 3 31 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 LL5 3 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 LL5 3 31 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 LL5 3 14 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 LL5 3 28 SMS 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 LL5 3 29 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 LL5 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 LL5 3 29 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 LL5 3 25 SMS 7 2007 F07 Nov07 29 LL5 3 21 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 LL5 3 0 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 LL5 4 65 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 2 LL5 4 43 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 LL5 4 49 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 4 LL5 4 42 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jun07 5 LL5 4 43 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 LL5 4 37 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 LL5 4 33 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jun07 8 LL5 4 17 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 LL5 4 16 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 10 LL5 4 16 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 LL5 4 33 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 LL5 4 0 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 LL5 4 31 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 LL5 4 20 SMS 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 LL5 4 41 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 LL5 4 41 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 LL5 4 41 SMS 8 2007 F07 Sep07 18 LL5 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 LL5 4 35 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 LL5 4 30 SMS 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 LL5 4 15 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 LL5 4 31 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 LL5 4 15 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 LL5 4 27 SMS 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 LL5 4 28 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 LL5 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 LL5 4 28 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 LL5 4 24 SMS 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 LL5 4 21 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 LL5 4 0 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 LL6 1 66 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 2 LL6 1 43 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 LL6 1 50 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 4 LL6 1 42 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 LL6 1 43 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 LL6 1 38 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 LL6 1 33 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 LL6 1 32 SMS

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223 2007 S07 Jul07 9 LL6 1 32 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 10 LL6 1 30 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 LL6 1 33 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 LL6 1 31 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 LL6 1 30 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 LL6 1 40 SMS 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 LL6 1 41 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 LL6 1 40 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 LL6 1 41 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 LL6 1 40 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 LL6 1 35 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 LL6 1 31 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 LL6 1 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 LL6 1 31 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 LL6 1 14 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 LL6 1 29 SMS 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 LL6 1 28 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 LL6 1 28 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 LL6 1 28 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 LL6 1 24 SMS 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 LL6 1 21 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 LL6 1 9 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 LL6 2 66 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 2 LL6 2 42 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 LL6 2 49 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 4 LL6 2 43 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jun07 5 LL6 2 43 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 LL6 2 38 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 LL6 2 33 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jun07 8 LL6 2 33 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 LL6 2 31 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 10 LL6 2 31 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 LL6 2 34 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 LL6 2 28 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 LL6 2 28 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 LL6 2 35 SMS 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 LL6 2 35 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 LL6 2 37 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 LL6 2 43 SMS 8 2007 F07 Sep07 18 LL6 2 41 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 LL6 2 38 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 LL6 2 32 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 LL6 2 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 LL6 2 33 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 LL6 2 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 LL6 2 30 SMS 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 LL6 2 30 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 LL6 2 29 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 LL6 2 30 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 LL6 2 26 SMS 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 LL6 2 21 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 LL6 2 11 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 LL6 3 67 SMS 7 2007 S07 May07 2 LL6 3 43 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 LL6 3 50 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 4 LL6 3 43 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jun07 5 LL6 3 43 SMS

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224 2007 S07 Jun07 6 LL6 3 38 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 LL6 3 33 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jun07 8 LL6 3 33 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 LL6 3 32 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 10 LL6 3 31 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 LL6 3 42 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 LL6 3 31 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 LL6 3 31 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 LL6 3 42 SMS 8 2007 S07 Aug07 15 LL6 3 41 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 LL6 3 41 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 LL6 3 42 SMS 8 2007 F07 Sep07 18 LL6 3 41 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 LL6 3 37 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 LL6 3 32 SMS 8 2007 F07 Sep07 21 LL6 3 17 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 LL6 3 31 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 LL6 3 15 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 LL6 3 29 SMS 8 2007 F07 Oct07 25 LL6 3 28 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 LL6 3 29 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 LL6 3 29 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 LL6 3 24 SMS 7 2007 F07 Nov07 29 LL6 3 21 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 LL6 3 10 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 LL6 4 66 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 2 LL6 4 43 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 LL6 4 49 SMS 7 2007 S07 May07 4 LL6 4 42 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 LL6 4 43 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 LL6 4 38 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 LL6 4 33 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jun07 8 LL6 4 32 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 LL6 4 31 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 10 LL6 4 31 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 LL6 4 42 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 LL6 4 31 SMS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 LL6 4 31 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 LL6 4 41 SMS 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 LL6 4 41 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 LL6 4 41 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 LL6 4 41 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 LL6 4 40 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 LL6 4 37 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 LL6 4 31 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 LL6 4 15 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 LL6 4 32 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 LL6 4 15 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 LL6 4 28 SMS 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 LL6 4 28 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 LL6 4 29 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 LL6 4 28 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 LL6 4 25 SMS 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 LL6 4 20 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 LL6 4 10 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 18 LL4 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 LL4 1 17 SMS

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225 2007 F07 Sep07 20 LL4 1 32 SMS 5 2007 F07 Sep07 21 LL4 1 32 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 LL4 1 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 LL4 1 31 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 LL4 1 29 SMS 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 LL4 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 LL4 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 LL4 1 15 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 LL4 1 26 SMS 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 LL4 1 23 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 LL4 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 18 LL4 2 0 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 LL4 2 16 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 LL4 2 31 SMS 5 2007 F07 Sep07 21 LL4 2 31 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 LL4 2 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 LL4 2 30 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 LL4 2 27 SMS 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 LL4 2 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 LL4 2 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 LL4 2 15 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 LL4 2 22 SMS 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 LL4 2 18 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 LL4 2 0 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 18 LL4 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 LL4 3 16 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 LL4 3 31 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 LL4 3 30 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 LL4 3 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 LL4 3 29 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 LL4 3 28 SMS 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 LL4 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 LL4 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 LL4 3 15 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 LL4 3 24 SMS 7 2007 F07 Nov07 29 LL4 3 21 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 LL4 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 18 LL4 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 LL4 4 16 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 LL4 4 31 SMS 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 LL4 4 30 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 LL4 4 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 LL4 4 30 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 LL4 4 27 SMS 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 LL4 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 LL4 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 LL4 4 14 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 LL4 4 24 SMS 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 LL4 4 21 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 LL4 4 0 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 WOS 1 29 WOS 2006 S06 May06 2 WOS 1 27 WOS 2006 S06 May06 3 WOS 1 27 WOS 4 2006 S06 May06 4 WOS 1 29 WOS 3 2006 S06 May06 5 WOS 1 27 WOS 3 2006 S06 June06 6 WOS 1 35 WOS 2006 S06 June06 7 WOS 1 33 WOS 3

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226 2006 S06 June06 8 WOS 1 35 WOS 2006 S06 June06 9 WOS 1 33 WOS 3 2006 S06 June06 10 WOS 1 33 WOS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 WOS 2 28 WOS 2006 S06 May06 2 WOS 2 26 WOS 2006 S06 May06 3 WOS 2 27 WOS 6 2006 S06 May06 4 WOS 2 25 WOS 5 2006 S06 May06 5 WOS 2 27 WOS 4 2006 S06 June06 6 WOS 2 33 WOS 2006 S06 June06 7 WOS 2 33 WOS 4 2006 S06 June06 8 WOS 2 33 WOS 2006 S06 June06 9 WOS 2 33 WOS 5 2006 S06 June06 10 WOS 2 33 WOS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 WOS 3 27 WOS 2006 S06 May06 2 WOS 3 26 WOS 2006 S06 May06 3 WOS 3 27 WOS 8 2006 S06 May06 4 WOS 3 25 WOS 8 2006 S06 May06 5 WOS 3 26 WOS 7 2006 S06 June06 6 WOS 3 32 WOS 2006 S06 June06 7 WOS 3 31 WOS 8 2006 S06 June06 8 WOS 3 31 WOS 2006 S06 June06 9 WOS 3 31 WOS 8 2006 S06 June06 10 WOS 3 29 WOS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 WOS 4 27 WOS 2006 S06 May06 2 WOS 4 26 WOS 2006 S06 May06 3 WOS 4 27 WOS 8 2006 S06 May06 4 WOS 4 27 WOS 7 2006 S06 May06 5 WOS 4 27 WOS 6 2006 S06 June06 6 WOS 4 33 WOS 2006 S06 June06 7 WOS 4 32 WOS 6 2006 S06 June06 8 WOS 4 33 WOS 2006 S06 June06 9 WOS 4 33 WOS 6 2006 S06 June06 10 WOS 4 32 WOS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 WOS 1 33 WOS 4 2006 F06 Oct06 2 WOS 1 33 WOS 4 2006 F06 Oct06 3 WOS 1 29 WOS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 WOS 1 29 WOS 4 2006 F06 Oct06 5 WOS 1 29 WOS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 WOS 1 13 WOS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 WOS 1 21 WOS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 WOS 1 23 WOS 4 2006 F06 Nov06 9 WOS 1 23 WOS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 WOS 1 21 WOS 3 2006 F06 Dec06 11 WOS 1 21 WOS 4 2006 F06 Dec06 12 WOS 1 21 WOS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 WOS 2 31 WOS 6 2006 F06 Oct06 2 WOS 2 33 WOS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 3 WOS 2 28 WOS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 WOS 2 28 WOS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 WOS 2 29 WOS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 WOS 2 10 WOS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 WOS 2 22 WOS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 WOS 2 21 WOS 6 2006 F06 Nov06 9 WOS 2 21 WOS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 WOS 2 20 WOS 5 2006 F06 Dec06 11 WOS 2 21 WOS 5 2006 F06 Dec06 12 WOS 2 21 WOS

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227 2006 F06 Sep06 1 WOS 3 32 WOS 8 2006 F06 Oct06 2 WOS 3 32 WOS 8 2006 F06 Oct06 3 WOS 3 28 WOS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 WOS 3 28 WOS 8 2006 F06 Oct06 5 WOS 3 28 WOS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 WOS 3 10 WOS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 WOS 3 21 WOS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 WOS 3 20 WOS 8 2006 F06 Nov06 9 WOS 3 21 WOS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 WOS 3 21 WOS 8 2006 F06 Dec06 11 WOS 3 20 WOS 8 2006 F06 Dec06 12 WOS 3 21 WOS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 WOS 4 32 WOS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 2 WOS 4 33 WOS 6 2006 F06 Oct06 3 WOS 4 28 WOS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 WOS 4 28 WOS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 WOS 4 29 WOS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 WOS 4 9 WOS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 WOS 4 21 WOS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 WOS 4 21 WOS 7 2006 F06 Nov06 9 WOS 4 21 WOS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 WOS 4 20 WOS 6 2006 F06 Dec06 11 WOS 4 21 WOS 6 2006 F06 Dec06 12 WOS 4 21 WOS 2007 S07 May07 1 WOS 1 42 WOS 4 2007 S07 May07 2 WOS 1 44 WOS 2007 S07 May07 3 WOS 1 52 WOS 4 2007 S07 May07 4 WOS 1 44 WOS 5 2007 S07 Jun07 5 WOS 1 44 WOS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 WOS 1 38 WOS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 WOS 1 33 WOS 5 2007 S07 Jun07 8 WOS 1 19 WOS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 WOS 1 40 WOS 5 2007 S07 Jul07 10 WOS 1 52 WOS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 WOS 1 40 WOS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 WOS 1 33 WOS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 WOS 1 31 WOS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 WOS 1 42 WOS 6 2007 S07 Aug07 15 WOS 1 44 WOS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 WOS 1 42 WOS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 WOS 1 44 WOS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 WOS 1 42 WOS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 WOS 1 38 WOS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 WOS 1 33 WOS 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 WOS 1 33 WOS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 WOS 1 31 WOS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 WOS 1 31 WOS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 WOS 1 31 WOS 5 2007 F07 Oct07 25 WOS 1 29 WOS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 WOS 1 29 WOS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 WOS 1 29 WOS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 WOS 1 25 WOS 4 2007 F07 Nov07 29 WOS 1 23 WOS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 WOS 1 21 WOS 2007 S07 May07 1 WOS 2 43 WOS 6 2007 S07 May07 2 WOS 2 46 WOS 2007 S07 May07 3 WOS 2 50 WOS 6

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228 2007 S07 May07 4 WOS 2 43 WOS 7 2007 S07 Jun07 5 WOS 2 42 WOS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 WOS 2 39 WOS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 WOS 2 32 WOS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 WOS 2 18 WOS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 WOS 2 40 WOS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 WOS 2 55 WOS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 WOS 2 39 WOS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 WOS 2 32 WOS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 WOS 2 34 WOS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 WOS 2 41 WOS 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 WOS 2 44 WOS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 WOS 2 44 WOS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 WOS 2 42 WOS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 WOS 2 41 WOS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 WOS 2 37 WOS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 WOS 2 33 WOS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 WOS 2 34 WOS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 WOS 2 31 WOS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 WOS 2 30 WOS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 WOS 2 29 WOS 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 WOS 2 30 WOS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 WOS 2 31 WOS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 WOS 2 29 WOS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 WOS 2 25 WOS 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 WOS 2 21 WOS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 WOS 2 21 WOS 2007 S07 May07 1 WOS 3 40 WOS 8 2007 S07 May07 2 WOS 3 37 WOS 2007 S07 May07 3 WOS 3 45 WOS 8 2007 S07 May07 4 WOS 3 38 WOS 8 2007 S07 Jun07 5 WOS 3 38 WOS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 WOS 3 34 WOS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 WOS 3 30 WOS 8 2007 S07 Jun07 8 WOS 3 15 WOS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 WOS 3 35 WOS 8 2007 S07 Jul07 10 WOS 3 47 WOS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 WOS 3 37 WOS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 WOS 3 29 WOS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 WOS 3 28 WOS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 WOS 3 39 WOS 8 2007 S07 Aug07 15 WOS 3 38 WOS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 WOS 3 38 WOS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 WOS 3 38 WOS 9 2007 F07 Sep07 18 WOS 3 38 WOS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 WOS 3 32 WOS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 WOS 3 28 WOS 8 2007 F07 Sep07 21 WOS 3 29 WOS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 WOS 3 31 WOS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 WOS 3 30 WOS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 WOS 3 28 WOS 8 2007 F07 Oct07 25 WOS 3 29 WOS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 WOS 3 28 WOS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 WOS 3 29 WOS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 WOS 3 25 WOS 8 2007 F07 Nov07 29 WOS 3 22 WOS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 WOS 3 21 WOS

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229 2007 S07 May07 1 WOS 4 43 WOS 6 2007 S07 May07 2 WOS 4 42 WOS 2007 S07 May07 3 WOS 4 50 WOS 6 2007 S07 May07 4 WOS 4 43 WOS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 WOS 4 42 WOS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 WOS 4 38 WOS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 WOS 4 33 WOS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 WOS 4 16 WOS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 WOS 4 40 WOS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 WOS 4 51 WOS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 WOS 4 39 WOS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 WOS 4 32 WOS 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 WOS 4 31 WOS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 WOS 4 41 WOS 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 WOS 4 41 WOS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 WOS 4 42 WOS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 WOS 4 41 WOS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 WOS 4 41 WOS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 WOS 4 37 WOS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 WOS 4 31 WOS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 WOS 4 31 WOS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 WOS 4 31 WOS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 WOS 4 30 WOS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 WOS 4 28 WOS 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 WOS 4 29 WOS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 WOS 4 28 WOS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 WOS 4 29 WOS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 WOS 4 26 WOS 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 WOS 4 21 WOS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 WOS 4 21 WOS run; proc sort; by season; run; proc glm; by season; title 'Turf Quality' ; class tmt rep week; model TQ = tmt rep week/ ss3; means tmt/duncan ; run; proc mixed; by season; title 'Turf Quality' ; class tmt rep week ; model TQ = tmt; random week rep; lsmeans tmt/pdiff; run; proc glm; by season; title 'Water Applied' ; class tmt rep week; model mm = tmt rep week/ ss3; means tmt/duncan ; run; proc mixed; by season; title 'Water Applied' ; class tmt rep week ; model mm = tmt; random week rep; lsmeans tmt/pdiff;

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231 Rain Sensor Treatments Water Applied and Turf Quality options nodate nonumber center formdlim= "*" linesize= 88; data RS; input year$ season$ month$ week$ tmt$ rep mm freq$ depth$ TQ; cards; 2006 S06 Apr06 1 RS1-3mm 1 27 1 3 2006 S06 May06 2 RS1-3mm 1 27 1 3 2006 S06 May06 3 RS1-3mm 1 27 1 3 4 2006 S06 May06 4 RS1-3mm 1 27 1 3 6 2006 S06 May06 5 RS1-3mm 1 27 1 3 6 2006 S06 June06 6 RS1-3mm 1 0 1 3 2006 S06 June06 7 RS1-3mm 1 33 1 3 4 2006 S06 June06 8 RS1-3mm 1 0 1 3 2006 S06 June06 9 RS1-3mm 1 33 1 3 4 2006 S06 June06 10 RS1-3mm 1 0 1 3 2006 S06 Apr06 1 RS1-3mm 2 27 1 3 2006 S06 May06 2 RS1-3mm 2 27 1 3 2006 S06 May06 3 RS1-3mm 2 27 1 3 5 2006 S06 May06 4 RS1-3mm 2 27 1 3 8 2006 S06 May06 5 RS1-3mm 2 27 1 3 8 2006 S06 June06 6 RS1-3mm 2 0 1 3 2006 S06 June06 7 RS1-3mm 2 33 1 3 8 2006 S06 June06 8 RS1-3mm 2 0 1 3 2006 S06 June06 9 RS1-3mm 2 33 1 3 8 2006 S06 June06 10 RS1-3mm 2 0 1 3 2006 S06 Apr06 1 RS1-3mm 3 25 1 3 2006 S06 May06 2 RS1-3mm 3 25 1 3 2006 S06 May06 3 RS1-3mm 3 24 1 3 2 2006 S06 May06 4 RS1-3mm 3 24 1 3 4 2006 S06 May06 5 RS1-3mm 3 27 1 3 4 2006 S06 June06 6 RS1-3mm 3 0 1 3 2006 S06 June06 7 RS1-3mm 3 34 1 3 3 2006 S06 June06 8 RS1-3mm 3 0 1 3 2006 S06 June06 9 RS1-3mm 3 33 1 3 2 2006 S06 June06 10 RS1-3mm 3 0 1 3 2006 S06 Apr06 1 RS1-3mm 4 27 1 3 2006 S06 May06 2 RS1-3mm 4 27 1 3 2006 S06 May06 3 RS1-3mm 4 29 1 3 2 2006 S06 May06 4 RS1-3mm 4 27 1 3 4 2006 S06 May06 5 RS1-3mm 4 27 1 3 3 2006 S06 June06 6 RS1-3mm 4 0 1 3 2006 S06 June06 7 RS1-3mm 4 33 1 3 3 2006 S06 June06 8 RS1-3mm 4 0 1 3 2006 S06 June06 9 RS1-3mm 4 33 1 3 3 2006 S06 June06 10 RS1-3mm 4 0 1 3 2006 S06 Apr06 1 RS2-3mm 1 14 2 3 2006 S06 May06 2 RS2-3mm 1 27 2 3 2006 S06 May06 3 RS2-3mm 1 26 2 3 7 2006 S06 May06 4 RS2-3mm 1 27 2 3 5 2006 S06 May06 5 RS2-3mm 1 26 2 3 4 2006 S06 June06 6 RS2-3mm 1 17 2 3 2006 S06 June06 7 RS2-3mm 1 32 2 3 4 2006 S06 June06 8 RS2-3mm 1 17 2 3 2006 S06 June06 9 RS2-3mm 1 32 2 3 4 2006 S06 June06 10 RS2-3mm 1 17 2 3

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232 2006 S06 Apr06 1 RS2-3mm 2 14 2 3 2006 S06 May06 2 RS2-3mm 2 27 2 3 2006 S06 May06 3 RS2-3mm 2 27 2 3 7 2006 S06 May06 4 RS2-3mm 2 27 2 3 7 2006 S06 May06 5 RS2-3mm 2 26 2 3 6 2006 S06 June06 6 RS2-3mm 2 17 2 3 2006 S06 June06 7 RS2-3mm 2 33 2 3 6 2006 S06 June06 8 RS2-3mm 2 17 2 3 2006 S06 June06 9 RS2-3mm 2 33 2 3 6 2006 S06 June06 10 RS2-3mm 2 16 2 3 2006 S06 Apr06 1 RS2-3mm 3 13 2 3 2006 S06 May06 2 RS2-3mm 3 26 2 3 2006 S06 May06 3 RS2-3mm 3 25 2 3 6 2006 S06 May06 4 RS2-3mm 3 25 2 3 7 2006 S06 May06 5 RS2-3mm 3 25 2 3 6 2006 S06 June06 6 RS2-3mm 3 16 2 3 2006 S06 June06 7 RS2-3mm 3 31 2 3 6 2006 S06 June06 8 RS2-3mm 3 15 2 3 2006 S06 June06 9 RS2-3mm 3 30 2 3 6 2006 S06 June06 10 RS2-3mm 3 15 2 3 2006 S06 Apr06 1 RS2-3mm 4 14 2 3 2006 S06 May06 2 RS2-3mm 4 27 2 3 2006 S06 May06 3 RS2-3mm 4 26 2 3 8 2006 S06 May06 4 RS2-3mm 4 27 2 3 7 2006 S06 May06 5 RS2-3mm 4 27 2 3 6 2006 S06 June06 6 RS2-3mm 4 17 2 3 2006 S06 June06 7 RS2-3mm 4 33 2 3 6 2006 S06 June06 8 RS2-3mm 4 17 2 3 2006 S06 June06 9 RS2-3mm 4 33 2 3 5 2006 S06 June06 10 RS2-3mm 4 16 2 3 2006 S06 Apr06 1 RS7-3mm 1 17 7 3 2006 S06 May06 2 RS7-3mm 1 28 7 3 2006 S06 May06 3 RS7-3mm 1 17 7 3 7 2006 S06 May06 4 RS7-3mm 1 28 7 3 6 2006 S06 May06 5 RS7-3mm 1 28 7 3 6 2006 S06 June06 6 RS7-3mm 1 29 7 3 2006 S06 June06 7 RS7-3mm 1 25 7 3 5 2006 S06 June06 8 RS7-3mm 1 19 7 3 2006 S06 June06 9 RS7-3mm 1 20 7 3 6 2006 S06 June06 10 RS7-3mm 1 20 7 3 2006 S06 Apr06 1 RS7-3mm 2 14 7 3 2006 S06 May06 2 RS7-3mm 2 27 7 3 2006 S06 May06 3 RS7-3mm 2 17 7 3 8 2006 S06 May06 4 RS7-3mm 2 27 7 3 7 2006 S06 May06 5 RS7-3mm 2 29 7 3 7 2006 S06 June06 6 RS7-3mm 2 27 7 3 2006 S06 June06 7 RS7-3mm 2 23 7 3 7 2006 S06 June06 8 RS7-3mm 2 21 7 3 2006 S06 June06 9 RS7-3mm 2 19 7 3 8 2006 S06 June06 10 RS7-3mm 2 19 7 3 2006 S06 Apr06 1 RS7-3mm 3 16 7 3 2006 S06 May06 2 RS7-3mm 3 29 7 3 2006 S06 May06 3 RS7-3mm 3 16 7 3 6 2006 S06 May06 4 RS7-3mm 3 29 7 3 6 2006 S06 May06 5 RS7-3mm 3 28 7 3 5 2006 S06 June06 6 RS7-3mm 3 30 7 3 2006 S06 June06 7 RS7-3mm 3 24 7 3 4

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233 2006 S06 June06 8 RS7-3mm 3 20 7 3 2006 S06 June06 9 RS7-3mm 3 20 7 3 5 2006 S06 June06 10 RS7-3mm 3 19 7 3 2006 S06 Apr06 1 RS7-3mm 4 16 7 3 2006 S06 May06 2 RS7-3mm 4 29 7 3 2006 S06 May06 3 RS7-3mm 4 16 7 3 6 2006 S06 May06 4 RS7-3mm 4 28 7 3 6 2006 S06 May06 5 RS7-3mm 4 28 7 3 5 2006 S06 June06 6 RS7-3mm 4 30 7 3 2006 S06 June06 7 RS7-3mm 4 23 7 3 7 2006 S06 June06 8 RS7-3mm 4 20 7 3 2006 S06 June06 9 RS7-3mm 4 19 7 3 6 2006 S06 June06 10 RS7-3mm 4 19 7 3 2006 S06 Apr06 1 RS1-6mm 1 28 1 6 2006 S06 May06 2 RS1-6mm 1 28 1 6 2006 S06 May06 3 RS1-6mm 1 28 1 6 2 2006 S06 May06 4 RS1-6mm 1 28 1 6 4 2006 S06 May06 5 RS1-6mm 1 28 1 6 3 2006 S06 June06 6 RS1-6mm 1 0 1 6 2006 S06 June06 7 RS1-6mm 1 34 1 6 3 2006 S06 June06 8 RS1-6mm 1 34 1 6 2006 S06 June06 9 RS1-6mm 1 34 1 6 3 2006 S06 June06 10 RS1-6mm 1 0 1 6 2006 S06 Apr06 1 RS1-6mm 2 27 1 6 2006 S06 May06 2 RS1-6mm 2 27 1 6 2006 S06 May06 3 RS1-6mm 2 27 1 6 5 2006 S06 May06 4 RS1-6mm 2 27 1 6 7 2006 S06 May06 5 RS1-6mm 2 28 1 6 7 2006 S06 June06 6 RS1-6mm 2 0 1 6 2006 S06 June06 7 RS1-6mm 2 33 1 6 6 2006 S06 June06 8 RS1-6mm 2 34 1 6 2006 S06 June06 9 RS1-6mm 2 33 1 6 6 2006 S06 June06 10 RS1-6mm 2 0 1 6 2006 S06 Apr06 1 RS1-6mm 3 27 1 6 2006 S06 May06 2 RS1-6mm 3 27 1 6 2006 S06 May06 3 RS1-6mm 3 27 1 6 4 2006 S06 May06 4 RS1-6mm 3 26 1 6 8 2006 S06 May06 5 RS1-6mm 3 27 1 6 8 2006 S06 June06 6 RS1-6mm 3 0 1 6 2006 S06 June06 7 RS1-6mm 3 33 1 6 8 2006 S06 June06 8 RS1-6mm 3 32 1 6 2006 S06 June06 9 RS1-6mm 3 33 1 6 7 2006 S06 June06 10 RS1-6mm 3 0 1 6 2006 S06 Apr06 1 RS1-6mm 4 27 1 6 2006 S06 May06 2 RS1-6mm 4 27 1 6 2006 S06 May06 3 RS1-6mm 4 26 1 6 4 2006 S06 May06 4 RS1-6mm 4 27 1 6 7 2006 S06 May06 5 RS1-6mm 4 27 1 6 6 2006 S06 June06 6 RS1-6mm 4 0 1 6 2006 S06 June06 7 RS1-6mm 4 32 1 6 4 2006 S06 June06 8 RS1-6mm 4 33 1 6 2006 S06 June06 9 RS1-6mm 4 33 1 6 4 2006 S06 June06 10 RS1-6mm 4 0 1 6 2006 S06 Apr06 1 RS2-6mm 1 14 2 6 2006 S06 May06 2 RS2-6mm 1 27 2 6 2006 S06 May06 3 RS2-6mm 1 27 2 6 7 2006 S06 May06 4 RS2-6mm 1 27 2 6 7

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234 2006 S06 May06 5 RS2-6mm 1 27 2 6 6 2006 S06 June06 6 RS2-6mm 1 17 2 6 2006 S06 June06 7 RS2-6mm 1 33 2 6 5 2006 S06 June06 8 RS2-6mm 1 33 2 6 2006 S06 June06 9 RS2-6mm 1 33 2 6 6 2006 S06 June06 10 RS2-6mm 1 0 2 6 2006 S06 Apr06 1 RS2-6mm 2 14 2 6 2006 S06 May06 2 RS2-6mm 2 27 2 6 2006 S06 May06 3 RS2-6mm 2 28 2 6 8 2006 S06 May06 4 RS2-6mm 2 27 2 6 7 2006 S06 May06 5 RS2-6mm 2 28 2 6 7 2006 S06 June06 6 RS2-6mm 2 17 2 6 2006 S06 June06 7 RS2-6mm 2 34 2 6 7 2006 S06 June06 8 RS2-6mm 2 34 2 6 2006 S06 June06 9 RS2-6mm 2 34 2 6 8 2006 S06 June06 10 RS2-6mm 2 0 2 6 2006 S06 Apr06 1 RS2-6mm 3 15 2 6 2006 S06 May06 2 RS2-6mm 3 27 2 6 2006 S06 May06 3 RS2-6mm 3 27 2 6 3 2006 S06 May06 4 RS2-6mm 3 27 2 6 4 2006 S06 May06 5 RS2-6mm 3 27 2 6 3 2006 S06 June06 6 RS2-6mm 3 17 2 6 2006 S06 June06 7 RS2-6mm 3 33 2 6 3 2006 S06 June06 8 RS2-6mm 3 34 2 6 2006 S06 June06 9 RS2-6mm 3 33 2 6 3 2006 S06 June06 10 RS2-6mm 3 0 2 6 2006 S06 Apr06 1 RS2-6mm 4 14 2 6 2006 S06 May06 2 RS2-6mm 4 27 2 6 2006 S06 May06 3 RS2-6mm 4 26 2 6 8 2006 S06 May06 4 RS2-6mm 4 27 2 6 7 2006 S06 May06 5 RS2-6mm 4 27 2 6 6 2006 S06 June06 6 RS2-6mm 4 17 2 6 2006 S06 June06 7 RS2-6mm 4 32 2 6 8 2006 S06 June06 8 RS2-6mm 4 33 2 6 2006 S06 June06 9 RS2-6mm 4 33 2 6 8 2006 S06 June06 10 RS2-6mm 4 0 2 6 2006 S06 Apr06 1 DWRS 1 15 2 6 2006 S06 May06 2 DWRS 1 28 2 6 2006 S06 May06 3 DWRS 1 27 2 6 5 2006 S06 May06 4 DWRS 1 28 2 6 6 2006 S06 May06 5 DWRS 1 22 2 6 5 2006 S06 June06 6 DWRS 1 9 2 6 2006 S06 June06 7 DWRS 1 20 2 6 5 2006 S06 June06 8 DWRS 1 19 2 6 2006 S06 June06 9 DWRS 1 20 2 6 5 2006 S06 June06 10 DWRS 1 10 2 6 2006 S06 Apr06 1 DWRS 2 15 2 6 2006 S06 May06 2 DWRS 2 27 2 6 2006 S06 May06 3 DWRS 2 27 2 6 8 2006 S06 May06 4 DWRS 2 27 2 6 6 2006 S06 May06 5 DWRS 2 23 2 6 7 2006 S06 June06 6 DWRS 2 8 2 6 2006 S06 June06 7 DWRS 2 21 2 6 5 2006 S06 June06 8 DWRS 2 19 2 6 2006 S06 June06 9 DWRS 2 19 2 6 5 2006 S06 June06 10 DWRS 2 10 2 6 2006 S06 Apr06 1 DWRS 3 14 2 6

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235 2006 S06 May06 2 DWRS 3 27 2 6 2006 S06 May06 3 DWRS 3 27 2 6 8 2006 S06 May06 4 DWRS 3 27 2 6 8 2006 S06 May06 5 DWRS 3 22 2 6 8 2006 S06 June06 6 DWRS 3 9 2 6 2006 S06 June06 7 DWRS 3 19 2 6 7 2006 S06 June06 8 DWRS 3 19 2 6 2006 S06 June06 9 DWRS 3 18 2 6 7 2006 S06 June06 10 DWRS 3 9 2 6 2006 S06 Apr06 1 DWRS 4 13 2 6 2006 S06 May06 2 DWRS 4 24 2 6 2006 S06 May06 3 DWRS 4 25 2 6 7 2006 S06 May06 4 DWRS 4 24 2 6 7 2006 S06 May06 5 DWRS 4 22 2 6 7 2006 S06 June06 6 DWRS 4 9 2 6 2006 S06 June06 7 DWRS 4 19 2 6 6 2006 S06 June06 8 DWRS 4 19 2 6 2006 S06 June06 9 DWRS 4 20 2 6 7 2006 S06 June06 10 DWRS 4 9 2 6 2006 F06 Sep06 1 RS2-3mm 1 32 2 3 6 2006 F06 Oct06 2 RS2-3mm 1 33 2 3 7 2006 F06 Oct06 3 RS2-3mm 1 28 2 3 2006 F06 Oct06 4 RS2-3mm 1 28 2 3 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 RS2-3mm 1 28 2 3 2006 F06 Nov06 6 RS2-3mm 1 10 2 3 2006 F06 Nov06 7 RS2-3mm 1 21 2 3 2006 F06 Nov06 8 RS2-3mm 1 9 2 3 5 2006 F06 Nov06 9 RS2-3mm 1 21 2 3 2006 F06 Dec06 10 RS2-3mm 1 10 2 3 5 2006 F06 Dec06 11 RS2-3mm 1 21 2 3 5 2006 F06 Dec06 12 RS2-3mm 1 21 2 3 2006 F06 Sep06 1 RS2-3mm 2 33 2 3 8 2006 F06 Oct06 2 RS2-3mm 2 33 2 3 8 2006 F06 Oct06 3 RS2-3mm 2 29 2 3 2006 F06 Oct06 4 RS2-3mm 2 28 2 3 8 2006 F06 Oct06 5 RS2-3mm 2 28 2 3 2006 F06 Nov06 6 RS2-3mm 2 10 2 3 2006 F06 Nov06 7 RS2-3mm 2 21 2 3 2006 F06 Nov06 8 RS2-3mm 2 10 2 3 8 2006 F06 Nov06 9 RS2-3mm 2 21 2 3 2006 F06 Dec06 10 RS2-3mm 2 10 2 3 6 2006 F06 Dec06 11 RS2-3mm 2 21 2 3 7 2006 F06 Dec06 12 RS2-3mm 2 21 2 3 2006 F06 Sep06 1 RS2-3mm 3 32 2 3 7 2006 F06 Oct06 2 RS2-3mm 3 29 2 3 7 2006 F06 Oct06 3 RS2-3mm 3 27 2 3 2006 F06 Oct06 4 RS2-3mm 3 29 2 3 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 RS2-3mm 3 28 2 3 2006 F06 Nov06 6 RS2-3mm 3 9 2 3 2006 F06 Nov06 7 RS2-3mm 3 21 2 3 2006 F06 Nov06 8 RS2-3mm 3 10 2 3 7 2006 F06 Nov06 9 RS2-3mm 3 21 2 3 2006 F06 Dec06 10 RS2-3mm 3 9 2 3 6 2006 F06 Dec06 11 RS2-3mm 3 21 2 3 7 2006 F06 Dec06 12 RS2-3mm 3 21 2 3 2006 F06 Sep06 1 RS2-3mm 4 33 2 3 7 2006 F06 Oct06 2 RS2-3mm 4 33 2 3 7

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236 2006 F06 Oct06 3 RS2-3mm 4 28 2 3 2006 F06 Oct06 4 RS2-3mm 4 28 2 3 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 RS2-3mm 4 28 2 3 2006 F06 Nov06 6 RS2-3mm 4 10 2 3 2006 F06 Nov06 7 RS2-3mm 4 21 2 3 2006 F06 Nov06 8 RS2-3mm 4 10 2 3 6 2006 F06 Nov06 9 RS2-3mm 4 21 2 3 2006 F06 Dec06 10 RS2-3mm 4 10 2 3 5 2006 F06 Dec06 11 RS2-3mm 4 21 2 3 5 2006 F06 Dec06 12 RS2-3mm 4 20 2 3 2006 F06 Sep06 1 RS2-6mm 1 33 2 6 8 2006 F06 Oct06 2 RS2-6mm 1 33 2 6 8 2006 F06 Oct06 3 RS2-6mm 1 28 2 6 2006 F06 Oct06 4 RS2-6mm 1 28 2 6 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 RS2-6mm 1 29 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 6 RS2-6mm 1 10 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 7 RS2-6mm 1 20 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 8 RS2-6mm 1 10 2 6 7 2006 F06 Nov06 9 RS2-6mm 1 21 2 6 2006 F06 Dec06 10 RS2-6mm 1 10 2 6 6 2006 F06 Dec06 11 RS2-6mm 1 21 2 6 6 2006 F06 Dec06 12 RS2-6mm 1 21 2 6 2006 F06 Sep06 1 RS2-6mm 2 33 2 6 5 2006 F06 Oct06 2 RS2-6mm 2 32 2 6 5 2006 F06 Oct06 3 RS2-6mm 2 29 2 6 2006 F06 Oct06 4 RS2-6mm 2 28 2 6 5 2006 F06 Oct06 5 RS2-6mm 2 29 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 6 RS2-6mm 2 9 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 7 RS2-6mm 2 21 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 8 RS2-6mm 2 10 2 6 5 2006 F06 Nov06 9 RS2-6mm 2 21 2 6 2006 F06 Dec06 10 RS2-6mm 2 10 2 6 4 2006 F06 Dec06 11 RS2-6mm 2 21 2 6 4 2006 F06 Dec06 12 RS2-6mm 2 21 2 6 2006 F06 Sep06 1 RS2-6mm 3 34 2 6 4 2006 F06 Oct06 2 RS2-6mm 3 33 2 6 4 2006 F06 Oct06 3 RS2-6mm 3 29 2 6 2006 F06 Oct06 4 RS2-6mm 3 29 2 6 4 2006 F06 Oct06 5 RS2-6mm 3 29 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 6 RS2-6mm 3 10 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 7 RS2-6mm 3 21 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 8 RS2-6mm 3 10 2 6 5 2006 F06 Nov06 9 RS2-6mm 3 22 2 6 2006 F06 Dec06 10 RS2-6mm 3 10 2 6 4 2006 F06 Dec06 11 RS2-6mm 3 21 2 6 5 2006 F06 Dec06 12 RS2-6mm 3 21 2 6 2006 F06 Sep06 1 RS2-6mm 4 33 2 6 7 2006 F06 Oct06 2 RS2-6mm 4 32 2 6 7 2006 F06 Oct06 3 RS2-6mm 4 28 2 6 2006 F06 Oct06 4 RS2-6mm 4 29 2 6 8 2006 F06 Oct06 5 RS2-6mm 4 28 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 6 RS2-6mm 4 10 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 7 RS2-6mm 4 21 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 8 RS2-6mm 4 10 2 6 7 2006 F06 Nov06 9 RS2-6mm 4 21 2 6 2006 F06 Dec06 10 RS2-6mm 4 10 2 6 6 2006 F06 Dec06 11 RS2-6mm 4 21 2 6 7

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237 2006 F06 Dec06 12 RS2-6mm 4 21 2 6 2006 F06 Sep06 1 RS7-6mm 1 3 1 6 8 2006 F06 Oct06 2 RS7-6mm 1 51 1 6 7 2006 F06 Oct06 3 RS7-6mm 1 28 1 6 2006 F06 Oct06 4 RS7-6mm 1 28 1 6 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 RS7-6mm 1 28 1 6 2006 F06 Nov06 6 RS7-6mm 1 13 1 6 2006 F06 Nov06 7 RS7-6mm 1 19 1 6 2006 F06 Nov06 8 RS7-6mm 1 20 1 6 7 2006 F06 Nov06 9 RS7-6mm 1 22 1 6 2006 F06 Dec06 10 RS7-6mm 1 17 1 6 6 2006 F06 Dec06 11 RS7-6mm 1 19 1 6 6 2006 F06 Dec06 12 RS7-6mm 1 14 1 6 2006 F06 Sep06 1 RS7-6mm 2 3 1 6 8 2006 F06 Oct06 2 RS7-6mm 2 52 1 6 8 2006 F06 Oct06 3 RS7-6mm 2 28 1 6 2006 F06 Oct06 4 RS7-6mm 2 28 1 6 8 2006 F06 Oct06 5 RS7-6mm 2 29 1 6 2006 F06 Nov06 6 RS7-6mm 2 13 1 6 2006 F06 Nov06 7 RS7-6mm 2 20 1 6 2006 F06 Nov06 8 RS7-6mm 2 20 1 6 8 2006 F06 Nov06 9 RS7-6mm 2 23 1 6 2006 F06 Dec06 10 RS7-6mm 2 16 1 6 8 2006 F06 Dec06 11 RS7-6mm 2 20 1 6 8 2006 F06 Dec06 12 RS7-6mm 2 13 1 6 2006 F06 Sep06 1 RS7-6mm 3 3 1 6 5 2006 F06 Oct06 2 RS7-6mm 3 52 1 6 4 2006 F06 Oct06 3 RS7-6mm 3 29 1 6 2006 F06 Oct06 4 RS7-6mm 3 28 1 6 6 2006 F06 Oct06 5 RS7-6mm 3 28 1 6 2006 F06 Nov06 6 RS7-6mm 3 13 1 6 2006 F06 Nov06 7 RS7-6mm 3 20 1 6 2006 F06 Nov06 8 RS7-6mm 3 20 1 6 5 2006 F06 Nov06 9 RS7-6mm 3 22 1 6 2006 F06 Dec06 10 RS7-6mm 3 17 1 6 4 2006 F06 Dec06 11 RS7-6mm 3 20 1 6 5 2006 F06 Dec06 12 RS7-6mm 3 13 1 6 2006 F06 Sep06 1 RS7-6mm 4 3 1 6 6 2006 F06 Oct06 2 RS7-6mm 4 51 1 6 6 2006 F06 Oct06 3 RS7-6mm 4 28 1 6 2006 F06 Oct06 4 RS7-6mm 4 28 1 6 6 2006 F06 Oct06 5 RS7-6mm 4 28 1 6 2006 F06 Nov06 6 RS7-6mm 4 13 1 6 2006 F06 Nov06 7 RS7-6mm 4 19 1 6 2006 F06 Nov06 8 RS7-6mm 4 19 1 6 7 2006 F06 Nov06 9 RS7-6mm 4 23 1 6 2006 F06 Dec06 10 RS7-6mm 4 16 1 6 6 2006 F06 Dec06 11 RS7-6mm 4 19 1 6 6 2006 F06 Dec06 12 RS7-6mm 4 13 1 6 2006 F06 Sep06 1 DWRS 1 21 2 6 7 2006 F06 Oct06 2 DWRS 1 21 2 6 7 2006 F06 Oct06 3 DWRS 1 18 2 6 2006 F06 Oct06 4 DWRS 1 18 2 6 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 DWRS 1 18 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 6 DWRS 1 7 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 7 DWRS 1 13 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 8 DWRS 1 7 2 6 7

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238 2006 F06 Nov06 9 DWRS 1 13 2 6 2006 F06 Dec06 10 DWRS 1 7 2 6 7 2006 F06 Dec06 11 DWRS 1 13 2 6 7 2006 F06 Dec06 12 DWRS 1 14 2 6 2006 F06 Sep06 1 DWRS 2 21 2 6 7 2006 F06 Oct06 2 DWRS 2 21 2 6 7 2006 F06 Oct06 3 DWRS 2 17 2 6 2006 F06 Oct06 4 DWRS 2 17 2 6 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 DWRS 2 19 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 6 DWRS 2 6 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 7 DWRS 2 13 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 8 DWRS 2 6 2 6 7 2006 F06 Nov06 9 DWRS 2 15 2 6 2006 F06 Dec06 10 DWRS 2 6 2 6 6 2006 F06 Dec06 11 DWRS 2 13 2 6 7 2006 F06 Dec06 12 DWRS 2 13 2 6 2006 F06 Sep06 1 DWRS 3 22 2 6 8 2006 F06 Oct06 2 DWRS 3 21 2 6 8 2006 F06 Oct06 3 DWRS 3 18 2 6 2006 F06 Oct06 4 DWRS 3 18 2 6 8 2006 F06 Oct06 5 DWRS 3 18 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 6 DWRS 3 6 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 7 DWRS 3 14 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 8 DWRS 3 6 2 6 8 2006 F06 Nov06 9 DWRS 3 13 2 6 2006 F06 Dec06 10 DWRS 3 7 2 6 8 2006 F06 Dec06 11 DWRS 3 13 2 6 8 2006 F06 Dec06 12 DWRS 3 13 2 6 2006 F06 Sep06 1 DWRS 4 21 2 6 7 2006 F06 Oct06 2 DWRS 4 21 2 6 7 2006 F06 Oct06 3 DWRS 4 18 2 6 2006 F06 Oct06 4 DWRS 4 18 2 6 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 DWRS 4 17 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 6 DWRS 4 7 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 7 DWRS 4 13 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 8 DWRS 4 6 2 6 7 2006 F06 Nov06 9 DWRS 4 14 2 6 2006 F06 Dec06 10 DWRS 4 6 2 6 6 2006 F06 Dec06 11 DWRS 4 14 2 6 6 2006 F06 Dec06 12 DWRS 4 13 2 6 2007 S07 May07 1 RS2-3mm 1 43 2 3 6 2007 S07 May07 2 RS2-3mm 1 42 2 3 2007 S07 May07 3 RS2-3mm 1 51 2 3 7 2007 S07 May07 4 RS2-3mm 1 21 2 3 7 2007 S07 Jun07 5 RS2-3mm 1 42 2 3 2007 S07 Jun07 6 RS2-3mm 1 38 2 3 2007 S07 Jun07 7 RS2-3mm 1 33 2 3 7 2007 S07 Jun07 8 RS2-3mm 1 17 2 3 2007 S07 Jul07 9 RS2-3mm 1 16 2 3 7 2007 S07 Jul07 10 RS2-3mm 1 32 2 3 2007 S07 Jul07 11 RS2-3mm 1 22 2 3 2007 S07 Jul07 12 RS2-3mm 1 31 2 3 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 RS2-3mm 1 31 2 3 2007 S07 Aug07 14 RS2-3mm 1 20 2 3 8 2007 S07 Aug07 15 RS2-3mm 1 41 2 3 2007 S07 Aug07 16 RS2-3mm 1 41 2 3 2007 S07 Aug07 17 RS2-3mm 1 40 2 3 8

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239 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS2-3mm 1 41 2 3 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS2-3mm 1 37 2 3 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS2-3mm 1 31 2 3 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS2-3mm 1 16 2 3 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS2-3mm 1 16 2 3 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS2-3mm 1 15 2 3 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS2-3mm 1 28 2 3 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS2-3mm 1 15 2 3 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS2-3mm 1 0 2 3 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS2-3mm 1 28 2 3 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS2-3mm 1 25 2 3 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS2-3mm 1 22 2 3 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS2-3mm 1 10 2 3 2007 S07 May07 1 RS2-3mm 2 43 2 3 7 2007 S07 May07 2 RS2-3mm 2 42 2 3 2007 S07 May07 3 RS2-3mm 2 51 2 3 7 2007 S07 May07 4 RS2-3mm 2 22 2 3 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 RS2-3mm 2 43 2 3 2007 S07 Jun07 6 RS2-3mm 2 39 2 3 2007 S07 Jun07 7 RS2-3mm 2 33 2 3 7 2007 S07 Jun07 8 RS2-3mm 2 17 2 3 2007 S07 Jul07 9 RS2-3mm 2 18 2 3 7 2007 S07 Jul07 10 RS2-3mm 2 31 2 3 2007 S07 Jul07 11 RS2-3mm 2 24 2 3 2007 S07 Jul07 12 RS2-3mm 2 31 2 3 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 RS2-3mm 2 32 2 3 2007 S07 Aug07 14 RS2-3mm 2 20 2 3 8 2007 S07 Aug07 15 RS2-3mm 2 42 2 3 2007 S07 Aug07 16 RS2-3mm 2 42 2 3 2007 S07 Aug07 17 RS2-3mm 2 42 2 3 8 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS2-3mm 2 41 2 3 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS2-3mm 2 37 2 3 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS2-3mm 2 32 2 3 8 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS2-3mm 2 16 2 3 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS2-3mm 2 16 2 3 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS2-3mm 2 15 2 3 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS2-3mm 2 29 2 3 8 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS2-3mm 2 15 2 3 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS2-3mm 2 0 2 3 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS2-3mm 2 28 2 3 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS2-3mm 2 25 2 3 8 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS2-3mm 2 21 2 3 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS2-3mm 2 10 2 3 2007 S07 May07 1 RS2-3mm 3 43 2 3 5 2007 S07 May07 2 RS2-3mm 3 42 2 3 2007 S07 May07 3 RS2-3mm 3 50 2 3 6 2007 S07 May07 4 RS2-3mm 3 21 2 3 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 RS2-3mm 3 43 2 3 2007 S07 Jun07 6 RS2-3mm 3 38 2 3 2007 S07 Jun07 7 RS2-3mm 3 32 2 3 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 RS2-3mm 3 17 2 3 2007 S07 Jul07 9 RS2-3mm 3 16 2 3 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 RS2-3mm 3 31 2 3 2007 S07 Jul07 11 RS2-3mm 3 23 2 3 2007 S07 Jul07 12 RS2-3mm 3 31 2 3 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 RS2-3mm 3 31 2 3 2007 S07 Aug07 14 RS2-3mm 3 20 2 3 7

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240 2007 S07 Aug07 15 RS2-3mm 3 41 2 3 2007 S07 Aug07 16 RS2-3mm 3 41 2 3 2007 S07 Aug07 17 RS2-3mm 3 41 2 3 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS2-3mm 3 41 2 3 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS2-3mm 3 35 2 3 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS2-3mm 3 31 2 3 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS2-3mm 3 16 2 3 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS2-3mm 3 16 2 3 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS2-3mm 3 14 2 3 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS2-3mm 3 28 2 3 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS2-3mm 3 15 2 3 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS2-3mm 3 0 2 3 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS2-3mm 3 28 2 3 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS2-3mm 3 24 2 3 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS2-3mm 3 21 2 3 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS2-3mm 3 10 2 3 2007 S07 May07 1 RS2-3mm 4 42 2 3 6 2007 S07 May07 2 RS2-3mm 4 43 2 3 2007 S07 May07 3 RS2-3mm 4 50 2 3 6 2007 S07 May07 4 RS2-3mm 4 21 2 3 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 RS2-3mm 4 43 2 3 2007 S07 Jun07 6 RS2-3mm 4 38 2 3 2007 S07 Jun07 7 RS2-3mm 4 33 2 3 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 RS2-3mm 4 16 2 3 2007 S07 Jul07 9 RS2-3mm 4 17 2 3 7 2007 S07 Jul07 10 RS2-3mm 4 31 2 3 2007 S07 Jul07 11 RS2-3mm 4 23 2 3 2007 S07 Jul07 12 RS2-3mm 4 31 2 3 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 RS2-3mm 4 31 2 3 2007 S07 Aug07 14 RS2-3mm 4 21 2 3 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 RS2-3mm 4 40 2 3 2007 S07 Aug07 16 RS2-3mm 4 41 2 3 2007 S07 Aug07 17 RS2-3mm 4 41 2 3 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS2-3mm 4 41 2 3 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS2-3mm 4 37 2 3 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS2-3mm 4 31 2 3 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS2-3mm 4 16 2 3 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS2-3mm 4 16 2 3 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS2-3mm 4 15 2 3 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS2-3mm 4 28 2 3 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS2-3mm 4 14 2 3 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS2-3mm 4 0 2 3 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS2-3mm 4 29 2 3 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS2-3mm 4 24 2 3 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS2-3mm 4 21 2 3 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS2-3mm 4 10 2 3 2007 S07 May07 1 RS7-3mm 1 46 7 3 6 2007 S07 May07 2 RS7-3mm 1 45 7 3 2007 S07 May07 3 RS7-3mm 1 53 7 3 6 2007 S07 May07 4 RS7-3mm 1 39 7 3 7 2007 S07 Jun07 5 RS7-3mm 1 32 7 3 2007 S07 Jun07 6 RS7-3mm 1 39 7 3 2007 S07 Jun07 7 RS7-3mm 1 28 7 3 8 2007 S07 Jun07 8 RS7-3mm 1 20 7 3 2007 S07 Jul07 9 RS7-3mm 1 24 7 3 7 2007 S07 Jul07 10 RS7-3mm 1 24 7 3 2007 S07 Jul07 11 RS7-3mm 1 27 7 3

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241 2007 S07 Jul07 12 RS7-3mm 1 24 7 3 8 2007 S07 Jul07 13 RS7-3mm 1 29 7 3 2007 S07 Aug07 14 RS7-3mm 1 17 7 3 8 2007 S07 Aug07 15 RS7-3mm 1 33 7 3 2007 S07 Aug07 16 RS7-3mm 1 34 7 3 2007 S07 Aug07 17 RS7-3mm 1 28 7 3 8 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS7-3mm 1 22 7 3 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS7-3mm 1 37 7 3 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS7-3mm 1 29 7 3 8 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS7-3mm 1 9 7 3 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS7-3mm 1 29 7 3 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS7-3mm 1 8 7 3 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS7-3mm 1 29 7 3 8 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS7-3mm 1 16 7 3 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS7-3mm 1 4 7 3 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS7-3mm 1 25 7 3 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS7-3mm 1 25 7 3 8 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS7-3mm 1 14 7 3 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS7-3mm 1 17 7 3 2007 S07 May07 1 RS7-3mm 2 33 7 3 7 2007 S07 May07 2 RS7-3mm 2 27 7 3 2007 S07 May07 3 RS7-3mm 2 42 7 3 7 2007 S07 May07 4 RS7-3mm 2 35 7 3 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 RS7-3mm 2 31 7 3 2007 S07 Jun07 6 RS7-3mm 2 38 7 3 2007 S07 Jun07 7 RS7-3mm 2 27 7 3 7 2007 S07 Jun07 8 RS7-3mm 2 19 7 3 2007 S07 Jul07 9 RS7-3mm 2 23 7 3 7 2007 S07 Jul07 10 RS7-3mm 2 23 7 3 2007 S07 Jul07 11 RS7-3mm 2 25 7 3 2007 S07 Jul07 12 RS7-3mm 2 23 7 3 8 2007 S07 Jul07 13 RS7-3mm 2 29 7 3 2007 S07 Aug07 14 RS7-3mm 2 17 7 3 6 2007 S07 Aug07 15 RS7-3mm 2 31 7 3 2007 S07 Aug07 16 RS7-3mm 2 33 7 3 2007 S07 Aug07 17 RS7-3mm 2 27 7 3 8 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS7-3mm 2 21 7 3 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS7-3mm 2 35 7 3 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS7-3mm 2 29 7 3 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS7-3mm 2 8 7 3 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS7-3mm 2 29 7 3 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS7-3mm 2 6 7 3 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS7-3mm 2 27 7 3 8 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS7-3mm 2 17 7 3 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS7-3mm 2 4 7 3 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS7-3mm 2 23 7 3 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS7-3mm 2 25 7 3 7 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS7-3mm 2 13 7 3 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS7-3mm 2 17 7 3 2007 S07 May07 1 RS7-3mm 3 48 7 3 6 2007 S07 May07 2 RS7-3mm 3 47 7 3 2007 S07 May07 3 RS7-3mm 3 55 7 3 7 2007 S07 May07 4 RS7-3mm 3 40 7 3 7 2007 S07 Jun07 5 RS7-3mm 3 33 7 3 2007 S07 Jun07 6 RS7-3mm 3 40 7 3 2007 S07 Jun07 7 RS7-3mm 3 30 7 3 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 RS7-3mm 3 20 7 3

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242 2007 S07 Jul07 9 RS7-3mm 3 26 7 3 7 2007 S07 Jul07 10 RS7-3mm 3 25 7 3 2007 S07 Jul07 11 RS7-3mm 3 28 7 3 2007 S07 Jul07 12 RS7-3mm 3 25 7 3 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 RS7-3mm 3 26 7 3 2007 S07 Aug07 14 RS7-3mm 3 18 7 3 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 RS7-3mm 3 35 7 3 2007 S07 Aug07 16 RS7-3mm 3 37 7 3 2007 S07 Aug07 17 RS7-3mm 3 30 7 3 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS7-3mm 3 24 7 3 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS7-3mm 3 32 7 3 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS7-3mm 3 31 7 3 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS7-3mm 3 10 7 3 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS7-3mm 3 29 7 3 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS7-3mm 3 8 7 3 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS7-3mm 3 30 7 3 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS7-3mm 3 18 7 3 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS7-3mm 3 0 7 3 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS7-3mm 3 22 7 3 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS7-3mm 3 27 7 3 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS7-3mm 3 15 7 3 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS7-3mm 3 18 7 3 2007 S07 May07 1 RS7-3mm 4 45 7 3 4 2007 S07 May07 2 RS7-3mm 4 46 7 3 2007 S07 May07 3 RS7-3mm 4 49 7 3 5 2007 S07 May07 4 RS7-3mm 4 39 7 3 4 2007 S07 Jun07 5 RS7-3mm 4 32 7 3 2007 S07 Jun07 6 RS7-3mm 4 39 7 3 2007 S07 Jun07 7 RS7-3mm 4 29 7 3 5 2007 S07 Jun07 8 RS7-3mm 4 19 7 3 2007 S07 Jul07 9 RS7-3mm 4 25 7 3 5 2007 S07 Jul07 10 RS7-3mm 4 24 7 3 2007 S07 Jul07 11 RS7-3mm 4 26 7 3 2007 S07 Jul07 12 RS7-3mm 4 25 7 3 5 2007 S07 Jul07 13 RS7-3mm 4 29 7 3 2007 S07 Aug07 14 RS7-3mm 4 17 7 3 5 2007 S07 Aug07 15 RS7-3mm 4 34 7 3 2007 S07 Aug07 16 RS7-3mm 4 34 7 3 2007 S07 Aug07 17 RS7-3mm 4 29 7 3 6 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS7-3mm 4 23 7 3 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS7-3mm 4 37 7 3 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS7-3mm 4 29 7 3 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS7-3mm 4 10 7 3 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS7-3mm 4 29 7 3 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS7-3mm 4 8 7 3 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS7-3mm 4 29 7 3 5 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS7-3mm 4 16 7 3 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS7-3mm 4 4 7 3 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS7-3mm 4 25 7 3 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS7-3mm 4 27 7 3 4 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS7-3mm 4 14 7 3 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS7-3mm 4 17 7 3 2007 S07 May07 1 RS1-6mm 1 44 1 6 7 2007 S07 May07 2 RS1-6mm 1 44 1 6 2007 S07 May07 3 RS1-6mm 1 52 1 6 6 2007 S07 May07 4 RS1-6mm 1 44 1 6 7 2007 S07 Jun07 5 RS1-6mm 1 45 1 6

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243 2007 S07 Jun07 6 RS1-6mm 1 44 1 6 2007 S07 Jun07 7 RS1-6mm 1 34 1 6 8 2007 S07 Jun07 8 RS1-6mm 1 0 1 6 2007 S07 Jul07 9 RS1-6mm 1 33 1 6 8 2007 S07 Jul07 10 RS1-6mm 1 33 1 6 2007 S07 Jul07 11 RS1-6mm 1 40 1 6 2007 S07 Jul07 12 RS1-6mm 1 33 1 6 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 RS1-6mm 1 32 1 6 2007 S07 Aug07 14 RS1-6mm 1 0 1 6 8 2007 S07 Aug07 15 RS1-6mm 1 43 1 6 2007 S07 Aug07 16 RS1-6mm 1 43 1 6 2007 S07 Aug07 17 RS1-6mm 1 42 1 6 8 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS1-6mm 1 43 1 6 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS1-6mm 1 43 1 6 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS1-6mm 1 32 1 6 8 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS1-6mm 1 0 1 6 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS1-6mm 1 33 1 6 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS1-6mm 1 0 1 6 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS1-6mm 1 29 1 6 8 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS1-6mm 1 29 1 6 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS1-6mm 1 0 1 6 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS1-6mm 1 30 1 6 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS1-6mm 1 29 1 6 8 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS1-6mm 1 22 1 6 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS1-6mm 1 0 1 6 2007 S07 May07 1 RS1-6mm 2 43 1 6 4 2007 S07 May07 2 RS1-6mm 2 43 1 6 2007 S07 May07 3 RS1-6mm 2 51 1 6 5 2007 S07 May07 4 RS1-6mm 2 43 1 6 4 2007 S07 Jun07 5 RS1-6mm 2 43 1 6 2007 S07 Jun07 6 RS1-6mm 2 43 1 6 2007 S07 Jun07 7 RS1-6mm 2 33 1 6 5 2007 S07 Jun07 8 RS1-6mm 2 0 1 6 2007 S07 Jul07 9 RS1-6mm 2 33 1 6 5 2007 S07 Jul07 10 RS1-6mm 2 32 1 6 2007 S07 Jul07 11 RS1-6mm 2 39 1 6 2007 S07 Jul07 12 RS1-6mm 2 32 1 6 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 RS1-6mm 2 31 1 6 2007 S07 Aug07 14 RS1-6mm 2 0 1 6 6 2007 S07 Aug07 15 RS1-6mm 2 42 1 6 2007 S07 Aug07 16 RS1-6mm 2 42 1 6 2007 S07 Aug07 17 RS1-6mm 2 41 1 6 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS1-6mm 2 42 1 6 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS1-6mm 2 42 1 6 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS1-6mm 2 31 1 6 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS1-6mm 2 0 1 6 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS1-6mm 2 32 1 6 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS1-6mm 2 0 1 6 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS1-6mm 2 31 1 6 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS1-6mm 2 28 1 6 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS1-6mm 2 0 1 6 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS1-6mm 2 30 1 6 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS1-6mm 2 32 1 6 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS1-6mm 2 23 1 6 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS1-6mm 2 0 1 6 2007 S07 May07 1 RS1-6mm 3 42 1 6 4 2007 S07 May07 2 RS1-6mm 3 42 1 6

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244 2007 S07 May07 3 RS1-6mm 3 50 1 6 4 2007 S07 May07 4 RS1-6mm 3 42 1 6 4 2007 S07 Jun07 5 RS1-6mm 3 43 1 6 2007 S07 Jun07 6 RS1-6mm 3 42 1 6 2007 S07 Jun07 7 RS1-6mm 3 33 1 6 4 2007 S07 Jun07 8 RS1-6mm 3 0 1 6 2007 S07 Jul07 9 RS1-6mm 3 32 1 6 5 2007 S07 Jul07 10 RS1-6mm 3 31 1 6 2007 S07 Jul07 11 RS1-6mm 3 33 1 6 2007 S07 Jul07 12 RS1-6mm 3 31 1 6 4 2007 S07 Jul07 13 RS1-6mm 3 30 1 6 2007 S07 Aug07 14 RS1-6mm 3 0 1 6 6 2007 S07 Aug07 15 RS1-6mm 3 41 1 6 2007 S07 Aug07 16 RS1-6mm 3 40 1 6 2007 S07 Aug07 17 RS1-6mm 3 40 1 6 6 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS1-6mm 3 41 1 6 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS1-6mm 3 41 1 6 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS1-6mm 3 30 1 6 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS1-6mm 3 0 1 6 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS1-6mm 3 31 1 6 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS1-6mm 3 0 1 6 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS1-6mm 3 27 1 6 4 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS1-6mm 3 28 1 6 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS1-6mm 3 0 1 6 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS1-6mm 3 28 1 6 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS1-6mm 3 28 1 6 4 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS1-6mm 3 21 1 6 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS1-6mm 3 0 1 6 2007 S07 May07 1 RS1-6mm 4 42 1 6 5 2007 S07 May07 2 RS1-6mm 4 43 1 6 2007 S07 May07 3 RS1-6mm 4 50 1 6 6 2007 S07 May07 4 RS1-6mm 4 42 1 6 5 2007 S07 Jun07 5 RS1-6mm 4 43 1 6 2007 S07 Jun07 6 RS1-6mm 4 42 1 6 2007 S07 Jun07 7 RS1-6mm 4 33 1 6 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 RS1-6mm 4 0 1 6 2007 S07 Jul07 9 RS1-6mm 4 32 1 6 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 RS1-6mm 4 31 1 6 2007 S07 Jul07 11 RS1-6mm 4 34 1 6 2007 S07 Jul07 12 RS1-6mm 4 32 1 6 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 RS1-6mm 4 31 1 6 2007 S07 Aug07 14 RS1-6mm 4 0 1 6 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 RS1-6mm 4 41 1 6 2007 S07 Aug07 16 RS1-6mm 4 41 1 6 2007 S07 Aug07 17 RS1-6mm 4 41 1 6 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS1-6mm 4 41 1 6 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS1-6mm 4 42 1 6 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS1-6mm 4 31 1 6 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS1-6mm 4 0 1 6 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS1-6mm 4 31 1 6 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS1-6mm 4 0 1 6 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS1-6mm 4 29 1 6 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS1-6mm 4 28 1 6 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS1-6mm 4 0 1 6 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS1-6mm 4 28 1 6 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS1-6mm 4 29 1 6 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS1-6mm 4 20 1 6

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245 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS1-6mm 4 0 1 6 2007 S07 May07 1 RS2-6mm 1 43 2 6 5 2007 S07 May07 2 RS2-6mm 1 43 2 6 2007 S07 May07 3 RS2-6mm 1 50 2 6 6 2007 S07 May07 4 RS2-6mm 1 43 2 6 5 2007 S07 Jun07 5 RS2-6mm 1 43 2 6 2007 S07 Jun07 6 RS2-6mm 1 38 2 6 2007 S07 Jun07 7 RS2-6mm 1 32 2 6 5 2007 S07 Jun07 8 RS2-6mm 1 17 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 9 RS2-6mm 1 17 2 6 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 RS2-6mm 1 31 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 11 RS2-6mm 1 23 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 12 RS2-6mm 1 32 2 6 5 2007 S07 Jul07 13 RS2-6mm 1 31 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 14 RS2-6mm 1 20 2 6 6 2007 S07 Aug07 15 RS2-6mm 1 42 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 16 RS2-6mm 1 41 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 17 RS2-6mm 1 42 2 6 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS2-6mm 1 41 2 6 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS2-6mm 1 37 2 6 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS2-6mm 1 31 2 6 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS2-6mm 1 16 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS2-6mm 1 17 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS2-6mm 1 15 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS2-6mm 1 30 2 6 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS2-6mm 1 29 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS2-6mm 1 0 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS2-6mm 1 30 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS2-6mm 1 27 2 6 4 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS2-6mm 1 22 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS2-6mm 1 10 2 6 2007 S07 May07 1 RS2-6mm 2 43 2 6 4 2007 S07 May07 2 RS2-6mm 2 43 2 6 2007 S07 May07 3 RS2-6mm 2 50 2 6 5 2007 S07 May07 4 RS2-6mm 2 43 2 6 5 2007 S07 Jun07 5 RS2-6mm 2 43 2 6 2007 S07 Jun07 6 RS2-6mm 2 38 2 6 2007 S07 Jun07 7 RS2-6mm 2 33 2 6 4 2007 S07 Jun07 8 RS2-6mm 2 17 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 9 RS2-6mm 2 17 2 6 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 RS2-6mm 2 31 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 11 RS2-6mm 2 24 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 12 RS2-6mm 2 31 2 6 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 RS2-6mm 2 32 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 14 RS2-6mm 2 20 2 6 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 RS2-6mm 2 42 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 16 RS2-6mm 2 41 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 17 RS2-6mm 2 41 2 6 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS2-6mm 2 42 2 6 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS2-6mm 2 35 2 6 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS2-6mm 2 32 2 6 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS2-6mm 2 16 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS2-6mm 2 16 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS2-6mm 2 15 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS2-6mm 2 28 2 6 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS2-6mm 2 29 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS2-6mm 2 0 2 6

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246 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS2-6mm 2 28 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS2-6mm 2 25 2 6 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS2-6mm 2 22 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS2-6mm 2 10 2 6 2007 S07 May07 1 RS2-6mm 3 44 2 6 4 2007 S07 May07 2 RS2-6mm 3 43 2 6 2007 S07 May07 3 RS2-6mm 3 50 2 6 5 2007 S07 May07 4 RS2-6mm 3 42 2 6 5 2007 S07 Jun07 5 RS2-6mm 3 43 2 6 2007 S07 Jun07 6 RS2-6mm 3 48 2 6 2007 S07 Jun07 7 RS2-6mm 3 33 2 6 5 2007 S07 Jun07 8 RS2-6mm 3 18 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 9 RS2-6mm 3 17 2 6 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 RS2-6mm 3 32 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 11 RS2-6mm 3 23 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 12 RS2-6mm 3 32 2 6 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 RS2-6mm 3 32 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 14 RS2-6mm 3 22 2 6 8 2007 S07 Aug07 15 RS2-6mm 3 43 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 16 RS2-6mm 3 43 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 17 RS2-6mm 3 43 2 6 8 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS2-6mm 3 43 2 6 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS2-6mm 3 39 2 6 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS2-6mm 3 33 2 6 8 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS2-6mm 3 17 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS2-6mm 3 17 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS2-6mm 3 16 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS2-6mm 3 30 2 6 8 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS2-6mm 3 29 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS2-6mm 3 0 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS2-6mm 3 30 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS2-6mm 3 26 2 6 7 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS2-6mm 3 23 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS2-6mm 3 10 2 6 2007 S07 May07 1 RS2-6mm 4 43 2 6 7 2007 S07 May07 2 RS2-6mm 4 43 2 6 2007 S07 May07 3 RS2-6mm 4 50 2 6 6 2007 S07 May07 4 RS2-6mm 4 42 2 6 7 2007 S07 Jun07 5 RS2-6mm 4 43 2 6 2007 S07 Jun07 6 RS2-6mm 4 38 2 6 2007 S07 Jun07 7 RS2-6mm 4 33 2 6 7 2007 S07 Jun07 8 RS2-6mm 4 17 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 9 RS2-6mm 4 17 2 6 7 2007 S07 Jul07 10 RS2-6mm 4 31 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 11 RS2-6mm 4 23 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 12 RS2-6mm 4 32 2 6 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 RS2-6mm 4 31 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 14 RS2-6mm 4 21 2 6 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 RS2-6mm 4 41 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 16 RS2-6mm 4 42 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 17 RS2-6mm 4 42 2 6 6 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS2-6mm 4 41 2 6 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS2-6mm 4 38 2 6 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS2-6mm 4 31 2 6 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS2-6mm 4 16 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS2-6mm 4 17 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS2-6mm 4 15 2 6

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247 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS2-6mm 4 28 2 6 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS2-6mm 4 29 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS2-6mm 4 0 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS2-6mm 4 29 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS2-6mm 4 26 2 6 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS2-6mm 4 21 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS2-6mm 4 10 2 6 2007 S07 May07 1 RS7-6mm 1 45 7 6 6 2007 S07 May07 2 RS7-6mm 1 45 7 6 2007 S07 May07 3 RS7-6mm 1 51 7 6 6 2007 S07 May07 4 RS7-6mm 1 44 7 6 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 RS7-6mm 1 32 7 6 2007 S07 Jun07 6 RS7-6mm 1 38 7 6 2007 S07 Jun07 7 RS7-6mm 1 28 7 6 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 RS7-6mm 1 19 7 6 2007 S07 Jul07 9 RS7-6mm 1 24 7 6 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 RS7-6mm 1 24 7 6 2007 S07 Jul07 11 RS7-6mm 1 31 7 6 2007 S07 Jul07 12 RS7-6mm 1 24 7 6 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 RS7-6mm 1 28 7 6 2007 S07 Aug07 14 RS7-6mm 1 17 7 6 6 2007 S07 Aug07 15 RS7-6mm 1 39 7 6 2007 S07 Aug07 16 RS7-6mm 1 33 7 6 2007 S07 Aug07 17 RS7-6mm 1 33 7 6 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS7-6mm 1 22 7 6 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS7-6mm 1 35 7 6 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS7-6mm 1 28 7 6 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS7-6mm 1 15 7 6 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS7-6mm 1 28 7 6 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS7-6mm 1 14 7 6 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS7-6mm 1 27 7 6 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS7-6mm 1 24 7 6 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS7-6mm 1 13 7 6 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS7-6mm 1 28 7 6 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS7-6mm 1 25 7 6 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS7-6mm 1 13 7 6 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS7-6mm 1 20 7 6 2007 S07 May07 1 RS7-6mm 2 46 7 6 8 2007 S07 May07 2 RS7-6mm 2 46 7 6 2007 S07 May07 3 RS7-6mm 2 55 7 6 8 2007 S07 May07 4 RS7-6mm 2 46 7 6 8 2007 S07 Jun07 5 RS7-6mm 2 33 7 6 2007 S07 Jun07 6 RS7-6mm 2 40 7 6 2007 S07 Jun07 7 RS7-6mm 2 29 7 6 8 2007 S07 Jun07 8 RS7-6mm 2 20 7 6 2007 S07 Jul07 9 RS7-6mm 2 25 7 6 8 2007 S07 Jul07 10 RS7-6mm 2 24 7 6 2007 S07 Jul07 11 RS7-6mm 2 32 7 6 2007 S07 Jul07 12 RS7-6mm 2 25 7 6 8 2007 S07 Jul07 13 RS7-6mm 2 30 7 6 2007 S07 Aug07 14 RS7-6mm 2 17 7 6 8 2007 S07 Aug07 15 RS7-6mm 2 41 7 6 2007 S07 Aug07 16 RS7-6mm 2 35 7 6 2007 S07 Aug07 17 RS7-6mm 2 35 7 6 9 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS7-6mm 2 23 7 6 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS7-6mm 2 37 7 6 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS7-6mm 2 30 7 6 8

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248 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS7-6mm 2 15 7 6 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS7-6mm 2 29 7 6 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS7-6mm 2 14 7 6 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS7-6mm 2 29 7 6 8 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS7-6mm 2 25 7 6 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS7-6mm 2 13 7 6 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS7-6mm 2 29 7 6 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS7-6mm 2 26 7 6 9 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS7-6mm 2 14 7 6 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS7-6mm 2 20 7 6 2007 S07 May07 1 RS7-6mm 3 45 7 6 5 2007 S07 May07 2 RS7-6mm 3 45 7 6 2007 S07 May07 3 RS7-6mm 3 53 7 6 7 2007 S07 May07 4 RS7-6mm 3 45 7 6 7 2007 S07 Jun07 5 RS7-6mm 3 31 7 6 2007 S07 Jun07 6 RS7-6mm 3 39 7 6 2007 S07 Jun07 7 RS7-6mm 3 29 7 6 7 2007 S07 Jun07 8 RS7-6mm 3 19 7 6 2007 S07 Jul07 9 RS7-6mm 3 24 7 6 7 2007 S07 Jul07 10 RS7-6mm 3 25 7 6 2007 S07 Jul07 11 RS7-6mm 3 31 7 6 2007 S07 Jul07 12 RS7-6mm 3 24 7 6 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 RS7-6mm 3 29 7 6 2007 S07 Aug07 14 RS7-6mm 3 17 7 6 8 2007 S07 Aug07 15 RS7-6mm 3 39 7 6 2007 S07 Aug07 16 RS7-6mm 3 34 7 6 2007 S07 Aug07 17 RS7-6mm 3 33 7 6 8 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS7-6mm 3 22 7 6 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS7-6mm 3 37 7 6 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS7-6mm 3 29 7 6 8 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS7-6mm 3 15 7 6 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS7-6mm 3 28 7 6 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS7-6mm 3 14 7 6 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS7-6mm 3 28 7 6 8 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS7-6mm 3 24 7 6 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS7-6mm 3 13 7 6 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS7-6mm 3 29 7 6 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS7-6mm 3 25 7 6 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS7-6mm 3 14 7 6 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS7-6mm 3 20 7 6 2007 S07 May07 1 RS7-6mm 4 45 7 6 5 2007 S07 May07 2 RS7-6mm 4 45 7 6 2007 S07 May07 3 RS7-6mm 4 52 7 6 5 2007 S07 May07 4 RS7-6mm 4 44 7 6 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 RS7-6mm 4 32 7 6 2007 S07 Jun07 6 RS7-6mm 4 38 7 6 2007 S07 Jun07 7 RS7-6mm 4 29 7 6 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 RS7-6mm 4 19 7 6 2007 S07 Jul07 9 RS7-6mm 4 24 7 6 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 RS7-6mm 4 24 7 6 2007 S07 Jul07 11 RS7-6mm 4 31 7 6 2007 S07 Jul07 12 RS7-6mm 4 23 7 6 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 RS7-6mm 4 28 7 6 2007 S07 Aug07 14 RS7-6mm 4 17 7 6 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 RS7-6mm 4 39 7 6 2007 S07 Aug07 16 RS7-6mm 4 32 7 6 2007 S07 Aug07 17 RS7-6mm 4 33 7 6 7

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249 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS7-6mm 4 22 7 6 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS7-6mm 4 37 7 6 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS7-6mm 4 30 7 6 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS7-6mm 4 15 7 6 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS7-6mm 4 29 7 6 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS7-6mm 4 13 7 6 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS7-6mm 4 28 7 6 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS7-6mm 4 25 7 6 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS7-6mm 4 13 7 6 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS7-6mm 4 28 7 6 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS7-6mm 4 25 7 6 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS7-6mm 4 14 7 6 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS7-6mm 4 20 7 6 2007 S07 May07 1 DWRS 1 26 2 6 6 2007 S07 May07 2 DWRS 1 26 2 6 2007 S07 May07 3 DWRS 1 34 2 6 6 2007 S07 May07 4 DWRS 1 26 2 6 7 2007 S07 Jun07 5 DWRS 1 26 2 6 2007 S07 Jun07 6 DWRS 1 23 2 6 2007 S07 Jun07 7 DWRS 1 20 2 6 7 2007 S07 Jun07 8 DWRS 1 9 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 9 DWRS 1 10 2 6 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 DWRS 1 19 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 11 DWRS 1 18 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 12 DWRS 1 20 2 6 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 DWRS 1 20 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 14 DWRS 1 14 2 6 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 DWRS 1 27 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 16 DWRS 1 27 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 17 DWRS 1 26 2 6 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 DWRS 1 27 2 6 2007 F07 Sep07 19 DWRS 1 24 2 6 2007 F07 Sep07 20 DWRS 1 20 2 6 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 DWRS 1 10 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 22 DWRS 1 9 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 23 DWRS 1 10 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 24 DWRS 1 19 2 6 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 DWRS 1 19 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 26 DWRS 1 0 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 27 DWRS 1 19 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 28 DWRS 1 17 2 6 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 DWRS 1 14 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 30 DWRS 1 6 2 6 2007 S07 May07 1 DWRS 2 25 2 6 7 2007 S07 May07 2 DWRS 2 25 2 6 2007 S07 May07 3 DWRS 2 33 2 6 7 2007 S07 May07 4 DWRS 2 25 2 6 7 2007 S07 Jun07 5 DWRS 2 27 2 6 2007 S07 Jun07 6 DWRS 2 23 2 6 2007 S07 Jun07 7 DWRS 2 19 2 6 7 2007 S07 Jun07 8 DWRS 2 8 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 9 DWRS 2 10 2 6 8 2007 S07 Jul07 10 DWRS 2 19 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 11 DWRS 2 19 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 12 DWRS 2 19 2 6 8 2007 S07 Jul07 13 DWRS 2 21 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 14 DWRS 2 13 2 6 8

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250 2007 S07 Aug07 15 DWRS 2 25 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 16 DWRS 2 27 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 17 DWRS 2 25 2 6 8 2007 F07 Sep07 18 DWRS 2 25 2 6 2007 F07 Sep07 19 DWRS 2 23 2 6 2007 F07 Sep07 20 DWRS 2 21 2 6 8 2007 F07 Sep07 21 DWRS 2 8 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 22 DWRS 2 10 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 23 DWRS 2 10 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 24 DWRS 2 17 2 6 8 2007 F07 Oct07 25 DWRS 2 19 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 26 DWRS 2 0 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 27 DWRS 2 19 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 28 DWRS 2 17 2 6 8 2007 F07 Nov07 29 DWRS 2 15 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 30 DWRS 2 6 2 6 2007 S07 May07 1 DWRS 3 26 2 6 6 2007 S07 May07 2 DWRS 3 25 2 6 2007 S07 May07 3 DWRS 3 33 2 6 7 2007 S07 May07 4 DWRS 3 26 2 6 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 DWRS 3 25 2 6 2007 S07 Jun07 6 DWRS 3 23 2 6 2007 S07 Jun07 7 DWRS 3 19 2 6 7 2007 S07 Jun07 8 DWRS 3 9 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 9 DWRS 3 10 2 6 8 2007 S07 Jul07 10 DWRS 3 19 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 11 DWRS 3 17 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 12 DWRS 3 20 2 6 8 2007 S07 Jul07 13 DWRS 3 19 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 14 DWRS 3 13 2 6 8 2007 S07 Aug07 15 DWRS 3 25 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 16 DWRS 3 22 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 17 DWRS 3 22 2 6 8 2007 F07 Sep07 18 DWRS 3 22 2 6 2007 F07 Sep07 19 DWRS 3 18 2 6 2007 F07 Sep07 20 DWRS 3 13 2 6 8 2007 F07 Sep07 21 DWRS 3 6 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 22 DWRS 3 9 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 23 DWRS 3 8 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 24 DWRS 3 16 2 6 8 2007 F07 Oct07 25 DWRS 3 15 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 26 DWRS 3 0 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 27 DWRS 3 16 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 28 DWRS 3 14 2 6 8 2007 F07 Nov07 29 DWRS 3 10 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 30 DWRS 3 6 2 6 2007 S07 May07 1 DWRS 4 26 2 6 6 2007 S07 May07 2 DWRS 4 26 2 6 2007 S07 May07 3 DWRS 4 33 2 6 6 2007 S07 May07 4 DWRS 4 25 2 6 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 DWRS 4 26 2 6 2007 S07 Jun07 6 DWRS 4 23 2 6 2007 S07 Jun07 7 DWRS 4 19 2 6 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 DWRS 4 10 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 9 DWRS 4 9 2 6 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 DWRS 4 19 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 11 DWRS 4 13 2 6

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251 2007 S07 Jul07 12 DWRS 4 21 2 6 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 DWRS 4 20 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 14 DWRS 4 14 2 6 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 DWRS 4 26 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 16 DWRS 4 27 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 17 DWRS 4 26 2 6 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 DWRS 4 27 2 6 2007 F07 Sep07 19 DWRS 4 24 2 6 2007 F07 Sep07 20 DWRS 4 20 2 6 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 DWRS 4 10 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 22 DWRS 4 10 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 23 DWRS 4 10 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 24 DWRS 4 20 2 6 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 DWRS 4 20 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 26 DWRS 4 0 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 27 DWRS 4 20 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 28 DWRS 4 17 2 6 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 DWRS 4 15 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 30 DWRS 4 7 2 6 2006 S06 Apr06 1 WOS 1 29 2 2006 S06 May06 2 WOS 1 27 2 2006 S06 May06 3 WOS 1 27 2 4 2006 S06 May06 4 WOS 1 29 2 3 2006 S06 May06 5 WOS 1 27 2 3 2006 S06 June06 6 WOS 1 35 2 2006 S06 June06 7 WOS 1 33 2 3 2006 S06 June06 8 WOS 1 35 2 2006 S06 June06 9 WOS 1 33 2 3 2006 S06 June06 10 WOS 1 33 2 2006 S06 Apr06 1 WOS 2 28 2 2006 S06 May06 2 WOS 2 26 2 2006 S06 May06 3 WOS 2 27 2 6 2006 S06 May06 4 WOS 2 25 2 5 2006 S06 May06 5 WOS 2 27 2 4 2006 S06 June06 6 WOS 2 33 2 2006 S06 June06 7 WOS 2 33 2 4 2006 S06 June06 8 WOS 2 33 2 2006 S06 June06 9 WOS 2 33 2 5 2006 S06 June06 10 WOS 2 33 2 2006 S06 Apr06 1 WOS 3 27 2 2006 S06 May06 2 WOS 3 26 2 2006 S06 May06 3 WOS 3 27 2 8 2006 S06 May06 4 WOS 3 25 2 8 2006 S06 May06 5 WOS 3 26 2 7 2006 S06 June06 6 WOS 3 32 2 2006 S06 June06 7 WOS 3 31 2 8 2006 S06 June06 8 WOS 3 31 2 2006 S06 June06 9 WOS 3 31 2 8 2006 S06 June06 10 WOS 3 29 2 2006 S06 Apr06 1 WOS 4 27 2 2006 S06 May06 2 WOS 4 26 2 2006 S06 May06 3 WOS 4 27 2 8 2006 S06 May06 4 WOS 4 27 2 7 2006 S06 May06 5 WOS 4 27 2 6 2006 S06 June06 6 WOS 4 33 2 2006 S06 June06 7 WOS 4 32 2 6 2006 S06 June06 8 WOS 4 33 2

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252 2006 S06 June06 9 WOS 4 33 2 6 2006 S06 June06 10 WOS 4 32 2 2006 F06 Sep06 1 WOS 1 33 2 4 2006 F06 Oct06 2 WOS 1 33 2 4 2006 F06 Oct06 3 WOS 1 29 2 2006 F06 Oct06 4 WOS 1 29 2 4 2006 F06 Oct06 5 WOS 1 29 2 2006 F06 Nov06 6 WOS 1 13 2 2006 F06 Nov06 7 WOS 1 21 2 2006 F06 Nov06 8 WOS 1 23 2 4 2006 F06 Nov06 9 WOS 1 23 2 2006 F06 Dec06 10 WOS 1 21 2 3 2006 F06 Dec06 11 WOS 1 21 2 4 2006 F06 Dec06 12 WOS 1 21 2 2006 F06 Sep06 1 WOS 2 31 2 6 2006 F06 Oct06 2 WOS 2 33 2 7 2006 F06 Oct06 3 WOS 2 28 2 2006 F06 Oct06 4 WOS 2 28 2 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 WOS 2 29 2 2006 F06 Nov06 6 WOS 2 10 2 2006 F06 Nov06 7 WOS 2 22 2 2006 F06 Nov06 8 WOS 2 21 2 6 2006 F06 Nov06 9 WOS 2 21 2 2006 F06 Dec06 10 WOS 2 20 2 5 2006 F06 Dec06 11 WOS 2 21 2 5 2006 F06 Dec06 12 WOS 2 21 2 2006 F06 Sep06 1 WOS 3 32 2 8 2006 F06 Oct06 2 WOS 3 32 2 8 2006 F06 Oct06 3 WOS 3 28 2 2006 F06 Oct06 4 WOS 3 28 2 8 2006 F06 Oct06 5 WOS 3 28 2 2006 F06 Nov06 6 WOS 3 10 2 2006 F06 Nov06 7 WOS 3 21 2 2006 F06 Nov06 8 WOS 3 20 2 8 2006 F06 Nov06 9 WOS 3 21 2 2006 F06 Dec06 10 WOS 3 21 2 8 2006 F06 Dec06 11 WOS 3 20 2 8 2006 F06 Dec06 12 WOS 3 21 2 2006 F06 Sep06 1 WOS 4 32 2 7 2006 F06 Oct06 2 WOS 4 33 2 6 2006 F06 Oct06 3 WOS 4 28 2 2006 F06 Oct06 4 WOS 4 28 2 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 WOS 4 29 2 2006 F06 Nov06 6 WOS 4 9 2 2006 F06 Nov06 7 WOS 4 21 2 2006 F06 Nov06 8 WOS 4 21 2 7 2006 F06 Nov06 9 WOS 4 21 2 2006 F06 Dec06 10 WOS 4 20 2 6 2006 F06 Dec06 11 WOS 4 21 2 6 2006 F06 Dec06 12 WOS 4 21 2 2007 S07 May07 1 WOS 1 42 2 4 2007 S07 May07 2 WOS 1 44 2 2007 S07 May07 3 WOS 1 52 2 4 2007 S07 May07 4 WOS 1 44 2 5 2007 S07 Jun07 5 WOS 1 44 2 2007 S07 Jun07 6 WOS 1 38 2 2007 S07 Jun07 7 WOS 1 33 2 5

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253 2007 S07 Jun07 8 WOS 1 19 2 2007 S07 Jul07 9 WOS 1 40 2 5 2007 S07 Jul07 10 WOS 1 52 2 2007 S07 Jul07 11 WOS 1 40 2 2007 S07 Jul07 12 WOS 1 33 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 WOS 1 31 2 2007 S07 Aug07 14 WOS 1 42 2 6 2007 S07 Aug07 15 WOS 1 44 2 2007 S07 Aug07 16 WOS 1 42 2 2007 S07 Aug07 17 WOS 1 44 2 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 WOS 1 42 2 2007 F07 Sep07 19 WOS 1 38 2 2007 F07 Sep07 20 WOS 1 33 2 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 WOS 1 33 2 2007 F07 Oct07 22 WOS 1 31 2 2007 F07 Oct07 23 WOS 1 31 2 2007 F07 Oct07 24 WOS 1 31 2 5 2007 F07 Oct07 25 WOS 1 29 2 2007 F07 Oct07 26 WOS 1 29 2 2007 F07 Nov07 27 WOS 1 29 2 2007 F07 Nov07 28 WOS 1 25 2 4 2007 F07 Nov07 29 WOS 1 23 2 2007 F07 Nov07 30 WOS 1 21 2 2007 S07 May07 1 WOS 2 43 2 6 2007 S07 May07 2 WOS 2 46 2 2007 S07 May07 3 WOS 2 50 2 6 2007 S07 May07 4 WOS 2 43 2 7 2007 S07 Jun07 5 WOS 2 42 2 2007 S07 Jun07 6 WOS 2 39 2 2007 S07 Jun07 7 WOS 2 32 2 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 WOS 2 18 2 2007 S07 Jul07 9 WOS 2 40 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 WOS 2 55 2 2007 S07 Jul07 11 WOS 2 39 2 2007 S07 Jul07 12 WOS 2 32 2 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 WOS 2 34 2 2007 S07 Aug07 14 WOS 2 41 2 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 WOS 2 44 2 2007 S07 Aug07 16 WOS 2 44 2 2007 S07 Aug07 17 WOS 2 42 2 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 WOS 2 41 2 2007 F07 Sep07 19 WOS 2 37 2 2007 F07 Sep07 20 WOS 2 33 2 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 WOS 2 34 2 2007 F07 Oct07 22 WOS 2 31 2 2007 F07 Oct07 23 WOS 2 30 2 2007 F07 Oct07 24 WOS 2 29 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 WOS 2 30 2 2007 F07 Oct07 26 WOS 2 31 2 2007 F07 Nov07 27 WOS 2 29 2 2007 F07 Nov07 28 WOS 2 25 2 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 WOS 2 21 2 2007 F07 Nov07 30 WOS 2 21 2 2007 S07 May07 1 WOS 3 40 2 8 2007 S07 May07 2 WOS 3 37 2 2007 S07 May07 3 WOS 3 45 2 8 2007 S07 May07 4 WOS 3 38 2 8

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254 2007 S07 Jun07 5 WOS 3 38 2 2007 S07 Jun07 6 WOS 3 34 2 2007 S07 Jun07 7 WOS 3 30 2 8 2007 S07 Jun07 8 WOS 3 15 2 2007 S07 Jul07 9 WOS 3 35 2 8 2007 S07 Jul07 10 WOS 3 47 2 2007 S07 Jul07 11 WOS 3 37 2 2007 S07 Jul07 12 WOS 3 29 2 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 WOS 3 28 2 2007 S07 Aug07 14 WOS 3 39 2 8 2007 S07 Aug07 15 WOS 3 38 2 2007 S07 Aug07 16 WOS 3 38 2 2007 S07 Aug07 17 WOS 3 38 2 9 2007 F07 Sep07 18 WOS 3 38 2 2007 F07 Sep07 19 WOS 3 32 2 2007 F07 Sep07 20 WOS 3 28 2 8 2007 F07 Sep07 21 WOS 3 29 2 2007 F07 Oct07 22 WOS 3 31 2 2007 F07 Oct07 23 WOS 3 30 2 2007 F07 Oct07 24 WOS 3 28 2 8 2007 F07 Oct07 25 WOS 3 29 2 2007 F07 Oct07 26 WOS 3 28 2 2007 F07 Nov07 27 WOS 3 29 2 2007 F07 Nov07 28 WOS 3 25 2 8 2007 F07 Nov07 29 WOS 3 22 2 2007 F07 Nov07 30 WOS 3 21 2 2007 S07 May07 1 WOS 4 43 2 6 2007 S07 May07 2 WOS 4 42 2 2007 S07 May07 3 WOS 4 50 2 6 2007 S07 May07 4 WOS 4 43 2 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 WOS 4 42 2 2007 S07 Jun07 6 WOS 4 38 2 2007 S07 Jun07 7 WOS 4 33 2 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 WOS 4 16 2 2007 S07 Jul07 9 WOS 4 40 2 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 WOS 4 51 2 2007 S07 Jul07 11 WOS 4 39 2 2007 S07 Jul07 12 WOS 4 32 2 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 WOS 4 31 2 2007 S07 Aug07 14 WOS 4 41 2 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 WOS 4 41 2 2007 S07 Aug07 16 WOS 4 42 2 2007 S07 Aug07 17 WOS 4 41 2 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 WOS 4 41 2 2007 F07 Sep07 19 WOS 4 37 2 2007 F07 Sep07 20 WOS 4 31 2 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 WOS 4 31 2 2007 F07 Oct07 22 WOS 4 31 2 2007 F07 Oct07 23 WOS 4 30 2 2007 F07 Oct07 24 WOS 4 28 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 WOS 4 29 2 2007 F07 Oct07 26 WOS 4 28 2 2007 F07 Nov07 27 WOS 4 29 2 2007 F07 Nov07 28 WOS 4 26 2 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 WOS 4 21 2 2007 F07 Nov07 30 WOS 4 21 2 2006 S06 Apr06 1 NON 1 .

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255 2006 S06 May06 2 NON 1 . 2006 S06 May06 3 NON 1 1 2006 S06 May06 4 NON 1 1 2006 S06 May06 5 NON 1 1 2006 S06 June06 6 NON 1 . 2006 S06 June06 7 NON 1 1 2006 S06 June06 8 NON 1 . 2006 S06 June06 9 NON 1 1 2006 S06 June06 10 NON 1 . 2006 S06 Apr06 1 NON 2 . 2006 S06 May06 2 NON 2 . 2006 S06 May06 3 NON 2 2 2006 S06 May06 4 NON 2 1 2006 S06 May06 5 NON 2 1 2006 S06 June06 6 NON 2 . 2006 S06 June06 7 NON 2 1 2006 S06 June06 8 NON 2 . 2006 S06 June06 9 NON 2 1 2006 S06 June06 10 NON 2 . 2006 S06 Apr06 1 NON 3 . 2006 S06 May06 2 NON 3 . 2006 S06 May06 3 NON 3 3 2006 S06 May06 4 NON 3 1 2006 S06 May06 5 NON 3 1 2006 S06 June06 6 NON 3 . 2006 S06 June06 7 NON 3 1 2006 S06 June06 8 NON 3 . 2006 S06 June06 9 NON 3 2 2006 S06 June06 10 NON 3 . 2006 S06 Apr06 1 NON 4 . 2006 S06 May06 2 NON 4 . 2006 S06 May06 3 NON 4 4 2006 S06 May06 4 NON 4 1 2006 S06 May06 5 NON 4 1 2006 S06 June06 6 NON 4 . 2006 S06 June06 7 NON 4 1 2006 S06 June06 8 NON 4 . 2006 S06 June06 9 NON 4 2 2006 S06 June06 10 NON 4 . 2007 F07 Sep07 18 NON 1 . 2007 F07 Sep07 19 NON 1 . 2007 F07 Sep07 20 NON 1 5 2007 F07 Sep07 21 NON 1 . 2007 F07 Oct07 22 NON 1 . 2007 F07 Oct07 23 NON 1 . 2007 F07 Oct07 24 NON 1 4 2007 F07 Oct07 25 NON 1 . 2007 F07 Oct07 26 NON 1 . 2007 F07 Nov07 27 NON 1 . 2007 F07 Nov07 28 NON 1 3 2007 F07 Nov07 29 NON 1 . 2007 F07 Nov07 30 NON 1 . 2007 F07 Sep07 18 NON 2 . 2007 F07 Sep07 19 NON 2 . 2007 F07 Sep07 20 NON 2 5 2007 F07 Sep07 21 NON 2 . 2007 F07 Oct07 22 NON 2 .

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256 2007 F07 Oct07 23 NON 2 . 2007 F07 Oct07 24 NON 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 NON 2 . 2007 F07 Oct07 26 NON 2 . 2007 F07 Nov07 27 NON 2 . 2007 F07 Nov07 28 NON 2 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 NON 2 . 2007 F07 Nov07 30 NON 2 . 2007 F07 Sep07 18 NON 3 . 2007 F07 Sep07 19 NON 3 . 2007 F07 Sep07 20 NON 3 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 NON 3 . 2007 F07 Oct07 22 NON 3 . 2007 F07 Oct07 23 NON 3 . 2007 F07 Oct07 24 NON 3 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 NON 3 . 2007 F07 Oct07 26 NON 3 . 2007 F07 Nov07 27 NON 3 . 2007 F07 Nov07 28 NON 3 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 NON 3 . 2007 F07 Nov07 30 NON 3 . 2007 F07 Sep07 18 NON 4 . 2007 F07 Sep07 19 NON 4 . 2007 F07 Sep07 20 NON 4 3 2007 F07 Sep07 21 NON 4 . 2007 F07 Oct07 22 NON 4 . 2007 F07 Oct07 23 NON 4 . 2007 F07 Oct07 24 NON 4 5 2007 F07 Oct07 25 NON 4 . 2007 F07 Oct07 26 NON 4 . 2007 F07 Nov07 27 NON 4 . 2007 F07 Nov07 28 NON 4 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 NON 4 . 2007 F07 Nov07 30 NON 4 . 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS1-3mm 1 0 1 3 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS1-3mm 1 42 1 3 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS1-3mm 1 32 1 3 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS1-3mm 1 0 1 3 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS1-3mm 1 32 1 3 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS1-3mm 1 0 1 3 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS1-3mm 1 29 1 3 5 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS1-3mm 1 28 1 3 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS1-3mm 1 0 1 3 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS1-3mm 1 29 1 3 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS1-3mm 1 29 1 3 4 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS1-3mm 1 21 1 3 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS1-3mm 1 0 1 3 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS1-3mm 2 0 1 3 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS1-3mm 2 42 1 3 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS1-3mm 2 32 1 3 8 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS1-3mm 2 0 1 3 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS1-3mm 2 33 1 3 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS1-3mm 2 0 1 3 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS1-3mm 2 29 1 3 8 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS1-3mm 2 30 1 3 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS1-3mm 2 0 1 3 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS1-3mm 2 29 1 3

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257 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS1-3mm 2 30 1 3 7 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS1-3mm 2 22 1 3 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS1-3mm 2 0 1 3 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS1-3mm 3 0 1 3 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS1-3mm 3 42 1 3 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS1-3mm 3 31 1 3 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS1-3mm 3 0 1 3 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS1-3mm 3 32 1 3 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS1-3mm 3 0 1 3 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS1-3mm 3 29 1 3 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS1-3mm 3 29 1 3 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS1-3mm 3 0 1 3 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS1-3mm 3 29 1 3 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS1-3mm 3 29 1 3 7 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS1-3mm 3 21 1 3 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS1-3mm 3 0 1 3 2007 F07 Sep07 18 RS1-3mm 4 0 1 3 2007 F07 Sep07 19 RS1-3mm 4 42 1 3 2007 F07 Sep07 20 RS1-3mm 4 33 1 3 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 RS1-3mm 4 0 1 3 2007 F07 Oct07 22 RS1-3mm 4 33 1 3 2007 F07 Oct07 23 RS1-3mm 4 0 1 3 2007 F07 Oct07 24 RS1-3mm 4 29 1 3 5 2007 F07 Oct07 25 RS1-3mm 4 29 1 3 2007 F07 Oct07 26 RS1-3mm 4 0 1 3 2007 F07 Nov07 27 RS1-3mm 4 29 1 3 2007 F07 Nov07 28 RS1-3mm 4 29 1 3 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 RS1-3mm 4 21 1 3 2007 F07 Nov07 30 RS1-3mm 4 0 1 3 run; proc sort; by season; run; proc glm; by season; title 'Turf Quality' ; class tmt rep week; model mm = tmt rep week/ ss3; means tmt/duncan ; run; proc mixed; by season; title 'Turf Quality' ; class tmt rep week ; model TQ = tmt; random week rep; lsmeans tmt/pdiff; run; proc glm; by season; title 'Water Applied' ; class tmt rep week; model TQ = tmt rep week/ ss3; means tmt/duncan ; run; proc mixed; by season; title 'Water Applied' ; class tmt rep week ; model mm = tmt; random week rep; lsmeans tmt/pdiff; run;

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258 ET Controllers Water Applied and Turf Quality options nodate nonumber center formdlim= "*" linesize= 88; data ET; input year$ season$ month$ week$ tmt$ rep mm TQ; cards; 2006 F06 Sep06 1 ETM 1 35 8 2006 F06 Oct06 2 ETM 1 35 8 2006 F06 Oct06 3 ETM 1 17 2006 F06 Oct06 4 ETM 1 33 8 2006 F06 Oct06 5 ETM 1 13 2006 F06 Nov06 6 ETM 1 0 2006 F06 Nov06 7 ETM 1 0 2006 F06 Nov06 8 ETM 1 0 8 2006 F06 Nov06 9 ETM 1 0 2006 F06 Dec06 10 ETM 1 13 8 2006 F06 Dec06 11 ETM 1 10 8 2006 F06 Dec06 12 ETM 1 21 2006 F06 Sep06 1 ETM 2 33 6 2006 F06 Oct06 2 ETM 2 35 6 2006 F06 Oct06 3 ETM 2 18 2006 F06 Oct06 4 ETM 2 31 6 2006 F06 Oct06 5 ETM 2 15 2006 F06 Nov06 6 ETM 2 0 2006 F06 Nov06 7 ETM 2 0 2006 F06 Nov06 8 ETM 2 0 4 2006 F06 Nov06 9 ETM 2 0 2006 F06 Dec06 10 ETM 2 10 4 2006 F06 Dec06 11 ETM 2 10 4 2006 F06 Dec06 12 ETM 2 21 2006 F06 Sep06 1 ETM 3 29 7 2006 F06 Oct06 2 ETM 3 34 7 2006 F06 Oct06 3 ETM 3 18 2006 F06 Oct06 4 ETM 3 31 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 ETM 3 15 2006 F06 Nov06 6 ETM 3 0 2006 F06 Nov06 7 ETM 3 0 2006 F06 Nov06 8 ETM 3 0 8 2006 F06 Nov06 9 ETM 3 0 2006 F06 Dec06 10 ETM 3 10 7 2006 F06 Dec06 11 ETM 3 10 8 2006 F06 Dec06 12 ETM 3 21 2006 F06 Sep06 1 ETM 4 33 8 2006 F06 Oct06 2 ETM 4 35 8 2006 F06 Oct06 3 ETM 4 18 2006 F06 Oct06 4 ETM 4 31 8 2006 F06 Oct06 5 ETM 4 14 2006 F06 Nov06 6 ETM 4 0 2006 F06 Nov06 7 ETM 4 0 2006 F06 Nov06 8 ETM 4 0 8 2006 F06 Nov06 9 ETM 4 0 2006 F06 Dec06 10 ETM 4 10 8 2006 F06 Dec06 11 ETM 4 10 8 2006 F06 Dec06 12 ETM 4 21 2006 F06 Sep06 1 TORO 1 6 5 2006 F06 Oct06 2 TORO 1 30 5 2006 F06 Oct06 3 TORO 1 9 2006 F06 Oct06 4 TORO 1 8 5

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259 2006 F06 Oct06 5 TORO 1 9 2006 F06 Nov06 6 TORO 1 8 2006 F06 Nov06 7 TORO 1 11 2006 F06 Nov06 8 TORO 1 0 5 2006 F06 Nov06 9 TORO 1 9 2006 F06 Dec06 10 TORO 1 5 4 2006 F06 Dec06 11 TORO 1 10 6 2006 F06 Dec06 12 TORO 1 0 2006 F06 Sep06 1 TORO 2 5 6 2006 F06 Oct06 2 TORO 2 30 6 2006 F06 Oct06 3 TORO 2 9 2006 F06 Oct06 4 TORO 2 8 6 2006 F06 Oct06 5 TORO 2 9 2006 F06 Nov06 6 TORO 2 7 2006 F06 Nov06 7 TORO 2 11 2006 F06 Nov06 8 TORO 2 0 6 2006 F06 Nov06 9 TORO 2 9 2006 F06 Dec06 10 TORO 2 4 5 2006 F06 Dec06 11 TORO 2 11 6 2006 F06 Dec06 12 TORO 2 0 2006 F06 Sep06 1 TORO 3 6 8 2006 F06 Oct06 2 TORO 3 29 8 2006 F06 Oct06 3 TORO 3 9 2006 F06 Oct06 4 TORO 3 8 8 2006 F06 Oct06 5 TORO 3 9 2006 F06 Nov06 6 TORO 3 7 2006 F06 Nov06 7 TORO 3 11 2006 F06 Nov06 8 TORO 3 0 7 2006 F06 Nov06 9 TORO 3 9 2006 F06 Dec06 10 TORO 3 4 8 2006 F06 Dec06 11 TORO 3 11 8 2006 F06 Dec06 12 TORO 3 0 2006 F06 Sep06 1 TORO 4 6 7 2006 F06 Oct06 2 TORO 4 29 8 2006 F06 Oct06 3 TORO 4 9 2006 F06 Oct06 4 TORO 4 8 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 TORO 4 9 2006 F06 Nov06 6 TORO 4 7 2006 F06 Nov06 7 TORO 4 11 2006 F06 Nov06 8 TORO 4 0 8 2006 F06 Nov06 9 TORO 4 9 2006 F06 Dec06 10 TORO 4 4 7 2006 F06 Dec06 11 TORO 4 10 8 2006 F06 Dec06 12 TORO 4 0 2007 S07 May07 1 ETM 1 21 8 2007 S07 May07 2 ETM 1 23 2007 S07 May07 3 ETM 1 29 6 2007 S07 May07 4 ETM 1 23 4 2007 S07 Jun07 5 ETM 1 21 2007 S07 Jun07 6 ETM 1 19 2007 S07 Jun07 7 ETM 1 17 7 2007 S07 Jun07 8 ETM 1 0 2007 S07 Jul07 9 ETM 1 17 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 ETM 1 17 2007 S07 Jul07 11 ETM 1 8 2007 S07 Jul07 12 ETM 1 0 5 2007 S07 Jul07 13 ETM 1 17

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260 2007 S07 Aug07 14 ETM 1 0 6 2007 S07 Aug07 15 ETM 1 35 2007 S07 Aug07 16 ETM 1 0 2007 S07 Aug07 17 ETM 1 4 6 2007 F07 Sep07 18 ETM 1 21 2007 F07 Sep07 19 ETM 1 23 2007 F07 Sep07 20 ETM 1 15 8 2007 F07 Sep07 21 ETM 1 0 2007 F07 Oct07 22 ETM 1 17 2007 F07 Oct07 23 ETM 1 0 2007 F07 Oct07 24 ETM 1 17 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 ETM 1 15 2007 F07 Oct07 26 ETM 1 0 2007 F07 Nov07 27 ETM 1 15 2007 F07 Nov07 28 ETM 1 10 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 ETM 1 21 2007 F07 Nov07 30 ETM 1 13 2007 S07 May07 1 ETM 2 21 5 2007 S07 May07 2 ETM 2 22 2007 S07 May07 3 ETM 2 29 3 2007 S07 May07 4 ETM 2 22 2 2007 S07 Jun07 5 ETM 2 21 2007 S07 Jun07 6 ETM 2 17 2007 S07 Jun07 7 ETM 2 17 3 2007 S07 Jun07 8 ETM 2 0 2007 S07 Jul07 9 ETM 2 17 3 2007 S07 Jul07 10 ETM 2 17 2007 S07 Jul07 11 ETM 2 10 2007 S07 Jul07 12 ETM 2 0 3 2007 S07 Jul07 13 ETM 2 16 2007 S07 Aug07 14 ETM 2 0 4 2007 S07 Aug07 15 ETM 2 35 2007 S07 Aug07 16 ETM 2 0 2007 S07 Aug07 17 ETM 2 5 3 2007 F07 Sep07 18 ETM 2 21 2007 F07 Sep07 19 ETM 2 22 2007 F07 Sep07 20 ETM 2 16 4 2007 F07 Sep07 21 ETM 2 0 2007 F07 Oct07 22 ETM 2 17 2007 F07 Oct07 23 ETM 2 0 2007 F07 Oct07 24 ETM 2 16 4 2007 F07 Oct07 25 ETM 2 15 2007 F07 Oct07 26 ETM 2 0 2007 F07 Nov07 27 ETM 2 15 2007 F07 Nov07 28 ETM 2 11 4 2007 F07 Nov07 29 ETM 2 21 2007 F07 Nov07 30 ETM 2 11 2007 S07 May07 1 ETM 3 22 6 2007 S07 May07 2 ETM 3 23 2007 S07 May07 3 ETM 3 45 4 2007 S07 May07 4 ETM 3 22 3 2007 S07 Jun07 5 ETM 3 21 2007 S07 Jun07 6 ETM 3 17 2007 S07 Jun07 7 ETM 3 16 4 2007 S07 Jun07 8 ETM 3 0 2007 S07 Jul07 9 ETM 3 19 4 2007 S07 Jul07 10 ETM 3 17

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261 2007 S07 Jul07 11 ETM 3 11 2007 S07 Jul07 12 ETM 3 0 5 2007 S07 Jul07 13 ETM 3 16 2007 S07 Aug07 14 ETM 3 0 6 2007 S07 Aug07 15 ETM 3 35 2007 S07 Aug07 16 ETM 3 0 2007 S07 Aug07 17 ETM 3 5 5 2007 F07 Sep07 18 ETM 3 21 2007 F07 Sep07 19 ETM 3 22 2007 F07 Sep07 20 ETM 3 16 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 ETM 3 0 2007 F07 Oct07 22 ETM 3 21 2007 F07 Oct07 23 ETM 3 0 2007 F07 Oct07 24 ETM 3 16 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 ETM 3 15 2007 F07 Oct07 26 ETM 3 0 2007 F07 Nov07 27 ETM 3 15 2007 F07 Nov07 28 ETM 3 11 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 ETM 3 21 2007 F07 Nov07 30 ETM 3 11 2007 S07 May07 1 ETM 4 21 6 2007 S07 May07 2 ETM 4 22 2007 S07 May07 3 ETM 4 29 4 2007 S07 May07 4 ETM 4 21 3 2007 S07 Jun07 5 ETM 4 22 2007 S07 Jun07 6 ETM 4 17 2007 S07 Jun07 7 ETM 4 17 3 2007 S07 Jun07 8 ETM 4 0 2007 S07 Jul07 9 ETM 4 17 4 2007 S07 Jul07 10 ETM 4 16 2007 S07 Jul07 11 ETM 4 10 2007 S07 Jul07 12 ETM 4 0 4 2007 S07 Jul07 13 ETM 4 16 2007 S07 Aug07 14 ETM 4 0 5 2007 S07 Aug07 15 ETM 4 35 2007 S07 Aug07 16 ETM 4 0 2007 S07 Aug07 17 ETM 4 5 4 2007 F07 Sep07 18 ETM 4 21 2007 F07 Sep07 19 ETM 4 21 2007 F07 Sep07 20 ETM 4 16 5 2007 F07 Sep07 21 ETM 4 0 2007 F07 Oct07 22 ETM 4 17 2007 F07 Oct07 23 ETM 4 0 2007 F07 Oct07 24 ETM 4 15 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 ETM 4 15 2007 F07 Oct07 26 ETM 4 0 2007 F07 Nov07 27 ETM 4 15 2007 F07 Nov07 28 ETM 4 10 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 ETM 4 21 2007 F07 Nov07 30 ETM 4 11 2007 S07 May07 1 TORO 1 53 5 2007 S07 May07 2 TORO 1 28 2007 S07 May07 3 TORO 1 39 5 2007 S07 May07 4 TORO 1 35 5 2007 S07 Jun07 5 TORO 1 15 2007 S07 Jun07 6 TORO 1 31 2007 S07 Jun07 7 TORO 1 29 4

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262 2007 S07 Jun07 8 TORO 1 26 2007 S07 Jul07 9 TORO 1 23 5 2007 S07 Jul07 10 TORO 1 18 2007 S07 Jul07 11 TORO 1 34 2007 S07 Jul07 12 TORO 1 8 5 2007 S07 Jul07 13 TORO 1 38 2007 S07 Aug07 14 TORO 1 28 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 TORO 1 28 2007 S07 Aug07 16 TORO 1 30 2007 S07 Aug07 17 TORO 1 27 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 TORO 1 10 2007 F07 Sep07 19 TORO 1 30 2007 F07 Sep07 20 TORO 1 21 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 TORO 1 8 2007 F07 Oct07 22 TORO 1 19 2007 F07 Oct07 23 TORO 1 0 2007 F07 Oct07 24 TORO 1 17 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 TORO 1 14 2007 F07 Oct07 26 TORO 1 0 2007 F07 Nov07 27 TORO 1 9 2007 F07 Nov07 28 TORO 1 13 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 TORO 1 4 2007 F07 Nov07 30 TORO 1 6 2007 S07 May07 1 TORO 2 52 4 2007 S07 May07 2 TORO 2 28 2007 S07 May07 3 TORO 2 39 4 2007 S07 May07 4 TORO 2 35 5 2007 S07 Jun07 5 TORO 2 15 2007 S07 Jun07 6 TORO 2 30 2007 S07 Jun07 7 TORO 2 30 4 2007 S07 Jun07 8 TORO 2 25 2007 S07 Jul07 9 TORO 2 24 5 2007 S07 Jul07 10 TORO 2 17 2007 S07 Jul07 11 TORO 2 35 2007 S07 Jul07 12 TORO 2 8 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 TORO 2 38 2007 S07 Aug07 14 TORO 2 27 6 2007 S07 Aug07 15 TORO 2 28 2007 S07 Aug07 16 TORO 2 29 2007 S07 Aug07 17 TORO 2 28 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 TORO 2 9 2007 F07 Sep07 19 TORO 2 30 2007 F07 Sep07 20 TORO 2 21 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 TORO 2 8 2007 F07 Oct07 22 TORO 2 18 2007 F07 Oct07 23 TORO 2 0 2007 F07 Oct07 24 TORO 2 18 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 TORO 2 14 2007 F07 Oct07 26 TORO 2 0 2007 F07 Nov07 27 TORO 2 9 2007 F07 Nov07 28 TORO 2 11 4 2007 F07 Nov07 29 TORO 2 5 2007 F07 Nov07 30 TORO 2 5 2007 S07 May07 1 TORO 3 56 5 2007 S07 May07 2 TORO 3 28 2007 S07 May07 3 TORO 3 42 6 2007 S07 May07 4 TORO 3 37 6

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263 2007 S07 Jun07 5 TORO 3 16 2007 S07 Jun07 6 TORO 3 32 2007 S07 Jun07 7 TORO 3 30 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 TORO 3 28 2007 S07 Jul07 9 TORO 3 25 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 TORO 3 19 2007 S07 Jul07 11 TORO 3 30 2007 S07 Jul07 12 TORO 3 8 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 TORO 3 42 2007 S07 Aug07 14 TORO 3 31 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 TORO 3 31 2007 S07 Aug07 16 TORO 3 32 2007 S07 Aug07 17 TORO 3 30 8 2007 F07 Sep07 18 TORO 3 11 2007 F07 Sep07 19 TORO 3 32 2007 F07 Sep07 20 TORO 3 22 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 TORO 3 9 2007 F07 Oct07 22 TORO 3 20 2007 F07 Oct07 23 TORO 3 0 2007 F07 Oct07 24 TORO 3 19 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 TORO 3 15 2007 F07 Oct07 26 TORO 3 0 2007 F07 Nov07 27 TORO 3 11 2007 F07 Nov07 28 TORO 3 13 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 TORO 3 5 2007 F07 Nov07 30 TORO 3 6 2007 S07 May07 1 TORO 4 52 6 2007 S07 May07 2 TORO 4 27 2007 S07 May07 3 TORO 4 39 7 2007 S07 May07 4 TORO 4 35 8 2007 S07 Jun07 5 TORO 4 14 2007 S07 Jun07 6 TORO 4 31 2007 S07 Jun07 7 TORO 4 29 8 2007 S07 Jun07 8 TORO 4 25 2007 S07 Jul07 9 TORO 4 23 8 2007 S07 Jul07 10 TORO 4 17 2007 S07 Jul07 11 TORO 4 35 2007 S07 Jul07 12 TORO 4 7 8 2007 S07 Jul07 13 TORO 4 38 2007 S07 Aug07 14 TORO 4 27 8 2007 S07 Aug07 15 TORO 4 28 2007 S07 Aug07 16 TORO 4 29 2007 S07 Aug07 17 TORO 4 27 8 2007 F07 Sep07 18 TORO 4 10 2007 F07 Sep07 19 TORO 4 29 2007 F07 Sep07 20 TORO 4 20 8 2007 F07 Sep07 21 TORO 4 8 2007 F07 Oct07 22 TORO 4 18 2007 F07 Oct07 23 TORO 4 0 2007 F07 Oct07 24 TORO 4 17 8 2007 F07 Oct07 25 TORO 4 13 2007 F07 Oct07 26 TORO 4 0 2007 F07 Nov07 27 TORO 4 10 2007 F07 Nov07 28 TORO 4 11 8 2007 F07 Nov07 29 TORO 4 4 2007 F07 Nov07 30 TORO 4 6 2006 F06 Sep06 1 WOS 1 33 4

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264 2006 F06 Oct06 2 WOS 1 33 4 2006 F06 Oct06 3 WOS 1 29 2006 F06 Oct06 4 WOS 1 29 4 2006 F06 Oct06 5 WOS 1 29 2006 F06 Nov06 6 WOS 1 13 2006 F06 Nov06 7 WOS 1 21 2006 F06 Nov06 8 WOS 1 23 4 2006 F06 Nov06 9 WOS 1 23 2006 F06 Dec06 10 WOS 1 21 3 2006 F06 Dec06 11 WOS 1 21 4 2006 F06 Dec06 12 WOS 1 21 2006 F06 Sep06 1 WOS 2 31 6 2006 F06 Oct06 2 WOS 2 33 7 2006 F06 Oct06 3 WOS 2 28 2006 F06 Oct06 4 WOS 2 28 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 WOS 2 29 2006 F06 Nov06 6 WOS 2 10 2006 F06 Nov06 7 WOS 2 22 2006 F06 Nov06 8 WOS 2 21 6 2006 F06 Nov06 9 WOS 2 21 2006 F06 Dec06 10 WOS 2 20 5 2006 F06 Dec06 11 WOS 2 21 5 2006 F06 Dec06 12 WOS 2 21 2006 F06 Sep06 1 WOS 3 32 8 2006 F06 Oct06 2 WOS 3 32 8 2006 F06 Oct06 3 WOS 3 28 2006 F06 Oct06 4 WOS 3 28 8 2006 F06 Oct06 5 WOS 3 28 2006 F06 Nov06 6 WOS 3 10 2006 F06 Nov06 7 WOS 3 21 2006 F06 Nov06 8 WOS 3 20 8 2006 F06 Nov06 9 WOS 3 21 2006 F06 Dec06 10 WOS 3 21 8 2006 F06 Dec06 11 WOS 3 20 8 2006 F06 Dec06 12 WOS 3 21 2006 F06 Sep06 1 WOS 4 32 7 2006 F06 Oct06 2 WOS 4 33 6 2006 F06 Oct06 3 WOS 4 28 2006 F06 Oct06 4 WOS 4 28 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 WOS 4 29 2006 F06 Nov06 6 WOS 4 9 2006 F06 Nov06 7 WOS 4 21 2006 F06 Nov06 8 WOS 4 21 7 2006 F06 Nov06 9 WOS 4 21 2006 F06 Dec06 10 WOS 4 20 6 2006 F06 Dec06 11 WOS 4 21 6 2006 F06 Dec06 12 WOS 4 21 2007 S07 May07 1 WOS 1 42 4 2007 S07 May07 2 WOS 1 44 2007 S07 May07 3 WOS 1 52 4 2007 S07 May07 4 WOS 1 44 5 2007 S07 Jun07 5 WOS 1 44 2007 S07 Jun07 6 WOS 1 38 2007 S07 Jun07 7 WOS 1 33 5 2007 S07 Jun07 8 WOS 1 19 2007 S07 Jul07 9 WOS 1 40 5 2007 S07 Jul07 10 WOS 1 52

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265 2007 S07 Jul07 11 WOS 1 40 2007 S07 Jul07 12 WOS 1 33 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 WOS 1 31 2007 S07 Aug07 14 WOS 1 42 6 2007 S07 Aug07 15 WOS 1 44 2007 S07 Aug07 16 WOS 1 42 2007 S07 Aug07 17 WOS 1 44 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 WOS 1 42 2007 F07 Sep07 19 WOS 1 38 2007 F07 Sep07 20 WOS 1 33 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 WOS 1 33 2007 F07 Oct07 22 WOS 1 31 2007 F07 Oct07 23 WOS 1 31 2007 F07 Oct07 24 WOS 1 31 5 2007 F07 Oct07 25 WOS 1 29 2007 F07 Oct07 26 WOS 1 29 2007 F07 Nov07 27 WOS 1 29 2007 F07 Nov07 28 WOS 1 25 4 2007 F07 Nov07 29 WOS 1 23 2007 F07 Nov07 30 WOS 1 21 2007 S07 May07 1 WOS 2 43 6 2007 S07 May07 2 WOS 2 46 2007 S07 May07 3 WOS 2 50 6 2007 S07 May07 4 WOS 2 43 7 2007 S07 Jun07 5 WOS 2 42 2007 S07 Jun07 6 WOS 2 39 2007 S07 Jun07 7 WOS 2 32 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 WOS 2 18 2007 S07 Jul07 9 WOS 2 40 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 WOS 2 55 2007 S07 Jul07 11 WOS 2 39 2007 S07 Jul07 12 WOS 2 32 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 WOS 2 34 2007 S07 Aug07 14 WOS 2 41 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 WOS 2 44 2007 S07 Aug07 16 WOS 2 44 2007 S07 Aug07 17 WOS 2 42 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 WOS 2 41 2007 F07 Sep07 19 WOS 2 37 2007 F07 Sep07 20 WOS 2 33 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 WOS 2 34 2007 F07 Oct07 22 WOS 2 31 2007 F07 Oct07 23 WOS 2 30 2007 F07 Oct07 24 WOS 2 29 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 WOS 2 30 2007 F07 Oct07 26 WOS 2 31 2007 F07 Nov07 27 WOS 2 29 2007 F07 Nov07 28 WOS 2 25 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 WOS 2 21 2007 F07 Nov07 30 WOS 2 21 2007 S07 May07 1 WOS 3 40 8 2007 S07 May07 2 WOS 3 37 2007 S07 May07 3 WOS 3 45 8 2007 S07 May07 4 WOS 3 38 8 2007 S07 Jun07 5 WOS 3 38 2007 S07 Jun07 6 WOS 3 34 2007 S07 Jun07 7 WOS 3 30 8

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266 2007 S07 Jun07 8 WOS 3 15 2007 S07 Jul07 9 WOS 3 35 8 2007 S07 Jul07 10 WOS 3 47 2007 S07 Jul07 11 WOS 3 37 2007 S07 Jul07 12 WOS 3 29 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 WOS 3 28 2007 S07 Aug07 14 WOS 3 39 8 2007 S07 Aug07 15 WOS 3 38 2007 S07 Aug07 16 WOS 3 38 2007 S07 Aug07 17 WOS 3 38 9 2007 F07 Sep07 18 WOS 3 38 2007 F07 Sep07 19 WOS 3 32 2007 F07 Sep07 20 WOS 3 28 8 2007 F07 Sep07 21 WOS 3 29 2007 F07 Oct07 22 WOS 3 31 2007 F07 Oct07 23 WOS 3 30 2007 F07 Oct07 24 WOS 3 28 8 2007 F07 Oct07 25 WOS 3 29 2007 F07 Oct07 26 WOS 3 28 2007 F07 Nov07 27 WOS 3 29 2007 F07 Nov07 28 WOS 3 25 8 2007 F07 Nov07 29 WOS 3 22 2007 F07 Nov07 30 WOS 3 21 2007 S07 May07 1 WOS 4 43 6 2007 S07 May07 2 WOS 4 42 2007 S07 May07 3 WOS 4 50 6 2007 S07 May07 4 WOS 4 43 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 WOS 4 42 2007 S07 Jun07 6 WOS 4 38 2007 S07 Jun07 7 WOS 4 33 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 WOS 4 16 2007 S07 Jul07 9 WOS 4 40 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 WOS 4 51 2007 S07 Jul07 11 WOS 4 39 2007 S07 Jul07 12 WOS 4 32 7 2007 S07 Jul07 13 WOS 4 31 2007 S07 Aug07 14 WOS 4 41 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 WOS 4 41 2007 S07 Aug07 16 WOS 4 42 2007 S07 Aug07 17 WOS 4 41 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 WOS 4 41 2007 F07 Sep07 19 WOS 4 37 2007 F07 Sep07 20 WOS 4 31 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 WOS 4 31 2007 F07 Oct07 22 WOS 4 31 2007 F07 Oct07 23 WOS 4 30 2007 F07 Oct07 24 WOS 4 28 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 WOS 4 29 2007 F07 Oct07 26 WOS 4 28 2007 F07 Nov07 27 WOS 4 29 2007 F07 Nov07 28 WOS 4 26 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 WOS 4 21 2007 F07 Nov07 30 WOS 4 21 2007 F07 Sep07 18 NON 1 2007 F07 Sep07 19 NON 1 2007 F07 Sep07 20 NON 1 5 2007 F07 Sep07 21 NON 1

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267 2007 F07 Oct07 22 NON 1 2007 F07 Oct07 23 NON 1 2007 F07 Oct07 24 NON 1 4 2007 F07 Oct07 25 NON 1 2007 F07 Oct07 26 NON 1 2007 F07 Nov07 27 NON 1 2007 F07 Nov07 28 NON 1 3 2007 F07 Nov07 29 NON 1 2007 F07 Nov07 30 NON 1 2007 F07 Sep07 18 NON 2 2007 F07 Sep07 19 NON 2 2007 F07 Sep07 20 NON 2 5 2007 F07 Sep07 21 NON 2 2007 F07 Oct07 22 NON 2 2007 F07 Oct07 23 NON 2 2007 F07 Oct07 24 NON 2 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 NON 2 2007 F07 Oct07 26 NON 2 2007 F07 Nov07 27 NON 2 2007 F07 Nov07 28 NON 2 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 NON 2 2007 F07 Nov07 30 NON 2 2007 F07 Sep07 18 NON 3 2007 F07 Sep07 19 NON 3 2007 F07 Sep07 20 NON 3 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 NON 3 2007 F07 Oct07 22 NON 3 2007 F07 Oct07 23 NON 3 2007 F07 Oct07 24 NON 3 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 NON 3 2007 F07 Oct07 26 NON 3 2007 F07 Nov07 27 NON 3 2007 F07 Nov07 28 NON 3 6 2007 F07 Nov07 29 NON 3 2007 F07 Nov07 30 NON 3 2007 F07 Sep07 18 NON 4 2007 F07 Sep07 19 NON 4 2007 F07 Sep07 20 NON 4 3 2007 F07 Sep07 21 NON 4 2007 F07 Oct07 22 NON 4 2007 F07 Oct07 23 NON 4 2007 F07 Oct07 24 NON 4 5 2007 F07 Oct07 25 NON 4 2007 F07 Oct07 26 NON 4 2007 F07 Nov07 27 NON 4 2007 F07 Nov07 28 NON 4 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 NON 4 2007 F07 Nov07 30 NON 4 run; proc sort; by season; run; proc glm; by season; title 'Turf Quality' ; class tmt rep week; model TQ = tmt rep week/ ss3; means tmt/duncan ;

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268 run; proc mixed; by season; title 'Turf Quality' ; class tmt rep week ; model TQ = tmt; random week rep; lsmeans tmt/pdiff; run; proc glm; by season; title 'Water Applied' ; class tmt rep week; model mm = tmt rep week/ ss3; means tmt/duncan ; run; proc mixed; by season; title 'Water Applied' ; class tmt rep week ; model mm = tmt; random week rep; lsmeans tmt/pdiff; run;

PAGE 269

269 Individually Controlled Acclima Treatment Water Applied and Turf Quality options nodate nonumber center formdlim= "*" linesize= 88; data ACIR; input year$ season$ month$ week$ tmt$ rep mm type$ TQ; cards; 2006 S06 Apr06 1 ACIR 1 14 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 ACIR 1 27 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 ACIR 1 27 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 4 ACIR 1 38 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 5 ACIR 1 27 SMS 6 2006 S06 June06 6 ACIR 1 34 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 ACIR 1 17 SMS 5 2006 S06 June06 8 ACIR 1 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 ACIR 1 17 SMS 5 2006 S06 June06 10 ACIR 1 16 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 ACIR 2 14 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 ACIR 2 27 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 ACIR 2 28 SMS 4 2006 S06 May06 4 ACIR 2 41 SMS 5 2006 S06 May06 5 ACIR 2 27 SMS 4 2006 S06 June06 6 ACIR 2 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 ACIR 2 18 SMS 3 2006 S06 June06 8 ACIR 2 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 ACIR 2 17 SMS 3 2006 S06 June06 10 ACIR 2 17 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 ACIR 3 35 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 ACIR 3 24 SMS 6 2006 S06 May06 4 ACIR 3 30 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 5 ACIR 3 23 SMS 5 2006 S06 June06 6 ACIR 3 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 ACIR 3 34 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 8 ACIR 3 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 ACIR 3 17 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 10 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2006 S06 Apr06 1 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2006 S06 May06 2 ACIR 4 19 SMS 2006 S06 May06 3 ACIR 4 24 SMS 7 2006 S06 May06 4 ACIR 4 18 SMS 6 2006 S06 May06 5 ACIR 4 27 SMS 6 2006 S06 June06 6 ACIR 4 33 SMS 2006 S06 June06 7 ACIR 4 8 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 8 ACIR 4 17 SMS 2006 S06 June06 9 ACIR 4 17 SMS 7 2006 S06 June06 10 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 ACIR 1 17 SMS 8 2006 F06 Oct06 2 ACIR 1 17 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 3 ACIR 1 15 SMS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 ACIR 1 15 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 ACIR 1 29 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 ACIR 1 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 ACIR 1 0 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 ACIR 1 0 SMS 7 2006 F06 Nov06 9 ACIR 1 0 SMS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 ACIR 1 10 SMS 6 2006 F06 Dec06 11 ACIR 1 0 SMS 7

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270 2006 F06 Dec06 12 ACIR 1 11 SMS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 ACIR 2 34 SMS 5 2006 F06 Oct06 2 ACIR 2 33 SMS 5 2006 F06 Oct06 3 ACIR 2 29 SMS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 ACIR 2 29 SMS 5 2006 F06 Oct06 5 ACIR 2 29 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 ACIR 2 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 ACIR 2 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 ACIR 2 10 SMS 5 2006 F06 Nov06 9 ACIR 2 10 SMS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 ACIR 2 0 SMS 4 2006 F06 Dec06 11 ACIR 2 10 SMS 5 2006 F06 Dec06 12 ACIR 2 10 SMS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 ACIR 3 17 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 2 ACIR 3 17 SMS 6 2006 F06 Oct06 3 ACIR 3 15 SMS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 ACIR 3 15 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 ACIR 3 15 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 ACIR 3 10 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 ACIR 3 0 SMS 8 2006 F06 Nov06 9 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 ACIR 3 10 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 11 ACIR 3 0 SMS 8 2006 F06 Dec06 12 ACIR 3 10 SMS 2006 F06 Sep06 1 ACIR 4 0 SMS 8 2006 F06 Oct06 2 ACIR 4 16 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 3 ACIR 4 15 SMS 2006 F06 Oct06 4 ACIR 4 13 SMS 7 2006 F06 Oct06 5 ACIR 4 22 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 6 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 7 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2006 F06 Nov06 8 ACIR 4 0 SMS 8 2006 F06 Nov06 9 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2006 F06 Dec06 10 ACIR 4 0 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 11 ACIR 4 0 SMS 7 2006 F06 Dec06 12 ACIR 4 10 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 ACIR 1 42 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 2 ACIR 1 22 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 ACIR 1 50 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 4 ACIR 1 21 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 ACIR 1 21 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 ACIR 1 39 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 ACIR 1 16 SMS 5 2007 S07 Jun07 8 ACIR 1 0 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 ACIR 1 17 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 ACIR 1 16 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 ACIR 1 3 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 ACIR 1 16 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 ACIR 1 16 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 ACIR 1 20 SMS 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 ACIR 1 20 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 ACIR 1 21 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 ACIR 1 0 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 ACIR 1 20 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 ACIR 1 16 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 ACIR 1 15 SMS 6

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271 2007 F07 Sep07 21 ACIR 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 ACIR 1 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 ACIR 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 ACIR 1 14 SMS 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 ACIR 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 ACIR 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 ACIR 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 ACIR 1 10 SMS 5 2007 F07 Nov07 29 ACIR 1 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 ACIR 1 0 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 ACIR 2 44 SMS 4 2007 S07 May07 2 ACIR 2 22 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 ACIR 2 29 SMS 4 2007 S07 May07 4 ACIR 2 43 SMS 4 2007 S07 Jun07 5 ACIR 2 44 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 ACIR 2 39 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 ACIR 2 17 SMS 4 2007 S07 Jun07 8 ACIR 2 0 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 ACIR 2 17 SMS 4 2007 S07 Jul07 10 ACIR 2 17 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 ACIR 2 8 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 ACIR 2 17 SMS 4 2007 S07 Jul07 13 ACIR 2 16 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 ACIR 2 21 SMS 6 2007 S07 Aug07 15 ACIR 2 43 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 ACIR 2 42 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 ACIR 2 22 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 ACIR 2 21 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 ACIR 2 37 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 ACIR 2 17 SMS 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 ACIR 2 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 ACIR 2 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 ACIR 2 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 ACIR 2 15 SMS 6 2007 F07 Oct07 25 ACIR 2 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 ACIR 2 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 ACIR 2 15 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 ACIR 2 10 SMS 4 2007 F07 Nov07 29 ACIR 2 10 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 ACIR 2 0 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 ACIR 3 22 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 2 ACIR 3 22 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 ACIR 3 28 SMS 4 2007 S07 May07 4 ACIR 3 44 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 ACIR 3 21 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 ACIR 3 39 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 ACIR 3 17 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 ACIR 3 17 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 ACIR 3 16 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 ACIR 3 3 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 ACIR 3 16 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 ACIR 3 17 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 ACIR 3 0 SMS 7 2007 S07 Aug07 15 ACIR 3 41 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 ACIR 3 21 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 ACIR 3 21 SMS 7

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272 2007 F07 Sep07 18 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 ACIR 3 17 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 ACIR 3 0 SMS 6 2007 F07 Sep07 21 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 ACIR 3 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 ACIR 3 15 SMS 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 ACIR 3 15 SMS 7 2007 F07 Nov07 29 ACIR 3 11 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 ACIR 3 0 SMS 2007 S07 May07 1 ACIR 4 11 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 2 ACIR 4 33 SMS 2007 S07 May07 3 ACIR 4 29 SMS 6 2007 S07 May07 4 ACIR 4 21 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 5 ACIR 4 22 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 6 ACIR 4 39 SMS 2007 S07 Jun07 7 ACIR 4 17 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jun07 8 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 9 ACIR 4 17 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 10 ACIR 4 17 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 11 ACIR 4 30 SMS 2007 S07 Jul07 12 ACIR 4 17 SMS 6 2007 S07 Jul07 13 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 14 ACIR 4 0 SMS 6 2007 S07 Aug07 15 ACIR 4 41 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 16 ACIR 4 21 SMS 2007 S07 Aug07 17 ACIR 4 20 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 18 ACIR 4 21 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 19 ACIR 4 16 SMS 2007 F07 Sep07 20 ACIR 4 17 SMS 7 2007 F07 Sep07 21 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 22 ACIR 4 16 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 23 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 24 ACIR 4 14 SMS 7 2007 F07 Oct07 25 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Oct07 26 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 27 ACIR 4 0 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 28 ACIR 4 10 SMS 7 2007 F07 Nov07 29 ACIR 4 21 SMS 2007 F07 Nov07 30 ACIR 4 0 SMS run; proc sort; by season; run; proc glm; by season; title 'Turf Quality' ; class rep week; model TQ = rep week/ ss3; means rep/duncan ; run; quit; proc mixed; by season; title 'Turf Quality' ; class rep week ;

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273 model TQ = rep; random week; lsmeans rep/pdiff; run; proc glm; by season; title 'Water Applied' ; class rep week; model mm = rep week/ ss3; means rep/duncan ; run; proc mixed; by season; title 'Water Applied' ; class rep week; model mm = rep; random week; lsmeans rep/pdiff; run;

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274 APPENDIX B CHAPTER 3 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS Soil Moisture Sensor Range options nodate nonumber center formdlim= "*" linesize= 88; data sensor range; input tmt$ type$ rep$ season$ range; cards; AC10 AC 2 S06 0.4 11.7 11.3 AC7.1 AC 4 S06 0.0 7.1 7.2 AC7.2 AC 5 S06 1.9 7.3 5.4 AC7.3 AC 6 S06 1.5 6.9 5.4 AC7.4 AC 7 S06 1.0 7.7 6.700 LLMed LL 2 S06 2.9 9.50 6.60 AC10 AC 2 F06 0.0 11.3 11.5 AC7.1 AC 4 F06 0.1 6.4 6.3 AC7.2 AC 5 F06 0.0 6.8 7.5 AC7.3 AC 6 F06 0.5 7.3 6.8 AC7.4 AC 7 F06 0.7 7.1 6.4 LLMed LL 2 F06 2.0 10.0 8.0 AC10 AC 2 S07 0.9 11.4 10.5 AC7.1 AC 4 S07 0.1 6.4 6.3 AC7.2 AC 5 S07 0.5 6.0 5.5 AC7.3 AC 6 S07 1.5 6.5 5.0 AC7.4 AC 7 S07 1.3 7.5 6.2 LLMed LL 2 S07 4.4 11.1 6.7 AC10 AC 2 F07 0.1 11.0 10.9 AC7.1 AC 4 F07 0.0 5.8 5.9 AC7.2 AC 5 F07 0.0 5.5 5.9 AC7.3 AC 6 F07 1.5 6.3 4.8 AC7.4 AC 7 F07 0.1 6.8 6.7 LLMed LL 2 F07 1.7 10.0 8.3 run; proc glm; title 'Sensor Range' ; class tmt season; model range = tmt season/ ss3; means tmt/duncan ; run;

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275 ACIR Irrigation Events options nodate nonumber center formdlim= "*" linesize= 88; data ACIR Max Min; input tmt$ type$ rep$ season$ range maxI minB; cards; AC7.1 AC 4 S06 0.0 7.1 7.2 AC7.2 AC 5 S06 1.9 7.3 5.4 AC7.3 AC 6 S06 1.5 6.9 5.4 AC7.4 AC 7 S06 1.0 7.7 6.7 AC7.1 AC 4 F06 0.1 6.4 6.3 AC7.2 AC 5 F06 0.0 6.8 7.5 AC7.3 AC 6 F06 0.5 7.3 6.8 AC7.4 AC 7 F06 0.7 7.1 6.4 AC7.1 AC 4 S07 0.1 6.4 6.3 AC7.2 AC 5 S07 0.5 6.0 5.5 AC7.3 AC 6 S07 1.5 6.5 5.0 AC7.4 AC 7 S07 1.3 7.5 6.2 AC7.1 AC 4 F07 0.0 5.8 5.9 AC7.2 AC 5 F07 0.0 5.5 5.9 AC7.3 AC 6 F07 1.5 6.3 4.8 AC7.4 AC 7 F07 0.1 6.8 6.7 run; proc glm; title 'Max Allowed' ; class tmt season; model maxI = tmt season/ ss3; means tmt/duncan ; run; proc mixed; title 'Max Allowed' ; class season rep tmt ; model maxI = tmt; random season rep; lsmeans tmt/pdiff; run; proc glm; title 'Min Bypassed' ; class tmt season; model minB = tmt season/ ss3; means tmt/duncan ; run; proc mixed; title 'Min Bypassed' ; class season rep tmt ; model minB = tmt; random season rep; lsmeans tmt/pdiff; run;

PAGE 276

276 APPENDIX C CHAPTER 4 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS Manual ET Data Comparisons options nodate nonumber center formdlim= "*" linesize = 88; data ET manual; input date$ ET type$; cards; 9/28/2006 4.32 ETM 9/29/2006 3.81 ETM 10/2/2006 3.81 ETM 10/4/2006 4.83 ETM 10/5/2006 5.33 ETM 10/9/2006 3.81 ETM 10/11/2006 4.32 ETM 10/13/2006 2.79 ETM 10/16/2006 4.06 ETM 10/18/2006 2.79 ETM 10/20/2006 2.03 ETM 10/23/2006 3.56 ETM 10/25/2006 3.56 ETM 10/27/2006 2.79 ETM 10/30/2006 3.30 ETM 11/1/2006 3.05 ETM 11/3/2006 2.54 ETM 11/6/2006 2.79 ETM 11/8/2006 1.27 ETM 11/10/2006 2.54 ETM 11/13/2006 3.05 ETM 11/15/2006 1.78 ETM 11/17/2006 2.29 ETM 11/20/2006 2.79 ETM 11/22/2006 2.29 ETM 11/27/2006 2.54 ETM 12/1/2006 1.78 ETM 12/4/2006 2.03 ETM 12/6/2006 2.54 ETM 12/8/2006 2.03 ETM 12/11/2006 2.03 ETM 12/13/2006 1.78 ETM 12/15/2006 1.02 ETM 12/18/2006 2.03 ETM 12/19/2006 2.03 ETM 12/20/2006 2.54 ETM 12/22/2006 1.78 ETM 12/27/2006 2.03 ETM 1/8/2007 2.03 ETM 1/10/2007 2.54 ETM 1/17/2007 2.29 ETM 1/18/2007 1.52 ETM 1/23/2007 2.03 ETM 1/24/2007 2.54 ETM 1/26/2007 1.52 ETM 1/29/2007 2.03 ETM 1/31/2007 1.78 ETM

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277 2/2/2007 2.03 ETM 2/8/2007 3.05 ETM 2/13/2007 2.03 ETM 2/15/2007 0.76 ETM 2/16/2007 2.03 ETM 2/20/2007 2.79 ETM 2/21/2007 2.54 ETM 2/26/2007 2.29 ETM 2/28/2007 3.30 ETM 3/7/2007 3.05 ETM 3/14/2007 4.06 ETM 3/16/2007 2.79 ETM 3/21/2007 2.54 ETM 3/23/2007 3.81 ETM 3/28/2007 3.56 ETM 4/4/2007 3.81 ETM 4/6/2007 3.56 ETM 4/9/2007 3.56 ETM 4/12/2007 3.81 ETM 4/17/2007 4.32 ETM 4/24/2007 4.83 ETM 4/25/2007 5.59 ETM 5/2/2007 4.32 ETM 5/7/2007 4.32 ETM 5/14/2007 2.54 ETM 5/20/2007 6.35 ETM 5/21/2007 5.84 ETM 5/22/2007 6.35 ETM 5/23/2007 6.10 ETM 5/24/2007 5.59 ETM 5/25/2007 4.83 ETM 5/27/2007 5.84 ETM 5/28/2007 5.84 ETM 5/29/2007 6.10 ETM 6/6/2007 4.83 ETM 6/13/2007 4.06 ETM 6/15/2007 6.10 ETM 6/22/2007 9.14 ETM 6/25/2007 6.86 ETM 6/27/2007 5.08 ETM 6/29/2007 4.57 ETM 7/9/2007 6.35 ETM 7/10/2007 5.84 ETM 7/12/2007 5.33 ETM 7/18/2007 4.57 ETM 7/19/2007 4.57 ETM 7/24/2007 2.03 ETM 7/25/2007 4.06 ETM 7/27/2007 4.32 ETM 8/1/2007 2.29 ETM 8/3/2007 2.79 ETM 8/6/2007 5.84 ETM 8/10/2007 4.57 ETM 8/16/2007 2.79 ETM 8/21/2007 5.33 ETM 8/22/2007 5.08 ETM 8/24/2007 5.33 ETM

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278 8/28/2007 5.08 ETM 9/5/2007 5.08 ETM 9/7/2007 5.33 ETM 9/14/2007 3.81 ETM 9/17/2007 4.32 ETM 9/19/2007 2.79 ETM 9/25/2007 4.06 ETM 9/27/2007 3.81 ETM 10/5/2007 3.05 ETM 10/9/2007 3.81 ETM 10/11/2007 4.06 ETM 10/16/2007 3.81 ETM 10/19/2007 3.81 ETM 10/23/2007 3.30 ETM 10/25/2007 0.76 ETM 11/1/2007 2.54 ETM 11/5/2007 3.30 ETM 11/9/2007 2.79 ETM 11/14/2007 2.54 ETM 11/16/2007 3.05 ETM 11/21/2007 2.79 ETM 11/26/2007 2.29 ETM 11/30/2007 1.02 ETM 9/28/2006 3.56 TORO 9/29/2006 3.56 TORO 10/2/2006 3.56 TORO 10/4/2006 3.30 TORO 10/5/2006 3.56 TORO 10/9/2006 3.05 TORO 10/11/2006 2.79 TORO 10/13/2006 3.05 TORO 10/16/2006 2.79 TORO 10/18/2006 2.79 TORO 10/20/2006 2.79 TORO 10/23/2006 3.81 TORO 10/25/2006 3.81 TORO 10/27/2006 3.05 TORO 10/30/2006 3.30 TORO 11/1/2006 3.81 TORO 11/3/2006 3.56 TORO 11/6/2006 3.56 TORO 11/8/2006 3.30 TORO 11/10/2006 3.30 TORO 11/13/2006 1.27 TORO 11/15/2006 1.27 TORO 11/17/2006 1.27 TORO 11/20/2006 2.54 TORO 11/22/2006 2.79 TORO 11/27/2006 3.05 TORO 12/1/2006 3.05 TORO 12/4/2006 3.05 TORO 12/6/2006 2.79 TORO 12/8/2006 1.02 TORO 12/11/2006 1.02 TORO 12/13/2006 1.27 TORO 12/15/2006 1.78 TORO 12/18/2006 2.03 TORO

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279 12/19/2006 2.29 TORO 12/20/2006 2.29 TORO 12/22/2006 1.78 TORO 12/27/2006 0.76 TORO 1/8/2007 2.79 TORO 1/10/2007 2.79 TORO 1/17/2007 2.79 TORO 1/18/2007 2.03 TORO 1/23/2007 2.54 TORO 1/24/2007 2.54 TORO 1/26/2007 2.03 TORO 1/29/2007 2.79 TORO 1/31/2007 1.27 TORO 2/2/2007 2.79 TORO 2/8/2007 3.30 TORO 2/13/2007 2.54 TORO 2/15/2007 1.52 TORO 2/16/2007 1.52 TORO 2/20/2007 2.54 TORO 2/21/2007 3.56 TORO 2/26/2007 3.81 TORO 2/28/2007 3.30 TORO 3/7/2007 4.06 TORO 3/14/2007 4.83 TORO 3/16/2007 4.57 TORO 3/21/2007 4.57 TORO 3/23/2007 5.33 TORO 3/28/2007 5.08 TORO 4/4/2007 5.84 TORO 4/6/2007 4.32 TORO 4/9/2007 5.33 TORO 4/12/2007 1.52 TORO 4/17/2007 6.60 TORO 4/24/2007 6.60 TORO 4/25/2007 6.60 TORO 5/2/2007 7.37 TORO 5/7/2007 6.35 TORO 5/14/2007 6.10 TORO 5/20/2007 6.35 TORO 5/21/2007 6.10 TORO 5/22/2007 6.35 TORO 5/23/2007 6.60 TORO 5/24/2007 7.11 TORO 5/25/2007 7.11 TORO 5/27/2007 6.35 TORO 5/28/2007 6.60 TORO 5/29/2007 6.60 TORO 6/6/2007 5.33 TORO 6/13/2007 6.35 TORO 6/15/2007 6.60 TORO 6/22/2007 6.35 TORO 6/25/2007 6.35 TORO 6/27/2007 6.86 TORO 6/29/2007 7.37 TORO 7/9/2007 5.08 TORO 7/10/2007 7.11 TORO 7/12/2007 7.11 TORO

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280 7/18/2007 5.84 TORO 7/19/2007 5.84 TORO 7/24/2007 6.10 TORO 7/25/2007 4.57 TORO 7/27/2007 6.60 TORO 8/1/2007 4.06 TORO 8/3/2007 2.29 TORO 8/6/2007 6.60 TORO 8/10/2007 5.84 TORO 8/16/2007 6.86 TORO 8/21/2007 5.84 TORO 8/22/2007 6.60 TORO 8/24/2007 6.60 TORO 8/28/2007 4.32 TORO 9/5/2007 6.10 TORO 9/7/2007 6.10 TORO 9/14/2007 5.08 TORO 9/17/2007 5.33 TORO 9/19/2007 5.08 TORO 9/25/2007 5.33 TORO 9/27/2007 4.57 TORO 10/5/2007 4.06 TORO 10/9/2007 4.06 TORO 10/11/2007 4.57 TORO 10/16/2007 4.06 TORO 10/19/2007 3.81 TORO 10/23/2007 2.29 TORO 10/25/2007 3.81 TORO 11/1/2007 4.06 TORO 11/5/2007 3.56 TORO 11/9/2007 2.79 TORO 11/14/2007 2.79 TORO 11/16/2007 2.79 TORO 11/21/2007 2.54 TORO 11/26/2007 1.27 TORO 11/30/2007 1.52 TORO 9/28/2006 3.75 WS 9/29/2006 3.90 WS 10/2/2006 3.60 WS 10/4/2006 4.12 WS 10/5/2006 3.76 WS 10/9/2006 3.48 WS 10/11/2006 3.97 WS 10/13/2006 3.14 WS 10/16/2006 2.69 WS 10/18/2006 3.56 WS 10/20/2006 3.72 WS 10/23/2006 3.56 WS 10/25/2006 3.23 WS 10/27/2006 3.12 WS 10/30/2006 2.90 WS 11/1/2006 3.00 WS 11/3/2006 2.90 WS 11/6/2006 2.40 WS 11/8/2006 3.18 WS 11/10/2006 2.20 WS 11/13/2006 2.37 WS

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281 11/15/2006 3.11 WS 11/17/2006 2.06 WS 11/20/2006 2.35 WS 11/22/2006 1.95 WS 11/27/2006 1.91 WS 12/1/2006 1.95 WS 12/4/2006 2.68 WS 12/6/2006 1.80 WS 12/8/2006 2.40 WS 12/11/2006 1.99 WS 12/13/2006 1.56 WS 12/15/2006 1.23 WS 12/18/2006 1.94 WS 12/19/2006 2.05 WS 12/20/2006 1.69 WS 12/22/2006 1.68 WS 12/27/2006 1.90 WS 1/8/2007 1.36 WS 1/10/2007 1.34 WS 1/17/2007 1.35 WS 1/18/2007 1.35 WS 1/23/2007 2.33 WS 1/24/2007 1.78 WS 1/26/2007 1.89 WS 1/29/2007 2.16 WS 1/31/2007 2.79 WS 2/2/2007 1.25 WS 2/8/2007 1.40 WS 2/13/2007 1.79 WS 2/15/2007 2.05 WS 2/16/2007 1.50 WS 2/20/2007 1.85 WS 2/21/2007 2.92 WS 2/26/2007 3.31 WS 2/28/2007 3.50 WS 3/7/2007 3.69 WS 3/14/2007 4.14 WS 3/16/2007 3.52 WS 3/21/2007 3.44 WS 3/23/2007 3.94 WS 3/28/2007 4.08 WS 4/4/2007 4.87 WS 4/6/2007 5.34 WS 4/9/2007 1.55 WS 4/12/2007 5.24 WS 4/17/2007 6.46 WS 4/24/2007 4.98 WS 4/25/2007 4.62 WS 5/2/2007 5.04 WS 5/7/2007 5.91 WS 5/14/2007 4.62 WS 5/20/2007 5.41 WS 5/21/2007 5.19 WS 5/22/2007 5.57 WS 5/23/2007 5.66 WS 5/24/2007 5.66 WS 5/25/2007 4.66 WS

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282 5/27/2007 5.06 WS 5/28/2007 5.03 WS 5/29/2007 5.47 WS 6/6/2007 5.27 WS 6/13/2007 5.00 WS 6/15/2007 5.79 WS 6/22/2007 5.72 WS 6/25/2007 3.95 WS 6/27/2007 5.67 WS 6/29/2007 4.57 WS 7/9/2007 6.53 WS 7/10/2007 5.19 WS 7/12/2007 4.57 WS 7/18/2007 5.52 WS 7/19/2007 5.46 WS 7/24/2007 3.44 WS 7/25/2007 4.23 WS 7/27/2007 3.66 WS 8/1/2007 2.55 WS 8/3/2007 4.57 WS 8/6/2007 5.55 WS 8/10/2007 5.54 WS 8/16/2007 4.68 WS 8/21/2007 4.79 WS 8/22/2007 5.43 WS 8/24/2007 3.56 WS 8/28/2007 5.24 WS 9/5/2007 3.79 WS 9/7/2007 5.20 WS 9/14/2007 4.24 WS 9/17/2007 2.81 WS 9/19/2007 1.21 WS 9/25/2007 3.95 WS 9/27/2007 4.15 WS 10/5/2007 2.33 WS 10/9/2007 3.59 WS 10/11/2007 3.69 WS 10/16/2007 2.89 WS 10/19/2007 3.22 WS 10/23/2007 3.34 WS 10/25/2007 2.49 WS 11/1/2007 2.84 WS 11/5/2007 2.72 WS 11/9/2007 2.63 WS 11/14/2007 2.17 WS 11/16/2007 2.42 WS 11/21/2007 2.39 WS 11/26/2007 2.30 WS 11/30/2007 2.20 WS run; proc glm; title 'Manual ET Comparison' ; class date type; model ET = date type; means type/ Duncan ; run; proc mixed;

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283 class type; model ET = type; lsmeans type/ pdiff; run;

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284 Manufacturer ET Data Comparisons options nodate nonumber center formdlim= "*" linesize = 88; data ET Manufacturer; input date$ ET type$; cards; 6/13/2007 6.86 TORO 6/14/2007 6.60 TORO 6/15/2007 6.35 TORO 6/16/2007 6.35 TORO 6/17/2007 6.86 TORO 6/18/2007 5.84 TORO 7/3/2007 5.59 TORO 7/4/2007 4.32 TORO 7/5/2007 4.06 TORO 7/6/2007 5.33 TORO 7/7/2007 4.57 TORO 7/8/2007 7.37 TORO 7/9/2007 7.11 TORO 7/10/2007 5.33 TORO 7/11/2007 7.11 TORO 7/12/2007 6.10 TORO 7/13/2007 5.59 TORO 7/14/2007 5.59 TORO 7/15/2007 5.84 TORO 7/16/2007 5.33 TORO 7/17/2007 5.84 TORO 8/5/2007 6.60 TORO 8/6/2007 6.86 TORO 8/7/2007 6.10 TORO 8/8/2007 5.84 TORO 8/9/2007 5.08 TORO 8/10/2007 4.83 TORO 9/2/2007 4.57 TORO 9/3/2007 4.57 TORO 9/4/2007 6.10 TORO 9/5/2007 6.35 TORO 9/6/2007 6.10 TORO 9/7/2007 5.84 TORO 10/2/2007 2.79 TORO 10/3/2007 3.81 TORO 10/4/2007 4.06 TORO 10/5/2007 3.56 TORO 10/6/2007 4.32 TORO 10/7/2007 3.30 TORO 10/8/2007 4.06 TORO 10/9/2007 3.56 TORO 10/10/2007 4.57 TORO 10/11/2007 4.83 TORO 10/12/2007 3.81 TORO 10/13/2007 4.06 TORO 10/14/2007 2.54 TORO 10/15/2007 4.06 TORO 10/16/2007 3.56 TORO 10/17/2007 3.56 TORO 10/18/2007 3.81 TORO 10/19/2007 4.06 TORO 10/23/2007 4.06 TORO

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285 10/24/2007 1.78 TORO 10/25/2007 3.05 TORO 10/26/2007 3.56 TORO 10/27/2007 2.54 TORO 10/28/2007 2.54 TORO 6/13/2007 3.53 ETM 6/14/2007 4.09 ETM 6/15/2007 5.83 ETM 6/16/2007 5.92 ETM 6/17/2007 6.05 ETM 6/18/2007 6.05 ETM 7/3/2007 4.33 ETM 7/4/2007 4.56 ETM 7/5/2007 3.97 ETM 7/6/2007 4.00 ETM 7/7/2007 3.88 ETM 7/8/2007 5.89 ETM 7/9/2007 5.55 ETM 7/10/2007 5.72 ETM 7/11/2007 5.49 ETM 7/12/2007 3.68 ETM 7/13/2007 3.55 ETM 7/14/2007 3.04 ETM 7/15/2007 4.26 ETM 7/16/2007 5.05 ETM 7/17/2007 4.13 ETM 8/5/2007 5.62 ETM 8/6/2007 5.29 ETM 8/7/2007 4.39 ETM 8/8/2007 4.20 ETM 8/9/2007 3.63 ETM 8/10/2007 5.31 ETM 9/2/2007 3.14 ETM 9/3/2007 5.04 ETM 9/4/2007 5.11 ETM 9/5/2007 3.60 ETM 9/6/2007 5.19 ETM 9/7/2007 5.20 ETM 10/2/2007 1.43 ETM 10/3/2007 3.49 ETM 10/4/2007 2.94 ETM 10/5/2007 1.83 ETM 10/6/2007 3.93 ETM 10/7/2007 2.29 ETM 10/8/2007 3.80 ETM 10/9/2007 3.84 ETM 10/10/2007 3.64 ETM 10/11/2007 3.42 ETM 10/12/2007 3.57 ETM 10/13/2007 3.85 ETM 10/14/2007 2.49 ETM 10/15/2007 4.17 ETM 10/16/2007 2.66 ETM 10/17/2007 3.43 ETM 10/18/2007 3.41 ETM 10/19/2007 2.88 ETM 10/23/2007 3.34 ETM

PAGE 286

286 10/24/2007 0.80 ETM 10/25/2007 1.91 ETM 10/26/2007 1.57 ETM 10/27/2007 1.12 ETM 10/28/2007 2.75 ETM 6/13/2007 5.00 WS 6/14/2007 4.82 WS 6/15/2007 5.79 WS 6/16/2007 5.59 WS 6/17/2007 6.15 WS 6/18/2007 5.95 WS 7/3/2007 4.00 WS 7/4/2007 3.44 WS 7/5/2007 4.32 WS 7/6/2007 5.71 WS 7/7/2007 5.80 WS 7/8/2007 5.93 WS 7/9/2007 6.53 WS 7/10/2007 5.19 WS 7/11/2007 5.97 WS 7/12/2007 4.57 WS 7/13/2007 4.93 WS 7/14/2007 2.89 WS 7/15/2007 4.05 WS 7/16/2007 5.13 WS 7/17/2007 4.93 WS 8/5/2007 5.73 WS 8/6/2007 5.55 WS 8/7/2007 5.56 WS 8/8/2007 5.38 WS 8/9/2007 5.38 WS 8/10/2007 5.54 WS 9/2/2007 2.89 WS 9/3/2007 4.51 WS 9/4/2007 5.07 WS 9/5/2007 3.79 WS 9/6/2007 4.38 WS 9/7/2007 5.20 WS 10/2/2007 1.26 WS 10/3/2007 3.39 WS 10/4/2007 2.89 WS 10/5/2007 2.33 WS 10/6/2007 3.09 WS 10/7/2007 3.37 WS 10/8/2007 3.78 WS 10/9/2007 3.59 WS 10/10/2007 3.29 WS 10/11/2007 3.69 WS 10/12/2007 3.50 WS 10/13/2007 3.42 WS 10/14/2007 2.61 WS 10/15/2007 3.62 WS 10/16/2007 2.89 WS 10/17/2007 2.85 WS 10/18/2007 3.08 WS 10/19/2007 3.22 WS 10/23/2007 3.34 WS

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287 10/24/2007 1.26 WS 10/25/2007 2.49 WS 10/26/2007 1.42 WS 10/27/2007 1.20 WS 10/28/2007 2.24 WS 6/7/2007 5.334 TORO 6/8/2007 5.08 TORO 6/9/2007 5.588 TORO 6/10/2007 6.096 TORO 6/11/2007 6.858 TORO 6/12/2007 6.35 TORO 6/7/2007 3.04 ETM 6/8/2007 4.85 ETM 6/9/2007 6.17 ETM 6/10/2007 4.73 ETM 6/11/2007 5.22 ETM 6/12/2007 3.53 ETM 6/7/2007 4.72 WS 6/8/2007 5.04 WS 6/9/2007 6.00 WS 6/10/2007 5.95 WS 6/11/2007 5.95 WS 6/12/2007 2.70 WS run; proc glm; title 'ET Manufacturer data' ; class date type; model ET = date type; means type/ Duncan ; run; proc mixed; class type; model ET = type; lsmeans type/ pdiff; run;

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288 Manufacturer Weekly ET Data Comparisons options nodate nonumber center formdlim= "*" linesize = 88; data ET; input week$ ET type$; cards; 1 38.35 TORO 2 40.89 TORO 3 25.91 TORO 4 27.43 TORO 5 23.88 TORO 1 32.17 ETM 2 30.78 ETM 3 19.73 ETM 4 24.98 ETM 5 18.44 ETM 1 35.73 WS 2 32.72 WS 3 20.11 WS 4 23.72 WS 5 19.14 WS 6 42.16 TORO 6 31.07 ETM 6 35.36 WS run; proc glm; title 'ET Manufacturer Weekly Sum Compared' ; class week type; model ET = week type; means type/ Duncan ; run; proc mixed; class type; model ET = type; lsmeans type/ pdiff; run;

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289 APPENDIX D CHAPTER 5 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS Rooting Depth Comparisons options nodate nonumber center formdlim= "*" linesize = 88; data roots; input tmt$ plot$ year$ block$ freq$ mrootsA mrootsB watertot waterweekly; cards; NON A01 2006 1 0 0.35 0.01 97.2 2.8 3.1 0.0 NON A09 2006 3 0 0.81 0.06 93.1 6.9 3.3 0.0 NON B06 2006 2 0 0.69 0.01 98.6 1.4 2.1 0.0 NON C10 2006 4 0 1.03 0.16 86.6 13.4 1.5 0.0 NON A01 2007 1 0.86 0.06 93.5 6.5 477.9 39.8 NON A09 2007 3 0.75 0.53 58.6 41.4 469.5 39.1 NON B06 2007 2 0.81 0.42 65.9 34.1 465.4 38.8 NON C10 2007 4 0.72 0 100.0 0.0 454.9 37.9 RS1-3mm A12 2006 1 1 1.29 0.08 94.2 5.8 212.7 22.7 RS1-3mm B01 2006 2 1 1.54 0.42 78.6 21.4 208.1 22.5 RS1-3mm B08 2006 3 1 0.78 0 100.0 0.0 204.7 21.4 RS1-3mm C06 2006 4 1 1.38 0.44 75.8 24.2 204.7 22.5 RS1-3mm A12 2007 4 1 0.71 0.12 85.5 14.5 480.0 40.0 RS1-3mm B01 2007 1 1 1.02 0.27 79.1 20.9 474.8 39.6 RS1-3mm B08 2007 3 1 0.91 0.23 79.8 20.2 481.0 40.1 RS1-3mm C06 2007 2 1 1.03 0.52 66.5 33.5 472.7 39.4 AC10 E05 2006 2 2 0.9 0.1 90.0 10.0 216.2 27.2 AC10 E08 2006 3 2 0.75 0.25 75.0 25.0 221.4 28.2 AC10 E11 2006 4 2 0.81 0.02 97.6 2.4 218.7 27.6 AC10 F02 2006 1 2 1.48 0.15 90.8 9.2 216.0 27.4 AC13 D07 2006 3 2 1.19 0.16 88.1 11.9 246.7 30.5 AC13 E06 2006 2 2 1.94 0.85 69.5 30.5 259.6 31.9 AC13 F01 2006 1 2 0.78 0.09 89.7 10.3 261.1 32.1 AC13 F11 2006 4 2 0.84 0.26 76.4 23.6 254.0 31.2 AC7 D12 2006 4 2 0.46 0.15 75.4 24.6 157.4 19.0 AC7 E02 2006 1 2 0.83 0.32 72.2 27.8 163.8 19.7 AC7 E04 2006 2 2 0.82 0.2 80.4 19.6 163.8 19.7 AC7 F07 2006 3 2 0.75 0 100.0 0.0 167.6 20.6 ACIR D03 2006 1 2 1.04 0.5 67.5 32.5 203.9 24.1 ACIR D09 2006 3 2 1.36 0.16 89.5 10.5 184.5 21.9 ACIR D10 2006 4 2 1.09 0.03 97.3 2.7 173.2 18.1 ACIR F04 2006 2 2 0.65 0.02 97.0 3.0 190.5 22.7 DWRS B05 2006 2 2 1.25 0.49 71.8 28.2 180.7 20.6 DWRS C01 2006 1 2 1.05 0.21 83.3 16.7 170.1 20.9 DWRS C07 2006 3 2 1.11 0.29 79.3 20.7 164.7 20.2 DWRS C11 2006 4 2 1.77 0.03 98.3 1.7 165.1 19.4 ET E07 2006 3 2 0.65 0.06 91.5 8.5 258.4 32.2 ET E10 2006 4 2 1.49 0.41 78.4 21.6 240.8 30.1 ET F03 2006 1 2 0.57 0.04 93.4 6.6 271.3 33.9 ET F05 2006 2 2 0.7 0 100.0 0.0 263.8 33.0 ETM E01 2006 1 2 0.67 0.06 91.8 8.2 257.5 30.1 ETM E09 2006 3 2 1.04 0.16 86.7 13.3 209.3 25.2 ETM F06 2006 2 2 0.63 0 100.0 0.0 243.5 29.8 ETM F10 2006 4 2 1.12 0.27 80.6 19.4 234.6 28.5 Llhigh D02 2006 1 2 0.73 0.05 93.6 6.4 328.7 40.6 Llhigh D06 2006 2 2 0.94 0.28 77.0 23.0 322.4 40.2 Llhigh E12 2006 4 2 0.84 0 100.0 0.0 327.0 40.5 Llhigh F09 2006 3 2 0.77 0.11 87.5 12.5 362.7 40.5

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290 LLlow D04 2006 2 2 0.82 0.26 75.9 24.1 116.4 12.3 LLlow D08 2006 3 2 1.02 0.32 76.1 23.9 115.4 12.4 LLlow E03 2006 1 2 0.85 0.03 96.6 3.4 116.2 12.5 LLlow F12 2006 4 2 0.45 0.09 83.3 16.7 113.7 11.9 Llmed D01 2006 1 2 1.41 0.18 88.7 11.3 225.4 26.4 Llmed D05 2006 2 2 0.62 0.08 88.6 11.4 226.4 26.4 Llmed D11 2006 4 2 1.07 0.21 83.6 16.4 223.3 25.5 Llmed F08 2006 3 2 0.98 0.25 79.7 20.3 228.1 26.8 RS1-6mm A02 2006 4 2 0.02 184.3 27.1 RS1-6mm B04 2006 1 2 0.31 0.2 60.8 39.2 171.5 26.4 RS1-6mm C08 2006 3 2 0.85 0.33 72.0 28.0 170.3 26.0 RS1-6mm C12 2006 2 2 0.8 0.11 87.9 12.1 173.2 26.0 RS2-3mm A06 2006 2 2 1.01 0.19 84.2 15.8 191.2 24.6 RS2-3mm B09 2006 3 2 0.67 0.14 82.7 17.3 178.4 22.8 RS2-3mm B10 2006 4 2 1.19 0.03 97.5 2.5 188.7 24.6 RS2-3mm C02 2006 1 2 1.02 0 100.0 0.0 187.4 24.2 WORS A03 2006 1 2 0.58 0.07 89.2 10.8 258.4 30.8 WORS A05 2006 2 2 0.97 0 100.0 0.0 223.7 29.7 WORS B12 2006 4 2 1.11 0 100.0 0.0 230.6 28.6 WORS C09 2006 3 2 1.15 0.14 89.1 10.9 235.4 29.7 WRS A04 2006 2 2 0.73 0.36 67.0 33.0 221.0 28.1 WRS A11 2006 4 2 0.81 0.07 92.0 8.0 220.8 27.8 WRS B07 2006 3 2 0.54 0 100.0 0.0 213.9 27.2 WRS C03 2006 1 2 1.24 0.32 79.5 20.5 220.0 28.1 AC7 D12 2007 4 2 1.27 0.19 87.0 13.0 246.3 20.5 AC7 E02 2007 1 2 1.03 0.42 71.0 29.0 252.5 21.0 AC7 E04 2007 2 2 0.63 0.64 49.6 50.4 254.6 21.2 AC7 F07 2007 3 2 1.3 0.5 72.2 27.8 271.3 22.6 DWRS B05 2007 2 2 1.03 0.8 56.3 43.7 252.5 21.0 DWRS C01 2007 1 2 1.53 0.29 84.1 15.9 257.7 21.5 DWRS C07 2007 3 2 0.74 0.7 51.4 48.6 252.5 21.0 DWRS C11 2007 4 2 2.11 0.47 81.8 18.2 250.4 20.9 ETM E01 2007 1 2 1 0.2 83.3 16.7 194.1 16.2 ETM E09 2007 3 2 1.12 0.27 80.6 19.4 212.1 17.7 ETM F10 2007 2 2 1.39 0.34 80.3 19.7 192.0 16.0 ETM F06 2007 4 2 1.29 0.34 79.1 20.9 190.9 15.9 Llhigh D02 2007 1 2 1.42 0.42 77.2 22.8 473.7 39.5 Llhigh D06 2007 2 2 1.21 1.36 47.1 52.9 471.6 39.3 Llhigh E12 2007 4 2 1.05 0.43 70.9 29.1 481.0 40.1 Llhigh F09 2007 3 2 1.18 0.2 85.5 14.5 486.2 40.5 WORS A03 2007 1 2 1.43 0.34 80.8 19.2 480.0 40.0 WORS A05 2007 2 2 0.83 0.66 55.7 44.3 477.9 39.8 WORS B12 2007 4 2 1.61 0.46 77.8 22.2 467.5 39.0 WORS C09 2007 3 2 0.79 0.46 63.2 36.8 423.6 35.3 WRS A04 2007 2 2 0.89 0.4 69.0 31.0 412.2 34.3 WRS A11 2007 4 2 1.16 0.12 90.6 9.4 411.1 34.3 WRS B07 2007 3 2 0.97 0.23 80.8 19.2 424.7 35.4 WRS C03 2007 1 2 1.13 1.16 49.3 50.7 411.1 34.3 RS2-6mm A07 2006 3 7 0.55 0.14 79.7 20.3 210.4 23.5 RS2-6mm B02 2006 1 7 0.62 0.3 67.4 32.6 207.9 23.2 RS2-6mm B11 2006 4 7 1.21 0.04 96.8 3.2 206.0 23.4 RS2-6mm C05 2006 2 7 0.91 0.1 90.1 9.9 211.4 22.7 RS7-3mm A08 2006 3 7 1 0.17 85.5 14.5 193.7 26.8 RS7-3mm A10 2006 4 7 1.72 0.03 98.3 1.7 192.2 26.5 RS7-3mm B03 2006 1 7 0.86 0.1 89.6 10.4 193.5 26.3 RS7-3mm C04 2006 2 7 0.99 0.07 93.4 6.6 201.2 27.1 RS7-3mm A08 2007 3 7 0.87 0.22 79.8 20.2 422.6 34.8

PAGE 291

291 RS7-3mm A10 2007 4 7 0.75 0 100.0 0.0 401.7 33.1 RS7-3mm B03 2007 1 7 0.89 0.08 91.8 8.2 404.9 33.4 RS7-3mm C04 2007 2 7 1.2 0.75 61.5 38.5 352.7 28.9 run; /*BY YEAR*/ proc sort; by year; run; /*0 to 15 cm depth*/ proc glm; by year; title 'Mass of Roots at 15 cm Frequency Analysis' ; class freq ; model mrootsA = freq ; means freq / duncan ; run; proc glm; by year; title 'Mass of Roots at 15 cm Total Water Applied Analysis' ; class watertot ; model mrootsA = watertot ; run; proc glm; by year; title 'Mass of Roots at 15 cm Weekly Water Applied Analysis' ; class waterweekly ; model mrootsA = waterweekly ; run; /*15 to 30 cm depth*/ proc glm; by year; title 'Mass of Roots at 30 cm Frequency Analysis' ; class freq ; model mrootsB = freq ; means freq / duncan ; run; proc glm; by year; title 'Mass of Roots at 30 cm Total Water Applied Analysis' ; class watertot ; model mrootsB = watertot ; run; proc glm; by year; title 'Mass of Roots at 30 cm Weekly Water Applied Analysis' ; class waterweekly ; model mrootsB = waterweekly ; run;

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292 Rooting Depth 2006-2007 Comparisons options nodate nonumber center formdlim= "*" linesize= 88; data roots; input tmt $ plot $ year block freq mrootsA mrootsB waterapp; cards; RS1-3mm A12 2006 1 1 1.29 0.08 94.2 5.8 212.7 22.7 RS1-3mm B01 2006 2 1 1.54 0.42 78.6 21.4 208.1 22.5 RS1-3mm B08 2006 3 1 0.78 0 100.0 0.0 204.7 21.4 RS1-3mm C06 2006 4 1 1.38 0.44 75.8 24.2 204.7 22.5 RS1-3mm A12 2007 4 1 0.71 0.12 85.5 14.5 480.0 40.0 RS1-3mm B01 2007 1 1 1.02 0.27 79.1 20.9 474.8 39.6 RS1-3mm B08 2007 3 1 0.91 0.23 79.8 20.2 481.0 40.1 RS1-3mm C06 2007 2 1 1.03 0.52 66.5 33.5 472.7 39.4 AC10 E05 2006 2 2 0.9 0.1 90.0 10.0 216.2 27.2 AC10 E08 2006 3 2 0.75 0.25 75.0 25.0 221.4 28.2 AC10 E11 2006 4 2 0.81 0.02 97.6 2.4 218.7 27.6 AC10 F02 2006 1 2 1.48 0.15 90.8 9.2 216.0 27.4 AC13 D07 2006 3 2 1.19 0.16 88.1 11.9 246.7 30.5 AC13 E06 2006 2 2 1.94 0.85 69.5 30.5 259.6 31.9 AC13 F01 2006 1 2 0.78 0.09 89.7 10.3 261.1 32.1 AC13 F11 2006 4 2 0.84 0.26 76.4 23.6 254.0 31.2 AC7 D12 2006 4 2 0.46 0.15 75.4 24.6 157.4 19.0 AC7 E02 2006 1 2 0.83 0.32 72.2 27.8 163.8 19.7 AC7 E04 2006 2 2 0.82 0.2 80.4 19.6 163.8 19.7 AC7 F07 2006 3 2 0.75 0 100.0 0.0 167.6 20.6 ACIR D03 2006 1 2 1.04 0.5 67.5 32.5 203.9 24.1 ACIR D09 2006 3 2 1.36 0.16 89.5 10.5 184.5 21.9 ACIR D10 2006 4 2 1.09 0.03 97.3 2.7 173.2 18.1 ACIR F04 2006 2 2 0.65 0.02 97.0 3.0 190.5 22.7 DWRS B05 2006 2 2 1.25 0.49 71.8 28.2 180.7 20.6 DWRS C01 2006 1 2 1.05 0.21 83.3 16.7 170.1 20.9 DWRS C07 2006 3 2 1.11 0.29 79.3 20.7 164.7 20.2 DWRS C11 2006 4 2 1.77 0.03 98.3 1.7 165.1 19.4 ET E07 2006 3 2 0.65 0.06 91.5 8.5 258.4 32.2 ET E10 2006 4 2 1.49 0.41 78.4 21.6 240.8 30.1 ET F03 2006 1 2 0.57 0.04 93.4 6.6 271.3 33.9 ET F05 2006 2 2 0.7 0 100.0 0.0 263.8 33.0 ETM E01 2006 1 2 0.67 0.06 91.8 8.2 257.5 30.1 ETM E09 2006 3 2 1.04 0.16 86.7 13.3 209.3 25.2 ETM F06 2006 2 2 0.63 0 100.0 0.0 243.5 29.8 ETM F10 2006 4 2 1.12 0.27 80.6 19.4 234.6 28.5 Llhigh D02 2006 1 2 0.73 0.05 93.6 6.4 328.7 40.6 Llhigh D06 2006 2 2 0.94 0.28 77.0 23.0 322.4 40.2 Llhigh E12 2006 4 2 0.84 0 100.0 0.0 327.0 40.5 Llhigh F09 2006 3 2 0.77 0.11 87.5 12.5 362.7 40.5 LLlow D04 2006 2 2 0.82 0.26 75.9 24.1 116.4 12.3 LLlow D08 2006 3 2 1.02 0.32 76.1 23.9 115.4 12.4 LLlow E03 2006 1 2 0.85 0.03 96.6 3.4 116.2 12.5 LLlow F12 2006 4 2 0.45 0.09 83.3 16.7 113.7 11.9 Llmed D01 2006 1 2 1.41 0.18 88.7 11.3 225.4 26.4 Llmed D05 2006 2 2 0.62 0.08 88.6 11.4 226.4 26.4 Llmed D11 2006 4 2 1.07 0.21 83.6 16.4 223.3 25.5 Llmed F08 2006 3 2 0.98 0.25 79.7 20.3 228.1 26.8 RS1-6mm A02 2006 4 2 0.02 184.3 27.1 RS1-6mm B04 2006 1 2 0.31 0.2 60.8 39.2 171.5 26.4 RS1-6mm C08 2006 3 2 0.85 0.33 72.0 28.0 170.3 26.0 RS1-6mm C12 2006 2 2 0.8 0.11 87.9 12.1 173.2 26.0

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293 RS2-3mm A06 2006 2 2 1.01 0.19 84.2 15.8 191.2 24.6 RS2-3mm B09 2006 3 2 0.67 0.14 82.7 17.3 178.4 22.8 RS2-3mm B10 2006 4 2 1.19 0.03 97.5 2.5 188.7 24.6 RS2-3mm C02 2006 1 2 1.02 0 100.0 0.0 187.4 24.2 WORS A03 2006 1 2 0.58 0.07 89.2 10.8 258.4 30.8 WORS A05 2006 2 2 0.97 0 100.0 0.0 223.7 29.7 WORS B12 2006 4 2 1.11 0 100.0 0.0 230.6 28.6 WORS C09 2006 3 2 1.15 0.14 89.1 10.9 235.4 29.7 WRS A04 2006 2 2 0.73 0.36 67.0 33.0 221.0 28.1 WRS A11 2006 4 2 0.81 0.07 92.0 8.0 220.8 27.8 WRS B07 2006 3 2 0.54 0 100.0 0.0 213.9 27.2 WRS C03 2006 1 2 1.24 0.32 79.5 20.5 220.0 28.1 AC7 D12 2007 4 2 1.27 0.19 87.0 13.0 246.3 20.5 AC7 E02 2007 1 2 1.03 0.42 71.0 29.0 252.5 21.0 AC7 E04 2007 2 2 0.63 0.64 49.6 50.4 254.6 21.2 AC7 F07 2007 3 2 1.3 0.5 72.2 27.8 271.3 22.6 DWRS B05 2007 2 2 1.03 0.8 56.3 43.7 252.5 21.0 DWRS C01 2007 1 2 1.53 0.29 84.1 15.9 257.7 21.5 DWRS C07 2007 3 2 0.74 0.7 51.4 48.6 252.5 21.0 DWRS C11 2007 4 2 2.11 0.47 81.8 18.2 250.4 20.9 ETM E01 2007 1 2 1 0.2 83.3 16.7 194.1 16.2 ETM E09 2007 3 2 1.12 0.27 80.6 19.4 212.1 17.7 ETM F10 2007 2 2 1.39 0.34 80.3 19.7 192.0 16.0 ETM F06 2007 4 2 1.29 0.34 79.1 20.9 190.9 15.9 Llhigh D02 2007 1 2 1.42 0.42 77.2 22.8 473.7 39.5 Llhigh D06 2007 2 2 1.21 1.36 47.1 52.9 471.6 39.3 Llhigh E12 2007 4 2 1.05 0.43 70.9 29.1 481.0 40.1 Llhigh F09 2007 3 2 1.18 0.2 85.5 14.5 486.2 40.5 WORS A03 2007 1 2 1.43 0.34 80.8 19.2 480.0 40.0 WORS A05 2007 2 2 0.83 0.66 55.7 44.3 477.9 39.8 WORS B12 2007 4 2 1.61 0.46 77.8 22.2 467.5 39.0 WORS C09 2007 3 2 0.79 0.46 63.2 36.8 423.6 35.3 WRS A04 2007 2 2 0.89 0.4 69.0 31.0 412.2 34.3 WRS A11 2007 4 2 1.16 0.12 90.6 9.4 411.1 34.3 WRS B07 2007 3 2 0.97 0.23 80.8 19.2 424.7 35.4 WRS C03 2007 1 2 1.13 1.16 49.3 50.7 411.1 34.3 RS2-6mm A07 2006 3 7 0.55 0.14 79.7 20.3 210.4 23.5 RS2-6mm B02 2006 1 7 0.62 0.3 67.4 32.6 207.9 23.2 RS2-6mm B11 2006 4 7 1.21 0.04 96.8 3.2 206.0 23.4 RS2-6mm C05 2006 2 7 0.91 0.1 90.1 9.9 211.4 22.7 RS7-3mm A08 2006 3 7 1 0.17 85.5 14.5 193.7 26.8 RS7-3mm A10 2006 4 7 1.72 0.03 98.3 1.7 192.2 26.5 RS7-3mm B03 2006 1 7 0.86 0.1 89.6 10.4 193.5 26.3 RS7-3mm C04 2006 2 7 0.99 0.07 93.4 6.6 201.2 27.1 RS7-3mm A08 2007 3 7 0.87 0.22 79.8 20.2 422.6 34.8 RS7-3mm A10 2007 4 7 0.75 0 100.0 0.0 401.7 33.1 RS7-3mm B03 2007 1 7 0.89 0.08 91.8 8.2 404.9 33.4 RS7-3mm C04 2007 2 7 1.2 0.75 61.5 38.5 352.7 28.9 run; proc glm; title 'Roots at 15 cm Frequency Analysis' ; class year ; model mrootsA = year ; means year / duncan ; run; proc glm;

PAGE 294

294 title 'Roots at 30 cm Frequency Analysis' ; class year ; model mrootsB = year ; means year / duncan ; run;

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295 Weekly Water Applied on Turf Quality data TQ and weekly water; input season$ month$ week$ tmt$ rep$ freq$ mm type$ TQ; cards; F06 Sep06 1 AC10 1 2 32 SMS 7 F06 Oct06 2 AC10 1 2 33 SMS 6 F06 Oct06 4 AC10 1 2 15 SMS 7 F06 Nov06 8 AC10 1 2 10 SMS 6 F06 Dec06 10 AC10 1 2 0 SMS 6 F06 Dec06 11 AC10 1 2 10 SMS 7 F06 Sep06 1 AC10 2 2 33 SMS 8 F06 Oct06 2 AC10 2 2 32 SMS 8 F06 Oct06 4 AC10 2 2 15 SMS 7 F06 Nov06 8 AC10 2 2 10 SMS 8 F06 Dec06 10 AC10 2 2 0 SMS 7 F06 Dec06 11 AC10 2 2 10 SMS 7 F06 Sep06 1 AC10 3 2 33 SMS 8 F06 Oct06 2 AC10 3 2 34 SMS 8 F06 Oct06 4 AC10 3 2 15 SMS 7 F06 Nov06 8 AC10 3 2 10 SMS 7 F06 Dec06 10 AC10 3 2 0 SMS 7 F06 Dec06 11 AC10 3 2 10 SMS 7 F06 Sep06 1 AC10 4 2 33 SMS 7 F06 Oct06 2 AC10 4 2 33 SMS 7 F06 Oct06 4 AC10 4 2 15 SMS 7 F06 Nov06 8 AC10 4 2 10 SMS 7 F06 Dec06 10 AC10 4 2 0 SMS 6 F06 Dec06 11 AC10 4 2 10 SMS 7 F06 Sep06 1 AC13 1 2 34 SMS 4 F06 Oct06 2 AC13 1 2 34 SMS 4 F06 Oct06 4 AC13 1 2 29 SMS 4 F06 Nov06 8 AC13 1 2 10 SMS 6 F06 Dec06 10 AC13 1 2 10 SMS 6 F06 Dec06 11 AC13 1 2 21 SMS 6 F06 Sep06 1 AC13 2 2 33 SMS 8 F06 Oct06 2 AC13 2 2 33 SMS 7 F06 Oct06 4 AC13 2 2 28 SMS 8 F06 Nov06 8 AC13 2 2 10 SMS 8 F06 Dec06 10 AC13 2 2 10 SMS 7 F06 Dec06 11 AC13 2 2 21 SMS 7 F06 Sep06 1 AC13 3 2 32 SMS 8 F06 Oct06 2 AC13 3 2 32 SMS 8 F06 Oct06 4 AC13 3 2 28 SMS 8 F06 Nov06 8 AC13 3 2 9 SMS 7 F06 Dec06 10 AC13 3 2 9 SMS 8 F06 Dec06 11 AC13 3 2 21 SMS 8 F06 Sep06 1 AC13 4 2 33 SMS 7 F06 Oct06 2 AC13 4 2 33 SMS 7 F06 Oct06 4 AC13 4 2 29 SMS 7 F06 Nov06 8 AC13 4 2 10 SMS 7 F06 Dec06 10 AC13 4 2 10 SMS 6 F06 Dec06 11 AC13 4 2 20 SMS 7 F06 Sep06 1 ACIR 1 2 17 SMS 8 F06 Oct06 2 ACIR 1 2 17 SMS 7 F06 Oct06 4 ACIR 1 2 15 SMS 7 F06 Nov06 8 ACIR 1 2 0 SMS 7

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296 F06 Dec06 10 ACIR 1 2 10 SMS 6 F06 Dec06 11 ACIR 1 2 0 SMS 7 F06 Sep06 1 ACIR 2 2 34 SMS 5 F06 Oct06 2 ACIR 2 2 33 SMS 5 F06 Oct06 4 ACIR 2 2 29 SMS 5 F06 Nov06 8 ACIR 2 2 10 SMS 5 F06 Dec06 10 ACIR 2 2 0 SMS 4 F06 Dec06 11 ACIR 2 2 10 SMS 5 F06 Sep06 1 ACIR 3 2 17 SMS 7 F06 Oct06 2 ACIR 3 2 17 SMS 6 F06 Oct06 4 ACIR 3 2 15 SMS 7 F06 Nov06 8 ACIR 3 2 0 SMS 8 F06 Dec06 10 ACIR 3 2 10 SMS 7 F06 Dec06 11 ACIR 3 2 0 SMS 8 F06 Sep06 1 ACIR 4 2 0 SMS 8 F06 Oct06 2 ACIR 4 2 16 SMS 7 F06 Oct06 4 ACIR 4 2 13 SMS 7 F06 Nov06 8 ACIR 4 2 0 SMS 8 F06 Dec06 10 ACIR 4 2 0 SMS 7 F06 Dec06 11 ACIR 4 2 0 SMS 7 F06 Sep06 1 DWRS 1 2 21 RS 7 F06 Oct06 2 DWRS 1 2 21 RS 7 F06 Oct06 4 DWRS 1 2 18 RS 7 F06 Nov06 8 DWRS 1 2 7 RS 7 F06 Dec06 10 DWRS 1 2 7 RS 7 F06 Dec06 11 DWRS 1 2 13 RS 7 F06 Sep06 1 DWRS 2 2 21 RS 7 F06 Oct06 2 DWRS 2 2 21 RS 7 F06 Oct06 4 DWRS 2 2 17 RS 7 F06 Nov06 8 DWRS 2 2 6 RS 7 F06 Dec06 10 DWRS 2 2 6 RS 6 F06 Dec06 11 DWRS 2 2 13 RS 7 F06 Sep06 1 DWRS 3 2 22 RS 8 F06 Oct06 2 DWRS 3 2 21 RS 8 F06 Oct06 4 DWRS 3 2 18 RS 8 F06 Nov06 8 DWRS 3 2 6 RS 8 F06 Dec06 10 DWRS 3 2 7 RS 8 F06 Dec06 11 DWRS 3 2 13 RS 8 F06 Sep06 1 DWRS 4 2 21 RS 7 F06 Oct06 2 DWRS 4 2 21 RS 7 F06 Oct06 4 DWRS 4 2 18 RS 7 F06 Nov06 8 DWRS 4 2 6 RS 7 F06 Dec06 10 DWRS 4 2 6 RS 6 F06 Dec06 11 DWRS 4 2 14 RS 6 F06 Sep06 1 ETM 1 2 35 ET 8 F06 Oct06 2 ETM 1 2 35 ET 8 F06 Oct06 4 ETM 1 2 33 ET 8 F06 Nov06 8 ETM 1 2 0 ET 8 F06 Dec06 10 ETM 1 2 13 ET 8 F06 Dec06 11 ETM 1 2 10 ET 8 F06 Sep06 1 ETM 2 2 33 ET 6 F06 Oct06 2 ETM 2 2 35 ET 6 F06 Oct06 4 ETM 2 2 31 ET 6 F06 Nov06 8 ETM 2 2 0 ET 4 F06 Dec06 10 ETM 2 2 10 ET 4 F06 Dec06 11 ETM 2 2 10 ET 4 F06 Sep06 1 ETM 3 2 29 ET 7

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297 F06 Oct06 2 ETM 3 2 34 ET 7 F06 Oct06 4 ETM 3 2 31 ET 7 F06 Nov06 8 ETM 3 2 0 ET 8 F06 Dec06 10 ETM 3 2 10 ET 7 F06 Dec06 11 ETM 3 2 10 ET 8 F06 Sep06 1 ETM 4 2 33 ET 8 F06 Oct06 2 ETM 4 2 35 ET 8 F06 Oct06 4 ETM 4 2 31 ET 8 F06 Nov06 8 ETM 4 2 0 ET 8 F06 Dec06 10 ETM 4 2 10 ET 8 F06 Dec06 11 ETM 4 2 10 ET 8 F06 Sep06 1 LL5 1 2 32 SMS 7 F06 Oct06 2 LL5 1 2 33 SMS 7 F06 Oct06 4 LL5 1 2 14 SMS 7 F06 Nov06 8 LL5 1 2 10 SMS 7 F06 Dec06 10 LL5 1 2 10 SMS 7 F06 Dec06 11 LL5 1 2 21 SMS 7 F06 Sep06 1 LL5 2 2 33 SMS 8 F06 Oct06 2 LL5 2 2 33 SMS 7 F06 Oct06 4 LL5 2 2 15 SMS 7 F06 Nov06 8 LL5 2 2 10 SMS 8 F06 Dec06 10 LL5 2 2 10 SMS 7 F06 Dec06 11 LL5 2 2 20 SMS 7 F06 Sep06 1 LL5 3 2 32 SMS 7 F06 Oct06 2 LL5 3 2 33 SMS 7 F06 Oct06 4 LL5 3 2 15 SMS 7 F06 Nov06 8 LL5 3 2 10 SMS 7 F06 Dec06 10 LL5 3 2 10 SMS 6 F06 Dec06 11 LL5 3 2 21 SMS 7 F06 Sep06 1 LL5 4 2 32 SMS 8 F06 Oct06 2 LL5 4 2 32 SMS 8 F06 Oct06 4 LL5 4 2 14 SMS 8 F06 Nov06 8 LL5 4 2 10 SMS 8 F06 Dec06 10 LL5 4 2 10 SMS 6 F06 Dec06 11 LL5 4 2 20 SMS 7 F06 Sep06 1 RS2-3mm 1 2 32 RS 6 F06 Oct06 2 RS2-3mm 1 2 33 RS 7 F06 Oct06 4 RS2-3mm 1 2 28 RS 7 F06 Nov06 8 RS2-3mm 1 2 9 RS 5 F06 Dec06 10 RS2-3mm 1 2 10 RS 5 F06 Dec06 11 RS2-3mm 1 2 21 RS 5 F06 Sep06 1 RS2-3mm 2 2 33 RS 8 F06 Oct06 2 RS2-3mm 2 2 33 RS 8 F06 Oct06 4 RS2-3mm 2 2 28 RS 8 F06 Nov06 8 RS2-3mm 2 2 10 RS 8 F06 Dec06 10 RS2-3mm 2 2 10 RS 6 F06 Dec06 11 RS2-3mm 2 2 21 RS 7 F06 Sep06 1 RS2-3mm 3 2 32 RS 7 F06 Oct06 2 RS2-3mm 3 2 29 RS 7 F06 Oct06 4 RS2-3mm 3 2 29 RS 7 F06 Nov06 8 RS2-3mm 3 2 10 RS 7 F06 Dec06 10 RS2-3mm 3 2 9 RS 6 F06 Dec06 11 RS2-3mm 3 2 21 RS 7 F06 Sep06 1 RS2-3mm 4 2 33 RS 7 F06 Oct06 2 RS2-3mm 4 2 33 RS 7 F06 Oct06 4 RS2-3mm 4 2 28 RS 7 F06 Nov06 8 RS2-3mm 4 2 10 RS 6

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298 F06 Dec06 10 RS2-3mm 4 2 10 RS 5 F06 Dec06 11 RS2-3mm 4 2 21 RS 5 F06 Sep06 1 RS2-6mm 1 2 33 RS 8 F06 Oct06 2 RS2-6mm 1 2 33 RS 8 F06 Oct06 4 RS2-6mm 1 2 28 RS 7 F06 Nov06 8 RS2-6mm 1 2 10 RS 7 F06 Dec06 10 RS2-6mm 1 2 10 RS 6 F06 Dec06 11 RS2-6mm 1 2 21 RS 6 F06 Sep06 1 RS2-6mm 2 2 33 RS 5 F06 Oct06 2 RS2-6mm 2 2 32 RS 5 F06 Oct06 4 RS2-6mm 2 2 28 RS 5 F06 Nov06 8 RS2-6mm 2 2 10 RS 5 F06 Dec06 10 RS2-6mm 2 2 10 RS 4 F06 Dec06 11 RS2-6mm 2 2 21 RS 4 F06 Sep06 1 RS2-6mm 3 2 34 RS 4 F06 Oct06 2 RS2-6mm 3 2 33 RS 4 F06 Oct06 4 RS2-6mm 3 2 29 RS 4 F06 Nov06 8 RS2-6mm 3 2 10 RS 5 F06 Dec06 10 RS2-6mm 3 2 10 RS 4 F06 Dec06 11 RS2-6mm 3 2 21 RS 5 F06 Sep06 1 RS2-6mm 4 2 33 RS 7 F06 Oct06 2 RS2-6mm 4 2 32 RS 7 F06 Oct06 4 RS2-6mm 4 2 29 RS 8 F06 Nov06 8 RS2-6mm 4 2 10 RS 7 F06 Dec06 10 RS2-6mm 4 2 10 RS 6 F06 Dec06 11 RS2-6mm 4 2 21 RS 7 F06 Sep06 1 RS7-6mm 1 7 3 RS 8 F06 Oct06 2 RS7-6mm 1 7 51 RS 7 F06 Oct06 4 RS7-6mm 1 7 28 RS 7 F06 Nov06 8 RS7-6mm 1 7 20 RS 7 F06 Dec06 10 RS7-6mm 1 7 17 RS 6 F06 Dec06 11 RS7-6mm 1 7 19 RS 6 F06 Sep06 1 RS7-6mm 2 7 3 RS 8 F06 Oct06 2 RS7-6mm 2 7 52 RS 8 F06 Oct06 4 RS7-6mm 2 7 28 RS 8 F06 Nov06 8 RS7-6mm 2 7 20 RS 8 F06 Dec06 10 RS7-6mm 2 7 16 RS 8 F06 Dec06 11 RS7-6mm 2 7 20 RS 8 F06 Sep06 1 RS7-6mm 3 7 3 RS 5 F06 Oct06 2 RS7-6mm 3 7 52 RS 4 F06 Oct06 4 RS7-6mm 3 7 28 RS 6 F06 Nov06 8 RS7-6mm 3 7 20 RS 5 F06 Dec06 10 RS7-6mm 3 7 17 RS 4 F06 Dec06 11 RS7-6mm 3 7 20 RS 5 F06 Sep06 1 RS7-6mm 4 7 3 RS 6 F06 Oct06 2 RS7-6mm 4 7 51 RS 6 F06 Oct06 4 RS7-6mm 4 7 28 RS 6 F06 Nov06 8 RS7-6mm 4 7 19 RS 7 F06 Dec06 10 RS7-6mm 4 7 16 RS 6 F06 Dec06 11 RS7-6mm 4 7 19 RS 6 F06 Sep06 1 TORO 1 2 6 ET 5 F06 Oct06 2 TORO 1 2 30 ET 5 F06 Oct06 4 TORO 1 2 8 ET 5 F06 Nov06 8 TORO 1 2 0 ET 5 F06 Dec06 10 TORO 1 2 5 ET 4 F06 Dec06 11 TORO 1 2 10 ET 6 F06 Sep06 1 TORO 2 2 5 ET 6

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299 F06 Oct06 2 TORO 2 2 30 ET 6 F06 Oct06 4 TORO 2 2 8 ET 6 F06 Nov06 8 TORO 2 2 0 ET 6 F06 Dec06 10 TORO 2 2 4 ET 5 F06 Dec06 11 TORO 2 2 11 ET 6 F06 Sep06 1 TORO 3 2 6 ET 8 F06 Oct06 2 TORO 3 2 29 ET 8 F06 Oct06 4 TORO 3 2 8 ET 8 F06 Nov06 8 TORO 3 2 0 ET 7 F06 Dec06 10 TORO 3 2 4 ET 8 F06 Dec06 11 TORO 3 2 11 ET 8 F06 Sep06 1 TORO 4 2 6 ET 7 F06 Oct06 2 TORO 4 2 29 ET 8 F06 Oct06 4 TORO 4 2 8 ET 7 F06 Nov06 8 TORO 4 2 0 ET 8 F06 Dec06 10 TORO 4 2 4 ET 7 F06 Dec06 11 TORO 4 2 10 ET 8 F06 Sep06 1 WOS 1 2 33 WOS 4 F06 Oct06 2 WOS 1 2 33 WOS 4 F06 Oct06 4 WOS 1 2 29 WOS 4 F06 Nov06 8 WOS 1 2 23 WOS 4 F06 Dec06 10 WOS 1 2 21 WOS 3 F06 Dec06 11 WOS 1 2 21 WOS 4 F06 Sep06 1 WOS 2 2 31 WOS 6 F06 Oct06 2 WOS 2 2 33 WOS 7 F06 Oct06 4 WOS 2 2 28 WOS 7 F06 Nov06 8 WOS 2 2 21 WOS 6 F06 Dec06 10 WOS 2 2 20 WOS 5 F06 Dec06 11 WOS 2 2 21 WOS 5 F06 Sep06 1 WOS 3 2 32 WOS 8 F06 Oct06 2 WOS 3 2 32 WOS 8 F06 Oct06 4 WOS 3 2 28 WOS 8 F06 Nov06 8 WOS 3 2 20 WOS 8 F06 Dec06 10 WOS 3 2 21 WOS 8 F06 Dec06 11 WOS 3 2 20 WOS 8 F06 Sep06 1 WOS 4 2 32 WOS 7 F06 Oct06 2 WOS 4 2 33 WOS 6 F06 Oct06 4 WOS 4 2 28 WOS 7 F06 Nov06 8 WOS 4 2 21 WOS 7 F06 Dec06 10 WOS 4 2 20 WOS 6 F06 Dec06 11 WOS 4 2 21 WOS 6 F07 Sep07 20 AC10 1 2 16 SMS 7 F07 Oct07 24 AC10 1 2 29 SMS 7 F07 Nov07 28 AC10 1 2 10 SMS 6 F07 Sep07 20 AC10 2 2 16 SMS 7 F07 Oct07 24 AC10 2 2 28 SMS 6 F07 Nov07 28 AC10 2 2 10 SMS 5 F07 Sep07 20 AC10 3 2 16 SMS 7 F07 Oct07 24 AC10 3 2 31 SMS 7 F07 Nov07 28 AC10 3 2 14 SMS 7 F07 Sep07 20 AC10 4 2 16 SMS 7 F07 Oct07 24 AC10 4 2 28 SMS 7 F07 Nov07 28 AC10 4 2 10 SMS 6 F07 Sep07 20 AC13 1 2 33 SMS 7 F07 Oct07 24 AC13 1 2 29 SMS 6 F07 Nov07 28 AC13 1 2 26 SMS 6 F07 Sep07 20 AC13 2 2 30 SMS 7

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300 F07 Oct07 24 AC13 2 2 27 SMS 7 F07 Nov07 28 AC13 2 2 24 SMS 6 F07 Sep07 20 AC13 3 2 31 SMS 7 F07 Oct07 24 AC13 3 2 63 SMS 7 F07 Nov07 28 AC13 3 2 25 SMS 6 F07 Sep07 20 AC13 4 2 31 SMS 7 F07 Oct07 24 AC13 4 2 28 SMS 7 F07 Nov07 28 AC13 4 2 25 SMS 6 F07 Sep07 20 AC7 1 2 17 SMS 7 F07 Oct07 24 AC7 1 2 15 SMS 7 F07 Nov07 28 AC7 1 2 15 SMS 6 F07 Sep07 20 AC7 2 2 16 SMS 6 F07 Oct07 24 AC7 2 2 14 SMS 7 F07 Nov07 28 AC7 2 2 15 SMS 5 F07 Sep07 20 AC7 3 2 19 SMS 6 F07 Oct07 24 AC7 3 2 17 SMS 5 F07 Nov07 28 AC7 3 2 21 SMS 5 F07 Sep07 20 AC7 4 2 16 SMS 6 F07 Oct07 24 AC7 4 2 15 SMS 6 F07 Nov07 28 AC7 4 2 15 SMS 5 F07 Sep07 20 ACIR 1 2 15 SMS 6 F07 Oct07 24 ACIR 1 2 14 SMS 6 F07 Nov07 28 ACIR 1 2 10 SMS 5 F07 Sep07 20 ACIR 2 2 17 SMS 6 F07 Oct07 24 ACIR 2 2 15 SMS 6 F07 Nov07 28 ACIR 2 2 10 SMS 4 F07 Sep07 20 ACIR 3 2 0 SMS 6 F07 Oct07 24 ACIR 3 2 15 SMS 7 F07 Nov07 28 ACIR 3 2 15 SMS 7 F07 Sep07 20 ACIR 4 2 17 SMS 7 F07 Oct07 24 ACIR 4 2 14 SMS 7 F07 Nov07 28 ACIR 4 2 10 SMS 7 F07 Sep07 20 DWRS 1 2 20 RS 6 F07 Oct07 24 DWRS 1 2 19 RS 7 F07 Nov07 28 DWRS 1 2 17 RS 5 F07 Sep07 20 DWRS 2 2 21 RS 8 F07 Oct07 24 DWRS 2 2 17 RS 8 F07 Nov07 28 DWRS 2 2 17 RS 8 F07 Sep07 20 DWRS 3 2 13 RS 8 F07 Oct07 24 DWRS 3 2 16 RS 8 F07 Nov07 28 DWRS 3 2 14 RS 8 F07 Sep07 20 DWRS 4 2 20 RS 6 F07 Oct07 24 DWRS 4 2 20 RS 6 F07 Nov07 28 DWRS 4 2 17 RS 6 F07 Sep07 20 ETM 1 2 15 ET 8 F07 Oct07 24 ETM 1 2 17 ET 6 F07 Nov07 28 ETM 1 2 10 ET 6 F07 Sep07 20 ETM 2 2 16 ET 4 F07 Oct07 24 ETM 2 2 16 ET 4 F07 Nov07 28 ETM 2 2 11 ET 4 F07 Sep07 20 ETM 3 2 16 ET 6 F07 Oct07 24 ETM 3 2 16 ET 7 F07 Nov07 28 ETM 3 2 11 ET 6 F07 Sep07 20 ETM 4 2 16 ET 5 F07 Oct07 24 ETM 4 2 15 ET 6 F07 Nov07 28 ETM 4 2 10 ET 6 F07 Sep07 20 LL4 1 2 32 SMS 5

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301 F07 Oct07 24 LL4 1 2 29 SMS 7 F07 Nov07 28 LL4 1 2 26 SMS 6 F07 Sep07 20 LL4 2 2 31 SMS 5 F07 Oct07 24 LL4 2 2 27 SMS 6 F07 Nov07 28 LL4 2 2 22 SMS 5 F07 Sep07 20 LL4 3 2 31 SMS 7 F07 Oct07 24 LL4 3 2 28 SMS 7 F07 Nov07 28 LL4 3 2 24 SMS 7 F07 Sep07 20 LL4 4 2 31 SMS 6 F07 Oct07 24 LL4 4 2 27 SMS 7 F07 Nov07 28 LL4 4 2 24 SMS 6 F07 Sep07 20 LL5 1 2 33 SMS 6 F07 Oct07 24 LL5 1 2 29 SMS 5 F07 Nov07 28 LL5 1 2 26 SMS 5 F07 Sep07 20 LL5 2 2 30 SMS 7 F07 Oct07 24 LL5 2 2 26 SMS 7 F07 Nov07 28 LL5 2 2 24 SMS 6 F07 Sep07 20 LL5 3 2 31 SMS 7 F07 Oct07 24 LL5 3 2 28 SMS 7 F07 Nov07 28 LL5 3 2 25 SMS 7 F07 Sep07 20 LL5 4 2 30 SMS 6 F07 Oct07 24 LL5 4 2 27 SMS 7 F07 Nov07 28 LL5 4 2 24 SMS 6 F07 Sep07 20 LL6 1 2 31 SMS 7 F07 Oct07 24 LL6 1 2 29 SMS 6 F07 Nov07 28 LL6 1 2 24 SMS 5 F07 Sep07 20 LL6 2 2 32 SMS 7 F07 Oct07 24 LL6 2 2 30 SMS 7 F07 Nov07 28 LL6 2 2 26 SMS 6 F07 Sep07 20 LL6 3 2 32 SMS 8 F07 Oct07 24 LL6 3 2 29 SMS 8 F07 Nov07 28 LL6 3 2 24 SMS 7 F07 Sep07 20 LL6 4 2 31 SMS 7 F07 Oct07 24 LL6 4 2 28 SMS 7 F07 Nov07 28 LL6 4 2 25 SMS 6 F07 Sep07 20 NON 1 0 0 5 F07 Oct07 24 NON 1 0 0 4 F07 Nov07 28 NON 1 0 0 3 F07 Sep07 20 NON 2 0 0 5 F07 Oct07 24 NON 2 0 0 6 F07 Nov07 28 NON 2 0 0 5 F07 Sep07 20 NON 3 0 0 6 F07 Oct07 24 NON 3 0 0 7 F07 Nov07 28 NON 3 0 0 6 F07 Sep07 20 NON 4 0 0 3 F07 Oct07 24 NON 4 0 0 5 F07 Nov07 28 NON 4 0 0 5 F07 Sep07 20 RS1-3mm 1 1 32 RS 6 F07 Oct07 24 RS1-3mm 1 1 29 RS 5 F07 Nov07 28 RS1-3mm 1 1 29 RS 4 F07 Sep07 20 RS1-3mm 2 1 32 RS 8 F07 Oct07 24 RS1-3mm 2 1 29 RS 8 F07 Nov07 28 RS1-3mm 2 1 30 RS 7 F07 Sep07 20 RS1-3mm 3 1 31 RS 7 F07 Oct07 24 RS1-3mm 3 1 29 RS 7 F07 Nov07 28 RS1-3mm 3 1 29 RS 7 F07 Sep07 20 RS1-3mm 4 1 33 RS 6

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302 F07 Oct07 24 RS1-3mm 4 1 29 RS 5 F07 Nov07 28 RS1-3mm 4 1 29 RS 5 F07 Sep07 20 RS1-6mm 1 1 32 RS 8 F07 Oct07 24 RS1-6mm 1 1 29 RS 8 F07 Nov07 28 RS1-6mm 1 1 29 RS 8 F07 Sep07 20 RS1-6mm 2 1 31 RS 6 F07 Oct07 24 RS1-6mm 2 1 31 RS 6 F07 Nov07 28 RS1-6mm 2 1 32 RS 5 F07 Sep07 20 RS1-6mm 3 1 30 RS 6 F07 Oct07 24 RS1-6mm 3 1 27 RS 4 F07 Nov07 28 RS1-6mm 3 1 28 RS 4 F07 Sep07 20 RS1-6mm 4 1 31 RS 7 F07 Oct07 24 RS1-6mm 4 1 29 RS 6 F07 Nov07 28 RS1-6mm 4 1 29 RS 6 F07 Sep07 20 RS2-3mm 1 2 31 RS 7 F07 Oct07 24 RS2-3mm 1 2 28 RS 7 F07 Nov07 28 RS2-3mm 1 2 25 RS 6 F07 Sep07 20 RS2-3mm 2 2 32 RS 8 F07 Oct07 24 RS2-3mm 2 2 29 RS 8 F07 Nov07 28 RS2-3mm 2 2 25 RS 8 F07 Sep07 20 RS2-3mm 3 2 31 RS 7 F07 Oct07 24 RS2-3mm 3 2 28 RS 7 F07 Nov07 28 RS2-3mm 3 2 24 RS 6 F07 Sep07 20 RS2-3mm 4 2 31 RS 7 F07 Oct07 24 RS2-3mm 4 2 28 RS 6 F07 Nov07 28 RS2-3mm 4 2 24 RS 5 F07 Sep07 20 RS2-6mm 1 2 31 RS 6 F07 Oct07 24 RS2-6mm 1 2 30 RS 6 F07 Nov07 28 RS2-6mm 1 2 27 RS 4 F07 Sep07 20 RS2-6mm 2 2 32 RS 7 F07 Oct07 24 RS2-6mm 2 2 28 RS 6 F07 Nov07 28 RS2-6mm 2 2 25 RS 5 F07 Sep07 20 RS2-6mm 3 2 33 RS 8 F07 Oct07 24 RS2-6mm 3 2 30 RS 8 F07 Nov07 28 RS2-6mm 3 2 26 RS 7 F07 Sep07 20 RS2-6mm 4 2 31 RS 7 F07 Oct07 24 RS2-6mm 4 2 28 RS 6 F07 Nov07 28 RS2-6mm 4 2 26 RS 6 F07 Sep07 20 RS7-3mm 1 7 29 RS 8 F07 Oct07 24 RS7-3mm 1 7 29 RS 8 F07 Nov07 28 RS7-3mm 1 7 25 RS 8 F07 Sep07 20 RS7-3mm 2 7 29 RS 7 F07 Oct07 24 RS7-3mm 2 7 27 RS 8 F07 Nov07 28 RS7-3mm 2 7 25 RS 7 F07 Sep07 20 RS7-3mm 3 7 31 RS 7 F07 Oct07 24 RS7-3mm 3 7 30 RS 7 F07 Nov07 28 RS7-3mm 3 7 27 RS 6 F07 Sep07 20 RS7-3mm 4 7 29 RS 6 F07 Oct07 24 RS7-3mm 4 7 29 RS 5 F07 Nov07 28 RS7-3mm 4 7 27 RS 4 F07 Sep07 20 RS7-6mm 1 7 28 RS 6 F07 Oct07 24 RS7-6mm 1 7 27 RS 6 F07 Nov07 28 RS7-6mm 1 7 25 RS 5 F07 Sep07 20 RS7-6mm 2 7 30 RS 8 F07 Oct07 24 RS7-6mm 2 7 29 RS 8 F07 Nov07 28 RS7-6mm 2 7 26 RS 9 F07 Sep07 20 RS7-6mm 3 7 29 RS 8

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303 F07 Oct07 24 RS7-6mm 3 7 28 RS 8 F07 Nov07 28 RS7-6mm 3 7 25 RS 6 F07 Sep07 20 RS7-6mm 4 7 30 RS 7 F07 Oct07 24 RS7-6mm 4 7 28 RS 6 F07 Nov07 28 RS7-6mm 4 7 25 RS 6 F07 Sep07 20 TORO 1 2 21 ET 6 F07 Oct07 24 TORO 1 2 17 ET 6 F07 Nov07 28 TORO 1 2 13 ET 5 F07 Sep07 20 TORO 2 2 21 ET 6 F07 Oct07 24 TORO 2 2 18 ET 6 F07 Nov07 28 TORO 2 2 11 ET 4 F07 Sep07 20 TORO 3 2 22 ET 7 F07 Oct07 24 TORO 3 2 19 ET 7 F07 Nov07 28 TORO 3 2 13 ET 6 F07 Sep07 20 TORO 4 2 20 ET 8 F07 Oct07 24 TORO 4 2 17 ET 8 F07 Nov07 28 TORO 4 2 11 ET 8 F07 Sep07 20 WOS 1 2 33 WOS 6 F07 Oct07 24 WOS 1 2 31 WOS 5 F07 Nov07 28 WOS 1 2 25 WOS 4 F07 Sep07 20 WOS 2 2 33 WOS 7 F07 Oct07 24 WOS 2 2 29 WOS 6 F07 Nov07 28 WOS 2 2 25 WOS 5 F07 Sep07 20 WOS 3 2 28 WOS 8 F07 Oct07 24 WOS 3 2 28 WOS 8 F07 Nov07 28 WOS 3 2 25 WOS 8 F07 Sep07 20 WOS 4 2 31 WOS 7 F07 Oct07 24 WOS 4 2 28 WOS 6 F07 Nov07 28 WOS 4 2 26 WOS 6 S06 May06 3 AC10 1 2 27 SMS 7 S06 May06 4 AC10 1 2 40 SMS 6 S06 May06 5 AC10 1 2 27 SMS 6 S06 June06 7 AC10 1 2 17 SMS 5 S06 June06 9 AC10 1 2 32 SMS 5 S06 May06 3 AC10 2 2 27 SMS 6 S06 May06 4 AC10 2 2 40 SMS 6 S06 May06 5 AC10 2 2 27 SMS 5 S06 June06 7 AC10 2 2 16 SMS 5 S06 June06 9 AC10 2 2 32 SMS 5 S06 May06 3 AC10 3 2 28 SMS 7 S06 May06 4 AC10 3 2 40 SMS 7 S06 May06 5 AC10 3 2 28 SMS 7 S06 June06 7 AC10 3 2 17 SMS 7 S06 June06 9 AC10 3 2 34 SMS 7 S06 May06 3 AC10 4 2 27 SMS 6 S06 May06 4 AC10 4 2 40 SMS 7 S06 May06 5 AC10 4 2 27 SMS 6 S06 June06 7 AC10 4 2 17 SMS 7 S06 June06 9 AC10 4 2 33 SMS 6 S06 May06 3 AC13 1 2 28 SMS 6 S06 May06 4 AC13 1 2 41 SMS 5 S06 May06 5 AC13 1 2 28 SMS 5 S06 June06 7 AC13 1 2 33 SMS 5 S06 June06 9 AC13 1 2 34 SMS 4 S06 May06 3 AC13 2 2 27 SMS 7 S06 May06 4 AC13 2 2 39 SMS 6 S06 May06 5 AC13 2 2 28 SMS 6

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304 S06 June06 7 AC13 2 2 34 SMS 6 S06 June06 9 AC13 2 2 34 SMS 6 S06 May06 3 AC13 3 2 27 SMS 6 S06 May06 4 AC13 3 2 37 SMS 7 S06 May06 5 AC13 3 2 27 SMS 7 S06 June06 7 AC13 3 2 32 SMS 7 S06 June06 9 AC13 3 2 32 SMS 7 S06 May06 3 AC13 4 2 27 SMS 7 S06 May06 4 AC13 4 2 40 SMS 7 S06 May06 5 AC13 4 2 27 SMS 7 S06 June06 7 AC13 4 2 33 SMS 7 S06 June06 9 AC13 4 2 33 SMS 7 S06 May06 3 AC7 1 2 14 SMS 8 S06 May06 4 AC7 1 2 26 SMS 7 S06 May06 5 AC7 1 2 27 SMS 4 S06 June06 7 AC7 1 2 17 SMS 6 S06 June06 9 AC7 1 2 17 SMS 5 S06 May06 3 AC7 2 2 14 SMS 4 S06 May06 4 AC7 2 2 24 SMS 5 S06 May06 5 AC7 2 2 27 SMS 3 S06 June06 7 AC7 2 2 17 SMS 3 S06 June06 9 AC7 2 2 18 SMS 3 S06 May06 3 AC7 3 2 15 SMS 7 S06 May06 4 AC7 3 2 27 SMS 6 S06 May06 5 AC7 3 2 29 SMS 5 S06 June06 7 AC7 3 2 17 SMS 5 S06 June06 9 AC7 3 2 17 SMS 4 S06 May06 3 AC7 4 2 14 SMS 6 S06 May06 4 AC7 4 2 24 SMS 6 S06 May06 5 AC7 4 2 26 SMS 5 S06 June06 7 AC7 4 2 17 SMS 4 S06 June06 9 AC7 4 2 17 SMS 5 S06 May06 3 ACIR 1 2 27 SMS 7 S06 May06 4 ACIR 1 2 38 SMS 7 S06 May06 5 ACIR 1 2 27 SMS 6 S06 June06 7 ACIR 1 2 17 SMS 5 S06 June06 9 ACIR 1 2 17 SMS 5 S06 May06 3 ACIR 2 2 28 SMS 4 S06 May06 4 ACIR 2 2 41 SMS 5 S06 May06 5 ACIR 2 2 27 SMS 4 S06 June06 7 ACIR 2 2 18 SMS 3 S06 June06 9 ACIR 2 2 17 SMS 3 S06 May06 3 ACIR 3 2 24 SMS 6 S06 May06 4 ACIR 3 2 30 SMS 7 S06 May06 5 ACIR 3 2 23 SMS 5 S06 June06 7 ACIR 3 2 34 SMS 7 S06 June06 9 ACIR 3 2 17 SMS 7 S06 May06 3 ACIR 4 2 24 SMS 7 S06 May06 4 ACIR 4 2 18 SMS 6 S06 May06 5 ACIR 4 2 27 SMS 6 S06 June06 7 ACIR 4 2 8 SMS 7 S06 June06 9 ACIR 4 2 17 SMS 7 S06 May06 3 DWRS 1 2 27 RS 5 S06 May06 4 DWRS 1 2 28 RS 6 S06 May06 5 DWRS 1 2 22 RS 5 S06 June06 7 DWRS 1 2 20 RS 5 S06 June06 9 DWRS 1 2 20 RS 5

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305 S06 May06 3 DWRS 2 2 27 RS 8 S06 May06 4 DWRS 2 2 27 RS 6 S06 May06 5 DWRS 2 2 23 RS 7 S06 June06 7 DWRS 2 2 21 RS 5 S06 June06 9 DWRS 2 2 19 RS 5 S06 May06 3 DWRS 3 2 27 RS 8 S06 May06 4 DWRS 3 2 27 RS 8 S06 May06 5 DWRS 3 2 22 RS 8 S06 June06 7 DWRS 3 2 19 RS 7 S06 June06 9 DWRS 3 2 18 RS 7 S06 May06 3 DWRS 4 2 25 RS 7 S06 May06 4 DWRS 4 2 24 RS 7 S06 May06 5 DWRS 4 2 22 RS 7 S06 June06 7 DWRS 4 2 19 RS 6 S06 June06 9 DWRS 4 2 20 RS 7 S06 May06 3 LL2 1 2 27 SMS 5 S06 May06 4 LL2 1 2 28 SMS 7 S06 May06 5 LL2 1 2 14 SMS 6 S06 June06 7 LL2 1 2 0 SMS 4 S06 June06 9 LL2 1 2 0 SMS 4 S06 May06 3 LL2 2 2 27 SMS 4 S06 May06 4 LL2 2 2 27 SMS 5 S06 May06 5 LL2 2 2 14 SMS 5 S06 June06 7 LL2 2 2 0 SMS 4 S06 June06 9 LL2 2 2 0 SMS 4 S06 May06 3 LL2 3 2 27 SMS 4 S06 May06 4 LL2 3 2 27 SMS 7 S06 May06 5 LL2 3 2 14 SMS 5 S06 June06 7 LL2 3 2 0 SMS 3 S06 June06 9 LL2 3 2 0 SMS 4 S06 May06 3 LL2 4 2 26 SMS 2 S06 May06 4 LL2 4 2 27 SMS 4 S06 May06 5 LL2 4 2 13 SMS 3 S06 June06 7 LL2 4 2 0 SMS 2 S06 June06 9 LL2 4 2 0 SMS 2 S06 May06 3 LL5 1 2 41 SMS 4 S06 May06 4 LL5 1 2 40 SMS 6 S06 May06 5 LL5 1 2 40 SMS 7 S06 June06 7 LL5 1 2 45 SMS 7 S06 June06 9 LL5 1 2 17 SMS 6 S06 May06 3 LL5 2 2 41 SMS 5 S06 May06 4 LL5 2 2 40 SMS 7 S06 May06 5 LL5 2 2 40 SMS 8 S06 June06 7 LL5 2 2 46 SMS 6 S06 June06 9 LL5 2 2 17 SMS 7 S06 May06 3 LL5 3 2 41 SMS 4 S06 May06 4 LL5 3 2 40 SMS 7 S06 May06 5 LL5 3 2 41 SMS 7 S06 June06 7 LL5 3 2 46 SMS 7 S06 June06 9 LL5 3 2 17 SMS 6 S06 May06 3 LL5 4 2 38 SMS 5 S06 May06 4 LL5 4 2 38 SMS 7 S06 May06 5 LL5 4 2 40 SMS 8 S06 June06 7 LL5 4 2 45 SMS 8 S06 June06 9 LL5 4 2 16 SMS 8 S06 May06 3 LL8 1 2 48 SMS 6 S06 May06 4 LL8 1 2 55 SMS 7

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306 S06 May06 5 LL8 1 2 51 SMS 8 S06 June06 7 LL8 1 2 72 SMS 7 S06 June06 9 LL8 1 2 17 SMS 7 S06 May06 3 LL8 2 2 47 SMS 6 S06 May06 4 LL8 2 2 55 SMS 7 S06 May06 5 LL8 2 2 51 SMS 8 S06 June06 7 LL8 2 2 72 SMS 8 S06 June06 9 LL8 2 2 16 SMS 8 S06 May06 3 LL8 3 2 48 SMS 6 S06 May06 4 LL8 3 2 54 SMS 8 S06 May06 5 LL8 3 2 51 SMS 8 S06 June06 7 LL8 3 2 73 SMS 8 S06 June06 9 LL8 3 2 17 SMS 7 S06 May06 3 LL8 4 2 49 SMS 4 S06 May06 4 LL8 4 2 53 SMS 5 S06 May06 5 LL8 4 2 51 SMS 6 S06 June06 7 LL8 4 2 72 SMS 5 S06 June06 9 LL8 4 2 17 SMS 5 S06 May06 3 NON 1 0 0 1 S06 May06 4 NON 1 0 0 1 S06 May06 5 NON 1 0 0 1 S06 June06 7 NON 1 0 0 1 S06 June06 9 NON 1 0 0 1 S06 May06 3 NON 2 0 0 2 S06 May06 4 NON 2 0 0 1 S06 May06 5 NON 2 0 0 1 S06 June06 7 NON 2 0 0 1 S06 June06 9 NON 2 0 0 1 S06 May06 3 NON 3 0 0 3 S06 May06 4 NON 3 0 0 1 S06 May06 5 NON 3 0 0 1 S06 June06 7 NON 3 0 0 1 S06 June06 9 NON 3 0 0 2 S06 May06 3 NON 4 0 0 4 S06 May06 4 NON 4 0 0 1 S06 May06 5 NON 4 0 0 1 S06 June06 7 NON 4 0 0 1 S06 June06 9 NON 4 0 0 2 S06 May06 3 RS1-3mm 1 1 27 RS 4 S06 May06 4 RS1-3mm 1 1 27 RS 6 S06 May06 5 RS1-3mm 1 1 27 RS 6 S06 June06 7 RS1-3mm 1 1 33 RS 4 S06 June06 9 RS1-3mm 1 1 33 RS 4 S06 May06 3 RS1-3mm 2 1 27 RS 5 S06 May06 4 RS1-3mm 2 1 27 RS 8 S06 May06 5 RS1-3mm 2 1 27 RS 8 S06 June06 7 RS1-3mm 2 1 33 RS 8 S06 June06 9 RS1-3mm 2 1 33 RS 8 S06 May06 3 RS1-3mm 3 1 24 RS 2 S06 May06 4 RS1-3mm 3 1 24 RS 4 S06 May06 5 RS1-3mm 3 1 27 RS 4 S06 June06 7 RS1-3mm 3 1 34 RS 3 S06 June06 9 RS1-3mm 3 1 33 RS 2 S06 May06 3 RS1-3mm 4 1 29 RS 2 S06 May06 4 RS1-3mm 4 1 27 RS 4 S06 May06 5 RS1-3mm 4 1 27 RS 3 S06 June06 7 RS1-3mm 4 1 33 RS 3

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307 S06 June06 9 RS1-3mm 4 1 33 RS 3 S06 May06 3 RS1-6mm 1 1 28 RS 2 S06 May06 4 RS1-6mm 1 1 28 RS 4 S06 May06 5 RS1-6mm 1 1 28 RS 3 S06 June06 7 RS1-6mm 1 1 34 RS 3 S06 June06 9 RS1-6mm 1 1 34 RS 3 S06 May06 3 RS1-6mm 2 1 27 RS 5 S06 May06 4 RS1-6mm 2 1 27 RS 7 S06 May06 5 RS1-6mm 2 1 28 RS 7 S06 June06 7 RS1-6mm 2 1 33 RS 6 S06 June06 9 RS1-6mm 2 1 33 RS 6 S06 May06 3 RS1-6mm 3 1 27 RS 4 S06 May06 4 RS1-6mm 3 1 26 RS 8 S06 May06 5 RS1-6mm 3 1 27 RS 8 S06 June06 7 RS1-6mm 3 1 33 RS 8 S06 June06 9 RS1-6mm 3 1 33 RS 7 S06 May06 3 RS1-6mm 4 1 26 RS 4 S06 May06 4 RS1-6mm 4 1 27 RS 7 S06 May06 5 RS1-6mm 4 1 27 RS 6 S06 June06 7 RS1-6mm 4 1 32 RS 4 S06 June06 9 RS1-6mm 4 1 33 RS 4 S06 May06 3 RS2-3mm 1 2 26 RS 7 S06 May06 4 RS2-3mm 1 2 27 RS 5 S06 May06 5 RS2-3mm 1 2 26 RS 4 S06 June06 7 RS2-3mm 1 2 32 RS 4 S06 June06 9 RS2-3mm 1 2 32 RS 4 S06 May06 3 RS2-3mm 2 2 27 RS 7 S06 May06 4 RS2-3mm 2 2 27 RS 7 S06 May06 5 RS2-3mm 2 2 26 RS 6 S06 June06 7 RS2-3mm 2 2 33 RS 6 S06 June06 9 RS2-3mm 2 2 33 RS 6 S06 May06 3 RS2-3mm 3 2 25 RS 6 S06 May06 4 RS2-3mm 3 2 25 RS 7 S06 May06 5 RS2-3mm 3 2 25 RS 6 S06 June06 7 RS2-3mm 3 2 31 RS 6 S06 June06 9 RS2-3mm 3 2 30 RS 6 S06 May06 3 RS2-3mm 4 2 26 RS 8 S06 May06 4 RS2-3mm 4 2 27 RS 7 S06 May06 5 RS2-3mm 4 2 27 RS 6 S06 June06 7 RS2-3mm 4 2 33 RS 6 S06 June06 9 RS2-3mm 4 2 33 RS 5 S06 May06 3 RS2-6mm 1 2 27 RS 7 S06 May06 4 RS2-6mm 1 2 27 RS 7 S06 May06 5 RS2-6mm 1 2 27 RS 6 S06 June06 7 RS2-6mm 1 2 33 RS 5 S06 June06 9 RS2-6mm 1 2 33 RS 6 S06 May06 3 RS2-6mm 2 2 28 RS 8 S06 May06 4 RS2-6mm 2 2 27 RS 7 S06 May06 5 RS2-6mm 2 2 28 RS 7 S06 June06 7 RS2-6mm 2 2 34 RS 7 S06 June06 9 RS2-6mm 2 2 34 RS 8 S06 May06 3 RS2-6mm 3 2 27 RS 3 S06 May06 4 RS2-6mm 3 2 27 RS 4 S06 May06 5 RS2-6mm 3 2 27 RS 3 S06 June06 7 RS2-6mm 3 2 33 RS 3 S06 June06 9 RS2-6mm 3 2 33 RS 3 S06 May06 3 RS2-6mm 4 2 26 RS 8

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308 S06 May06 4 RS2-6mm 4 2 27 RS 7 S06 May06 5 RS2-6mm 4 2 27 RS 6 S06 June06 7 RS2-6mm 4 2 32 RS 8 S06 June06 9 RS2-6mm 4 2 33 RS 8 S06 May06 3 RS7-3mm 1 7 17 RS 7 S06 May06 4 RS7-3mm 1 7 28 RS 6 S06 May06 5 RS7-3mm 1 7 28 RS 6 S06 June06 7 RS7-3mm 1 7 25 RS 5 S06 June06 9 RS7-3mm 1 7 20 RS 6 S06 May06 3 RS7-3mm 2 7 17 RS 8 S06 May06 4 RS7-3mm 2 7 27 RS 7 S06 May06 5 RS7-3mm 2 7 29 RS 7 S06 June06 7 RS7-3mm 2 7 23 RS 7 S06 June06 9 RS7-3mm 2 7 19 RS 8 S06 May06 3 RS7-3mm 3 7 16 RS 6 S06 May06 4 RS7-3mm 3 7 29 RS 6 S06 May06 5 RS7-3mm 3 7 28 RS 5 S06 June06 7 RS7-3mm 3 7 24 RS 4 S06 June06 9 RS7-3mm 3 7 20 RS 5 S06 May06 3 RS7-3mm 4 7 16 RS 6 S06 May06 4 RS7-3mm 4 7 28 RS 6 S06 May06 5 RS7-3mm 4 7 28 RS 5 S06 June06 7 RS7-3mm 4 7 23 RS 7 S06 June06 9 RS7-3mm 4 7 19 RS 6 S06 May06 3 WOS 1 2 27 WOS 4 S06 May06 4 WOS 1 2 29 WOS 3 S06 May06 5 WOS 1 2 27 WOS 3 S06 June06 7 WOS 1 2 33 WOS 3 S06 June06 9 WOS 1 2 33 WOS 3 S06 May06 3 WOS 2 2 27 WOS 6 S06 May06 4 WOS 2 2 25 WOS 5 S06 May06 5 WOS 2 2 27 WOS 4 S06 June06 7 WOS 2 2 33 WOS 4 S06 June06 9 WOS 2 2 33 WOS 5 S06 May06 3 WOS 3 2 27 WOS 8 S06 May06 4 WOS 3 2 25 WOS 8 S06 May06 5 WOS 3 2 26 WOS 7 S06 June06 7 WOS 3 2 31 WOS 8 S06 June06 9 WOS 3 2 31 WOS 8 S06 May06 3 WOS 4 2 27 WOS 8 S06 May06 4 WOS 4 2 27 WOS 7 S06 May06 5 WOS 4 2 27 WOS 6 S06 June06 7 WOS 4 2 32 WOS 6 S06 June06 9 WOS 4 2 33 WOS 6 S07 May07 1 AC10 1 2 43 SMS 7 S07 May07 3 AC10 1 2 50 SMS 7 S07 May07 4 AC10 1 2 43 SMS 7 S07 Jun07 7 AC10 1 2 17 SMS 6 S07 Jul07 9 AC10 1 2 17 SMS 7 S07 Jul07 12 AC10 1 2 31 SMS 6 S07 Aug07 14 AC10 1 2 20 SMS 8 S07 Aug07 17 AC10 1 2 41 SMS 8 S07 May07 1 AC10 2 2 42 SMS 7 S07 May07 3 AC10 2 2 49 SMS 6 S07 May07 4 AC10 2 2 43 SMS 6 S07 Jun07 7 AC10 2 2 16 SMS 5 S07 Jul07 9 AC10 2 2 17 SMS 6

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309 S07 Jul07 12 AC10 2 2 31 SMS 6 S07 Aug07 14 AC10 2 2 20 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 17 AC10 2 2 41 SMS 7 S07 May07 1 AC10 3 2 43 SMS 6 S07 May07 3 AC10 3 2 50 SMS 6 S07 May07 4 AC10 3 2 44 SMS 6 S07 Jun07 7 AC10 3 2 17 SMS 6 S07 Jul07 9 AC10 3 2 18 SMS 7 S07 Jul07 12 AC10 3 2 32 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 14 AC10 3 2 21 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 17 AC10 3 2 42 SMS 8 S07 May07 1 AC10 4 2 43 SMS 6 S07 May07 3 AC10 4 2 49 SMS 6 S07 May07 4 AC10 4 2 43 SMS 6 S07 Jun07 7 AC10 4 2 17 SMS 6 S07 Jul07 9 AC10 4 2 17 SMS 6 S07 Jul07 12 AC10 4 2 32 SMS 6 S07 Aug07 14 AC10 4 2 21 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 17 AC10 4 2 42 SMS 7 S07 May07 1 AC13 1 2 44 SMS 6 S07 May07 3 AC13 1 2 51 SMS 6 S07 May07 4 AC13 1 2 44 SMS 7 S07 Jun07 7 AC13 1 2 33 SMS 7 S07 Jul07 9 AC13 1 2 18 SMS 6 S07 Jul07 12 AC13 1 2 33 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 14 AC13 1 2 22 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 17 AC13 1 2 43 SMS 7 S07 May07 1 AC13 2 2 43 SMS 6 S07 May07 3 AC13 2 2 51 SMS 6 S07 May07 4 AC13 2 2 43 SMS 7 S07 Jun07 7 AC13 2 2 33 SMS 6 S07 Jul07 9 AC13 2 2 17 SMS 7 S07 Jul07 12 AC13 2 2 32 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 14 AC13 2 2 21 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 17 AC13 2 2 41 SMS 8 S07 May07 1 AC13 3 2 41 SMS 7 S07 May07 3 AC13 3 2 48 SMS 7 S07 May07 4 AC13 3 2 41 SMS 7 S07 Jun07 7 AC13 3 2 31 SMS 7 S07 Jul07 9 AC13 3 2 16 SMS 6 S07 Jul07 12 AC13 3 2 28 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 14 AC13 3 2 19 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 17 AC13 3 2 42 SMS 8 S07 May07 1 AC13 4 2 43 SMS 7 S07 May07 3 AC13 4 2 50 SMS 6 S07 May07 4 AC13 4 2 43 SMS 7 S07 Jun07 7 AC13 4 2 32 SMS 6 S07 Jul07 9 AC13 4 2 17 SMS 7 S07 Jul07 12 AC13 4 2 31 SMS 6 S07 Aug07 14 AC13 4 2 21 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 17 AC13 4 2 41 SMS 7 S07 May07 1 AC7 1 2 28 SMS 7 S07 May07 3 AC7 1 2 28 SMS 6 S07 May07 4 AC7 1 2 21 SMS 6 S07 Jun07 7 AC7 1 2 17 SMS 6 S07 Jul07 9 AC7 1 2 17 SMS 7 S07 Jul07 12 AC7 1 2 16 SMS 6

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310 S07 Aug07 14 AC7 1 2 0 SMS 8 S07 Aug07 17 AC7 1 2 21 SMS 8 S07 May07 1 AC7 2 2 29 SMS 5 S07 May07 3 AC7 2 2 28 SMS 5 S07 May07 4 AC7 2 2 22 SMS 5 S07 Jun07 7 AC7 2 2 16 SMS 5 S07 Jul07 9 AC7 2 2 17 SMS 4 S07 Jul07 12 AC7 2 2 16 SMS 5 S07 Aug07 14 AC7 2 2 0 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 17 AC7 2 2 20 SMS 7 S07 May07 1 AC7 3 2 31 SMS 5 S07 May07 3 AC7 3 2 31 SMS 5 S07 May07 4 AC7 3 2 23 SMS 5 S07 Jun07 7 AC7 3 2 17 SMS 5 S07 Jul07 9 AC7 3 2 19 SMS 4 S07 Jul07 12 AC7 3 2 17 SMS 5 S07 Aug07 14 AC7 3 2 0 SMS 6 S07 Aug07 17 AC7 3 2 23 SMS 6 S07 May07 1 AC7 4 2 27 SMS 5 S07 May07 3 AC7 4 2 28 SMS 5 S07 May07 4 AC7 4 2 21 SMS 6 S07 Jun07 7 AC7 4 2 17 SMS 6 S07 Jul07 9 AC7 4 2 16 SMS 5 S07 Jul07 12 AC7 4 2 16 SMS 6 S07 Aug07 14 AC7 4 2 0 SMS 6 S07 Aug07 17 AC7 4 2 20 SMS 7 S07 May07 1 ACIR 1 2 42 SMS 6 S07 May07 3 ACIR 1 2 50 SMS 6 S07 May07 4 ACIR 1 2 21 SMS 6 S07 Jun07 7 ACIR 1 2 16 SMS 5 S07 Jul07 9 ACIR 1 2 17 SMS 6 S07 Jul07 12 ACIR 1 2 16 SMS 6 S07 Aug07 14 ACIR 1 2 20 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 17 ACIR 1 2 0 SMS 7 S07 May07 1 ACIR 2 2 44 SMS 4 S07 May07 3 ACIR 2 2 29 SMS 4 S07 May07 4 ACIR 2 2 43 SMS 4 S07 Jun07 7 ACIR 2 2 17 SMS 4 S07 Jul07 9 ACIR 2 2 17 SMS 4 S07 Jul07 12 ACIR 2 2 17 SMS 4 S07 Aug07 14 ACIR 2 2 21 SMS 6 S07 Aug07 17 ACIR 2 2 22 SMS 7 S07 May07 1 ACIR 3 2 22 SMS 6 S07 May07 3 ACIR 3 2 28 SMS 4 S07 May07 4 ACIR 3 2 44 SMS 6 S07 Jun07 7 ACIR 3 2 17 SMS 6 S07 Jul07 9 ACIR 3 2 17 SMS 6 S07 Jul07 12 ACIR 3 2 16 SMS 6 S07 Aug07 14 ACIR 3 2 0 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 17 ACIR 3 2 21 SMS 7 S07 May07 1 ACIR 4 2 11 SMS 6 S07 May07 3 ACIR 4 2 29 SMS 6 S07 May07 4 ACIR 4 2 21 SMS 6 S07 Jun07 7 ACIR 4 2 17 SMS 6 S07 Jul07 9 ACIR 4 2 17 SMS 6 S07 Jul07 12 ACIR 4 2 17 SMS 6 S07 Aug07 14 ACIR 4 2 0 SMS 6

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311 S07 Aug07 17 ACIR 4 2 20 SMS 7 S07 May07 1 DWRS 1 2 26 RS 6 S07 May07 3 DWRS 1 2 34 RS 6 S07 May07 4 DWRS 1 2 26 RS 7 S07 Jun07 7 DWRS 1 2 20 RS 7 S07 Jul07 9 DWRS 1 2 10 RS 6 S07 Jul07 12 DWRS 1 2 20 RS 6 S07 Aug07 14 DWRS 1 2 14 RS 7 S07 Aug07 17 DWRS 1 2 26 RS 7 S07 May07 1 DWRS 2 2 25 RS 7 S07 May07 3 DWRS 2 2 33 RS 7 S07 May07 4 DWRS 2 2 25 RS 7 S07 Jun07 7 DWRS 2 2 19 RS 7 S07 Jul07 9 DWRS 2 2 10 RS 8 S07 Jul07 12 DWRS 2 2 19 RS 8 S07 Aug07 14 DWRS 2 2 13 RS 8 S07 Aug07 17 DWRS 2 2 25 RS 8 S07 May07 1 DWRS 3 2 26 RS 6 S07 May07 3 DWRS 3 2 33 RS 7 S07 May07 4 DWRS 3 2 26 RS 6 S07 Jun07 7 DWRS 3 2 19 RS 7 S07 Jul07 9 DWRS 3 2 10 RS 8 S07 Jul07 12 DWRS 3 2 20 RS 8 S07 Aug07 14 DWRS 3 2 13 RS 8 S07 Aug07 17 DWRS 3 2 22 RS 8 S07 May07 1 DWRS 4 2 26 RS 6 S07 May07 3 DWRS 4 2 33 RS 6 S07 May07 4 DWRS 4 2 25 RS 6 S07 Jun07 7 DWRS 4 2 19 RS 6 S07 Jul07 9 DWRS 4 2 9 RS 6 S07 Jul07 12 DWRS 4 2 21 RS 6 S07 Aug07 14 DWRS 4 2 14 RS 7 S07 Aug07 17 DWRS 4 2 26 RS 7 S07 May07 1 ETM 1 2 21 ET 8 S07 May07 3 ETM 1 2 29 ET 6 S07 May07 4 ETM 1 2 23 ET 4 S07 Jun07 7 ETM 1 2 17 ET 7 S07 Jul07 9 ETM 1 2 17 ET 6 S07 Jul07 12 ETM 1 2 0 ET 5 S07 Aug07 14 ETM 1 2 0 ET 6 S07 Aug07 17 ETM 1 2 4 ET 6 S07 May07 1 ETM 2 2 21 ET 5 S07 May07 3 ETM 2 2 29 ET 3 S07 May07 4 ETM 2 2 22 ET 2 S07 Jun07 7 ETM 2 2 17 ET 3 S07 Jul07 9 ETM 2 2 17 ET 3 S07 Jul07 12 ETM 2 2 0 ET 3 S07 Aug07 14 ETM 2 2 0 ET 4 S07 Aug07 17 ETM 2 2 5 ET 3 S07 May07 1 ETM 3 2 22 ET 6 S07 May07 3 ETM 3 2 45 ET 4 S07 May07 4 ETM 3 2 22 ET 3 S07 Jun07 7 ETM 3 2 16 ET 4 S07 Jul07 9 ETM 3 2 19 ET 4 S07 Jul07 12 ETM 3 2 0 ET 5 S07 Aug07 14 ETM 3 2 0 ET 6 S07 Aug07 17 ETM 3 2 5 ET 5

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312 S07 May07 1 ETM 4 2 21 ET 6 S07 May07 3 ETM 4 2 29 ET 4 S07 May07 4 ETM 4 2 21 ET 3 S07 Jun07 7 ETM 4 2 17 ET 3 S07 Jul07 9 ETM 4 2 17 ET 4 S07 Jul07 12 ETM 4 2 0 ET 4 S07 Aug07 14 ETM 4 2 0 ET 5 S07 Aug07 17 ETM 4 2 5 ET 4 S07 May07 1 LL5 1 2 67 SMS 6 S07 May07 3 LL5 1 2 50 SMS 6 S07 May07 4 LL5 1 2 43 SMS 6 S07 Jun07 7 LL5 1 2 33 SMS 6 S07 Jul07 9 LL5 1 2 17 SMS 6 S07 Jul07 12 LL5 1 2 0 SMS 6 S07 Aug07 14 LL5 1 2 21 SMS 6 S07 Aug07 17 LL5 1 2 42 SMS 7 S07 May07 1 LL5 2 2 66 SMS 6 S07 May07 3 LL5 2 2 50 SMS 7 S07 May07 4 LL5 2 2 42 SMS 6 S07 Jun07 7 LL5 2 2 32 SMS 7 S07 Jul07 9 LL5 2 2 17 SMS 7 S07 Jul07 12 LL5 2 2 0 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 14 LL5 2 2 19 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 17 LL5 2 2 40 SMS 8 S07 May07 1 LL5 3 2 67 SMS 6 S07 May07 3 LL5 3 2 50 SMS 5 S07 May07 4 LL5 3 2 42 SMS 6 S07 Jun07 7 LL5 3 2 32 SMS 6 S07 Jul07 9 LL5 3 2 17 SMS 6 S07 Jul07 12 LL5 3 2 0 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 14 LL5 3 2 20 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 17 LL5 3 2 41 SMS 7 S07 May07 1 LL5 4 2 65 SMS 6 S07 May07 3 LL5 4 2 49 SMS 6 S07 May07 4 LL5 4 2 42 SMS 7 S07 Jun07 7 LL5 4 2 33 SMS 7 S07 Jul07 9 LL5 4 2 16 SMS 7 S07 Jul07 12 LL5 4 2 0 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 14 LL5 4 2 20 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 17 LL5 4 2 41 SMS 8 S07 May07 1 LL6 1 2 66 SMS 6 S07 May07 3 LL6 1 2 50 SMS 6 S07 May07 4 LL6 1 2 42 SMS 6 S07 Jun07 7 LL6 1 2 33 SMS 6 S07 Jul07 9 LL6 1 2 32 SMS 7 S07 Jul07 12 LL6 1 2 31 SMS 6 S07 Aug07 14 LL6 1 2 40 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 17 LL6 1 2 41 SMS 7 S07 May07 1 LL6 2 2 66 SMS 6 S07 May07 3 LL6 2 2 49 SMS 6 S07 May07 4 LL6 2 2 43 SMS 7 S07 Jun07 7 LL6 2 2 33 SMS 7 S07 Jul07 9 LL6 2 2 31 SMS 7 S07 Jul07 12 LL6 2 2 28 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 14 LL6 2 2 35 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 17 LL6 2 2 43 SMS 8 S07 May07 1 LL6 3 2 67 SMS 7

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313 S07 May07 3 LL6 3 2 50 SMS 6 S07 May07 4 LL6 3 2 43 SMS 7 S07 Jun07 7 LL6 3 2 33 SMS 7 S07 Jul07 9 LL6 3 2 32 SMS 7 S07 Jul07 12 LL6 3 2 31 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 14 LL6 3 2 42 SMS 8 S07 Aug07 17 LL6 3 2 42 SMS 8 S07 May07 1 LL6 4 2 66 SMS 6 S07 May07 3 LL6 4 2 49 SMS 7 S07 May07 4 LL6 4 2 42 SMS 6 S07 Jun07 7 LL6 4 2 33 SMS 7 S07 Jul07 9 LL6 4 2 31 SMS 7 S07 Jul07 12 LL6 4 2 31 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 14 LL6 4 2 41 SMS 7 S07 Aug07 17 LL6 4 2 41 SMS 7 S07 May07 1 RS1-6mm 1 1 44 RS 7 S07 May07 3 RS1-6mm 1 1 52 RS 6 S07 May07 4 RS1-6mm 1 1 44 RS 7 S07 Jun07 7 RS1-6mm 1 1 34 RS 8 S07 Jul07 9 RS1-6mm 1 1 33 RS 8 S07 Jul07 12 RS1-6mm 1 1 33 RS 7 S07 Aug07 14 RS1-6mm 1 1 0 RS 8 S07 Aug07 17 RS1-6mm 1 1 42 RS 8 S07 May07 1 RS1-6mm 2 1 43 RS 4 S07 May07 3 RS1-6mm 2 1 51 RS 5 S07 May07 4 RS1-6mm 2 1 43 RS 4 S07 Jun07 7 RS1-6mm 2 1 33 RS 5 S07 Jul07 9 RS1-6mm 2 1 33 RS 5 S07 Jul07 12 RS1-6mm 2 1 32 RS 6 S07 Aug07 14 RS1-6mm 2 1 0 RS 6 S07 Aug07 17 RS1-6mm 2 1 41 RS 7 S07 May07 1 RS1-6mm 3 1 42 RS 4 S07 May07 3 RS1-6mm 3 1 50 RS 4 S07 May07 4 RS1-6mm 3 1 42 RS 4 S07 Jun07 7 RS1-6mm 3 1 33 RS 4 S07 Jul07 9 RS1-6mm 3 1 32 RS 5 S07 Jul07 12 RS1-6mm 3 1 31 RS 4 S07 Aug07 14 RS1-6mm 3 1 0 RS 6 S07 Aug07 17 RS1-6mm 3 1 40 RS 6 S07 May07 1 RS1-6mm 4 1 42 RS 5 S07 May07 3 RS1-6mm 4 1 50 RS 6 S07 May07 4 RS1-6mm 4 1 42 RS 5 S07 Jun07 7 RS1-6mm 4 1 33 RS 6 S07 Jul07 9 RS1-6mm 4 1 32 RS 6 S07 Jul07 12 RS1-6mm 4 1 32 RS 6 S07 Aug07 14 RS1-6mm 4 1 0 RS 7 S07 Aug07 17 RS1-6mm 4 1 41 RS 7 S07 May07 1 RS2-3mm 1 2 43 RS 6 S07 May07 3 RS2-3mm 1 2 51 RS 7 S07 May07 4 RS2-3mm 1 2 21 RS 7 S07 Jun07 7 RS2-3mm 1 2 33 RS 7 S07 Jul07 9 RS2-3mm 1 2 16 RS 7 S07 Jul07 12 RS2-3mm 1 2 31 RS 7 S07 Aug07 14 RS2-3mm 1 2 20 RS 8 S07 Aug07 17 RS2-3mm 1 2 40 RS 8 S07 May07 1 RS2-3mm 2 2 43 RS 7 S07 May07 3 RS2-3mm 2 2 51 RS 7

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314 S07 May07 4 RS2-3mm 2 2 22 RS 6 S07 Jun07 7 RS2-3mm 2 2 33 RS 7 S07 Jul07 9 RS2-3mm 2 2 18 RS 7 S07 Jul07 12 RS2-3mm 2 2 31 RS 7 S07 Aug07 14 RS2-3mm 2 2 20 RS 8 S07 Aug07 17 RS2-3mm 2 2 42 RS 8 S07 May07 1 RS2-3mm 3 2 43 RS 5 S07 May07 3 RS2-3mm 3 2 50 RS 6 S07 May07 4 RS2-3mm 3 2 21 RS 6 S07 Jun07 7 RS2-3mm 3 2 32 RS 6 S07 Jul07 9 RS2-3mm 3 2 16 RS 6 S07 Jul07 12 RS2-3mm 3 2 31 RS 7 S07 Aug07 14 RS2-3mm 3 2 20 RS 7 S07 Aug07 17 RS2-3mm 3 2 41 RS 7 S07 May07 1 RS2-3mm 4 2 42 RS 6 S07 May07 3 RS2-3mm 4 2 50 RS 6 S07 May07 4 RS2-3mm 4 2 21 RS 6 S07 Jun07 7 RS2-3mm 4 2 33 RS 6 S07 Jul07 9 RS2-3mm 4 2 17 RS 7 S07 Jul07 12 RS2-3mm 4 2 31 RS 6 S07 Aug07 14 RS2-3mm 4 2 21 RS 7 S07 Aug07 17 RS2-3mm 4 2 41 RS 7 S07 May07 1 RS2-6mm 1 2 43 RS 5 S07 May07 3 RS2-6mm 1 2 50 RS 6 S07 May07 4 RS2-6mm 1 2 43 RS 5 S07 Jun07 7 RS2-6mm 1 2 32 RS 5 S07 Jul07 9 RS2-6mm 1 2 17 RS 6 S07 Jul07 12 RS2-6mm 1 2 32 RS 5 S07 Aug07 14 RS2-6mm 1 2 20 RS 6 S07 Aug07 17 RS2-6mm 1 2 42 RS 7 S07 May07 1 RS2-6mm 2 2 43 RS 4 S07 May07 3 RS2-6mm 2 2 50 RS 5 S07 May07 4 RS2-6mm 2 2 43 RS 5 S07 Jun07 7 RS2-6mm 2 2 33 RS 4 S07 Jul07 9 RS2-6mm 2 2 17 RS 6 S07 Jul07 12 RS2-6mm 2 2 31 RS 7 S07 Aug07 14 RS2-6mm 2 2 20 RS 7 S07 Aug07 17 RS2-6mm 2 2 41 RS 7 S07 May07 1 RS2-6mm 3 2 44 RS 4 S07 May07 3 RS2-6mm 3 2 50 RS 5 S07 May07 4 RS2-6mm 3 2 42 RS 5 S07 Jun07 7 RS2-6mm 3 2 33 RS 5 S07 Jul07 9 RS2-6mm 3 2 17 RS 6 S07 Jul07 12 RS2-6mm 3 2 32 RS 7 S07 Aug07 14 RS2-6mm 3 2 22 RS 8 S07 Aug07 17 RS2-6mm 3 2 43 RS 8 S07 May07 1 RS2-6mm 4 2 43 RS 7 S07 May07 3 RS2-6mm 4 2 50 RS 6 S07 May07 4 RS2-6mm 4 2 42 RS 7 S07 Jun07 7 RS2-6mm 4 2 33 RS 7 S07 Jul07 9 RS2-6mm 4 2 17 RS 7 S07 Jul07 12 RS2-6mm 4 2 32 RS 7 S07 Aug07 14 RS2-6mm 4 2 21 RS 7 S07 Aug07 17 RS2-6mm 4 2 42 RS 6 S07 May07 1 RS7-3mm 1 7 46 RS 6 S07 May07 3 RS7-3mm 1 7 53 RS 6 S07 May07 4 RS7-3mm 1 7 39 RS 7

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315 S07 Jun07 7 RS7-3mm 1 7 28 RS 8 S07 Jul07 9 RS7-3mm 1 7 24 RS 7 S07 Jul07 12 RS7-3mm 1 7 24 RS 8 S07 Aug07 14 RS7-3mm 1 7 17 RS 8 S07 Aug07 17 RS7-3mm 1 7 28 RS 8 S07 May07 1 RS7-3mm 2 7 33 RS 7 S07 May07 3 RS7-3mm 2 7 42 RS 7 S07 May07 4 RS7-3mm 2 7 35 RS 6 S07 Jun07 7 RS7-3mm 2 7 27 RS 7 S07 Jul07 9 RS7-3mm 2 7 23 RS 7 S07 Jul07 12 RS7-3mm 2 7 23 RS 8 S07 Aug07 14 RS7-3mm 2 7 17 RS 6 S07 Aug07 17 RS7-3mm 2 7 27 RS 8 S07 May07 1 RS7-3mm 3 7 48 RS 6 S07 May07 3 RS7-3mm 3 7 55 RS 7 S07 May07 4 RS7-3mm 3 7 40 RS 7 S07 Jun07 7 RS7-3mm 3 7 30 RS 6 S07 Jul07 9 RS7-3mm 3 7 26 RS 7 S07 Jul07 12 RS7-3mm 3 7 25 RS 7 S07 Aug07 14 RS7-3mm 3 7 18 RS 7 S07 Aug07 17 RS7-3mm 3 7 30 RS 7 S07 May07 1 RS7-3mm 4 7 45 RS 4 S07 May07 3 RS7-3mm 4 7 49 RS 5 S07 May07 4 RS7-3mm 4 7 39 RS 4 S07 Jun07 7 RS7-3mm 4 7 29 RS 5 S07 Jul07 9 RS7-3mm 4 7 25 RS 5 S07 Jul07 12 RS7-3mm 4 7 25 RS 5 S07 Aug07 14 RS7-3mm 4 7 17 RS 5 S07 Aug07 17 RS7-3mm 4 7 29 RS 6 S07 May07 1 RS7-6mm 1 7 45 RS 6 S07 May07 3 RS7-6mm 1 7 51 RS 6 S07 May07 4 RS7-6mm 1 7 44 RS 6 S07 Jun07 7 RS7-6mm 1 7 28 RS 6 S07 Jul07 9 RS7-6mm 1 7 24 RS 6 S07 Jul07 12 RS7-6mm 1 7 24 RS 6 S07 Aug07 14 RS7-6mm 1 7 17 RS 6 S07 Aug07 17 RS7-6mm 1 7 33 RS 7 S07 May07 1 RS7-6mm 2 7 46 RS 8 S07 May07 3 RS7-6mm 2 7 55 RS 8 S07 May07 4 RS7-6mm 2 7 46 RS 8 S07 Jun07 7 RS7-6mm 2 7 29 RS 8 S07 Jul07 9 RS7-6mm 2 7 25 RS 8 S07 Jul07 12 RS7-6mm 2 7 25 RS 8 S07 Aug07 14 RS7-6mm 2 7 17 RS 8 S07 Aug07 17 RS7-6mm 2 7 35 RS 9 S07 May07 1 RS7-6mm 3 7 45 RS 5 S07 May07 3 RS7-6mm 3 7 53 RS 7 S07 May07 4 RS7-6mm 3 7 45 RS 7 S07 Jun07 7 RS7-6mm 3 7 29 RS 7 S07 Jul07 9 RS7-6mm 3 7 24 RS 7 S07 Jul07 12 RS7-6mm 3 7 24 RS 7 S07 Aug07 14 RS7-6mm 3 7 17 RS 8 S07 Aug07 17 RS7-6mm 3 7 33 RS 8 S07 May07 1 RS7-6mm 4 7 45 RS 5 S07 May07 3 RS7-6mm 4 7 52 RS 5 S07 May07 4 RS7-6mm 4 7 44 RS 6 S07 Jun07 7 RS7-6mm 4 7 29 RS 6

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316 S07 Jul07 9 RS7-6mm 4 7 24 RS 6 S07 Jul07 12 RS7-6mm 4 7 23 RS 7 S07 Aug07 14 RS7-6mm 4 7 17 RS 7 S07 Aug07 17 RS7-6mm 4 7 33 RS 7 S07 May07 1 TORO 1 2 53 ET 5 S07 May07 3 TORO 1 2 39 ET 5 S07 May07 4 TORO 1 2 35 ET 5 S07 Jun07 7 TORO 1 2 29 ET 4 S07 Jul07 9 TORO 1 2 23 ET 5 S07 Jul07 12 TORO 1 2 8 ET 5 S07 Aug07 14 TORO 1 2 28 ET 7 S07 Aug07 17 TORO 1 2 27 ET 7 S07 May07 1 TORO 2 2 52 ET 4 S07 May07 3 TORO 2 2 39 ET 4 S07 May07 4 TORO 2 2 35 ET 5 S07 Jun07 7 TORO 2 2 30 ET 4 S07 Jul07 9 TORO 2 2 24 ET 5 S07 Jul07 12 TORO 2 2 8 ET 6 S07 Aug07 14 TORO 2 2 27 ET 6 S07 Aug07 17 TORO 2 2 28 ET 7 S07 May07 1 TORO 3 2 56 ET 5 S07 May07 3 TORO 3 2 42 ET 6 S07 May07 4 TORO 3 2 37 ET 6 S07 Jun07 7 TORO 3 2 30 ET 6 S07 Jul07 9 TORO 3 2 25 ET 6 S07 Jul07 12 TORO 3 2 8 ET 7 S07 Aug07 14 TORO 3 2 31 ET 7 S07 Aug07 17 TORO 3 2 30 ET 8 S07 May07 1 TORO 4 2 52 ET 6 S07 May07 3 TORO 4 2 39 ET 7 S07 May07 4 TORO 4 2 35 ET 8 S07 Jun07 7 TORO 4 2 29 ET 8 S07 Jul07 9 TORO 4 2 23 ET 8 S07 Jul07 12 TORO 4 2 7 ET 8 S07 Aug07 14 TORO 4 2 27 ET 8 S07 Aug07 17 TORO 4 2 27 ET 8 S07 May07 1 WOS 1 2 42 WOS 4 S07 May07 3 WOS 1 2 52 WOS 4 S07 May07 4 WOS 1 2 44 WOS 5 S07 Jun07 7 WOS 1 2 33 WOS 5 S07 Jul07 9 WOS 1 2 40 WOS 5 S07 Jul07 12 WOS 1 2 33 WOS 6 S07 Aug07 14 WOS 1 2 42 WOS 6 S07 Aug07 17 WOS 1 2 44 WOS 7 S07 May07 1 WOS 2 2 43 WOS 6 S07 May07 3 WOS 2 2 50 WOS 6 S07 May07 4 WOS 2 2 43 WOS 7 S07 Jun07 7 WOS 2 2 32 WOS 6 S07 Jul07 9 WOS 2 2 40 WOS 6 S07 Jul07 12 WOS 2 2 32 WOS 7 S07 Aug07 14 WOS 2 2 41 WOS 7 S07 Aug07 17 WOS 2 2 42 WOS 7 S07 May07 1 WOS 3 2 40 WOS 8 S07 May07 3 WOS 3 2 45 WOS 8 S07 May07 4 WOS 3 2 38 WOS 8 S07 Jun07 7 WOS 3 2 30 WOS 8 S07 Jul07 9 WOS 3 2 35 WOS 8

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317 S07 Jul07 12 WOS 3 2 29 WOS 7 S07 Aug07 14 WOS 3 2 39 WOS 8 S07 Aug07 17 WOS 3 2 38 WOS 9 S07 May07 1 WOS 4 2 43 WOS 6 S07 May07 3 WOS 4 2 50 WOS 6 S07 May07 4 WOS 4 2 43 WOS 6 S07 Jun07 7 WOS 4 2 33 WOS 6 S07 Jul07 9 WOS 4 2 40 WOS 6 S07 Jul07 12 WOS 4 2 32 WOS 7 S07 Aug07 14 WOS 4 2 41 WOS 7 S07 Aug07 17 WOS 4 2 41 WOS 7 run; proc glm; title 'TQ and Weekly Water' ; class mm; model TQ = mm; means mm/Duncan; run; proc glm; title 'TQ and Frequency' ; class freq; model TQ = freq; means freq/ Duncan ; run; proc glm; title 'TQ and Frequency' ; class rep; model TQ = rep; means rep/Duncan ; run; proc glm; title 'TQ and Season' ; class season; model TQ = season; means season/ Duncan ; run; proc sort; by season; run; proc glm; by season; title 'TQ and Weekly Water' ; class mm; model TQ = mm; means mm/Duncan; run; proc glm; by season; title 'TQ and Frequency' ; class freq; model TQ = freq; means freq/ Duncan ; run; proc mixed; by season; class freq rep; model TQ = freq; random rep; lsmeans freq/ pdiff; run;

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318 Weekly Water Applied on Turf Quality by Season data TQ and TotalWater; input season$ plot$ tmt$ rep$ TQ mm; cards; F06 E05 AC10 1 7 199 F06 E08 AC10 3 7 203 F06 E11 AC10 2 7 200 F06 F02 AC10 4 7 198 F06 D07 AC13 1 8 250 F06 E06 AC13 3 7 258 F06 F01 AC13 2 6 263 F06 F11 AC13 4 7 256 F06 D12 AC7 1 7 253 F06 E02 AC7 3 7 264 F06 E04 AC7 2 7 268 F06 F07 AC7 4 6 294 F06 D03 ACIR 1 7 124 F06 D09 ACIR 3 8 109 F06 D10 ACIR 2 7 75 F06 F04 ACIR 4 5 218 F06 B05 DWRS 1 7 165 F06 C01 DWRS 3 7 168 F06 C07 DWRS 2 8 167 F06 C11 DWRS 4 6 166 F06 E01 ETM 1 8 177 F06 E09 ETM 3 8 169 F06 F06 ETM 2 4 174 F06 F10 ETM 4 8 173 F06 D02 Llhigh 1 7 458 F06 D06 Llhigh 3 7 456 F06 E12 Llhigh 2 7 456 F06 F09 Llhigh 4 8 460 F06 D01 Llmed 1 7 235 F06 D05 Llmed 3 7 236 F06 D11 Llmed 2 7 233 F06 F08 Llmed 4 7 236 F06 A08 RS2-3mm 1 5 267 F06 A10 RS2-3mm 3 7 259 F06 B03 RS2-3mm 2 5 265 F06 C04 RS2-3mm 4 7 264 F06 A07 RS7-6mm 1 5 264 F06 B02 RS7-6mm 3 6 261 F06 B11 RS7-6mm 2 6 259 F06 C05 RS7-6mm 4 8 264 F06 E07 TORO 1 8 106 F06 E10 TORO 3 8 105 F06 F03 TORO 2 6 108 F06 F05 TORO 4 6 106 F06 A03 WORS 1 4 296 F06 A05 WORS 3 5 286 F06 B12 WORS 2 6 285 F06 C09 WORS 4 8 283 F06 A04 WRS 1 4 266 F06 A11 WRS 3 7 266 F06 B07 WRS 2 5 271 F06 C03 WRS 4 6 266 F07 E05 AC10 1 5 173

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319 F07 E08 AC10 3 7 185 F07 E11 AC10 2 6 177 F07 F02 AC10 4 6 173 F07 D07 AC13 1 6 382 F07 E06 AC13 3 6 292 F07 F01 AC13 2 6 315 F07 F11 AC13 4 6 304 F07 D12 AC7 1 5 89 F07 E02 AC7 3 6 93 F07 E04 AC7 2 5 91 F07 F07 AC7 4 5 111 F07 D03 ACIR 1 5 70 F07 D09 ACIR 3 7 73 F07 D10 ACIR 2 7 93 F07 F04 ACIR 4 4 135 F07 B05 DWRS 1 8 184 F07 C01 DWRS 3 5 188 F07 C07 DWRS 2 8 147 F07 C11 DWRS 4 6 194 F07 E01 ETM 1 6 154 F07 E09 ETM 3 6 159 F07 F06 ETM 2 4 154 F07 F10 ETM 4 6 150 F07 D02 Llhigh 1 5 327 F07 D06 Llhigh 3 6 343 F07 E12 Llhigh 2 6 329 F07 F09 Llhigh 4 7 333 F07 D04 LLlow 1 5 206 F07 D08 LLlow 3 7 210 F07 E03 LLlow 2 6 221 F07 F12 LLlow 4 6 209 F07 D01 Llmed 1 5 271 F07 D05 Llmed 3 6 251 F07 D11 Llmed 2 6 255 F07 F08 Llmed 4 7 261 F07 A01 NON 1 3 0 F07 A09 NON 3 6 0 F07 B06 NON 2 5 0 F07 C10 NON 4 5 0 F07 A12 RS1-3mm 1 5 267 F07 B01 RS1-3mm 3 4 264 F07 B08 RS1-3mm 2 7 264 F07 C06 RS1-3mm 4 7 270 F07 A02 RS1-6mm 1 4 270 F07 B04 RS1-6mm 3 6 271 F07 C08 RS1-6mm 2 8 255 F07 C12 RS1-6mm 4 5 260 F07 A06 RS2-3mm 1 6 274 F07 B09 RS2-3mm 3 8 268 F07 B10 RS2-3mm 2 6 270 F07 C02 RS2-3mm 4 5 271 F07 A08 RS7-3mm 1 8 264 F07 A10 RS7-3mm 3 6 267 F07 B03 RS7-3mm 2 4 262 F07 C04 RS7-3mm 4 7 255 F07 A07 RS7-6mm 1 6 290 F07 B02 RS7-6mm 3 5 285

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320 F07 B11 RS7-6mm 2 6 290 F07 C05 RS7-6mm 4 9 295 F07 E07 TORO 1 6 152 F07 E10 TORO 3 8 137 F07 F03 TORO 2 5 141 F07 F05 TORO 4 4 140 F07 A03 WORS 1 4 386 F07 A05 WORS 3 5 383 F07 B12 WORS 2 6 374 F07 C09 WORS 4 8 363 F07 A04 WRS 1 5 288 F07 A11 WRS 3 6 290 F07 B07 WRS 2 7 303 F07 C03 WRS 4 4 296 S06 E05 AC10 1 5 261 S06 E08 AC10 3 7 270 S06 E11 AC10 2 6 264 S06 F02 AC10 4 5 263 S06 D07 AC13 1 7 307 S06 E06 AC13 3 6 321 S06 F01 AC13 2 4 322 S06 F11 AC13 4 7 313 S06 D12 AC7 1 5 171 S06 E02 AC7 3 5 177 S06 E04 AC7 2 3 177 S06 F07 AC7 4 4 186 S06 D03 ACIR 1 5 233 S06 D09 ACIR 3 7 197 S06 D10 ACIR 2 7 163 S06 F04 ACIR 4 3 221 S06 B05 DWRS 1 5 196 S06 C01 DWRS 3 5 198 S06 C07 DWRS 2 7 191 S06 C11 DWRS 4 7 184 S06 E01 ETM 1 6 305 S06 E09 ETM 3 6 259 S06 F06 ETM 2 3 302 S06 F10 ETM 4 7 288 S06 D02 Llhigh 1 7 398 S06 D06 Llhigh 3 8 393 S06 E12 Llhigh 2 5 397 S06 F09 Llhigh 4 7 397 S06 D04 LLlow 1 4 111 S06 D08 LLlow 3 4 112 S06 E03 LLlow 2 4 113 S06 F12 LLlow 4 2 107 S06 D01 Llmed 1 6 238 S06 D05 Llmed 3 7 238 S06 D11 Llmed 2 8 230 S06 F08 Llmed 4 6 241 S06 A01 NON 1 1 0 S06 A09 NON 3 2 0 S06 B06 NON 2 1 0 S06 C10 NON 4 2 0 S06 A12 RS1-3mm 1 3 204 S06 B01 RS1-3mm 3 4 202 S06 B08 RS1-3mm 2 2 193

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321 S06 C06 RS1-3mm 4 8 202 S06 A02 RS1-6mm 1 3 244 S06 B04 RS1-6mm 3 6 238 S06 C08 RS1-6mm 2 7 234 S06 C12 RS1-6mm 4 4 234 S06 A06 RS2-3mm 1 4 237 S06 B09 RS2-3mm 3 6 220 S06 B10 RS2-3mm 2 5 237 S06 C02 RS2-3mm 4 6 235 S06 A07 RS2-6mm 1 3 241 S06 B02 RS2-6mm 3 6 239 S06 B11 RS2-6mm 2 8 237 S06 C05 RS2-6mm 4 8 244 S06 A08 RS7-3mm 1 5 231 S06 A10 RS7-3mm 3 6 227 S06 B03 RS7-3mm 2 6 231 S06 C04 RS7-3mm 4 8 223 S06 E07 TORO 1 8 307 S06 E10 TORO 3 6 286 S06 F03 TORO 2 2 321 S06 F05 TORO 4 2 314 S06 A03 WORS 1 3 311 S06 A05 WORS 3 5 300 S06 B12 WORS 2 6 287 S06 C09 WORS 4 8 299 S06 A04 WRS 1 4 268 S06 A11 WRS 3 5 267 S06 B07 WRS 2 3 262 S06 C03 WRS 4 7 268 S07 E05 AC10 1 7 553 S07 E08 AC10 3 8 563 S07 E11 AC10 2 7 566 S07 F02 AC10 4 8 559 S07 D07 AC13 1 8 567 S07 E06 AC13 3 8 610 S07 F01 AC13 2 7 631 S07 F11 AC13 4 7 607 S07 D12 AC7 1 7 342 S07 E02 AC7 3 8 351 S07 E04 AC7 2 7 353 S07 F07 AC7 4 6 378 S07 D03 ACIR 1 7 357 S07 D09 ACIR 3 7 342 S07 D10 ACIR 2 7 355 S07 F04 ACIR 4 7 459 S07 B05 DWRS 1 8 376 S07 C01 DWRS 3 7 385 S07 C07 DWRS 2 8 363 S07 C11 DWRS 4 7 377 S07 E01 ETM 1 6 271 S07 E09 ETM 3 5 289 S07 F06 ETM 2 3 269 S07 F10 ETM 4 4 268 S07 D02 Llhigh 1 7 684 S07 D06 Llhigh 3 8 671 S07 E12 Llhigh 2 7 695 S07 F09 Llhigh 4 8 703

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322 S07 D01 Llmed 1 7 586 S07 D05 Llmed 3 8 560 S07 D11 Llmed 2 8 566 S07 F08 Llmed 4 7 575 S07 A02 RS1-6mm 1 6 649 S07 B04 RS1-6mm 3 7 632 S07 C08 RS1-6mm 2 8 612 S07 C12 RS1-6mm 4 7 619 S07 A06 RS2-3mm 1 8 591 S07 B09 RS2-3mm 3 8 579 S07 B10 RS2-3mm 2 7 581 S07 C02 RS2-3mm 4 7 580 S07 A08 RS7-3mm 1 8 575 S07 A10 RS7-3mm 3 7 553 S07 B03 RS7-3mm 2 6 554 S07 C04 RS7-3mm 4 8 495 S07 A07 RS7-6mm 1 8 579 S07 B02 RS7-6mm 3 7 571 S07 B11 RS7-6mm 2 7 572 S07 C05 RS7-6mm 4 9 597 S07 E07 TORO 1 8 530 S07 E10 TORO 3 8 495 S07 F03 TORO 2 7 502 S07 F05 TORO 4 7 499 S07 A03 WORS 1 7 703 S07 A05 WORS 3 7 702 S07 B12 WORS 2 7 683 S07 C09 WORS 4 9 622 S07 A04 WRS 1 7 608 S07 A11 WRS 3 6 608 S07 B07 WRS 2 8 629 S07 C03 WRS 4 7 606 run; proc sort; by season; run; proc glm; by season; title 'Water Applied' ; class mm; model TQ = mm; means mm/Duncan; run;

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323 LIST OF REFERENCES Allen, R.G., 1997. De monstration of potential for residential water savings using a soil moisture controlled irrigation monito r. Project 6-FC-40-19490. Water Management and Conservation Activity U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Provo, Utah. Allen, R.G., Pereira, L.S., Raes, D., and Smith M., 1998. Crop evapotranspiration: Guidelines for computing crop requirements. Irrigation and Drainage Paper No. 56, FAO, Rome, Italy. Allen, R.G., Walter, I.A., Elliot, R., Howell, T., Itenfisu, D., and Jensen, M. (eds)., 2005. The ASCE standardized reference evapotranspira tion equation. American Society of Civil Engineers Environmental and Water Resource Institute (ASCE-EWRI). 59 pp. American Society of Agricultural Engin eering (ASAE)., 2000. Testing procedure for determining uniformity of water distribution of center pivot and lateral move irrigation machines equipped with spray or sprinkler nozzles. ASCE-S436.1, 48th Ed., St. Joseph, Mich. Augustin, B.J., Snyder, G.H., 1984. Moisture se nsor-controlled irriga tion for maintaining bermudagrass turf. Agronomy Journal. 76, 848-850. Bamezai, A., 2004. LADWP weather-based irrigation controller pilot study. A report submitted to the Los Angeles Department of Power and Wa ter. Los Angeles, California. Available at http://www.cuwcc.org/Landscape_Irr_Tech. Accessed 20 December 2007. Bastug, R., and Buyuktas, D. 2003. The effects of different irrigation le vels applied in golf courses on some quality characteristics of turfgrass. Irrigation Science. 22, 87-93. Baum, M. C., Dukes, M. D., Miller, G. L., 2005. Analysis of residential irrigation distribution uniformity. Journal of Irrigati on and Drainage Engineering. 131(4), 336. Beard, J.B., Green, R.L., 1994. The role of turf grasses in environmenta l protection and their benefits to humans. Journal of Environmental Quality, 23(3), 452-460. Blonquist Jr., J.M., Jones, S.B., Robinson, D. A., 2005. A time domain transmission sensor with TDR performance characteris tics. Journal of Hydrology. 314, 235-245. Blonquist Jr., J.M., Jones, S.B., Robinson, D.A., 2006. Precise irrigation scheduling for turfgrass using a subsurface electromagnetic soil moisture sensor. Agricultural Water Management. 84, 153-165. Campbell Scientific, Inc. 2006. CS616 and CS wate r content reflectometers. Instruction manual. Logan, Utah. Available at: http://www.campbellsci.com/documents/manuals/cs616.pdf Accessed 11 January 2007. Cardenas-Lailhacar, B., Dukes, M. D., Miller, G. L., 2008. Senso r-bas ed automation of irrigation on bermudagrass, during wet weather conditio ns. Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering. 134, 120-128.

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324 Carlisle, V.W., Sodek, III, F., Collins, M.E., Hammond, L.C., Harris., W.G.,1989. Characterization data for selected Florida so ils. Soil Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla. Carrow, R.N., 2006. Can we maintain turf to custom ers satisfaction with le ss water. Agricultural Water Management. 80, 117-131 Cassel, D. K., Nielsen, D. R., 1986. Field capaci ty and available water capacity. In Klute, A. (ed.), Methods of soil analys is. Part 1. Physical and mi neralogical methods, 2nd ed. Soil Science Society of America, Madison, WI. Center for Irrigation Technology., 2006. Climatologically based controllers; 7th draft testing protocol. The Irrigation Asso ciation, Falls Church, VA. Christiansen, J.E., 1942. Irrigat ion by sprinkling. California Agric. Exp. Stn. Bull. 670. University of California, Berkley, CA. Condon, A.G., Richards, R.A., Rebetzke, G.J., Fa rqhuar, G.D., 2002. Improving intrinsic wateruse efficiency and crop yield. Crop Science. 42, 122-131. Connellan, G.J., 1999. Turfgrass i rrigation. In: Aldous, D.E. (Ed.), Irrigation Inte rnational Turf Management Handbook. CRC Press, Boca Rat on, London, NewYork, Washington, D.C. pp. 119-138. Davis, S., Dukes, M.D., Vyapari, S., Miller G.L., 2007. Evaluation and demonstration of evapotranspiration-based irriga tion controllers. Proceedings from the ASCE EWRI World Environmental & Water Resources Congress, 15-19 May 2007, Tampa, FL. Devitt, D.A., Carstensen, K., Morris, R.L., 2008. Residential water savi ngs associated with satellite-based ET irrigation controllers. Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering. 134, 74-82. Doss, B.D., Ashley, D.A., Bennett, O.L., 1960. Effect of soil moisture regime on root distribution of warm-season forage species. Agronomy Journal. 52, 569-572. Doss, B.D., Bennett, O.L., Ashley, D.A., 1964. Mois ture use by forage speci es as related to pan evaporation and net radiation. Soil Science. 98, 322-327. Dukes, M.D. 2005. Residential irrigation water use and control. Encyclopedia of Water Science. Marcel Dekker, New York, NY. DOI: 10.1081/E-EWS-120041736. Dukes, M.D. and D.Z. Haman. 2002a. Residential irrigation system rainfall shutoff devices. ABE325, Institute of Food and Agricultural Scie nces, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Available at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE221 Accessed 4 January 2008. Dukes, M.D. Ha man, D. Z., 2002b. Operation of residential irrigation controllers. CIR1421, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Available at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE220 Acc essed 20 April, 2006.

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325 Dukes, M.D., Haley, M.B., Hanks, S.A., 2006. Sp rinkler irrigation and soil moisture uniformity. Proceedings from the 27th Annual International Irrigati on Show, 5-7 November 2006, San Antonio, TX. Irrigation Association. Feldhake, C.M., Danielson, R.E., Butler, J.D., 1983. Turfgrass evapotranspiration. I. Factors influencing rate in urban e nvironments. Agronomy Journal. 75, 824-830. Feldhake, C.M., Danielson, R.E., Butler, J.D.,1984. Turfgrass evapotranspiration. II. Response to deficit irrigation. Agronomy Journal. 76, 85-89. Florida Department of Environmental Protecti on. 2002. Florida water conservation initiative. Section 62-40.412(1), F.A.C. Ta llahassee, FL. Available at: http://www.floridadep.org/water/waterpolicy/docs/WCI_2002_Final_Report.pdf Accessed 16 Septem ber 2008. Florida Statutes, Part VI, Chapter 373.62. n.d. Water conservation; automatic sprinkler systems. Available at: http://www.leg.state.fl.us/statutes/index.cfm ?App_mode=Display_Statute&Search_String= &URL=Ch0373/PART06.HTM Accessed 4 January 2008. Gee, G.W., Bauder, J.W., 1986. Pa rticle-size analysis. In: Klut e, A. (Ed.) Methods of Soil Analysis,. Part 1, (2nd edition). Agronomy Mana. 9. American Society of Agronomy, Madison, WI, pp. 383. Friel, R., Or. D., 1999. Frequency analysis of time-domain reflectometry (TDR) with application to dielectric spectroscopy of soil constituents. Geophysics. 64(3), 701-718. Haley, M.B., Dukes, M.D., Miller, G.L., 2007. Residential irrigation water use in Central Florida. Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering. 133(3), 427-434. Haley, M.B., Dukes. M.D., 2007. Evaluation of sensor based reside ntial irrigation water application. Proceedings from the Ameri can Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers International Meeting, 17-20 June 2007, Minneapolis, MI. Haman, D.Z., Izuno, F.T., 1993. Soil plant water relationships. CIR1085. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Fl orida, Gainesville, FL. Available at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE021 Accessed 7 January 2008. Harivandi, M.A., Davis, W ., Gibeault, V.A., Henr y, M., John, V.D., Wu, L., 1984. Selecting the best turfgrass Calif ornia Turfgrass Culture Vol. 34 No. 4. University of California Cooperative Extension. Hodges, A.W., Haydu, J.J., van Blokland, P.J., Bell, A.P., 1994. Contribution of the turfgrass industry to Floridas economy, 1991-1992: A valu e-added approach. University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Scienc es, Food and Resource economics Department. Economic Report ER.

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326 Hutson, S.S., Barber, N.L., Kenny, J.F., Linsey, K.S., Deborah, S.L., Maupin, M.A., 2004. Estimated Use of Water in the United States in 2000. U.S. Geologi cal Survey Circular 1268. Irvine Ranch Water District., 2001. Residential weather based irrigation scheduling: Evidence from the Irvine ET controller study. Irvine, California. Available at: http://www.irwd.com/Conservati on/water_conservation_research.php Accessed 20 Decem ber 2007. Irrigation Association., 2005. La ndscape irrigation scheduling and water management. Irrigation Association Water Management Committee. Falls Church, VA. Available at: http://www.irrigation.org/gov/pdf/IA_LISWM_MARCH_2005.pdf Ac cessed 17 January 2008. Jia, X., Dukes, M.D., Jacobs, J.M., 2007. Developm ent of bahiagrass crop coefficient in a humid climate. Proceedings from the American Soci ety of Agricultural and Biological Engineers annual meeting, paper number 072151, 17-20 June 2007, Minneapolis, MI. Kenney, D.S., Klein, R.A., Clark, M.P., 2004. Use and effectiveness of municipal water restrictions during drought in Colorado. Journal of the American Water Resources Association. Paper No. 03072. pp 77-87. Marella, R.L., 1992. Factors that affect public supply water use in Florida, with a Section on projected water use to the year 2020. Water Resources Investigation Report 91-4123. United States Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey, Tallahassee, FL. Mayer, P.W., DeOreo, W.B., Opitz, E.M., Kiefer J.C., Davis, W.Y., Dziegielewski, B., and Nelson, J.O., 1999. Residential end uses of water. American Water Works Association Research Foundation. Denver, CO. Merriam, J.L., Keller, J., 1978. Farm irrigati on system evaluation: a guide for management. Department of Agricultural and Irrigation Engi neering, Utah State University, Logan, UT. Morgan, K.T., Parsons, L.R., Wheaton, T.A., Pitts, D.J., Obreza, T.A., 1999. Field calibration of a capacitance water content probe in fine sa ndy soils. Soil Science Society of America Journal. 63, 987-989. Mullins, C.E., 2001. Matric Potential, In: Smith, K.A., Mullins, C.E. (Eds.) Soil and Environmental Analysis. Marcel Dekker, New York, pp 68-93. Municipal Water District of Or ange County and Irvine Ranch Wa ter District. 2004. Residential runoff reduction study. Irvine, California. Available at: http://www.irwd.com/Conservati on/water_conservation_research.php Accessed 20 Decem ber 2007. Muoz-Carpena, R., A. Ritter, D.D. Bosch. 2005. Field methods for monitoring soil water status. In: Alvarez-Benedi, J., Muoz-Carpena, R. (Eds), Soil-WaterSolute Process Characterization. CRC Press, Boca Raton, pp. 167-195.

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327 Muoz-Carpena, R., Dukes, M.D., 2005. Automa tic Irrigation Based on Soil Moisture for Vegetable Crops. ABE 356. Institute of Food a nd Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Available at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE354. Acc essed 11 September 2005. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administra tion (NOAA). National Climatic Data Center. Surface Data. Available at: http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/ncdc.html Accessed 14 Decem ber 2006. Obreza, T.A., Pitts, D.J., Parsons, L.R., Wheaton, T.A., Morgan, K.T., 1997. Soil water holding characteristics affects citrus irrigation sche duling strategy. Proceedings from the Florida State Horticultural Society 110:36-39. Or, D., 2001. Who invented the tensiometer? Soil Science Society of America Journal. 65:1-3. Paramasivam, S., Alva, A.K., Fares, A., 2000. An evaluation of soil water status using tensiometers in a sandy soil profile under citrus production. Soil Science. 165, 4. Peacock, C.H., Dudeck, A.E., 1985. Effect of irri gation interval on St. Augustinegrass rooting. Agronomy Journal. 77, 813-815. Peacock, C.H., Dudeck, A.E., 1984. Physiological response of St. Augus tinegrass to irrigation scheduling. Agronomy Journal. 76, 275-279. Qualls, R.J., Scott, J.M., DeOreo, W.B., 2001. Soil moisture sensors for urban landscape irrigation: effectiveness and reliability. Journal of the American Water Resources Association. 37(3), 547-559. Richie, W.E., Green, R.L., Klein, G.J., Hartin, J.S., 2002. Tall fescue influenced by irrigation scheduling, cultivar, and mowing height. Crop Science, 42, 2011-2017. Schmitz, M., Sourell, H., 2000. Variability in so il moisture measurements. Irrigation Science. 19, 147-151. Shearman. R. C. and Morris, K. N., 1998. NTEP Turfgrass Evaluation Workbook. NTEP Turfgrass Evaluation Workshop, October 17, 1998, Beltsville, MD. Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)., 2008. Gl ossary of soil science terms. Soil Science Society of America, Madison, WI. Available at: https://www.soils.org/sssagloss/ Accessed 15 Septem ber 2008. St. Johns River Water Management District., 2005a. Technical Publication SJ2006-2 District Water Supply Plan 2005. Palatka, FL. Available at: http://sjr.state.fl.us/techn icalreports/pdfs/TP/SJ20062.pdf. Accessed 1 September 2006 St. Johns River Water Management District., 20 01. Aquifer protection program. Palatka, FL. Available at: http://www.lake.wateratlas.usf.edu/upload/documents/fs_aqprotect.pdf Accessed 11 February 2008.

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328 St. Johns River Water Management District., 20 05b. Waterwise Florida landscapes. Palatka, FL. Available at: http://www.sjrwmd.com/programs/outreach /conservation/landscape/landscaping.htm l. Accessed 28 November 2005. St. Johns River Water Management District., 2008. Lawn and landscape irrigation rule. Palatka, FL. Available at: http://www.sjrwmd.com/irri gationrule/summ ary.html Accessed 11 February 2008. Topp, G.C., Davis, J.L., Annan, A.P., 1980. Elect romagnetic determination of soil water content: Measurement in coaxial transmission lines. Water Resources Research. 16, 579-582. Trenholm, L.E., Gilman, E.F., Knox, G.W., Black R.J., 2002. Fertilization and irrigation needs for Florida lawns and landscapes. ENH860, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Available at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/EP110 Accessed 20 Septem ber 2005. United States Census Bureau (USCB)., 2007. Sta tistical Abstract of the United States: 2007. Available at: http://www.census.gov/prod/www/ statistical-abstract.htm l Accessed 17 December 2007. United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) ., 2006 Official soil series descriptions. Natural Resource and Conservation Service, Washington, DC. Available at: http://soils.usda.gov/ technical/classification/osd/index.htm l Accessed 19 December 2006. Wraith, J.M., Or, D., 1998. Nonlinear parameter estimation using spreadsheet software. Journal of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Education. 27, 13-19. Zazueta, F.S., Smajstrla, A.G., Clark, G.A., 1993. Irrigation system controllers. SSAGE22, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Available at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE077 Acc essed 11 September 2005.

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329 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH Mary L. Shedd received her Bachelo r of Science in Agricultural and Biological Engineering at the University of Florida. Du ring her undergraduate studies she focused on land and water resources and assisted on several unive rsity research projects. In 2005, she accepted a graduate assistantship position from the Agricult ural and Biological Engi neering department at the University of Florida. While working on her graduate studies, she pres ented research results at both state and national conferences. Mary won second place in a student paper competition at a state-level scientific conference. Also during her gradua te studies, she had the opportunity to work on a research project with students from EARTH Univ ersity in Costa Rica. She spent several weeks researching the uniformity of irriga tion at a golf course in Guanacaste. Mary has traveled to eight c ountries and has lived in four US. states. She travels once a year to backpack small sections of the Appalachian Trail with friends.