<%BANNER%>

Teacher-Child Interactions in Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten Programs in Child Care Settings

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022528/00001

Material Information

Title: Teacher-Child Interactions in Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten Programs in Child Care Settings A Critical Analysis of Barriers and Facilitators
Physical Description: 1 online resource (211 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Kim, Seunghee
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: barrier, child, childcare, critical, discourse, effective, facilitator, florida, interaction, interview, observation, postmodernism, prekindergarten, problem, program, qualitative, solving, teacher, thinking, voluntary
Teaching and Learning -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Curriculum and Instruction (ISC) thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: We investigated barriers to and facilitators of effective teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings. An effective teacher-child interaction enables both teachers and children to actively engage in solving the problems they confront in their daily lives. The effective teacher-child interaction relies on their mutual respect rather than teachers'dominant positions, and enables both teachers and children to make an effort to find the best way to change the status quo through critical thinking. However, several factors that impede effective teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings allow children few opportunities to solve their own problems and articulate their own needs by preventing teachers from effectively interacting with children. Thus, by investigating barriers to and facilitators of effective teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings, this qualitative research project ultimately aims to find ways to empower both teachers and children through effective teacher-child interactions. Based on the theoretical orientation of critical theory and postmodernism, interviews and observations of three teachers were used in Florida's voluntary pre-kindergarten (VPK) program in child care settings, and the data were analyzed using Gee's (2005) method of discourse analysis. The interviews were conducted in the teachers' workplaces, and the observations focused on the teachers? behavior and speech in their classrooms during whole-group, free-play, and meal time. According to the steps of discourse analysis, the interview data were organized into 'stanzas,' several story lines were made, and then a number of building tasks were established. The results of data analysis demonstrate that the unique characteristics of the VPK program impede the three teachers' most effective interactions with children, even though they are aware of the importance of their one-on-one interactions with children. The findings of the study show several barriers to and facilitators of effective teacher-child interactions, as defined from a critical perspective, in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings. This study includes a number of strategies to enhance the internal validity, reliability, generalizability, and trustworthiness of the study, including 'member checks.' In particular, my subjectivity statement shows why I am interested in this qualitative research project as well as why I believe that this study is important. By clarifying my assumptions and worldview based on my personal experiences, this subjectivity statement contributes to increasing the internal validity of this study. However, this study demonstrates several limitations resulting from the fact that the data were collected over a short period of time. Some recommendations for further research are suggested in order to address these limitations as well as to lead further research to focus on improving educational practice. As a first attempt to investigate the nature of teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings by using the theoretical orientation of critical theory and postmodernism, this qualitative research project offers some helpful suggestions to interested practitioners, including teachers, policy makers, and researchers.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Seunghee Kim.
Thesis: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2008.
Local: Adviser: Kemple, Kristen M.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2010-08-31

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2008
System ID: UFE0022528:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022528/00001

Material Information

Title: Teacher-Child Interactions in Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten Programs in Child Care Settings A Critical Analysis of Barriers and Facilitators
Physical Description: 1 online resource (211 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Kim, Seunghee
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2008

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: barrier, child, childcare, critical, discourse, effective, facilitator, florida, interaction, interview, observation, postmodernism, prekindergarten, problem, program, qualitative, solving, teacher, thinking, voluntary
Teaching and Learning -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Curriculum and Instruction (ISC) thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: We investigated barriers to and facilitators of effective teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings. An effective teacher-child interaction enables both teachers and children to actively engage in solving the problems they confront in their daily lives. The effective teacher-child interaction relies on their mutual respect rather than teachers'dominant positions, and enables both teachers and children to make an effort to find the best way to change the status quo through critical thinking. However, several factors that impede effective teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings allow children few opportunities to solve their own problems and articulate their own needs by preventing teachers from effectively interacting with children. Thus, by investigating barriers to and facilitators of effective teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings, this qualitative research project ultimately aims to find ways to empower both teachers and children through effective teacher-child interactions. Based on the theoretical orientation of critical theory and postmodernism, interviews and observations of three teachers were used in Florida's voluntary pre-kindergarten (VPK) program in child care settings, and the data were analyzed using Gee's (2005) method of discourse analysis. The interviews were conducted in the teachers' workplaces, and the observations focused on the teachers? behavior and speech in their classrooms during whole-group, free-play, and meal time. According to the steps of discourse analysis, the interview data were organized into 'stanzas,' several story lines were made, and then a number of building tasks were established. The results of data analysis demonstrate that the unique characteristics of the VPK program impede the three teachers' most effective interactions with children, even though they are aware of the importance of their one-on-one interactions with children. The findings of the study show several barriers to and facilitators of effective teacher-child interactions, as defined from a critical perspective, in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings. This study includes a number of strategies to enhance the internal validity, reliability, generalizability, and trustworthiness of the study, including 'member checks.' In particular, my subjectivity statement shows why I am interested in this qualitative research project as well as why I believe that this study is important. By clarifying my assumptions and worldview based on my personal experiences, this subjectivity statement contributes to increasing the internal validity of this study. However, this study demonstrates several limitations resulting from the fact that the data were collected over a short period of time. Some recommendations for further research are suggested in order to address these limitations as well as to lead further research to focus on improving educational practice. As a first attempt to investigate the nature of teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings by using the theoretical orientation of critical theory and postmodernism, this qualitative research project offers some helpful suggestions to interested practitioners, including teachers, policy makers, and researchers.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Seunghee Kim.
Thesis: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2008.
Local: Adviser: Kemple, Kristen M.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2010-08-31

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2008
System ID: UFE0022528:00001


This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E20101107_AAAACE INGEST_TIME 2010-11-07T20:42:49Z PACKAGE UFE0022528_00001
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES
FILE SIZE 6207 DFID F20101107_AABOCH ORIGIN DEPOSITOR PATH kim_s_Page_147thm.jpg GLOBAL false PRESERVATION BIT MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM MD5
be771af373b6a870aefec2d7f7232a3d
SHA-1
ba54b59b490aa928bc07f016e0a789024d4d3a13
6133 F20101107_AABOBT kim_s_Page_140thm.jpg
4a519b9066f02c58580966ba5086d784
48d979999201e757ac6b76cc140561962a0645ec
9303 F20101107_AABNXB kim_s_Page_076thm.jpg
d21cbbda34924bfbcd20d28e815c9ebd
668eef89f0cbe9893c2d97575980299e253e4309
36829 F20101107_AABNWN kim_s_Page_069.QC.jpg
5af5cfa07673061204a5906e6d2fef31
cb92928679f37984f0f50a575c22e2ae905afb70
35048 F20101107_AABNVY kim_s_Page_061.QC.jpg
0e4e81a1c158c7f8aa9018709b3b0071
f5ee471b60ce25ba1c83f832a88897bf2118ea4f
1051948 F20101107_AABMTL kim_s_Page_182.jp2
d26f9f7bc8bbeecd98ee72fb2815118c
4e40546e28713d1d5f39495e10d46278b5d805a5
1051960 F20101107_AABMSW kim_s_Page_166.jp2
5acf122c107653f0207625b29ed74b18
cb7cbdf63e29c6e8b41d430322ebeae9c39ba9cb
22634 F20101107_AABOCI kim_s_Page_148.QC.jpg
fb9ea4750ad6bed8de3686829221b331
c611e1a3463792f8087085e181e46b27e567f0d1
23098 F20101107_AABOBU kim_s_Page_141.QC.jpg
e910aae2ee1189d7946af72a13e97ef6
17bb1b180e78657f88edffc05b5b8aaaf0165507
37411 F20101107_AABNXC kim_s_Page_077.QC.jpg
062ac4eda53c1636fc2e8fd08b399fce
da0df3d4a05f7f3bca4672772a530d648f9c19fb
9057 F20101107_AABNWO kim_s_Page_069thm.jpg
25053f811668a2807c009a2d836d01c3
98a554dae744128208b5c72c257ecbf165c9fc9a
8597 F20101107_AABNVZ kim_s_Page_061thm.jpg
a9890726d3adeb2e2263794402d977af
ca3936f26ba06b0a3384591ad78d730bba08317f
1051986 F20101107_AABMUA kim_s_Page_198.jp2
8e9a3bef61dbc3539843c3ceade7cce0
0a856ff2e1e7c9b169b19f7d2f160dcab9e8161b
1051980 F20101107_AABMTM kim_s_Page_183.jp2
37732c31f3b4d77e78fb415f00e18d3f
66e75a151713f5d1484d9cebb4b37ed00db6f75a
F20101107_AABMSX kim_s_Page_167.jp2
b66b1bb4044cc070566bce88d7ee2745
4e9244c6282786bd867b557a9fa20c24dcc8558d
6188 F20101107_AABOCJ kim_s_Page_148thm.jpg
9df4e85132256a1bab5e99f2990a662a
c89379ab04f9cbd9746dd3073c25974c61360ec9
6377 F20101107_AABOBV kim_s_Page_141thm.jpg
e4a15cd5c62f4c8461c0e82a8df7c156
dc5049c232b48a9098d23a6a63d5177c54548222
8753 F20101107_AABNXD kim_s_Page_077thm.jpg
3a85f2338f9d6d7dc1c37ca0f48a6346
b3b3793b1f5993cc8d5cb5db945a2c7d03511bb2
36959 F20101107_AABNWP kim_s_Page_070.QC.jpg
cfcbd6a6da8a941151f2989d0474bdc2
7d6fbc180079acb79c8b08f3878111cd3259a460
1051964 F20101107_AABMUB kim_s_Page_199.jp2
04bafc81bfb0cbb60a15ac712f1e0e9a
21cb43cb5f4b668517d1f97e3c4c80b0425c8924
1051979 F20101107_AABMTN kim_s_Page_184.jp2
c5724a3e5e649a812a2d847b9ccf04b6
d113c21f8acdf63fedbd1efdd77db48fcee8ed09
F20101107_AABMSY kim_s_Page_168.jp2
dfde3ff395baa910f801c80e1aecef2a
d9db14c1e2512f7726dc3f07cadbf03d2c0075d3
8456 F20101107_AABOCK kim_s_Page_149thm.jpg
b91d7ad69b778c6606c59782bf331f45
e4976b8b548e573707bcdb0e3ed9c25300084dfc
24095 F20101107_AABOBW kim_s_Page_142.QC.jpg
3fbdd5d572d5e125a3b01b847e4f1243
a75f2ebf1aa644d5b3ccb01372d2425d731b867d
37940 F20101107_AABNXE kim_s_Page_078.QC.jpg
e0c664424cce63510779739e05850172
37979e93842417945acc19b5fc2b3540c0685828
9230 F20101107_AABNWQ kim_s_Page_070thm.jpg
f78ae2634b2a720e378f6835630f35cb
39a4c6fb8505ab53b4d102da410563e1987ca311
1051978 F20101107_AABMUC kim_s_Page_200.jp2
bf45e0bcfe0718c0011166def394deb8
20d1de870422b277726d58838805c46106833955
F20101107_AABMTO kim_s_Page_185.jp2
fd423e38b627b3aed8c3ec71dae6ce3b
d27f32bf70a62b9eae762bad0c6dcdc0dc12bcf6
1051917 F20101107_AABMSZ kim_s_Page_169.jp2
2a594898af3b61fe655e50efe241c9e4
65830d9837d244691489e34404383f0f665debdd
8635 F20101107_AABODA kim_s_Page_158thm.jpg
d328606281f413cd9cd60519c3a2fae8
b0811e42a2f2fbb3359d6d7149a242948e6cc4af
35208 F20101107_AABOCL kim_s_Page_150.QC.jpg
7a6564a48fc081b95c6316d06f33df2d
9257fbb6967dcabe6d5fb1ae78a0794be67b9b23
6507 F20101107_AABOBX kim_s_Page_142thm.jpg
815cd0bfbe468afd2830577dab88b1c1
f8941dcdfa701864119c7ee74a9ab9f44edf3fd7
8985 F20101107_AABNXF kim_s_Page_078thm.jpg
5052d48cac4f16e3fda3ab94224a3fed
5174c4523f6e98066dd4085c8e3174b3bad917a8
35794 F20101107_AABNWR kim_s_Page_071.QC.jpg
ff23fb17feba7ba1d7419513da2148ce
5cacfc9dcca490c895ba076d6420c53e32d4f6ce
1051954 F20101107_AABMUD kim_s_Page_201.jp2
7698f647506754a610e3dac6a93e551b
e558a37fba82102290a7907fb04d04ff285548d7
1051968 F20101107_AABMTP kim_s_Page_186.jp2
9ef5efcfdb0ffa92b71f9f3021cde112
1109aacc27e4cd8e915b8858ceea900903120f64
34128 F20101107_AABOCM kim_s_Page_151.QC.jpg
979ac40ced25533bdb3b72fba0b4ce94
6963b876c8087f14b6977f58002c350afc23744a
20860 F20101107_AABOBY kim_s_Page_143.QC.jpg
74dc8d4d2f313ab3c40ad8e20e492416
78037002c756f09324b5597759b855bfec5efe1b
35111 F20101107_AABNXG kim_s_Page_079.QC.jpg
3b0f9b743b91ca911307c571e38c70c2
492db51ac2907aeb68314d856f4b9139f6ba4dea
8775 F20101107_AABNWS kim_s_Page_071thm.jpg
e0b129e55c4117b0bc1d771d4c242245
dd925a88fed74deb73b03559890b9ab15000e1a1
1051966 F20101107_AABMUE kim_s_Page_202.jp2
9fcb52b60980fda9857ed63ca418b33e
89988481982e720455f9ca85bd32fd1e4d86a7b2
1051955 F20101107_AABMTQ kim_s_Page_187.jp2
89d721f3908bc447ef59e16b7505a85e
8cf24e05d822a37af6475dd51431f8653983643b
33702 F20101107_AABODB kim_s_Page_159.QC.jpg
f5831dea598fec4aa8b90a95d066b5f0
f445c1f427aa0f0f37aa4333bf2751013bca1555
36371 F20101107_AABOCN kim_s_Page_152.QC.jpg
2552784b469aa772264cdb5fd5f50ebd
891065b164e592e542c2417da2e4050ba886bda9
6008 F20101107_AABOBZ kim_s_Page_143thm.jpg
5bcfad0fe501566fcbbcdf9bf031283c
a94ebe4da11e469ac89eadfdd442d5b9a0ad90c2
8692 F20101107_AABNXH kim_s_Page_079thm.jpg
4925e93d93920995c682d74ed8aee76e
6667444f0c44b0bfc8f7302115e973519a1e58d5
36239 F20101107_AABNWT kim_s_Page_072.QC.jpg
34078813bae8353c4247fec8e33df31a
da66e29348cb523f8ee01f4532ddfb5c3e2dd68f
F20101107_AABMUF kim_s_Page_204.jp2
60ae0e8729067dc751bf8dd65ec954a4
c21b236fdced1ec6822f8dc918a08c7a9c252c7c
1051963 F20101107_AABMTR kim_s_Page_188.jp2
ec238621dc81603d04d124d6795e626f
52a5befc4a27ea34685496e9ce484bcf828d0a5e
8869 F20101107_AABODC kim_s_Page_159thm.jpg
a58ff210253c12e1a4958dd9f2f4b1f1
73ee19c2e64ff2a6b635fa379183f039523ac1c6
9202 F20101107_AABOCO kim_s_Page_152thm.jpg
34b51a190f39799fad5d665317a0b8c0
41b78497edf7f8386180c4b9444e3543ed20ff72
8619 F20101107_AABNXI kim_s_Page_080thm.jpg
c807a8758422ea05598f8d732b309e33
e903d7fc7bcb4ba853ff8dd9ab2cffa51ee98858
8998 F20101107_AABNWU kim_s_Page_072thm.jpg
89554118c766d34364c894b7bbe5860f
345ae19d424e5359c98d60f79d14db0affb13d3b
F20101107_AABMUG kim_s_Page_205.jp2
8e6a6ecdff942b5cf6a339fc6d52b26d
91a8b267d52e3a9ef6be20fda1117adfa1f8dcfd
1051952 F20101107_AABMTS kim_s_Page_189.jp2
25e49933761e9107977c880fcf24a21d
18cb0c8655d71e3f13da2d33f247d4ca5c401ec1
25271604 F20101107_AABNAA kim_s_Page_150.tif
580e037dbe84daa75b9298c9a5042f12
647f5ff4765bcbff66444952252fef10639e11ec
35227 F20101107_AABODD kim_s_Page_160.QC.jpg
e10bfdaf451e462234efc1551436af68
53ce69b26d799253ee8e5f3775d16c34372a2a9d
37469 F20101107_AABOCP kim_s_Page_153.QC.jpg
850e5a910f559b748a3b7f8299074be4
3b244977d5e4a4a674987ed6476629bffb9975a1
8607 F20101107_AABNXJ kim_s_Page_081.QC.jpg
07514ca6bd56342da0468e8efdc9a5ef
9985b5419a8ef9248e0f4688ea92413554b38e6d
1051976 F20101107_AABMUH kim_s_Page_206.jp2
890f39136df43da6be8da279e372729a
4b73be7b05de638077644349fa843499070a16e2
F20101107_AABNAB kim_s_Page_151.tif
d6d75cfc1fd0cbdcf62bb3f171b84c36
591083dbfb07a6e7d7635c12d31dd75a3b509dfe
8854 F20101107_AABODE kim_s_Page_160thm.jpg
90ee6bd1aca0baedac4e5ab9d6167457
448292719effede6ff385b25f0d8c51922f086db
9022 F20101107_AABOCQ kim_s_Page_153thm.jpg
4d0a43881e299e56ed9e60489bac0976
dcf065c4ceaac6f39d0a7c3e6afacad86bfddda6
2160 F20101107_AABNXK kim_s_Page_081thm.jpg
59aad4ee9b15f452f2b145a588d4a38b
e252a6d42083fe31938e5d8dba720a0ccd4176d0
37231 F20101107_AABNWV kim_s_Page_073.QC.jpg
c277818fc78aa24f36b49fdd60666000
99dcec810d5e0a1d4e0d03f2d7be0d150ae628bd
1051961 F20101107_AABMUI kim_s_Page_207.jp2
3ab21a679ff6a59d1f73da0ef6c69d2a
331cefe464fb0dddf8abb99008da31e0e83d5e04
932632 F20101107_AABMTT kim_s_Page_190.jp2
957e34026c5876f62d5fbfb328dcda45
ea77e9896683c42436ed2561e6950a5c36abb2e8
F20101107_AABNAC kim_s_Page_152.tif
95b8b8b2cb8a2e33bf4829566d1fe5e4
151c957dd87d1673efcbe1d9ccc2dcd8496c0e90
37594 F20101107_AABODF kim_s_Page_161.QC.jpg
c626183f68fe62a8b0b5f594544bad68
97b7395e2e79a5bc78db1ed6d3243bd67f5070e4
36450 F20101107_AABOCR kim_s_Page_154.QC.jpg
6de51c50ab0e79efeb93dada26f3fe5a
c08643fc78d7b9921fcf9e5c911bf4e2c1a6d0c9
34003 F20101107_AABNXL kim_s_Page_082.QC.jpg
3affc5b9fe1e6a9ef0a0f43a7e79326a
59bb0a5427919e5959aca70bb6e0d1372cadcd92
8807 F20101107_AABNWW kim_s_Page_073thm.jpg
1b5a9425706318db6e8e0f20baffcf75
6c6ad87af5c241a2208cf71fb8dc5e4d42c1fcd9
F20101107_AABMUJ kim_s_Page_208.jp2
fdbd5fa6a4a412310ea894fb1f489bac
262d5e0020caf43accae2557c0b8985f5fdea28a
1051899 F20101107_AABMTU kim_s_Page_191.jp2
3fc4a17936f8b4f68c95147cf6e19463
52cf482da4c49c2f37a2eacf2dea76e43478306e
F20101107_AABNAD kim_s_Page_154.tif
2178c8d713a798e785e151dfe414db7e
8640277e66e433d8b6ad2c4872b52305b40dbaaf
9139 F20101107_AABODG kim_s_Page_161thm.jpg
9b4ec42de8b27880a9dce3b9f0e65869
bb134d95e1511985e75829c86a851e183c17462d
9153 F20101107_AABOCS kim_s_Page_154thm.jpg
fc521b5ee05450f9dec9ec0490a70db7
a684554f0cc8960a1281a6ed37238f8d3203e2b6
20360 F20101107_AABNYA kim_s_Page_090.QC.jpg
bd0c2722695698718011f1244785e36f
5f2f698e9255fb8bbb4e2fc665d4346e0101a60a
8649 F20101107_AABNXM kim_s_Page_082thm.jpg
7f2c3da71a258b734c5bc0efcdc1f109
c3db6692e632fd33cc75ea828effb7098500a701
35921 F20101107_AABNWX kim_s_Page_074.QC.jpg
452cd2d5e2417ff6dd08f7f7feac066b
3ff24672f22701fff2e2e3d943c989d4dcd85714
1051858 F20101107_AABMUK kim_s_Page_209.jp2
102ea4ec308e6c374daaf4786744391c
ed58d655c13f8de2ba241d51f61292fe7caf602b
977317 F20101107_AABMTV kim_s_Page_193.jp2
ed6ad15c80a70094e0356593ddfbeb52
ce6f46e29bd244e180edf32e409300ec019c9ff0
F20101107_AABNAE kim_s_Page_155.tif
974cb1db209d22292093ebbc7cc9b61f
e91a1254990ba3dbcfbd579eddee5d30747ff9a7
37732 F20101107_AABODH kim_s_Page_162.QC.jpg
21c1a866e71dfcd2195a811287ff678a
dee8a65c029a679259e041fafcd410035da1872e
34305 F20101107_AABOCT kim_s_Page_155.QC.jpg
4a2d29f012eda3ccbde5e0ed3435fad3
94d1764166c1e21c6fd3ec4332cb815dd1eef7a2
5875 F20101107_AABNYB kim_s_Page_090thm.jpg
0d7a4efcd5b4d1a73e91da695add0a82
5fa527007e102e0b6a3ef81aa3c3951e497bc88d
33230 F20101107_AABNXN kim_s_Page_083.QC.jpg
459f85a05da5dbf1b5cddc6511ab20c2
eac0028fad85bd685155fa9ed1a6b583cb1b1183
8530 F20101107_AABNWY kim_s_Page_074thm.jpg
d96f30784490a1910c83995963bd45cb
eb23a51664324b1a29e6f3d06b5ae003238d99fb
730215 F20101107_AABMUL kim_s_Page_210.jp2
7c40a487fb013402cbc604e27cd12e8e
21145cc3124c2630d483227c8388e032ad439578
990766 F20101107_AABMTW kim_s_Page_194.jp2
7d2e914fedf12c56859d9e1d89ad50f2
1d4208d47f1b1218d5cd3621fa9e2d0e7eaf4e4e
F20101107_AABNAF kim_s_Page_156.tif
f9cc89bfafd51bbd61919f5fb087ce89
39945dfae874bfc0c8d40af7d7a898951efb3577
9357 F20101107_AABODI kim_s_Page_162thm.jpg
0f7c5e86989d616f4676059e66f3b0f3
90a2af756689e81569fe08a15e9eb6ec0895abe6
8461 F20101107_AABOCU kim_s_Page_155thm.jpg
724845243f24e54d961955c97820f326
7ea8368e1ff10f0d5304d70e31f205211519f87d
21696 F20101107_AABNYC kim_s_Page_091.QC.jpg
a4e3bd7896e9ac97ca3634dbb8d64920
4b9c6d8a0217b5503b8ebb7ea3a7a738a63e8df8
8130 F20101107_AABNXO kim_s_Page_083thm.jpg
c1d558e7e29e899b3379d3479978baf1
8dca40d42163a03ffa657c4ecb9e0bc8aecaa085
36906 F20101107_AABNWZ kim_s_Page_075.QC.jpg
9d423570a992a97248dba3bc381401f9
952cb9b224b3f854cfd577d0177857278367c4fe
747299 F20101107_AABMUM kim_s_Page_211.jp2
1f530b8971437a96b4bb865da3d1c698
1a82ece5b86718fb2739c898e5934182a1d0db90
251789 F20101107_AABMTX kim_s_Page_195.jp2
04e59d095546ff0be50d5b0a674616fd
c923a3d558e4186188d0c7f839730428ef8a8d44
F20101107_AABNAG kim_s_Page_157.tif
8cf952b55e36d1d843d0ebb545d1475f
e5760711a42a9fbbd71585e98f4cca3550897b96
F20101107_AABMVA kim_s_Page_014.tif
c9276ef8258a5e3db565ac045437912c
e109fa558c921c165c5ae095efc06308d8079205
37699 F20101107_AABODJ kim_s_Page_163.QC.jpg
2a2e84c9a1e56afcade612bafae82ac8
3ac81b05003c7e817cc53e30d79d4da1f960b58c
F20101107_AABOCV kim_s_Page_156.QC.jpg
c932b077a7fc7cce8c6c9062f5a7a79c
0a965846895d09b8de5adada34c1cc7536fa7890
6071 F20101107_AABNYD kim_s_Page_091thm.jpg
b5bda8eb81fd9455b26d4db47db6f139
360c274299023ff2952366356d275885e469be54
24487 F20101107_AABNXP kim_s_Page_084.QC.jpg
49ecb363adbe27cc513150c567c9b09b
8c831b158488277d282855ad637c3e5af060cef7
F20101107_AABMUN kim_s_Page_001.tif
adb70304056237aa64f350acd881d5c6
f1c212ea0ac4e2ea45502acd1e5242a3c494cf79
F20101107_AABMTY kim_s_Page_196.jp2
68b105967070e1747d21b7ed38be180d
5476006023afc3f0442feba867eaff1d1fa9a2b8
F20101107_AABNAH kim_s_Page_158.tif
d0ce4f43a06faa8feb161a907c5201f2
96492db7b287b158368c845e0c1035448867780c
F20101107_AABMVB kim_s_Page_015.tif
3343e4042518ee27ae8cce1f4e297d2c
f2d527127f01452ee2855542df404a712783971a
9211 F20101107_AABODK kim_s_Page_163thm.jpg
579d6db1249e512ea77f545ba6420ff5
9cda5c2e05bf925e5c2368421acf009c4287d30a
8596 F20101107_AABOCW kim_s_Page_156thm.jpg
df88f4079bc17b82b3496e1ad16b5397
71b55e0d19270c72f4f1c7397f0dcb7130a9b524
21474 F20101107_AABNYE kim_s_Page_092.QC.jpg
bbe7e0abad58939d050c838035d39660
12afcd2241132f272ab4c07f044920d23eb301f6
21979 F20101107_AABNXQ kim_s_Page_085.QC.jpg
4a76469cf187bf6a858d3618a5c73e20
e1e4f638440fd54a6ef4dc4b41bd7cd146bd7c6d
F20101107_AABMUO kim_s_Page_002.tif
8ec91273d61257307575e9a19fa1830e
c332a16f40e309fba6b939f60ec065db02994d0d
1051973 F20101107_AABMTZ kim_s_Page_197.jp2
7b9895d6fe876bf5f07b0f21690ebe0a
d6d60115cb2fc1cfb2b184dd8b90b3a73b923b0b
F20101107_AABNAI kim_s_Page_159.tif
a291b0e3f891072b7049df376b6abec5
0e0bad14357dd7581e466e69860750518db9a346
F20101107_AABMVC kim_s_Page_016.tif
6fc3bab053ca791cdf2ad1e422f0dc48
4c0d5d3f35fe1a75b4191de4bef63ed46c9b591f
8903 F20101107_AABOEA kim_s_Page_171thm.jpg
18321c66d26f4a792f79d8d5a7354b38
2395af72ac4322747e0c5fde7ddcbe9e273f131f
21331 F20101107_AABODL kim_s_Page_164.QC.jpg
883631b45d3038f95ddd5e0d1e33297a
1d7bdd7c0d1d235bd80a8c6314c975060e879bfe
38408 F20101107_AABOCX kim_s_Page_157.QC.jpg
c02a59a5f521db59e7bb60668c5c161a
51d556975e04ef565ce192337142a7d4beb5a23d
6237 F20101107_AABNYF kim_s_Page_092thm.jpg
3a2c63ab21be62d727cedf4e2a0b6f3e
34d62a0c23ce1632ea6bff05bab4d250f8f0d65f
5893 F20101107_AABNXR kim_s_Page_085thm.jpg
0f890fc25fc17e5f3ecc5f79028412b6
dc4d776b7de249b97f49a2b6dfb1d032295f5a9a
F20101107_AABMUP kim_s_Page_003.tif
13b05b66514e535ba7bfcace3c332c99
839ece8f6457fb7042ef342b71feb07b996c5545
F20101107_AABNAJ kim_s_Page_160.tif
424d5ae3d83e69da742f314992bb6fa1
638373340f182e3eee5a2c427b6aee4f4cbfb8d3
F20101107_AABMVD kim_s_Page_017.tif
3114e18dd0e93b7955f40ad8078d3ddd
be4e7019ad6d732717acfdaee2b82312dbabcde5
36973 F20101107_AABOEB kim_s_Page_172.QC.jpg
0e989f5a119824e7d93f1d6eb7e4bc4e
ae62467036ad0c6adae33295c070921c5f507c48
5089 F20101107_AABODM kim_s_Page_164thm.jpg
bda416139a2e78a487a8405f83d71dd8
ca42aa8211a4ab378793eb25fc6910f029e5c037
8790 F20101107_AABOCY kim_s_Page_157thm.jpg
40c312a9bb38a02d74cf5e66a350b912
f73d8fcbffc4c08c6019d382d0ebea23306848d3
F20101107_AABNYG kim_s_Page_093.QC.jpg
7d74b76275ef543426db09dcac720315
98a8bc665c5689ad6163925d0271265bc2ed61bb
20349 F20101107_AABNXS kim_s_Page_086.QC.jpg
fc53ef49e3a4f4961e0f50a2d603fd21
95d9308a96fa936fbc2a967ed817ed56e8c0c89e
F20101107_AABNAK kim_s_Page_161.tif
05710bb0fe7b70d1250423104e877a51
e408c80e28224f906366ce2a9852cce40dfb9172
F20101107_AABMVE kim_s_Page_018.tif
77bf53adae41c4ac3dfc1de9b90f7bc7
d52716729914c59282e7df300343dd3956a2edc9
F20101107_AABMUQ kim_s_Page_004.tif
f763dd8b156d5973fb029cc8acd246bf
a69d69f671a874226d1decae1d7cdd39d24aeced
35441 F20101107_AABODN kim_s_Page_165.QC.jpg
1b6e6b399b9c7571921d44c2cce6273e
78f24ec9346a8d33fb89acc9c6806bdc59c79df1
35101 F20101107_AABOCZ kim_s_Page_158.QC.jpg
b695f77d16acd6ecdf452973be2239db
5f8311ae96dccf11dfe5dadadf894cae04dec8d7
6418 F20101107_AABNYH kim_s_Page_093thm.jpg
c02878c3e1b96f5808d5c22989eea245
605a3bca5dfdbde48cf5553f75ee039c33def3e4
5645 F20101107_AABNXT kim_s_Page_086thm.jpg
8cc26c911bc923b52175169b2280aaa0
fd01b5207d29b124ebaa84605ea8f4c38098bef0
F20101107_AABNAL kim_s_Page_162.tif
a286c29c44cb0c7e532d6969f07cd92a
c92d4b94d9893f47d377753f052b09e6ded813f7
F20101107_AABMVF kim_s_Page_020.tif
64510617a36ae2a189ab8cdd4d229511
0fcf55763f04f4d0ecb43b77607e7989f7c836dc
F20101107_AABMUR kim_s_Page_005.tif
be26d642e7465b5c40399ae5a604f619
d477baa3427deb30c2137f58a3dfbf38f04e09bf
9024 F20101107_AABOEC kim_s_Page_172thm.jpg
029434356907388e1556d6d2928db881
d0d259c67904c7e0951ea53d9c319611757acc4b
8815 F20101107_AABODO kim_s_Page_165thm.jpg
a93d2345a68310e97b1cb2da38a88069
5f1dcac7b5adcca341c1e5dcbdc22fb52400bc1a
21335 F20101107_AABNYI kim_s_Page_094.QC.jpg
7ba0d49457b0fcb97a7b4a35be45eff7
0be8ffaa535bc5e3199b4c05a30bafbb9aa52ac3
23940 F20101107_AABNXU kim_s_Page_087.QC.jpg
dab4d322537e5c79fad326080251a54c
34ea9bf16dc00ba14d74e48319864b918c0b6f34
F20101107_AABNBA kim_s_Page_178.tif
7d39ef4545fa69198aa874bfd593ce6f
db83d17c57535bd417d6b37168bb2affa7df25a6
F20101107_AABNAM kim_s_Page_163.tif
fd972e5eea3760ded532a6c99e3693d1
1605b0d6adecc9f1b3e598bfeb7eeb624082bb67
F20101107_AABMVG kim_s_Page_021.tif
0841b8aeb4229c4a55db77a32e7cafe1
be56a18cdb84f4d3dd42b450511af044136b298c
F20101107_AABMUS kim_s_Page_006.tif
bae4ed2a1738d1b1bbabf20b24b35266
e3072fa971361105bec747f5aa56a19c9e146d63
36629 F20101107_AABOED kim_s_Page_173.QC.jpg
70232013e78bb72acc8256ff4419907f
888772b392bef0cff21f3f186295cee076f7b74f
F20101107_AABODP kim_s_Page_166.QC.jpg
3d214bc98b1060a02c4b18bf2495940d
ee9c69840ce73b788055ce7d04b1a8e74f1b648a
5981 F20101107_AABNYJ kim_s_Page_094thm.jpg
64343d051edc59cb9a14265032b74e17
04a49fcaf6116958e9254c7523c17571a761573d
6448 F20101107_AABNXV kim_s_Page_087thm.jpg
4190437736fdc439bf4f5d76e2363adc
e12887171f020146f0bebea6ca7fa5b30933c6a3
F20101107_AABNBB kim_s_Page_179.tif
9e47f7e1bb224a3fa5835e9f5d0b5ef4
4dd696e4f8391c1db15c73bcca19640aa59e8a39
F20101107_AABNAN kim_s_Page_164.tif
30c9c4e1521e17030fc59707e0f3ccf5
45aab35ea380a13aa9a7614253aae5a7110dca2b
F20101107_AABMVH kim_s_Page_022.tif
c63e41a0bd2047ec7d5bc2b9b409f2d5
b4c0639c552c858662b98913bacc8502c7054db6
F20101107_AABMUT kim_s_Page_007.tif
a641ed9e7d3b247660a286499d11a453
f43234b5dc52562991d8ddd1c37653473c623110
8895 F20101107_AABOEE kim_s_Page_173thm.jpg
e504558f5046fd5c70d3df7956c553f2
3aed2a2b79d54f571f9e6b2d4854118d3eb80b03
9214 F20101107_AABODQ kim_s_Page_166thm.jpg
9900d1f218be574480fa68af66e2b660
6469ac3bc780933785b8a485f0c89c0c316b7713
29763 F20101107_AABNYK kim_s_Page_095.QC.jpg
1ee70f5d66a6b9a061e810633dca28d8
1b1f2b8bd5075f555df9fe3d414a08e8d457eb95
F20101107_AABNBC kim_s_Page_180.tif
571647deb67edaa6d7f85cd4f157481c
a2be4974d89eed141fa72b9f9b1c143ac0fc301f
F20101107_AABNAO kim_s_Page_165.tif
e5a1d01227bb98544b3098afba024582
cf4d51b11e0512f7306bfa84fda0f0b177357367
F20101107_AABMVI kim_s_Page_023.tif
f50de882256c731a72289a32b7cd2bec
888a6a79a955e483f8eb34afd53d2ad18a14fb04
39763 F20101107_AABOEF kim_s_Page_174.QC.jpg
7fa79a7e79696206a94b5d2a01644644
23d31bd4978557970b6ff94c815479b40ba7d216
36908 F20101107_AABODR kim_s_Page_167.QC.jpg
dae0453402907735983adcc51203b25b
3400f12e487e1a66f7fca9b862cac9dbb78a0c22
8225 F20101107_AABNYL kim_s_Page_095thm.jpg
98f97d10cb00d1c5f1b8cd724a8b472d
75547d1af9c237573f38dcb4abc59e549743eeaf
20483 F20101107_AABNXW kim_s_Page_088.QC.jpg
90d54bc954250637eaaafe2a488773d7
72123228eba7d0c61dba09e2adbfab42c7de1d9c
F20101107_AABNBD kim_s_Page_181.tif
9be7189a64ee019b94921d6cfff5c8a4
d1f7e129c8194732779938a9074cb97312fd6314
F20101107_AABNAP kim_s_Page_166.tif
ace6124ca47e5877fad00373078b617b
2aec224f78569455985a6eb81c574fe16f49b002
F20101107_AABMVJ kim_s_Page_024.tif
805ee65f74d97aac4a7a952abd3a5725
4b37b4c1418e547e6f14b66b260ca2ff93b8ee4c
F20101107_AABMUU kim_s_Page_008.tif
b3c6bf45808fecde550d351662ba28f4
772b5188b9ef0b5d584e8274221c04f90adbe058
9325 F20101107_AABOEG kim_s_Page_174thm.jpg
bba3a40c06c49cd0b9555a950fac850d
42a0cb6522cf0743a832935e0d74cce9b9de9e70
9228 F20101107_AABODS kim_s_Page_167thm.jpg
782591232f6a33cb838c79bf35089a7f
6428fbc60054e2b6d6556cf78a0986fa47891e69
36772 F20101107_AABNZA kim_s_Page_103.QC.jpg
ab0841b0d39c460eda3bc0d267049f7b
8178c3ed02436ce119365df42147d460b9a29857
33885 F20101107_AABNYM kim_s_Page_096.QC.jpg
214fcbbd722e14add8b1db8d9c96bf56
35adde2ec8cc0108c8f4eabe7091894a32304803
5730 F20101107_AABNXX kim_s_Page_088thm.jpg
d3268c8fac7cbe1b609b1bfd1d8d3a87
516afe668142adc0a8697cc9a4cf80fd49436883
F20101107_AABNBE kim_s_Page_182.tif
14a66272fa69cf03c4436ae4bc3b8b38
73dd223af161face13c760c5ec1f6673ccd85f90
F20101107_AABNAQ kim_s_Page_167.tif
825975b0175acc7a90baab1f55bef74f
50a07d290a85d16b4e4163b0ed7fa9b7963500c9
F20101107_AABMVK kim_s_Page_025.tif
d781e61c812fcf08d8f85482fd5e7775
7567b49a70bfda06da5a50ccf11fcbf28e588fb6
F20101107_AABMUV kim_s_Page_009.tif
7e529f918d19b0fa983f175b2bd0ef5a
dbcdd9e880661b54bba70f53a4c51dfb9bc1b8da
37252 F20101107_AABOEH kim_s_Page_175.QC.jpg
61c7db07f961d22553623bb4c14a7caa
224845adb835d2c3d6d339a85833e6b89f5eaeb1
35989 F20101107_AABODT kim_s_Page_168.QC.jpg
9fff501751d04849416ecb7eecdb3a94
0c745cc0f9fdbcbc53c82fd9204054bec3d4de74
9127 F20101107_AABNZB kim_s_Page_103thm.jpg
b2e7a5aa5fd4ca24ddfc78311e9d8f6f
49a2ef686e92ca6fc9f2c1c38ae5e9059040fe82
8577 F20101107_AABNYN kim_s_Page_096thm.jpg
cab8ce19963b07d1d84b469d2e44379b
fc7d215fd0d2af8f15eaf840437ec665c383ea30
21321 F20101107_AABNXY kim_s_Page_089.QC.jpg
e2d33a603ebbd414bd6da5342b4c9fda
b3d68f75a00e34a7fc3568a884b08562b739f411
F20101107_AABNBF kim_s_Page_184.tif
e32d1f97fc52d96ac98b197937e4a86b
b74848936e4dc735596cfdd822b2f6f7ed52c8ae
F20101107_AABNAR kim_s_Page_168.tif
741dc4c881f7fb87201aedd143ee5647
1df44169a17af852184e53a8c80df62bd4469b9a
F20101107_AABMVL kim_s_Page_026.tif
c5f062cf5ad8212a766ed668674a23aa
553f702a00ca11c7be92bb449fdba8830ac918d0
F20101107_AABMUW kim_s_Page_010.tif
c567ce4cfca73e61aec4a7d07234bd7c
387027bde07c5bc29d679607b473f27e2cceb69e
9223 F20101107_AABOEI kim_s_Page_175thm.jpg
eb194bba1a3842455da86639eb4a766d
5100ff2441d7c9ac8aad4f5443d5414d7b71399a
8887 F20101107_AABODU kim_s_Page_168thm.jpg
b3bde854887fcdea27baaeb769cb2048
6856c4959c561d2a0757c46580621ce72e8a8619
37506 F20101107_AABNZC kim_s_Page_104.QC.jpg
29f0c00d468730733d3fd8d564314b09
f3d2f1ea6d6b482c3bb925a85b35f059e7e6295d
30508 F20101107_AABNYO kim_s_Page_097.QC.jpg
87d99a1bef10dd944aaac3f06da9d554
af58e138d7da2b8616a57523fda67c3c12ca682b
6022 F20101107_AABNXZ kim_s_Page_089thm.jpg
3e03e10cc307019affac7a1af5db0026
225485e60f435f8f93119a42f5f47b767d0b9477
F20101107_AABNBG kim_s_Page_185.tif
718cd62c914382152751d4be4c784de8
1429161a9853c42c9dfd58a06af9b95f7ad7d2a1
F20101107_AABMWA kim_s_Page_041.tif
97149ede08c3fb25544a59e3c24b507c
baf4ce0f085d503bc834e6ee27f927179a11fd09
F20101107_AABNAS kim_s_Page_169.tif
64296b3dba9e69c0638dde8973282e27
e030703d26a1cb6d35276e549dc54292a606fee0
F20101107_AABMVM kim_s_Page_027.tif
623d2a1222e2ddcd5cb174d05ba62a24
0012df077bf5a93630c9944aad8e3f6061ade1ef
F20101107_AABMUX kim_s_Page_011.tif
b0ec188dd714688415c0d201ed6c3249
7812a1186a6658c6773c2605d1d3d5f826631f56
8639 F20101107_AABOEJ kim_s_Page_176thm.jpg
ebd23b062fa85a4b9054e3611ea69da5
589c65749d7066c0b775f88fa9f8798367089ebc
36235 F20101107_AABODV kim_s_Page_169.QC.jpg
378826f0f1634bbb31a4785ea43712d6
3abd08b2f48e9ff0de811916e061d20f0b32f5aa
9205 F20101107_AABNZD kim_s_Page_104thm.jpg
54077327cbfe4dc0bae04dac229c15d7
5f684f2c4729aa2eef80e9efc355481b284c5a64
8093 F20101107_AABNYP kim_s_Page_097thm.jpg
f7c1de95893d8e35c767ec4701d6db54
7baddd8752a4414cb9db352b3e7d9247a490fb9b
F20101107_AABNBH kim_s_Page_186.tif
649b9f1cf48470ed8c22112e6bdb6fb4
4366d4b1680996902317a2aabc1e075bc70926c2
F20101107_AABMWB kim_s_Page_042.tif
75bb701d19c8a630928b700f226deb4c
c74cdfab60f55d1b0ea578da412659ab2bd4d953
F20101107_AABNAT kim_s_Page_170.tif
46cbd9e02818da7f8b64f48bad1c8adf
f558161baded1f6144f93fc749d87393f7529d19
F20101107_AABMVN kim_s_Page_028.tif
ef9e77541ba53ba8d38309d76ffec26b
428aac33825bd3d687b7d183c79536718c5ef4f0
F20101107_AABMUY kim_s_Page_012.tif
44db2c021fe237527d74df1e36cc2c02
23a8e3a982d634d67438b039c476239cef17bb7c
34987 F20101107_AABOEK kim_s_Page_177.QC.jpg
c6ffa14f45544499225b6dd02c3ee143
a6b9d002b1fbaceea572d50eb6d1d037697280ae
9159 F20101107_AABODW kim_s_Page_169thm.jpg
45c015c3139a09a1aa95db0277745c57
11c973c0014cecc29ab1fe943eb1cc478badcead
37374 F20101107_AABNZE kim_s_Page_105.QC.jpg
b5a7396ff6badd75f3d65f5678229673
aa6dbba8d70cb21f4def371c29c1da27ca860034
35974 F20101107_AABNYQ kim_s_Page_098.QC.jpg
7b4b81ab5b614232245548c083f15dc6
8bed93e9bd814aa9096f4870ddd5ce398f1cb561
F20101107_AABNBI kim_s_Page_187.tif
f2300e211927514c0e99d4d664da0b01
6950e39723a803c353c5bb8cc5e6d84e38af5ffb
F20101107_AABMWC kim_s_Page_043.tif
71956935a7a8ccedf928284d36fff417
8268eb29b1e6e6f3975c6b81f0f62013ac1749b0
F20101107_AABNAU kim_s_Page_171.tif
c250d354bf42d968395febd1395068bc
17072d8f430b29ca60c49a336b05b08ca69ab111
F20101107_AABMVO kim_s_Page_029.tif
e6d32fd79ef89730dc6d533cffeb658f
3bd7265c513669838fcd0f771f8eacbcdcf704ac
F20101107_AABMUZ kim_s_Page_013.tif
53e7572d9875f9c8fac0536e14b5d8cf
cca9c1fd3735c17ebd94aa67db6b67c778cbf956
8697 F20101107_AABOFA kim_s_Page_185thm.jpg
3e6993e03e5e165579f1ee0c793867b5
9aec878062a1726e861c56e0337c92056064f31e
8699 F20101107_AABOEL kim_s_Page_177thm.jpg
b4dc33c8a1f3a93d9b3cb6df37ac270e
d2bfbcacfbfb66e05e8a22c9ea6c3a59b68ff97b
35248 F20101107_AABODX kim_s_Page_170.QC.jpg
843f8e3591fcea78de6988d59d25b1d1
de7dd096f2c2957a9a34a4c819aae9b0db846877
9149 F20101107_AABNZF kim_s_Page_105thm.jpg
d6d2a32c4d5270ed7f066be8c7c5d7e5
cc0a31ef1d3b2df82333c0c98bbf20cad0184263
8565 F20101107_AABNYR kim_s_Page_098thm.jpg
83014d086ae3b3964965b52378339486
200c30d2ba12b4f5e7a9f3d6b4378a8c5e65244b
F20101107_AABNBJ kim_s_Page_188.tif
848c09f03b7cc4380e3eae954fc5a9e5
1ff8dbbd9301166b1c9a68826bf448d5a410674b
F20101107_AABMWD kim_s_Page_044.tif
27e18c1060f20854db9403ba6c1d0770
ddf52be12141b2dbbb672dc35ecf74c8e95f4392
F20101107_AABNAV kim_s_Page_172.tif
89c81a7a3d08ffbac3d32857c36659ea
48e577272a5c84b18db9385cbbe3d262e8acc242
F20101107_AABMVP kim_s_Page_030.tif
b4c0d60f25614f4c5b02d0411c4e9c27
bda73cb19310fafc1c3d1472ebc6249ff38d1514
37326 F20101107_AABOFB kim_s_Page_186.QC.jpg
c73d22d349dd2bf8b69fe5e4d9692cbe
877257c244d9e7cc48577c70077fa7132c48219d
39309 F20101107_AABOEM kim_s_Page_178.QC.jpg
7fb34a4392785a3afc5dedcc76cb2d97
a0f2a4f5b54335426bc4e162c3f1d160ef875024
8704 F20101107_AABODY kim_s_Page_170thm.jpg
ad0b94034b3850a2d951b98132ae49d2
83b0cc88c5379004d87bf7ecff514a4fa7be2652
9158 F20101107_AABNZG kim_s_Page_106thm.jpg
6773cc8f1c96f647503df00869b59761
55b9d23cf8a2723a368169cc6ccd801bb97d47fd
36892 F20101107_AABNYS kim_s_Page_099.QC.jpg
bdaa771107c68fb5e7208e2e69ffaa38
fdc1033c686a0e0ddfb231c7cd47414e36e405b3
F20101107_AABNBK kim_s_Page_189.tif
f39484a5cb978eab5fc3ab784bd59db9
3f8bc326cf88b16b89ec5f086205ba06ada8493d
F20101107_AABMWE kim_s_Page_045.tif
490175faf82b42526dc1672e96d881df
53f0d4199acb7cd79e522fd221470b33d0bcd6bc
F20101107_AABNAW kim_s_Page_173.tif
1c472b5f7e1bb2bd6343a74c2cbed160
9a40e5dff931ac97fab41ec14da2f1d818d44ffa
F20101107_AABMVQ kim_s_Page_031.tif
06446d91f780ffd0a9af57922b023dc3
3b9fca34303065e8848a0c4d9a97763f058e2804
9071 F20101107_AABOFC kim_s_Page_186thm.jpg
05be1899f5428a4cc04c7f6c08bb8c56
2030a5a8d901599e9db1b8c807b9a5adf5782748
9185 F20101107_AABOEN kim_s_Page_178thm.jpg
f0b145003cb19a780497212471dea170
a68bd82c13de6ee657340c90d1bf5da0916d5837
36899 F20101107_AABODZ kim_s_Page_171.QC.jpg
ed7d3c33c6638e9144c162aa4674b158
d4ad3224ba2b029267248f4a451b10ec8261cef5
37075 F20101107_AABNZH kim_s_Page_107.QC.jpg
afe079f4feb526f58f4414a2242309d7
b436c4776d236860303868123f8e261a9a555e48
9200 F20101107_AABNYT kim_s_Page_099thm.jpg
e91829c9a51e5062384f800b848e3705
e4a916ed0f518e1795b214df82e788daa3d32122
F20101107_AABNBL kim_s_Page_190.tif
44c20b1b7e3bf427c6e8d7281c1b1342
b3fdbfc6605f053444cfcc1a10958d08fb2ff4bc
F20101107_AABMWF kim_s_Page_046.tif
8bad4d53a715fe94177ca73b12220bea
9cf6d6cba26f49c20068ba6bc58c85398126712e
F20101107_AABNAX kim_s_Page_175.tif
c01fb020be6e9780fedd4ae48cf10217
1a0c8756c73cc97956ff4b948ad97d96721251e3
F20101107_AABMVR kim_s_Page_032.tif
7cb335ce390ca2f06e20ffee624853dc
99fb676160277edb949ed12b022f5ff56214353a
F20101107_AABNCA kim_s_Page_205.tif
d99da6f9c973688a517555e572335e72
983d03148496542fabc0143f6e588437b75b82e8
35610 F20101107_AABOEO kim_s_Page_179.QC.jpg
5e9aea8a04124c79d1aee50df96d85c9
695105cbb6bc7d552464bfda5f0c7595d1713d1e
9259 F20101107_AABNZI kim_s_Page_107thm.jpg
9f73cb2f0ac2184ee48687aac1a45b8c
6070d908280ce554509332fc1cf1ba8179dfb13f
35134 F20101107_AABNYU kim_s_Page_100.QC.jpg
9cdc13547247bb6076116b096118a92b
6bbb72639f2492bcf2b6fb7bbbfae52a149a4c42
F20101107_AABNBM kim_s_Page_191.tif
3db20fc77d69ce9544a279fdaa08e2dd
17d7b81a75b4bd6907095c118e06ae3b41cf3c2f
F20101107_AABMWG kim_s_Page_047.tif
3a64a4b64514fd8c8a85414dd78347eb
57977e30deaf41aed6459b3dab69b293a45a49d5
F20101107_AABNAY kim_s_Page_176.tif
6760c4aaa798b4276e554c4fdb96da72
fdb30394dff662512c03c3f8153a546bef3d6f25
F20101107_AABMVS kim_s_Page_033.tif
5d528b82b613dbf2b9cde302873d7cfc
32dc6e9b5fe934f6ec88f9afc401da338ee25798
36824 F20101107_AABOFD kim_s_Page_187.QC.jpg
865bd7af77b475eabd15358587ecd6da
35d9c708d05e5e6782ee81c494fdfe10b2051514
8785 F20101107_AABOEP kim_s_Page_179thm.jpg
679390dcb211000b005ab1a7437431d8
bed10750a747d78ddfcfa6693038afbbca00e0f5
36331 F20101107_AABNZJ kim_s_Page_108.QC.jpg
cedd9415f97f6fa059c59c5e81d7cdcb
01808556fd7b1118c1b57bc52c0462e2f5a0db57
8459 F20101107_AABNYV kim_s_Page_100thm.jpg
aee69e15fd0ba6ec9d5381ef8a1d18ea
717d287ba00df2ca860397847bbc5692259d95ae
F20101107_AABMWH kim_s_Page_048.tif
1ce08db934239a510f19b04d1c99ae2c
334bf25d2df4cc0b4ebe4d38d929cced5e8edbaf
F20101107_AABNAZ kim_s_Page_177.tif
f552de0aed51ae2df0b06e9388cb3611
524c8b5ad7c7bcc284ceaaab2952fd16adb3d13b
F20101107_AABMVT kim_s_Page_034.tif
e96fe569659f2778f0ab558b9b42452c
0abec8d3621bd69317b53745d9cea6234e738cc7
F20101107_AABNCB kim_s_Page_206.tif
05803f270ccd9a2baa7ca9bd1ea955d5
e81059d4023fa7e05af9e925aa86c925d7bac60e
F20101107_AABNBN kim_s_Page_192.tif
5f0da29e45ea3158aceeb4c561e21354
ffa3f973b46ccec028465432d7905001b802a31b
9052 F20101107_AABOFE kim_s_Page_187thm.jpg
5f2ff0941a89f88fbaa729b761b07137
4298b87781bb94713413dd5b1a822844927c261a
37500 F20101107_AABOEQ kim_s_Page_180.QC.jpg
baecb3c4c1cb183ced0d750d9a830e3a
489b15b247845165815986d070cff317feb68790
8942 F20101107_AABNZK kim_s_Page_108thm.jpg
9603c583555324cbbbf534defd678a6b
05e417f2e80ad6fcd3cfe9c87d67dd91e49b16a8
37380 F20101107_AABNYW kim_s_Page_101.QC.jpg
4bb075e39c38761e463bbb20836f252d
7a3ea3694a4d5c339b35aa04ae336c50ec3b0bbf
F20101107_AABMWI kim_s_Page_049.tif
0852480d113392b91d0a9ea63e247120
087bf4709979136f58795f136ce78022a5338978
F20101107_AABMVU kim_s_Page_035.tif
0c589c18e68954388e08f1083c815ec4
eb303d27473a3c5e462b48eeddf2312c2a3e2714
F20101107_AABNCC kim_s_Page_207.tif
f533cac098f4dc1475d8fae2c9944ad5
6486f587d3a050db8e270d6124b2434fb4535643
F20101107_AABNBO kim_s_Page_193.tif
238595076e1ffee75f5192e2dcbd7694
ae595116d1a765046f24811b3527c21d965dbc42
35938 F20101107_AABOFF kim_s_Page_188.QC.jpg
61e4062afbab594933032e6ff0e2fa57
5440b79cceee496aef254f0acf2acd1ecb0d8a9d
9169 F20101107_AABOER kim_s_Page_180thm.jpg
ca7cd89267c5916c67671524948dc301
3b5acc142fd8e186982ed271ffbf54cfedd67022
36522 F20101107_AABNZL kim_s_Page_109.QC.jpg
1aee9e18a343f2f0947006c0f780fbee
d8d6d45bb01bf20ff8d9096bd2ef80998e372443
F20101107_AABMWJ kim_s_Page_050.tif
b0e8675e3ec0caf8244101adc7936a6e
060c41dc0690cbb68c9cd77e5c707edbc01f57bf
F20101107_AABNCD kim_s_Page_208.tif
7805c50d163999d415d310146a3fc03a
ee7e7a4a99a21c24b91cea12b90e922e2749b2a0
F20101107_AABNBP kim_s_Page_194.tif
ed88a1d94d3fa067cf8f55045604dd0e
c8849c27f0912feaa25695c294594849003486bc
9138 F20101107_AABOFG kim_s_Page_188thm.jpg
21dbcb46d8eb7c6b8cd378b04bc6dfac
dd24e740eb86a19dd9006faa97934dde98cbebc5
8484 F20101107_AABOES kim_s_Page_181thm.jpg
39667aee5fe86e109fbc92e5b1f2f96e
c3cf85287217fe46d303117e9ecc80285b615740
8911 F20101107_AABNZM kim_s_Page_109thm.jpg
dda68cf5d8b74781952900aaa39bb9ed
16611d712cc83f54bdba5101a73314dccbe60a16
8877 F20101107_AABNYX kim_s_Page_101thm.jpg
ccd41be1b4ef89abc7a99b97c3c90914
054394b17b72e090404b5e3c1f0c0f7030a1dc0b
F20101107_AABMWK kim_s_Page_051.tif
b4a2dc4dbc3cee2a8c9310a54d02babf
9fca4271d55183867ce456bd96d463238e95cc37
F20101107_AABMVV kim_s_Page_036.tif
a27c5dc98f02c0d576df5274b08a1934
aec780e3c45ad97cd8fc487f153fdf9f71a95af3
F20101107_AABNCE kim_s_Page_209.tif
9b2b19c285854cb42051c8c750675551
bd382f872779f6f55d7b1efa64c2452a17a37933
F20101107_AABNBQ kim_s_Page_195.tif
ead3fe1738724ea69b64e642b35b2d56
ebb3deab057eded9635651838a37d7736cb49070
36901 F20101107_AABOFH kim_s_Page_189.QC.jpg
b097975ed1f454cf634332a7c0bb7371
4fe98d128f17a94766a71765661e38851f308d0d
36220 F20101107_AABOET kim_s_Page_182.QC.jpg
5baff14419a7eb476f80cb54f7611f51
c63687e8227065880522fdc1aa78c8d431ba5e1a
26251 F20101107_AABNZN kim_s_Page_110.QC.jpg
2bf3a3bab81b5cea27b53d8322fc2407
87fa1bdf211a708269dd24678482c196c5dde045
35450 F20101107_AABNYY kim_s_Page_102.QC.jpg
8a7970b43e1b5ef93a89a647549e155b
665d06711c641dba2bf49ca804a37ea18e4e1882
F20101107_AABMWL kim_s_Page_052.tif
33d2eeb03bef05679280ef9422077776
77d750274545ffee847af27a7d961f307720a889
F20101107_AABMVW kim_s_Page_037.tif
d68e42a90b55847882a161c622d8a381
40c97186b461993f4481319737b84b15216a8632
F20101107_AABNCF kim_s_Page_210.tif
2a4987d31486217fc0c674c5507eb318
dc9831b34e4b2610ab4ebd8fd80ca0f545cc61e0
F20101107_AABNBR kim_s_Page_196.tif
259fa546101067559e97606c3e4aa40e
45724787449a7c5e6831258c88c26488de0000f8
8970 F20101107_AABOFI kim_s_Page_189thm.jpg
ebb305d0f13a14f03d90ebbdccf26ea6
eaa828be40987595dedce2d1404c28d1ae03ccc2
8866 F20101107_AABOEU kim_s_Page_182thm.jpg
f80daca1b5baf58467248426283759d2
133fdea97e874ae0a706d4665364008cbf9d2c5b
6834 F20101107_AABNZO kim_s_Page_110thm.jpg
f2a35935f9fc2152d7f443bb1ac39103
82388ec62b7f353ba58b5292352ba941db5fd552
8612 F20101107_AABNYZ kim_s_Page_102thm.jpg
9b079ca3c143100c71256f08eebcbc9a
ccf7139370c185644ea691929b95caef2c5c6db8
F20101107_AABMWM kim_s_Page_053.tif
0546db447085367afdce7655bc423453
5e370deb39f788e2db72503c0a502c6ce7fd5434
F20101107_AABMVX kim_s_Page_038.tif
81fce083b51b3ac395de9fcba2984b3a
7da6b4d583701d7f437fe2e8b2b33d28387bb57d
9711 F20101107_AABNCG kim_s_Page_001.pro
9801f93844e7ad9de58c0a69786f49bf
d0d9c9334f38c5f41156659bc11e038ecbf72374
F20101107_AABMXA kim_s_Page_067.tif
5cf6f230a0590437153ee8b04c7be1e2
7b646ae28aadf8e6d2343d90ef1578f42c558bf7
F20101107_AABNBS kim_s_Page_197.tif
927df06dfbf08966e623229e288828a8
79243299c342aae7061c8cd33ebbe6507a5de6a9
27546 F20101107_AABOFJ kim_s_Page_190.QC.jpg
aeb94279b091a4751c59492d1f4b7ddc
89506b92157582fee131c23f1be17ab5bc3afa89
37129 F20101107_AABOEV kim_s_Page_183.QC.jpg
fed414c61f08efe211b01fd96bb279ee
d61889f1e40accdf053a5e55da0bd4e8d9d13063
22245 F20101107_AABNZP kim_s_Page_111.QC.jpg
28e0be9d236610d3e89758f9e006ad59
82684007ad587effafe940801354a2c1ad644f1c
F20101107_AABMWN kim_s_Page_054.tif
6963996c01e3342233b60bd0a05f72e2
8e77c2266277d225952df8423221e00367d2f5de
F20101107_AABMVY kim_s_Page_039.tif
9e65785c63a81c5bd80e63638a2a37ba
0963daca7458c127d9a093c21fbd2ad21e14cace
780 F20101107_AABNCH kim_s_Page_002.pro
5e08be2b1186e61f7f399f168d1c0d26
1f5b9191f171704366f501e74d57e67fbb660a7f
F20101107_AABMXB kim_s_Page_068.tif
8f517ca8298ca1f63de62269492b9744
7a34838e4453250069abd605a814dd0331fa79b3
F20101107_AABNBT kim_s_Page_198.tif
3c8e8ef487c25526751b307ef5ac0aa9
af6e0f621d57054f75848920a4ba4358fb2d31ca
37162 F20101107_AABOFK kim_s_Page_191.QC.jpg
69cea9f973c4b240237f13d2704a6269
762764bccd3aa5951c46ad9fabfe3bc68bd3c92a
8881 F20101107_AABOEW kim_s_Page_183thm.jpg
8accd2477cd8a8f13c661991913e7330
a0bab56976172425a6d3f96e1003f7492ed9b0e4
6078 F20101107_AABNZQ kim_s_Page_111thm.jpg
80175446c6723d15b7bed02f854799e7
cb420b688234d6ef1c77dc93c2325167858371d7
F20101107_AABMWO kim_s_Page_055.tif
4cf06ed69f023bf5745f67efe20238ea
a720453ae2b7ac26e27dba9e225c558616b31f6d
F20101107_AABMVZ kim_s_Page_040.tif
45098145e3d8c88b6b393aa6d9afaea1
7b8f1f52f498e654b0068c3166c5c7c0792114b4
50933 F20101107_AABNCI kim_s_Page_003.pro
f580a64a7ddfd20762e5997f07c9bb1e
11ec341f24edd5b96b81f36fdc80e8313dfe8636
F20101107_AABMXC kim_s_Page_069.tif
59cb4f0406b1c8c14782c343798395be
b3a3d17964b477c4ab88b214e25c845a8cc7dc0d
F20101107_AABNBU kim_s_Page_199.tif
90af2075bf6cbaf02ca2bec476648120
2491fe340a97c6885b07813a13faf3a1849490ac
9019 F20101107_AABOGA kim_s_Page_199thm.jpg
78d6161c188d92b7cb85a096a8f9fc2c
61ad4a77e681fafb908016a98575705057076643
9023 F20101107_AABOFL kim_s_Page_191thm.jpg
33f6119f2b0c17b6fd4c562bbe64d6d7
a8ce47a91bd6f720f0e6fd26c9c3762813d255dd
34897 F20101107_AABOEX kim_s_Page_184.QC.jpg
d1a653661116754edc7de8127b7cfd01
6199dd3677f7755a4427c8f8b2f1b1c1e336c608
21532 F20101107_AABNZR kim_s_Page_112.QC.jpg
f08577cb0f60088be249585446d6005d
4dcbd9af66d03f911e3bc4b491495e81eb38ca1d
F20101107_AABMWP kim_s_Page_056.tif
63e37e8fc35af4235e2ac2832378d082
87e8fafa4be7d39af328ecf7aa3683e77a5876d2
25837 F20101107_AABNCJ kim_s_Page_004.pro
492493920365bf05905c846ea5eb3557
01709d487d7da6edf735c35db13301b3ff4a4c81
F20101107_AABMXD kim_s_Page_070.tif
a5eaf3156307f35349ce07c6d463acfa
11b2b1de8da8d26fc3d771fe1638f9f31d610d92
F20101107_AABNBV kim_s_Page_200.tif
fddea2056082d831b4c7b983467eac21
feacb9830ff11bc3a6d90e90987a05de513e019b
38462 F20101107_AABOGB kim_s_Page_200.QC.jpg
566dee092929239c8a116fee5499c129
c513365dee3edb25303d6b3c3923c3c59452324e
3646 F20101107_AABOFM kim_s_Page_192thm.jpg
c1ef5b63a2cb229d681e4f5e4f35c899
f481d71a4ec3abb58b2695bf7cf9bcf640c9bb34
8529 F20101107_AABOEY kim_s_Page_184thm.jpg
9b19a688376d1f9ba9a28d71e1e768bd
138377496b9f12c0117d9fb57dee951603d06804
5977 F20101107_AABNZS kim_s_Page_112thm.jpg
b6488b3f8548f96618dbf7877e9d4259
3b332f72cfbe0b000b75bc6830c62fa5747964a0
F20101107_AABMWQ kim_s_Page_057.tif
ab63b89a068bfb0445d5de1edb13b874
d5eab26054f525f3132cdbd730103fe8fa2d200a
97827 F20101107_AABNCK kim_s_Page_005.pro
ce9590a62d2bb8eeaa6eb983688c7172
7baab72879208ac4d509d0641a96a655335d2782
F20101107_AABMXE kim_s_Page_071.tif
3af7371701e8d7739f78f572248d9fef
ae267a7c3ca0c1e9518e4bbf86fcac6f081c4405
F20101107_AABNBW kim_s_Page_201.tif
85021ac3382df6b6cc53f32b7654d831
bdb54688070baee406b0a5f7fdee0da147b71264
9463 F20101107_AABOGC kim_s_Page_200thm.jpg
bdec8963fe59217d60623f83e2ca5bd0
ba6fbc3b4754d04e394caee026878bdff668f0e5
28858 F20101107_AABOFN kim_s_Page_193.QC.jpg
d058c28b158fff9fa11fb9841e6d7060
fc0b1ce45aaa9541d67b48246e6121b4b56ce78c
34766 F20101107_AABOEZ kim_s_Page_185.QC.jpg
1400bb6289985aab090c229419234b22
a1bb2aa62df677b410643fa457e214436c3f7c73
22452 F20101107_AABNZT kim_s_Page_113.QC.jpg
c2c5d65f4565924d9e8f13aee1b7b035
8fe3f0c5f537fc423f3eeaaecfc2ca2ee95519c1
F20101107_AABMWR kim_s_Page_058.tif
7cd34b133ea6235449dda13bc1cba264
6b3d3e5b1b371b5054c3f569458866296cd79391
54870 F20101107_AABNDA kim_s_Page_021.pro
33fab96e75510e2b083b350f1f6d301e
ff8acceccd0024db570eccf862a5fdce93001b6f
118171 F20101107_AABNCL kim_s_Page_006.pro
6da61f1ee4f12a4d39bc3f86d412ed3e
2fdb9bca88f81c9ebacfb979f765a9afd52e711a
F20101107_AABMXF kim_s_Page_072.tif
b85e3844292742bb5b2e57586ac2d70e
59ea0a4edc5709332b560da8d5472de3f74ef57a
F20101107_AABNBX kim_s_Page_202.tif
9fc0110e3869256a5c428d4d7b9106d0
c20c20c5c0515968b50d2d5ebee7a185f3173156
35621 F20101107_AABOGD kim_s_Page_201.QC.jpg
8f3e506bc7045c12514c381e4fc4cc04
767ac0f6b68a6b56bfdc34733fa41e9cae3f7363
7468 F20101107_AABOFO kim_s_Page_193thm.jpg
371bf0d35c3272444ada40627b62ab21
a778c32daf7de923cf4ab821f5de77849d168df8
6049 F20101107_AABNZU kim_s_Page_113thm.jpg
1d86e2bc4512c4a0d7bc640f11f6aa86
5724f158e81ad387c9dcd40d01118dea2d8c215c
F20101107_AABMWS kim_s_Page_059.tif
02e3a7e9d8b881bffc3ac1ef602cdb03
b81dcdde912c585b7f2a2724d8e079903b55f0bc
50111 F20101107_AABNDB kim_s_Page_022.pro
89bbfa332858c4ae2f9040233abbfbd2
8595f1127bf684b8d3bc9609368d3b47b70bb907
26914 F20101107_AABNCM kim_s_Page_007.pro
6b7325a78e1cf3ab9870d0e1cf1dc61f
50e284792ef286be075299ec19c2f7af643e6bd2
F20101107_AABMXG kim_s_Page_073.tif
ab881433723e0257ced4a386c99cd500
eeb98a77daf430affa4766d028b5503debfb3436
F20101107_AABNBY kim_s_Page_203.tif
fffddfc25fbc002cc8855bfb4e650e4c
4b78f98351862140517d7dcaf7584b6fa601fab8
27369 F20101107_AABOFP kim_s_Page_194.QC.jpg
1f4259b8688a692331613713282980ab
f8ca52e96fc75e26763845f98e0ce8ee7248515d
22423 F20101107_AABNZV kim_s_Page_114.QC.jpg
51dd95528461503f2be346ab07f03295
37a3ab81f4753bb9662b4a06a0f124fb1fc8ff2c
F20101107_AABMWT kim_s_Page_060.tif
d138d88b46ee22bbb04d1d4af0984128
4725be069d4ab2f3be2458b32b377749c5634462
11202 F20101107_AABNCN kim_s_Page_008.pro
1e2a4215e21aab4f175d38c71c3c8d36
cf22091db7cab2297f43af6d8d053835a9d090a7
F20101107_AABMXH kim_s_Page_074.tif
81ea9d2b56c921312394d895712e809c
ae2bf0b248b1c372da0dd0eb46bf0f3ab2fc28d9
F20101107_AABNBZ kim_s_Page_204.tif
13373ce4d37b6f8d10d87cb5b757400b
3f411bbf778252d8f40579358f33f60a2775dea3
F20101107_AABOGE kim_s_Page_201thm.jpg
30353020314401ca46ae858c9aaacd11
ee9e544817af1ee85139625a2658962a6d55cc38
7254 F20101107_AABOFQ kim_s_Page_194thm.jpg
c4a6ee7f2e8588817e8ad992c2251ea1
82bd72e5876fc79b03d1baa8e2258effa6c0f990
6257 F20101107_AABNZW kim_s_Page_114thm.jpg
f1ee75c16aa13881c5f72ec6f1559f11
0009a0edbc19348024269defd883e303d1942186
F20101107_AABMWU kim_s_Page_061.tif
9e1844dca21891ba984d86eb49de3929
452e229f64f81a37929670f1375b5b7b9f614866
54769 F20101107_AABNDC kim_s_Page_023.pro
6a3b41bf34a1d8edff05d1c8efdc8d99
44ed3b57c550f8ca691f6b447ec8efc9dd8048d1
48329 F20101107_AABNCO kim_s_Page_009.pro
7695c657772c2869275129f35b21c248
1f1d9a614550877d2e22226abf3e93e5b48c45a7
F20101107_AABMXI kim_s_Page_075.tif
a5f92d18672ea05ebf72d8ff387e4318
afa8c2c502e99d301bc3ad3f21eed232c126d1f4
36739 F20101107_AABOGF kim_s_Page_202.QC.jpg
6964ecb3a351fbb4a10ae5c499de73b4
bd8f8346fb1a3a231b0409e3e1b3d067a1424b94
8427 F20101107_AABOFR kim_s_Page_195.QC.jpg
458f25469c205b9ba5cf423cb5538939
85c3317cb4adc6b961300f5bf50e7354e4b7c2ed
23137 F20101107_AABNZX kim_s_Page_115.QC.jpg
a28361470e7d9b2526e5d45ebf2c5836
3290121a44e29ec847b687af52f94ef1860be49c
F20101107_AABMWV kim_s_Page_062.tif
8703cae53e7fbf394cb7fb42012d7cbd
f256c5fdb1a0a0a543cd29fca029a6471c94f89d
53782 F20101107_AABNDD kim_s_Page_024.pro
b6fbcd125d9ff567392c12145a980bf0
526991d1a52b35035f44f2f04f89f0d7a72a8990
53269 F20101107_AABNCP kim_s_Page_010.pro
070f56f62490e27aea6ccd41a4b6bede
f96a75f869c254612f8f831448e0be9172b2d066
F20101107_AABMXJ kim_s_Page_076.tif
fd5d08fbbca565aa1a605a06acbab56f
488a1da5bc5115385aad991ed7dca6e72eed32b5
9351 F20101107_AABOGG kim_s_Page_202thm.jpg
5b8ac929ad17c5db4453b8eed6526b9f
fedda1a6021f76bfaeb29ac54a6087c7326063cd
2195 F20101107_AABOFS kim_s_Page_195thm.jpg
422adb4d208fe82cf600c1dab49a73c0
308ab159af2f994a0038436d289afdaf7b168cf5
29596 F20101107_AABNDE kim_s_Page_025.pro
b961bc25f756d8b1e7a9dd29b1ae1439
8e4766eef24a823a320c42663f22560079180c0f
54683 F20101107_AABNCQ kim_s_Page_011.pro
a86eec8bd4ab1f3c8145dfdd63809636
80790e2bf3ccee0ae29fda63d9b37e97df87d158
F20101107_AABMXK kim_s_Page_077.tif
33dae89d77db2297ad7c4cdc39872ac6
7353dd1ecff6a807da97a0904250588020b5da3d
39939 F20101107_AABOGH kim_s_Page_203.QC.jpg
27f73282d8c9f8f44b04bb49cd4e2552
4aa454bfabf346e4753b1c6f8258bceee843f0d2
35036 F20101107_AABOFT kim_s_Page_196.QC.jpg
c7d557fac7a58b5ba3bfb05acd75a3ca
0427fc48a259198212bdcfa3713129430e832b2b
6344 F20101107_AABNZY kim_s_Page_115thm.jpg
7a5fabb78e106d92c006ff5cbbd7f5c5
d01fe5e31115f69c72fb6f0632099e7fe0799390
F20101107_AABMWW kim_s_Page_063.tif
4966dceef7e3d65680a62153bf964d27
c669fead0bfd4e20b8d7f0c7e372ba7861bff786
52441 F20101107_AABNDF kim_s_Page_026.pro
2e0d0bdb995df2d35afe658712ad8abb
186914d18856bdd2c6f7a79bff2574b650b6d33a
55271 F20101107_AABNCR kim_s_Page_012.pro
076d7bcfccdb6a979c8d5cebbf48b183
1c730c15ee9eb79e5fde9b120864530f5a744936
F20101107_AABMXL kim_s_Page_078.tif
46da2d635de187a2dda97dd508c2ff30
16e57a06e8f9c0341cc9e5dc866e8b4c54bff3f5
9739 F20101107_AABOGI kim_s_Page_203thm.jpg
ac9b6c72f4fe7ef992d8a6d93d86f9fe
eed684ec2bdc2285f72c1b350e070ee1b5189f79
F20101107_AABOFU kim_s_Page_196thm.jpg
4b0df94c225ea4d3f46c7bfa250cb9ef
3d7310909dd8536695819e797d8dcdf69449433d
23824 F20101107_AABNZZ kim_s_Page_116.QC.jpg
e94fa91a5fa4218f1bdb4c8e307eee4f
4ac2a72473d2d6242de2dac7e8e9b57b11a47c9d
F20101107_AABMWX kim_s_Page_064.tif
49b5be30da2f59c335bc9218c761508a
9796ab38f8f8ff00937fbbbd5b57174ffa01dd61
56046 F20101107_AABNDG kim_s_Page_027.pro
51b0fdbace433202cba5195547e083ba
fc66594d74a441038e9ef6b77efc0675de3634a3
F20101107_AABMYA kim_s_Page_093.tif
7145377d3f40a0b87961e576a25f914a
4972e50713dc42cf8620e753015063f69f044cf4
56210 F20101107_AABNCS kim_s_Page_013.pro
8c7641f55a88f30c86b6e9221320414f
e38612a5d31df1b64b6a0d24a1169f1ca464fdb9
F20101107_AABMXM kim_s_Page_079.tif
19544ebf300318532075ca88c54c7457
9e2c0b8b67391643fc29edc9d99f81ed4f6c67d7
9051 F20101107_AABOGJ kim_s_Page_204thm.jpg
40b3f9ebea719cfd8b13be0958f6ef7c
f48cda3e9de780150c8ee8013d98a181fdb3c6bd
40304 F20101107_AABOFV kim_s_Page_197.QC.jpg
91dd4c242b085fbaf7ee22028199630c
f501c679173aec90d9625629e6f8fa41692ff0ff
F20101107_AABMWY kim_s_Page_065.tif
0483f93e2deebf7a30789fe70f7e275e
e50c93bd6311ee8b36824a8c63b06ad9ff29e3c1
57694 F20101107_AABNDH kim_s_Page_028.pro
807291d8b832223255fc08de56e5a7b5
e39ec4dbdf8d8b400ac5068693e00bbca68e7e8c
F20101107_AABMYB kim_s_Page_094.tif
f9ed5bb506bf36efd87fb9b1639c33e9
f5864b390ce9aaff9b9b48457960d72d5104323b
53589 F20101107_AABNCT kim_s_Page_014.pro
5a1713a8d73824e4cdb07c7db8e950d3
07faafe1fc1d96719b66c1a32dd77716c6b61c98
F20101107_AABMXN kim_s_Page_080.tif
224afc85044196fe5442d0ce010a969e
2e1abc52959f17a3dcda38d75bcbae66876090c8
37648 F20101107_AABOGK kim_s_Page_205.QC.jpg
4f45db6bb6f31021a41177d99c7f6214
047b10ca162bac2d02a3b2cc082a46eeda5b2f39
9413 F20101107_AABOFW kim_s_Page_197thm.jpg
900f14f0becf62aef9ea5d1f28ec9f38
9a585d54c51a10925778e6df38b7173c57fc14ba
F20101107_AABMWZ kim_s_Page_066.tif
acbad409e73b715546f27ce8fe387ec8
c2944021d0b91eb3e4555570be5ae5ee09a2bb2c
55878 F20101107_AABNDI kim_s_Page_029.pro
346d498c7d083494135ed9fd65a8a7b7
a87e7186483c278ac4790cfa90b528910d327ce1
F20101107_AABMYC kim_s_Page_095.tif
035f2c73f7b5850f6ee02c0997aaadea
368e43f52b37c9f0cbce218aed07719e2b6b8653
52541 F20101107_AABNCU kim_s_Page_015.pro
b8f54a1b8b5e55d760fb272b23183205
2468a7f94b276d262aac348829958f48afbcf95e
F20101107_AABMXO kim_s_Page_081.tif
6c056c5c5ff1d5e14e86ab182333ab51
767523afa73a121486322069eddf6cefc5c680f4
9424 F20101107_AABOGL kim_s_Page_205thm.jpg
90f11b3d3d486c72d2d6e01b8e89e479
6a21677a34428ed1077aedc4f501d8c6dddd0cc0
39929 F20101107_AABOFX kim_s_Page_198.QC.jpg
3a168f7e51afcd50ed449229f24531d7
be54c3f5acb5d8cdfadd00caf30ab555add88e59
55450 F20101107_AABNDJ kim_s_Page_030.pro
1bff97b3679a102166fb3e964457229f
6ce7b54601cc60ca20eabedf31075151cc4a6902
F20101107_AABMYD kim_s_Page_096.tif
97077d9ae4971080fb6e0ee86544edfd
ee78270e395a9031fdc32d26734fe9b693ac81b8
56095 F20101107_AABNCV kim_s_Page_016.pro
11cda5e7196b4b2908bdeb4bd5eddb0c
cb630db5e7ead79290e2d1b9e202a8331908094d
F20101107_AABMXP kim_s_Page_082.tif
9ac284c752a5a83e28180ba519b4a5d0
df3595c38dceca08a3a620ddbf75d9f253f79530
35764 F20101107_AABOGM kim_s_Page_206.QC.jpg
d2ac4524bf10ab809d9cff6f7e6a52e9
1cabdb70cd515dfc72c9acfb395431d21e0d1941
9495 F20101107_AABOFY kim_s_Page_198thm.jpg
f0f67666f8a4ffb629eb1bf57f2f78c3
b96d7fd79c2b34222105c4a9f958f1b1bde2f46b
58262 F20101107_AABNDK kim_s_Page_031.pro
41b13700fa6c8529ef2524388fc4d6ad
ca359eff1b42228e350fe80f1bde1565bed028af
F20101107_AABMYE kim_s_Page_097.tif
c9f237e15077ad08b554386dd957b432
d0df85139c3443d946ad510f2c7c79378b748fc4
56175 F20101107_AABNCW kim_s_Page_017.pro
ec592ad57c9130f1ae8e7ee5ee36771a
07f913af0a4e6cf91530df6e344f37afc0c9b3fe
F20101107_AABMXQ kim_s_Page_083.tif
b4af667e52592e09d9732b1bc339ffcf
366c93073fd46806bcd3ddedb6fd01ff50b0e9ca
F20101107_AABOGN kim_s_Page_206thm.jpg
7355b03c48e4b87054314e74727b00e1
779025e754ac6aca2dafc1ea8261d6fda3584253
35702 F20101107_AABOFZ kim_s_Page_199.QC.jpg
7977a3895a1a38e406075ba5ecebff49
b8402368b9a837d6b08c05ad4316b5696cb9202e
57109 F20101107_AABNDL kim_s_Page_032.pro
38c996e92a3bac818b8b68203fbfc21c
c5227d8b042d17638ed39f64f915334f665b5e8f
F20101107_AABMYF kim_s_Page_098.tif
31917fb198242af942c2a4b74d89128b
75a6497047283df55d2049745e029d28c3f60a23
52504 F20101107_AABNCX kim_s_Page_018.pro
5e16f2ac4ed21c0717a050dc8e3a2be7
21418c1920dc8adf7d5d2afbf0513b8d658e4fa9
F20101107_AABMXR kim_s_Page_084.tif
e1db818cbb094858dfc34ea5c108d4b9
677055dd6cb819d221a4b7ccfe3e18999c43a582
58684 F20101107_AABNEA kim_s_Page_048.pro
552ea6d7186abdc0e2b9751a4470dc77
adbf68cfd33aef45b1be6b611dc1f4c18d977ea4
37434 F20101107_AABOGO kim_s_Page_207.QC.jpg
0c76fd047eaff641085294a47abd0a12
ff34ebe6f5e01af119b9a806e0d972abd259a202
54279 F20101107_AABNDM kim_s_Page_033.pro
627bae0fe3725f9519a77b950c934b0b
0a2534222abfb971a3520dc9eefa62762daa55a1
F20101107_AABMYG kim_s_Page_099.tif
30c035b29972c2fb4248368c881f5d4b
7f1a933cba1ae46a7335bb9afca6695f2d04cbc2
54005 F20101107_AABNCY kim_s_Page_019.pro
7f6814df5d9662a25fa11a5b6a460eed
513064e7c89f7ca6ee900bac835c2d327f69600d
F20101107_AABMXS kim_s_Page_085.tif
2169df6cb67df2ae3ce89056b404aec5
0851a020873083ba717f0e5e1c18a093a5a952d5
58007 F20101107_AABNEB kim_s_Page_049.pro
9e2bb861e0c6d51206d86a2de48776aa
337ccd7a1dcdf43b5e152b214c57387b9aad4b67
9198 F20101107_AABOGP kim_s_Page_207thm.jpg
269fcd16ad4b6091be69818bb7939d77
876517189f7fc813a8bb395e5ee7699cdba6fcce
56853 F20101107_AABNDN kim_s_Page_034.pro
015d8ea0458904502d1af8f3384fcc8e
52108d0fe7d4e628f0a7c59253de6bff265d059d
F20101107_AABMYH kim_s_Page_100.tif
80e2b6b282e7fda16516d9222f49e085
b97c51be0a558af32e123c163429d16d2d444338
55715 F20101107_AABNCZ kim_s_Page_020.pro
b74a0eb3ce4cad8524764133c3bc24a6
3ae7ac8c0e194732583c720c2ccf9559d3279138
F20101107_AABMXT kim_s_Page_086.tif
bd097cddd9ffa1e6226bfe6b8388e2f1
fadd77c2221c899d17ce0d3c81fdfb010a907343
52998 F20101107_AABNEC kim_s_Page_050.pro
188a7955b119d5e5cfd5e9b225d708d7
ccb004506a4518c0349807d299fa0a871aff53e7
9764 F20101107_AABOGQ kim_s_Page_208thm.jpg
02f9fad720f5728fcc9ac27db60bc2c2
355823c2719e45626270a4600574ae67886300f4
54747 F20101107_AABNDO kim_s_Page_035.pro
40be1c415d22b86347f51d20ae7d85b3
28efc5dcf45a365437f77dcaec35d686326f2fa8
F20101107_AABMYI kim_s_Page_101.tif
033091ef9b0f5c691df8ebc0ae7768f1
2828e04eff755b101ca7d0bda36789974732f00d
F20101107_AABMXU kim_s_Page_087.tif
03159b460b300539487dfde618e08fa4
6fc69c144667e99074a5524cf29fa07c6301f507
38531 F20101107_AABOGR kim_s_Page_209.QC.jpg
ddb88dbb6683c4a37d935e944ef1d2d5
e9ed35f635eb30a0149c04ad2b1346d178c36c1b
58545 F20101107_AABNDP kim_s_Page_036.pro
269ebfeba8750b77876c8c99b1a5692b
25af65b6b0868442a6168c9b646bc0cf2e9fde89
F20101107_AABMYJ kim_s_Page_102.tif
adba3a6322bfa5ca018a08947c32c248
2b0fa124eff7f87c66d3df94090b106587673ef4
F20101107_AABMXV kim_s_Page_088.tif
c271a63c31dc72de2fd39131bf22b8da
4fb6a5d3385565bbaae844867d09a9e878cf228d
60376 F20101107_AABNED kim_s_Page_051.pro
e2aa13e9c88f8ff0752b718601c321af
105e74c71e38055433cc64133dff7ef0df3c8f1f
9216 F20101107_AABOGS kim_s_Page_209thm.jpg
7ddff8e4d424e44f096870c75225cea0
a11450df8bb02d19313b538da7ade654b3198631
57338 F20101107_AABNDQ kim_s_Page_037.pro
446e79a1e8650768305c24c7f2adde4c
7b810cc61d1620cd32e9723b468603da755020ea
F20101107_AABMYK kim_s_Page_103.tif
5a3a7d1cdf5a490ff725de9e41db5eb1
4acee6d95b7af60edbf29807abacf06a02d9b118
F20101107_AABMXW kim_s_Page_089.tif
b017648734dad3801a3b778cc95c6ef8
b312c0b2195271c71793f7917c49271a17ec38aa
57133 F20101107_AABNEE kim_s_Page_052.pro
23f54d1fef7cb5a364a2796c8fac4d31
f71c99536eb81275a16e7ac0d239798f6b97a907
19116 F20101107_AABOGT kim_s_Page_210.QC.jpg
de302d2344fc244e37a6e0417cefb05f
fa8b9e0d9aab8c3e7e2e1ce27f9fc1ba1d2f737a
56388 F20101107_AABNDR kim_s_Page_038.pro
08f6bbc78d70321b8f610a9fbfca19c4
6010a2447f571dd2629524e4889ae3240b9e8f1d
F20101107_AABMYL kim_s_Page_104.tif
2abd3b53fc064c0d338e7c43d8e0dac8
4fa6ce3db6a69305c8bb01832f32806ceb2b94c0
55879 F20101107_AABNEF kim_s_Page_053.pro
04fd543bb53cbfddcff594d8facaaed5
72d6806e7f509ac0874ae2aa5411d84e45146ed4
4873 F20101107_AABOGU kim_s_Page_210thm.jpg
0e444231b055dc73ed39f1c3edd570eb
229065310e7757485231b53813135e84f1f66ab1
F20101107_AABMZA kim_s_Page_120.tif
79db3d2eb1bb4c0f264a5468e40f90bf
0390a8b030835a24ee48ac75ff353da6489bf21c
56176 F20101107_AABNDS kim_s_Page_039.pro
c44abf7f09992d4a3906dd64901b7907
a5812cd0bf287263cec2428899a11d235d3e539a
F20101107_AABMYM kim_s_Page_105.tif
e8f5153d0d375f7d6a3117119d559895
57ef432e84d02c627c415298704b99970c3a2d36
F20101107_AABMXX kim_s_Page_090.tif
16fa5f0fe049ee331f20af3751709536
1970626f927646cd2ae64511e192f3208026c7bb
58378 F20101107_AABNEG kim_s_Page_054.pro
8e6eb93bed1ebfa0dd9034bbd0982d84
c927e886519205d5d625802eb0abaf971482c3ec
22688 F20101107_AABOGV kim_s_Page_211.QC.jpg
8164c43bc3c0c8b582fbe523f2c069eb
81841c70c016170371087f5b719773b344451d95
F20101107_AABMZB kim_s_Page_121.tif
9b455cb1e7535cd299d2c5ec197b817f
e8cd2c8caa148fdfa8775dc02fca76d6ac9cad0b
56727 F20101107_AABNDT kim_s_Page_040.pro
b875337a76fe32f206f7db8ca4f5a4a0
d971b75d302e3f6853ef211f8bb2fd250c7fcb3b
F20101107_AABMYN kim_s_Page_106.tif
5ff5cd10ce422144ddb9cfd9fad5c6ab
674cc46ddea31a85b2be26824ba5661e13faed51
F20101107_AABMXY kim_s_Page_091.tif
321f7dd6817d106b2e2600fd1a522f75
a768e2791ef93cc2d64a49148af277848b8765a0
56346 F20101107_AABNEH kim_s_Page_055.pro
25791b8b0816fadb88607fc760891399
1bc62a6a8b7d8c08aee21bfc6109162171b171b8
5586 F20101107_AABOGW kim_s_Page_211thm.jpg
11ca12b2d56e76db2c34ac80ca0e43fc
897fa229dca75375924e1ae2fcf3d3caa5d93b87
F20101107_AABMZC kim_s_Page_122.tif
00105040640e8c62d3a717a8d195399a
1fa2ac6f32f287efd199371b0fa6b3423c55bc76
56512 F20101107_AABNDU kim_s_Page_041.pro
a0b58e891fc13bc6ef8052bf950fbd81
e0b3da6100120e2d6b5ef4286bd8492e790998d4
F20101107_AABMYO kim_s_Page_107.tif
4635aa50b84fff411596560a57aaf8e6
8072493afb825fff2f31b4e2c5171e760e22da74
F20101107_AABMXZ kim_s_Page_092.tif
1839931ff4fb1bae032645071dd0d4b5
1cf5d646420b0fe242a0d94f82a344ceb52df070
58302 F20101107_AABNEI kim_s_Page_056.pro
03f3e71a496f5c5d7f1aaa043ccb41b4
5fc70ea015fce8996d7bdd92da61f82899576a4a
239757 F20101107_AABOGX UFE0022528_00001.mets FULL
d88970977279be9a737a3f557eda8786
92cbc564ec2665cc5df43f9b4e3309d47077c5e9
F20101107_AABMZD kim_s_Page_123.tif
d3dd15cead4396a7a9f35c082f61fcff
ba0ff5af65bb169372fd53635ac56116fab59973
57395 F20101107_AABNDV kim_s_Page_043.pro
abfc1244810fa1c066fabba98d98bcee
ae7bf8bac98dd3d56d1c3cfe00e1a1f92ee033a8
F20101107_AABMYP kim_s_Page_108.tif
4568b129d2acbff1c19dbe3de20abc1c
08b983ecbb89ac30ae4847bc1727ae22ef7b5cf3
55639 F20101107_AABNEJ kim_s_Page_057.pro
245c914fd2476ac8edbf4f328d5980ce
60e7346428f77d4512e84dcdbe5b41d7d70f90c8
F20101107_AABMZE kim_s_Page_124.tif
d0581df14bc8a0873800b2fccc593276
5fe89f3465b3df83bdf3d65881b0e9fb09954de9
57402 F20101107_AABNDW kim_s_Page_044.pro
5e1545ce61467991c396a0e14775f836
af4240c2f2dc04735646be9f903fa9a738af3f88
F20101107_AABMYQ kim_s_Page_109.tif
faaa434b21e3d158a3ea3e180c2f0fe6
4d571c573bcf2845386b8c16ba174fc47b8a62b1
55544 F20101107_AABNEK kim_s_Page_058.pro
da0ee9f50bbabe3b5b8d20afbd9bee18
1bd54835f37404f7d790d6f7c7359bb7446807f6
F20101107_AABMZF kim_s_Page_125.tif
b3cfc726d492296480accb0ca59c67c0
58d175944ec260d4132d017abb1b3446c1e4ca49
55531 F20101107_AABNDX kim_s_Page_045.pro
32c823d837882c3ca75f167cecd9fdc8
e81c316f48f64cd4e63fdd849566856c88cfd193
F20101107_AABMYR kim_s_Page_110.tif
e400df6d8889269e8cfca37a05d8f054
4cc07d50e93a856c74c2f2446fb85664c6b02f99
55062 F20101107_AABNFA kim_s_Page_074.pro
c07bb79b54babdabf8f11369771e2b05
56adbd106f49b92faadee25d337a58120e122ed1
58005 F20101107_AABNEL kim_s_Page_059.pro
171e3c1058a6a24bacfab3256dac1c9f
d365ad9a07ee238fd51ce38db7a3085744ac7d4d
F20101107_AABMZG kim_s_Page_126.tif
496dcd35f626145c168c3ccefc194bdf
dec70bea6b59b21637cb926238cf55b5733498a9
56971 F20101107_AABNDY kim_s_Page_046.pro
4be917aa9b89119145fc3e9e48f7d1b3
feeef757273e037d582f2458e8ff50602634171f
F20101107_AABMYS kim_s_Page_111.tif
ee1fad4199cd5e701528cabd16275015
b115dbeb7ce6a815d138ca8bd47546951d081dc9
56639 F20101107_AABNFB kim_s_Page_075.pro
2b2d79d7fe3478df6fe7904ff4d85da5
da46a7653709f7f44a12db7004be161a5d677bfe
21828 F20101107_AABNEM kim_s_Page_060.pro
96e85f530367a7043bd383972db3c77f
37ce195d19bcaf43f9f883dd93a7439c98938d26
F20101107_AABMZH kim_s_Page_127.tif
376870ab7ef12d2feca12b2b95b1bf9c
bb468aa32f2b4a1f8472fd07528f413d348ac6f5
58341 F20101107_AABNDZ kim_s_Page_047.pro
b541948670425554eeb2f421a67103e0
deca185b70758bec6e4efe5c2e6a11b7bcbc1f01
F20101107_AABMYT kim_s_Page_112.tif
6defc935d3f447fc827dbf6b52649d14
477ec26ad95d67066a88520b69a5184aab310f48
12320 F20101107_AABMCA kim_s_Page_192.QC.jpg
78cef04c8f616d73d6620a27bb584085
7ba6ebfa150697866ad0ce96ba29f0c0e4a92f68
56471 F20101107_AABNFC kim_s_Page_076.pro
732e90b0f2b46a8e7915d09673470c33
463a2a449338cc5d001d7482d97f679f83cce2eb
53149 F20101107_AABNEN kim_s_Page_061.pro
10bba66b0e83bf8ed4075d63eaa96f20
5a70abd7030c16832489d147d57a4b0f0b3d2a35
F20101107_AABMZI kim_s_Page_130.tif
c2946413355e034125c3b4c4b44cf547
3dca21d11f382a54af407169ab24ab66525a324d
F20101107_AABMYU kim_s_Page_113.tif
e2892a159098503169e28885c5334085
56a67138878797066eded8b4d552c39de8ab7cef
91202 F20101107_AABMCB kim_s_Page_194.jpg
736ac8195aed5b0e3aba2870c469b4b0
c034bcfed10e71b717bef9a1139a609a60aa9a22
57634 F20101107_AABNFD kim_s_Page_077.pro
f37e30519504e3c376187292cf0bb8c0
97e3e5829bd4d6b47f4bb80e54e2d49530e08458
57417 F20101107_AABNEO kim_s_Page_062.pro
68d4d158d45084f840d40bfa2c62a7e9
9d304d78fe15fb15b49bebc6c0c620a14250d786
F20101107_AABMZJ kim_s_Page_131.tif
f4ca0a6dc31e0d0a9345914d63f66c4e
a9fc08960e3cfaeb52d1d3c12dd666557ba8c37f
F20101107_AABMYV kim_s_Page_115.tif
14bf6a5cd7bb6dd7f45a6b3b054f6487
cf8647762dc5d38d894d76668acbeaee049e026e
55698 F20101107_AABNEP kim_s_Page_063.pro
17205468b23a478a34cb5aaa293cba41
4a8b1092017b926cb5cd36d7469584d7a789bae4
F20101107_AABMZK kim_s_Page_132.tif
d5eef7cf9e5391db6a142ad53e1dbe4e
33d67b783fb2e9a25ae22dfa69b1cf2a21618296
F20101107_AABMYW kim_s_Page_116.tif
8bb024219b1070ced702404a6b7c2048
451cbcf31b567495e191625242d907beeae2d241
57273 F20101107_AABMCC kim_s_Page_042.pro
1a2624668e23667b3c56799de8dc4cb7
6357dc28bb3ee1e4fcd0adfe90e4ce50a29518b7
57711 F20101107_AABNFE kim_s_Page_078.pro
7e8f05436d1d3befe713135ef8346e72
a0ede67f1a790d4f7f37d9f3bafafb7bb445f66f
56550 F20101107_AABNEQ kim_s_Page_064.pro
80e3d8a4d8fa092db7efae18b6d8e335
17bd02945864487e686969f6d8696aa90f138920
F20101107_AABMZL kim_s_Page_133.tif
c12f7d00af24d3e5cb64385ed1f7f28b
c60acf54255117d5974b5d430cde5418e6df1769
F20101107_AABMYX kim_s_Page_117.tif
d6d748ede17c702e38bebb4a83eafff2
eea70e317a6b44fcfa2512b9e0ffecc834f0fa5d
31458 F20101107_AABMCD kim_s_Page_089.pro
402067bed5c50fdd19db563e0209ea92
30afaf16fef3a2315be15c7bc09fad5c34e12a20
54970 F20101107_AABNFF kim_s_Page_079.pro
b0623996b9c52d997b2ba4d937bdcf3c
6c04a81549e555ac4138a22710709f95e934513e
55848 F20101107_AABNER kim_s_Page_065.pro
33adce1a6c09c1b9bed4e8265f19852e
8707081118d596f6a7772afe392aab04864cda74
F20101107_AABMZM kim_s_Page_134.tif
adf15da8a3a3ac3761ceacef9e4cf0c8
fbf42ab8aa4e9fea94e0504f140c766f194a6aa0
36347 F20101107_AABMCE kim_s_Page_126.QC.jpg
34fe477b780610dc9af49484d5d25d74
fc0efcb5cca13158b0d87250e5d6521e17504fef
54721 F20101107_AABNFG kim_s_Page_080.pro
f6b71b8ad596cff9a1273ea256e69d80
9cb46985e6409bacfe276cd9c4619fbf4a3d2218
55298 F20101107_AABNES kim_s_Page_066.pro
0aad6f870aee15eada078a2f3184ad68
fc3abf2a5887b892eea3273d48d2d1381699b047
F20101107_AABMYY kim_s_Page_118.tif
7e38bf7deba016c8659e6c56c9858172
6fb95d26ea94520287f94b2dcf15032e63e34830
38479 F20101107_AABMCF kim_s_Page_054.QC.jpg
09056ba6e1edd35334337e8c647efd52
3584c8208aaf8129fb23bc6bd410d02ac027e78a
11472 F20101107_AABNFH kim_s_Page_081.pro
d655ad7a1f6ca57dba345ec97ad993de
6edc0d39b5812b91c556f841f66e9793b223067f
53081 F20101107_AABNET kim_s_Page_067.pro
eee1181c3ba78d6186fb6403b186f1ad
1e8ad92115f670accd39d91439929bc8d14a8802
F20101107_AABMZN kim_s_Page_136.tif
c80c2dc45017a7b3c455a6c293d68945
e1e119848145eeee6082902e0e172019dc5d62cf
F20101107_AABMYZ kim_s_Page_119.tif
00938245efab7e71bc5dd5e54cfdb962
304d3ee220145313d43d1d6bbc3f3cc044601213
35077 F20101107_AABMCG kim_s_Page_176.QC.jpg
8537adf0b9fe6ca9f089556ae78db8d8
d3dd6935dcfbaaf4a538d41abd0775450ee97de8
52241 F20101107_AABNFI kim_s_Page_082.pro
76c4f0908123e258fe3665b2e744af5a
1b5a0fd28b016b0f3cd82cde17ead9d97a87431f
55923 F20101107_AABNEU kim_s_Page_068.pro
4e9ea7e82173b16f683bae66549c201b
c25b7627878662e848fffa93832e0810b97b81dd
F20101107_AABMZO kim_s_Page_137.tif
7b51736c364eb71c7b298282576a8825
b170e89fea994653f1fe09e88655d06f7cb53141
F20101107_AABMCH kim_s_Page_165.jp2
5e2124b3aa36912ebf08c962d366ff5f
992204eb31b12b8607f9d46493f4bee4f7c7f2bc
48955 F20101107_AABNFJ kim_s_Page_083.pro
e9a56a0bbd6c860f08727684c05c4eff
09971976c6b8a62d1cd7f422657822c7ab9366d6
55412 F20101107_AABNEV kim_s_Page_069.pro
8059e500be5fe79a8894543866ab92f7
09755c5e66e6783b913469159c9b7fe9a33e10a5
F20101107_AABMZP kim_s_Page_138.tif
a817cda2789dea849c23e07699a62b11
0236215ed51f99364c3b0d8cc20e4ea5027208e1
106105 F20101107_AABMCI kim_s_Page_160.jpg
998eac5b3db92a46b31595baa585bd96
9533c52cd305240290dfe72ceb5fcf845d0a859f
34943 F20101107_AABNFK kim_s_Page_084.pro
6c55954315c023b88621d94844fd4db7
808849b059785d7ce4f01e8ce36638c32321b3c2
56294 F20101107_AABNEW kim_s_Page_070.pro
c052dd2675a7074ed76b453325a1de1f
faa0336f6a74f16d38bdee92695596a18a72a398
F20101107_AABMZQ kim_s_Page_140.tif
5ace93890f9a72da1d53e1a647155c02
a6f616105b17684b66ef546f2b23fa7bd8781931
58797 F20101107_AABNGA kim_s_Page_101.pro
16272d57bade60f1cabea636ebeffe53
ff6b66ac34758b1e18dc199e36f53ab1fc50269f
F20101107_AABMCJ kim_s_Page_019.tif
8785394d92656759e5b9e6abdddc4fe2
cb6d64158d4c0788acf32ef913eb9791ccf00799
32167 F20101107_AABNFL kim_s_Page_085.pro
d8920c6f26467f581759b67d19c993fe
7a55d76114c43db82c58f862c203d08f4c07396f
54031 F20101107_AABNEX kim_s_Page_071.pro
7954c85e75a9bcb406a94be4cc0c431c
a73741deeea1fde407fe9ca7c7ab326366222bcc
F20101107_AABMZR kim_s_Page_141.tif
8753758acf233bb8077c9d16afedfffc
2dd46bccab200f298d5e65f8869626c42869bce8
53593 F20101107_AABNGB kim_s_Page_102.pro
d166e71e3644a4088dcbf00e8ec86b4f
ab91a86b0f64c767a44fdbfb58e62cf3c0d02149
37072 F20101107_AABMCK kim_s_Page_041.QC.jpg
670b5d89f30c1f3bc5c5a0cf7f2e4ee5
1a7872bf82f3bfafb4200a06c0d500f104d00325
30174 F20101107_AABNFM kim_s_Page_086.pro
fdd4fe5e6ae32a8b6bec4aeed000fe67
72309b54659166c019edcefa8ce987fb45fc7787
55002 F20101107_AABNEY kim_s_Page_072.pro
21687e8e22818ee871f8831920ae2ee6
b00706c57290c04ed927c64ccd17548e85625355
F20101107_AABMZS kim_s_Page_142.tif
aa564921df12e1f23ce50cb608ed1144
5cdeb62ce7d07bd4944ab2927e372dcbe427c9ca
56120 F20101107_AABNGC kim_s_Page_103.pro
2f0f3b39c7147bcbc4f291922ad976df
c4dab038a0f66b01e38604a00908d04aea1aab67
35574 F20101107_AABMCL kim_s_Page_204.QC.jpg
fd028d68ba1a1ca54a21187bc71f11b1
1586d5a76b8e5f798bd4bf6beb27312c57c65df6
34482 F20101107_AABNFN kim_s_Page_087.pro
09c03c0d3fadb93c610a89666e5d1f83
ebf712dfc411cd698cd5cf16361fdd5538d00059
55537 F20101107_AABNEZ kim_s_Page_073.pro
f5d4bbcd4a65e597507645510c300a32
a73f7bce39930cea885ed96a80ae35f8a5acffa5
F20101107_AABMZT kim_s_Page_143.tif
cb566556599575ba0247ec2a026de6b7
3d3e2f754f0f596da31836229f1a9c6a41047c97
33140 F20101107_AABMDA kim_s_Page_147.pro
82a003f9f8a9f424345ee11b79c28cc0
6fc3fbe0a2aa369e5493e508c0801992bf238063
57520 F20101107_AABNGD kim_s_Page_104.pro
3319281916a29551ecc3078939b48ce5
becf3a3033b112b36ba2aea3f36e4b1aa76f5558
115446 F20101107_AABMCM kim_s_Page_101.jpg
c09f32acbc0fa0ce735b087ba556024f
5beb92d9b46dbaa5d2bb97f0ed1853c999438dc4
29364 F20101107_AABNFO kim_s_Page_088.pro
700a015660cc8477ea40dbecf1dc2922
f8b34139850a98979f4f5736ad8baa7f5bb81e64
36258 F20101107_AABMBY kim_s_Page_018.QC.jpg
cffb4de5e3fada9b54f3e12f0fba4082
1d465cd4840a5b7edb88bbdf278e723fdeb46887
F20101107_AABMZU kim_s_Page_144.tif
7894814989d5d4086f33c1bd0dec3fb7
a5b93f986ba5a1b1eb9dc65143b68035fc8ff312
1180 F20101107_AABMDB kim_s_Page_088.txt
646e1de0cca520081e3159f74ada5525
ee6a7262ef82af90c636331d093149025a66c16a
57256 F20101107_AABNGE kim_s_Page_105.pro
ee7cc55712cbf786a236698ce8039ba3
d65f35abd6f1e477d34b1c7fd9dfaa9928e0fdfd
F20101107_AABMCN kim_s_Page_174.tif
6a9736994209ad07e76a5a723a34c4ea
f9f751eb7147e3bcba83379d99d9322992f7d8ee
30711 F20101107_AABNFP kim_s_Page_090.pro
80f9dc2ae9bc10133119bcfd27fd829c
ec66696eb4fc128d17b3bbab2bb6ae5e2496a56e
34271 F20101107_AABMBZ kim_s_Page_080.QC.jpg
c5ab5c2bcac76c64bc956234e5f5b2f0
a81f1823d36774ff5c9fec66d1059154ae1d60cb
F20101107_AABMZV kim_s_Page_145.tif
00105d8917e0d5d6e3701f9ec4898770
e321dbfacbdec65df0cbfaf3dc0a899b6f5a94e3
57996 F20101107_AABMDC kim_s_Page_180.pro
8c1eb8f078b9350a96e2d55322f29f5f
081a3e9221dae1e4761c7c0e3e2faa57228c58f7
54612 F20101107_AABMCO kim_s_Page_123.pro
726d7fae99b8f90490e24f84248954b8
fe2c968f87ce8e4726bb2e8ae65b0c20048650fc
32326 F20101107_AABNFQ kim_s_Page_091.pro
d96b4d59d546e768ec1dcedbad182336
406e9d04251be7f37556e84d2ccd372bd338846b
F20101107_AABMZW kim_s_Page_146.tif
0513cc1c8f622bf8bbfa6afa13dfd2a9
e18104844e5b0b68aefb3fe4d0b663311ce34f7d
56785 F20101107_AABNGF kim_s_Page_106.pro
edded3df9be4ac4a4491264aa16cad57
2c7d0f291bf80b57e1554090e0badb7e8c3d5237
F20101107_AABMCP kim_s_Page_211.tif
d57064ffa3b4b3a18d4522df36b0f1ad
9fc8b204966a40036ff42428b5cc777eb8f41a09
32646 F20101107_AABNFR kim_s_Page_092.pro
c40b74ca04ec81978edf30433f11e01b
68a40caae3dd759ad6f366a3f487caa19a32b1c2
F20101107_AABMZX kim_s_Page_147.tif
60c9e44e116de8edb4df48d6e2cfb925
34d5e0622cc9176a66b10865c89d907664b1c440
8621 F20101107_AABMDD kim_s_Page_151thm.jpg
c9c94ac448d8b72dec382fcecdacf789
52e38783295c5ce46301a10437f1917b8b705a5b
55870 F20101107_AABNGG kim_s_Page_108.pro
5a358c8a0d2680c6c52c3f78da78cb3a
a17f9817805a503d60118e19079f30cb42eeb649
36765 F20101107_AABMCQ kim_s_Page_106.QC.jpg
6232972c2314c76dd073a265b6915937
20d1c769c0617e9c93a331a7e4954ecbc5daf562
34374 F20101107_AABNFS kim_s_Page_093.pro
06edd77f4cfecbb5c728dd7e1e4d6181
b967a94bd8c9a1e4ea447afb0ba244a6a84ba703
F20101107_AABMZY kim_s_Page_148.tif
f01b5dcb7f72cded222a1e5a0aebf888
1ea23b99093f5e2e1028d2c076f401b7e505da6f
1051945 F20101107_AABMDE kim_s_Page_175.jp2
1e20f9c2316a8b9e8fdbf5adee3d1d8e
3898cac6a61f8206cc99acee69ddd8a1ab6229a4
55142 F20101107_AABNGH kim_s_Page_109.pro
afb29b5d5edb13d4b2768666e61682fc
d1ba6f8c970e6ff4ad6161a7fa32815674b9d660
133835 F20101107_AABMCR kim_s_Page_205.jpg
b50af5251cef481b9ed361a40d382543
53f33bac4330123fe95c5d926c922e56947402a0
31459 F20101107_AABNFT kim_s_Page_094.pro
8ce8f9cdbefe2f234da998dd5163dd70
23f8c060f3c383b11e746fe7d10a2bd6e01e2655
31565 F20101107_AABMDF kim_s_Page_009.QC.jpg
34a5339eae3d3eee9a6e3a77595f091f
5086a1dd1eeec9fd8aa6b618dc2aa5a7d8157246
37319 F20101107_AABNGI kim_s_Page_110.pro
83f76e19943f0d3ff8ae5b40049b9e6d
72d273c6d092ee3b6fb875259c94dd5d6c3dd49a
8718 F20101107_AABMCS kim_s_Page_041thm.jpg
feb60bc71622ccbe45698727bc60967b
a05b64a1c931ca388432a0c3644f8abf773b9e9f
48607 F20101107_AABNFU kim_s_Page_095.pro
14c96a4e4009294dc8bd8150dd4da84f
6713a479c26f1dc0be47a0ebe6135c6c501dbcc9
F20101107_AABMZZ kim_s_Page_149.tif
9ae529e46d191d56c6295caac68e6fbb
823f0cae833a377547b4da48824cb8669be69352
F20101107_AABMDG kim_s_Page_153.tif
3af4ae94919f7bcfdd1cc0f76b23cc31
6311d9d8689bc2c6da261f5f6820deb35a1d24c1
32582 F20101107_AABNGJ kim_s_Page_111.pro
1e4957b9e2130ee38cdb84a01c6e9017
137a1e2f2ba13751412f1adff17f7971643e61ad
1051975 F20101107_AABMCT kim_s_Page_078.jp2
2e18e348c59bce9f3b14c91b52e5b16a
aaf2f64e4eea4bf86d5ea54ded6dd20a342ec166
54727 F20101107_AABNFV kim_s_Page_096.pro
00ebae6a8c7e73f9b3c5874218d87a5f
396b9287e4adbc17c29bfc0ba219100185862c92
108228 F20101107_AABMDH kim_s_Page_023.jpg
f0882946e74580a94e09378af7251fb5
66cfaaf1a70ea4fc8d7730332a07303358df7e52
33406 F20101107_AABNGK kim_s_Page_113.pro
6913b0c0ca0500ddc8e5dd58b8bb9798
c1f996e885d7b44e7450205d10882214ec8ecf15
21242 F20101107_AABMCU kim_s_Page_120.QC.jpg
4b7b582b945f15f70a99450e2b1e835a
59d75e3bbe8ece44bcb17e1731e2e80d9ac668e4
47447 F20101107_AABNFW kim_s_Page_097.pro
a202716edcfa87a7d5f9d913efed6a19
81660ee382b104a37e60767c98e2642491d5837b
2216 F20101107_AABMDI kim_s_Page_188.txt
bca1c6e2f568b49d825e04d44478e964
19811d8f76fb9e2e711277e9e6e58a2bf5ca8664
54127 F20101107_AABNHA kim_s_Page_130.pro
91b5138a3dac9978fb464293f7b8e188
6057dc53dfd1c9ceeb9957ef2f1c8bbf4d33b9d7
33047 F20101107_AABNGL kim_s_Page_114.pro
ab717ce483e683f37c3fcc89c21d99ee
cabc57b03668fd7c2541a45cc76894f2108911ef
64795 F20101107_AABMCV kim_s_Page_147.jpg
51ee55a1ea8371d40bc164a881054354
e7967a3023dce1b2e97436e569887596f672102d
55819 F20101107_AABNFX kim_s_Page_098.pro
a2a09a151070900e23119fe7cbc457a8
5797f2b85117ed0f9d6881a89f93bc234f46bb60
F20101107_AABMDJ kim_s_Page_135.tif
ce705b335edfd84a5cede46b97acc411
6747b6f67202029c662156898182d236b03ea00c
57252 F20101107_AABNHB kim_s_Page_131.pro
2681c6c42b2fd9fccb144546f07abd9b
bde1d59affadd556f5e13be6c2a56c79b57efdfe
33726 F20101107_AABNGM kim_s_Page_115.pro
504753488ecad0a5ed34ac2eeae33db0
462a44b6d8b69ccc4a13afa2309073a38904413f
103236 F20101107_AABMCW kim_s_Page_026.jpg
79171d4dfe92eb1dc4c93abb9b865bd9
1dd5f3f595798f147114c671d6fa0015f2eced3d
56814 F20101107_AABNFY kim_s_Page_099.pro
2f5c76348127abdb2ec9cc20d46b61d6
b8c7a5aa93ea0b02ab805b8740ae69e312873108
2231 F20101107_AABMDK kim_s_Page_020.txt
45289a258a1a2e7b5247836e3b80daef
73d151d9044a0292f382b4c3a128e73bb1cb7674
57314 F20101107_AABNHC kim_s_Page_132.pro
3b5f313cc9f0359a519831ccb55d19e7
9756c1e378d8179820bc8f638434a56cba8d509b
35909 F20101107_AABNGN kim_s_Page_116.pro
ea146a9c953907af22ffcca64b1f488d
21fb9d0b8c3ad60773edec2fc0c6932bd1a24b33
70579 F20101107_AABMCX kim_s_Page_087.jpg
4f1e0dea11cdd0da2c519930940d1259
c9310fd324094bbd85f5eb86d658111a8ee29da5
54201 F20101107_AABNFZ kim_s_Page_100.pro
7d18baf1c66777ba9cfc7c70a62b1d2e
283d5ebba7dc858b661a3429cf76515c9e6afcab
148986 F20101107_AABMEA kim_s_Page_006.jpg
abc7670b33d4fc6ee0ae7053962025d5
588cb88dfe1eab57e899d0f5de9fa5b4c15fad8f
3827 F20101107_AABMDL kim_s_Page_002.jpg
5b48f29ebf40e29368ab40b2965396bc
a08cf78d988c18e9a76f3701482e76c0e05efccc
F20101107_AABNHD kim_s_Page_133.pro
8669f597b73567d2945ba463b8654577
2fe3b187a784a423bcb8b989de60322197f8abd9
33105 F20101107_AABNGO kim_s_Page_117.pro
3b49a32f265c6d1888064eb057ddef39
a99e750cd70642197ee2f6ee44714de573b0784c
34962 F20101107_AABMCY kim_s_Page_181.QC.jpg
5ef35123936f9f917f32143b59430270
7bf60719af7da58ca83d60cc8ed0c90cbca983c2
548 F20101107_AABMEB kim_s_Page_001.txt
c8fd5bd1bcfe2918fa410c35c74ff3fd
8ae121a7abcbd055ce1f61100627e4ecdfd365e6
56929 F20101107_AABMDM kim_s_Page_107.pro
76de70af00dd5e374a1b9488cdc8ea12
37817a17eaff18a81af2b4182bdbf646ca11fd5f
57625 F20101107_AABNHE kim_s_Page_134.pro
c71e224b8767d2b850871e724369794a
b13267379f143bd56efa6c52592dd84f491c220f
34971 F20101107_AABNGP kim_s_Page_118.pro
aae6febf8e7a25d8d2a94ae52b342a36
50516c65908a523151cb320e988cbc7e6af875f1
67887 F20101107_AABMCZ kim_s_Page_093.jpg
d59ac1a19a6e39ff055dc5d7a65eb59c
93231ea7fd00418369d7b907732d83da74d27073
52867 F20101107_AABMEC kim_s_Page_159.pro
a0560812077de85ac4b01cd5bfc6fc3b
8f5353b9551d79da41dd68ce8747009c8ed26dcd
F20101107_AABMDN kim_s_Page_079.jp2
aef6789408f0acb08fe4ab87b73d7756
36eba99d9a5d950f09657c381b5f318b9efd6c95
58387 F20101107_AABNHF kim_s_Page_135.pro
ac8bbc18b2c3ad906b89e729b0e5582a
1819797f0cf25e8a0208a608aafe8213f04d1f4b
31434 F20101107_AABNGQ kim_s_Page_119.pro
91059f2ed7869df703a2d1fc2b0ac1db
72bd17ec46270dc39e90d3f35435e635ae096f0c
2207 F20101107_AABMED kim_s_Page_149.txt
221a6d60719e2e56976fc02e56329d63
447500ad61cb2423c296f57ea1c49400b3cdb8d9
8581 F20101107_AABMDO kim_s_Page_068thm.jpg
f0e062e231e4bd7f2d3439f07360f7aa
7389e8bc2eeafaf5f652a98aeb494cb06c9a5bec
30514 F20101107_AABNGR kim_s_Page_120.pro
daf56b71f65a27cfd9d855229c21eba0
768bec1a89ac8ca3ca5340a31ea850a6b278a144
F20101107_AABMDP kim_s_Page_129.tif
c48ebd3ba4d385f2d8e10ddb299e32ef
b63047e55c9a7818a9c02aea7a5b0a95b5f642f2
56252 F20101107_AABNHG kim_s_Page_136.pro
8f5e43d70fcb4e7712fac1567fea2898
61643749a35701d5b0d5ebab80b2378cb2198ff0
56151 F20101107_AABNGS kim_s_Page_121.pro
76ec4c9cb500690b84b68bfea0670c49
9feb96613f483232cd8f161e961ba5cb1b99c24e
112805 F20101107_AABMEE kim_s_Page_038.jpg
f1499825c7e4c09899ded37a05c65d2b
98f3fcb3dbb08b3b983ef12d67ac1c56585746e6
1051983 F20101107_AABMDQ kim_s_Page_203.jp2
3cae388b965c4f3fedbe7af2650febb7
5747e1d907f2e00ad07b1f447dfadaa20938fef5
54001 F20101107_AABNHH kim_s_Page_137.pro
1c51f36d11350d9fa97bd3cb9dc05144
a7526c556da656a4174a6bcec943cc482f1a6008
57801 F20101107_AABNGT kim_s_Page_122.pro
b903f1d2786458564161d0799ebe29fa
fd0e0dec9a37723fe1b78c068e1d8e6db0e21373
721551 F20101107_AABMEF kim_s_Page_113.jp2
56e3bcb99ed369320dfc1b8a91d8b99f
38075768a4aa8837a3da7df5cdbe43784e19b4e9
2164 F20101107_AABMDR kim_s_Page_079.txt
585dd4ef3dd2e23beca9c4f1e1aebd8c
a5f04b5d31e7bb7c777bdcf612873eb93e4eb2b6
27577 F20101107_AABNHI kim_s_Page_138.pro
b76d788107e05ef388e44311173c17f1
a70fb54d0ee59b15181ceb205ebeeb46efb59ddb
55653 F20101107_AABNGU kim_s_Page_124.pro
5359cc49b60cb618ffdeb5763fab9551
8a2857800083ae4bc2d374fcd980e788f8bfeae3
590256 F20101107_AABMEG kim_s_Page_138.jp2
4a2d5ade3fc11d2c6a2b032175f4bc0a
270421d637ef0f986ce6ba15f89d198287c8324c
2065 F20101107_AABMDS kim_s_Page_015.txt
dd63879a06990193d9e2db38888699bb
838f57f5f8141cdd0c413f24389e8fbb4ad8fcf8
33920 F20101107_AABNHJ kim_s_Page_139.pro
79bf49d662343a836b71b6f134b96fb3
be04bee8f59ad1c505259377674feccb9c24d76f
59394 F20101107_AABNGV kim_s_Page_125.pro
391ec97179d9d8fdf39cc1424fb5a2f5
9cb299370a588f82d797b5739a95a52f3d58a57c
1051972 F20101107_AABMEH kim_s_Page_074.jp2
a1cc46f4865feda9742410a1ad52cac6
45f2ee5f1a788b69414d7194c5fbd59103f1aa1a
6370 F20101107_AABMDT kim_s_Page_084thm.jpg
4f259cad57db75cbd81f9778c5e368b3
4053bee07bb47bffc7c9272b7b0e9e576f4a49c5
34509 F20101107_AABNHK kim_s_Page_140.pro
1437949807a8d1a905c15d37b06d1b02
6f9996d424944cd3c18ce0a35dfe1a47a0da661a
55586 F20101107_AABNGW kim_s_Page_126.pro
2410981a9925da163914ea25c3cd3229
d7327afd47a2f66bfb61431676471429bd1b96d3
6798 F20101107_AABMEI kim_s_Page_190thm.jpg
63dd721da8bb53b26160846eb664caf7
8e2cb39892e95d4a5ed2954961a10da9a4e7d657
2105 F20101107_AABMDU kim_s_Page_181.txt
be8aa9319549023be71a1dbb652d117f
d77df124071fedea6bbafa29feb6c463dc5a3940
58509 F20101107_AABNIA kim_s_Page_157.pro
2e437bdb4eb02c70909e8247cfbcc4f9
4b0a91b8039aba33c392e434ef24fcf3e205e1ae
35445 F20101107_AABNHL kim_s_Page_141.pro
0b5aa6efdcd73b64062fc45de7d0780d
4da9d5d2b8a2679fc3571799e983a2dab144ffa0
56093 F20101107_AABNGX kim_s_Page_127.pro
80cd7c22d97114983a20f4a0a00c31d7
699b80954593e46e9b1cc7bc6eb55e31d0ecfa98
31665 F20101107_AABMEJ kim_s_Page_112.pro
a922a836f9043caa9d925a244cbb739b
b11122655c356e046547fb5dc00a31c3154ac7be
383692 F20101107_AABMDV kim_s_Page_192.jp2
c66552b2959218152a0308efb8c6a288
fb761a742ea7332bc4dd3bfd1fc7409c6efd591d
51053 F20101107_AABNIB kim_s_Page_158.pro
e31b8050eb1a803efb17b3841489e31d
233df9dd74000f3f0c586b95abd9cfe360c14fc8
35601 F20101107_AABNHM kim_s_Page_142.pro
d4525fd5032b90dbee74779afa9f26e8
b9b5dadd535b98a3509e53e5d9672b4a5c40511e
57249 F20101107_AABNGY kim_s_Page_128.pro
6eac7ee78d12594f761064929478573d
6f7a68ee920ed232fc38190a687027daaa90e1e1
2302 F20101107_AABMEK kim_s_Page_031.txt
4f018f4c1aca7e0e1b4eae2fd87a2ce7
33b6d7c1aafc1ccdbde72e10853370c6f78e147d
9106 F20101107_AABMDW kim_s_Page_125thm.jpg
39f7ff9aa2aff3cb3e167158435f285f
611bcd349e606c77c49ff9f439918c759d23803f
53246 F20101107_AABNIC kim_s_Page_160.pro
ef7aef927e1dd311570d766cbc06746f
0286165bec32d0714d5e9207d7156b1879c662ac
31644 F20101107_AABNHN kim_s_Page_143.pro
e4fceb517f1cf22203dfd5cc4a9f422c
bc942b2774e1642e4e145956927d849ccbf2766e
58984 F20101107_AABNGZ kim_s_Page_129.pro
6cc0e5a3967fa0d32497dc57f359f5eb
898499539e6ce9c620c380eefb62e9d03f5a8f63
1051982 F20101107_AABMFA kim_s_Page_161.jp2
6e80197f26463baa3a50a26abc1e7104
f6bfab09bb03e60103f0dca0ee103178210e3e86
F20101107_AABMEL kim_s_Page_183.tif
a08a47bab4470d346fb1213ee776cbc6
ad7962d78c237934a50a784ea8c08f68a082df13
36811 F20101107_AABMDX kim_s_Page_076.QC.jpg
97cbfc8f3b69c574eec690ebcd666307
637e136238c7d4e4c8cb3a191591f3fa035f87be
58631 F20101107_AABNID kim_s_Page_161.pro
44b8cb6f2a98f4619b3d699d7a66a655
7f52c2973b3bfff65406f0a3bc0d85e2010247ed
34421 F20101107_AABNHO kim_s_Page_144.pro
98b83d760b243741075dd4b28abcc7ff
ec3d0a74a3fa7f78ce30bbea65821aeb38572e81
F20101107_AABMFB kim_s_Page_139.tif
5451ac8c626bb9dd3263b76783bd43c7
6b2fc361518feae338c4c676947881e85ea12f3b
8279 F20101107_AABMEM kim_s_Page_003thm.jpg
4037eb41e2188a21da0ada2c780e4c1c
306d25ecae387982a87f78652e59122cbf9f581e
36180 F20101107_AABMDY kim_s_Page_020.QC.jpg
d7f5b62335444f6181b61d900a303b2f
22426c51d0ec807072b3ef90b6311024615ccaa7
58911 F20101107_AABNIE kim_s_Page_162.pro
a317dcd5ef53fde1aba908b3aec9b04a
7ce4192a1b432cd1519b4cd4088df8c61a64c11c
31881 F20101107_AABNHP kim_s_Page_145.pro
9b7ec11df04aa3d8827368b064aa6fc4
b06fc00805b0dab7b1219022d7b48fd72d65de56
2212 F20101107_AABMFC kim_s_Page_016.txt
b36f4031a7e80fdc9e3476a298da6f5e
0f1afcf77b4780268477bf9e6398d5f61cbec5b9
2123 F20101107_AABMEN kim_s_Page_137.txt
c9d0701940a0af712de15fda3bfaf3ee
7b7e8bdbb276dc0031d62d337aea317fdac58a40
1051913 F20101107_AABMDZ kim_s_Page_153.jp2
40eec16604aa1a3bd76a8a8c223948e6
dee0dec01ac3ea0b2a576669b04207a2292477fb
57433 F20101107_AABNIF kim_s_Page_163.pro
310a8d0a95c81217844732365106317e
df22a980c6b95deb2702d5ddc432fd1231df50de
30501 F20101107_AABNHQ kim_s_Page_146.pro
945a39e93a15160946de3f740999bd23
e06550304c29be21a6e6d793606c6aa85245ee6f
F20101107_AABMFD kim_s_Page_114.tif
fbbefe5674b8dc3e0327581c5c27801e
f37247efea4b47e77e1fea9b8ac11f995094ee4f
114219 F20101107_AABMEO kim_s_Page_175.jpg
14de8dc46458e89e16c520d943014407
70ea912f8a2f104d60a7213cc88d508533c6d539
30781 F20101107_AABNIG kim_s_Page_164.pro
4d9f0ac736cfa79ec1bf95a8278becde
040c5768718f28617eff4378a17320d0063ddc99
32082 F20101107_AABNHR kim_s_Page_148.pro
0f850b9d14a85fff78beed50b1097e90
2cd2ebcbf8b61293ad1714de44ea0a7f1b31fdc7
310129 F20101107_AABMFE UFE0022528_00001.xml
2b08d1a894e53c3a4e0570bc53814178
50d01512dca6d14a18ce3fbed42d10bf31fabc01
105453 F20101107_AABMEP kim_s_Page_010.jpg
654084b23959bfc14d9c8269dd6877fb
191a7752fdc8d622212b4d51985abe67796b4c78
53894 F20101107_AABNHS kim_s_Page_149.pro
d4ae2b27e4f549da1da16a151e9e90f7
9c720ffea4db4d181626842009c23be4af1c9610
33964 F20101107_AABMEQ kim_s_Page_149.QC.jpg
76fdd430ba3a458d80744dc20dc0bed7
cc1289adce0e58887a35ddf7f545b72f2c6debcf
54141 F20101107_AABNIH kim_s_Page_165.pro
500750aae1864cc596428afa426d8477
6787c6d21ce3e3580311920668896dde787ab196
55943 F20101107_AABNHT kim_s_Page_150.pro
ad1e1c6b4a3e966725e48fe6e1f04686
1e6a21e26cb1f47da352f68fac393ded9f3f4e1b
2199 F20101107_AABMER kim_s_Page_017.txt
a3bc5607cdfa3a8bc91ff6a933f3fe1c
95d474f6a34a673f8723fc67dccf19356cc8cd3d
55764 F20101107_AABNII kim_s_Page_166.pro
7f0a7a05a5a3cfabee5e75b4c318762c
000159f6c2a4eeab30a35b2c05be8bf614591020
53889 F20101107_AABNHU kim_s_Page_151.pro
5bd0b408ac05e580a60df8def16f3ddd
64ff8f9e8557cdbe5b98157280bad201a8866a7b
39901 F20101107_AABMES kim_s_Page_208.QC.jpg
bba49ac9aa68b5dfa35f67459dc56e48
62874fca60006e63db90e379a04e34261b459dba
57112 F20101107_AABNIJ kim_s_Page_167.pro
1126e99afd143a710dd5fcf4418485f6
c4c559d1b5e3fa5089b5e87c78385606546df788
56148 F20101107_AABNHV kim_s_Page_152.pro
887bb5a278eb34bc2b5ffb99311a20dc
488d38c0d12b1d11f6ce6dbf280e744dd0cfc4da
31211 F20101107_AABMFH kim_s_Page_001.jpg
7d464b582580951bae8ef61c1141e486
9442e59f160ac1e35a7850772e04c5f3b97cd31f
2226 F20101107_AABMET kim_s_Page_189.txt
12ee299ac5d6abe13b71768f93a141ff
db14862a50c15bf9a6a1030fa0c86c852af8e5d7
55341 F20101107_AABNIK kim_s_Page_168.pro
aed7bc5fbeb09ed1bf113ede87599fa0
b6c760448bcc1f670d2c85cdee8ef6d8a1943b0e
58035 F20101107_AABNHW kim_s_Page_153.pro
3f9b28162f49febc42cbafed6b64acc7
9e6f3e28b34785db2d4bee10b15cbca2afae9b28
103421 F20101107_AABMFI kim_s_Page_003.jpg
cc05220cc811a996011ee1d3226ec422
100862e2dd13ec9506fe6f9a1bf4a2315db90397
9208 F20101107_AABMEU kim_s_Page_016thm.jpg
dd2180fd0ee7c7e8539ad67160aae6a7
9c02591bf27a6ec55af045b0dbad990609476b08
54620 F20101107_AABNJA kim_s_Page_185.pro
e92ef8f7aace96627de4b64d25b77e2b
6290e70fc56094da22fce49868ad8d12c9a98849
56113 F20101107_AABNIL kim_s_Page_169.pro
0d06b13b04c988943080c448b372b9cb
5292bcc87a56359509bee261b42cc23d7bed4d93
57206 F20101107_AABNHX kim_s_Page_154.pro
ba02df6331e77d268098d938ffee08a2
3fcbc75440de10ea2c7d9b206b9f29f85d093399
55129 F20101107_AABMFJ kim_s_Page_004.jpg
96c4fd29f67ea0b3abcdd869ba0adb24
a4996818c26a8bff6831e36dc89260c58ac8f190
F20101107_AABMEV kim_s_Page_128.tif
a6feb6c6a55f07a780cdfa1cff179e0b
cccb8ebd78ba39438c38242804d1826f5ca43f65
57963 F20101107_AABNJB kim_s_Page_186.pro
19e8d53606356cfa77c4565fda657aa9
49b16d648b41b70884501fc6f5ac57cbc22096be
55080 F20101107_AABNIM kim_s_Page_170.pro
c975a16779753c36b90ad01d5f26bd4f
aa633bf83c73eb286ca8b94911ff6c712c0c57f3
52792 F20101107_AABNHY kim_s_Page_155.pro
76ee279c71ac072ecbb497465949fa12
8b49416f42d562f9f2308c66c87f4eaddd484242
120695 F20101107_AABMFK kim_s_Page_005.jpg
ebece821325acfafc3d089c0e5c29eab
022c06a6df728402c5503aa2321edb7b6849c1fb
2200 F20101107_AABMEW kim_s_Page_013.txt
b049f1744ee48e6f52d1cdff7b2ed731
1074145050f62de7a7b0ee00bdefccd5ad20c770
57364 F20101107_AABNJC kim_s_Page_187.pro
4f9c681b06ccce710b03cab469ada3bc
da02f6a7645a0d6f44e17872ddd82cbd1e788010
57115 F20101107_AABNIN kim_s_Page_171.pro
68c89a6ba2d0e6456bc508dbf9bbba8e
879f38fee8e5f7de07bd692d6b4b9e5e711dc9f3
53307 F20101107_AABNHZ kim_s_Page_156.pro
17b1be81606cc64f54165c3f64e235fe
57d67c51fc190238a4213da6bd2f53edf20f6cb2
43873 F20101107_AABMFL kim_s_Page_007.jpg
957b8a9359088284fba3cf42f9703b7e
a1d5765aa9af6a2520eadb48be6497500b14d873
2595 F20101107_AABMEX kim_s_Page_202.txt
b463bf6d45e1fa20a0bc79d5653a7241
d6de4171b359c428f0fa599f5abde13f4fa4effd
108227 F20101107_AABMGA kim_s_Page_024.jpg
3b655855008088d7de60ce922300b4aa
d8750644d69547cf6ec252d02e1e97203ff6e816
56622 F20101107_AABNJD kim_s_Page_188.pro
1981e675897088491a2c3f6efe70a478
476a64a16d0bbeb0e3de3317fab44e2044972d66
56085 F20101107_AABNIO kim_s_Page_172.pro
cbdf5d11f755fc5c09fafa79fa3fd60f
767628d81be49f766b6d313a0daa686dad98fccf
17556 F20101107_AABMFM kim_s_Page_008.jpg
9a32437d2bae3270cee1509269301025
0f2973ab78094f4463d7e3cbbd7d1a460aac1ed9
8377 F20101107_AABMEY kim_s_Page_150thm.jpg
13b2476233c761112b4c4edc4a89792d
a4c050eacb90f2df41f68f1fbea508a953b8b019
61641 F20101107_AABMGB kim_s_Page_025.jpg
08e9ac0368c16dda8b518f6681b8afe6
b20302aa94029a0a246ac03f98690d27d8888e32
56905 F20101107_AABNJE kim_s_Page_189.pro
982e4b3de3d7442789ca6be9d756ae71
21d4882d5ba39e8e1075f9fe50ae9d6cbef04acc
55973 F20101107_AABNIP kim_s_Page_173.pro
d6cedcb5f3d9b987054a86abc17eb96a
911550dda34fb022cdc560865d6c6184626426aa
101667 F20101107_AABMFN kim_s_Page_009.jpg
f7289a2244a07fee5f6d14a111c4973b
e20c20efc1d33052f00dd868658e9c9c6aeefb70
1051962 F20101107_AABMEZ kim_s_Page_124.jp2
70f3e191bca16d0b4e2785e484eb6790
4d3f19697812d93333d48532e5a8672f04d8ef9a
112422 F20101107_AABMGC kim_s_Page_027.jpg
2445aacd18c68aaa7ee15398c6d327e1
746e02cb2117be4bf337eea9e2f309e0e2e3a090
41958 F20101107_AABNJF kim_s_Page_190.pro
0ff35120ca470cfc8f95e8c7532aea13
d356feaad28714c553bbda0c1cbce82a8e56ebff
60182 F20101107_AABNIQ kim_s_Page_174.pro
ca147f19383d16934f838e6826e22c6b
f11f05d2fd38c25596b35c62c5d6cea3ffdbf3da
110598 F20101107_AABMFO kim_s_Page_011.jpg
7f8edaa1a1116f9a9dcffa6864487b7d
10ee9260c83ff7e5354388af5bb3de416cd2b89d
113660 F20101107_AABMGD kim_s_Page_028.jpg
0c0eb33515d84d85ebaba34056f1513b
fae0781f62cef35970e4b37db34ba89364473615
66170 F20101107_AABNJG kim_s_Page_191.pro
dc1809ad8003a2346ce790f1547d8356
3ed8a3a60998c4203e20b908e59e4f3dabab80e4
57540 F20101107_AABNIR kim_s_Page_175.pro
d47995d60c44cd8f67f778f3f8f1c13c
44e5f8f69ffe166b84449e1056c84074b2488c4e
112434 F20101107_AABMFP kim_s_Page_012.jpg
f88d619e19827b872476767111d28584
8c23596fc10890d1b9dffffb11d5f409515bf9cd
110489 F20101107_AABMGE kim_s_Page_029.jpg
9b1a1a36a9df4279fd6cbec1013cfff1
06a079b8762e1f1a33dc9aa99c665ea0f2124f43
15281 F20101107_AABNJH kim_s_Page_192.pro
a06fb52b4cfb71e516ec4b3de6865e40
ce33df6f61777b9d2af3ff3f712bf5a636780df4
53585 F20101107_AABNIS kim_s_Page_176.pro
6ca83642bf6b5ad885016d7cc3b37fb8
c1c8d8c02f9003884a77564e3bb468a20f69da45
116240 F20101107_AABMFQ kim_s_Page_013.jpg
508ca7f44c6112e3ed4380f8ffc415b1
cc53f37c0c0b9d3167217156fb51db70846bbde1
111495 F20101107_AABMGF kim_s_Page_030.jpg
ebb4e6b698df4cdaaa09a7b2e3e224fd
71032a54fd0c47c44d54ccee96355046387447fb
53609 F20101107_AABNIT kim_s_Page_177.pro
58d20df799e8ba5fb820e3bc127770c4
d7bdefe3361965a01e890cb5ad14f68673ae789f
112444 F20101107_AABMFR kim_s_Page_014.jpg
3be2f202f6c2fd9c44548385c51cc510
1876ccf1820d96004754addc912653b216d66f0b
44261 F20101107_AABNJI kim_s_Page_193.pro
007d74385c63c12d9aa1b3dd9978b509
688b669e06f38381f7353915548a91ad5f6437a6
59583 F20101107_AABNIU kim_s_Page_178.pro
6e5fbffa3dbe632aabab220a223e934d
eea9b9d9619aecc718a304d36d1a654296d90c4c
112533 F20101107_AABMFS kim_s_Page_015.jpg
510f788b042c605b471d1cbd7689405f
bada0b19a2cb2b1336761af16c0f78cc41354a36
116533 F20101107_AABMGG kim_s_Page_031.jpg
08dd1037620c7db884533c10640e46e5
eea63ceaefbfd8e7e49934e7cb499f4a35560142
45819 F20101107_AABNJJ kim_s_Page_194.pro
f22371750cd0e4f8f9e6cb00aa49787d
e0facd39aa1a5fb2392c2a1144c31ea00bd43d0b
56104 F20101107_AABNIV kim_s_Page_179.pro
046d7ff1ba621ff044722129068010b6
4a1a40ca8743442f3722ecd619a0983b719d638b
114619 F20101107_AABMFT kim_s_Page_016.jpg
67d0c0f984a278deec3507d25e0ffe07
6e7e51bee7c96ac17b076b156122c55c1a6e0b52
115313 F20101107_AABMGH kim_s_Page_032.jpg
98758957b286b0dd90f56aa43742ae93
234889ece97a3d6f537a721ac647bd70368be1c6
11060 F20101107_AABNJK kim_s_Page_195.pro
32b029f5ddd65008001bea7e669a305e
169990dd6483f4682195cf05cea55d21949dc7f4
53512 F20101107_AABNIW kim_s_Page_181.pro
3311213bffe33715258992e7f342602c
5c023cdd625f3be7cf3c9c357d49fb991e7f0476
112548 F20101107_AABMFU kim_s_Page_017.jpg
a1bf87dad51fb8b47c19c6b37abe860c
2dbfd36277cde5aa9946eb7220dd0985b27ebb57
112479 F20101107_AABMGI kim_s_Page_033.jpg
5ce2f3aad6340b109a37adc7db45e482
2d60f15f204586f0ca549a411741cabbf3fd4795
32969 F20101107_AABNKA kim_s_Page_211.pro
09930ad37efd0f1cce38932d4e7160ba
93ceae0ec0fb8cb1290a70a079fe30ffdffa4656
63899 F20101107_AABNJL kim_s_Page_196.pro
dd26204d6948915810ca181d94c4d790
efee0bdc0bfe1bf9b01be7d7beff9db94a1ab134
55905 F20101107_AABNIX kim_s_Page_182.pro
d3aa7efac7151407ac27bcc27ae9ebc9
dfc40495d37e2b3ef3e1fc20e56d8b17c6942ab6
111682 F20101107_AABMFV kim_s_Page_018.jpg
ce91f29711189e7c60a5d2366caf2e47
91bcf66b2df4fbfc402b1b203d6b273366262351
115709 F20101107_AABMGJ kim_s_Page_034.jpg
4e8cfad386792959efa83b505bfeec4a
93135705daf5ee310d4aadced6a378fe11af4277
90 F20101107_AABNKB kim_s_Page_002.txt
c94d4a460de3519d236a227e224b2ac0
578e4c046da31aa3ed9115232ddf8acff2bd4335
72802 F20101107_AABNJM kim_s_Page_197.pro
3b13f3013a99a691f7d1748891c9c06c
1a9a7e74676facb2fba13e091e1353a4b6662421
56502 F20101107_AABNIY kim_s_Page_183.pro
a1f8a32ddbf44b59abf4fcfa9c1b71ce
f428cb33a7cc683746cf622affd84a3204518ad8
107320 F20101107_AABMFW kim_s_Page_019.jpg
19d14e8b75fe531e38df1c7d2fa7501d
bee703ea42518b3705c937fb25463381b4fcfd99
111412 F20101107_AABMGK kim_s_Page_035.jpg
56397456664788c3407673667167431a
b4c91c9cb63e4ae95725ba0d02b83ba05cb05553
2045 F20101107_AABNKC kim_s_Page_003.txt
333dd76ea7ddd81cb43caf23b08e5f2e
512a027cf8cb42a055e177462089a58e190c455a
69312 F20101107_AABNJN kim_s_Page_198.pro
fee60935cc2f772522dc22e16d2c77a8
573fd86cf43a8f9bf797c735c2ae063f17052c20
54929 F20101107_AABNIZ kim_s_Page_184.pro
831a1ac851fcb2624c29c45f90e51e7f
41db832d0798bcd5c80807f13ddaf39b75d25ab7
108897 F20101107_AABMFX kim_s_Page_020.jpg
0b7872a28d445666cf7906599eb46fee
b31adf9d6415b74af8df333960c337d027e47fe4
116088 F20101107_AABMHA kim_s_Page_052.jpg
ed2865b108c384f18eb21c0be65426cf
af3d5d3111eead52ac01147473be584b08384192
116571 F20101107_AABMGL kim_s_Page_036.jpg
7d45279ece467e31c4846f892234fd6d
5d47aff7882ce7286523370a5d2b5120f3e086de
1031 F20101107_AABNKD kim_s_Page_004.txt
6cdbbea673d1738c8b04222ff135ad5d
ed768d028de5789a4117c39ca7381cff15c299b5
64015 F20101107_AABNJO kim_s_Page_199.pro
7ae7b7be7b10c6f71d79b1ae8911fd77
664a85dc7aaec4b82fa040053162560c8ba24d69
111190 F20101107_AABMHB kim_s_Page_053.jpg
f2fed686a571565d91a9a1f9f519c2a2
78dc5ae481b76c0acdce5088714e160494c6ea3b
114032 F20101107_AABMGM kim_s_Page_037.jpg
8236a66f247da83f9b1fba5f88ce63af
7e6d5ff27e0a78bd821cc397d61a462db1e35088
108855 F20101107_AABMFY kim_s_Page_021.jpg
bb2807aabe67c8c8f1aae176afef800d
5ff58a71b5d4d837acd17d02f5ecfa09cbb21642
3977 F20101107_AABNKE kim_s_Page_005.txt
a9e0ada0a6cc297ad6b112cd70c131ed
54960442916f77472ad209cb4f3f32a9cd114031
64644 F20101107_AABNJP kim_s_Page_200.pro
7b63ca9e048e1f3eb9f68fde96ab1e18
9f34be93848fd9cc6d6ea7a89ad878d558f201bf
116070 F20101107_AABMHC kim_s_Page_054.jpg
47e1f468a019d5bcd3e2c0431486caeb
5fd781ef24eea3ebfb0fdf62e79d762733ae59f7
110970 F20101107_AABMGN kim_s_Page_039.jpg
adafd97da7024907a2f0d6055b54f07c
cd46ed641232627584a5aa9fb0c07890aeb5aa3a
98084 F20101107_AABMFZ kim_s_Page_022.jpg
c2cb241a74734e71f7703fe77d06bada
4462ea2eac017d6ec931a0e94e1ca1499f48f849
4970 F20101107_AABNKF kim_s_Page_006.txt
8fa678b9af97f5336f4f7acb44ba74c1
8831f91b682ce3928f29745c6c7f2b37b96a4af2
62237 F20101107_AABNJQ kim_s_Page_201.pro
cd329fbc978b6c13145a5a658182f7bb
bed01419d4653626b996479b2f1e87e89d862285
112979 F20101107_AABMHD kim_s_Page_055.jpg
8a8f88518ef4906a8a2c96a6c755f950
32eed9cd961e1b98a8bc14cedee53e72bb048b9b
114189 F20101107_AABMGO kim_s_Page_040.jpg
811a8ed0a873192104eee71438a19546
5732c4ac104bf3ab5e1dafda62190af0ee01c238
1200 F20101107_AABNKG kim_s_Page_007.txt
38ce8644fc94c6792b2a2adeb45e7e29
042b2d96b58fceb51522f468f71202822f41be2a
63680 F20101107_AABNJR kim_s_Page_202.pro
99e1fa37eeccaca7f87d06e7d9b7f4e4
b5f3557aa2c81dcb9887fb964e35e3d57cd8ffdf
117269 F20101107_AABMHE kim_s_Page_056.jpg
d572d9bbfcca177a8d600f32890916cb
603b35cb3b0fbbb03ff8dc63be4e6d02087a2b61
110914 F20101107_AABMGP kim_s_Page_041.jpg
90778a42d853b76faf6e75ba024f22c1
7f03b54298227042fd2955845abd54d37a2b9281
512 F20101107_AABNKH kim_s_Page_008.txt
f7da1ad74b27d91790b3848f089fae96
26de70ccd2d633a3be71c70565a1a7ca4dd9ba08
68190 F20101107_AABNJS kim_s_Page_203.pro
e740fb7a2e638e69aee7df1381cc47b0
5cb29eae1384b3a874e03dfc3debe1004a6c4c49
108191 F20101107_AABMHF kim_s_Page_057.jpg
d166a9c92fa3a6e86e68fec5b19db5ca
70b65e557a8e65a2ccb18a313bb0da1f0bd51e8c
114181 F20101107_AABMGQ kim_s_Page_042.jpg
d38093f4fcb1fd5a50b792ed4512ed33
8667dea64ef60d06bc2d7346df530362a5662fd3
2122 F20101107_AABNKI kim_s_Page_009.txt
85915ae5c067daffcbfa74c81ae4a056
795093bfab98650c664519bbf009d4718acc1c97
60701 F20101107_AABNJT kim_s_Page_204.pro
5d535ac4f17164c5452a7f5924eb8e96
163ada3c6d304babee0fcdd1d4c88de2153afeb3
109879 F20101107_AABMHG kim_s_Page_058.jpg
dfff353aea337c8485a4eb8a1a30185d
44582d406b9f1735aef60d937c589db37a5c1205
114391 F20101107_AABMGR kim_s_Page_043.jpg
47341856d866096446ef2e26568b6e45
93154f83821ebeb3910b3a4e022cc58c6dd9d40a
66641 F20101107_AABNJU kim_s_Page_205.pro
b7359e6f2d8e2c9a157e8b2e82bd73ae
395a07715fa94abf2ed94624fc9da9e1071e0f6a
111351 F20101107_AABMGS kim_s_Page_044.jpg
2acd0a537a96261b1bedecfd054da11f
bb081e35d97ed094d555e054af8dbf874661c26c
2096 F20101107_AABNKJ kim_s_Page_010.txt
a290c8148f769b2dd85cae0fcd319300
d5ea4aa4fa6490be2f523c8ff0709c1128f3aa43
59645 F20101107_AABNJV kim_s_Page_206.pro
0bffdfc50268decd074e97ecebdb5031
46bb27e43cd6e1a871162437ba2130a5f46eda68
115024 F20101107_AABMHH kim_s_Page_059.jpg
ee26d1bb2e6db4c332acf149fea7685c
082b99af6ee4a88f1965da374b651d895837f522
109311 F20101107_AABMGT kim_s_Page_045.jpg
b0a95157648f5868e22f1d09c7462c66
e5fef7f0e8118ff450ef1205cbea13cdaf038d4b
2225 F20101107_AABNKK kim_s_Page_011.txt
c9966bfd78d78ee8cc3f3e35cfc35047
af1d2a9faa06f4fb045f2e1ad79c1668346daec5
66255 F20101107_AABNJW kim_s_Page_207.pro
a970ed7234e81d5e82e8a0fc4dcc62d7
fa302438235cb023a6223f407da5eabe2b3844c9
46220 F20101107_AABMHI kim_s_Page_060.jpg
12b1f7aa5b88cef9eb98a92e1caa671a
8acf24796a56d95339c23771cda981fa2a436256
114236 F20101107_AABMGU kim_s_Page_046.jpg
f186335cee20c17d636ebe923fedc7bd
320d1c123a69be622b8cf00bb92c7c81ad86cf62
2128 F20101107_AABNLA kim_s_Page_033.txt
a47da80f651e607f1aa91e3b46c319cd
aee8480d59b330c93bf5e517a50792a043c674c1
2186 F20101107_AABNKL kim_s_Page_012.txt
6c3c27ffc0a661bedca19754bc76b806
73f050c01bda758014d30e103a68cf4179f0def8
69172 F20101107_AABNJX kim_s_Page_208.pro
4248e6c750ce1935794a21fcc3c9ffce
0c4ce5da7da2426706d1e94acdc84fad78598223
106576 F20101107_AABMHJ kim_s_Page_061.jpg
76ed04cc8d9eebd89054d97dad2c3b6d
f9eca32de5207751166e97f15147d2b57ea98c49
116369 F20101107_AABMGV kim_s_Page_047.jpg
73fc97c8523766e1438f5dea64c19048
1d8d40280e3c50841c5e3fcc7d85fec1e498c0c0
2239 F20101107_AABNLB kim_s_Page_034.txt
97bdfe65e5592c0af2f84372d6d09930
59be5cbe19d0a121a2ae03daedd2e47172a06c18
F20101107_AABNKM kim_s_Page_014.txt
bad18f46f93424e6e5f7adc41b75f1ea
ab2ba87ff5395b54dc6ffe70441e656114e8fac0
66797 F20101107_AABNJY kim_s_Page_209.pro
3617aea4fc1f4f973adf5a4f6f2b68cf
b4e55f6110d4e10dfa8548c1f04dd91f13b914ee
114166 F20101107_AABMHK kim_s_Page_062.jpg
6b1433d94452e7b1b4547f549056604c
fe27a5c3ec37544f527fb7ff6a5771c6aee10215
115953 F20101107_AABMGW kim_s_Page_048.jpg
efa962b8e1a81c78bbdf90c40bd9a170
89b05cba7036e7c2a598dfb623cc8def0156a6db
2144 F20101107_AABNLC kim_s_Page_035.txt
10e3a1624363bbde184bec4dfe9ab81c
70d5e6dca9ef6a994b9ec6d9bdde8ac84cb04ee2
2062 F20101107_AABNKN kim_s_Page_018.txt
70b86575f2b994a7fde1512fc58f6cc3
20fadc8d04f7d24082b606734b8df6d2719e33da
32063 F20101107_AABNJZ kim_s_Page_210.pro
634d0fcc20c5e8196e878880ac07bd19
6e8241c66afdd464af9e4df0a01f82eb69d4e203
111849 F20101107_AABMHL kim_s_Page_063.jpg
d0407ce63e05eaedf796a9a127e3a6e8
4eadd489e8d427465c73bafffde19e4eb5dd044a
115102 F20101107_AABMGX kim_s_Page_049.jpg
43a196bb58ba9be3c0276b404a021952
01cd7c85ac3adf6cb9420df07ab28b38d774ed1b
112442 F20101107_AABMIA kim_s_Page_078.jpg
150a1dd522a72e4168612bdc8de4475a
66c4650955b72dd2cd58c14221b434c4c433c63f
2305 F20101107_AABNLD kim_s_Page_036.txt
c41169ebeb67c446b851ad2a1ecf7a35
e8a81ce2500e48be9d49e739c9417e9b375604e3
2178 F20101107_AABNKO kim_s_Page_019.txt
7e75ace45341a73e88d3cbcbf96a47f9
38ec491b58a7c05bb023a38033890b154f54cd51
111692 F20101107_AABMHM kim_s_Page_064.jpg
550e8177e4efffcddc7c9083c8893d3d
1c657831603b8d3dc23b7a34671b00473c5ca3aa
108078 F20101107_AABMGY kim_s_Page_050.jpg
d912e976cb199b75d0fad7a9b7846331
558dbc2fc9c8feb693655d88b0499df0c4418d28
108993 F20101107_AABMIB kim_s_Page_079.jpg
b7978bf293dfa049355db0d749bf6056
db93f2863b0a04abce517fe5ba000525a1f2d219
2242 F20101107_AABNLE kim_s_Page_037.txt
0a5c969bdeddb51cffb997ef38932d75
7843df377362bfc51d266b5a96d5ac9aab882f9a
2203 F20101107_AABNKP kim_s_Page_021.txt
eca74b5c28797c57a898ac896ecffe09
9053d1eaa6e953152d22647070c3aa3a29265cfd
110383 F20101107_AABMHN kim_s_Page_065.jpg
4f38231cc928543acebf74d753267342
cd8cadcbfa75d06de301bd562e4adfa6eae18c59
120546 F20101107_AABMGZ kim_s_Page_051.jpg
e0193ca41d31ec508da6d20cca711144
1e2178321a6ca214d288c6c94db4718b4ec55b55
107568 F20101107_AABMIC kim_s_Page_080.jpg
3ef2e1f6371db6e29fa4b912235399fa
5d354bb14d47dcf720ba73fe021d982b68868204
F20101107_AABNLF kim_s_Page_038.txt
50fdc50d56a9821a73ba8845c49f6536
2a3ff7fff00de94941531eb6edc838d4679e45e7
2055 F20101107_AABNKQ kim_s_Page_022.txt
9c705a919d435a6340ef5c187c953a24
0c126850fb5d1a6ce51d89be5d1986c3e5a00722
109267 F20101107_AABMHO kim_s_Page_066.jpg
60a1fc95037edefbe8685908fa168581
a496d0b4f805391f3eaacf380241a81520e4f013
25898 F20101107_AABMID kim_s_Page_081.jpg
b63f12c8a9f2f3c1ea6f235048f14132
87395ce71f3c2eef5f0b9eb1b75e94a1702b4215
2198 F20101107_AABNLG kim_s_Page_039.txt
6a82adeeb93e8cd00f752d4128924e30
3f0150fb724f8683227d859220e008b3fc7a347a
2184 F20101107_AABNKR kim_s_Page_023.txt
4bcf4f803a4122aea65e377f2ee64d1d
46c6f22e0792d9c651728d894c80c597e6717caf
104988 F20101107_AABMHP kim_s_Page_067.jpg
555362fcc7e8068506f0e51218569d3a
34d3d268d2d57b8ab1e4d6bc1dc5c14197acbb0e
104995 F20101107_AABMIE kim_s_Page_082.jpg
8ff36734e880a8c918691c39270f9327
9898107539c87ea23272284614bad4b989f6ea2c
2222 F20101107_AABNLH kim_s_Page_040.txt
747942c0b15bc7de1b1f42db6da83587
b6ed51841cbeab3befb33586b5f7071f464dcf7f
2115 F20101107_AABNKS kim_s_Page_024.txt
d32916c124230d63747ab6b235ccb640
c1dfe59fc20f6fa6b384d1869e214c06e321e150
109954 F20101107_AABMHQ kim_s_Page_068.jpg
a7f7b0045c59445b00a067d1588363be
29c53c65d0556a7ac54062b7bf304f660ce35610
99816 F20101107_AABMIF kim_s_Page_083.jpg
2bc2bcb24af82b7784d094c76457e0e3
892b85d88dd204fac6e4f9eb44faa584f19f9b74
2240 F20101107_AABNLI kim_s_Page_041.txt
787bc12960061e6dcb117c127e05c66d
cc5be3220c4d698f57b6a92ed4d4ec628fd0b66a
1178 F20101107_AABNKT kim_s_Page_025.txt
af51d052aaa6dae27922a21d93f1b9b3
016641de27381c1604d990e427a0b8b9a1160979
111804 F20101107_AABMHR kim_s_Page_069.jpg
72711354ab14fe7ad8e3a39d4bc51eb1
fe514b09ffd1c69745d3496a78d91cd5827fecc7
71778 F20101107_AABMIG kim_s_Page_084.jpg
84482a20f1a19069ae7ced6d5c81c337
469a3d8ff74b77b32bf778ce4d1ebf5b299dcd51
F20101107_AABNLJ kim_s_Page_042.txt
ef7d9997ba13cea07c3c4ff7ce23ee89
01d8e6aaeef05d4f2e1f216db73784fa72847815
2172 F20101107_AABNKU kim_s_Page_026.txt
c517f4e7776d3da724e8dc13c132ace4
be1e75e452769ed02ab30df1aaf0e04c14f40c7b
112874 F20101107_AABMHS kim_s_Page_070.jpg
152c0a3f018a3ef1fad74d7cccbc83cd
c082b75e173125cef881066163530436b30ed7aa
65794 F20101107_AABMIH kim_s_Page_085.jpg
733009d5ce4853f06a16e7b2b8cbbf98
e20cfac28a0d8ce38622de7ed6016554a5044c6f
2197 F20101107_AABNKV kim_s_Page_027.txt
096059295b0cdd137d07793f74fdd2f6
f5db17f25722d68b2fb776135abe31dce4cfcb26
106763 F20101107_AABMHT kim_s_Page_071.jpg
33bc7a07860f2f45f4e695075d71a5b7
c947d160d8359e92bd518d2321acb75d852e9da2
2246 F20101107_AABNLK kim_s_Page_043.txt
5d157448c672e0b7bc6e31320738db5e
203f19c7028c0c579dfdcf77256210347a0bf58b
2293 F20101107_AABNKW kim_s_Page_028.txt
d934e16b47184241b74bfa478b21d565
522951f9733d8dcbd0112fd404d1bbfaa03de628
110249 F20101107_AABMHU kim_s_Page_072.jpg
2e1377cb7de494e03c0aa9bc8a35e2ed
22e6c85eb0145c2146a83cc6056054715e92ef3a
61759 F20101107_AABMII kim_s_Page_086.jpg
ca0920b05482fc68fae3b3b3ef75326b
d9d2bacf35c0f896a80a59dbf4c19b10bafa1c3b
2270 F20101107_AABNMA kim_s_Page_059.txt
41cf36bc56584871a934643d38598658
df605ccf89fb2523f956125e083a32ee35376735
2272 F20101107_AABNLL kim_s_Page_044.txt
8f4ab8d8cee021a52dd1bc24de53ffa0
19ea669a1694d14c5281205b033e36daad7c0320
2187 F20101107_AABNKX kim_s_Page_029.txt
21ae64b053b07a02bca717c63c2a6ace
1dc2c62f7cbb9850b2a2a946dcaabd69f2accb30
111055 F20101107_AABMHV kim_s_Page_073.jpg
0c99265d9c25ff9e2b837852e559b372
a08c7a1dd96e39de095920068cb7f13653873218
61075 F20101107_AABMIJ kim_s_Page_088.jpg
8fe6463902f1d28643db61ae6329ffce
86fc39550873c676b800345458a51431bf4e7e3a
865 F20101107_AABNMB kim_s_Page_060.txt
0fbc0c1b2014c42831d31856e5b63b42
5af7960a87e6fdbf1e5e21edcc820b65dfc58a20
2173 F20101107_AABNLM kim_s_Page_045.txt
c60b1a37c76fb94f2084aaa05036706e
03fcd24d8d8d445e6286a4737ffb86c11cadde8d
F20101107_AABNKY kim_s_Page_030.txt
72cc24c5eb75702498216f3affc3b260
543fd3a920b7f859571d1a502559b289a92195c8
108774 F20101107_AABMHW kim_s_Page_074.jpg
8195d90505a2baef2c5bfb5dc1e90834
3b42fa96b0f34a46335b376ae36105e40b518f7b
64118 F20101107_AABMIK kim_s_Page_089.jpg
83ef648c8c15b9fb62ddf9ec708ff70f
d74b1d98eb372bff0f6df3b240a3b863619c680d
F20101107_AABNMC kim_s_Page_061.txt
cc7ae95370d1482b38b5114ede1b7a35
061e9f9023d6f2aaf47764ba2f4cc041b12ca1df
2232 F20101107_AABNLN kim_s_Page_046.txt
e97b58d8ec4cd06b925fbbb06f4a95b4
5171c161e1bdf172949eb9f036f6eaf1250c5144
2234 F20101107_AABNKZ kim_s_Page_032.txt
b172a60ef1f97e7fa90452bd13a51f0c
c22d29922590feda0124f4ba19ecb21ab997dacb
113454 F20101107_AABMHX kim_s_Page_075.jpg
a969134297171016feb5c6f368dd844f
a53a6cf064510a6670fe10ac6c92f0b6ff6312c0
112123 F20101107_AABMJA kim_s_Page_107.jpg
3acb8cc9c161b6163c6642df3887a79c
912b3b1c888243c25b1c9b7fa44487c3b7c97509
60971 F20101107_AABMIL kim_s_Page_090.jpg
bd4954cb598b28ce6a142aa8327127bf
e23d4485603489a9421bcc7302158dd8faeef6c5
F20101107_AABNMD kim_s_Page_062.txt
32e81dd82338312f1fc67b72759e7220
e1f225ff07aaacfeee75b6341a50ea01a482cb66
2274 F20101107_AABNLO kim_s_Page_047.txt
fa07fb5c2ea6848f09939022f0bff3ae
149f2bee6addad9a58f83542ead4e0a1333d943f
112620 F20101107_AABMHY kim_s_Page_076.jpg
8da77b09b13df9d6d8ab02d243f4d4bb
5725246484f4ab9478094b1e9b8e51d341fc0c6d
111025 F20101107_AABMJB kim_s_Page_108.jpg
9b29400f23b0796d85a2928de3e67078
867fb3eb74820e76120f8a0076cc5a131084439d
64943 F20101107_AABMIM kim_s_Page_091.jpg
f9253823a8ec90422cb2820329f6ff54
2c70f34740ed7b49a2965503a9b0806ff693e3a6
2181 F20101107_AABNME kim_s_Page_063.txt
00306707770b11bef67695c5e8225a8a
ca7062554299c70a5009ce664df052832292b491
2311 F20101107_AABNLP kim_s_Page_048.txt
0d43ccbae2e8598f8a704837b596e6cf
9d2bd66313ee25e422dc5340a780b4e4c0134af4
112568 F20101107_AABMHZ kim_s_Page_077.jpg
97612e8e667df38ddb6ac9afd89b00fe
9b42d11c9beff0e426c4ebfcf40972928043ac24
110924 F20101107_AABMJC kim_s_Page_109.jpg
d6f4ee1bad0db4a27f3a3a1646ddd1e6
a71130cd50fd2050a26b248fd196a9020e16e13b
66007 F20101107_AABMIN kim_s_Page_092.jpg
4e80b19a853b50ad0ed7cb88625367ea
df632852fa7953f13d008db68f2029f1b25f1725
2213 F20101107_AABNMF kim_s_Page_064.txt
741901b291a0f79a101d383ceb931d35
3ea9aa9823bb1c6ec4813b44c8997a64f30be6ea
2269 F20101107_AABNLQ kim_s_Page_049.txt
92c58588f958bb6a229a9864a3049ab3
0d294cec0fbb35fee946d362065acbbfc115af60
76634 F20101107_AABMJD kim_s_Page_110.jpg
32d184b5a74294bb8f2d5eda160993f8
580191df5204867d1c71ec7d9e307bbfefcb89cf
66674 F20101107_AABMIO kim_s_Page_094.jpg
6e8e0921826406df527205affc3f0b38
c520e48a65f23529c287e2275bfcff75dac3c0f5
2193 F20101107_AABNMG kim_s_Page_065.txt
d9ba14318cef64f378bbadac8bb05d58
aaf220b3e0917ae13b25985df692e35514cde4a0
2081 F20101107_AABNLR kim_s_Page_050.txt
20e4c85cd870df9048fe27b312d27945
d833a774535ab95eb45d2901cfbe9e1956910c8b
66492 F20101107_AABMJE kim_s_Page_111.jpg
b0e30ccacb9c114a90124c0faad7c8e5
f46627cdc674ee234aba56c3e6285a3734f3a7a1
95752 F20101107_AABMIP kim_s_Page_095.jpg
938fbb5b30f75fb2e3589064613b31a9
f3f64298becb6320f52059ed3d0c9c8af05c1272
2214 F20101107_AABNMH kim_s_Page_066.txt
81135fff70f719cda07686ad24680ab0
fb0412c3fae3a7743fb1068bf5828fe13b21de7b
2368 F20101107_AABNLS kim_s_Page_051.txt
315c9faa43726b3d090dd86e9108e09e
d87c213b3d306d91da8883c4f2186bf37534f94e
63808 F20101107_AABMJF kim_s_Page_112.jpg
d46ec46b98be0a06451504d747e11d70
4dd1d304bad9e2ab5b3f12637896c70d5311d54e
106684 F20101107_AABMIQ kim_s_Page_096.jpg
5a64174222bf9ce6a32b733d948a888b
bf00928b6bb15f0a706bb768070977539f1e36f5
2147 F20101107_AABNMI kim_s_Page_067.txt
a28e801932e31eb00e22b5d2ce9bae06
09eed7cf721b0b9a49333710013523916f19c882
2237 F20101107_AABNLT kim_s_Page_052.txt
222a2b38d329f70e4f0c1dd0c1869106
7cfaf0b201d73bfba3b4dd5963c0ee3c2ad942ff
67816 F20101107_AABMJG kim_s_Page_113.jpg
c54ac8541a2ac6a52f2f34157bcae7b6
9d49273bbd39a34450f811e821431db66ec7a77a
93215 F20101107_AABMIR kim_s_Page_097.jpg
3aa92cbd65ab0bfddad33e55e5c1106d
0baad05beb3e201fc131411b9c2d16189d550a70
2220 F20101107_AABNMJ kim_s_Page_068.txt
3238dad960f944bbe14817c378c41e60
ab797f6d22d36277bbd4b8837ba66b1ebba2ba4b
F20101107_AABNLU kim_s_Page_053.txt
1b3ef475b06ca9ab2c7274aa271366f9
6522a7c8fe8f635178b795a54502eb61435f0f72
66413 F20101107_AABMJH kim_s_Page_114.jpg
3fab71458a18858d5f1c13a63ad9b0d3
f150ad2217af7ee9a95ac5dc013ef77183a1372d
110716 F20101107_AABMIS kim_s_Page_098.jpg
2d8e2f97ee376ab04dd8ac357a445b10
992377e16b0f747471336bef4a39b14dcab5afa9
2171 F20101107_AABNMK kim_s_Page_069.txt
02f47b56fcf1234828eb388e005c7f95
968e2bf3a0b4c116c1da7d73826c4060856ab07b
2291 F20101107_AABNLV kim_s_Page_054.txt
7a917558bfc448df119eb6f5f3956dc2
5ab3c8ba8a621c32ab9752280b34409fd4b82dea
69713 F20101107_AABMJI kim_s_Page_115.jpg
d8deeebc236d9f774a87a040b8e3ca71
6368ab2aab39d6ae4f54b31dc55e197be6d594c3
112618 F20101107_AABMIT kim_s_Page_099.jpg
11c3c4c7dd928207e5c865cd0da1ee70
1ac9a3564aaa2bfa607b76017971986dd4bd1721
2206 F20101107_AABNLW kim_s_Page_055.txt
a1087034c31093d3ed2d7ff48c962efd
9459728438d80cd5c3c381b6f11915d0bf7172bb
108010 F20101107_AABMIU kim_s_Page_100.jpg
25a36d434c4e9438c43c83d846b51884
ac4c0f7f5ea30d64cca77fedb135d291c9811ea6
1221 F20101107_AABNNA kim_s_Page_086.txt
627ba754ec3108d91a79f1b4103c2fd4
1d6317688e5db6449872dcfe278cd64854546c47
F20101107_AABNML kim_s_Page_070.txt
20855d002805c184a9ef0f3225a516f5
4ea5d4bebd8b2bf8b46541a35be6d7b98d2e8104
2280 F20101107_AABNLX kim_s_Page_056.txt
6e83f47636b855a75860fe65336644b2
dd8bb0e518f2aa7181083aa1b15ca4d4aeb0e370
71828 F20101107_AABMJJ kim_s_Page_116.jpg
0ccffda358b2899f5f08c0d580cd423e
fdfb6e3a1142613920fac3a65cd87376e0e13ed9
106454 F20101107_AABMIV kim_s_Page_102.jpg
bf2c501d4d80a3420780de9120f70aa8
009c32b5bb757bf06ccb803e634e039af95326cd
1452 F20101107_AABNNB kim_s_Page_087.txt
15e316bd0c5be836e83c9adfee93076f
5161831df8ad7bf967b0a9ec18de7e1ed8f41e9b
2148 F20101107_AABNMM kim_s_Page_071.txt
8cbde500bf6b0bbb606c82011247569f
59475b4c01d1545741ff8fde71bfe509aacfc403
F20101107_AABNLY kim_s_Page_057.txt
04a1b31fa5ca506c207f3c8363e9b1cd
00f8d05907fd9239df0f1207a40571c8c2e49fbc
67120 F20101107_AABMJK kim_s_Page_117.jpg
8ecedcd684677c3537af6a330d66b638
7e02521ce4424fafe7212a3880ec1c5a7dc8bafe
111618 F20101107_AABMIW kim_s_Page_103.jpg
3567f195d5bad4540c04582534779468
1443f7de59efb4a12e182e20ebb3b91cd0610dfd
1325 F20101107_AABNNC kim_s_Page_089.txt
f4e5ffe06039a7ddfa2d980f1e645a69
516179715d6faf342d9234141f3b7edf13f6bff1
2161 F20101107_AABNMN kim_s_Page_072.txt
73dbc8e3376ce7c413aea39584ad7333
34cb60716da67ab822274aa08c46910e36ef9619
2179 F20101107_AABNLZ kim_s_Page_058.txt
d9b735f270b1bb92ff53151aedef563d
2220c1deec0eb91206f3391e2aafeda816ce9a15
113437 F20101107_AABMKA kim_s_Page_133.jpg
ebe54b74fb6ed33f3c43645d47cee83b
bba8f364936fd0161f793bd117facc25ffb162a8
70232 F20101107_AABMJL kim_s_Page_118.jpg
507046a1483ef68c7e9e40f23f723543
3edab777f187a69861ccca7c2af27b24ff5a9398
113369 F20101107_AABMIX kim_s_Page_104.jpg
da1eac8609831292ccf4a0f2f5d96571
de9c728d5276d26e84be2222bd383045fae8f384
1290 F20101107_AABNND kim_s_Page_090.txt
cd706d4f0dea3a6ceb38d88a100f56bb
6060aa38d27a91d30d90dd460cb3719be92f9462
F20101107_AABNMO kim_s_Page_073.txt
b48df5d8cf9c128675531ef30ca7f2f4
b4eeeb822de1085d43b6c70b5d6bd87b6f7d5d65
112996 F20101107_AABMKB kim_s_Page_134.jpg
b8c46d801d8210a5b2dec69a34a48e66
1944b26097223695598bd311a93ff49b2b177667
63530 F20101107_AABMJM kim_s_Page_119.jpg
dabd47d041bb5e4a7862e77a82affecc
f460e0035f9dac6225c99fd22cbfb121bca1ea73
113950 F20101107_AABMIY kim_s_Page_105.jpg
ddceb701d73cf05e5a77c6cd274d6577
321d819244a2ebfbf268c06207d1ae294e5cabbd
1435 F20101107_AABNNE kim_s_Page_091.txt
c0a022088fd0cfd055af5ad777a05579
4cea454641fea0f78b6fdcf0637171e89d5b4932
2205 F20101107_AABNMP kim_s_Page_074.txt
4e44c4071bdf23a1a5502e487fc869be
1e99b9511863f65c0a0a6683e8a839a4b4ee1f76
115346 F20101107_AABMKC kim_s_Page_135.jpg
68d0ac35f39c55e32fd0ceb2f0a3debd
eb345543058e18f0f9d426a22972739b406850bf
64081 F20101107_AABMJN kim_s_Page_120.jpg
55e2b07cefab07196a474b7e39f3b60b
49ebdf36c36a3ef5a2de27db355ffda9b300a301
112539 F20101107_AABMIZ kim_s_Page_106.jpg
c63aadfdaf3a6366b441c414c4d5e194
525caff01ba8636a153c2d5a852c318f8fcf25ae
1364 F20101107_AABNNF kim_s_Page_092.txt
728e3133313073658da3cd5176a87c80
19d2a63584a1d7b7cdebd452b2c503d3664cf5fa
2218 F20101107_AABNMQ kim_s_Page_075.txt
6a59159477ffc9fabbe4560baaecc572
58f066a7b8d01441e9561dd0dd1506738f247b15
113114 F20101107_AABMKD kim_s_Page_136.jpg
8b8a712fd5a06889c60835ae02330f59
2aaf995d5a649431e5b585fb2740ca1042685c2c
110469 F20101107_AABMJO kim_s_Page_121.jpg
2de73d4b132ad8a9881247d1e05ae313
915464a7c7703adc71a4b35914bfc720bb44085b
1451 F20101107_AABNNG kim_s_Page_093.txt
c009f610e4e9163dd83c2f83f6d3dc77
a2aaaf05dc651d065c0c685689ffb229865d8b93
2217 F20101107_AABNMR kim_s_Page_076.txt
443e9c7e7e6c8beeb1489d17809fc0c2
f3f42eff483374e4ab41198f26b03154d2954816
105663 F20101107_AABMKE kim_s_Page_137.jpg
771af644f7038a844fcb9b9a2bef28c8
0e87213813aa2441ae05cac2cc898087c7676f71
113597 F20101107_AABMJP kim_s_Page_122.jpg
01968ce172ef73f8965e538d68c8fc57
b2be4d35af8a2d6f46e881f3fb75d2b9709f3ad3
F20101107_AABNNH kim_s_Page_094.txt
3188bb8d25fa19acb11bb84090e213cc
5131e4d1bf0784c4bbf41d0368887eb8f4f5a872
2297 F20101107_AABNMS kim_s_Page_077.txt
983e4e243edd220bf8e19c8a7ad54d89
bf9f03a0e09480ac6f6b03fdef593f91afd8ffdd
56859 F20101107_AABMKF kim_s_Page_138.jpg
be8e7b436eb56e3761f95dbedf1d15eb
3b53ecdae2623e4ff0ff0df89a397e472bfbca01
105479 F20101107_AABMJQ kim_s_Page_123.jpg
fe1e1c74dce0f521479a3c61c72ced1b
5db83e70fa84fe7ad23ef9b8bc19587c1cbc6544
1988 F20101107_AABNNI kim_s_Page_095.txt
a4b3efaf2ff793978ed658299e2b3109
20cf3097328a6899fcf1484f39c6c8b2aa3b2804
2289 F20101107_AABNMT kim_s_Page_078.txt
14fe9dce6f5514bda70d30caa6bef8ab
d64b2bed6d3edecb31a2079c47cdb67076ba7db9
68174 F20101107_AABMKG kim_s_Page_139.jpg
76246faa87403b417fedbb1cecb9d8d5
485053d41767f440a721d57e1ffb7ef7376debbd
109020 F20101107_AABMJR kim_s_Page_124.jpg
2ebaa519ab7183e0fc229e147ac66dc8
df10ca0834ade5c09a9c08a6d675daac463f77ce
2245 F20101107_AABNNJ kim_s_Page_096.txt
24ade5acf8da77abbdb4f6d0d0695065
e3495d48f97afee730af4f88ac688711a67fb1bd
2155 F20101107_AABNMU kim_s_Page_080.txt
58d336135c05654f74fb9291e2b23988
fc2a05b5073c8042606103ef8b4f9b12c79463c8
69159 F20101107_AABMKH kim_s_Page_140.jpg
ed8dcef335eb60fd649c89bd882e9c90
87b7db94327ccec60acd232010bf84e2cbddc173
114038 F20101107_AABMJS kim_s_Page_125.jpg
751763cf83118c00164404dd7b6b7ecf
fc102896d81121a2b5c3a5cf1fbf878a67d62f2b
1906 F20101107_AABNNK kim_s_Page_097.txt
8300c23c469396eb3d8b4dc6e720b150
5e0dda79b12d2f1bedcc3a0e8bceef24d836d3e4
457 F20101107_AABNMV kim_s_Page_081.txt
61707f9c06dbdfc739dee67804c69ecc
54382f0f1a9b055b95833d17746f1bd9646b799c
71047 F20101107_AABMKI kim_s_Page_141.jpg
a7a762f8d212668eaa1f325170c2e4cb
486af577a274e613033702581e4efd3ef503509d
111009 F20101107_AABMJT kim_s_Page_126.jpg
81ec802eef9df035d5f85ec57cde3c28
cc4184ebfef59c3814e3effaecd1e0c5a8bcff42
F20101107_AABNNL kim_s_Page_098.txt
90d1f7765a2de5eedee58cf26ea53545
5cb18812c728eb1f9f187b7e425ed610a88c5173
F20101107_AABNMW kim_s_Page_082.txt
72b4b0a4a8dcb789798af05db28902b1
e8b295998dc2c5dee431f66a113bc8e7b7f314c4
71678 F20101107_AABMKJ kim_s_Page_142.jpg
a2cc38026be427367104a6303a2332a6
ba2ebb4bce3bf0bfa3598b5f2a19c1d96bfd0156
109191 F20101107_AABMJU kim_s_Page_127.jpg
b208965418afb03178bacde4541a3507
02c383495bd135c21742e5dfb85aa468507247a7
1422 F20101107_AABNOA kim_s_Page_113.txt
8cf2b3d347a969d74b942e58f6f3d7a4
1bba8b432c93caa420b9ed25ad7962d1a522bbc4
1954 F20101107_AABNMX kim_s_Page_083.txt
7076d2793236c2627dbba192a90f2dc0
206cacd5890eee52f1d52fd0b3c3e03802e5c753
113688 F20101107_AABMJV kim_s_Page_128.jpg
464871b939750b06f8dc9f04b817fdd7
cc9fa1ff67bffe3285a738f82d9c70cea245afe9
1349 F20101107_AABNOB kim_s_Page_114.txt
c45cf29c68588a42362af7cdbb20c33b
574ae3d6ee90676b88c95948dee58e1a2a71ef7f
2229 F20101107_AABNNM kim_s_Page_099.txt
2270c72f65bd5877ecc7ae248480753f
b797be2d3d738241deebed9d1d7b4da0548ef1b0
1476 F20101107_AABNMY kim_s_Page_084.txt
d228faaa5502089e69ebd3482ce0cef9
7e3387794a56b1fdd3272ec786031554e6d969eb
63887 F20101107_AABMKK kim_s_Page_143.jpg
836d8e43f69007e36f34b86e577270bc
e828685bc33fb1bcd5db9efcb0e7f1e5f6a56523
117825 F20101107_AABMJW kim_s_Page_129.jpg
de29cee1cce78346af07560e0ea6941f
6d0a03069ef0491a6bd7ece1131a0ba482d13db5
1424 F20101107_AABNOC kim_s_Page_115.txt
14834f40cc9dab2100d8a8f35a61d6dc
1d6960e186bb310441cf8be93957babcbec02ca4
2154 F20101107_AABNNN kim_s_Page_100.txt
11ca0b64845b5c7ecd5a75ef69445aeb
3e8f69ac9c55d6c3e16bff886195817864d0f2b3
1306 F20101107_AABNMZ kim_s_Page_085.txt
3b1623663ab33aef379d85fb57b6a79f
c840621baf9fea140d97edc55f9ef039feda635f
69056 F20101107_AABMKL kim_s_Page_144.jpg
46d50a1addd39edb89f7b5bbe7daa3c5
2c0b20a662569b335484ca74c1916ca87379f635
107986 F20101107_AABMJX kim_s_Page_130.jpg
fa80269d1a3792737091b4a4de869054
e1dbe454ea169dbf96ce26f6de98a0623f9ee407
115500 F20101107_AABMLA kim_s_Page_161.jpg
ecd18af85ee6936d94ce984e49a2ad9e
3f759f1d1636dbd87e494b33200b11c286116dd1
1497 F20101107_AABNOD kim_s_Page_116.txt
3ee509320bd59085b59fc7f9fbc98ad6
6230b48318b78c292bf41fa6f313ad8cd4dc4c0f
2325 F20101107_AABNNO kim_s_Page_101.txt
ae8432017bdc22313de2cef6be69c7c6
52cf0f595b3bc6e555dbbbf067d799d1b6c0148f
64565 F20101107_AABMKM kim_s_Page_145.jpg
e87a05ffad5d1e6789e00e11676e0625
3d3ca878b91939633986972a5f8aa918591d5439
113674 F20101107_AABMJY kim_s_Page_131.jpg
4627b7f4fcda380b5de6b9f550a5abcd
68ed602519b2dc402d073b8361392a5d0097ea2f
115899 F20101107_AABMLB kim_s_Page_162.jpg
9554ce8be7f6880285fb0a4de0b9eb5b
3eb33212337aa799c311bd0e9481b56732c7889d
1400 F20101107_AABNOE kim_s_Page_117.txt
cdc735a48201985b1ab89c36b0fc4f9c
153d3cd2c5ea10197e11e5c5c73c786688587489
F20101107_AABNNP kim_s_Page_102.txt
a030afbcdb8c93585c767b4f9d36f8a0
5ddc8b0ba89ac1cc48bf90a0d778f214bc3cb63c
61007 F20101107_AABMKN kim_s_Page_146.jpg
bfd540d89ca7afcb41a598f7207cb156
cef86afdb6e1de8395c1ba24aeb2a6261c50a964
112178 F20101107_AABMJZ kim_s_Page_132.jpg
5a68acf8030f4bbd391b2a4404a1d97d
ea4eeebf64d5ff124c99bdf4d083af5c2a12121d
114858 F20101107_AABMLC kim_s_Page_163.jpg
3fcf4ba4561dae02d9fd13ff54e18765
7032099b77169531314c3bf8d4efeb98cabadd98
1533 F20101107_AABNOF kim_s_Page_118.txt
09cde2d1975cb066bfb487158022a3c1
da80b7687a8528b22326203e2a12ec2130ff1848
2204 F20101107_AABNNQ kim_s_Page_103.txt
4b7b6810b394ece3b0921d9b1f5d361b
266afcb03729b27a55aac4468b7b70234f745601
67799 F20101107_AABMKO kim_s_Page_148.jpg
92fd7c198651d540128b498c0e12611b
dd338aad438f7b866792a688f7a435aca0246cf2
63794 F20101107_AABMLD kim_s_Page_164.jpg
2efa75a65bf1fa83549034e606f76bcd
7ed974743ab1e0bd50648af46e532f645b50525a
1336 F20101107_AABNOG kim_s_Page_119.txt
1f8f963d6dd83734016838190e41142f
279cd516e8ae1d0b2929b331df2fc4069a9fc642
2275 F20101107_AABNNR kim_s_Page_104.txt
6ba5694944be57c7e08136f6540e53d2
9684eb52c444444ddae7935191749c46aab3a576
110679 F20101107_AABMKP kim_s_Page_149.jpg
7c7401bbb939bc2a938c23bcdb6dea4d
67fa7c23d46861e267541668992bd5d041af2b6e
108436 F20101107_AABMLE kim_s_Page_165.jpg
4173fb73dd53453c209a791fa9ff95d0
88701dd61f6cb5e622709bf49ecdc0a5fbf72372
1328 F20101107_AABNOH kim_s_Page_120.txt
9d469cdb6891a9e2abf9beb6fd894912
388cfd38c3c70e987cd9ac18ca5a8f2114f410c6
2265 F20101107_AABNNS kim_s_Page_105.txt
a87e6b5b4cb2e7b5a91d80be057a9899
c9b08d127f0a9475622685063adfab5d0ebe79d3
113490 F20101107_AABMKQ kim_s_Page_150.jpg
355d4f6dc9cdb25cc873ed77a19325d3
15a6736ea4fa103b158fafff8ce51d12cfa1ceaa
110516 F20101107_AABMLF kim_s_Page_166.jpg
e9d6012e791e8c2a3dbe808085fb8829
f0d52b9a16e229a4bb31cecdd351585072920eff
F20101107_AABNOI kim_s_Page_121.txt
4201fd805fc8e7c1c67be29de10b718e
5298e7c4c8641a21d6da566eca28726db2491d1b
F20101107_AABNNT kim_s_Page_106.txt
a973f3e417deffb5f77ac1b17da0b35d
55ef9fff59e2b231e47a6f634fb688e29a19b815
107577 F20101107_AABMKR kim_s_Page_151.jpg
06dbd967b14f830945afd685b0068446
78b2622ccfc0d914605e2bbe5866856a12c8494d
113860 F20101107_AABMLG kim_s_Page_167.jpg
d9e562189001abeecb6ca43efce70112
ad85f2f9eaafc6274c5bcbe906d2b5470543aca0
2345 F20101107_AABNOJ kim_s_Page_122.txt
b35d5ef8ff028bbfb3b9f3488101439e
f8cf8188ded9124a8f591d3e63ce0808377993a3
2244 F20101107_AABNNU kim_s_Page_107.txt
a3b64aa93297b55081c999b94a2e12de
965159729e16520b1a42c41c3fdf0d851af4d8f9
110461 F20101107_AABMKS kim_s_Page_152.jpg
aa09247ac9fa9e9d8680074f092f09d6
2a9f95d186980db74d081b09c6eed55c264f0f64
110909 F20101107_AABMLH kim_s_Page_168.jpg
efe9edc5caf6f4231c357aed88d9e5ab
97795eb79d9da6829e580ca17de0c3739ed8f748
2208 F20101107_AABNOK kim_s_Page_123.txt
3795299f58d7538f99d608b6df907983
722cb7049e4f12786b1af4476139630d390669aa
2194 F20101107_AABNNV kim_s_Page_108.txt
c2722f884b7cb8cdc8b3ccdc6b25f630
4a45999e902e300c7aecdafa7c56f50f524b6c77
113071 F20101107_AABMKT kim_s_Page_153.jpg
3d24538794c60d15d79cc3f4478ec146
7a2d8255455baac14cec11146b6d0f16dffac066
111463 F20101107_AABMLI kim_s_Page_169.jpg
99bd46c7ae489eacd36482bdc4559726
44eb295a0da73b0edc21ac58b672fb23c40437a4
2196 F20101107_AABNOL kim_s_Page_124.txt
f68a78a600897227cd7270fa3e028282
0adf27d4a09aeaf4d313b6ca3305c8e8d37035f5
2202 F20101107_AABNNW kim_s_Page_109.txt
5a254fab73daaad8da8013deeeeb804f
ff874ab45515ebaf7301f767c9befd519b7db2f0
112894 F20101107_AABMKU kim_s_Page_154.jpg
b517bfc4b203cab688a1b1293294a0ca
fbbacf7227a1693da577856e207d4b72ca4e8c71
108460 F20101107_AABMLJ kim_s_Page_170.jpg
8dfc11541d17bfeb7288fd059b6cb1d0
49fa56df16b24caf5a16ae426b74c217e6585702
F20101107_AABNPA kim_s_Page_140.txt
0768f488ed66247204cc1ea94d1f64f5
4a1c2ba1ab052c00948cce1fe1b8c48cd4207bb7
2347 F20101107_AABNOM kim_s_Page_125.txt
464902fe8ececa40fc2af07a2063a727
9d4922befb17fa3c25f4b9bc2671161d4d7c1a8f
1551 F20101107_AABNNX kim_s_Page_110.txt
33e1283138d04937449ae19654419c6e
2a9a263da7ff446ca874a65bc3596a1560a1b13e
111483 F20101107_AABMLK kim_s_Page_171.jpg
3534e53906b62fdcdfae0ae1990e1d7e
6df7d9322f6184d31183eb23bdced617259688bd
106309 F20101107_AABMKV kim_s_Page_155.jpg
67aa45a8761d084c41a2eb23a7cacbf2
dc182b14cbaee5b54a4c8588e3978f88d43d03d9
1442 F20101107_AABNPB kim_s_Page_141.txt
16c1c6c3fec880043ab141dec6cf1b01
c7afb6f831f6aa5c0fa75b11959ceda1825bb793
1333 F20101107_AABNNY kim_s_Page_111.txt
3577e86be5203c4ad62c478958a6e2d1
cefac7d46fd5bf48c99aa5d36b5df2771660020d
105252 F20101107_AABMKW kim_s_Page_156.jpg
82a5bd6fc5229847ca4c6349de44127a
02ffedd77ef4718dd53e91be0d4d830cb47dfd61
1503 F20101107_AABNPC kim_s_Page_142.txt
d75ad51549b970edd574e0660fc46e70
9a8a09864b18eab266016644451d24491341d41a
2183 F20101107_AABNON kim_s_Page_126.txt
a706fb54444ec3be388b1ffac4e89860
8ea99f8dd60853482f8583ecab38aaabc0c1368c
1291 F20101107_AABNNZ kim_s_Page_112.txt
d9ca9d08fd4f52fb210e8ed7e5d0c786
aba0f675c9c8f4ef620d0c770754a7e99e875ca1
111071 F20101107_AABMMA kim_s_Page_188.jpg
4cab9954f7952b36477d80c4d1cc3596
c4540b4129a270d36e39839001ef1db4f2c6042f
112021 F20101107_AABMLL kim_s_Page_172.jpg
8aba877b23c2b39ad79bca3e159bbab5
f174518c3ff906055c26a1de0b028cd020860370
116341 F20101107_AABMKX kim_s_Page_157.jpg
d56c11f2e8332c22eec1120d43ea7765
f94bb5983f4ea12125e5c64bdeb6f642be769201
1308 F20101107_AABNPD kim_s_Page_143.txt
54a86df1bdaff7146b0a4318071d5764
2b84bca7c8f18e06ee506912144eaddc7adc0a36
F20101107_AABNOO kim_s_Page_127.txt
12874fc8634cf9f9ebd1e3deacd09afa
469024aaf49cd3cb16f1d62e83c3a798d2dd5221
112247 F20101107_AABMMB kim_s_Page_189.jpg
e7fca89ce5cadea1d9b1cdfa35944147
4310809108bb43b4b2426226c933e1bdb2340601
111003 F20101107_AABMLM kim_s_Page_173.jpg
ae5c54b81795b7908ce22e400ffcac3a
a8e458a9f51d18d92f9e3c5a81575e1cf4759805
105544 F20101107_AABMKY kim_s_Page_158.jpg
6fffd1a5156ff09995c63effa2a6b7db
3572d98fac20068d3bac4829efa08f7cd4da8496
1511 F20101107_AABNPE kim_s_Page_144.txt
e29c0dc43db7e23feca7557d588367b3
c9160271b2722875457ae556e11bb5fc988b64d2
F20101107_AABNOP kim_s_Page_128.txt
c7fe807f02683667bc9698bcf2858e86
a5f11843c566f21c3423c62d738949d91f796331
84644 F20101107_AABMMC kim_s_Page_190.jpg
a97673803f0ad1aa1782aadd476f373f
6226b5b38da99be0d1e99128e1c22ee398fc6cbf
119192 F20101107_AABMLN kim_s_Page_174.jpg
48a0f3781b1589633683f8b2f9c9a075
b3975c662627268149cb01063d4aef056a467f9e
102116 F20101107_AABMKZ kim_s_Page_159.jpg
ed10a4d12de413f508c437e21ce72b57
0d9b202ffb58a6b3279588bafa99ec3e8ce0724c
1352 F20101107_AABNPF kim_s_Page_145.txt
02f80eafd8e0b8808fd4148b9c252f96
423f557a2899d1f1cc3abe50d55729fa7a1d5bb7
2335 F20101107_AABNOQ kim_s_Page_129.txt
988bbc0a4af9ab2607f2e70bc2043d81
29cda595fe9dbf93199e728ea5c4fcfe728c24c7
134311 F20101107_AABMMD kim_s_Page_191.jpg
a123c943b5f42ff6c69249db9eb4fe1b
932c9cc1d6deebdd2e62915b1ad194a210a23ced
108867 F20101107_AABMLO kim_s_Page_176.jpg
300aa934d9ae06cc2678bc868f79d0fd
c4d465a31d3eafc9a01605ffbc3be14e22144c7b
1281 F20101107_AABNPG kim_s_Page_146.txt
bd74333fd476a0c7e4f4cb94a2eecd7b
f7a3d72a99d2a9ce9a42bbb177d1eef2165018f6
F20101107_AABNOR kim_s_Page_130.txt
2b2077b0ad5fa227e09f4b29df5e4ab6
07d54702a85099d5140eb96364a0f24531fc66c7
39878 F20101107_AABMME kim_s_Page_192.jpg
984fc258f0f0042a16738f887c067369
a7bdcac9c3617659bbb3884268ed4593d0d22fa0
106887 F20101107_AABMLP kim_s_Page_177.jpg
ab3faddc2e134669e3740881995a19db
bd035e87feb485b48d1344640e0fcf57c003539f
1392 F20101107_AABNPH kim_s_Page_147.txt
a3861a648d72b9cd9159764c3f752dab
7c91435ece0783b978097b91169ce11eff1ca262
F20101107_AABNOS kim_s_Page_131.txt
bd86626afbf7d8160e738b7dcd61d331
024f92bcc02f435468059f8aadde9291197b68c4
90787 F20101107_AABMMF kim_s_Page_193.jpg
fec1480cc93fb67f75ccdfe2d6ae473c
29409fc0dabf6daf1399cd5d4496cb1bfe17ffd4
117979 F20101107_AABMLQ kim_s_Page_178.jpg
44be6ac8a35a9bff54c3e005d9af6f2f
ecc54a6c48f6d8a71a9c13ad0d82145ae7e0052f
1351 F20101107_AABNPI kim_s_Page_148.txt
48636a6a73d4c098d6c40bbba2a032c0
e00a3f9bffa7c929c843171ba161ac88e76f8269
F20101107_AABNOT kim_s_Page_132.txt
0766fa5c8a0cd9746d47d32f3be442ed
6957a6ad8adc647c621324c7c0ac56e0d055f034
24532 F20101107_AABMMG kim_s_Page_195.jpg
d488589f8c48c3117c5ec9a692a0d92d
01edb2427bc5dd165a25794879ca35ab0b8b241b
110756 F20101107_AABMLR kim_s_Page_179.jpg
dc240a6f952134203ccaf2f9b1499cf4
eafc2301e8b4b5d1ca0875eea3b0387268369242
2279 F20101107_AABNPJ kim_s_Page_150.txt
864010ed6e207af5199e511697faa85d
2f7aa0ee8fcdb335d3b5b42ffbed3d2422c33c08
2250 F20101107_AABNOU kim_s_Page_133.txt
ab8ae79855ea1394c766b521ae6a3738
59550a1a41e4393ff730999cd5deeea7bb5b5833
116427 F20101107_AABMMH kim_s_Page_196.jpg
0bad6567756a6bb98737ed0d6a80a540
21413668a6aa27f21cd2977bd8e5879b8b82e505
115176 F20101107_AABMLS kim_s_Page_180.jpg
0bdb6a1fbefb6473caf6b32c844d3dba
fee3604f1c679cc8cf83458d77b2f2fec5d72429
2170 F20101107_AABNPK kim_s_Page_151.txt
3e07ccfabc5ade5e7bca2344d126ea7d
54a38bfed270d5fdb84f613ac1335590fb14e789
F20101107_AABNOV kim_s_Page_134.txt
8641659fbd32552bffe826c25b7db42d
d1f90d52b325b1322e7fb930c12f7e09b656afb0
145521 F20101107_AABMMI kim_s_Page_197.jpg
6b200a1db3c13191e8baa8003c0c9c07
79d00a8801504a0e7297b7fa76206acc70b1d266
107162 F20101107_AABMLT kim_s_Page_181.jpg
b28162f203101e9c0533cef44b53bc3f
5fa1c7c29fb8c23d2b58746d2d04a4e5d30cdcad
F20101107_AABNPL kim_s_Page_152.txt
1bc5f2cac86a2c86ef9ceacaa38f48d3
5ca0376f72a3be65174d487fc6ea4b21090493b3
2308 F20101107_AABNOW kim_s_Page_135.txt
3349ef67359ebc2aecc942038479c45e
46264dedfde437e8879d2746722bc6c93b38a624
141610 F20101107_AABMMJ kim_s_Page_198.jpg
1704647e26aa900246135fd13aa87239
005641e021e2fea9033d464c149b7f1da0c21d17
111771 F20101107_AABMLU kim_s_Page_182.jpg
ae18d107633fa05f0afdc9411823e653
211996abd0af1d22ae5756524560c4913cf1cb81
F20101107_AABNQA kim_s_Page_167.txt
60a185aa59daf5506447c7663c63ad52
dca09aea659778e30c7e6f01fce33cdf3437468f
2295 F20101107_AABNPM kim_s_Page_153.txt
42f44e9a96fcb7270c0eb6fedbb29ed7
7ccd1531b36de06a8217452252d70e1f1703a571
F20101107_AABNOX kim_s_Page_136.txt
182317e9cc153f3cc7a9987f048dfd09
8e410ba0de1730e9045edf10bada49655a74d008
123400 F20101107_AABMMK kim_s_Page_199.jpg
39891a093fd3e10af263d043848c48dc
d5d24ff2894790b94ba85f7635497247bed8b9b8
F20101107_AABMLV kim_s_Page_183.jpg
fb719599ac1c42a9f933fdab9664fb12
2510fc5598ac47ac645cac87ba455f2dce22735f
F20101107_AABNQB kim_s_Page_168.txt
22f8898af5cdc77c474d718fd1723d2a
5258fc493fd875355c3fc63953580ca6f42c7db0
2241 F20101107_AABNPN kim_s_Page_154.txt
2e51862d6a314221bc05c4598c8896be
f42125336609fca4d5355a6ffa6fe30a40b43619
1192 F20101107_AABNOY kim_s_Page_138.txt
22207772ac7492f7ee6f5e2036288a7a
b672ada781bb151c78f717623325274828ce8f0a
137155 F20101107_AABMML kim_s_Page_200.jpg
91f5c21541011369307c4b84565dd114
7aea91142ec58181948f9f1196adeefba788b227
108998 F20101107_AABMLW kim_s_Page_184.jpg
dd2a2bca311dfff2b15708bf0bcfc3ac
08c2ab698a5af31b3c3fb8cda348eea20ccbd8bf
F20101107_AABNQC kim_s_Page_169.txt
3215b51a5223d428931d6b5ec8c75df1
c3f2e480513381a6c2fc98d9addccdda7f5b0421
1376 F20101107_AABNOZ kim_s_Page_139.txt
25bd29216d8293dc45b7d94324ee90ef
5ac48074ecf4f6883fc1c5edb28dc62e46d6f98c
107733 F20101107_AABMLX kim_s_Page_185.jpg
3cffb633d332b63ffc864a3b761d4c81
f8eccddfa359f78ee2eedf9331e8abb43fdc4b51
F20101107_AABMNA kim_s_Page_005.jp2
cbc58a327694a7008676e679bfc4fc95
a0358fdd211f5e56d6552a6a83d0d4d20e0807cc
2167 F20101107_AABNQD kim_s_Page_170.txt
6f73c0d270392479b28df765f1651ef1
f4b99d51a9531e60e290dc1ba3b08eb4d62732b7
F20101107_AABNPO kim_s_Page_155.txt
6fd1988e52d4c17312dce24755c4ab30
10b7971ebf4964bc065bbfb77ecf808cd6e46c84
121434 F20101107_AABMMM kim_s_Page_201.jpg
9994ed4b4311a9d86449cd7320650c3f
fdbd92179d05d7a650553f7351dc0fb893aac62b
113270 F20101107_AABMLY kim_s_Page_186.jpg
3b4e75a030c788c23a78556b92fac69f
73c0b49978826382cf9357d0db8196e06d3af7d5
1051971 F20101107_AABMNB kim_s_Page_006.jp2
94188d88474a1b43c4ad33045a094e25
59100ec32d43596d2fe0cb022cd01599b08aa541
2268 F20101107_AABNQE kim_s_Page_171.txt
53a0a9a29cc77cc4f738eee6ab0c183c
ccc81b30efebdd974d6d4f592354c589e6a7b519
2112 F20101107_AABNPP kim_s_Page_156.txt
def46b4c149e6b8e9e55bb51e2627b2f
63d1df5280601ab01493bf68b9c9f3410963e7de
122885 F20101107_AABMMN kim_s_Page_202.jpg
78afcd308d7649ad44f24054196b3c91
09e5b1d854aec5f4d6203b82e11b10353498e606
111946 F20101107_AABMLZ kim_s_Page_187.jpg
1a1e154d37a3a99e9939236d02f4b51d
2e47a4ed43b297a8ca3bea5f1b5894d78d1f60a6
779211 F20101107_AABMNC kim_s_Page_007.jp2
73a2bc0701732cd7c7c12242b4270d29
8b39dd1aaecff94a157ec5527b8615e5da13c725
F20101107_AABNQF kim_s_Page_172.txt
bbd853f69f068fab26b2660f5399be6b
9e7181efc922cf640d3d5135e36f5bfcbb562cb7
2320 F20101107_AABNPQ kim_s_Page_157.txt
7d3baa742d4b4019c625dda2ad24ea33
e8db9fc44e1876af26dcf39095e42a62d7afb7d5
143692 F20101107_AABMMO kim_s_Page_203.jpg
8680674aa76a480c23b3bf72791dd5a7
82c6d154efb6ddc22d2812ad48ea5d089a7e97ee
250590 F20101107_AABMND kim_s_Page_008.jp2
1016f92f215e3eedb45b64fe98e827b5
b96c42c172c1dc757abca13c5dc424651c91912e
2192 F20101107_AABNQG kim_s_Page_173.txt
8d0e48e4dc9ad6a3dd9ec5b6be249c51
f158f88f1c7bb5be5ca211e78c019b8b2d2a2932
2014 F20101107_AABNPR kim_s_Page_158.txt
71a96ac3a26191429afed81a03ad6031
f1ce5ff8746f8f9ad3778d7761d4baeae15a5944
124572 F20101107_AABMMP kim_s_Page_204.jpg
1b88f4fc9f1decdaf6f4e165a0a06b2d
d1b6962d5f1e00461ee4d9d0b437af55118a3806
1051950 F20101107_AABMNE kim_s_Page_009.jp2
d51fdd5457d648a2d4a7979debe297b8
15018169c02a4ade8bc641ef9a7f3dcb02197950
2350 F20101107_AABNQH kim_s_Page_174.txt
0dec5c8310c656fe55e2cd8952071d89
111af3a5bc7ca2e9b2809bbbca48af343e4c22ea
F20101107_AABNPS kim_s_Page_159.txt
6c0f1a61e56c7cb9fcc9df6160e43be5
db91a7c15dc9add502002ef0dfa241ece80aaff4
127505 F20101107_AABMMQ kim_s_Page_206.jpg
98ef0d35986b78ce38fecaedcd0116ba
c1b7952439f3f19e3c7d8469aece27ffd0832daa
1051974 F20101107_AABMNF kim_s_Page_010.jp2
7245dc3ef5e619027ff827ceac8ecd78
f5e089ea6908c9dabb93ebfa7d4bf7c16e786cea
2252 F20101107_AABNQI kim_s_Page_175.txt
a9fbf0c39d7381d309fd31cffd948770
32065a529699c76eddca836d82467b887d65c894
2094 F20101107_AABNPT kim_s_Page_160.txt
dca546e92cb9b316f6e4fb663bf4ecb1
3582aedeafdf4d5a2d23e8b34842ea237abe5203
136430 F20101107_AABMMR kim_s_Page_207.jpg
4f89817353534954e7e2307eeb26dbee
d2e1e0edc7053ceab510e4f2a50a9f0bed035bb9
F20101107_AABMNG kim_s_Page_011.jp2
d9f117abba0d5f063fb772d83069498a
858d6ec91b381d0afe9e5ff5ca04d4ec02cffdf6
2104 F20101107_AABNQJ kim_s_Page_176.txt
af92780f9d0a561bd4a718fa7733184e
dcdb2926e425b10b77cb198c53ae29b088110f8e
F20101107_AABNPU kim_s_Page_161.txt
9671fb3471975a007df1c049f798e225
c703a63ce713828cb96846f253795672f8a90daa
142105 F20101107_AABMMS kim_s_Page_208.jpg
a126c3d82fe333e0b1312646db9a02eb
d88750be0633db83aaca6c77c3b8f6c22ca0d72d
F20101107_AABMNH kim_s_Page_012.jp2
90f19067245f00c7bc0511c954b00b65
fd9a76c604685d433ab76081ffd85bdbe5d0544d
F20101107_AABNQK kim_s_Page_177.txt
c5cc07b44d155bfa86149bf7956c5a0a
4e419a94f38a4a42e4f044c9c50744349b8d0a71
2328 F20101107_AABNPV kim_s_Page_162.txt
c5660463193d123129b55d911bf779a0
78266fca357926d0194d3018653162f688853e44
139348 F20101107_AABMMT kim_s_Page_209.jpg
6af6961e66f77564282ddd47e66a6c45
fdea45d322e559cca3c1f2a8f5307ddc1c655861
1051967 F20101107_AABMNI kim_s_Page_013.jp2
f76add9230caa00d4a63b943ede2797e
11aa7d3e16498239164518baf61997eaaaea7b54
2364 F20101107_AABNQL kim_s_Page_178.txt
d769751a9deb0d66807ac9247fa715fe
cd85a79325688de264a640d4b1978a63dd2dc163
F20101107_AABNPW kim_s_Page_163.txt
0506b543d53db21873fa80f78d5c036f
e7a5d04706100d109359ccb6619b90ad99bfa4a1
68012 F20101107_AABMMU kim_s_Page_210.jpg
1a9058e091f86fdb25696d94600ff25f
bf91d059404920f91984c1df648bce93cf53cb2c
1051965 F20101107_AABMNJ kim_s_Page_014.jp2
1134eb8967581103346f042fcad35681
1b9a5b8f2ca0b3edfbba6e89c59c9dec28a730a8
2597 F20101107_AABNRA kim_s_Page_196.txt
a6d7d62463a2ed55d3ab1fc223781c49
cf90821296aae20f568698b0ca4c8b90bced35bd
F20101107_AABNQM kim_s_Page_179.txt
ae62ed69ef809caa626185999c705967
a55f115715d26a37b2c20fd590c350b012d1c327
1219 F20101107_AABNPX kim_s_Page_164.txt
62ee7de298f94a13461e5e2d9a31dfbc
40da5595d053a86ea6791b2b6afc153644360f5f
70231 F20101107_AABMMV kim_s_Page_211.jpg
041cf7a0be1c1911cc5497d7823c5595
b0216cb95df051e5b142abd42879fdcbd4cf188f
1051953 F20101107_AABMNK kim_s_Page_015.jp2
27c7ca8b71c28ad3869f3e60a62dfc44
a766f94e4766ae9a52f8ddc167abc9aa9006f259
2960 F20101107_AABNRB kim_s_Page_197.txt
326480bf79f9a3d30f4c48917f9473ff
3a2117a3ca9342ac251ec35a18e8e688d51c48b2
F20101107_AABNQN kim_s_Page_180.txt
59f9dce73abbfd3896928725e729b870
a50d6a7118bd37243ed30f3dacf06f78b2da0bdd
2230 F20101107_AABNPY kim_s_Page_165.txt
e86bc7a5713bc82d50764c77458db88d
2371376589348b967ceee18e3d4047c9c687b720
291444 F20101107_AABMMW kim_s_Page_001.jp2
5ab2cab560222a2a4e8d7052c44a5c80
02f9a90f8733ba768d5b6eced91b1f965368bbda
F20101107_AABMNL kim_s_Page_016.jp2
78d67e19f1566b9767d682978ed04e8d
7e9ca2596e7cc4fab988970b85deddf6e7a10403
2821 F20101107_AABNRC kim_s_Page_198.txt
8e7ef7d8dd4fcc3ec101a821472eb474
2d55fa57eac13f478abcbf4632eb4c24a0c01e4d
F20101107_AABNQO kim_s_Page_182.txt
f94adb1408ab812972286ad0242eba31
e2c9c9e7a581416292e8dfa09b91a413066cf9c4
F20101107_AABNPZ kim_s_Page_166.txt
bf696be20dfd01b5dc51592e69c7c775
923d691901a4b798818699563d4cd15e32f03936
24852 F20101107_AABMMX kim_s_Page_002.jp2
c8fcdb154b3b45a8d407c574f247fdc3
a0f9035f2eefa3956436b8bcc0baaef3d4c7b917
1051984 F20101107_AABMOA kim_s_Page_031.jp2
95b2c3328e3e378f52bfaf8ab0cbd1f5
ac132048e4a0cdcdec81a7627d90f0f6d35d16c3
1051901 F20101107_AABMNM kim_s_Page_017.jp2
bb6279f261a771a652715080ddeaae16
364396d7cf0458fe34e90773370392938f6c917c
2625 F20101107_AABNRD kim_s_Page_199.txt
13f2de7fb35eba8de2e84baefc861e42
2e9f856969da661c64fb2b142b4a2419f6445db8
F20101107_AABMMY kim_s_Page_003.jp2
967810b41c741aea98cb06a285ead6e0
8518e8062211e1ceea2355e45de1629588399cc8
1051939 F20101107_AABMOB kim_s_Page_032.jp2
f805ab881936f42364a540486dc86fcf
bdbeb97b94a7e851d9eb3d80e4341f5891c989a1
2650 F20101107_AABNRE kim_s_Page_200.txt
a4a6990e2413926891c2c647bef9b2f6
338b3645ad131f01cedb42f0cd2250be230937ac
2236 F20101107_AABNQP kim_s_Page_183.txt
f8964aa708ab6cbf1770137a5d9c6060
261251d8256a52ce52f760e716f590c6945ebfa5
585382 F20101107_AABMMZ kim_s_Page_004.jp2
c988e84b7f29a8da8fb67698c5da51f6
2d79277668b1a2450765299ff4241cf3fc08ac6a
1051958 F20101107_AABMOC kim_s_Page_033.jp2
2ccb48dd696c4d4d027933d615e01ec7
d9ecf3cd95e9c72ede9373aa78c62ee03b1e236f
1051947 F20101107_AABMNN kim_s_Page_018.jp2
2e50d42e6afa9b4b7289b1171bcef3e8
79ee032454785eded84383610f1a11d7088f191c
2545 F20101107_AABNRF kim_s_Page_201.txt
9ce93144f4c861d2577e776ea6415f2e
39f17cfa44f53f9384fe4faf5e99778a3a9573a4
F20101107_AABNQQ kim_s_Page_184.txt
9b31d96d83ece9125b628bd660f31c1d
2376f328a3c50eafc91ec75644acb264f45d3057
1051926 F20101107_AABMOD kim_s_Page_034.jp2
6f54ebbdf8088aa690fcfe91bfbe2ec0
0db42a06ed75b74782079e6204f2ae82474eb404
F20101107_AABMNO kim_s_Page_019.jp2
77767a533b8c3a64deb7eb76b846a004
a9c74cb997efd01aa2092880c6f2444d5094b6d6
2780 F20101107_AABNRG kim_s_Page_203.txt
b843a58a248664453c8255daa7540a19
b35fd98fedf3401e27e27a5a698188c9b0da5d44
2146 F20101107_AABNQR kim_s_Page_185.txt
428e29f428a45274cb8adef021446321
3216a25838e85884c9d7dfcb59b4da4177d870e1
F20101107_AABMOE kim_s_Page_035.jp2
b98bfcc0c1139bd3e0c8e445f936e56d
c9d928fea3a6b3865f8e5392194db0203161d5a9
1051951 F20101107_AABMNP kim_s_Page_020.jp2
3acaad049a00eba3fd178e940052338f
ededf4c7fbffb4972998e02c5a19fede0cf3d511
2483 F20101107_AABNRH kim_s_Page_204.txt
b3021a076e95f54c4804eb438621bddd
941eefa4bcbabce54a8ee869fef1aa10a2b42cda
F20101107_AABNQS kim_s_Page_186.txt
a8de25ebad747e23157aa622d59c2729
b891ad180ae168766f260628b05ef044a0464b5d
F20101107_AABMOF kim_s_Page_036.jp2
65e6013a8e6f5ceda033f58e42b3e46f
c6302ecc1ba5fb20a3d2df239221d6346922f95c
F20101107_AABMNQ kim_s_Page_021.jp2
3096fd8ecde2193e0ad439567ac935d5
c3d5077becbb78aa80e32bb149ed77e0d2872af9
2739 F20101107_AABNRI kim_s_Page_205.txt
7fe5662380d8bf7c0d2d070d6b6b4da8
8ceee2170ab87621bea7c7262719e6844309a675
F20101107_AABNQT kim_s_Page_187.txt
dc1ef37b95479f8e34bc2779cbafc665
6e11ce5f3ffe75d92b3658ef4eb99e6b566f26fa
F20101107_AABMOG kim_s_Page_037.jp2
7bf74e3f0e783b8260eebd21771eb4d1
07bd8da5bbe0a29e43d6d7ac47883f40b963fef9
F20101107_AABMNR kim_s_Page_022.jp2
8119818f1a04362e69e4b5385a1b7df9
e49579b3892926a1e8fd283e6c96bec2ec47dcde
2453 F20101107_AABNRJ kim_s_Page_206.txt
d613a589c57836cba2acd1e7ad8fb53a
880aef350b51fb01440c98dc00d9eb02dcf12d54
1668 F20101107_AABNQU kim_s_Page_190.txt
d8da9ed8774c468783c7821641561120
150fa92a6724f16e8f09e449d9f2f360eb1f9393
F20101107_AABMOH kim_s_Page_038.jp2
d0299506019242dfbd8a048e4b676c54
c58299b6cacdbe4c03aa420a2ab6654e86f8da70
F20101107_AABMNS kim_s_Page_023.jp2
ff7d4c963ea96c11d548512d1352e339
93adbe29768644885abc1f8786ecdfb14be2c45a
2714 F20101107_AABNRK kim_s_Page_207.txt
70d74c296e792bb66f6ad4fea1604925
f0eff68fbc5120f678fbbc7e5f14105b921c2638
2648 F20101107_AABNQV kim_s_Page_191.txt
41b284d0cdc56fee27e31851f9b3d62d
922945823170eba69f316566b5df8e3ac9533fa5
1051919 F20101107_AABMOI kim_s_Page_039.jp2
95015da2c7d5321238d6bfff0a7e3c14
d0e174593ee23c648c4bcad2f19d27838261220c
F20101107_AABMNT kim_s_Page_024.jp2
e2fb266acb703687d876d7dce4e7b5be
26a4da312a97efaf1748f6acc02d3a689ba1afb3
2837 F20101107_AABNRL kim_s_Page_208.txt
edbe405cb3c17c4320a17fc7f64cb56b
1dd1580cc3e87760ac839de815c685b5d61ebb99
614 F20101107_AABNQW kim_s_Page_192.txt
efd002159677c8794e68a0344e4c7a29
54d89a3eb87c80883ace872ede83801fa097f9c4
F20101107_AABMOJ kim_s_Page_040.jp2
43681b480da90247ba186f9144c9d578
202a38b2ee87771bddbac0d3b91691c3b8d2b510
664110 F20101107_AABMNU kim_s_Page_025.jp2
7ca160722b04695f416be5d0168dbfec
30f69d9a83e58df0cc947158d083bb06848353e4
7289 F20101107_AABNSA kim_s_Page_006thm.jpg
399ea1df139461665c82429c914b2903
9172fc3d43184f5f4999f501eb7c43770449744d
2737 F20101107_AABNRM kim_s_Page_209.txt
3ebb6f64b54b0ae42f6834f24839c286
54129ffa290ad1472066d0f6689c1e4d6b2354cb
2024 F20101107_AABNQX kim_s_Page_193.txt
0cb318a614d72e70faeae57b56369834
55e8cc37098b98475898c861f8b522390726dc86
F20101107_AABMOK kim_s_Page_041.jp2
e6eb16dfb894c9495d99e1896f1cd93c
c17c635ba659ec137806e8c337542fbec7ba3be6
F20101107_AABMNV kim_s_Page_026.jp2
b803c6f1b58df87c285cfa551feebc1b
234876cb1d4e8f75b78fa1147b133282beb073f4
11011 F20101107_AABNSB kim_s_Page_007.QC.jpg
79f14c4458109f7d595d501f8261a71e
3f46efc8407e078bc85cf2126328b88bdf03d92e
F20101107_AABNRN kim_s_Page_210.txt
e31eec1f8d17e9474f224e17562627ac
42a60bc30a5149580cb19e05ff6525c30a4e7fd0
2031 F20101107_AABNQY kim_s_Page_194.txt
8087f1677a856277b5e25162568b5e84
d0ff53fda3e81fedb453a171dd34482b6e7b68cf
1051907 F20101107_AABMOL kim_s_Page_042.jp2
82fd0dc4cae391c1c099022d9de6ba6b
64063ccceb94affa895cf463a435929fc0721026
1051941 F20101107_AABMNW kim_s_Page_027.jp2
42940f6cee07b13dff9f1b4b21cc9187
494443a29589d3142bf35ae1936dcd3167c312e2
2970 F20101107_AABNSC kim_s_Page_007thm.jpg
4dd64f52ab37637a68c45ecf56dde3b0
be75689442ed79d90db5f352de194d303c778a78
1347 F20101107_AABNRO kim_s_Page_211.txt
cb0b64b557a8f9f7f632bff03d3fb72e
2d566acc0d59f5a6d9588af0c29ee1fad7ef39a2
449 F20101107_AABNQZ kim_s_Page_195.txt
d11877ead06cebc40814b4496241cbfa
65b2098a0de6e61ef610103358133eff8ace083a
F20101107_AABMPA kim_s_Page_057.jp2
640af1f39126f3bfcef137a010710167
8093bf8fcd680d29d9710883367dca30c5963ff9
F20101107_AABMOM kim_s_Page_043.jp2
3e02f85c6f7de4613ca6e36d94d4a629
f1a44f094c6026286b77a2c51639347bdb4e0844
F20101107_AABMNX kim_s_Page_028.jp2
6edbcf2c029328edd314b170ba72b0b8
9c07665eeb6e5dc1ba40a846083f3df86f947afb
5439 F20101107_AABNSD kim_s_Page_008.QC.jpg
25019ee5ae3be5b45a90022bbc55e7bc
66a2c24f4b4d983dad88ef16e5f87c0b9a651d53
2182 F20101107_AABNRP kim_s_Page_001thm.jpg
80db1512453f8728a07b7eca31a5593a
97eb68b02a1cde37100735b8eb1afe6253c875ba
1051956 F20101107_AABMPB kim_s_Page_058.jp2
42b38c6b9af8160688f2c5926dbf932e
ede04f3a1e354e6e16d1c610540a4f567347da5c
F20101107_AABMON kim_s_Page_044.jp2
bd26f025b6c1330a5aba8b9f9145e7c0
fe3b4eb6fd4e2f94048c4777573f523aa2d278dd
F20101107_AABMNY kim_s_Page_029.jp2
3808410b428c4b4f8573da548b91aa36
65da569a64e60f90e26552c884bc2a194f87b897
1569 F20101107_AABNSE kim_s_Page_008thm.jpg
5e10d5679821dc12f9e74da6a7b6b775
e93acd1100fbd1f1eabf61005a9ab5d191ac9e65
F20101107_AABMPC kim_s_Page_059.jp2
15f480c5fa8c680a219d3037c49b034a
1a8b213320a140763c9909c1bfd8acbbb081e918
F20101107_AABMNZ kim_s_Page_030.jp2
7178ac9bbdc954ee33cce8f3ec56270b
2ef125d927feea0967951bdd1efe91a527c5d67e
7742 F20101107_AABNSF kim_s_Page_009thm.jpg
99e67976c9ab40955f2245a014aa96b1
a08895df06fb501650a95605cb7c3c28848b3939
906121 F20101107_AABNRQ kim_s.pdf
ab7ae56fd539dfe28db4fd0c207a898c
543e0bfb3e5be547c02337a825dcce9138f4c544
489919 F20101107_AABMPD kim_s_Page_060.jp2
8387b2ffc2ea53b8eeef364c88aa85fc
91458017895b349fcac3d7a3edebfcb400753a80
1051940 F20101107_AABMOO kim_s_Page_045.jp2
d0443417ed909dfeef197fb60297f534
4d82a2acff2efeaa75ce58319b5907c8913e01bc
34797 F20101107_AABNSG kim_s_Page_010.QC.jpg
7f52d326dabbd6c0f7c724c111334402
5e05c9ba5bde1439a04cd0546592b08a5002e2c1
9784 F20101107_AABNRR kim_s_Page_001.QC.jpg
6adc7fda5231ca7acaafdf9c1f25514a
f15f71735aa1c2646012803d2c92f5e312ae370e
1051985 F20101107_AABMPE kim_s_Page_061.jp2
4f295eace846d4c39a3768f32021d010
b5ec168c58a464f84f9ba4d0f54f9a442d28f069
F20101107_AABMOP kim_s_Page_046.jp2
cc89e2847b93d658662f015e24118ea8
7e02ea51cee9b11dd8502561d8c61da3bae97621
8412 F20101107_AABNSH kim_s_Page_010thm.jpg
9e3769b077b6c24bdc98f2cfd6b79c85
f29cadb5f8adfe19daac0ee45ece8742048f9b6d
1137 F20101107_AABNRS kim_s_Page_002.QC.jpg
eec644a8beed7653aee77587d4a6a0c1
4744ddceb9e6496b2df8e02a825edb8eb8f49707
F20101107_AABMPF kim_s_Page_062.jp2
5c847f09358698b46fc22e5df27355bb
917a90caeab0e75e6d2cd0a2cd5ec4c27dc3994b
1051889 F20101107_AABMOQ kim_s_Page_047.jp2
698c7e720e0ce35b764b8d2a9c7101c2
dfff0956bd6f002e24907eca9932f2494d510ce6
35480 F20101107_AABNSI kim_s_Page_011.QC.jpg
6c1d69b4cf034b393effe9ad8731a10a
da82198ad929de543e4de857540c4e40f05b1a2f
535 F20101107_AABNRT kim_s_Page_002thm.jpg
4b521c460b5c194bb1abde6ae266fa24
96413450833c59572a18fb980e9b8a9ff0ec00b9
F20101107_AABMPG kim_s_Page_063.jp2
3e81c6f5231d279c5e90ab24aba9bbe5
de77f9c63ebe58dee279a7a864c4559d2ee39eb8
F20101107_AABMOR kim_s_Page_048.jp2
201de796f982433643ac4bdae2778311
236eaf2731f3718b7d87d671c9793d5c67c97f3c
8744 F20101107_AABNSJ kim_s_Page_011thm.jpg
d4911054e6cc3a2952940ac37d244bc0
d70323a2b0cc4be073b9debd977431f6c6c27835
33100 F20101107_AABNRU kim_s_Page_003.QC.jpg
76eb98ff795fa83f927ff70257539098
b5d78168ba24ff5e1a8e722d5220f88ba193ee88
F20101107_AABMPH kim_s_Page_064.jp2
f726d854f5e1de277dc578159e5946d1
a9e0811b892fd84556370aae00979040104d1985
1051946 F20101107_AABMOS kim_s_Page_049.jp2
711e71a4b13bf58e916631fd4bb0a3dd
7aa785ec860ffdce49dd44ac08a5be0ad8885580
37354 F20101107_AABNSK kim_s_Page_012.QC.jpg
11a361caf753da15d338a26fa0d6557b
f7ddeddc67cf58371dccd56c7a96097cc12ab78d
18373 F20101107_AABNRV kim_s_Page_004.QC.jpg
26bccf5a22d510a199b6b0966d80a45a
eee63c9936622bdc19b5d3909600c4d071e745d2
1051923 F20101107_AABMPI kim_s_Page_065.jp2
2f8e1d1cdcbeaa741a78b1a5325b43fa
9303fa2325a6868a1a03e14b633bf2309c429b52
F20101107_AABMOT kim_s_Page_050.jp2
17182c7ad52d59b2e2843f61c0c10936
6d8e6c4443464b5559695724422e18a9debc3ac7
9173 F20101107_AABNSL kim_s_Page_012thm.jpg
af0ebd23a2aee0d5c7c35a16031b0072
923c066a618e85225d935cf24b1916e015fecbd2
4624 F20101107_AABNRW kim_s_Page_004thm.jpg
e705479cc68be35ac6c4ac08d946cc87
7fda05990b6b4460ebe8b39e79938720c6c56959
1051933 F20101107_AABMPJ kim_s_Page_066.jp2
a92e21f67eda37d9ad6c3c92d0740c4d
70f19724ec82cab43825e1aef58dc0b4083ad406
1051944 F20101107_AABMOU kim_s_Page_051.jp2
05079a3228d1a0914b2316aa473b8434
0eaa526e0e079fbe4bfb22aa6dcaee2c1b2ccdb6
8666 F20101107_AABNTA kim_s_Page_021thm.jpg
55a8f1fca23eaceb74fd49f16cd492e5
e0649416482d9a7cf4d745e133270544727e51c2
38237 F20101107_AABNSM kim_s_Page_013.QC.jpg
2db36f50e2dab2ac0a62d7f805517d4b
8a9c9d1cbed68ec30ab055da2f05b28b7f018039
27063 F20101107_AABNRX kim_s_Page_005.QC.jpg
4c23c418806f9912e79defb7536aca16
82a78a792d12732e74ca86589df79715c2bfcfdd
F20101107_AABMPK kim_s_Page_067.jp2
f3c777bbe75b2096e58aa0b39f171736
12ffd539319edf1fbbda6712bb29bbe7fd6dead9
F20101107_AABMOV kim_s_Page_052.jp2
2fc999ca5961a868076f0fa475bb1c64
582c4283c698d3dfafb00c7de7340d09be2cf6ad
32848 F20101107_AABNTB kim_s_Page_022.QC.jpg
06dfed10d5a860de858f0c844218deca
b326bd37a0f02ba3ca4b0bb2eec741e40160d82d
9324 F20101107_AABNSN kim_s_Page_013thm.jpg
279c0bc40cf1ddc120e417d5579ae696
ee83360c8014fb3e6ed7099d7cc953aea51c74e9
6617 F20101107_AABNRY kim_s_Page_005thm.jpg
20487b732b873f66414b80293a14aac6
6f7920fb14b49ad6ad5d3af486fc240ca7aa1129
1051924 F20101107_AABMPL kim_s_Page_068.jp2
ade26cf464a6631b84974c77dc75cd36
571c833bdb7468c4c2426546073d32edfbfeb4fe
F20101107_AABMOW kim_s_Page_053.jp2
6d0ca1ae37c824c8ea8bcab54c0e636b
58e50b99bc69376f13f4be125f16dc2b0720f6be
7670 F20101107_AABNTC kim_s_Page_022thm.jpg
01bc7052da031b4186a8c745ddc40849
b43f5dabed9828ec24e416249d064190e5268883
36378 F20101107_AABNSO kim_s_Page_014.QC.jpg
287ed358420dc8cab12517d80cfa4735
0f3d829c00ffc2d75c6e9fb14e63f2916e6aa4df
31498 F20101107_AABNRZ kim_s_Page_006.QC.jpg
a73cc12fedb41d4787430206ea073934
9ab6b0f002b4128df8a4b3e2e09fbabca7961203
F20101107_AABMPM kim_s_Page_069.jp2
3ce20352cc2f576a45ded2a3e2a07802
b529f300965bb8cc3320231f1685bb25c7ebd01e
1051918 F20101107_AABMOX kim_s_Page_054.jp2
e4a7112f9fc76414bfe9d4ee23b4acc8
b140185729b6de7dab502991741a92532321a070
652991 F20101107_AABMQA kim_s_Page_086.jp2
be00599c10c357fefc294946a26b1724
5a7f3389fd1aca928afe4a165c675287c05a55d7
35880 F20101107_AABNTD kim_s_Page_023.QC.jpg
0773145b775da15926c8c6ef8539b399
f556cc46daf5b464792ab0491c3a09af9b656dc6
9017 F20101107_AABNSP kim_s_Page_014thm.jpg
9a2bb08f1c76cd0c8e0e9b1ee3a3e8ac
1db62966fb60d882e8f9c9da197f3bfbb52b3b22
F20101107_AABMPN kim_s_Page_070.jp2
5a38b69e33245f34d151db4ad9e0210b
0064b5e6b715cf019b89a3020b25e52866353e26
1051937 F20101107_AABMOY kim_s_Page_055.jp2
084ec7ffaacf75bacde1267c9923db65
fb1b7715f4dfd2c1eb2176e58c3ac24d2d1290af
765760 F20101107_AABMQB kim_s_Page_087.jp2
4c969a5fa7a83034969611b1fa535067
dbfce4bd6101df60db99f9c67f5bc64d0c25f5ed
F20101107_AABNTE kim_s_Page_023thm.jpg
97a38d2ba6ef443922f6414697ff6684
301389e4ecbfcfe79008cd5d136f972682fc4776
35939 F20101107_AABNSQ kim_s_Page_015.QC.jpg
8ac858d5687067af1976524f000e38d4
65e4d3f74a8141f740f22180bd00f43062d5c551
F20101107_AABMPO kim_s_Page_071.jp2
fede082c9e71f1e5e52f2c7cf87bbabe
bb655295498ebf65e2ef027da05fad3fc32734ed
F20101107_AABMOZ kim_s_Page_056.jp2
378f2f2f937c1aeef777cb1974e40a58
4926545f7174252652bc0b57acea32af8decc14b
641413 F20101107_AABMQC kim_s_Page_088.jp2
041ba085a947cf626fe54d7d219c8972
54909b0e54f3a19447e658487f2bdf0baf0c5e36
35240 F20101107_AABNTF kim_s_Page_024.QC.jpg
9d2911942e4e5995dc12cbd7e9c72fdc
e35a0c6fd3839f00f1a18f29e40d927c7f613d4e
661898 F20101107_AABMQD kim_s_Page_089.jp2
3a822c7abede0ab74319369f31744941
9fd039cdf41c771b74bc3b708bbfed9260f39b0a
8552 F20101107_AABNTG kim_s_Page_024thm.jpg
f5a32a99517daabd3e6f34b1eadd8c23
60c588f56eca69a014cbaec76c34ee924ef2b6b7
8918 F20101107_AABNSR kim_s_Page_015thm.jpg
0cadae394c9ed90e5be890f5ddf0bfd5
bead1b57eafd9646daf0f51e9071624b34a8d054
F20101107_AABMPP kim_s_Page_072.jp2
e558c748bf8979cb739bc6693a39b414
0aacb71c6b11a903f4560f08acb0cb9eb763cf09
633466 F20101107_AABMQE kim_s_Page_090.jp2
870fe60510013f7bb4f13fd7e091a4b8
35d35dad28b557f450ff41e097ec0fa1c435786e
20479 F20101107_AABNTH kim_s_Page_025.QC.jpg
7945e40f04931d865e9c3eb0c56d80cb
30603a6eabda1d09adbe0da9f3a53a4512c23667
38269 F20101107_AABNSS kim_s_Page_016.QC.jpg
22b953fb7c7ed217c40da951f3efa839
20ab69bf6c677dfc047ab5f592281e7d4ab70d8b
F20101107_AABMPQ kim_s_Page_073.jp2
b0617a5197d02689391bc496a7cee3af
16ab8ea2c5407735a71908725e3f3406292ba707
691232 F20101107_AABMQF kim_s_Page_091.jp2
8089b2acee5fcc611e376efcf5ec28af
a39fac9ecfecf3cd6bd29083ba5c91f0fdf2ae9e
4841 F20101107_AABNTI kim_s_Page_025thm.jpg
f296a1fdd12436a3a71a309492fc4d18
c68bcb7207d8091cd6bea247264d3c28944890c3
F20101107_AABNST kim_s_Page_017.QC.jpg
c7c56a4a6eb0890d4297476bf66af4fa
60d520ad1075f8183aa14fdf968524d5399a872c
F20101107_AABMPR kim_s_Page_075.jp2
9fcf5e6afc63218bd6ff719ab131e99f
1d029dd1d0bebd06438debe6f8783f2a3ca9cb4b
687713 F20101107_AABMQG kim_s_Page_092.jp2
ef178c4325224b6577b34818a099aff5
263ee47904e068a3251930f4042e28c02dfd13dd
34162 F20101107_AABNTJ kim_s_Page_026.QC.jpg
53ea48d90e8544ec8c168c6760f809e6
550f0f7f0b6a6bae21f9010a99ee854de83fc6c0
9121 F20101107_AABNSU kim_s_Page_017thm.jpg
531514d53c3c9360cd2c4c04fd6078d9
ab2ea1f066ca94c84ba2b7835daa51b950c047b2
718827 F20101107_AABMQH kim_s_Page_093.jp2
1625914657b31bb4a9c2bb83e18c956a
2488f1479e8029e64294bc25f14ea9bd73cde5dd
F20101107_AABMPS kim_s_Page_076.jp2
d44df09d0dba518fa37353e65fe81d17
6a318cc5683ac54cad90e8adb6aaa85642936192
8315 F20101107_AABNTK kim_s_Page_026thm.jpg
e06a6b856948daaf22bfa848e215e5b7
23f6ea07dbbe613875fd316a0ee12f6398589867
F20101107_AABNSV kim_s_Page_018thm.jpg
fba07341f29d5f0ef9b181dbb63eb1a3
984178b37cdeee10b2ec8726c05360b1372e2bbc
688574 F20101107_AABMQI kim_s_Page_094.jp2
a894bee41a3b4429b34e06fd6f3ad95a
c36216a61700f9af1e86a02b1671a4168f74207d
F20101107_AABMPT kim_s_Page_077.jp2
2b565526c0e8df9f3f648ff87f3dfd6a
1f99767a8917543aeeec0db6b7ea903d5a3458f4
36554 F20101107_AABNTL kim_s_Page_027.QC.jpg
ca7519a51da4f9f344e689789e470828
15b059e117856288a72addc1c59eab02b50b43d0
35789 F20101107_AABNSW kim_s_Page_019.QC.jpg
e5ec0327609c2a652116d5483f92a7c0
c4a3d0ceed308d6fc89b709ecd4b77de9e018b6c
F20101107_AABMQJ kim_s_Page_095.jp2
cbe95f819301256eb907927cf5d62700
66ce02cf9fbe7aab2e9bfc6f9d4d1014f1e2a364
F20101107_AABMPU kim_s_Page_080.jp2
f9379b20eab0ba758741eddfd3b75c12
ef5f6f543698cd50e592f3b066cd5a9edb58103d
9031 F20101107_AABNUA kim_s_Page_034thm.jpg
fa23d496eaf42ef18370caff3637f8a8
db5211b7d1db32bfbefe8c649ca297850b08116e
8943 F20101107_AABNTM kim_s_Page_027thm.jpg
39b97170bca4a1b01f023c531724c65c
6f9ed270d2bd3152e86edf361f674bca590971c4
8628 F20101107_AABNSX kim_s_Page_019thm.jpg
d389649837d84cd914f70791fd2ead13
ec3a9989f770ed934ebbad4b557c1383d92c588c
F20101107_AABMQK kim_s_Page_096.jp2
20492c94598ffb7487361134ec428bd6
2f33e6c7f9ef96367e8a9a96fc086ae236003993
262515 F20101107_AABMPV kim_s_Page_081.jp2
a59df2346629413deba8a2b9d56bad27
5fc52b4a2ef0dcd89aee6aa78aee9c5f04149e0f
35851 F20101107_AABNUB kim_s_Page_035.QC.jpg
d28b5da780128af47e905fa9a25ca0aa
b0f0af87144783f7e94d6cf76d0bc38956a1b968
37977 F20101107_AABNTN kim_s_Page_028.QC.jpg
219831b625d8745430ddb7bb40de849a
805a20000f72487a9140402ef8219d3908255f53
9075 F20101107_AABNSY kim_s_Page_020thm.jpg
00d3df5d37ed6ad071dc7a1dd7495119
62746bd6bca0fc8bbe60d60d642fab3d92c83a6f
1033084 F20101107_AABMQL kim_s_Page_097.jp2
1f3ee70c8101307d33882e2904794fc3
2c058961f1999ecb059ce47a6a16f6ffc5f6b866
F20101107_AABMPW kim_s_Page_082.jp2
e779a2340c59f6ce618a07ba32783558
b4b187f580b08e9c60235ba78186b1e260f33efc
9091 F20101107_AABNUC kim_s_Page_035thm.jpg
59320d7cca6ec4c8df1348da922e8bba
fdc851fd4a31aa84ac7dc4319eba91ca3702231d
F20101107_AABNTO kim_s_Page_028thm.jpg
42722b18e826d77b33397672d2209eca
c5df68d873ebcdd70a2e805c310c90009a6bd5df
36199 F20101107_AABNSZ kim_s_Page_021.QC.jpg
77227e64c46127fc45ac5bd2058b972b
e436a76e939312d5e336a969ad052ff70d6a9bb7
682286 F20101107_AABMRA kim_s_Page_112.jp2
f49db4f8aeb9473c65a904b1f6c8c993
7f50447341674d533a71fe73dee396ca3d89311f
F20101107_AABMQM kim_s_Page_098.jp2
8f1b1f1289b49c98010285e0b35def58
3c7290866c00c725da7523c08bd508d0be22e86e
F20101107_AABMPX kim_s_Page_083.jp2
1e2e779bdd5a45ec6235ad45b2ffe10b
cbf12730f16d15477aa1500e8cf851a772fbffd0
38864 F20101107_AABNUD kim_s_Page_036.QC.jpg
a583769a901e13aba021140a057676a9
e6d5bc092350f749bbdec9cbf6d45a1fcab21b7d
36514 F20101107_AABNTP kim_s_Page_029.QC.jpg
cc644371a5b4ac3817d3acd05311805e
e159e094a0e4aaabcf526c25319d3542e6f7ee89
720250 F20101107_AABMRB kim_s_Page_114.jp2
a087defa1ae47f0bac2611cc8a3976b6
8866884e6c2a83ecdd865d333eebec23dc37967f
F20101107_AABMQN kim_s_Page_099.jp2
c0671831c2dcfacae5a108ce122c333d
de1929767da6ef451588a4adc8a380b68e0b7944
769037 F20101107_AABMPY kim_s_Page_084.jp2
649da1f8c788240787a1e0aef6be0dd1
0a5fb0e53b991d09d6a791ce2cf03051b248b85a
8923 F20101107_AABNUE kim_s_Page_036thm.jpg
a5f91717541db3d52cd00dd6d297c865
a9b7186af36762fe4887685fb99bef65eae72402
9070 F20101107_AABNTQ kim_s_Page_029thm.jpg
7dda377aa8d61d439310998d07c5eb2d
511fdf22690c8cd9abf2dc65238eb4d2e7b560da
747689 F20101107_AABMRC kim_s_Page_115.jp2
c4d327d43a3d0118129c23898ea9d342
92a013718012755c8521989ad447fc9fcdf1de04
1051970 F20101107_AABMQO kim_s_Page_100.jp2
dc7911af440aaff5d75d14d7e2d10ae1
279463bb39da587855e8b8dc60d3ac4847b6295c
705887 F20101107_AABMPZ kim_s_Page_085.jp2
b46773d5fda5400caf60276dea6238a9
ad16c9def045e1aaca87b15d4ee12d8d45c7b11a
37194 F20101107_AABNUF kim_s_Page_037.QC.jpg
7f3b86bbd1578aefdeea931284d43ea0
87fdba3ebfadba54ece171b2315547b80c48f3e1
36129 F20101107_AABNTR kim_s_Page_030.QC.jpg
ffadea8dfe29cc5dc5067974d56d8cbf
e4351279e097dfa5f632591cbc98e0ee0ffdbb01
773857 F20101107_AABMRD kim_s_Page_116.jp2
a81b6532e1b39ba74ba98b2e3866b227
b183e0f89b3ee2c9e5daa5cccd3d5443e88bef00
F20101107_AABMQP kim_s_Page_101.jp2
26600f29dd7111ec49d4fa476e0ad1d7
71a81ce55dadd9f17f0da98d8f376bb216cdd5a2
6799 F20101107_AABOAA kim_s_Page_116thm.jpg
06a981981d1efc2e9c2fc94f63a6e623
255282f871dd940d0be485484a3a7ad824b294db
9113 F20101107_AABNUG kim_s_Page_037thm.jpg
2791f07582d80ae3a99a655bb0978516
49f2c33454ac78be6d56958a6ad92321102685de
706457 F20101107_AABMRE kim_s_Page_117.jp2
f6ea2434434f73ff4f5586ac13393fbb
69551c4ffb5556e0af591bc274046a8a7252b884
22036 F20101107_AABOAB kim_s_Page_117.QC.jpg
f6340887c87d5186a627419ca8d41766
01b6f07c5a8cdc5b58a0fcd3c851fa432e7bc1b0
36874 F20101107_AABNUH kim_s_Page_038.QC.jpg
b4a7dd47a2bb748a1a5254b02123e3a9
bb1558ca07aae4af54b0e3311bafc9fbda61f923
8868 F20101107_AABNTS kim_s_Page_030thm.jpg
a774638d1e97609180ff93c0904119c1
682549da3d2353a98dbc75ae0397921a1ef65b2e
740238 F20101107_AABMRF kim_s_Page_118.jp2
0434c29b9053b691ef97d5326ae9c9f1
450ad1026f3664869e5498958222087449ffa1bc
F20101107_AABMQQ kim_s_Page_102.jp2
7b4e88f47d836eddb8d1bdc6e6118b55
2ad1efd64c86bdbfd40b6349403e3be2172bf263
6294 F20101107_AABOAC kim_s_Page_117thm.jpg
98504b46b6f4688471e420d46d53f628
10b868924d93f2de4ff1c594fc535fb8c1607265
8971 F20101107_AABNUI kim_s_Page_038thm.jpg
d8bddfeee270935f7ce13edffb124e06
d5503ce198ff4aa67a37273dd57bdf19e1ce2350
38951 F20101107_AABNTT kim_s_Page_031.QC.jpg
4a360661c8a88c764a5f4fec849ea4f0
fccd877dfa50b669ca327c8ccffb527dd6bca4be
661403 F20101107_AABMRG kim_s_Page_119.jp2
995088412b2b332b45dc707d5e43eb10
a48cc992c99fc2eee37e80c1ab343c63bded43f2
F20101107_AABMQR kim_s_Page_103.jp2
63a4e5bbfb673a102c7c54593e4a9703
49269bd471cac973c065e3ce6443f6f9a5e8785d
24242 F20101107_AABOAD kim_s_Page_118.QC.jpg
439c08f574bed750f4cde8eb46b2fd5c
e15f19db316560f01f9cf64cb1b0af7699421f28
36722 F20101107_AABNUJ kim_s_Page_039.QC.jpg
9c48b6a03fcb29cea384dc02a29d5c00
9ef94f530981a8ac0f08bbbb167a88f82c34bf3f
F20101107_AABNTU kim_s_Page_031thm.jpg
26aac154f25dae405a6eb8824d27c2aa
bd805c9335e27d6ca33371efede9e3c73965111d
670920 F20101107_AABMRH kim_s_Page_120.jp2
7e7bcf037d78cfa0fdfa8556c0f7e686
71d5ebe890b098e87559e75146de332049e9504c
F20101107_AABMQS kim_s_Page_104.jp2
b56df46246e98b701ceac83523be591d
52a56de14aab74cd7b331a9799a2dc3c74bf1bbe
6602 F20101107_AABOAE kim_s_Page_118thm.jpg
cf0d62566e1452bea76b871c1c1a4b29
5d44ce9a7741bb992d06c153313ec2dc36b7c6d2
9122 F20101107_AABNUK kim_s_Page_039thm.jpg
30009c68e7016112b73e743cdb69a37a
f422c5e355c7908cbe03f52ab562aece5aa03ce8
37719 F20101107_AABNTV kim_s_Page_032.QC.jpg
a09fd2dab789d2792f73e70a912ca228
60c5d784f5afbca6d426ae50f62d144a58ed6160
1051977 F20101107_AABMRI kim_s_Page_121.jp2
76e611e07f1212d460857e920dd0ec14
598e82627f919233be84a2533f69b851274fb4fa
F20101107_AABMQT kim_s_Page_105.jp2
02679e264c4f3443acc69071c0b9f1d3
7d7a6a8a264697bb7bea2b66c17979923f266eca
20995 F20101107_AABOAF kim_s_Page_119.QC.jpg
c4f0aecd4e258b38e8e6639c9c7b2a68
ce01597aaecab52959651df6e4bd6d8a64deb3f8
37270 F20101107_AABNUL kim_s_Page_040.QC.jpg
996b0549e218e4c51b1d590d5748467b
5d1571d19d60a9c2ab916ae2de32a306047cfe12
9083 F20101107_AABNTW kim_s_Page_032thm.jpg
ec29f9a2f72fdfec248540ccda57498d
c1626a25b5db13fa4923a2d96ea42ad4d5cab6b1
F20101107_AABMRJ kim_s_Page_122.jp2
e5a53e3ac916510faa04576b4154d756
bcd68be8ee78979489d1f721f245a7cf7bf741c8
F20101107_AABMQU kim_s_Page_106.jp2
c494d802e8831c142d501ee2f3d12cb7
b84ed7d7dab5db5128ef47601f55dd05c2edef56
6128 F20101107_AABOAG kim_s_Page_119thm.jpg
5f8f66d89f67ce6213826e4e411016ab
67dc8dab0f7b4018e756b5f7080acd413653bba2
9145 F20101107_AABNVA kim_s_Page_048thm.jpg
1f54deccc71968a8bba140dd276b6182
67164c168f48db379560bdea0ce904a4f48f2f5b
9142 F20101107_AABNUM kim_s_Page_040thm.jpg
b7b815ec90a2c9124656606ba010437c
ae0a693a6cb0e1a9871be75a076c8f776c94d972
36528 F20101107_AABNTX kim_s_Page_033.QC.jpg
40eeb3d39fdfbdf44a7b37169c3c1f6d
48d6b8a38eceb29bf6dc8bedc68f2a6b630b981a
F20101107_AABMRK kim_s_Page_123.jp2
effb6eb03ec61948c43e87b73fd661c2
71560020181dd6297492391e38353b8dbe03a477
1051935 F20101107_AABMQV kim_s_Page_107.jp2
060ba30c0b3defe70c7492ac5fed3f4d
cf22d885920a285c0507eb4c40895c6a922d2ee6
6095 F20101107_AABOAH kim_s_Page_120thm.jpg
77321ebba6cb745f8fa3c614fed64a9c
c8a2b8b7a0dd88ff11e4e01d22498b43e9aa38cb
37324 F20101107_AABNVB kim_s_Page_049.QC.jpg
5033742a3c1c0789a45eddf0cf532b9c
e6dc316cd69a6a7149bddf7511d33934c47ec23d
F20101107_AABNUN kim_s_Page_042.QC.jpg
0c90c90a9f8a016269501b45121bea35
02245548f466cc8c5799fc601723bd5d2e631245
9072 F20101107_AABNTY kim_s_Page_033thm.jpg
0a67086d4bf7e76a73690bc81bb119f4
3a2dcad1145ee651d65b29954b98c93a37d2fbee
F20101107_AABMRL kim_s_Page_125.jp2
8c8c6e2aa117d7c8aac48f9c64ee842f
50b521777ab833fc2d6c47597770b5ef5566c748
F20101107_AABMQW kim_s_Page_108.jp2
4a94e0143f0befa449dd9cf7f6a3d2a2
0ecbcd4de89109e06130e23072ac991e4594d633
31534 F20101107_AABOAI kim_s_Page_121.QC.jpg
f123aebf5fada01d61a00873bbf160fd
54a1ed368f6fe2ba87e2aa7e7ec0c13110959b3a
9069 F20101107_AABNVC kim_s_Page_049thm.jpg
1504da46eeab09b7abe79a09ac4026c2
2d3244be75b363f8dc15ee569d1b053375f1795b
9063 F20101107_AABNUO kim_s_Page_042thm.jpg
d6a8291f7bbc1173d1ecbe443489cd77
1c91a9f6dad9d38d5460ca4a43d20d5a42959de7
38019 F20101107_AABNTZ kim_s_Page_034.QC.jpg
7cfd217a13ed1faa3791e8c792df6d2b
354c4c00a3c45afa145ec04f08e8b2254aadcf7e
F20101107_AABMRM kim_s_Page_126.jp2
926d19a1016098f3b118b09b8d4b8ca3
7f799f566aa591206d4503fd00fe2c69b2086764
F20101107_AABMQX kim_s_Page_109.jp2
a130c69407f3b3fcb4ea3184c4c4ec91
2a30e8452cdec5717c73b3842092cd1d5b04a6d6
758115 F20101107_AABMSA kim_s_Page_141.jp2
1924aaf305d36644a3c0e96059bcbfd4
40db433f7b5f56da78f288ec3fbd1e4670b3af04
8476 F20101107_AABOAJ kim_s_Page_121thm.jpg
276ac358928ea6915abaca477f0f0ee8
d5044a4229a03c96e9d7c86491455ab8ba57a179
34927 F20101107_AABNVD kim_s_Page_050.QC.jpg
7bd3f1292436ca6a42599c13f6158f6e
eb366164fceb80144aff6b6b3055f4d497100d21
37174 F20101107_AABNUP kim_s_Page_043.QC.jpg
fbba0e7c2d3da3a4bc915ecbb5c5efd3
d6aff3e2a72f1a89b673d3ddfc2554c24f1deee2
F20101107_AABMRN kim_s_Page_127.jp2
b4e8ae0e9b2a8098ac6adbcb7700db0b
5f59e1774ff49f4a941b3a562223fc787620d0fe
821052 F20101107_AABMQY kim_s_Page_110.jp2
f996bafff6a5401dd8e991d78857bd58
6d419adb0ac84182f18abb32149be93dcefb1bda
761117 F20101107_AABMSB kim_s_Page_142.jp2
6e75a390388c04be37589dbb48f7a29c
ccf3fbb4e3c5eeb95331a367e35923d01d7c8ce0
35127 F20101107_AABOAK kim_s_Page_122.QC.jpg
20d998cab491799cc0757a4267a285f1
5a758a6d22a91a1f6ae8299c3f71c9b5f60cd7ab
F20101107_AABNVE kim_s_Page_050thm.jpg
cf7f77b7988209c031385fe0d2c1dfc3
1b5cd28999f75b514aad4a0575dfedc9ec502357
9218 F20101107_AABNUQ kim_s_Page_043thm.jpg
688f90c9fbc4615cf3a66f2f47bba81c
1f77c8e02db792ecb072602e99aece0e6c1e34eb
1051957 F20101107_AABMRO kim_s_Page_128.jp2
d8dac556747b38c8b8d6b5ab3c28a17e
2aa91f6b2c4c32f5f1bfe48cd963c495b34c6ce1
708214 F20101107_AABMQZ kim_s_Page_111.jp2
2028829d97172d30612527a1e09d46bd
a9cadab947c73a11392780d62ad8079d6e9f2f94
677552 F20101107_AABMSC kim_s_Page_143.jp2
4af9393bfd0eed7aeae039774e17b0df
5a4483aab55ecfcc62e40dbbcc2721a1c5a81883
8627 F20101107_AABOAL kim_s_Page_122thm.jpg
343aea866916c7d1f7773682ba755a9c
6079342538bb4a71dd11e404ef2f71f3bdbb993d
39877 F20101107_AABNVF kim_s_Page_051.QC.jpg
0a4101fc60be028273b13054ab407a7a
c623d8a987e3070d068687129a6738d7628ca663
37349 F20101107_AABNUR kim_s_Page_044.QC.jpg
a2e0b51047efe450bb1bdad8cd1fc3d4
16209d480bb579cc452e1d3886b91ffffc3b74af
F20101107_AABMRP kim_s_Page_129.jp2
84ee253b7170f8366720ebcc4a5a07bb
a05e1c9b60866ddd57f310b4428014474ec0fbcd
728421 F20101107_AABMSD kim_s_Page_144.jp2
c899e4f0e58631a98fe8d53b914077bc
17fed3b43d892ee1f13bf9db646b82ade1a541e0
36978 F20101107_AABOBA kim_s_Page_131.QC.jpg
44bffff65e2a09e7134a74efbc3f89da
b54085855c9e888b33911106fb6a7e64d69546eb
33428 F20101107_AABOAM kim_s_Page_123.QC.jpg
4fa586439ae9492e3edff0502102d72f
de3bca76e0a7de386bd163829a2f87f7fd740e61
9404 F20101107_AABNVG kim_s_Page_051thm.jpg
d46d31b019d6214ecb13dbe8260ba2e0
c3febb2333e5bdcf41d5a3644b297ea5afb97964
9012 F20101107_AABNUS kim_s_Page_044thm.jpg
01c8219398114f5c8fad3ba9645d01c5
bbf263b612b53c3631958670b780a9008f597046
F20101107_AABMRQ kim_s_Page_130.jp2
c82ed0f9540703cb6fcf37f62dbd601a
935617b9bb66fd11e56c3cbd70c8408d9d6f1828
670543 F20101107_AABMSE kim_s_Page_145.jp2
6627aae02547df52d1fa98b5d621eddd
4091ca55a9d7056556cd11ff3ca38597e84808ef
9289 F20101107_AABOBB kim_s_Page_131thm.jpg
d0613f174c6e3d5358f2662e103825a1
173bcd6043761c03c55b524c8b9a043a3ae1d6b7
8469 F20101107_AABOAN kim_s_Page_123thm.jpg
45fda3bbfec2ee0941964cf0436515be
789d09e80f3fb9b9f6fb78dd959039a511a9e1a3
37835 F20101107_AABNVH kim_s_Page_052.QC.jpg
ed7741adf22e0b5f2fcf6958b8fbdea7
208e44a2196a7b5d8bcde2597186d929c49c9e3b
631870 F20101107_AABMSF kim_s_Page_146.jp2
1440f5319d5f69c3f5c5e52c23129a72
2dacc586d6da48943a8bd88706e8685578cadf6d
37486 F20101107_AABOBC kim_s_Page_132.QC.jpg
d3b307ce28a83580cc5cb91d8d4a4c29
4d8dfc9a464b6dee18d126fbf251505013fd8258
35609 F20101107_AABOAO kim_s_Page_124.QC.jpg
8f17e048e8da48a2c00a1f9e53f3ce5f
93879d0ea5f068697fe64adde9c0618527bb7c9e
9227 F20101107_AABNVI kim_s_Page_052thm.jpg
bf90756dbd93c3fd3b6d474cfd703c3a
80922e9288e0faf1da7284ea230d51d6d9bf0e53
36207 F20101107_AABNUT kim_s_Page_045.QC.jpg
94a17e64b545e345885dfbd3f2eaa6bb
9fbdb3fc6f55542a24a1c9420f1b1874a04d6392
F20101107_AABMRR kim_s_Page_131.jp2
444691da5f65b00a219ec9c65188486d
4ae5f6d9cb6c080ccf1ef967622352a0c0d63933
686538 F20101107_AABMSG kim_s_Page_147.jp2
355fd024c3629f82baf0baeaa2547e98
a23eaad13a4b94e9a28931af94cee1781e0ac383
F20101107_AABOBD kim_s_Page_132thm.jpg
00fc227f8d227b3a6fbb5822d9eb5666
0a444435c1a7234dc1de27905c51fce3919d3efa
9055 F20101107_AABOAP kim_s_Page_124thm.jpg
592213389408d78a39a1682c201f7e56
a78989d72df8912390d205da52a0c17cd68568cb
35843 F20101107_AABNVJ kim_s_Page_053.QC.jpg
de6d8da36f58431ef95535220d0bb616
a2b7fb3faec03d84044ff35c05615dbc825f4d35
9041 F20101107_AABNUU kim_s_Page_045thm.jpg
9a7077ce32481359edfd611be9512f47
c3e9fe3ce3ebd7002b6932bbbd2a2649f790712b
F20101107_AABMRS kim_s_Page_132.jp2
db6f8404be616ba0cc0ac3ad6cf80dc4
08cb7a5c88d852ffdbb731bf00fb71c97d2cd008
709890 F20101107_AABMSH kim_s_Page_148.jp2
15da79a42a709964011d4d04c1e17c4c
3ce1eebd4d22a246245b44bc3004225ee15d2012
37069 F20101107_AABOBE kim_s_Page_133.QC.jpg
ebfe94df369af967922fabc2b367be25
0343323726f67e87ec2539d0f359184731443f90
36864 F20101107_AABOAQ kim_s_Page_125.QC.jpg
45510a38fc5032277cfeba30eef9e5bd
35b036da6bf63a686a785202d1ccbf6bc1b45bf0
8834 F20101107_AABNVK kim_s_Page_053thm.jpg
51424a493f7754ddf2870fa0bb9c86d6
50ca7eb47f448cd1934fa14169a5fbab6ec2f635
37038 F20101107_AABNUV kim_s_Page_046.QC.jpg
6d82614a637fc23f5abb37d966d5258b
79a0e285478ebe422e11f789b931c2558e0cc1a3
F20101107_AABMRT kim_s_Page_133.jp2
c8b07da812e17139ee1acdc6e00405ef
bea5119de6b53dcc2ed98545e4f7f48da17f9463
F20101107_AABMSI kim_s_Page_149.jp2
7a5ff2570262866d36b4c72e61f0dd8f
d7a0048b8e778597e02428679bcee4225f46a776
9164 F20101107_AABOBF kim_s_Page_133thm.jpg
1d19ebbfe85e424304f432574b0b2514
dc60fcc990f467ee5f722d2f04fb6bec45c41892
9350 F20101107_AABOAR kim_s_Page_126thm.jpg
6f36f06a0dff018bfa378ebffa9475af
d8b9d634ce969f9eef50e2c3edd3757472bb1944
9109 F20101107_AABNVL kim_s_Page_054thm.jpg
914072e0291534b26eca3b703fb83028
33434174e983f3e91d5c3803d12c40d96add65fe
9015 F20101107_AABNUW kim_s_Page_046thm.jpg
3fc83cfd2f3e621fd7d30c92e7c3bebd
916c7d169f27380b57a193f206ab157b807c229f
F20101107_AABMRU kim_s_Page_134.jp2
30c4247aca487cb0dac91c804b6a3302
4692e0b32d1631dcc1febc80afb7a00ef490216b
1051943 F20101107_AABMSJ kim_s_Page_150.jp2
a4997217c972e786ee7fdc77c36b9371
45b58f28eadc0506911da64411d3dd381b38ec62
37055 F20101107_AABOBG kim_s_Page_134.QC.jpg
542840e5442d0eee59aceea759c1b912
2da4d19d38f58e219d2901bd77e3b62c75dcc933
36758 F20101107_AABOAS kim_s_Page_127.QC.jpg
bd1b25bc6134edd462ee8b3ba3011aab
bd53e988ec6cf61b9da6b58f7c52784d06f29d86
37020 F20101107_AABNWA kim_s_Page_062.QC.jpg
b6f85cb2f9663fbb83d70f192ac1c129
1a656a0ae7f4da352b5f600e3f37e281d4a4eeed
36383 F20101107_AABNVM kim_s_Page_055.QC.jpg
cd6648c1746401d8dffd65bc9e2d7a11
86fdc6be0a26c818b815fee314e4dc437f0f9a57
37794 F20101107_AABNUX kim_s_Page_047.QC.jpg
186b570b1a0d635005cb7d363cb13053
de6764a531e30609c189ec784f9cf0525d7181a3
F20101107_AABMRV kim_s_Page_135.jp2
351af4e63cc0cd929bc4ad57953d210a
e6709889ed2d012538b60b0480e971165c1c4255
F20101107_AABMSK kim_s_Page_151.jp2
9b06254a25903c3f9d7c9e5239730096
cf1f1178bf6ca19a07313601bb72b65af0e85a1c
9280 F20101107_AABOBH kim_s_Page_134thm.jpg
1e3a6112dfc048987e4f28ffa9182eac
3c32b05998d03c7fdfd8001492462fcd8ab19249
9010 F20101107_AABOAT kim_s_Page_127thm.jpg
bce1a9f5409b7d4365723fbffd2bf735
58338b782e7379c04d9f436edfed812188bfafbb
9131 F20101107_AABNWB kim_s_Page_062thm.jpg
6528f36efef93c516c0d75f257c9e97b
9bb32367570dcae2e9f74dcb3ee4a1b957c15a9f
F20101107_AABNVN kim_s_Page_055thm.jpg
2dd5036b3e2e908a199a13e95dca8499
94f2596b841645f813c25dc26dec16f567f120b6
9333 F20101107_AABNUY kim_s_Page_047thm.jpg
e4de09a3ff97fc4bcc72615af31c4052
a4c6df6d49dc8290ec78dd892d7e93bd8bc1ca3b
1051949 F20101107_AABMRW kim_s_Page_136.jp2
c9d8b9d7d97195aaaf8438b613731a78
d4dbbacaaabb41592e8c8ac956f7db83a8581ab6
1051921 F20101107_AABMSL kim_s_Page_152.jp2
bd8c219ab0a7766f3c81c673c5f2a238
c5357428c1aa7ebae78c266e1a06add283108b89
38224 F20101107_AABOBI kim_s_Page_135.QC.jpg
e28bc8cb9b80e14441d82fed07cf4c2e
90ad88c26018970096412ced9ebac0a8bc538673
37519 F20101107_AABOAU kim_s_Page_128.QC.jpg
d65694d251de02689f96c287346e3a2e
0deac577db548bee45f410eeee1cc95873412273
36014 F20101107_AABNWC kim_s_Page_063.QC.jpg
6b9cdf2963490426840062c26f530ea5
fed16cd80b4f9370a59a5dd2faa11803739afadb
38385 F20101107_AABNVO kim_s_Page_056.QC.jpg
649b71ae0536f6c435d53010640eaa64
c58972ed2a7db72149267c5763628da73ef1c7d5
38629 F20101107_AABNUZ kim_s_Page_048.QC.jpg
a8e59ac3c8ac3a062bf3542c6219b4da
107d92abbe3910c9d90f79fa9b79bb0143c254a9
F20101107_AABMRX kim_s_Page_137.jp2
30b7d8e34fa8c954e8ce0c56e4f11ad5
0d2a757cd328f4922b99101043eb7ab21e10c1df
F20101107_AABMTA kim_s_Page_170.jp2
17ab58a11884cb348af5fdc9a457b38e
e1bf20f46ee6fb69ab493b8fd2cb893d8219c6b3
F20101107_AABMSM kim_s_Page_154.jp2
eb48827eb6b677a8b521fd24913382b8
7d47e8a83c1a4ce16e92050c31b88c155dd4bdcb
F20101107_AABOBJ kim_s_Page_135thm.jpg
49aaaf157e6776c9fb7d973701cf86c1
d0d956979f1278f3e769740c51185b50a4a0cba2
9317 F20101107_AABOAV kim_s_Page_128thm.jpg
d1919c50e92b2e5bc55a2d4d2e7acd87
6a24a2e6d364454700ad68932b989a9cf2ce66bd
8961 F20101107_AABNWD kim_s_Page_063thm.jpg
8c360d8837747be4be66eeeae0e60384
8468031f60e5d6235ad9aaabe9463bbf726d2056
9264 F20101107_AABNVP kim_s_Page_056thm.jpg
d942c26b48d71af86c4ab1fd71223f7c
dcb8fdd213354bef83240f5f3ee9bcc8a21c9d3f
717996 F20101107_AABMRY kim_s_Page_139.jp2
69731d362188f853afd0ec06217a0e8f
3cfa1e7b257d5d4390f06ff5dee6039de6eb1552
F20101107_AABMTB kim_s_Page_171.jp2
da8932cf620bf2b7e33d000d08fd279e
11e1f27ca1b466f30062d57222873424da68f888
F20101107_AABMSN kim_s_Page_155.jp2
1190453a112cf4d39faeb91d8d6c9963
9b2f12fa4e3a5e0af9c70358d16cfa54735137ec
38086 F20101107_AABOBK kim_s_Page_136.QC.jpg
a6f9ae1ca1be420e0e94632f200d56d6
4c779831f0b60e0dcf16cc2c5bc0eaf1617e6865
38232 F20101107_AABOAW kim_s_Page_129.QC.jpg
b8fba30dcb8d6dbcbc6242ea4872cc16
8a59a68dfca32014d6d49141bda85720139af1a5
36082 F20101107_AABNWE kim_s_Page_064.QC.jpg
1323393cec499e6cd0c270781733729d
9f9cde290cd839fc7e3ad353321ffaa095e1456d
35886 F20101107_AABNVQ kim_s_Page_057.QC.jpg
96dcf915f4c0c20aa5f21031165ae4e2
07eff558b43574d9cd9cff0c5bd95eeb978ed4f9
733737 F20101107_AABMRZ kim_s_Page_140.jp2
f9b69f421c63fe0217216d068cbc46a4
f4a743771e7329c7741fc443c3af153018a034e0
1051969 F20101107_AABMTC kim_s_Page_172.jp2
f39ca4eff4b7a1280adfba5a9f86c136
22b17568a4176d7195a1c7ac2970f5df17e987b7
1051934 F20101107_AABMSO kim_s_Page_156.jp2
c59075f85f9c81f3b1d6d3f14c1216c1
405c3c5220f41fd37b9db190351315800d39d7ab
9140 F20101107_AABOBL kim_s_Page_136thm.jpg
3294dea5fd8fa9573f47eef78dfd4eb8
42f79e7fd47dd03098d15396775dfb191302df86
9038 F20101107_AABOAX kim_s_Page_129thm.jpg
11917de15ea0dc0b184e48600e4c536a
ac6fcbb77cc1eb5f8eb80d7601ea116753e24f15
F20101107_AABNWF kim_s_Page_064thm.jpg
d781be2c3af1af03ba1dd107ddf54541
476913d30002874e6f4433e64983beb8994b8443
8633 F20101107_AABNVR kim_s_Page_057thm.jpg
bb99d1da3283598dfda1f383cf938ac2
0fe1198861d39e6e1cae0aceda477f1d6676b0a0
F20101107_AABMTD kim_s_Page_173.jp2
51e93f429d2ae5f53c062cd8edaae200
a9531a2e6685e48de0a8733e2307e7f736705308
1051928 F20101107_AABMSP kim_s_Page_157.jp2
423307c5f05d5806eaaa1bdab23794a1
47fb32f077a6323741e1f4fc6ae4d902f7670830
22652 F20101107_AABOCA kim_s_Page_144.QC.jpg
f1ae47a5a8c086c8f37c33ed16003184
633e8dced09ea59f32c5ae02896d43c8ecc03d80
35430 F20101107_AABOBM kim_s_Page_137.QC.jpg
30772030941b9546e267c958a10a3155
06df11cda88ee49caa1637da957d93f730039b4d
35971 F20101107_AABOAY kim_s_Page_130.QC.jpg
85fda74a7c901aedaba9daea13de8d1c
000af9c51933394c1c7d3f47525e995cfea01a3f
36032 F20101107_AABNWG kim_s_Page_065.QC.jpg
919f90365b6398d6ea00aedfd9862b21
f3371ddb1557f5dfb985ca143a3e4540822db79f
35579 F20101107_AABNVS kim_s_Page_058.QC.jpg
5ed32b9504c2db5514a99fe3babd3da1
0769950fe0122d505d27e0f79a5b1178f7de2ccd
F20101107_AABMTE kim_s_Page_174.jp2
7021e1a2ca87a283287d52903242f7ba
4e1f91e007c524aa1d6ffe1744a52117c44c61aa
F20101107_AABMSQ kim_s_Page_158.jp2
c63da0638fd44550e5e1e98487e07edb
9689f271af0211f5cc4e429e76f3b05b6e5b56f6
6522 F20101107_AABOCB kim_s_Page_144thm.jpg
9c5f9cbf1fdac502fc77e50b9660b1d9
9f69ad27a9614b47e3b97011bb9b08118cf816cc
8706 F20101107_AABOBN kim_s_Page_137thm.jpg
5d09b2114ddc7894731d7c3403e7b577
76a198b7953367775182e3f7160e5f2c54a01364
8676 F20101107_AABOAZ kim_s_Page_130thm.jpg
6e427a3be2146e5eb6176d59d5278ae4
c0e9bab99fcb14c5c506c33181e9ea449fe384d3
8909 F20101107_AABNWH kim_s_Page_065thm.jpg
38d2aebc974a2b95ab9b73fb597390c7
9de7b3982e54b6ff878ca9066c84d1351d31eb82
8715 F20101107_AABNVT kim_s_Page_058thm.jpg
b6d77b2f29040ad56ac3f242be641c3e
6e6662de80d4ae74247071d3b8fbdf8dcd6e47c7
F20101107_AABMTF kim_s_Page_176.jp2
9e5303a46a0add41a4b1a44f39f859c3
f880edc145326989b21ef787773e343a116dc299
F20101107_AABMSR kim_s_Page_159.jp2
9ff34562a2041cd97878224786e1e9c6
f85bd006c7c407a711f4a493db14f0f2db89081c
21657 F20101107_AABOCC kim_s_Page_145.QC.jpg
15fc5a18949475e3435ce55292b08078
810d1d6a91220a0bdaa931a00f9836dcb8c03253
19282 F20101107_AABOBO kim_s_Page_138.QC.jpg
bc7b4ae80f013e751c2a9e1103fb26b6
5e698c691fd2b7a390eb1b98cca7cccaf29343fe
36834 F20101107_AABNWI kim_s_Page_066.QC.jpg
4c80413b6d19229edcf8bb4714398e6e
b26d5e983a745248880b6fdc965357f22814bca1
F20101107_AABMTG kim_s_Page_177.jp2
45cae970f21b8fe8c8900e9349d7e2e0
f67aa861aff2c7a815b65f2484ef87f9cfa150ac
6111 F20101107_AABOCD kim_s_Page_145thm.jpg
9175c7218a67c721e04fedaaacf04d62
035686c349b2ec587e295fbcd4aebd7a8fe4f456
5143 F20101107_AABOBP kim_s_Page_138thm.jpg
f64c9be5aa4ebf232a507818856a33db
b812712c7992c1a321e17d6e85019392961fb2f6
8479 F20101107_AABNWJ kim_s_Page_066thm.jpg
80c7fe56b12bf27589d9ffb3ba080b8b
809b722afabe37b123b4cfef7885c0f510ac9e19
37062 F20101107_AABNVU kim_s_Page_059.QC.jpg
6e40cf51364744356f57c913a253015e
943c387439c67beec99a7aeb99232aeb3fdffe03
F20101107_AABMTH kim_s_Page_178.jp2
8a398ac7a924237a469b5c9c86218236
38b7be8da65722b35e3644fcf18769cb1d6a9e67
F20101107_AABMSS kim_s_Page_160.jp2
6588722892f05084b152e7f3a3f39ba6
684327212bcb1f43c74a2a69680287ef247deb53
20646 F20101107_AABOCE kim_s_Page_146.QC.jpg
3a586fdd0ce44014e9aa1533927422bf
67b4993286e6f7e3b57c9c804e31912112b10425
22118 F20101107_AABOBQ kim_s_Page_139.QC.jpg
abb4afa874376cee25f898c0f099d928
1a1e575b50053fcbf7c84b097a471b3cb38a98ee
34379 F20101107_AABNWK kim_s_Page_067.QC.jpg
1cd8a3de436c0dbe26e2c3aafceb0012
d1e7aa949809d88045de914f22334815ce1f37b5
9018 F20101107_AABNVV kim_s_Page_059thm.jpg
83d22604b4db860256ace712a9d2d7b1
fed9342d603f0d17fe906dd61e06a678b2d9987b
F20101107_AABMTI kim_s_Page_179.jp2
e1ec6e34c9de2e5bd68a80546651cf90
5f230703c6bfd0ef75668206df5d08724ac52176
F20101107_AABMST kim_s_Page_162.jp2
6e9877923be58a0a02bc54f7b9b59235
aee55f399790cf27e6edf59f0104054ee98c163b
6044 F20101107_AABOCF kim_s_Page_146thm.jpg
2035a9834b001f8ee918fc067098ddd8
ee17912580cb05fadb3f88c0f9a4ccccf2f21b3b
6122 F20101107_AABOBR kim_s_Page_139thm.jpg
f4b5650f22b4c55a27861fcb1b7d24b7
52008f74a436b98d47f844c76088cea007ef3284
8391 F20101107_AABNWL kim_s_Page_067thm.jpg
8ba24b8d0ca356064508e11dc402912b
ba5e4f930ebd63b87adf3348106e29038d44de60
15349 F20101107_AABNVW kim_s_Page_060.QC.jpg
ff0d75849c6ff4a4b404db8296053169
781e3bd4d1c7d974f4b863d7a285442aa6f77eb1
F20101107_AABMTJ kim_s_Page_180.jp2
af55c8e627d95e1e5c1b68c0ed0168db
bcadd0983a977e52176dd01abec50d98a8bd9209
F20101107_AABMSU kim_s_Page_163.jp2
a487f3cda2984ec77a3e7702568cc011
8743a35fa77b97abe28f6b218b84f117eca43639
22040 F20101107_AABOCG kim_s_Page_147.QC.jpg
149f78e8bf19d46472e4626ca129b8f1
27ab7eea3c027f7d4937b989bf389faec8e543bb
23084 F20101107_AABOBS kim_s_Page_140.QC.jpg
89dde265802b9e0699bc23a41d3d20b4
6719f10fe591b5e0548ce816d2e9ab788d11d506
F20101107_AABNXA kim_s_Page_075thm.jpg
45f7bef45571d9dde4f6109c56eff900
d9d7bacb6f919a7058ce9282110e6ac6de6e7112
36872 F20101107_AABNWM kim_s_Page_068.QC.jpg
d00c9228f970ddb20c130276036ebe13
469eb8e9e17e6fec678ae6cddc378ca9298f342a
3799 F20101107_AABNVX kim_s_Page_060thm.jpg
177235477518af07300490dc11469f66
ca938fe48053482523582b20e9b664750eedb31b
F20101107_AABMTK kim_s_Page_181.jp2
fa64a729a3505bb4181dee11b71f6a4f
f6c0a86c08e64cef5d499b59c569098e20c327e7
679410 F20101107_AABMSV kim_s_Page_164.jp2
326393abfaf78791b98773f16a1d7844
ad1e53061728cd9d4d94439becf83e35b8f50465







TEACHER-CHILD INTERACTIONS IN VOLUNTARY PRE-KINDERGARTEN
PROGRAMS IN CHILD CARE SETTINGS: A CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF BARRIERS AND
FACILITATORS

















By

SEUNGHEE KIM


A DISSERTATION PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT
OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

2008



































2008 Seunghee Kim









ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I owe everything to many people who have encouraged me to complete my doctorate

over the years. My deepest thanks go to my supervisory committee members. I am extremely

grateful to my supervisory committee chair, Dr. Kristen Kemple, for her encouragement and

guidance in every piece of my dissertation. As a mentor and advisor, she has provided me with

many ideas and opportunities that have truly helped to guide my professional career for four

years. To my other outstanding supervisory committee members, Dr. Christie Cavanaugh, Dr.

Elizabeth Bondy, and Dr. Hazel Jones, I wish to express my gratitude for their immense practical

help and comments about my dissertation. Their comments helped me brainstorm every step of

the way from the first stage of my dissertation proposal until the final dissertation defense. Also,

I would like to express my thanks to Dr. Ellen Brantlinger, Dr. Phil Carspecken, and Dr. Mirka

Koro-Ljungberg, who gave me a wealth of useful information about qualitative research

methodology. I earnestly thank my undergraduate advisor, Dr. Seung Urn Choe, for encouraging

me to study in the United States.

I am indebted to First Presbyterian Preschool in Gainesville, Florida, which provided an

opportunity to volunteer for pre-kindergarten children over three years. This opportunity

extended my experience of working with culturally diverse children and their families as well as

my knowledge about pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings. I am especially grateful to

the three teachers who participated in my dissertation project for their truthfulness and

willingness to share their stories with me. They helped me to be aware of the importance of the

relationships between participants and researchers. My thanks also go to the directors of the three

teachers' workplaces, who introduced the three teachers to me and gave me permission to

conduct this study.









I thank my family for encouraging me to pursue my academic goals. I give thanks every

day to my mother and father, who instilled a love of learning and a sense of self-confidence in

me. Thanks also to my sister, brothers, brother-in-law, and sister-in-law. Their enduring love,

support, and acceptance of what I am doing have always provided me with the inspiration for my

study and dissertation. In addition, I owe a debt of thanks to my network of friends and

neighbors, who have listened to my words, made an effort to cheer me up, and given me lots of

helpful suggestions for the completion of my dissertation. Finally, I dedicate my dissertation to

my shining niece and nephews: Jung Min Han, Jung Wook Han, and Myung Jae Kim. Their

happy smiling faces enabled me to overcome several difficulties and worries I confronted while I

was writing my dissertation. Watching them grow, I realize a wealth of responsibility to help

young children get a great future ahead of them.









TABLE OF CONTENTS

page

A C K N O W L E D G M E N T S ............................ ................. ............................................................ 3

LIST O F TA B LE S .................................................................................. 8

A B STR A C T ......... .. ............................... ... .......................................................................... 9

CHAPTER

1 IN T R O D U C T IO N ......... ............................................... .......................... .. .. ....... ..... 11

Florida's Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten (VPK) Program........... .............................. 12
Limitations of Florida's Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten (VPK) Program............. .............. 16
D e fin itio n s ....................... ................................................................................ . ..... ..... 1 9
T he P problem ......... ........................................ ............................ 20
Im portance of the Study .............. ............. ................... ........ ...... ................. 21
Purpose of the Study ............ .................. ................... .... .. .. ........ ............ ..... 22
G u hiding R research Q u estion ................................................................................................... 22
Subjectivity Statem ent ........... .............. ....... ... ............ ............ .. 23

2 REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE.............................................................. .............. 26

C critical T h eory ......... .... .............. .................................... ............................ 2 6
P o stm o d em ism ............... ... .................................... ................................................ ... 2 8
Rationale of Pre-Kindergarten Programs.................................................. ................ 31
Effectiveness of State-Funded Pre-Kindergarten Programs ............................................... 34
Limitations of State-Funded Pre-Kindergarten Programs .............................................. 36
Teacher-Child Interactions in Child Care Settings .............. .............................. ....... ....... 41
Nature of Teacher-Child Interactions ................................................. 44
Unilateral Interactions between Teachers and Children .............................. .............. 48
Causes of the Unilateral Interactions between Teachers and Children............................. 51
Problems of the Unilateral Interactions between Teachers and Children............................ 54
S u m m a ry ............. ..... ............ ...................................... ............................................ ..... 5 7

3 PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGY ................. .......... ................... 61

Qualitative R research M ethodology......... .................................... ................. .............. 61
S am p lin g S trateg y ............. ................. ................. ................................................. 6 6
Sam pling Procedures............ .. ................................. .. ..... ...... ........... .. 67
Description of Participants and Context ........... ..................................... 68
D ata C collection M methods .... .................................. ................... .... .... .......... ... 71
Interview s ................. ................................... ........................... 7 1
Observations ............................................ ............... 73









D ata A analysis M ethod.................... ........................................... .. .. ............ .. .............. 74
T ru stw north in ess ..................................................................... 7 7
Lim stations of the Study.................... .................... ...................... .. .......... .. .......... ... 78

4 PRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF DATA ............ ........................................... 82

T h e F irst P articip ant, Su san ................................................................................................... 82
Susan's Narrative ..................................................................... ......... 83
Seven Building Tasks ......... ...................... .... .............. .... ......... 95
B building significance .............................................. .. .. .. .. .......... .. 95
Building activities....................... ........ 97
B building identities................................... .............. 98
B building relationships ................... ............ ......... ............. .... 100
Building politics (the distribution of social goods) ......................................... 101
Building connections .................................... ......... .. .... .. .. .. .......... .. 102
Building significance for sign systems and knowledge................................. 104
The Second Participant, Veronica.......................................... 109
V veronica' s N arrative ........................................................... .. .......... 110
Seven Building Tasks ......... ................... ... .. .. ....... .......... 121
B building significance .............................................. ... .... .. .......... .. 121
B u ild in g a ctiv itie s ............................................ ... ................ ...... ................. 12 3
B u ild in g id en titie s........................................................................ ...... ....... 12 5
B building relationships ................... ............ ......... ............. .... 127
Building politics (the distribution of social goods) ......................................... 129
B building connections ................................... .............. ...... .. .......... .. 130
Building significance for sign systems and knowledge................................. 132
T he T third P participant, C indy ...................................... ................................................... 136
C in dy 's N arrativ e ..................................................................... 13 8
Seven Building Tasks ......... ................... ... .. .. ....... .......... 148
Building significance ..................................... ........ .... .... .. .......... .. 148
B building activities ........................................................................ ....... ............ 151
Building identities ........................................... 153
Building relationships ........................ ........... 156
Building politics (the distribution of social goods) ......................................... 157
Building connections .................................... ......... .. .... .. .. .. .......... .. 159
Building significance for sign systems and knowledge................................. 160

5 DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS ................................... 165

Sum m ary of Findings ........................................................ ............ ........ ..... 165
D discussion of Findings .................................. .. ............ .......... .............. 171
Barriers to Effective Teacher-Child Interactions ............. ....................... .............. 171
Facilitators of Effective Teacher-Child Interactions ........................................ ...... 174
S u m m a ry ............... ..................................................................................... 1 7 7
C connections w ith Previous R research ............................................................................ ... 178
Im plications for Professional Practice ........................................... .......................... 183
Recom m endations for Further Research..................................... ......................... .. ....... 186


6









APPENDIX

A LETTER OF INVITATION AND CONSENT FORM FOR A TEACHER....................... 191

B IN TE R V IE W PR O T O C O L ................................................................................................. 193

Interview Guide for the First Formal Interview................................ ....................... 193
Interview Guide for the First Inform al Interview ...................................... ................... 193
Interview Guide for the Second Informal Interview......................................................... 194
Interview Guide for the Third Informal Interview....................... ..... ............. 194
Interview Guide for the Second Form al Interview .................................... .................... 194

REFERENCES ...................................................................... ........ 196

B IO G R A P H IC A L SK E T C H ...................................................................................................... 2 11







































7









LIST OF TABLES

Table page

4-1 Susan's class schedule.......................................................... .. .......... .. .... ....... 94

4-2 V eronica's class schedule...... .. ............... ............................................ ....... .......... ... 120

4-3 Cindy's class schedule .. ................. .................... ........ .. 148









Abstract of Dissertation Presented to the Graduate School
of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the
Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy

TEACHER-CHILD INTERACTIONS IN VOLUNTARY PRE-KINDERGARTEN
PROGRAMS IN CHILD CARE SETTINGS: A CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF BARRIERS AND
FACILITATORS

By

Seunghee Kim

August 2008

Chair: Kristen Kemple
Major: Curriculum and Instruction

We investigated barriers to and facilitators of effective teacher-child interactions in

voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings. An effective teacher-child interaction

enables both teachers and children to actively engage in solving the problems they confront in

their daily lives. The effective teacher-child interaction relies on their mutual respect rather than

teachers' dominant positions, and enables both teachers and children to make an effort to find the

best way to change the status quo through critical thinking. However, several factors that impede

effective teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings

allow children few opportunities to solve their own problems and articulate their own needs by

preventing teachers from effectively interacting with children. Thus, by investigating barriers to

and facilitators of effective teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in

child care settings, this qualitative research project ultimately aims to find ways to empower both

teachers and children through effective teacher-child interactions.

Based on the theoretical orientation of critical theory and postmodernism, interviews and

observations of three teachers were used in Florida's voluntary pre-kindergarten (VPK) program

in child care settings, and the data were analyzed using Gee's (2005) method of discourse









analysis. The interviews were conducted in the teachers' workplaces, and the observations

focused on the teachers' behavior and speech in their classrooms during whole-group, free-play,

and meal time. According to the steps of discourse analysis, the interview data were organized

into "stanzas," several story lines were made, and then a number of building tasks were

established. The results of data analysis demonstrate that the unique characteristics of the VPK

program impede the three teachers' most effective interactions with children, even though they

are aware of the importance of their one-on-one interactions with children. The findings of the

study show several barriers to and facilitators of effective teacher-child interactions, as defined

from a critical perspective, in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings.

This study includes a number of strategies to enhance the internal validity, reliability,

generalizability, and trustworthiness of the study, including "member checks." In particular, my

subjectivity statement shows why I am interested in this qualitative research project as well as

why I believe that this study is important. By clarifying my assumptions and worldview based on

my personal experiences, this subjectivity statement contributes to increasing the internal validity

of this study. However, this study demonstrates several limitations resulting from the fact that the

data were collected over a short period of time. Some recommendations for further research are

suggested in order to address these limitations as well as to lead further research to focus on

improving educational practice. As a first attempt to investigate the nature of teacher-child

interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings by using the theoretical

orientation of critical theory and postmodernism, this qualitative research project offers some

helpful suggestions to interested practitioners, including teachers, policy makers, and researchers.









CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION

Teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings

reflect the characteristics of voluntary pre-kindergarten programs as well as of child care settings.

Voluntary pre-kindergarten programs emphasize school readiness, instead of addressing a child-

care service for four-year-old children. Nevertheless, voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in

child care settings perform the function of taking care of children since the programs take place

in child care settings. Also, teachers' educational philosophies or teaching methods are

influenced by the standards for voluntary pre-kindergarten programs as well as their own

experiences developed in child care settings over the years.

Especially in the case of Florida's voluntary pre-kindergarten (VPK) program, first

offered in 2005, its short history indicates that the VPK program has minimally involved

teachers in changing their own ways of teaching or interacting with children. Also, because of its

unique characteristics that are distinguished from other state-funded pre-kindergarten programs,

the VPK program in child care settings is strongly affected by the characteristics of child care

settings. One of the unique characteristics of the VPK program is to allow VPK providers to

have flexibility in creating curricula and philosophies, provided that they are accountable to the

state. Such a characteristic enables VPK providers to depend on the VPK standards as well as

their own guidelines on the organization and management of school curriculum. In particular,

since most of the VPK providers have already prepared children for kindergarten before they

offer the VPK program, they use the VPK standards as well as their own lesson plans that they

have developed over the years. The VPK standards include several domains, such as health and

social/emotional/motor development and emergent literacy, but they do not suggest a way of

teaching or interacting with children. As a result, teacher-child interactions in the VPK program









in child care settings strongly reflect the characteristics of teacher-child interactions in child care

settings.

Moreover, there is little research on the nature and quality of teacher-child interactions in

pre-kindergarten programs, even though many studies show the positive effects of pre-

kindergarten programs on children's developmental needs. This lack of research makes this

qualitative research project depend on the existing research on the characteristics of teacher-child

interactions in child care settings. Thus, this qualitative research project examines teacher-child

interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings, based on the teacher-

child interactions in child care settings that are characterized by the theoretical orientation of

critical theory and postmodernism as teacher authority over children. In this chapter I will

explain the unique characteristics of Florida's voluntary pre-kindergarten (VPK) program and its

limitations, such as an inadequate accountability system of the VPK program. Also, I will clarify

the purpose of the study, along with a statement of the problem and the importance of the study.

Finally, I will make my subjectivity statement in order to increase the internal validity of this

study.

Florida's Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten (VPK) Program

Florida's voluntary pre-kindergarten (VPK) program, as the result of a constitutional

amendment passed by 60% of Florida voters in November 2002, began in the 2005-2006 school

year. As an early childhood development and education program, the VPK program is voluntary,

high quality, and free for eligible children regardless of family income. Similar to other states'

pre-kindergarten programs, the VPK program is based on its own early learning standards, which

reflect its own organizations, structures, and resources. First of all, unlike many other state-

funded pre-kindergarten programs, the VPK program is independent from public school systems

(Finn Jr., http://www.teachmorelovemore.org/PDF/ktf floridabook_229.pdf). That is to say, the









VPK program allows public, private, and faith-based providers to deliver the VPK program

depending on whether they meet the minimum standards required in law. VPK providers have

flexibility in creating curricula and philosophies, providing they follow a few basic rules for

staffing and accounting and submit to results-based accountability. For example, one of the three

teachers who participated in this study teaches children in the VPK classroom in a private child

care center, and the others do so in a faith-based child care center. All of the participants use

their own classroom curriculum based on both the guidelines for the VPK program and the

school curriculum that has developed over the years.

In addition, VPK providers flexibly structure the hours per day and days per week, as

long as they meet the required instructional hours (State of Florida Agency for Workforce

Innovation, http://www.floridajobs.org/earlylearing/VPK/FAQs.html). For example, if a VPK

provider offers a school-year program, it would offer 3 hours of instruction each day to meet the

540-hour requirement. In the case of the three teachers who participated in this study, their

workplaces provide children with 3-hour instruction in the morning from 9:00 to 12:00. By and

large, the VPK program in child care settings is offered through two different types of pre-

kindergarten classrooms. One type of pre-kindergarten classroom as a half-day program offers

only the 3-hour instruction of the VPK program; that is, children stay only from 9:00 to 12:00

and have only snack time. Since they leave the classroom at 12:00, they have no meal time. The

other type of pre-kindergarten classroom as a full-day program is open before 9:00 and offers

both the 3-hour instruction of the VPK program and other activities, including meal time.

Children in the classroom stay all day and usually spend the rest of the day, except for the 3

hours of instruction, eating, free-playing, and sleeping. The three-hour-a-day instruction of the

VPK program is considered realistic and efficient considering staff supply, facilities, and cost.









However, the three-hour-a-day program has been faulted by national groups and experts, who

strongly suggest that children need a longer day and stronger staff credentials than the VPK

standards for lasting positive effects on their development.

Another unique characteristic of the VPK program is aiming at results-based

accountability (Finn Jr., http://www.teachmorelovemore.org/PDF/ktf floridabook 229.pdf).

That is to say, the VPK program judges the quality of a VPK provider by how well pre-

kindergarten graduates fare in kindergarten. This point of view is different from the conventional

opinion on how to measure the quality of preschool programs, which focuses on inputs, ratios,

expenditures, and staff credentials. Thus, the results-based accountability of the VPK program

contributes to increasing diversity and creativity of VPK providers, since VPK providers are able

to be freed from different regulations related to money and time, providing they meet the VPK

standards. The diversity of VPK providers gives all parents an opportunity to consider different

conditions related to their family's own needs and then select the most appropriate provider for

their child. The fact that the VPK program gives all parents a chance to have their child

participate in a high-quality learning experience is related to the fact that the VPK program is

universal but voluntary. The VPK program is available to every four-year-old child residing in

Florida and does not require the child's citizenship. Since the VPK program remains optional,

parents are told about the program but have no obligation to enroll their child. Thus, parents are

able to choose a high-quality pre-kindergarten provider that has a positive effect on their child's

learning. This indicates that all VPK providers make an effort to meet the state's high-quality

prekindergarten standards. As a result, the state expects that a voluntary universal pre-

kindergarten program leads to high participation rates as Oklahoma's and Georgia's pre-









kindergarten programs do (State of Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation,

http://www.floridajobs.org/earlylearning/VPK/WhyPreKimportant.html).

The results-based accountability of the VPK program demands assessments that are well

aligned to its standards. The state uses two assessment instruments: one instrument aims to

assess children's early literacy skills, such as letter naming and initial sounds; the other

instrument is used by kindergarten teachers in order to measure children's school readiness in a

number of domains, including social, emotional, and cognitive domains. Thus, the VPK program

particularly emphasizes literacy readiness, instead of addressing a child-care service for four-

year-olds. In detail, the VPK program includes a curriculum that is developmentally appropriate,

focuses on early literacy skills, and gets children ready for kindergarten based on standards

adopted by the State Board of Education (Florida's voluntary prekindergarten program,

http://www.fldoe.org/earlylearning/vpkparent.asp). The VPK standards include seven domains,

including health and social/emotional/motor development, language and communication,

emergent literacy (reading readiness), cognitive development, and general knowledge. Also, the

results-based accountability of the VPK program requires VPK teachers to be well educated and

of good moral character. The VPK program demands that all lead VPK instructors must have a

minimum of a Child Development Associate for the school year program and successfully

complete an emergent literacy training course approved by the department. Emergent literacy

training courses provide teachers with instructional strategies and techniques to develop pre-

kindergarten children's emergent literacy skills, including oral communication, knowledge of

print and letters, phonemic and phonological awareness, and vocabulary and comprehension

development. In order to examine all VPK instructors' moral character, the VPK program









requires all instructors to be screened before employment and re-screened at least once every 5

years.

Moreover, the VPK program places strict limits on teacher-child ratios and class sizes.

Based on the notion that low teacher-child ratios and small group sizes lead to a high-quality pre-

kindergarten program, the VPK program requires one teacher to be responsible for at most 10

children, with a class size not to exceed 18 children. If one VPK class has 11 or more children,

the class must have at least one additional instructor who is not required to have a Child

Development Associate or complete an emergent literacy training course (State of Florida

Agency for Workforce Innovation, http://www.floridajobs.org/earlylearing/VPK/FAQs.html).

Thus, the VPK program usually takes place in the classroom where two teachers are responsible

for 18 children. All of the three teachers who participated in this study teach 18 pre-kindergarten

children with an assistant teacher or a co-teacher in the classroom. Also, the VPK program aims

to provide the necessary resources to ensure that every class offers a high-quality learning

environment that prepares children for kindergarten. That is to say, the VPK program expects

that VPK providers provide pre-kindergarten children with well-equipped facilities suited to the

needs of preschool-age children as well as sufficient toys, books, and materials.

Limitations of Florida's Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten (VPK) Program

This is the third year that the state has offered the VPK program, which provides every

four-year-old child in Florida with free, publicly funded education in the year prior to

kindergarten. However, the VPK program still shows many limitations even though many

parents are putting their child in the program. Most of all, the VPK standards are poor; that is,

among ten minimum standards that have been developed by the National Institute for Early

Education Research (NIEER) for state-funded pre-kindergarten programs, the VPK program

meets only four standards: early learning standards, maximum class size, staff-child ratio, and









monitoring (Barnett, Hustedt, Friedman, Boyd, & Ainsworth, 2007). Florida is among only seven

states that meet less than half of NIEER's quality benchmarks, and the VPK program is

considered to have serious problems by NIEER (NIEER, 2008). The poor VPK standards are

likely to result in a poor-quality VPK program, especially in the case of private VPK providers

that are located in the area where the majority of the population lives in poverty. Since the VPK

standards do not require the provider to improve the quality of its facilities, teachers, curricula,

and other support services, the provider tends to use its poor facilities or curricula. Thus, children

from low-income families are likely to learn in a poor-quality VPK program, even though they

are taught the necessary skills for kindergarten.

Another limitation of the VPK program is its inadequate accountability system. The

National Institute for Early Education Research (2006) points out that the Florida Kindergarten

Readiness Screener a tool for assessing the school readiness of all entering kindergarteners is

not classified as a rigorous evaluation design because "the Screener may or may not prove to

yield accurate information about what children know when they start kindergarten" (NIEER,

2006). Thus, the NIEER states that it is unfair and unwise to link children's Kindergarten

Screener scores back to what children learned during the VPK year or to the VPK provider's

accountability. In addition, the VPK law requires that the state Department of Education must

assess the school readiness of all entering kindergarteners according to state readiness standards

and must "establish kindergarten readiness rates" (Wilkins, 2005, p. 4). Under the Florida

system, a VPK provider is put on probation and is subject to intervention, if the provider does

not meet its school readiness targets for two years. If a VPK provider fails to meet its targets for

four years, the provider loses its eligibility to participate in the VPK program. This

accountability system might lead VPK providers to prefer children from upper- and middle-









income families to children from low-income families. This is because those economically

advantaged children are likely to have sufficient academic skills and be already prepared for

kindergarten, and a VPK provider is able to easily meet its school readiness targets by enrolling

those advantaged children.

As a result, both the poor VPK standards and an inadequate accountability system of the

VPK program are likely to negatively influence the school readiness of children from low-

income families. In particular, the VPK program, unlike most of the state-funded pre-

kindergarten programs that make an effort to decrease the achievement gap between

disadvantaged children and their advantaged peers, does not state clearly or specifically how to

improve disadvantaged children's school readiness. For example, New Jersey and Kentucky aim

to provide children in poverty with free preschool education, and New Jersey law especially

mandates free, high-quality preschool for 3- and 4-year-olds living in the state's highest-poverty

districts in order to remedy their socioeconomic disadvantages (State of Florida Agency for

Workforce Innovation, http://www.floridajobs.org/earlylearing/VPK/WhyPreKimportant.html).

However, the VPK program requires parents to be responsible for their child's transportation.

This is likely to prevent low-income families from choosing a high-quality pre-kindergarten

provider that has a positive effect on their child's learning. This is because the families might not

be able to give their child a ride or to afford a car. This indicates that improving disadvantaged

children's school readiness needs more intensive and extensive services as well as more

resources. Moreover, this indicates that the state needs to make a larger investment in the VPK

program even though "money is not an adequate proxy for high quality" (Wilkins, 2005, p. 3).

Thus, the school readiness of children from low-income families is unlikely to be significantly









increased by the VPK program that does not make a clear statement about how to improve

disadvantaged children's school readiness and is not supported by the state's larger investment.

Definitions

In this research project "effective" teacher-child interaction is defined as the process that

leads both teachers and children to solve their own problems through critical thinking. Also,

"unilateral" teacher-child interaction is defined as the opposite of "effective" teacher-child

interaction, and means that teacher authority over children prevents both teachers and children

from critically thinking and independently solving problems.

From a traditional view of teacher-child interaction, effective teacher-child interaction

means that teachers help children effectively learn and practice a set of skills and a body of

knowledge to use in the wider society. Teachers determine what children must study, and

children wait for teachers to tell them what to do. Thus, effective teacher-child interaction

enables teachers to have children successfully follow the teachers' directions and get good test

results in school.

However, this traditional definition of effective teacher-child interaction is likely to lead

children to passively accept what teachers utter and practice discipline without being aware of

what is really happening. That is to say, children think and behave according to the teachers'

values and ideologies, which are deeply rooted in their own past experiences and reflect

particular ideological patterns or social structures. This prevents children from being conscious

of the world and themselves through their feelings and desires as well as from developing their

abilities to realize and seize the world with their own intentions.

Thus, children need to develop their own critical-thinking and problem-solving skills in

order to actively seek a better understanding of and improvement in the aspects of their

schooling experiences in a collaborative and collegial way. Teachers need to help children









develop their critical-thinking and problem-solving skills through effective teacher-child

interactions and eventually take their places in a participatory, democratic society. That is to say,

effective teacher-child interaction contributes to developing the kinds of critical-thinking and

problem-solving skills that are needed for children to eventually take their places in a

participatory, democratic society. As a result, in this project "effective" teacher-child interaction

is defined from a critical perspective, and the definition of "effective" teacher-child interaction -

the process that leads both teachers and children to solve their own problems through critical

thinking is different from the traditional definition of effective teacher-child interaction.

The Problem

Using a feminist /critical theory interpretation, Edward and Westgate (1994) pointed out

that the interactions between teachers and children in classrooms were normally "high in power

and low in solidarity" (p. 28), and concluded that most of the conversations between teachers and

children showed power relations between them. That is to say, teachers exercise unilateral

teacher authority over children in order to force children to passively learn a body of knowledge

through unequal communication between teachers and children.

In particular, DeVries and Zan (2005) characterize the unilateral teacher-child

interactions as "coercion or constraint," which indicates that children must follow "ready-made

rules and instructions for behavior" set by teachers (p. 136). Teachers control children's behavior

and force children to respect them by using authority to socialize and instruct children. Thus,

such respect is considered "a one-way affair," since children's behavior results from the values

and beliefs of others rather than their own motivations or interests (DeVries & Zan, 2005, p. 136).

Within the unilateral teacher-child interactions, teachers frequently use teacher-directed

statements, such as "You need to sit down" or "You need to wait until I call your name" (Katz &

McClellan, 1997).









In the case of traditional whole-class instruction, teachers mostly lead classroom talking,

decide who is to talk, and normally evaluate what children are required or permitted to say. Also,

teachers ask children a lot of questions and children answer very briefly, and most

communication occurs within a "central action zone." This kind of structured, teacher-directed

instruction leads children to comply with what the leaders of society think as well as the status

quo, since teachers force all children to move through "the same learning sequence" (Westwood,

Knight, & Redden, 1997, p. 227). In addition, children have trouble getting opportunities to

communicate their own thoughts, ideas, and feelings as well as to share their own stories and

experiences with others.

As a result, the conversations between teachers and children resulting from the unilateral

teacher-child interactions prevent young children from developing their abilities to solve

problems; from recognizing and dealing with their own problems in their daily lives; and from

articulating their experiences, thoughts, needs, ideas, and problems in classrooms.

Importance of the Study

The unilateral teacher-child interactions in child care settings allow children few

opportunities to engage in developing their different abilities independently and actively by

preventing teachers from effectively interacting with children. Taking into account the fact that

effective teacher-child interactions in child care settings significantly contribute to children's

early learning and development, this problem is considered a threat to improving the quality of

child care and other early childhood programs.

In particular, voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings tend to focus on

children's academic competence rather than the whole of essential skills for successful school

readiness, such as self-regulatory skills. This tendency leads the conversations between teachers

and children to aim at improving children's academic outcomes rather than ranging over various









topics, including children's own interests or problems. This indicates that children have few

opportunities to develop their problem-solving skills. Furthermore, qualitative research

methodologies have been rarely used for describing the teacher-child interactions themselves in

voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings. This allows teachers few

opportunities to reflect on how they interact with children and what the nature of the teacher-

child interactions is.

Thus, this study is important today because of (1) the possibility that teachers have scant

knowledge of the nature of teacher-child interactions resulting from the characteristics of

voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings; (2) the possibility that teachers are

unaware of the unilateral teacher-child interactions or are incapable of changing the status quo;

and (3) the lack of studies that explore the nature of teacher-child interactions and describe the

detailed moment-to-moment encounters between teachers and children by using qualitative

research methodologies.

Purpose of the Study

The purpose of this research project is to investigate barriers to and facilitators of

effective teacher-child interactions, as defined from a critical perspective, in voluntary pre-

kindergarten programs in child care settings. This ultimately aims to help teachers find ways to

overcome the unilateral teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in

child care settings and empower both themselves and children through effective teacher-child

interactions.

Guiding Research Question

Based on the theoretical orientation of critical theory and postmodernism, the guiding

research question is, "What kinds of barriers to and facilitators of effective teacher-child

interactions do teachers face in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings?" This









question is based on the notion that teachers as the oppressors force children to learn the

dominant culture and ideology via the interactions between themselves and children, and

teachers as the oppressed are forced to contribute to maintaining the social inequalities within the

hierarchical structure of schools.

Subjectivity Statement

I was born and grew up in the Korean society, which was extremely homogeneous in

terms of ethnicity, culture, and history, and was apt to be easily dominated by the ideology of the

mainstream society. Its homogeneity makes people follow dominant rules or viewpoints rather

than pursuing their own opinions or life styles, since people are afraid of being isolated from the

majority group by disobeying the norms of the dominant group. For example, I have been taught

to respect and not disobey seniors, including teachers, parents, and administrators. Especially

when I was a student in Korea, I could not imagine the possibility that teachers' instruction was

wrong or that I could ask a teacher something before being called on by the teacher.

Furthermore, my parents absolutely supported teachers' instruction as well as school directions

and made their children follow these directions without any exceptions. For instance, my parents

bought me whichever books teachers recommended and always let me participate in inside as

well as outside classroom activities. As a result, I totally trusted teachers' one-sided perspectives

and one-way instruction in classrooms and learned conformity and passiveness rather than

critical thinking skills.

Contrary to my strong beliefs about teachers and schooling, I was sometimes

disappointed that teachers frequently expressed their complaints about the teaching profession in

classrooms. In particular, teachers complained that their salaries were lower than those of other

jobs and that they suffered from a lot of miscellaneous duties. I heard these kinds of complaints

more frequently when I attended the private high school than when I attended the public middle









school. This is because Korean private schools are controlled by both their foundations and the

Korean government, while Korean public schools are dominated only by the Korean government

in terms of teachers, textbooks, physical environments, facilities, equipment, and curricula. This

means that these school systems are very hierarchically structured and prevent teachers from

thinking creatively and critically as well as expressing their thoughts and opinions freely. Thus, I

felt that teachers were identified as the lowest persons in the hierarchical organizations of

schools even though they were classified as the highest position in each classroom.

In addition, in the 1970s and 1980s, I had been taught subjects with sixty or seventy

students in the classroom in Korea. This physical environment forced teachers to consider one-

way, cramming methods of teaching as the best way of instruction; for example, teachers had

students memorize everything in textbooks, and students were not allowed to ask their teachers

questions about the content of the textbooks. Teachers always said something in order to transmit

knowledge, and students only listened to their instruction in order to get a good grade. I had

never experienced or imagined teachers' instruction based on dialogue, reflection, and

communication. I had only written down teachers' lectures from the beginning to the end. Some

of the teachers regularly checked if students took notes and considered students' abilities to write

down clearly and accurately as one of the excellent students' talents. I made every effort to

exactly write down teachers' lectures in class and spent a lot of time organizing and rewriting the

lectures at home after class. Moreover, I was sometimes able to contact teachers in order to talk

about my future like entering my next school, but rarely got in touch with teachers in order to

discuss personal matters. When I was called on by teachers, I expected that I would be rebuked

or warned rather than praised or encouraged.









In short, I had experienced distorted teacher-student relationships resulting from the

characteristics of the unique Korean history and culture, and had no doubt about the relationships

since they were taken-for-granted assumptions of society. Even though teaching in Korea is

considered one of the most respected and competitive positions like a doctor or lawyer, teachers

are unique in that they can be simultaneously classified as the "oppressed" and "oppressors"

within the distorted teacher-student relationships. This is because teachers in the lowest position

of the school organization have little power to solve the problems of schooling systematically

and fundamentally, but as the most authoritative people in the classroom, they control students.

Within the relationships, students as the oppressed have no opportunity to learn how to respect

others' diverse opinions and life styles, nor how to engage in a struggle against all forms of

social injustice. Thus, from my experience, I am deeply conscious of the importance of the

effective teacher-student relationships that empower both teachers and students.









CHAPTER 2
REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

In this chapter I will review the literature on teacher-child interactions as well as on pre-

kindergarten programs, especially state-funded pre-kindergarten programs, by using the

theoretical orientation of critical theory and postmodernism. By examining the effectiveness and

limitations of state-funded pre-kindergarten programs, this literature review shows the general

characteristics of state-funded pre-kindergarten programs that voluntary pre-kindergarten

programs in child care settings are based on. This literature review includes how teacher-child

interactions in child care settings play a significant role in children's early learning and

development. Also, this review presents how teacher-child interactions are influenced by

different factors of child care settings and mainly consist of talk between teachers and children.

In addition, this review looks at how teacher-child interactions are characterized as unilateral, as

well as how the unilateral teacher-child interactions prevent children from being aware of their

social reality and taking action to make changes in that reality. Finally, this review considers

how teachers as the oppressed and oppressors are able to overcome the unilateral teacher-child

interactions in child care settings by taking account of the causes and problems of the unilateral

teacher-child interactions.

Critical Theory

Critical theory examines "the patterns and meanings enacted within and among people in

specific social locations at specific points in history" and expresses "particular relations of

culture, power, and identity" (Keenan, 2004, p. 540). It also assumes that "the relationship

between concept and object and between signifier and signified is never stable or fixed and is

often mediated by the social relations of capitalist production and consumption; that certain

groups in any society and particular societies are privileged over others; that mainstream









research practices are generally, although most often unwittingly, implicated in the reproduction

of systems of class, race, and gender oppression" (Kincheloe & McLaren, 2005, p. 304). From

this perspective, all social interactions between teachers and students are characterized as

hierarchically structured, since students want to be rewarded for exhibiting discipline,

intellectual behavior, or hard work (Giroux, 1988). Teachers, as experts "possessing knowledge

of and judgmental power over children," transmit information to their children through

structured curricula and specialized textbooks as well as interactions with children, and this

professional behavior is guaranteed by "the existence of power as infused, as located within the

knowledge and methods that we choose, and as potentially dangerous" (Canella, 2005, p. 30).

Thus, the interactions between teachers and children are considered one of the examples of "the

conflicting relationship between social classes within an economy based on the exchange of

commodities" (Brookfield, 2005, p. 23), involving how teachers maintain and exercise power as

well as how children are resilient and resist that power (Dahlberg, Moss, & Pence, 1999). This

perspective looks different from a traditional view of teacher-child interaction, which is

concerned with the most successful ways to learn a particular body of knowledge, to produce

common moral judgment, and to provide school structures that reproduce the existing society

(Giroux, 1988). From this traditional viewpoint, teachers are characterized as people who help

children effectively learn a set of skills and a body of knowledge to use in the wider society, and

children are mainly taught curriculum packages through teacher-child interactions as well as

formal instruction in school as an instructional site.

In particular, the interactions between teachers and children play an important role in

reproducing ideology, which contributes to maintaining the power of a dominant group by

characterizing the interests of this dominant group as universally true beliefs (Brookfield, 2005).









According to Giroux (2001), ideology "digs beneath the phenomenal forms of classroom

knowledge and social practices and helps to locate the structuring principles and ideas that

mediate between the dominant society and the everyday experiences of teachers and students" (p.

161). Also, ideology is always produced, expressed, and accepted through particular social

practices within a specific social context such as teachers' daily routines in classrooms: making

curricula, planning and teaching lessons, testing students, and communicating with students

(Giroux, 2001). In particular, the interactions between teachers and children play a significant

role in reproducing the dominant ideology, which values the knowledge and practices of the

mainstream and devalues the knowledge of socially and culturally different groups. This is

because the dominant ideology governs almost all the social practices in classrooms, including

"gestures, body postures, seating arrangements, facial tics, and phrases that learners and teachers

commonly utter" (Brookfield, 2005, p. 125), and children who spend most of the time in schools

interacting with other children or teachers experience these social practices through the

interactions with other children or teachers (Roselli, 2005). As a result, the interactions between

teachers and children provide children with opportunities to learn the beliefs, values, and

practices of a dominant class or group and to be acculturated to existing social structures,

systems, and relations that mainly serve the interests of the dominant class or group.

Postmodernism

Critical theory explains that teachers, as experts privileged over children, exercise power

in the classroom; that is, teachers transmit the dominant ideology of any society to their children

through curricula and the interactions between teachers and children. By considering the

relationship between teachers and children to be incompatible, critical theory clarifies the

characteristics of the relationship between teachers and children. However, critical theory does

not give details about how teachers' power over children is exercised through teachers' and









children's activities or routines within different classroom settings. In child care settings, the

organization and management of daily routines reflect teachers' power over children and are

very differently implemented by each teacher's and school's characteristics. For example, a

teacher may allow children to spend more time playing outside rather than learning academic

subjects, even though other teachers in the same school focus on children's educational

competence. This situation raises many questions, including why the teacher focuses on

children's free-play or how the teacher can use his or her own classroom schedule different from

that of other teachers. Those questions are influenced by several elements in which the effects of

teachers' power over children are articulated. In particular, teachers currently interact with

children from much more diverse ethnic, racial, cultural, and socioeconomic backgrounds than in

the past (Zimiles, 2000). These children come to school with much different learning experiences

and varied developmental needs. Within the situation when teachers need to work with children

who are very different in many ways, the effects of teachers' power over children are very

different and need to be examined by considering differentiated interactions between teachers

and children. Thus, in order to explain how teachers' power over children is exercised differently

within a specific classroom setting, this qualitative research project uses postmodernism as

another theoretical orientation.

Postmodernism includes plural voices and narratives, which "emerge from historically

specific struggles," and emphasizes specific knowledge within "particular configurations of

space, place, time, and power" (Giroux, 1988a, p. 15). Postmodernism includes "diversity,

complexity, subjectivity, and multiple perspectives" (Dahlberg et al., 1999, p. 106), and it prefers

"a process-driven" approach to education to "a product-driven" one (p. 184). That is to say,

postmodernism assumes that "there are no fixed or value-free facts," "no one interpretation is the









authoritative truth," and "no one method is the method for understanding" (Leavitt, 1994, pp. 22-

23). From this perspective, childhood as a social construction is always contextualized and

socially determined in relation to time, place, and culture, rather than being natural or universal.

Also, early childhood institutions and pedagogy are socially constructed rather than resulting

from any objective, context-free, power-free, value-free, or universally true knowledge

(Dahlberg et al., 1999). Knowledge is produced through a variety of experiences, which are

constantly constructed and reconstructed. Thus, our knowledge of the past and the present is

always relative and incomplete because the meanings of our experiences are differently

interpreted according to when and how we understand our experiences. The postmodernist

perspective pays attention to the relations between power and knowledge and emphasizes the

notion that power and knowledge are correlative and always found together in "what is accepted

as rational and truthful" (Usher & Edwards, 1994, p. 87). This is because the exercise of power

itself results in emerging new bodies of knowledge and, in turn, "knowledge constantly induces

effects of power" (Foucault, 1980, p. 52).

From this postmodernist perspective, the interactions between teachers and children play

a vital role in how the relations between power and knowledge are produced, exercised, and

resisted in classrooms. This is because power is exercised, reproduced, mediated, and resisted

through discourses, which are articulated in the forms of knowledge that constitute the formal

curricula as well as the social interactions between teachers and children in classrooms (Giroux,

1988). In other words, the interactions between teachers and children include a variety of

discourses, and the discourses are governed by the power that determines "what counts as

knowledge" and "what can be said and done by whom" (Ryan, 2005, p. 101), as well as by the

power that controls such knowledge; for example, teachers' authority makes text interpreted









through the storylines of their culture (Davies, 1993). Therefore, the interactions between

teachers and children are characterized as social relations in which the relations between power

and knowledge are continually exercised, produced, and articulated with "submissive subjects"

and "a dependable body of knowledge" (Foucault, 1975/1995, p. 295). This postmodernist

perspective on the interactions between teachers and children indicates that the interactions are

not "an actively negotiated set of social relations," which enables children as co-constructers of

knowledge, identity, and culture to participate in socially constructing and determining their own

lives (Dahlberg et al., 1999, p. 49). Thus, the postmodernist perspective provides teachers with

an opportunity to think about their own understanding of the discourses between themselves and

children, as well as helps children to aggressively solve their own problems as active subjects by

giving them a chance to construct and articulate their own knowledge.

Rationale of Pre-Kindergarten Programs

Pre-kindergarten programs aim to ensure that all pre-kindergarten-aged children, usually

3- and 4-year olds, have access to early learning for school success or school readiness. That is to

say, pre-kindergarten programs enable children to experience school readiness skills, including

physical well-being and motor development, social and emotional development, cognition and

general knowledge, approaches toward learning, and language and communication. Thus, pre-

kindergarten programs aim at helping all children get ready for formal schooling by providing

social systems that affect children's development and readiness for school, such as the health

care system, education system, or child care system. In particular, pre-kindergarten programs

pursue improving the school readiness of at-risk children by providing them with enriching

learning experiences. This is related to the fact that children from chronically poor families are

more seriously and consistently disadvantaged than those in transitory poverty and have the

lowest scores on tests of language and school-readiness skills (NICHD Early Child Care









Research Network, 2005; Votruba-Drzal, Coley, & Chase-Lansdale, 2004). This is because they

have rarely experienced adequate stimuli during the critical period of their cognitive

development. In the case of the combination of low-quality child care and poor home learning

environments, including maternal education and cognitive stimulation, children display serious

externalizing behavior problems and low-level cognitive development. Thus, by providing at-risk

children with opportunities to develop their readiness for school, pre-kindergarten programs

prevent at-risk children from experiencing adverse outcomes resulting from childhood poverty,

for example, low self-esteem, underachievement, and antisocial behavior.

The emphasis of pre-kindergarten programs on school readiness is based on the notion

that the learning that takes place before the formal schooling significantly influences the learning

that takes place afterward (Zigler, Gilliam, & Jones, 2006). In other words, individual children's

success throughout schooling and in adult life is critically affected by the type and quality of

learning experiences provided during the preschool years. According to cost-benefit analysis

(CBA), preschool attendance has short- and long-term positive effects on a variety of academic

and social competencies, such as educational achievement and economic well-being into

adulthood (Reynolds & Temple, 2006). In detail, preschool programs lead to a large reduction in

grade retention, special education placement, and high school dropout rates. Thus, preschool

programs contribute to reducing the need for future remedial school services including special

education and grade retention as well as costs for administration and processing of crime cases or

incarceration by preparing preschool graduates for less delinquency and fewer arrests in

adulthood. In particular, high-quality child care positively affects the developmental outcomes of

at-risk children and is likely to have a lasting impact on academic performance of the children.

This is because high-quality child care allows at-risk children to have an opportunity to make up









for their poor learning experiences resulting from their poor home environments, even though

high-quality child care does not directly lead to children's positive developmental outcomes. For

example, high-quality child care can help ethnic minority children to develop different skills to

handle the current and unpredictable problems resulting from racism or discrimination in the

society as well as to reinforce their racial and personal identities (Johnson, Jaeger, Randolph,

Cause, Ward, & NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, 2003). As a result, pre-

kindergarten programs are rooted in the notion that preschool programs play an important role in

helping children expand their developmental outcomes through enriching learning experiences

and, in particular, helping disadvantaged children enter school as well prepared as their

advantaged peers.

School readiness needs multidimensional support as well as the abilities of children

themselves, such as age-appropriate motor skills, emotional and behavioral regulation, adult and

peer interaction skills, communication skills, and cognitive and academic skills (Neuman &

Roskos, 2005; Zigler, Gilliam, & Jones, 2006). The multidimensional support includes family

resources like good physical and mental health, school resources such as professional

development for teachers, and community resources including high-quality child care (Zigler,

Gilliam, & Jones, 2006). For example, children's language and cognitive skills, which are

important predictors of their school readiness, are linearly associated with child care quality,

including teacher-child interactions. (Burchinal, Peisner-Feinberg, Bryant, & Clifford, 2000;

Burchinal, Roberts, Nabors, & Bryant, 1996; NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, 2000;

NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, 2003; NICHD Early Child Care Research Network,

2004a; NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, 2004b; NICHD Early Child Care Research

Network & Duncan, 2003; Parke, 2004; Peisner-Feinberg, Burchinal, Clifford, Culkin, Howes,









Kagan, & Yazejian, 2001). That is to say, caregivers' language stimulation strongly influences

children's language and cognitive development, and high-quality child care is likely to provide

children with more opportunities to verbally interact with caregivers. However, "more high-

quality care does not lead to better outcomes and more low-quality care does not lead to worse

outcomes in any simple linear way," and early and extensive child care, in and of itself, is neither

deleterious nor advantageous for children's cognitive and language development (NICHD Early

Child Care Research Network, 2003, p. 467). This is because in reality, children are unlikely to

consistently receive the same level of stimulation from caregivers during their routine activities

like eating, napping, or free play. Also, children's language and cognitive development is

influenced by other sources of individual differences in children's verbal abilities, such as

gender, maternal vocabulary, maternal cognitive stimulation, supportive family environment, or

family economic status, as well as child care quality. Therefore, children are able to develop

school readiness skills through a variety of resources that affect their development and readiness

for school.

Effectiveness of State-Funded Pre-Kindergarten Programs

Pre-kindergarten programs have grown as one type of effective preschool program to

meet the school readiness needs of all children, and state-funded pre-kindergarten programs have

become increasingly common across the nation. Several studies show that state-funded pre-

kindergarten programs positively affect children's developmental competence, including social,

language, and academic skills (Barnett, Lamy, & Jung, 2005; Gilliam & Zigler, 2000; Gormley

Jr., Gayer, Phillips, & Dawson, 2005; Gormley Jr. & Phillips, 2005; Jacobson, 2003; Howes,

Burchinal, Pianta, Bryant, Clifford, & Barbarin, 2008; La Paro, Pianta, & Stuhlman, 2004;

Starkey, Klein, & Wakeley, 2004). Based on children's test scores, a study by Gilliam and Zigler

(2000) demonstrates that state-funded pre-kindergarten programs have a great effect on









children's overall developmental competence, including social-emotional and cognitive

development, motor and language skills, and academic/literacy skills. The significant effects on

language and academic/literacy skills are consistent in first grade. A study by Barnett, Lamy, and

Jung (2005) also shows that the effects of state-funded pre-kindergarten programs on children's

language, literacy, and math skills are significantly meaningful, and the programs produce broad

gains in children's learning and development at kindergarten entry. For example, Oklahoma's

universal pre-kindergarten program has statistically significant effects on children's pre-reading

and reading skills, prewriting and spelling skills, and math reasoning and problem-solving

abilities, making strong impacts on all racial and ethnic groups, including Hispanic, Black,

White, and Native American, across full-day and half-day programs (Gormley Jr., Gayer,

Phillips, & Dawson, 2005).

However, state-funded pre-kindergarten programs produce limited gains in motor skills

and no gains in social-emotional development, such as the development of pro-social behavior

and motivation to learn (Gormley Jr. & Phillips, 2005). A study by Gilliam and Zigler (2000)

shows that positive impacts of the programs are seldom observed in the domains of parent

involvement, social development, and behavioral problems. As for the reason for these

situations, Gormley Jr., Gayer, Phillips, and Dawson (2005) insist that state-funded pre-

kindergarten programs consistently emphasize academic instruction in classrooms rather than a

balance between test scores and other classroom activities, even though pre-kindergarten

classrooms typically have a pleasant, warm atmosphere related to teacher sensitivity and

effective behavior management (La Paro, Pianta, & Stuhlman, 2004). In addition, Gilliam and

Zigler (2000) say, "Impact evaluations of state-funded preschool programs vary considerably in

their domains of interest, evaluation methodologies, and findings" (p. 465). For example, some









evaluations consist of as little as a pretest and post-test of participants, while others use

comparison groups of varying resemblance to the participants. Bamett et al. (2005) also say that

the most difficult problem of the evaluations is "possible selection bias due to unmeasured

differences between the children who attend state-funded preschool programs and those who do

not" (p. 3). Especially in the case of universal pre-kindergarten programs, it is difficult to obtain

an adequate comparison group since the programs are freely available to all children and few

children are not engaged in the programs. Thus, various evaluations of state-funded pre-

kindergarten programs prevent researchers from gaining best estimates of program impacts or

certainty about the effectiveness of the programs. Nevertheless, several studies provide scientific

evidence that state-funded pre-kindergarten programs positively contribute to improving the

learning and development of at-risk children as well as other children and improving their

preparation for the increasingly rigorous challenges of kindergarten.

Limitations of State-Funded Pre-Kindergarten Programs

First, state-funded pre-kindergarten programs tend to focus on children's cognitive

development rather than the whole of child characteristics considered essential for successful

school readiness, like self-regulatory skills (Francis, 2006; Neuman, 2003). In particular, Francis

(2006) points out that the programs help children increase their reading and mathematics skills at

school entry, but the programs boost children's classroom behavioral problems, such as fighting,

arguing, or disturbing others, and reduce their self-control, such as controlling their temper,

accepting peer ideas for group activities, or responding to peer pressure in an appropriate way.

These negative behavioral effects continue until the spring of first grade, while the positive

effects of the programs on skills largely dissipate. In fact, these negative behaviors are likely to

do some damage to their academic achievement in later years, because socially negative

behaviors in classrooms are associated with poorer attitude toward learning and lower









competence in social-emotional motivation for school readiness (Fantuzzo, Bulotsky-Shearer,

Fusco, & McWayne, 2005). Moreover, a study by Espinosa and Laffey (2003) demonstrates that

children's academic competence is strongly correlated with teachers' ratings of social skills at

the kindergarten level. For example, children who are rated as high for behavioral problems are

rated as low for academic ability by teachers. Thus, children who display behavioral problems

are less likely to conform to teacher expectations or to establish a warm, positive relationship

with teachers and are more likely to be underestimated in their academic potential. As a result,

state-funded pre-kindergarten programs do not show sufficient evidence that the programs

contribute to improving children's long-term educational outcomes.

Second, the levels of support services of state-funded pre-kindergarten programs are very

different according to where the classroom happens to be located (Gilliam, 2005; Kaplan, 1998).

Early learning standards vary widely across states in their organizations, structures, resources,

and audiences for which they are intended, since early learning standards in states reflect their

own unique characteristics (Neuman & Roskos, 2005). In terms of income eligibility,

administrative structure and site, funding program standards like staffing and curriculum, child

care programs, and evaluation strategies, one state's program is not totally similar to that of

another state (Kaplan, 1998). These different levels of support service of state-funded pre-

kindergarten programs cause unclear standards or procedures for the programs. For example,

since the programs do not include clear procedural guidelines regarding the discipline of pre-

kindergarteners, the expulsion rates in state-funded pre-kindergarten systems are high and vary

according to classroom settings (Gilliam, 2005). The expulsion rates are the lowest in classrooms

located in public schools and Head Start and are the highest in faith-affiliated centers, for-profit

childcare, and other community-based settings. In particular, four-year-olds are expelled at a rate









about 1.5 times greater than three-year-olds; boys are expelled at a rate over 4.5 times that of

girls; and African-American children who attend state-funded pre-kindergarten programs are

about twice as likely to be expelled as Latino and Caucasian children. The lowest expulsion rates

are reported by the teachers that have an ongoing, regular relationship with a mental health

consultant, who is able to provide classroom-based strategies for dealing with challenging

children behaviors. In other words, the high expulsion rates are caused by the special conditions

of each pre-kindergarten classroom or teachers' subjective judgment rather than the clear

standards and procedures for the discipline of pre-kindergarteners.

Third, teacher qualifications vary widely by setting; for example, education levels of pre-

kindergarten teachers in public schools are higher than those of teachers in nonpublic school

settings (Clifford, Bryant, & Early, 2005; Neuman, 2003). Also, teacher credentialing

requirements, which represent minimum standards, vary greatly: twenty-four states require

teachers in state-funded pre-kindergarten programs to have a bachelor's degree; four states

require a two-year college degree; eleven states require a Child Development Associates

credential; and California requires twenty-four credits related to early childhood education

(National Prekindergarten Center, 2004). In addition, teachers' majors and licensing vary both by

state and time, and thus, teaching certification requirements change over time and today's

licensed teachers do not necessarily meet today's certification requirements. As a result, wide

variation in teacher qualifications and teacher credentialing requirements indicates that the

quality and level of state-funded pre-kindergarten programs vary widely, and some children who

are involved in the programs are less likely to be actively taught by qualified teachers than

others. By and large, well-trained teachers in early childhood education are defined as people

who get a minimum of a bachelor's degree with specialized training (Zigler, Gilliam, & Jones,









2006). Teachers with more years of education and more specialized training in early childhood

have been shown to have higher-quality, less authoritarian teaching practices than teachers with

lower educational attainment. The teachers are also able to be more sensitive to children's needs

and create a more stimulating learning environment. This indicates that higher education and

specialized training in early childhood enable teachers to gain the necessary skills to facilitate

children's learning, manage classroom environments, and involve parents in classroom activities.

However, in reality, many states have difficulty in finding enough teachers who meet these

minimum standards or who are trained and highly skilled in developing children's school

readiness.

Lack of qualified teachers in state-funded pre-kindergarten programs as well as in the

overall early childhood field is strongly associated with the fact that teacher wages vary greatly

by several school characteristics like school size, locale, region, and poverty concentration

(National Center for Education Statistics, 2003). For example, the wages of teachers in public

schools are much higher (about $27 an hour) than in nonpublic school settings (about $13 an

hour) (Clifford et al., 2005). Also, wages in early childhood education tend to increase a little

over time, and the situation is worse for preschool teachers who serve the most at-risk children.

As one of the most robust predictors of the quality of the classroom learning environment,

teacher wages significantly predict classroom process quality, which involves social, emotional,

physical, and instructional elements of interactions with young children, even after teacher-child

ratio, group size, and teacher education are controlled (Zigler, Gilliam, & Jones, 2006). Teacher

wages play a significant role in predicting classroom quality for children of all ages, since they

contribute to the stability of care and the consistency of teacher-child interactions, which are

associated with program quality and child development (Clifford et al., 2005). In fact, teachers









who are more educated are paid more and are likely to stay at their jobs longer than those who

are less educated and paid less (National Prekindergarten Center, 2004). Thus, the link between

wages and turnover is understandable and undeniable because better wages and benefits reduce

teacher turnover. Both wages and turnover are clearly associated with program quality and child

development since good programs are characterized by smaller group sizes, lower teacher-child

ratios, more secure teacher-child interactions, and more educational activities.

Finally, the population of pre-kindergarten teachers is not nearly as diverse as the

population of children in state-funded pre-kindergarten programs; for example, 44% of children

are Black or Latino, but just 27% of teachers so identify themselves (Clifford et al., 2005; Saluja,

Early, & Clifford, 2002). In reality, most of the pre-kindergarten teachers are still White and are

not well matched with the ethnic/racial diversity of children in state-funded pre-kindergarten

programs. Moreover, the percentage of teachers from minority backgrounds in early education

and care programs has decreased since 1990, even though the early childhood workforce should

reflect the increasing cultural diversity of children in early childhood programs (Saluja et al.,

2002). The high rates of ethnic minority children in state-funded pre-kindergarten programs

reflect the relation between poverty concentration and minority enrollment; that is, schools with

a high minority enrollment are more likely to have a high concentration of poverty (National

Center for Education Statistics, 2003). Thus, state-funded pre-kindergarten programs consider

children with limited English proficiency as one of the most vulnerable groups for poor

educational outcomes (National Prekindergarten Center, 2004). This is because "low family

income, low maternal education, and low English proficiency are all considered key

demographic risk factors for the development of social and emotional problems" (Zigler,

Gilliam, Jones, & Malakoff, 2006, p. 78). However, few professional development programs for









pre-kindergarten teachers include training in understanding, facilitating, and assessing children's

second-language acquisition, and there are few qualified teachers who speak the different

languages used by children from many different cultures. This indicates that pre-kindergarten

teachers have difficulty in effectively addressing children's diverse cultural and linguistic needs

with a wide range of experiences and skills as well as in being competent or sensitive to

multilingual/multicultural issues.

Teacher-Child Interactions in Child Care Settings

The topic of teacher-child interactions in child care settings has only recently been

focused on by researchers; that is, researchers have begun to carefully observe and analyze daily

teacher-child interactions within the last 20 years. Recent research on teacher-child interactions

has characterized the significant role of teacher-child interactions in children's early learning and

development as the crux of child care quality. For example, a study by Kontos, Howes, Shinn,

and Galinsky (1995) demonstrates that both parents and teachers consider a warm, caring,

responsive interaction between teachers and children, a safe environment, and good

communication between parents and teachers as the crux of child care quality. In particular,

teachers and parents say that a warm and caring interaction between teachers and children is

"high on most peoples' list of what they hope for in child care" (Kontos et al., 1995, p. 65). This

is because the interaction provides children with a powerful context for early learning and

development by enabling the children to learn about "self, others, the physical environment, and

the cultural contexts within which these occur" and to develop the strategies, propensities, and

perceptions of those issues (McCollum & Bair, 1994, p. 88).

As for the importance of teacher-child interactions in child care settings, many studies

show that the quantity and quality of teacher-child interactions affect children's social and

emotional competence as well as the characteristics of classroom environments (Churchill, 2003;









Coplan & Prakash, 2003; Howes, 2000; Howes, Hamilton, & Matheson, 1994). This is because

children are able to learn how to interact with other adults and peers through the ways they

interact with teachers, and classroom settings are influenced by the nature and form of specific

practices related to the qualities of teacher-child interactions, such as how sensitively teachers

interact with children and how efficiently teachers encourage children to engage in learning

behaviors (La Paro, Pianta, & Stuhlman, 2004). According to Howes et al. (1994), teacher-child

interactions include different aspects, such as emotional security, dependency, and socialization,

because teachers play very different roles in children's classroom experiences, such as

playmates, teachers, managers, and caregivers. Therefore, children interact with teachers in

different places in different ways, and the types of teacher-child interactions are different and are

influenced by different factors, including children's behaviors and characteristics, gender, or

teachers' perceptions of children's characteristics. In the case of Howes' five-year longitudinal

study (2000), teachers generally believe that the second-grade children who show less aggressive

and disruptive behaviors with peers tend to keep closer teacher-child interactions, and children

who have high behavioral problems and low teacher-child closeness in preschool classrooms are

more likely to show high aggressive behaviors with peers and low teacher-child closeness as

second graders. A study by Blankemeyer, Flannery, and Vazsonyi (2002) also demonstrates that

children who highly value the teacher-child interactions are less likely to behave aggressively

and more likely to show their social competence.

Especially in child care settings, positive teacher-child interactions encourage children to

participate in different cooperative activities in classrooms as well as to actively accomplish their

learning at school (Webster-Stratton, 1999). By and large, children in child care settings keep

different patterns of interactions with different teachers (Howes & Ritchie, 2002). That is to say,









children interact with the morning teacher, the afternoon teacher, and the assistant teachers, and

each interaction between a child and a teacher has a particular pattern. Whenever a new teacher

comes to a classroom, a child and the teacher construct a new relationship and the relationship

develops with a certain pattern in their environment. Thus, children who have experienced

negative interactions with teachers are likely to distrust teachers or other adults and to have

fewer opportunities to learn social skills than any other children. A study by Ashiabi (2000)

shows that caregiver-child interactions play an important role in identifying children's emotions

in social interactions with peers as well as children's affective displays, negotiation skills, and

abilities to learn classroom regulations and perceive their expectancies. Children who have

secure interactions with caregivers are able to display accurately both positive and negative

feelings in all situations, as well as to see their surroundings as responsive, stable, and secure

(Cicchetti, Ganiban, & Bamett, 1991; Katz & McClellan, 1997). As a result, the dependability

and responsiveness of the caregiver affect the quality of the caregiver-child interaction and lead

to different caregiver's expectations for children, which differently have an impact on children's

later expression of emotion and regulation of emotion (Sroufe, 1996).

Several studies show that teacher-child interactions in preschool strongly affect children's

later developmental outcomes (Burchinal, Peisner-Feinberg, Pianta, & Howes, 2002; Hamre &

Pianta, 2001; Howes, 2000; Peisner-Feinberg, Burchinal, Clifford, Culkin, Howes, Kagan, &

Yazejian, 2001; Pianta & Stuhlman, 2004). A study by Hamre and Pianta (2001) shows that early

teacher-child interactions are unique predictors of children's academic and behavioral outcomes

in early elementary school. Especially in the case of the children who have high levels of

behavioral problems in kindergarten, the kindergarten teachers' perceptions of conflict and over-

dependency are related to their behavioral and academic problems through eighth grade. In









addition, Pianta and Stuhlman (2004) emphasize that teacher-child interactions affect children's

abilities to acquire the necessary skills for school success and are strongly associated with

changes in each child's acquiring social and academic skills. In terms of children's behavioral

development inside and outside of the school setting, teachers perceive children who are more

troublesome and have less close interactions with them as having internalized problems at high

levels. Thus, teachers are apt to passively interact with those children, and the children are likely

to have few opportunities to engage in academic activities and talk about procedural matters with

teachers. This is strongly associated with the fact that teacher-child interactions are significantly

related to several aspects of children's behaviors toward teachers as well as those of teachers'

behaviors toward children (Stuhlman & Pianta, 2001). For example, the more often teachers

mention compliance to children, the less they show positive affect towards those children, and

the less teachers express negative affect towards children, the more the children show self-reliant

attitudes. Thus, teachers and children are able to mutually hold positive or negative beliefs and

expectations of one another, and these beliefs and expectations are reinforced by their behavioral

interactions.

Nature of Teacher-Child Interactions

First of all, the quality of teacher-child interactions is influenced by several factors,

including class size, teacher-child ratio, and teachers' perceptions about teacher-child

interactions. In the case of class size and teacher-child ratio, many studies show that teacher-

child interactions are more extensive and personalized in smaller classes, and peer interactions

are more extensive and personalized in larger classes (Blatchford, 2003; Kontos et al., 1995;

National institute of child health and human development, Early child care research network,

2002; Stipek, 2004; Wylie & Thompson, 2003). In addition, a low teacher-child ratio leads to the

classrooms that provide more emotional support; children in these classrooms engage in









academic activities more actively and interact with peers more positively (National Institute of

Child Health and Human Development, Early child care research network, 2002). As for

teachers' perceptions about teacher-child interactions, a study by Howes and Hamilton (1992a)

shows that teachers are most sensitive to and involved with children who have a secure

interaction with them, and they are least sensitive to and involved with children who have an

avoidant interaction with them. Especially in the case of children with disabilities or at-risk

children, teachers view the intellectual abilities and behaviors of these children less favorably

than those of typical children, and interact with the children negatively and inappropriately

(Chapman, Larsen, & Parker, 1979; McKinney & Feagans, 1983). Also, the ways that teachers

teach and organize children and tasks influence the quality of teacher-child interactions. A study

by Stipek (2004) shows that more didactic and less constructivist teaching is particularly

prevalent in schools and classrooms with a high proportion of low-income children, children of

color, and poorly-achieving children. This situation results from teachers' beliefs that

"sequentially ordered curricula that maximize the teacher's direct control over learning

opportunities are best suited to these children" (p. 552), and directly results in a big class size or

a high teacher-child ratio, which is likely to cause insecure, inappropriate teacher-child

interactions.

Second, the styles of teacher-child interactions are different depending on types of

activity settings, such as group activity, free play, and meal time. In the case of book reading as a

group activity, an observational study by Dickinson (200 b) shows that teachers mainly interact

with children for the purpose of instruction, for example, "asking children to attend, taking steps

to control their behavior, evaluating children's responses, and, when necessary, correcting their

incorrect responses" (p. 247). That is to say, teachers typically interact with children in book









reading sessions by asking questions to get specific answers from children and by evaluating the

children's responses as being right or wrong (Dickinson, 2001a). Also, a qualitative and

quantitative study by Kontos (1999) demonstrates that a sample of teachers mostly interact with

children during free play by helping children engage in play, providing different materials,

suggesting the use of materials, and physically assisting children who are using the materials.

Most of the teacher-child interactions are concerned with objects in children's play and

children's use of materials rather than children's behavior management or peer relations. As for

teacher-child interactions during meal time, Cote's (2001) observational study conducted in a

Head Start program shows that teachers have an opportunity to hear each child's voice at a small

table, ask questions and pursue topics of interest, and provide each child with a chance to engage

in conversation. By using a large variety of common words as well as novel or rare words and by

modeling polite forms of speech to children like "Okay, thank you for tasting" during meal time

(Cote, 2001, p. 207), teachers help children develop their social and language abilities. In

particular, an observational study by Gest, Holland-Coviello, Welsh, Eicher-Catt, and Gill (2006)

demonstrates that 65% (24/37) of all teachers engage in "decontextualized talk" "talk about

people, places, things, and events that are not present" during meal time (p. 304), compared to

43% (16/37) of teachers during book reading and 35% (13/37) during free play. Thus, teacher-

child interactions during meal time contribute to children's language development by enabling

teachers to involve children in linguistically challenging conversations about objects and events

that are not present through sustained face-to-face contact.

Third, the majority of the teacher-child interactions in child care settings consist of talk

between teachers and children. This is because most of the teacher behaviors across a range of

daily activities in child care settings are communicative, and a large majority of the









communicative behaviors include interactions with children. Talk is a key medium for all kinds

of interactions in classrooms and represents a large portion of what occurs between teachers and

children, but most of the talk in classrooms is done by the teacher. The findings of Walker and

Meighan's (1986) study demonstrate that teachers regularly take control of "who talks to whom

about what in the classroom dialogue," and this can negatively influence children's identity

development (p. 158). For example, even when children talk to each other in classrooms, the

teacher controls the "officially sanctioned or privately established conversations" by managing

the content or direction of talk (p. 157). Also, children play a secondary role in talking to

teachers because they have few opportunities to initiate talk or introduce topics, make statements,

ask questions, and make evaluations and judgments. However, the teachers in a study by

Girolametto and Weitzman (2002) carry on child-oriented conversations with children regardless

of the children's ages or language abilities. Also, a study by Gest et al. (2006) demonstrates that

teachers who most frequently talk to children and use "the most challenging forms of talk" are

rated by observers as warmer and more sensitive (p. 309), and a book reading session in a Head

Start classroom has a high level of rich and challenging child-directed talk as well as a richness

of teachers' spontaneous utterances. This indicates that the book reading session in a Head Start

classroom is considered the most dependable time to provide children with a wealth of linguistic

stimulation and can contribute to improving children's oral language skills. The study also

provides evidence that teachers' "pretend talk" "talk used to give objects nonreal

characteristics or otherwise participate in episodes of pretend play with children" occurs almost

exclusively during free play, while teachers' "decontextualized talk" is most common during

meal time (Gest et al., 2006, p. 303). Thus, each activity setting includes distinctive patterns of

"cognitively challenging talk" (Gest et al., 2006, p. 309), and the amount and type of teacher talk









are closely associated with children's learning and development and play an important role in

predicting how sensitively the environment stimulates children to learn. As a result, teachers

differently talk to children according to classroom activity settings, even though they generally

use a certain familiar style of speech modes and language patterns.

Unilateral Interactions between Teachers and Children

From the theoretical orientation of critical theory and postmodernism, teacher-child

interactions in child care settings demonstrate unilateral characteristics resulting from teacher

authority over children, and the unilateral teacher-child interactions in child care settings

negatively influence children's developmental outcomes. In a study of real-life conversations in

a traditional school, Hayes and Matusov (2005) observe that when a child does not produce the

expected answer, the teacher usually rejects the child's answer as incorrect in order to elicit the

correct answer she already knows. That is to say, the teacher is concerned with affirming the

truth she already possesses rather than accepting others' truth that does not fit her truth. This

does not apparently contribute to children's better understanding of the world because they have

no opportunity to reflect on their answers and act on their own perspectives. Similarly, a study by

Gale and Cosgrove (2004) shows that a child is devalued and disempowered because his words

like "Dunno," "Gotta," and "Yeah" are continually corrected by the teacher (p. 129). The words

are "wrong" according to the teacher's knowledge and school norms, and thus, the teacher's

power forces the child to say the "right" words that the teacher already knows, but the child does

not know. A study by Girolametto, Weitzman, van Lieshout, and Duff (2000) shows that

teachers commonly dominate the conversation by using frequent verbal turns during a group

activity in child care settings, and this prevents children from speaking frequently, saying

different words, and using multiword combinations. Even when teachers praise children in the

form of a reward, such as "You did a great job," "You're the best student," and "You did terrific









on your presentation," the teacher-child interactions are characterized as unilateral (Evans, 1991,

p. 263). This is because praise "conveys a lack of faith in human nature" and is based on the

belief that children can do something only "through external evaluations leading to reward and

punishment" (p. 261). As a result, the unilateral teacher-child interactions lead children to "lower

productivity" and "put teachers in power struggles with" children by forcing children to learn

obedience to authority and follow orders rather than thinking for themselves (p. 262).

A study by Leavitt and Power (1989) shows how this unilateral interaction between

teachers and children in child care settings influences children's daily experiences in classrooms.

For example, caregivers deny the legitimacy of children's emotions and often treat the children

as if they cannot "interpret and understand their own and others' emotions," and are "unfeeling

objects, unaware of or indifferent to the caregivers' negative assessments" (p. 37). Caregivers

ignore, deny, or reject children's deep emotions, and instead, they are concerned with children's

performances and children's appropriate behaviors in their everyday interactions. As a result,

children experience incongruence between their deep emotions and their surface emotions

because they are taught to "suppress, deny, and rework their deep emotions into incongruent

surface displays" rather than to appropriately express their feelings, especially negative feelings

like anger, frustration, boredom, and sadness (p. 39). This study demonstrates that unilateral

teacher authority over children prevents teachers from understanding children's emotions clearly,

interacting with children authentically, and developing the ability to see the children's

experiences from the children's viewpoints. Leavitt (1994) indicates that caregivers' routine

tasks, such as endlessly repeated diaper changing and feeding, make them feel the emotional

stresses of their work. This leads them to passively react to children's requests, lose interest in

children's needs, and become separated from children's feelings. This emotional alienation felt









by caregivers allows caregivers to exercise negative power, which refers to "the ways they

control, punish, and ignore children" in order to simply compel children's surface behaviors (p.

65).

In conclusion, the interaction between teachers and children, as an activity in which they

interpret each other's intentions as well as a discourse set within a broader context, reflects the

teacher's dominant position over the child (Fisher, 2005). That is to say, teachers are considered

experts "possessing knowledge of and judgmental power over children" (Canella, 2005, p. 30).

Teachers are also considered to be able to have access to particular programs, create changes

using power, strengthen the current distribution of power, and possess knowledge to fortify the

status quo (Merriam, 2002). Thus, the daily routine in classrooms includes teachers making

decisions about curricula, methodology, individual children and their needs and problems,

classroom management, and personal and professional morals (Reagan, Case, & Brubacher,

2000). Also, teachers judge children's feelings and thoughts according to their values and

ideologies, determine the quality of children's work, and force children to think and behave

according to the rules and standards they expect. However, children are rarely involved in "the

creation of goals, objectives, and expectations of the course" (Breunig, 2005, p. 115), spending

most of their time carrying out school tasks which allow them to find and give right answers they

think the teacher wants (Calderhead, 2003). As a result, through the formal curricula as well as

the social interactions with children in classrooms, teachers exercise unilateral teacher authority

over their children in order to force the children to passively learn what they want their children

to know. This unequal interaction between teachers and children is repeatedly produced. This is

because power is embedded in discourses and is exercised, reproduced, mediated, and resisted









through discourses that convey the specific needs, problems, and concerns of everyday life, as

well as represent an ideological structure related to particular interests and social relations.

Causes of the Unilateral Interactions between Teachers and Children

First of all, teachers themselves are "domesticated by their own schooling" (Stokes, 1997,

p. 214), which forces students to follow "no-talking rules" all day long, which lead to the

absence of self-expression (Hankins, 1999, p. 64). Students are encouraged to sit and listen rather

than speak, as well as to simply obtain a piece of information that has already been discovered

and categorized by experts (Hinchey, 2001). Thus, students who are accustomed to "the bond of

shared silences" do not express their own experiences (Hankins, 1999, p. 64). It is hardly

surprising that this experience forces student teachers to "be passive, conforming, authoritative,

inflexible, unimaginative, apolitical, and silent" in schools, including colleges of education

(Hinchey, 2001, p. 134), as well as to learn the cultural value system that "their work is far less

important than that of doctors, of lawyers and even, judging by income comparisons, less

important than the work of plumbers" (p. 24). That is to say, teachers are not encouraged to view

themselves as intellectuals and their work or knowledge as politically and socially constructed,

but instead as merely given (Stokes, 1997). In particular, teacher training programs allow student

teachers to acquire the knowledge of what they have to teach, as well as to practice different

methods, techniques, and skills in order to efficiently transmit such knowledge to their students.

Thus, Stokes (1997) says that "the language of teacher training is the language of methods,

materials, objectives, skills, schedules, grouping, tracking, discipline, tests, diagnosis,

disabilities, deficits, interventions, remediation, and so on," since student teachers are trained to

compel their students to "acquire skills that can be evaluated efficiently through standardized

tests" by managing their students' behaviors (p. 202). In summary, teachers themselves are

taught a body of knowledge, which is guaranteed by the authority and power of schools, through









the process of being silenced, and they force their children to learn both such knowledge and the

process of knowing through the unilateral interactions between themselves and children as well

as different regulations such as punishment, assessment, promotion, and graduation.

Second, teachers are powerless against the dominant ideology in classrooms, which refers

to "patterns of beliefs and values shared by the majority of individuals" (McLaren, 1998, p. 182).

The dominant ideology in classrooms determines what knowledge is worth the most or what it

means to know something; specifically, the dominant ideology determines what books teachers

may use or what values and beliefs teachers should transmit to their students (Breunig, 2005;

McLaren, 1998). Especially in the United States, the white society's ways of "thinking, living,

and relating with people of color" are considered a standard for "what is right, what is good, and

what is true" (McIntyre, 1997, p. 135), and schools reward and reinforce "the norms, standards,

and educational models set by white academics and institutions" through diverse techniques of

normalizing, such as observation, measurement, classification, regulation, and assessment

(McIntyre, 1997, p. 13). A study by Gitlin (2001) shows that teachers underutilize their

autonomy because of the state core curriculum, textbooks, and prepackaged curricula, and these

limit their abilities to "act on and even transform pedagogical relations, forms of legitimate

knowledge, and cultural canons" (p. 254). Moreover, since teachers have lots of"clerking-type

tasks" like grading practices during the school day, they do not have time to obtain "an intimate

knowledge of their students" and cannot help but repeat "a defensive, fact-oriented curriculum"

(p. 254). In short, the teachers' work becomes characterized as a deskilling job through "tighter

management control and packaged curricula" (Connell, 1994), and prevents teachers from

stepping back from their classroom practices and considering broader educational concerns or

employing a more holistic view of teaching (Gitlin, 2001). As a result, the teachers'









powerlessness against the dominant ideology and lack of control over their work commonly

result in teachers putting into place a defensive form of teaching. Moreover, such defensive

teaching is completed through the unilateral interactions between teachers and children, since

unilateral teacher authority over their children can easily force children to passively learn

traditional textbooks that are designed to keep a white, male, European-American model as a

cultural standard.

Third, teachers as the oppressed are accustomed to the structure of domination and want

to convert "their characteristic ways of living and behaving" into those of the oppressors,

showing "a lack of confidence in the people's ability to think, to want, and to know" (Freire,

1970/2001, pp. 60-61). In other words, teachers as "victims of a systematic culture of oppression

and misinformation" have been "socially, politically, and culturally oppressed into thinking that

they are incapable of changing their working environments or their approaches to teaching and

learning" (Figueroa-Britapaja, 2002, p. 264). For example, through school structures like school

meeting faculty meetings, parent-teacher meetings, and subject area or interdisciplinary team

meetings, teachers face the unequal distribution of power within the school or the inequity of

school decision-making processes. Teachers feel their lack of confidence, knowledge, and power

through the meetings, since they face the expectations of parents and school administrators or the

accountability for students' scores on required tests (Barksdale-Ladd & Thomas, 1993; Gitlin,

2001). The teachers' autonomy, in terms of goals, pedagogy, and content, is constrained by these

common structures, even though school meetings simply aim to communicate, solve trivial

problems, and facilitate planning (Gitlin, 2001). In the case of child care settings, teachers are

often excluded from decision-making processes, for example, deciding on how many infants the

caregivers will be responsible for (Leavitt, 1994). Also, teachers interact with parents somewhat









negatively because of arguments about the way to care for the child, cost, and being late to pick

up the child, and thus, most teachers have felt criticized by parents (Kontos, 1995). As a result,

teachers have unequal access to school decision-making processes, such as "what kinds of people

will teach which grades and subjects" or "what kind of people will be responsible for policies

governing classroom activity" (Hinchey, 2004, p. 25). This indicates that teachers rarely have an

opportunity to voice their opinions on educational reform, which refers to correcting a real

problem that impacts children's lives through the authentic interactions between teachers and

children as well as among children (Roselli, 2005). Instead, teachers are apt to keep the unilateral

interactions between themselves and children, as they are accustomed to the structure of

domination already existing in schools.

Problems of the Unilateral Interactions between Teachers and Children

Children learn to manifest personality types willing to accept the characteristics of the

social relationships that govern the structures of the workplace, such as conformity, passivity,

and obedience (Giroux, 2001), by being accustomed to unilateral teacher authority over them and

experiencing a patience that is rooted in an unwarranted submission to authority. For example, a

study by Leavitt (1994) shows that the arrangement of the rooms in child care settings is

determined by the necessity of custodial routines, and all the aspects of children's lives,

including sleeping, playing, and eating, are conducted in one place according to the shared

authority of the caregivers. This arrangement of the physical environment is interpreted as

"enclosure," a space "closed in upon itself' (Foucault, 1975/1995, p. 141), and indicates that

children's mobility is limited within certain boundaries and is controlled by the caregivers'

management of routines and their exercise of power. Thus, the arrangement of the rooms and

materials enables children to practice discipline, which organizes the space at the same time

(Foucault, 1975/1995). The societal regulatory practices lead children to passively accept what









teachers utter and to learn knowledge which constitutes "what is taken to be true" rather than

knowledge which authentically reveals and represents the real world (Usher & Edwards, 1994, p.

87). In other words, unilateral teacher authority over children forces children to be taught the

norms, values, and beliefs that contribute to reinforcing the current distribution of power in

society, such as conformity, passivity, and obedience, by leading children to practice discipline

without being aware of what is happening.

Moreover, children have a variety of negative emotions like "self-doubt, hostility,

resentment, boredom, indignation, cynicism, disrespect, frustration, and the desire to escape" by

learning the dominant curriculum in traditional classrooms, since children are forced to passively

learn the curriculum through unilateral teacher authority over them (Shor, 1992, p. 23). The

dominant curriculum is considered a key source of educational inequality because the curriculum

is historically derived from the educational practices of European upper class men (Connell,

1994). That is to say, as "outcomes of struggles over power, authority, and legitimacy, which are

decided in historically specific ways," the dominant curriculum plays a vital role in reinforcing

already existing inequality among children (Leonardo, 2003, p. 242). Also, the dominant

curriculum does not consider that schooling includes "the complex political, economic, and

cultural relations that structure it as a borderland of movement and translation" (Giroux, 1999, p.

37). Thus, each child's voice is dominated by the privileged voices of the white middle and

upper classes even though it has been shaped by his or her particular cultural and historical

backgrounds (McLaren, 1998), and the discourse of children from subordinate classes is

considered "ugly, inferior, and incorrect" speech, precisely in "the so-called multicultural

societies where the language and hegemonic culture smash and belittle the language and culture

of the so-called minorities" (Freire, 1993, p. 135). Even the NAEYC's (National Association for









the Education of Young Children) guidelines for developmentally appropriate practice, which are

commonly considered the most suitable methods for developing children's different abilities, do

not reflect "the qualities of diversity," since the guidelines have "privileged certain ways of

being and knowing that do not recognize the diverse qualities of children and their families in a

global context" (Yelland & Kilderry, 2005, p. 5). As a result, the dominant curriculum forced by

unilateral teacher authority over children allows children to have a variety of negative emotions

by excluding them from the privileged voices of the white middle and upper classes. Moreover,

the dominant curriculum makes some children have school experiences to be characterized by

high school dropout rates, low academic achievement, weak literacy, and lack of critical thinking.

Finally, children rarely have an opportunity to participate in "a culture of inquiry," which

enables them to seek a better understanding of and improvement in the aspects of their schooling

experiences in a collaborative and collegial way, by valuing "curiosity, a willingness to try new

ideas and practices, and the ability to remain open to the unforeseen and unexpected" (Reagan,

Case, & Brubacher, 2000, p. 43). This is because unilateral teacher authority over children, as a

necessary basis for classroom management and control, allows teachers to have the authoritative

codes for interpreting meaning and text (Davies, 1993). That is to say, unilateral teacher

authority over children forces children to think and behave within teachers' values and

ideologies, which are deeply rooted in their own past experiences and reflect particular

ideological patterns, social structures, or systems of negotiation (McLaren, 1998). Teachers as

the oppressors prevent children from being conscious of the world and themselves through their

feelings and desires as well as from developing their abilities to realize and seize the world with

their own intentions (Freire, 1997). Moreover, teachers sometimes misunderstand the world of

children, since "a reservoir of emotions and thoughts to inform their understanding of the world









of children" results from their own feelings and memories of their childhood, or teachers "use

only their own experiences as the hallmarks for the experiences of others" (Bowman & Stott,

1994, p. 128). In the end, the dominant discourse and practices in traditional classrooms like

"teacher-talk, reading the riot act, and the last word" allow teachers to easily exercise unilateral

teacher authority over children and to prevent children from building on intellectual curiosity as

well as from pursuing their inquiries in different ways (Shor, 1992, p. 203).

Summary

The past twenty years have seen a notable growth in an understanding of the nature of

teacher-child interactions in child care settings, including the precursors, concomitants, and

outcomes related to the quality of teacher-child interactions. In the past 20 years, researchers

who study teacher-child interactions have shown that teacher-child interactions play a critical

role in providing children with experiences that extend their learning as well as their social and

emotional development. However, research on teacher-child interactions has been almost

exclusively quantitative; for example, the quality of teacher-child interactions has typically been

assessed by teachers' own ratings rather than naturalistic observational data about various

features of teacher-child interactions, such as warmth, conflict, involvement, and dependency.

Also, research attention has mainly been given to identifying and classifying the specific teacher

behaviors that affect particular child outcomes like children's social and emotional competence.

However, little attention has been focused on describing the responsive teachers' behaviors with

information about the overall context within which these behaviors occur. As a result, very little

research shows a description of the teacher-child interactions themselves, including a detailed

description of the moment-to-moment encounters between teachers and children. Thus, this

qualitative research project is expected to contribute to the existing literature on teacher-child









interactions by providing a whole picture of teacher-child interactions within a specific context

in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings using qualitative research methods.

In addition, this qualitative research project will make a major contribution to the existing

literature on teacher-child interactions by exploring and describing barriers to and facilitators of

effective teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings

using the theoretical orientation of critical theory and postmodernism. From the theoretical

orientation of critical theory and postmodernism, teachers are governed by oppressive practices

and ideologies and thus are isolated from the narrative of mainstream history and culture.

Specifically, teachers are forced to follow "the norms, standards, and educational models set by

white academics and institutions" as well as to consider them to be typical, worldwide, and

ordinary (McIntyre, 1997, p. 13). However, within the interactions between teachers and

children, teachers are mostly considered the oppressors who exercise the power given by

educational institutions, since they force children to learn the norms, beliefs, and values of a

dominant class or group through the "networks of discursive and material practices," such as

"ordering, measuring, categorizing, normalizing, and regulating" (Usher & Edwards, 1994, p.

92). Thus, several studies show how the interactions between teachers and children in classrooms

are characterized as unilateral and how most of the conversations between them reflect teacher

authority over children. However, there is little research on the unilateral teacher-child

interactions in child care settings, especially in terms of the potential negative influences of the

unilateral teacher-child interactions in child care settings on children's critical-thinking and

problem-solving skills. Therefore, this qualitative research project will advance an understanding

of the causes and problems of the unilateral teacher-child interactions by providing scientific









evidence of barriers to and facilitators of effective teacher-child interactions, as defined from a

critical perspective, in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings.

Finally, this qualitative research project will lead future research to further explore how

teachers as the oppressed and oppressors overcome the unilateral teacher-child interactions in

voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings. The above literature review implies

that, in order to do so, teachers must engage in the struggle for their liberation by acquiring "a

critical awareness of oppression through the praxis of this struggle" (Freire, 1970/2001, p. 51).

This is because as long as the oppressed are not aware of the causes of their conditions, their

status in the structure of domination and their fatalistic attitudes towards the current situations

are less likely to change or be improved. Thus, teachers need to realize the reality that they, as

"victims of a systematic culture of oppression," have been acculturatedd, assimilated, and melted

into a single frame of mind that is repressive and limiting" (Figueroa-Britapaja, 2002, p. 264).

They also need to be aware of how they as the oppressors instill knowledge supported by the

authority and power of a dominant class or group into children through the interactions between

themselves and children at the moment of classroom engagement. Shor (1992) suggests that

teachers can negotiate their lesson plans, learning methods, and personal experiences with their

children as well as begin with children's words, themes, and understandings, and children can

relate critical thinking to everyday life by examining "daily themes, social issues, and academic

lore" and by questioning "rules, work relations, and daily episodes often taken for granted" (p.

44). Also, teachers can use more open-ended questions, clarification questions, and

conversational yes/no questions that attempt to involve children in conversation than

"commands, test questions, and yes/no questions that serve to elicit a specific vocal, verbal, or

action response from the child" (Girolametto et al., 2000, p. 1102). These methods enable both









teachers and children to express their multiple perspectives, engage in more complex discourses,

and create more critical thoughts, and finally contribute to the empowerment of teachers and

children by enabling them to actively participate in "the search for and acquisition of knowledge

and subsequent action to change the status quo" through teacher-child interactions (Merriam,

2002, p. 10). Thus, this qualitative research project will display barriers to and facilitators of

effective teacher-child interactions, as defined from a critical perspective, in voluntary pre-

kindergarten programs in child care settings, and stimulate future research to provide more

concrete, specific methods for teachers to overcome the unilateral teacher-child interactions in

voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings.









CHAPTER 3
PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGY

This is a qualitative research project that used interviews and observations in three

teachers' workplaces, in order to investigate barriers to and facilitators of effective teacher-child

interactions, as defined from a critical perspective, in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in

child care settings. In this research project the methods of in-depth interviewing and participant

observation are considered the most effective ways to collect data, since the methods enable this

study to describe what is really happening by focusing on the three teachers' behavior and

speech in their classrooms. In order to enhance internal validity, reliability, generalizability, and

trustworthiness, I used a number of strategies, including "member checks," which refers to

taking data and tentative interpretations back to the people from whom they are derived and

asking them whether or not the interpretations are plausible (Merriam, 1998, p. 204).

Nevertheless, this qualitative research project shows several limitations resulting from the

general characteristics of qualitative research and the unique features of this research project. In

this chapter I will explain the unique characteristics of qualitative research and how well these

characteristics fit the purpose of this research project. I will describe the three participants who

were selected according to the particular criteria that could serve the purpose of this research

project. Also, I will give details about the methods of collecting and analyzing the data as well as

many strategies used to increase the trustworthiness of this research project. Finally, I will

present several limitations of this study in terms of internal validity, reliability, generalizability,

and trustworthiness.

Qualitative Research Methodology

According to Bogdan and Biklen (2003), qualitative research has the following five

features: naturalistic character, descriptive data, concern with process, inductive method, and









meaning. That is to say, qualitative research is always conducted in actual settings that are

considered the direct source of data and include the concrete data collected from human sources.

Qualitative data consist of the forms of words or pictures obtained from interviews and

observations, for example, direct quotations about people's experiences, opinions, and feelings,

and detailed descriptions of people's activities and behaviors. Also, qualitative researchers are

concerned with process rather than simply with outcomes or products, as well as with a statement

that identifies the phenomenon to be studied. In other words, qualitative research does not search

out data or evidence to prove or disprove hypotheses about the relationships between a

dependent variable and an independent variable, as is common in quantitative studies (Strauss &

Corbin, 1998). By listening to what others say, observing what others do, and representing these

as accurately as possible, qualitative researchers are interested in what is going on in the here and

now, as well as specially want to know about human subjects in the actual settings. Thus,

qualitative researchers are fundamentally concerned with the meaning of the events and

happenings in data, and try to see beneath the obvious to discover the new by making

comparisons, going out and collecting more data, and asking questions, for example, "How do

people negotiate meaning?" or "How do certain terms and labels come to be applied?"

As for the naturalistic character of qualitative research, Lincoln and Guba (1985) say that

naturalistic inquiry always takes place in a natural setting because context is deeply related to

meaning. Such a contextual inquiry requires an instrument that can take account of all factors

and influences in the context rather than paying attention to some variables of interest. Thus, a

human instrument is used in the natural setting, since the human instrument can be fully adapted

to the "indeterminate situation that will be encountered" by using different methods that are

"appropriate to humanly implemented inquiry," such as interviews and observations (Lincoln &









Guba, 1985, p. 187). In other words, the "human-as-instrument" is primarily based on the notion

that "everything is indeterminate" in a natural setting and only the human instrument is able to

deal with an indeterminate situation (p. 193). As for the characteristics of the "human-as-

instrument," Lincoln and Guba (1985) list the following seven elements: (1) Responsiveness: the

"human-as-instrument" can react to all personal and environmental contexts, (2) Adaptability:

the "human-as-instrument" can collect a variety of data through different methods at the same

time, (3) Holistic emphasis: the "human-as-instrument" is only capable of seeing any

phenomenon and its surrounding context in one view, (4) Knowledge base expansion: the

"human-as-instrument" is able to use the knowledge of both reason and gossip as well as the

knowledge gained from experience with objects and events, (5) Processual immediacy: the

"human-as-instrument" is capable of handling data as soon as they become available, creating

hypotheses on the spot, and examining those hypotheses in the context in which they are created,

(6) Opportunitiesfor clarification and summarization: only the "human-as-instrument" can

summarize data and have tentative interpretations or conclusions tested by the people from

whom they are derived for clarification, rectification, and intensification, and (7) Opportunity to

explore atypical or idiosyncratic responses: the "human-as-instrument" can investigate atypical

and idiosyncratic responses in order to examine their validity and to more deeply understand

them through different points of view (pp. 193-194).

In particular, Swann and Pratt (2003) mention that the purpose of educational research is

to improve educational action by informing educational judgments and decisions. That is to say,

educational research as critical and systematic inquiry should be directed towards the

improvement of educational practice by focusing on what happens in learning situations and

continually asking the following questions: "Do research questions have the same meaning to the









participants?" "Does this mean what it appears to mean?" or "Are researchers observing what

they think they are looking at?" Thus, Swann and Pratt (2003) emphasize that educational

research must be based on respect for people by providing them with information about what is

and what is not ethical practice. Also, its outcomes must be important to interested practitioners,

including teachers, policy-makers, parents, and learners, so that they can employ them in new

and creative ways in order to improve educational practice. In addition, an educational research

report must be meaningful and readable to the various audiences by demonstrating what is really

happening through multiple investigators, multiple sources of data, or multiple methods, as well

as by clarifying the researcher's assumptions or biases. As a result, the report enables readers to

judge the applicability of the researcher's findings and conclusions and to determine whether the

researcher's findings fit their situations or not.

In conclusion, qualitative research methodology enables educational research to improve

educational practice by making critical and systematic inquiries as well as describing what is

really happening. This is because qualitative research assumes that reality is holistic,

multidimensional, and ever-changing, rather than a single, fixed, and objective phenomenon

waiting to be discovered, observed, and measured as in quantitative research. From this

perspective, qualitative research is interested in understanding "the perspectives of those

involved in the phenomenon of interest," discovering "the complexity of human behavior in a

contextual framework," and presenting "a holistic interpretation of what is happening" (Merriam,

1998, p. 203). At the same time, qualitative research is inherently political and is shaped by

"multiple ethical and political allegiance" (Denzin & Lincoln, 2003, p. 613). This is because

qualitative research is not objective, authoritative, or politically neutral outside the context, and

qualitative researchers as the "human-as-instrument" are historically positioned and locally









situated. As a result, the naturalistic characteristics of qualitative research and its holistic

interpretation of human experience enable educational research to improve educational practice

through critical and systematic inquiry.

This viewpoint especially fits well the purpose of this qualitative research project to

help teachers find ways to empower both themselves and children through effective teacher-child

interactions, as defined from a critical perspective, by investigating barriers to and facilitators of

effective teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings.

This research project involved three teachers in the study using qualitative research methods; that

is, they participated in two formal interviews, three informal interviews, and three observations

of classrooms. This process of collecting data itself was very meaningful because the process

gave the three teachers an opportunity to reflect on how they interacted with children. All of

them had no experience of thinking about the topic of teacher-child interaction before

participating in the study, and thus, they were able to recognize the issue of teacher-child

interaction through participation in repeated interviews and observations. The data collection

process also provided sufficient information about the teachers' experiences, opinions, and

feelings, as well as detailed descriptions of their activities and behaviors. Since these concrete

data include what is going on in the here and now, interested practitioners are able to employ the

data in creative ways to improve educational practice.

In particular, this research project includes "member checks" the process of taking data

and tentative interpretations back to the teachers and asking them whether or not the

interpretations are plausible. By reading and understanding the interpretations, the three teachers

were aware of how they interacted with children as well as of how the events and happenings in

data were interpreted. By raising their opinions about the interpretations, the teachers had an









opportunity to explain why they behaved in a particular way or to correct some

misinterpretations. Also, the teachers were given a chance to know how their behavior and

speech were interpreted by the theoretical orientation of critical theory and postmodernism. Thus,

the teachers were able to understand the nature of teacher-child interactions as well as barriers to

and facilitators of effective teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in

child care settings. This process of "member checks" results from one of the naturalistic

characteristics of qualitative research; that is, only a human instrument in a natural setting can

have tentative interpretations tested by the people from whom they are derived for clarification

and rectification. As a result, qualitative research methodology enables this research project to

achieve its purpose to help teachers find ways to empower both themselves and children

through effective teacher-child interactions by investigating barriers to and facilitators of

effective teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings.

Sampling Strategy

The three teachers were selected according to Patton's (2002) purposeful sampling

strategies. The rationale of purposeful sampling is based on the fact that cases for study such as

people, organizations, and communities provide a variety of information about the

phenomenon of interest, and studying the "information-rich cases" yields a thorough

investigation of the phenomenon rather than empirical generalization from a sample to a

population (Patton, 2002, p. 230). Thus, purposeful sampling enables one to learn greatly about

essentially important issues related to the purpose of the inquiry through the "information-rich

cases."

Among several different strategies for purposefully selecting "information-rich cases," I

chose a criterion sampling strategy since the strategy provided me with an opportunity to fully

explore the central issues of this qualitative research project barriers to and facilitators of









effective teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings.

The logic of criterion sampling is to "review and study all cases that meet some predetermined

criterion of importance, a strategy common in quality assurance efforts." The point of criterion

sampling is to understand the "information-rich cases" because they may uncover "major system

weaknesses that become targets of opportunity for program or system improvement" (Patton,

2002, p. 238).

Based on a criterion sampling strategy (Hatch, 2002), the following criteria were used:

1. The teachers must willingly participate in the study.

2. The teachers must be female teachers.

3. The teachers must be teaching children in Florida's voluntary pre-kindergarten (VPK)
classrooms in child care settings in Gainesville.

4. The teachers must be lead instructors who have credentials required by Florida's voluntary
pre-kindergarten (VPK) program.

5. The teachers must have experience of teaching children in preschool classrooms other than
Florida's voluntary pre-kindergarten (VPK) classrooms.

6. The teachers must be enthusiastic about their work.

7. The teachers must be proud of what they are doing.

Sampling Procedures

In order to involve teachers who met the above criteria in the study, I directly visited

several child care centers in Gainesville that offered the VPK program and met system directors.

I explained the purpose and procedures of this study to them and asked them to recommend a

teacher who met the above criteria. One of the directors rejected my request, saying that the

study would require teachers to spend too much time and teachers might be tired of participation

in the study. Another director said that she could not allow teachers to do things other than

teaching children during working hours because she paid for the hours. Some directors refused

my request, saying that teachers were too busy to participate in the study. After several visits to









child care centers, I finally selected three teachers that met the above criteria and invited them to

an audio tape recording via a letter of invitation and consent form.

As I expected from the perspective of a criterion sampling strategy, the three teachers

provided me with a wealth of information about barriers to and facilitators of effective teacher-

child interactions, as defined from a critical perspective, as well as several systematic or

programmatic factors that impeded effective teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-

kindergarten programs in child care settings. In particular, since the teachers had many

experiences of teaching children in different classroom settings other than VPK classrooms, they

were able to compare the characteristics of the VPK program with those of other preschool

programs. This indicates that their judgment about the VPK program is based on objective or

unbiased facts resulting from their different experiences and thus is useful for interested

practitioners to act for program or system improvements in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs

in child care settings.

Description of Participants and Context

The first participant, Susan, has been working with children for thirty-four years and has

been teaching children at her current workplace for twelve years. From her experiences, she is

very well aware of the different characteristics of a whole range of children's ages as well as

how to teach each child according to his or her unique personality. In particular, since most of

the children in her pre-kindergarten classroom have attended the school over one year, she and

most of them had already known each other by the time they started the class. She very well

understands what kind of curriculum is good for children and how to manage classrooms because

she had had her own child care center for six years. She has a bachelor's degree in music

education and uses music as an effective teaching tool, since she believes that singing a song

enables teachers to reinforce what they are talking about and to help children remember the









lesson for a long time. For example, children in her classroom ask her to sing songs that they

have learned before over and over again. Also, since she thinks that teachers need to help

children build a good vocabulary and children need to have a good vocabulary for success in

school, she uses each time she talks to children as a chance to teach children new vocabularies.

She is very proud that she has a good relationship with other teachers in the school. She

frequently talks to other teachers about how to work with children and learns from other

teachers' experiences. In addition, the school began offering the VPK program in 2006, and the

curriculum of her pre-kindergarten classroom is based on both the guidelines for the VPK

program and the school curriculum that has developed over the years. According to the

guidelines, she makes every effort to get children ready for kindergarten by focusing on

children's literacy and keeping track of each child's progress. In particular, she is concerned

about the school's accountability and thus needs to make sure that every single child in her pre-

kindergarten classroom is prepared for kindergarten.

The second participant, Veronica, has been working with children for two years, and her

current workplace is her first teaching experience. In order to overcome her insufficient teaching

experience, she continually observes how other teachers teach and talk to children as well as asks

them some suggestions when she has trouble solving problems. The school began offering the

VPK program in 2005, and children in her pre-kindergarten classroom started attending the

school last August. She has not known her children long, but has no trouble understanding each

child's characteristics. The school has four VPK classrooms, and each VPK classroom uses the

same curriculum based on both the guidelines for the VPK program and the school curriculum.

As a half-day classroom, her pre-kindergarten classroom provides children with a three-hour

schedule regulated by the VPK program. The time frame of the VPK program makes her









constantly work and teach because she has to do the same amounts of work as teachers in a full-

day classroom do within only three hours. However, she is very proud of teaching children in the

VPK classroom and is convinced that the VPK program successfully helps teachers to get

children ready for kindergarten. Her trust in the VPK program mainly results from her

experience of putting her daughter in the program. She saw the VPK program get her daughter

ready for kindergarten by providing an opportunity to learn many necessary skills for

kindergarten. Thus, when the school gave teachers a chance to select which class they would like

to teach, she chose the VPK classroom. She uses every time she talks to children as a chance to

make children understand what they need to know to go to kindergarten. For example, even

when teachers and children move upstairs to eat their snacks, she continually communicates with

children by raising new topics or expanding children's ideas.

The third participant, Cindy, has six years of teaching experience and has been teaching

children at her current workplace for four years. Her previous workplace was a working

environment that enabled teachers to sufficiently interact one-on-one with children, since the

teacher-child ratio of each classroom was low and the class size was small. The number of

teachers in the classroom was twice as many as a standard teacher-child ratio. This experience

made her understand the fact that a low teacher-child ratio enabled teachers to provide children

with a stable learning environment. For example, since teachers were able to always observe and

respond to each child's behavior and speech, children did not need to speak loudly and teachers

did not need to frequently correct children's misbehavior. Thus, she thinks that the teacher-child

ratio in her pre-kindergarten classroom is a little bit high and prevents her from having enough

one-on-one interactions with children. In addition, the school has offered the VPK program since

2005 and has three VPK classrooms. The classrooms use the same curriculum based on both the









school curriculum and the guidelines for the VPK program. She prefers the school curriculum to

the guidelines, since she believes that the school curriculum has more expectations for children

and motivates children to learn more. Her pre-kindergarten classroom is open from 7:00 A.M. to

6:00 P.M., and children in her classroom stay after the class regulated by the VPK program ends.

Since most of the children in her classroom have attended the school longer than one year, she

already knows their names as well as their characteristics. Also, since their parents already know

that she works as a teacher at the school, she is able to easily communicate with the parents.

Through a daily report as one way of communicating with parents, she informs parents of what

their child was doing and asks them to discuss the school day with their child when their child

had a really tough time.

Data Collection Methods

Interviews

Two formal in-depth interviews were conducted in the three teachers' workplaces before

and after the series of observations, and the interview data were audio tape recorded and

transcribed. Audio tape recording was conducted at the teachers' workplaces, and the audio tape

recording sessions lasted one hour each. In the case of the first and third participants, I

interviewed them during children's nap time. However, I interviewed Veronica (the second

participant) after all children in her classroom went home, since her classroom as a half-day

program was open only from 9:00 to 12:00. Also, I conducted three observations in the teachers'

classrooms with an informal interview to follow each classroom observation. The informal

interviews lasted approximately 5 minutes each, and the data were audio tape recorded and

transcribed. In particular, the informal interviews were very helpful for me to immediately

understand the meaning of each event and happening that took place during each classroom

observation. The interviews as semi-structured included a few probing questions, specifically "a









list of questions and prompts in order to increase the likelihood that all topics will be covered in

each interview in more or less the same way" (Dewalt & Dewalt, 2002, p. 122). Interview guides

are included in the Appendix.

The reason that I chose in-depth interviewing as the first method of data collection is that

in-depth interviewing offers "a valuable source of data on the ideologies of language that

underlie social scientific research" (Briggs, 2003, p. 499). That is to say, by providing

participants with opportunities to perceive, inquire about, and report their own thoughts and

feelings, in-depth interviewing enables participants to "reconstruct their experience and to

explore their meaning" (Seidman, 1991, p. 69). Thus, every aspect of the structure, process, and

practice of interviewing needs to be aimed at creating "a climate for mutual disclosure," which

indicates that both the interviewer and the participants willingly share their own feelings and

thoughts, and the participants are able to put their experience into language without being hurried

into interview situations prematurely (Holstein & Gubrium, 2004, p. 147).

During the interview sessions, I tried to make interviewing be informal, nondirective, and

freewheeling because I believed that a less structured atmosphere could enhance rapport with

participants (Adler & Adler, 2003). In order to establish the less structured atmosphere, I

sometimes used rephrasing of the questions since "carefully worded questions" can make

participants feel less threatened (Adler & Adler, 2003, p. 167). Also, I used "summary

feedback," which means that the interviewer "summarizes the last set of statements" expressed

by the participants, since "summary feedback" makes participants be aware that the interviewer

has heard what they are saying and encourages them to continue and expand their answers

(Dewalt & Dewalt, 2002, p. 131). In the end, I as a listener showed a genuine interest in the

participants' stories and was cautious about using my gestures or body language, for example,









raising my eyebrows or changing my tone of voice. This is because such a motion may represent

the power of the interviewer, which can control "what takes place in the interview itself"

(Briggs, 2003, p. 500).

Observations

As the second method of collecting data, three observations of classrooms during whole-

group, free-play, and meal time were conducted per teacher. However, I observed Veronica's

classroom during snack time instead of meal time, since children in her classroom stayed only

from 9:00 to 12:00 and had no meal time. The reason that I chose the three different activity

settings as the targets for observation is that teachers were expected to differently interact with

children through different conversations depending on different activity settings (Cote, 2001;

Dickinson, 2001a; Dickinson, 2001b; Gest et al., 2006). The observation focused on three

teachers' behavior and speech in their classrooms, for example, how the teachers talked to

children in order to make children pay attention to their directions. This is associated with the

description of how teachers stimulate children to learn through teacher-child interactions by

providing evidence of the detailed moment-to-moment encounters and the actual words that the

teachers use in daily classrooms. The three teachers wore a remote microphone, and their

language was audio tape recorded and transcribed. Also, the observation data were recorded in

the form of field notes, and expanded field notes were recorded for each event.

The observations are characterized as participant observation, which is conducted in

natural settings that reflect the life experiences of participants more precisely than do laboratory

or contrived settings (Merriam, 1998). Participant observation is considered a method "to

develop a holistic understanding of the phenomena under study that is as objective and accurate

as possible given the limitations of the method" (Dewalt & Dewalt, 2002, p. 92). In particular,

participant observation is useful to understand what is going on in the here and now, and thus, it









is effectively used to understand phenomena that happen at a specific time and place as well as to

"discover the existence of patterns of thought and behavior" (Dewalt & Dewalt, 2002, p. 100).

As a result, participant observation enabled me to understand the three teachers' behavior and

speech in a specific context as well as the patterns of their behavior and speech in their daily

classrooms when interacting with children. This is the reason that I chose participant observation

as the second method of data collection.

During the classroom observations, I minimally participated in the research site; that is, I

was present at the scene of the action and identifiable as a researcher, but I did not actively

participate or only occasionally interacted with people in it. This is because the biggest threat to

reliability in qualitative research is researchers' biases, such as researchers' excessive

involvement in the site. At the beginning of the first observation, the three teachers introduced

me to their children, along with a short explanation of why I was there. While I was observing

the teachers' behavior and speech, the children were seldom interested in me, but some children

sometimes asked their teacher why she wore a remote microphone. That is to say, all children

and teachers were hardly conscious of my presence and displayed their usual behavior and

speech in daily classrooms. In addition, I made an effort to be a good and careful listener,

showed respect for participants in a setting, and was prepared to tell the truth, since the quality of

participant observation would vary depending on researchers' personal characteristics like

gender and age, their training and experience, and their theoretical orientation (Dewalt & Dewalt,

2002).

Data Analysis Method

I used the method of discourse analysis because discourse as a technology of power is

articulated in the forms of knowledge that constitute the formal curricula as well as the social

interactions between teachers and children in classrooms. In the case of discourse analysis, its









framework provides an understanding of meaning-making systems and discourse networks in

specific situations through the description and interpretation of meaning making as well as the

critical analysis of ideology. From this perspective, I was concerned with how teachers'

discourses were constructed, reproduced, and controlled by the hierarchical organizations of

school systems. Also, I was interested in how the discourses that constituted the social

interactions between teachers and children in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care

settings were enacted and confirmed through the forms of laws, rules, norms, or habits. This is

because I consider power that is exercised, reproduced, mediated, and resisted through

discourses in classrooms as the biggest threat to effective teacher-child interactions, as defined

from a critical perspective, in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings.

I selected Gee's (2005) method of discourse analysis, which formulates hypotheses about

the data as well as moves from context to language and from language to context. Gee (2005)

says that these hypotheses need to be confirmed by further exploration of more data since much

of discourse analysis is about formulating and gaining some confidence in hypotheses which

should be further investigated, rather than gaining any sort of"definitive proof" (p. 13). Through

"information about a context in which a piece of language has been used," hypotheses about

"what that piece of language means and is doing" are created, and information about how the

context is interpreted by the people is produced (p. 14). From this perspective, I formulated two

contrasting hypotheses: one is that teachers as the oppressed are forced to teach children a white,

male, European-American model through diverse techniques of normalization, such as

measurement, regulation, and evaluation; the other is that teachers as the oppressors force

children to learn such a model through the unilateral interactions between themselves and

children. However, as Gee (2005) emphasizes, I am always open to further investigation of my









hypotheses and to finding evidence against my preferred views, since I as the primary instrument

for data collection am likely to filter data through my theoretical point of view.

According to Gee's (2005) method of discourse analysis, I read interview and

observation data, which were audio tape recorded and transcribed, and underlined "the word or

phrase with the most stress" and "the new and most salient information" (Gee, 2005, p. 125).

And then I organized the data into a number of stanzas, which mean "sets of lines devoted to a

single topic, event, image, perspective, or theme" (Gee, 2005, p. 127). In order to analyze the

data at a macro level, I read the stanzas and made sub-sub-stories, sub-stories, and frames within

stories, in that order. When making the stories, I used idealized lines, by removing many

different sorts of "speech hesitations and dysfluencies" from the actual lines (Gee, 2005, p. 129).

This is because idealized lines are useful for "discovering meaningful patterns in people's

speech" and "getting at their basic themes and how they are organized" (Gee, 2005, p. 129).

Finally, I completed seven building tasks: Significance, Activities, Identities, Relationships,

Politics (the distribution of social goods), Connections, and Sign systems and knowledge. When

creating building tasks, I sometimes used hesitations, pauses, dysfluencies, and non-clause lines.

This is because these factors include important information about the discourses, such as "how

planning is going on in the speaker's head" (Gee, 2005, p. 129).

The seven building tasks mean seven areas of "reality," and result from the notion that we

always and simultaneously build the seven areas of "reality" whenever we speak or write (Gee,

2005, p. 11). That is to say, we continually and actively construct and reconstruct our worlds

through language used in interactions, nonverbal systems, technologies, and particular ways of

"thinking, valuing, feeling, and believing" (p. 10). For example, we engage in a certain kind of

activity and recognize our engagement through a piece of language used in the activity. By









asking the question of how this piece of language is used in the activity or what we are using this

piece of language to do here, discourse analysis is able to investigate the reality that we are

actively building through language in the activity. In summary, studying language enables

discourse analysis to reflect "reality" by exploring different identities and activities enacted

through language as well as people's different access to different identities and activities linked

to different kinds of status and social goods.

Trustworthiness

Data collection and data analysis in qualitative research are likely to present ethical

dilemmas. In the case of interviewing as a standard data collection technique in a qualitative

study, participants face both risks and benefits, and the risks are likely to raise ethical problems.

For example, participants may "feel that their privacy has been invaded," may be uncomfortable

about certain questions, or may tell things they have never intended to make known (Merriam,

1998, p. 214). However, participants may have positive feelings when they are asked to review

their achievements or are encouraged to act positively in their own behalf. Also, participants may

enjoy sharing their thoughts, beliefs, or experiences, and may acquire very helpful self-

knowledge. Observation as a second method of collecting data in a qualitative study has its own

ethical pitfalls according to the researcher's participation in the activity. For example,

participants who are accustomed to the researcher's presence may engage in an activity they will

later feel embarrassed about or give information they have not intended to reveal. In addition,

data analysis may present ethical dilemmas since the researcher as the primary instrument for

data collection has filtered data through his or her particular theoretical orientation and biases.

In order to avoid these kinds of ethical problems, I first helped participants understand

the meaning of informed consent. This is because participants have the "right to freely choose

whether to participate in a research project or not" with a reasonable understanding of both risks









and benefits that are involved in the research project (Dewalt & Dewalt, 2002, pp. 198-199).

Also, I secured or concealed all personal data by using pseudonyms of participants in field notes

as well as in possible publication, since "no one deserves harm or embarrassment as a result of

insensitive research practices" (Denzin & Lincoln, 2003, p. 218). Thus, I tried to increase the

trustworthiness of this qualitative research project by continually asking the questions of whether

participants had been given full information about what the study involved, whether participants

willingly had given their consent to participate, and whether participants in the study were

deceived in any way or not.

Limitations of the Study

In terms of internal validity, reliability, generalizability, and trustworthiness, this

qualitative research project shows several limitations resulting from the general characteristics of

qualitative research and the unique features of this research project. First of all, this research

project does not provide sufficient evidence on generalizability, which is concerned with "the

extent to which the findings of one study can be applied to other situations" (Merriam, 1998, p.

207). This is mostly caused by the fact that this research was conducted in the VPK program. As

one of the state-funded pre-kindergarten programs, the VPK program includes several limitations

of state-funded pre-kindergarten programs. One of the limitations is that the levels of support

services of state-funded pre-kindergarten programs as well as teacher qualifications are very

different according to where the classroom happens to be located. Thus, the events or individuals

in one state-funded pre-kindergarten classroom are not typical and are hard to compare with

those of another classroom. Also, this research project includes the general characteristics of

qualitative research, which is concerned with the particular situation of a single case or a small

nonrandom sample (Merriam, 1998). That is to say, I focused on the particular rather than the

general and thus selected three participants using the particular criteria that could serve the









purpose of this research project. As a result, the situations of this study are not typical, and the

findings of this study cannot be readily applied to other situations.

However, in order to increase generalizability, this research project used different

strategies, including rich, thick description and maximum variation, which refers to using several

sites, cases, or situations. In order to maximize diversity in teacher-child interactions in the VPK

program, I conducted three observations of classrooms during whole-group, free-play, and meal

time per teacher. In order to provide enough detailed information about classroom events, I

recorded the observations in the form of field notes and included very detailed descriptions of the

observations in Chapter 4. The rich, detailed information about teacher-child interactions in the

VPK program enables readers to determine how closely their situations match this research

context or whether the findings of this study can be transferred to their situations.

Another limitation of this qualitative research project is to offer partial evidence on

internal validity despite its several strategies to enhance internal validity. In order to clarify my

assumptions and worldview based on my personal experiences, I involved my subjectivity

statement in Chapter 1. Also, I conducted "member checks" after completing the first draft of

data analysis; that is, I asked the three participants whether or not my tentative interpretations

were plausible. Nevertheless, this research project provides insufficient evidence on the validity

of the findings, since the data were collected over a short period of time. That is to say, the data

were not collected through "long-term observation at the research site or repeated observations

of the same phenomenon" (Merriam, 1998, p. 204). This prevents this research project from fully

explaining "the complexity of human behavior in a contextual framework" or from presenting "a

holistic interpretation of what is happening" (Merriam, 1998, p. 203). Thus, this research project









does not give a positive answer to the question of whether the research demonstrates what is

really happening.

From a traditional perspective on reliability in a research design, the fact that the data

were collected over a short period of time is related to the reliability of this research project. This

is because the traditional perspective assumes that a study can increase validity through repeated

observations in the same study that lead to the same results. However, since human behavior is

never static and reality includes many interpretations of what is happening, a qualitative study

will not yield the same results repeatedly (Merriam, 1998). Thus, in qualitative research, the

results are reliable if they are "consistent and dependable" rather than exactly the same (Merriam,

1998, p. 206). Reliability in qualitative research is generally improved by researchers' detailed

descriptions of how data are collected, how categories are derived, and how decisions are made

throughout the inquiry. From this viewpoint, this qualitative research project sufficiently shows

its reliability and enables readers to understand how the results are produced and to confirm the

findings of this study independently. Also, by minimally participating in the research site, I dealt

with the biggest threat to reliability in qualitative research: researchers' biases, such as

researchers' excessive involvement in the site. However, since only I as a human instrument

participated in the research site, this research project includes observer's biases resulting from

my personal characteristics like cultural and academic backgrounds, my lack of experience of

conducting research, and my theoretical orientation. This is another limitation of this qualitative

research project.

Finally, I used many strategies to increase the trustworthiness of this qualitative research

project. However, since this research project was conducted over a short period of time, I did not

have sufficient time to establish a close rapport with the participants. Also, my lack of









experience of conducting research prevented me from building an excellent rapport. This

indicates that both I and the participants partly understood and shared reciprocal cultures and

beliefs, and this research project is based on such an understanding. This point needs to be

addressed by future research based on long-term relationships between researchers and

participants or researchers' rich experience of building rapport.









CHAPTER 4
PRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF DATA

In this chapter I will present the results of data analysis, which are based on two

contrasting hypotheses: one is that teachers as the oppressed are forced to teach children a white,

male, European-American model through diverse techniques of normalization, such as

measurement, regulation, and evaluation; the other is that teachers as the oppressors force

children to learn such a model through the unilateral interactions between themselves and

children. The results of data analysis consist of two parts: each teacher's narrative and seven

building tasks. Each teacher's narrative is part of each teacher's interview data and reflects my

main concern with each teacher's interview. The narrative includes sub-sub-stories, sub-stories,

and frames within stories by means of idealized lines and stanzas. In addition, seven building

tasks consist of Significance, Activities, Identities, Relationships, Politics (the distribution of

social goods), Connections, and Sign systems and knowledge. Unlike the narrative, seven

building tasks are based on interviews as well as observation data and include hesitations,

pauses, dysfluencies, and non-clause lines, which show important information about the

discourses. Thus, each teacher's seven building tasks show how each teacher interacts with

children in her classroom; what makes her behave and speak in a particular way; what her

behavior and speech mean within a specific context; and how the events and happenings in data

are connected and interpreted.

The First Participant, Susan

My main interest in Susan's interview is to see how she is concerned about the school's

accountability through her actual words. This main interest comes from the fact that as one of the

issues most frequently mentioned during the interview sessions, the school's accountability

seems to significantly influence Susan's behavior and speech. Susan frequently talked to children









to have them build a good vocabulary and believed that free-play time was the best for effective

teacher-child interactions because she was able to freely interact with each child. However, her

behavior and speech mainly focused on getting children ready for kindergarten, since she was

constantly worried about the school's accountability.

When children go to kindergarten, their school readiness is evaluated by kindergarten

teachers. Since kindergarten teachers keep track of what school children attended before, pre-

kindergarten teachers need to make sure that children know the necessary skills for kindergarten.

After the VPK program started, pre-kindergarten teachers have more responsibility for children's

school readiness and do more paperwork to check each child's progress. This indicates that the

VPK program does not allow teachers to do activities other than things required by the VPK

standards. Thus, the VPK program makes teachers teach children only the values and norms of

the VPK program through measurement and evaluation.

Susan's narrative shows how and why she is concerned about the school's accountability.

Also, it demonstrates how her concern about the school's accountability influences her behavior

and speech as well as interactions with children. In particular, her narrative includes how the

VPK program changes and constrains her way of teaching and interacting with children. As a

result, Susan's narrative shows how her discourses are constructed and controlled by the

hierarchical organizations of school systems and how her interactions with children are

influenced by the discourses.

Susan's Narrative

FRAME: Stanza 1: Teachers consider some problems of the earth as a weekly theme

1. It is a program that we had read about

2. and we know that the earth is having problems,

3. there are so many people









4. and a lot of people are not reusing things and recycling items

5. and throwing away so many things,

6. the garbage piles are piling up higher and higher

7. and it's a problem, that the earth has.

Story: Teachers' concerns about the school's accountability

Sub-story 1: VPK program's specific information about the necessary skills for kindergarten

Sub-sub-story 1: What to do with a theme is based on the necessary skills for kindergarten

Stanza 2: Teachers add some problems of the earth to the school curriculum

8. So, that's one reason we've added that to our curriculum.

9. And then certain written programs are about it

10. and tell you something you can do with the children.

Stanza 3: Teachers show children how to reuse something

11. Like last year, we made paper,

12. they all brought in lint from their dryers

13. and we made paper out of it to show them

14. how we can reuse something that someone might throw away,

15. we can use it to make something else.

16. It's a good thing for them to know and think about it.

Stanza 4: Teachers decide a weekly theme based on the school curriculum

17. We have curriculum here at my school

18. that was developed over, over some years by teachers

19. and we usually go by that, by that theme each week

Stanza 5: Teachers choose what to do with a theme









20. but we are responsible for deciding what to do.

21. For instance, if our theme is recycling or, saving the earth,

22. then we teachers that are here now would kind of decide

23. what we're going to do, with that theme.

24. We have some suggestions

25. but, we are also looking for books that we have,

Stanza 6: Teachers think about the necessary skills for kindergarten

26. and we think about what these children need to know

27. to go to kindergarten,

28. how we can incorporate those skills also.

29. What we do, everything that we have,

30. we, we relate that using the standards

31. that they need to have for kindergarten.

Stanza 7: What to do with a theme is related to the necessary skills for kindergarten

32. For instance, we might have them, drawing things about the earth,

33. or painting a river, painting a clean river,

34. and talking about what that would have in it,

35. a live animal and fish and, things like that so.

36. Everything that we do goes with that theme,

37. but it would also build on their skills

38. and their needs for VPK.

Sub-sub-story 2: VPK program provides teachers with much specific information

Stanza 8: VPK program provides a lot of helpful information









39. We have a lot of standards.

40. They are very helpful,

41. there's so much, so there's so much

42. because how, I'll have to show you the book if you want,

Stanza 9: The information is very specific

43. but there's a unit as a whole section on their physical abilities,

44. if they, if they can do small motor things, large motor things,

45. physically, how are they physically,

46. how they're in good health,

47. do they seem to eat good food.

Stanza 10: VPK program emphasizes children's literacy

48. That's just one aspect, then you have, you have another one,

49. that's, there's a whole section on literacy on what,

50. what they need to be able to do

51. to facilitate learning to write and read

Stanza 11: VPK program includes tracking children's progress

52. and you have to, you have to track every child and see.

53. For instance, for us it's like if you were a child in my class

54. I would watch you drawing

55. and see what you needed to work on.

Stanza 12: Teachers assess many different aspects of children's development

56. I would ask you, "What letter is this?"

57. and see how many letters you know









58. and that if you didn't know very many

59. we would write that down, well, needs to work on letters

60. and we would work with you more on letter recognition.

61. It is really quite complicated (ha, ha) the standards for kindergarten.

Stanza 13: Teachers have gotten children ready for kindergarten even before the VPK

62. We just started VPK programs last year

63. and that's when we got the official standards.

64. But we had basically been doing most of those things before,

65. just getting them ready for kindergarten,

66. teaching them about the world,

Stanza 14: VPK program includes very specific information

67. but this is very specific,

68. it has, specific things that you can do,

69. to help them, be ready for their world.

Sub-story 2: Teachers' understanding of each child's progress through paperwork

Sub-sub-story 3: Teachers fill out paperwork to identify what each child needs to know

Stanza 15: Teachers need to fill out more paperwork

70. A little bit, it's probably we have more paperwork, because the work,

71. we're filling out the forms for each child.

72. We're doing assessment on them throughout the year.

73. We have to keep the portfolio to make sure.

74. We have samples for their work,

Stanza 16: More paperwork aims to check what children need to know









75. so that we, we track each child

76. and we scaffold on what they already know.

77. We build on that.

78. So there's more and more paperwork,

79. and more reading,

80. more really doing with each child one-on-one too.

81. And we did it before,

82. but it's, we don't really do that many more different things.

Stanza 17: She is concerned about the school's accountability

83. I think just more accountability for us, just.

84. I now know and think children go to kindergarten now.

85. At least I think in this county

86. they keep track of what school they attended before.

87. So this school will become known,

88. as either being excellent or not,

89. according to how many children know what they need to know

90. when they go to kindergarten.

91. So I hold the school's accountability now.

Stanza 18: A portfolio shows how children develop their abilities

92. Portfolio? Okay. We do, we keep the samples of their art work.

93. For instance, at the beginning of the year,

94. we say, "Draw yourself," so they draw,

95. and then a year later we say again "Draw a picture of yourself."









96. And then they draw a more detailed picture.

Stanza 19: A portfolio enables teachers to keep track of children's progress

97. At the end of the year,

98. we can keep track of their progress,

99. and also, we have, things that they try to write,

100. they can write the letters.

101. When they write their name,

102. we put that in at the beginning of the year,

103. and then every few weeks put in another try to write their name,

104. and we track their progress on that.

Sub-sub-story 4: Paperwork helps teachers know what they have to do for children

Stanza 20: Paperwork enables teachers to be aware of what they are doing

105. I don't like it.

106. But, it really, I mean it, ultimately it is a good thing

107. because it does keep you aware of,

108. how much they need to learn,

Stanza 21: Paperwork helps teachers understand something

109. you have to be kind of some of it's, subjective,

110. like they may not know something one day

111. and if you ask them another day they know it

112. and, sometimes they don't know it right then,

113. but then later they remember,

114. (she uses a child's voice) "Oh, yeah, I knew that."









Stanza 22: Paperwork is considered burdensome

115. So that makes it a little bit difficult

116. but, I think in the long run it's good,

117. it does take more of our time and more,

118. there's more pressure on us,

119. to make sure that they're doing what they need to do.

120. So that, that part of it is hard,

Stanza 23: Paperwork helps teachers care about their children

121. but I think it is a good thing,

122. because, there are a lot of teachers

123. I think that if they don't really care about the children that much,

124. they won't do anything,

125. they just let 'em play,

126. they don't talk to them,

127. they don't do anything.

Stanza 24: Paperwork enables teachers to know how to assess children's progress

128. But now if they're doing the VPK,

129. they have to have a folder for each child that shows, their progress.

130. They have to assess each child,

131. they have some kind of form that they fill out.

Stanza 25: Paperwork is helpful for teachers in the end

132. So they have to be, doing what they're supposed to be doing.

133. So I think it's really good in the long run,









134. it's harder (ha, ha) it's more for us but,

135. I think it's, a good thing.

Sub-story 3: Teachers' concerns about the school's accountability

Sub-sub-story 5: Teachers are concerned about the school's accountability

Stanza 26: Teachers need to make sure children are prepared enough for kindergarten

136. One thing is that with this new VPK program,

137. we are responsible for knowing each child enough

138. so that we know what they need to learn

139. before they go to kindergarten

140. and so we have to assess them,

Stanza 27: Teachers need to see if children understand what they need to know

141. we have to show them letters

142. and see which ones they don't know.

143. And then record that so we can make sure

144. they work on those letters

145. and same thing with colors and numbers, the different concepts,

146. like, prepositional words like over, under, around,

147. we have to talk to them about those

148. and see if they understand those,

Stanza 28: Which school children came from will be known

149. because, at the, when they do go to kindergarten,

150. they, the teachers will know what school they came from.

151. So that's another thing,









152. people who know, teachers who know,

153. "Oh, this child came from so-and-so school,"

154. and he knows a lot, so they must have really worked.

155. And they made sure that he knew everything.

Stanza 29: The school's accountability is important

156. That's another way we were held accountable by the other schools,

157. they will, I don't know if they'll report that,

158. but they will know.

159. I'm not sure if there are some kinds of grading systems yet,

160. but that might be coming.

Stanza 30: The school needs to be accountable to parents

161. So, so we're held accountable and also to the parents

162. we have a conference with all the parents in January, in January or February,

163. I think February this year.

Stanza 31: Teachers inform parents of what their child knows

164. And we will tell them,

165. your child knows that, knows all of this,

166. but if you could work with him on this

167. while you were still working on,

168. him learning all of his letters or whatever.

Stanza 32: Parents need to make sure their child is ready for kindergarten

169. So we're accountable to the parents also

170. because they want their child ready for kindergarten









171. and they know that, that's one thing we say that we do.

172. So we say we do it, so we have to,

173. to live up to that statement that we do get them ready for kindergarten.

Stanza 33: Parents need to know what their child needs to learn

174. So we have to be sure we tell them everything,

175. that they need to do or that their child needs to learn.

176. So we're held accountable to the parents

177. to the, to the schools they're going to,

Stanza 34: The school needs to be accountable to the state

178. which is, (3.0) it really adds up to that we're accountable to the state,

179. 'cause they're putting money in it,

180. they are paying for these children to go to VPK.

181. So we're accountable to them

182. we have to be sure that

183. we, chart, each child's progress

184. and do everything we can

185. to have them ready for kindergarten.

Sub-sub-story 6: Teachers have to make every effort to get children ready for kindergarten

Stanza 35: Teachers have to show their efforts to get children ready for kindergarten

186. It's that the whole, whole idea behind this.

187. It's that more children will do well in kindergarten.

188. sometimes it makes it a little harder

189. because you have to be sure that you're doing enough,









Stanza 36: Teachers have to work with children who do not understand letters

190. you look at your records say,

191. he still doesn't, he still doesn't understand,

192. these different letters and the sounds of the letters so.

193. Then you have to find the time

194. when you can work with them on that

195. or make sure that they're participating in

196. a game that talks about, those sounds of those letters.

End of Story: The school's accountability makes teachers try hard to get children ready for

kindergarten

FRAME: Stanza 37: Teachers have to record everything that happens to each child

197. So it's, so it's a lot more (2.0) mental preparation

198. and also on paper

199. and we have to write all these things down

200. and have a record of each child.

201. So, that affects a lot.

Table 4-1. Susan's class schedule
9:00 Group time: Roll call, Pledge of allegiance, Calendar, Story, Helper chart, Poem &
Songs
9:20 Free-play: Art, Dramatic play and other centers
10:15 Switch rooms: Another group time with story, Review and Recall
11:15 Clean-up: Another group time Review and Recall, Educational game
11:30 Outside
12:00 End of the VPK time









Seven Building Tasks

Building significance

How and what different things mean the sorts of meaning and significance they are given is a

component of any situation.

1. What are the situated meanings of some of the words and phrases that seem important
in the situation?

In the first and second formal interviews, she frequently uses the word "talk," and the

word "talk" is differently interpreted according to each situation. First, the meaning of "talk" is

that teachers and children simply express their thoughts and feelings. That is to say, the word

"talk" means that teachers and children say something rather than conveying the particular.

If they don't talk and listen a lot, they might not understand the test questions, you know,
that seems to happen.

It's, uh, it's a lot easier for a child to start reading and writing if they can talk well and they
can hear people talking a lot.

Second, the word "talk" means that teachers involve children in discussing a certain topic

by making children pay attention to the topic. In the situation when teachers teach children a

certain subject by giving children a chance to say their ideas about the subject, the situated

meaning of "talk" is to discuss something.

We talk about, um, for instance, this week we were talking about recycling and reusing
items, you know, saving, trying to keep the earth clean.

We talk about that subject again, "Who talked about the recycling?" Later on today I just
ask them, "Do you remember what we were talking about this morning?"

Third, the word "talk" has the meaning that teachers say what they want children to do

and children are required to do what is expected of them. Through "talk," teachers ask children

to do what teachers expect. In other words, "talk" is considered a means of having children do

what teachers expect.









I ask them open-ended questions, which means they can't just say yes or no they have to
talk to me about it, so that improves their vocabulary and helps the interaction.

If we're sitting close to them, we usually try to talk about, you know, talk about things to
go to the vocabulary.

Finally, the meaning of "talk" is sometimes considered to be equal to the meaning of

"interact." "Talk" means that teachers and children give and take their thoughts and feelings

based on mutual respect, trust, and understanding. Also, the word "talk" means that teachers

share their thoughts and feelings with other teachers when teachers "talk" to each other.

We just go and interact. We might go into the dramatic play area, and, for instance, we're
having, uh, a bakery shop, we might talk to them about it, "What do you think we need to
make a bakery shop?"

We talk to each other about what we learn, you know, to help the other teachers, to be able
to do some of those things that we will be successful with.

Next, she frequently uses the word "tell" during the interviews and observations, and it

has three different situated meanings. First, when she wants children to express their thoughts

and feelings obviously and positively, she uses the word "tell." Especially when children

complain about other children's misbehavior, she allows children to say their feelings using the

word "tell." Thus, the word "tell" means that teachers and children articulate their opinions

persuasively and clearly.

After the story, uh, we talk about what it was about and I let them tell me things about the
story.

We staple the paper together, and they can draw pictures and then they tell us what they
write for their book, we do that a lot too.

Remember what we talked about. Tell him how you're feeling. Don't just hit.

That hurts your feelings. You need to tell her, okay?

The second meaning of 'tell' is to explain or describe something. That is to say, the

meaning of "tell" is to provide information about something, and thus, teachers and children are

able to use it.









Certain written programs are about it and, uh, tell you something you can do with the
children.

The third meaning of "tell" is that teachers and children understand something. In other

words, the word "tell" means that teachers and children recognize what something means and

react to it.

If they are mad, we can tell that they are mad.

How can you tell from his face that he's sad?

Building activities

Some activity or set of activities is a component of any situation (the specific social activity or

activities in which the participants are engaging; activities are, in turn, made up of a sequence of

actions).

2. What is the larger or main activity (or set of activities) going on in the situation?

The main activity is to prepare children for kindergarten in the VPK program in child

care settings. Based on the standards for kindergarten, teachers teach children what children need

to know when they go to kindergarten during whole-group, free-play, and meal time. Since

teachers believe that preparing children for kindergarten is closely related to the school's

accountability, teachers focus on children's academic skills and create the school curriculum to

expand those skills. This main activity consists of several sub-activities, which are made up of a

number of different actions.

One of the sub-activities is to focus on children's literacy. This sub-activity consists of

facilitating children's learning to read and write, helping children build a good vocabulary, and

giving children an opportunity to experience different expressions. In particular, teachers try to

help a child who speaks English as a second language practice a perfect sentence by correcting

the child's broken English. This is because teachers are concerned that the child might have









trouble understanding teachers' words in kindergarten and might not be understood by other

children or teachers.

A second sub-activity is to assess children's abilities. The aim of this sub-activity is to

figure out what each child already knows and needs to know. This sub-activity consists of seeing

what each child is doing through one-on-one interaction, filling out different forms for each

child, and keeping track of each child's progress, for example, completing each child's portfolio.

A third sub-activity is to create the school curriculum based on the standards for

kindergarten and the guidelines for the VPK program. This sub-activity consists of discussing the

school curriculum with other teachers, gathering information through different sources such as

participation in a conference, and sharing different experiences with other teachers. Through

these kinds of actions, teachers obtain specific information about children's learning and create

the school curriculum that maximizes the children's learning.

Building identities

Any situation involves identities as a component, the identities that the people involved in the

situation are enacting and recognizing as consequential.

3. What identities (roles, positions), with their concomitant personal, social, and cultural
knowledge and beliefs (cognition), feelings (affect), and values, seem to be relevant
to, taken for granted in, or under construction in the situation?

From the interview and observation data, her role as a pre-kindergarten teacher seems to

be mainly connected to the school's accountability. Her major concern is how well teachers get

children ready for kindergarten, saying, "At least I think in this county they keep track of what

school they attended before. So this school will become known, you know, as either being

excellent or not, according to how many children know what they need to know when they go to

kindergarten." Thus, her instruction mostly focuses on increasing children's literacy and

allowing children to accomplish their tasks well in kindergarten. For example, during whole-









group time, she says to a child, "When you get to kindergarten and you're gonna do it, you need

to start doing it in that way, all right? Not this way. That's okay for today," and "You can't do

this any more 'cause kindergarten teachers don't want that. When you begin big school, you

have to do it another way." That is to say, even though children are in a pre-kindergarten

classroom and their behavior and speech are not wrong, she needs children to be aware of and

practice what kindergarten teachers expect in advance.

In addition, her role in helping children build a good vocabulary seems to be related to

the school's accountability. She says that children might have trouble with the test questions

when they read them if they do not understand, if they do not have a good vocabulary, or if they

do not talk and listen a lot. In other words, she is worried that her children are not able to succeed

in school because of their poor vocabulary, and believes that teachers are responsible for

developing children's vocabulary. Thus, she helps children build a good vocabulary in different

ways. For example, during meal time, she makes her salad by herself while children are eating

lunch and asks children what kinds of vegetables she has, saying "Who knows a vegetable I have

now?" She allows children to answer the question and gives children a quick explanation of the

vegetables. As a result, she tries to give children a chance to develop a good vocabulary as often

as possible regardless of time and place, in order for children to succeed in school.

In summary, she as a teacher makes every effort to develop children's vocabulary

because she believes that children's success in school depends on the quality of the children's

vocabulary. Furthermore, as a pre-kindergarten teacher, she gets children ready for kindergarten

by giving children a chance to practice the standards for kindergarten. Thus, her role as a teacher

in helping children build a good vocabulary and her role as a pre-kindergarten teacher in getting

children ready for kindergarten seem to be consistently relevant to the school's accountability.









Building relationships

Any situation involves relationships as a component, the relationships that the people involved

enact and contract with each other and recognize as operative and consequential.

4. What sorts of social relationships seem to be relevant to, taken for granted in, or
under construction in the situation?

Children frequently complain that they are mentally or physically hurt by other children

and ask teachers to deal with the problem. This situation involves both a teacher-child

relationship and a child-child relationship. For example, during free-play time, when one child

complains about another child's misbehavior, she says, "That's right. That hurts your feelings.

You need to tell her, okay? So that hurt my feelings. Tell her it made you sad. Yeah, tell her it

made you sad." Also, she says, "Remember what we talked about. Tell him how you're feeling.

Don't just hit." Moreover, she specifically teaches children how to say something using a child's

voice and tone, saying, "Honey, don't rip it more, it's still usable, I'm gonna take that." This

indicates that she wants children to solve the problem by themselves, but she helps children solve

the problem by reminding children about how to express their feelings. According to the first

interview data, her children have already learned how to deal with this kind of problem and how

to say their feelings. However, since children do not always remember how to say something,

she reminds children about that. Therefore, this situation shows that she needs children to get

through the situation by using the ways that they have already experienced. In other words, this

situation involves a teacher-child relationship, which indicates that teachers need children to

understand and practice what teachers are saying, and children need to follow what teachers

expect.

In addition, this situation involves a child-child relationship. Children learn the ways to

get along with other children from teachers and are able to improve their relationships with other









children using those ways. Since children do not always remember how to say their feelings,

they often need teachers' help in a specific situation. Thus, this situation gives children an

opportunity to experience different child-child relationships by practicing the ways that they

have already learned through a teacher-child relationship. These social relationships are

stabilized in this situation. This is because whenever this situation takes place, children ask

teachers' help and teachers instruct the same thing.

Building politics (the distribution of social goods)

Any situation involves social goods and views on their distribution as a component.

5. What social goods (e.g., status, power, aspects of gender, race, and class, or more
narrowly defined social networks and identities) are relevant (and irrelevant) in this
situation? How are they made relevant (and irrelevant), and in what ways?

The curriculum of the VPK classroom is based on both the guidelines for the VPK

program and the school curriculum that has developed over the years. In general, the pre-

kindergarten teachers decide a theme each week based on the school curriculum and then choose

what to do with that theme using the guidelines for the VPK program. When the teachers decide

what to do, they think about what children need to know to go to kindergarten and then select

some skills among the skills that the VPK program suggests. The pre-kindergarten teachers

incorporate those skills into the curriculum of the VPK classroom. However, the majority of the

curriculum of the VPK classroom consists of the guidelines for the VPK program rather than the

school curriculum. This is because the teachers focus on having children practice the skills that

children need to know to go to kindergarten and children spend much time practicing those

skills. For example, if the teachers chose recycling as a theme, the teachers might have children

draw things about the earth, paint a river, talk about things that would live in a river, and read

about recycling. As a result, the curriculum of the VPK classroom is dominantly controlled by

the standards for kindergarten, even though the VPK classroom is a child care setting.









The dominant status of the standards for kindergarten in the curriculum of the VPK

classroom appears through her speech. For example, during whole-group time, she says, "You

need, I know you can do it, name on it with all the capitals. That's really good, but the

kindergarten teachers, let me show you, they want the capital "G" like you do, then little "a,"

little "b," little "r," little "i," little "e," and little "1," just like we've been having you do your

name on those, your name papers. You need to start doing it in that way, okay?" This indicates

that the standards for kindergarten fix the way children write their names and need children to

follow that way. In order to go to kindergarten, pre-kindergarten children need to know and

practice the way of writing their names. Thus, teachers involve the way in the curriculum of the

VPK classroom since they should prepare children for kindergarten. In other words, the way of

writing children's names based on the standards for kindergarten is considered to be proper in

the VPK classroom, and this indicates the dominant status of the standards for kindergarten in

the curriculum of the VPK classroom.

Building connections

In any situation things are connected or disconnected, relevant to or irrelevant to each other, in

certain ways.

6. What sorts of connections looking backward and/or forward are made within and
across utterances and large stretches of the interaction?

During the first formal interview, she says that it is pretty easy to understand what

children are feeling because children are freely open and do not hide their feelings. Her

understanding of children's feelings helps her have more effective interactions with children

because she is able to think about what children are going to do and react to it in an appropriate

way. In particular, she emphasizes that her teaching experience enables her to easily figure out

what children are feeling, saying "That's true, experience makes a big difference." That is to say,









her teaching experience helps her understand children's feelings and her understanding enables

her to effectively interact with children. Thus, those utterances show that her teaching experience

positively influences her way of interacting with children.

In addition, during the second formal interview, she says that her teaching experience

enables her to become more relaxed with the way of teaching and the way of feeling. If she used

a certain way and found that the way was not working, she tried another way in order to find the

best way to interact with children. Thus, she allows children to talk a little bit rather than

focusing on classroom discipline, saying, "I've become relaxed and I am able to have more fun

with them sometimes than I used to. Because I'm, I used to be afraid of losing control, you

know, that they were gonna go crazy and I wouldn't be able to control it. But I don't, I don't fear

that anymore, because I've had so much experience I know I can get them back under control

anytime." Those utterances show that her teaching experience positively affects her way of

interacting with children, and her current understanding of how to interact with children results

from her previous experiences developed through a process of trial and error.

Furthermore, as for her relationship with other teachers, she says, "We get along together

and we help each other, we work together," and "We usually learn from experiences we have,

you know, we might talk to them about things we've done and they can try or also some other

books are talking about some other research, after we get back from a conference, we talk to

each other about what we learn, you know, to help the other teachers, to be able to do some of

those things to do that we will be successful with." These utterances are connected to the

previous utterances in terms of emphasis on the importance of teaching experience. That is to

say, teachers try to help each other, talk about what they are doing, and learn from their

experiences. By observing how other teachers interact with children, teachers are able to think









about their own ways to interact with children and find a better way of interacting with children.

Thus, the teachers have good relationships with other teachers by sharing their experiences with

other teachers, and this indicates that teaching experience plays an important role in maintaining

good relationships between teachers. As a result, teaching experience is consistently connected to

the relationships among teachers as well as the interactions between teachers and children. This

is because teachers are able to learn an example of effective teacher-child interaction from other

teachers' experiences, and good relationships among teachers provide teachers with a better

chance of sharing their experiences with other teachers.

Building significance for sign systems and knowledge

In any situation, one or more sign systems and various ways of knowing are operative, oriented

to, and valued or disvalued in certain ways.

7. What sign systems are relevant (or irrelevant) in the situation (e.g., speech, writing,
images and gestures)? How are they made relevant (and irrelevant), and in what
ways?

Her words about the teacher-child ratio and paperwork are relevant in the situation when

teachers have to follow the guidelines for the VPK program even though they do not totally

agree with the guidelines. During the first formal interview, she says that when there are fifteen

children and two teachers in her classroom, the teacher-child ratio is appropriate because

teachers are able to have more one-on-one interactions with children and children are able to talk

to each other very well. Her classroom has eighteen children on the roll and two teachers based

on the guidelines for the VPK program, but her classroom usually has fifteen or sixteen children

and two teachers because one or two children are usually absent. By emphasizing the notion that

fifteen is a really good number, she implies that the teacher-child ratio set by the guidelines for

the VPK program is a little bit high and prevents children from learning well and from

effectively interacting with teachers. That is to say, she does not totally agree with the guidelines









for the VPK program, but she has to follow the guidelines because the guidelines are valued and

she is powerless against the guidelines in the VPK classroom.

In addition, during the first formal interview, she points out that teachers have more

paperwork after the VPK program started, saying, "There's more and more paperwork, and more

reading, you know, more really doing with each child one-on-one too. And we did it before, but

it's, we don't really do that many more different things." This implies that she considers much

paperwork as burdensome. However, during the second formal interview, she says, "I think in

the long run it's good, um, it does take more of our time and more, uh, there's more pressure on

us, you know, to make sure that they're doing what they need to do. So that, that part of it is hard,

but I think it is a good thing, because there are a lot of teachers I think that (2.0) if they don't

really care about the children that much, they won't do anything, they just let 'em play, they

don't talk to them, they don't do anything. But now if they're doing the VPK, (2.0) they have to

have a folder for each child that shows their progress. They have to assess each child, they have

some kind of form that they fill out. So they have to be, you know, doing what they're supposed

to be doing. So I think it's really good in the long run, it's harder (ha, ha) it's more for us but,

(1.0) I think it's a good thing." This shows that she considers much paperwork as burdensome,

but she makes an effort to get through the difficult situation by seeing the positive aspects of the

VPK program. Similar to her words about the teacher-child ratio, her words about paperwork

show that the guidelines for the VPK program are valued, and she is powerless against the

guidelines in the VPK classroom.

8. What systems of knowledge and ways of knowing are relevant (or irrelevant) in the
situation? How are they made relevant (and irrelevant), and in what ways?

Both singing a song and one-on-one interaction are considered ways of knowing and are

relevant in the situation when teachers try to make children understand and remember what









teachers are saying. During whole-group time, she allows children to sing different songs,

including a "recycling" song, a "pledge allegiance" song, and a "days of the week" song. As for

the reason that she frequently uses a song in the classroom, she says, "Especially when we're

doing action songs and do a song about whatever our theme is. And then (2.0) they really

become more involved, so it makes it easier to have interactions and easier to talk about them

later if we've done some music about it because they enjoy that and they have a good feeling

about it, you know, then they, they wanna do more and talk more about it. So that's, that's one

way I found really makes things more effective." That is to say, by using a song, teachers are

able to easily involve children in an activity because children enjoy singing a song and have a

good feeling when they are singing a song. Moreover, she says, "We reinforce what we're

talking about in other ways. We do songs, a lot of songs. Like today we started learning every

recycling song. That's another way that we remember that, they're singing, they remember that

for weeks, they learn the song, and they like it. Yeah, they still ask us for the songs we've done

before, on the different subjects, because it stays in their minds if they sing. Especially, if they

move to it, they know from the latest research that if a child sings something and does something

physical, it stays in their brain longer." That is to say, teachers believe that singing a song is a

successful way to make children understand and remember what teachers are saying, and thus,

they frequently incorporate singing a song into the school curriculum. As a result, singing a song

is considered one of the ways of knowing.

Another way of knowing is one-on-one interaction. She says, "I had already given them

some examples earlier, and then when I called on one child, and they started to talk about it, and

then they could think of the words, so I kind of help them and then they are able to give that idea.

So we had one-on-one interactions, you know, I talk to them and then they say things back to









me. I think, I think, that's, that's one of the effective ways. Especially, if they want to talk about

it, they raise their hands, you know, and so they are ready to hear what we have to say too." The

situation when a teacher calls on one child in order to give the child a chance to answer the

question that the teacher and the child have already talked about and then the child answers the

question is considered one-on-one interaction. For example, during whole-group time, she asks,

"Who can tell me the name of our poem we have this week? Raise your hand if you can tell me

the name of our poem." Then she picks one child among several children who raise their hands,

and the child answers the question. Similar to the situation when she asks a child what the child

is doing and then the child answers the question during free-play time, this situation is

considered one-on-one interaction because one teacher and one child talk about the same issue.

By giving one child a chance to answer the question that the teacher and the child have already

talked about, teachers are able to check whether the child understands and remembers what

teachers are saying. By answering the question, the child is able to expand his or her thoughts

and receive new ideas from teachers. Thus, one-on-one interaction is considered one of the ways

of knowing.

9. What languages in the sense of "national" languages like English, Russian, or Hausa,
are relevant (or irrelevant) in the situation?

English and Korean are relevant in the situation when teachers have difficulty in making

one Korean boy who does not speak English well understand what teachers are saying. She says,

"We have some children from all around the world. Sometimes they are still learning English

and now I try to talk to them, and sometimes they just don't, because they don't know English

very well, they don't understand what I'm saying. Like today, um, (2.0) one little boy came up,

uh, I think he's from Korea and, uh, he just comes up and says 'Car.' And I ask him, 'What do

you want to do with the car?' He wanted to get the cars out to play with them, but he just can't









go with 'car.' And then I just said, 'You want me to get the cars out?' 'Yes,' and then I said,

'You need to say that.' And he just, he would say that, you know. I try to get him to say, 'Please

get the cars out.' But I think he, he felt intimidated because his verbal skills in English are not

very good yet. So I felt that I wasn't very effective." That is to say, the language barrier prevents

the Korean boy from communicating with teachers and from understanding what teachers are

saying, and thus, she defines this situation as ineffective teacher-child interaction. Also, she says

that teachers try to talk to the Korean boy more and get him to talk more to them using full

sentences because teachers are worried that he is going to have a lot of trouble in kindergarten.

However, she does not consider the language barrier as one of the barriers to effective

teacher-child interactions. This is because she believes that young children are able to pick up

English quickly because their brain is ready to learn language and sees that young children are

usually able to speak English fluently in about six months. In other words, the language barrier

can be easily overcome in her classroom through children's progress towards English, and

children are able to understand what teachers are saying after a while. Nevertheless, the situation

when the Korean boy does not understand what teachers are saying is considered ineffective

because she defines a child's misunderstanding of what teachers are saying as ineffective

teacher-child interaction. Thus, she wants the Korean boy to pick up English as soon as possible

by expressing her dissatisfaction with his speed of learning English, for example, "I think he

speaks Korean at home, they, the parents don't know English very well. So that makes it harder

for him, but he'll get it (ha, ha)." As a result, according to her definition of effective teacher-

child interaction, English and Korean are relevant in the situation when teachers do not

effectively interact with one Korean boy because of his misunderstanding of what teachers are

saying.









The Second Participant, Veronica

My main concern with Veronica's interview is to see how her way of teaching and

interacting with children is affected by the VPK program. This main concern comes from the fact

that Veronica is very confident in the VPK program and is expected to actively follow the

guidelines for the VPK program. Veronica emphasizes the positive effects of the VPK program

on children's school readiness, such as having children know alphabets or colors. Before the

VPK program started, many children were not prepared for kindergarten; for example, they did

not know how to write their names. However, the VPK program gets children ready for

kindergarten for a whole year, and thus, she is not worried that children in her classroom are not

prepared for kindergarten.

Despite the positive aspects of the VPK program, the time frame set by the VPK program

prevents her from effectively interacting with children. Veronica does not have enough time to

talk to children because she has to constantly plan and teach lessons within a three-hour schedule.

In other words, she has little time to listen to and react to each child's interests and needs, even

though she considers children's positive reaction to teachers' words as effective teacher-child

interaction. Also, the time frame set by the VPK program prevents her from finding a successful

way to deal with an unhappy conversation with a shy and quiet child, which is considered

ineffective teacher-child interaction in terms of her definition of effective teacher-child

interaction. This indicates that in reality, the VPK program is not helpful for her to effectively

interact with children, contrary to her trust in the program.

Veronica's narrative shows what makes her trust in the VPK program and why she is

satisfied with the VPK program. Through her actual words, her narrative also demonstrates how

the VPK program gives her a limited chance to effectively interact with children and how she

interacts with children within the time frame set by the VPK program. As a result, Veronica's









narrative shows how the interactions between her and children are enacted by the guidelines for

the VPK program she has to follow as well as how the discourses that constitute these

interactions are confirmed through the forms of rules or norms.

Veronica's Narrative

FRAME: Stanza 1: Teachers see children's positive reaction to their words

1. You can tell what is effective

2. because you see the child is happy or satisfied,

3. or they're proud of themselves for

4. whatever they discussed about you, with you.

Story: Effects of the VPK program on preparing children for kindergarten

Sub-story 1: Benefits of children using their own words

Sub-sub-story 1: Teachers need children to do what they are saying

Stanza 2: Teachers say something to get desired actions from children

5. And you can tell when they're not successful,

6. because they're,

7. you're gonna get the action that you desired,

Stanza 3: Teachers need children to do something that teachers expect

8. like if you were telling them the word,

9. "Can you use your words to set up instead of hitting your friends?"

10. or, "Can you put this away or something like that?"

Stanza 4: Teachers try to find a successful way of correcting children's misbehavior

11. And you can see that they're still upset about something

12. or they're not listening to you that day,

13. they just choose not to do, what you have asked of them,









14. you can tell then what is successful for them.

Sub-sub-story 2: Children are encouraged to use their own words when solving problems

Stanza 5: Teachers help children use their own words

15. Like on a daily basis,

16. we, try to get the children to use their words more with each other,

17. 'cause we see that the children of VPK

18. they have no problem with telling you something,

Stanza 6: Children have problems with others

19. but they're, they won't interact with their, their peers,

20. the same as they interact with you so.

21. Like they're having a problem with someone else,

Stanza 7: Teachers teach children how to express their feelings

22. and, "Oh, this person pushed me, oh, this person took my toys or whatever."

23. We'll ask them, "We want you to tell him how they made you feel,"

24. "Tell them how they did you like that."

Stanza 8: Children learn how to talk to each other

25. And, now we're saying more

26. that the kids are talking to each other,

27. and we try to get them to know

28. that they could use their own voice,

Stanza 9: Children can express their desires and share them with other children

29. that they can say what they want

30. or say what they don't like with each other









31. and their friends will understand,

Sub-sub-story 3: Children develop their independence by using their own words

Stanza 10: Children develop their independence

32. so they don't have to, run to the teacher every time that,

33. it builds more independence

34. that they know they can solve their own problems.

Stanza 11: Children can solve their own problems using their own words

35. So that's the interaction we've been doing

36. lately to try to get the kids to know that,

37. they have a voice that they can speak with each other

38. as well as not only to the teachers, to the,

39. with their peers as well.

Stanza 12: She usually tells children what she wants

40. The strategy that I usually use here,

41. basically I wouldn't say

42. there's a specific strategy as I talk to the kids,

43. I talk to them like, I talk to anybody else,

44. tell them what I want

Stanza 13: Children feel valued when expressing their feelings

45. and ask them what they would like to,

46. and just basically we use the words to express our feelings

47. and to know that their feelings are valuable.

Sub-sub-story 4: Children learn how to interact with others by conversing with teachers









Stanza 14: Teachers help children express what they are feeling

48. And we try to help them to express what they're feeling too.

49. And sometimes the kids will have the words to use,

50. so I just try to help them to say what they're feeling

51. and then tell them what I'm feeling,

52. and tell them what I would like to help them.

Stanza 15: Children learn how to respond to others from teachers

53. And usually I'm responding to them in the same way

54. that they'll see you're talking to them in a certain way,

55. then they'll talk to you in the same way.

Stanza 16: Children learn how to interact with others

56. They're, like, Veronica doesn't like this

57. and I don't like this either so

58. that's how they interact with their selves,

59. with their, their peers.

Sub-story 2: Her way of dealing with ineffective teacher-child interactions

Sub-sub-story 5: Unhappy conversations with children are considered ineffective

Stanza 17: Unhappy interactions with children are considered ineffective

60. What I would consider ineffective is,

61. any interaction that doesn't leave,

62. me and the child being happy afterwards.

Stanza 18: She tries to find what makes children upset

63. So that was, any situation where I could help the child,









64. to figure out what was making them upset

65. or what was causing them not to make the choices that day

Stanza 19: She has trouble conversing with a shy and quiet child

66. or, like a episode a particularly quiet child,

67. not being able to converse with that child,

68. because they're, maybe they're shy or don't want to talk to me.

Stanza 20: Unhappy conversations with children are considered ineffective

69. That's what I would consider ineffective,

70. if we're not happy at the end of the conversation,

71. one of us is not happy.

72. We both wanna walk away

73. and to be happy in the situation with the problem solved,

74. I think it's ineffective.

Sub-sub-story 6: She asks other teachers some suggestions to solve the problem

Stanza 21: She keeps trying to solve the problem

75. We'll like, keep trying until I do.

76. I keep trying until I do,

77. we don't just give up on trying to make me and the child happy.

Stanza 22: She asks teachers to give her an idea about how to deal with the problem

78. And if I can't figure it out then,

79. I will go to another teacher, and then, like,

80. "Well, can you help me with this situation?"

Stanza 23: She gets some ideas about how to solve the problem from other teachers









81. or if that doesn't work out,

82. which that hasn't ever been the case,

83. then I will go to, maybe the director.

84. My system director asks, "What do you think?"

85. to get some suggestions on how can I solve the situation.

Sub-story 3: Positive effects of the VPK program on getting children ready for kindergarten

Sub-sub-story 7: VPK program helps children learn how to interact with others

Stanza 24: Her personal experience made her love the VPK program

86. I love the VPK program.

87. When it first started, I put my daughter in it

88. because not everybody needs to go to preschools,

89. so there's a lot at home with moms.

Stanza 25: Children learn how to interact with others through the VPK program

90. And so I love how it gets them ready for kindergarten, I mean.

91. So I love that, the kids are learning

92. how to interact with other kids their own age

93. when they just could've been at home with their moms,

94. they're not getting any interactions with moms.

Stanza 26: Children learn how they should behave in school through the VPK program

95. I love how they're learning

96. what is expected of them in a classroom setting,

Stanza 27: VPK program helps children learn how to interact with other adults

97. and I love how they learn









98. that they can actually trust another grown up, another adult

99. that's someone that is not their parents.

Stanza 28: Children can trust and have good relationships with other adults

100. They can, they can grow to love us and everything,

101. we have great relationships with our kids.

102. I love that about the VPK.

Sub-sub-story 8: VPK program gets children ready for kindergarten

Stanza 29: Many children were not prepared for kindergarten before the VPK started

103. Before VPK,

104. we see a lot of children not ready for kindergarten.

105. Like we may see a lot not knowing how to write their names,

106. not knowing what the alphabets are or colors or anything that,

107. that is expected from children nowadays,

108. before they even get into the kindergarten.

109. And as for kindergarten we see,

Stanza 30: Children learn the necessary skills for kindergarten through the VPK program

110. after VPK we see,

111. the kids have learned so much for a whole year,

112. we have not had a problem where we felt

113. the kid was not ready for kindergarten at the end of the year.

Stanza 31: Children become accustomed to a kindergarten classroom setting

114. We see that the children are so excited about the kindergarten

115. and now they, they've gotten used to being in a classroom setting.









116. So it's less traumatic for them when kindergarten,

117. when their parents leave,

118. because now they've gotten used to knowing

119. that their parents are going to come back at the end of the day,

Stanza 32: VPK program helps children succeed in school

120. and they are ready for it,

121. I love that VPK asks them to be ready for kindergarten

122. to be successful in the school.

Sub-sub-story 9: VPK program enables children to build a good vocabulary

Stanza 33: Teachers talk to children as much as they do in other classrooms

123. I wouldn't say that

124. that is any different than any regular preschool programs,

125. because we still talk to the kids,

126. we talk to them just as much

127. as if they're in a one-year-old room

128. as they're in a four-year-old room,

Stanza 34: Children build a vocabulary through conversations with teachers

129. we're constantly speaking with the children

130. that's how they learn their vocabulary

131. and how they learn how to interact with adults and other people.

Stanza 35: Children have trouble being prepared for kindergarten at home

132. So I see VPK basically is, has helped the kids

133. who didn't have any preschool beforehand









134. they didn't have, don't have many brothers and sisters at home

135. or they don't, they don't have any other way to get ready for school.

136. I see that's what VPK programs have benefited among us.

Sub-story 4: Some barriers to effective teacher-child interactions in the VPK program

Sub-sub-story 10: She has trouble interacting with some children

Stanza 36: She has difficulty in interacting with children who are extremely shy

137. Extremely shy children, extremely shy children,

138. they are not,

139. it takes a while for them

140. to open up to any adult that is not their mom or dad.

Stanza 37: Teachers help shy children open their minds

141. And we had that problem from the beginning of the year,

142. and we just now are having those students

143. to kind of open up to us,

144. and actually talk with us

Stanza 38: Shy children are considered a barrier to effective teacher-child interaction

145. and do what their peers are doing,

146. it just takes them a while longer

147. but, but that's, that's kind of a barrier.

Stanza 39: Children who do not speak English well are considered another barrier

148. And then again, a child doesn't speak English well,

149. that's another barrier.

150. We haven't had that this year, but have had that before.









151. The child isn't learning English along with everything else

152. that he's learning in the VPK.

153. That is the barrier.

Sub-sub-story 11: The time frame of the VPK program makes her work constantly

Stanza 40: Time constraints are considered a third barrier

154. For, maybe time constraints, like if you,

155. we're running late then,

156. we don't really have that time

157. to just sit around and talk or whatever.

158. That's a kind of barrier too as well.

Stanza 41: VPK program provides teachers with only three hours

159. With the time constraints with,

160. with the VPK programs have only,

161. they're for three hours a day.

162. But we work a whole day in preschool,

163. a whole day of preschool within those three hours.

Stanza 42: Teachers have to do so much work within the short time frame

164. So we kind of move pretty fast,

165. within the day we don't have much time.

166. And we have plenty of time to talk to the kids,

167. because we do all the time,

Stanza 43: Children have to do the same amounts of work as full-day children do

168. but not as much as the child who was in a regular preschool here,









169. although they have all day to be with the teachers,

170. 'cause they have three hours with us,

171. and they still have to get just the same amounts of work done

172. as a full-day preschool child.

Stanza 44: Teachers have to constantly work for three hours

173. So we're constantly working,

174. we're constantly teaching more than

175. if we were in a full-day program.

End of Story: The time frame of the VPK program prevents teachers from effectively

interacting with children despite the program's positive effects on getting children ready

for kindergarten

FRAME: Stanza 45: Teachers need more time to converse with children more frequently

176. We can still teach them constantly the words,

177. but we'll have plenty of time

178. to also converse with children too,

179. because we have a whole day to get things done

180. instead of the three hours.

Table 4-2. Veronica's class schedule
9:00 Centers
9:15 Share time, Alphabet challenge, Project
9:30 Special class
10:15 Bathroom breaks
10:20 Snack
10:35 Clean up
10:45 Indoor field trip
11:10 Circle time
11:35 Projects
12:00 End of the VPK time









Seven Building Tasks

Building significance

How and what different things mean the sorts of meaning and significance they are given is a

component of any situation.

1. What are the situated meanings of some of the words and phrases that seem important
in the situation?

During the interviews and observations, she frequently uses the word "see," and it has

three different situated meanings according to each situation. First, the word "see" has the

meaning that teachers and children are aware of something. That is to say, she uses the word

"see" instead of using the word "understand."

We're constantly talking to the children here, because the, the child will listen more, if they
see we're listening to them too.

We, um, try to get the children to use their words more with each other, 'cause we see that
the children of VPK they have no problem with telling you something, but they're (3.0),
they won't interact with their, their peers, the same as they interact with you so.

Second, the word "see" means that teachers and children observe any situation or any

change. In other words, the meaning of "see" is to watch carefully what is going on in order to

get information. She especially uses the word "see" when she wants to figure out what the VPK

program is changing in classrooms.

Before VPK, we see a lot of children (1.0) not ready for kindergarten. Like we may see a
lot (1.0) not knowing how to write their names, not knowing what the alphabets are or
colors or anything that, that is expected from children nowadays, before they even get into
the kindergarten. And as for kindergarten we see, after VPK we see, you know, the kids
have learned so much for a whole year, we have not had a problem where we felt the kid
was not ready for kindergarten at the end of the year. We see that the children are so
excited about the kindergarten and now they, they've gotten used to being in a classroom
setting.

Third, the word "see" means that teachers and children are needed to pay attention to

something. In particular, she uses the word "see" when she needs children to listen to her speech









and to understand what she is saying. That is to say, when she finds one child who does not

concentrate on her speech or a particular activity, she uses the word "see" rather than directly

pointing out the child's misbehavior, saying, "I don't see Sally's eyes or James's. I don't see

crisscross applesauce from Hurley."

Caroline, can I see your eyes, please? Caroline, can I see your eyes?

Even if they didn't like something or they're making a bad choice right now, listen why
they're doing that, if they, you know, they just see that, okay, they listen to me, okay, that's
all I really wanted it, somebody to pay attention to me at that moment.

Next, she frequently uses the word "learn," and it has four different situated meanings.

First, the word "leam" means that teachers and children start to understand the fact that they

have to change the way they behave. Thus, the fact that children "learn" how to interact with

others means that children have begun acknowledging that they need to change their own way of

interacting with others by reflecting on that way.

I love how (1.0) they learn that they can actually trust another grown up, another adult
that's someone that is not their parents.

We're constantly speaking with the children, that's how they learn their vocabulary and
how they learn how to interact with adults and other people.

Second, the meaning of "learn" is to get information about a new subject or activity.

According to her speech, children always "leam" something, and this means that children

constantly gain new facts from their surroundings.

I wanna say that they can change their curriculum if they would like to say, "Okay, we
wanna learn about that," but all throughout the day, they're learning about something else
that might not be our curriculum, because they'll ask several questions.

We haven't had many parents come in (3.0) and say, "When can they learn about this and
learn about that?" We have had that but we say, "Yes, you're welcome as well."

Third, the meaning of "learn" is to remember something through repetition. From the

interview data, both singing a song and parent involvement are considered effective ways to









make children remember teachers' words. Within those contexts, the fact that children "learn"

something in classrooms means that children keep in mind what teachers are saying by repeating

it many times.

It's like confirming what we are already teaching the kids and then, and then the parents
teach them too because the kids learn through repetition, and so it helps the kid out more,
and they seem like the more successful in school and in class where their parents help them
at home to learn the same thing.

It's just a teaching tool, the more songs they sing is easier for them since like I pick up the
song and they'll remember what we want them to learn.

Finally, the word "leam" means that teachers and children accidentally become

acquainted with something. She uses the word "leam" in the situation when children get to know

how valued they are through the process of expressing their feelings verbally. That is to say,

teachers give children an opportunity to express their feelings, and this opportunity allows

children to "learn" how valued they are.

We're gonna find out what makes him or her upset and (2.0) make them happy (2.0) and
usually just telling us about it (2.0) satisfies them and let them tell us about that, "Such and
such made me upset," and they're gonna talk to you about that, they learn that they are
valued and their emotions are valued.

Building activities

Some activity or set of activities is a component of any situation (the specific social activity or

activities in which the participants are engaging; activities are, in turn, made up of a sequence of

actions).

2. What is the larger or main activity (or set of activities) going on in the situation?

The main activity is to get children ready for kindergarten, and this main activity mostly

takes place during whole-group time, but is connected to all kinds of children's actions. This

main activity consists of several sub-activities, which are made up of a number of different

actions that are related to what children need to know to go to kindergarten.









A major sub-activity is to involve children in an activity to develop their ability to read

and write. For example, during whole-group time, teachers ask, "What is the letter that sounds

'B'?" or "What starts with 'B'?" Teachers pick one child among children who want to answer

the question and raise their hand. In order to involve all children in this activity, teachers try to

pick a different child every time and ask children the same question until most of the children

answer it. Also, teachers let children practice the vowels in English to make children remember

them. As a result, this sub-activity developing children's literacy consists of a number of

different actions, for example, making children raise their hand; figure out the words that start

with a special sound; remember the vowels in English; pay attention to teachers' speech; and

listen to other children's words.

A second sub-activity is to make children accustomed to their daily routine. This sub-

activity includes all the actions that children do every day. For example, during whole-group

time, children participate in the same activities every day, including doing the calendar, the date,

the weather, the planet, the color, and the continent. Also, during snack time, teachers let

children line up by making a pattern, such as "girl, boy, boy, girl, boy, boy," when they finish

eating snacks in the cafeteria and move to their classroom. She says that teachers let children do

different things every day to get them to line up; for example, they walk in the line holding their

hands to pretend to be a snake. That is to say, children learn what teachers think children need to

know to go to kindergarten through their daily routine. Since teachers believe that children are

able to go to kindergarten by practicing what children need to know to go to kindergarten every

day, they make children accustomed to their daily routine.

A third sub-activity is to allow children to experience a kindergarten lifestyle. For

example, during snack time, teachers and children move upstairs to eat their snacks in the









cafeteria, and during free-play time, they go outside and spend time in the playground. Also,

children go to different rooms, including a project room, in order to participate in different

activities. She says, "I like that we have to move around because that's more (2.0) in my mind,

toward the kindergarten setting. Everything's not gonna be in their room when they're in

kindergarten, they're gonna have to leave to go to the lunch, they're gonna have to leave to go to

the library, they're gonna have to leave for different activities." Thus, she says that children's

experience of traveling from one place to another is an effective way to get children ready for

kindergarten. As a result, by allowing children to experience a kindergarten lifestyle, such as

traveling to different locations in the school, teachers prepare children for kindergarten.

Building identities

Any situation involves identities as a component, the identities that the people involved in the

situation are enacting and recognizing as consequential.

3. What identities (roles, positions), with their concomitant personal, social, and cultural
knowledge and beliefs (cognition), feelings (affect), and values, seem to be relevant
to, taken for granted in, or under construction in the situation?

The interview data show that she has different identities as a mother, pre-kindergarten

teacher, and employee, along with her belief that children are able to be successfully prepared for

kindergarten in the VPK program. Her identities as a mother, pre-kindergarten teacher, and

employee seem to be relevant in the situation when she teaches children what they need to know

to go to kindergarten according to the schedule of the VPK classroom. First, she, as a mother,

has experience in putting her daughter in the VPK program, and this experience gives her a sense

of identity. During the second formal interview, she says, "When my daughter was in VPK, I fell

in love with that program, I loved it, I felt it got them ready for school, um, much to me, I just

loved it, actually that's where I wanna be." That is to say, she as a mother saw that the VPK

program provided her daughter with opportunities to learn the necessary skills for kindergarten,









develop her different abilities, and be ready for kindergarten. Thus, this experience made her

trust the VPK program, and she was genuinely motivated to become a pre-kindergarten teacher

by this trust. When the school gave teachers a chance to select where they would like to work,

she chose the VPK classroom because of her trust in the VPK program.

Second, she as a pre-kindergarten teacher strongly believes that she successfully gets

children ready for kindergarten in the VPK program. During the first formal interview, she says,

"After VPK we see, you know, the kids have learned so much for a whole year, we have not had

a problem where we felt the kid was not ready for kindergarten at the end of the year. We see

that the children are so excited about the kindergarten and now they, they've gotten used to being

in a classroom setting." Also, during the second formal interview, she says, "I (3.0) love the

organization of the VPK, because it is a faster pace than, because it is more like kindergarten and

like I see the differences in those children from when they start with us to when they leave. It is a

total difference, that I know I have complete faith that they're ready for school." That is to say,

she sees that children learn a lot in the VPK classroom and thus are ready for kindergarten. As a

result, she, as a pre-kindergarten teacher, is very proud of her teaching job, and this fact gives her

a sense of identity.

Third, as an employee, she follows the schedule of the VPK classroom based on the

guidelines for the VPK program and the school curriculum. The schedule of the VPK classroom

makes her do so much work within a short time frame, but she cannot avoid this hectic schedule.

This fact gives her a sense of identity as an employee. In her school, classroom schedules are

decided at the beginning of the year, and teachers have to stick to their classroom schedule.

When teachers want to change the schedule, they need to get the director's approval in order to

give the director time to look over the schedule and make sure everything will work out. In









reality, the schedule of the VPK classroom is restricted because the schedule is arranged within

only three hours. Thus, teachers in the VPK classroom are constantly working and teaching

because they do the same amounts of work as teachers in a full-day classroom do within only

three hours. However, she says, "We do have a leeway time for if, you know, we feel like (3.0)

we wanna stay a little longer at snack time or we wanna stay a little longer outside to play or

longer project time room, we can, you know, shorten it in some places, shorten it in somewhere

else and take that time out." That is to say, teachers are able to change their classroom schedule a

little bit, but such changes are not easy. This is because they need to get the director's approval

when they want to change the schedule. As a result, the fact that she has to follow the schedule

of the VPK classroom and has trouble changing the schedule shows that she is only an employee

of the school, and this gives her a sense of identity.

Building relationships

Any situation involves relationships as a component, the relationships that the people involved

enact and contract with each other and recognize as operative and consequential.

4. What sorts of social relationships seem to be relevant to, taken for granted in, or
under construction in the situation?

A teacher-child relationship and a teacher-teacher relationship seem to be relevant in the

situation when she tries to deal with ineffective teacher-child interactions. She says that she has

trouble conversing with a child who is shy or does not want to talk to her. She considers the

situation when she has an unhappy conversation with the child as ineffective teacher-child

interaction. In order to solve this problem, she tries to make both her and the child feel happy in

different ways. For example, she goes to other teachers and asks, "Well, can you help me with

this situation?" As a result, she gets some suggestions and tries them until she finds the best way

to solve the problem. If she finds that the suggestions are not working, she goes to the director









and gets some further ideas about how to solve the problem. In particular, she has only two years

of teaching experience and thinks that her insufficient experience of working with children is one

of the barriers to effective teacher-child interactions. She has learned how to deal with certain

situations or how to communicate with children from other experienced teachers and thus is

much more confident in herself than in the past by overcoming a fear of "I don't know what to

do." In short, she deals with the situation in which she has trouble having a happy conversation

with a child by getting some suggestions from other teachers. This indicates that a teacher-child

relationship and a teacher-teacher relationship seem to be relevant in the situation when she tries

to deal with ineffective teacher-child interactions.

In addition, a teacher-child relationship and a child-child relationship seem to be under

construction in the situation when she has children clap and cheer for their friends in her

classroom. For example, during whole-group time, she encourages children to participate in an

activity, saying, "I need a friend to draw a line from Asia to the Arctic. Emily, do you wanna try

it?" If Emily accepts her offer, she claps her hands and cheers for Emily, saying, "Yeah, Emily."

As for the reason that she frequently uses clapping and cheering, she says that children are very

upset or grumpy when they are not picked for something and then they do not want to do

anything else for the day. Thus, teachers start rewarding children to cheer for their friends,

saying, "Oh, yeah, good job, you propped for it for your friends, you know, we like that, I like

that, you're such a good sport, you know, now I'm gonna pick you, 'cause you did such a good

job." This makes children learn good sportsmanship because they praise their friends without

being upset that they are not picked for something. Also, she says, "They basically make their

friends have higher self-esteem too, because they're being cheered for, 'Yeah, yeah, they did a

good job, our friends are happy for me.'" As a result, having children clap and cheer for their









friends contributes to improving teacher-child relationships because it enables children to

continually listen to what teachers are saying without being upset that they are not picked for

something. It also contributes to improving child-child relationships because it enables children

to learn good sportsmanship as well as to make their friends have higher self-esteem.

Building politics (the distribution of social goods)

Any situation involves social goods and views on their distribution as a component.

5. What social goods (e.g., status, power, aspects of gender, race, and class, or more
narrowly defined social networks and identities) are relevant (and irrelevant) in this
situation? How are they made relevant (and irrelevant), and in what ways?

The school authority and family values are relevant in the situation when parents help

children do their homework. Every Friday, her pre-kindergarten classroom sends home the

homework that a child cannot do by him/herself and parents should be involved in. For example,

teachers have parents and children make an "R" collage with the letter "R," by cutting out things

that begin with the letter "R" from magazines, books, or newspapers and pasting them to a piece

of thin cardboard. Also, teachers have parents teach their children what they have already learned

in school, since teachers believe that children are able to successfully learn what teachers are

saying through repetition. As for the benefit of this parent involvement in the homework, she

says, "The kids like say, 'Yeah, my mom helped me out with this and we did this together,' and

they know there have been more stories and they're more proud of, 'My dad did this, my dad

helped me cut out this,' and it's more involvement when they're more interested in the

homework because they're doing it with their mom and dad. And so (3.0) that lets them learn

better, 'cause they're interested in it and it's not something that they have to do, (3.0), it's

something that they get to do with mom or dad." That is to say, this parent involvement in the

homework makes children interested in the homework, be proud of doing their homework with

their mother or father, and actively engage in learning.









As a result, this parent involvement in the homework is considered a useful way of

getting children to learn what teachers are saying. However, this parent involvement in the

homework makes parents spend much time helping children do their homework and talking

about it. In particular, since her pre-kindergarten classroom sends home the homework every

Friday, parents and children need to spend a lot of time doing the homework over the weekend.

This implies that parents and children focus their attention on the school curriculum as well as on

academic performance rather than social and emotional competence. As a result, this indicates

that they have little time to talk about family values including what is right and wrong and what

is most important in life, and the school authority controls family values. Also, she says,

"Usually we're pretty good with the curriculum we have, our parents just, (2.0) you know, they,

they're learning what we're teaching their kids that day, you know, it's approved." That is to say,

parents trust the school curriculum and accept whatever teachers teach their children rather than

asking questions about the school curriculum. As part of the school curriculum, the parent

involvement in homework is taken for granted by parents, and thus, parents rarely think about its

educational effects on their child and its advantages and disadvantages in terms of family values.

As a result, the school authority represented by the school curriculum is relevant to family values

in the situation when parents help children do their homework.

Building connections

In any situation things are connected or disconnected, relevant to or irrelevant to each other, in

certain ways.

6. What sorts of connections looking backward and/or forward are made within and
across utterances and large stretches of the interaction?

She considers children's positive reaction to what teachers are saying as effective

teacher-child interaction. For example, when a child actively answers a teacher's question or a









teacher willingly responds to a child's question, the child seems to be satisfied with the

conversation. This makes the child feel valued and proud of him or herself. In terms of her

definition of effective teacher-child interaction, she considers every chance teachers get as the

best time for effective teacher-child interactions, saying, "Because we're constantly talking to the

children here, because the, the child will listen more if they see we're listening to them too. So

we talk to them constantly. The only time really (5.0), I can't even say the time we're not

interacting with children verbally, because even during the circle time they raise their hands and

they're answering and questioning. Um, during the free-play morning time, they were playing

and they're talking to them, they're telling all of their stories, what will happen the next day or a

long time ago, it doesn't matter, and they tell their stories and (3.0), you know, any chance we

get any time, any alone time we get to tell her, any time we see they're upset about anything,

that's a good time to talk to them." That is to say, she tries to talk to children as often as possible

and make children experience a valuable conversation with her, which gives them a chance to

positively react to her speech. Thus, in terms of her definition of effective teacher-child

interaction, these utterances indicate that she considers every chance she talks to children as the

best time for effective teacher-child interactions.

During snack time, her classroom moves upstairs to have a snack at the cafeteria. While

teachers and children are moving, she continually talks to children by asking them several

questions, for example, "You're going to Europe? I wanna come? I wanna go to Europe. Can I

see the Eiffel tower, too? You go to Africa? I want to see some giraffes." She allows children to

freely talk about what country they want to go to. Children enjoy talking about the subject and

seem to be satisfied with the conversation. While teachers and children are eating their snacks,

they talk about what movie they have already watched, including "Tom and Jerry," "That's So









Raven," and "Curious George." When a child asks her what kind of beverage she is drinking, she

answers the question and explains where it is from and what is included in it. This conversation

develops into discussion about where children were born and where their parents came from. In

addition, during free-play time, she pretends to be a monster and encourages children to pretend

to be something else, saying, "Stacy, what are you? Are you still a polar bear? What are you?

What are you guys? Are you a sea monster still? I thought you guys got rid of the sea monster."

And she chases children like a monster, and children enjoy playing with her and seem to be

really joyful. These utterances show that she tries to talk to children as often as possible, and

their discussion ranges over various topics. As a result, these utterances are connected to the

previous utterances because these utterances provide evidence that she uses every chance she

talks to children as time for effective teacher-child interactions.

Building significance for sign systems and knowledge

In any situation, one or more sign systems and various ways of knowing are operative, oriented

to, and valued or disvalued in certain ways.

7. What sign systems are relevant (or irrelevant) in the situation (e.g., speech, writing,
images and gestures)? How are they made relevant (and irrelevant), and in what
ways?

During the first formal interview, she says that teachers try to make children use their

own words in order to get children ready for kindergarten. For example, she says, "Like they're

having a problem with someone else, and, 'Oh, this person pushed me, oh, this person took my

toys or whatever.' We'll ask them, well, 'We want you to tell him how they made you feel,' 'Tell

them how they did you like that.' And, now we're saying more that the kids are talking to each

other, and we try to get them to know that they could use their own voice, that they can (1.0) say

what they want or say what they don't like with each other and their friends will understand, so

they don't have to (2.0), you know, run to the teacher every time that, (1.0) it builds more









independence that they know they can solve their own problems." That is to say, by using their

own words, children are able to independently solve their own problems and to successfully

interact with others. Also, she says, "We're gonna find out what makes him or her upset and

(2.0) make them happy (2.0) and usually just telling us about it (2.0) satisfies them and let them

tell us about that, 'Such and such made me upset,' and they're gonna talk to you about that, they

learn that they are valued and their emotions are valued, they learn how to express that, and that

makes them feel better." That is to say, when teachers need to know what makes children upset

or happy, teachers let children express their feelings using their own words. Moreover, she is

worried about a child who is shy and quiet because the child is poor at expressing his or her

thoughts and feelings by using his or her own words. The child's poor ability to use his or her

own words indicates that the child has trouble solving his or her own problems independently

and interacting with others successfully. In summary, she believes that children need to develop

their ability to use their own words in order to go to kindergarten because the ability influences

their problem-solving skills as well as their school achievement.

During the second formal interview, she says that she has changed her way of interacting

with children over time by not using negative words, such as "Don't" and "No." She says,

"Instead of telling them things that they can't do, telling them things that they can do. Like if

they're running in the classroom, like I say, 'Use inside feet, please,' they still give me the

desired behaviors what I want. So instead of (3.0) their talking again now, instead of saying,

'Okay, everybody be quiet. No more talking,' that's negative. Instead, I'll say, 'Inside voices,

please,' then they'll use inside voices, (1.0) that's positive, 'cause I'm telling them what they can

do and they're choosing to do the right behavior for themselves." By using positive words, she

encourages children to make the right choice on their own and leads children to behave in a









proper way. Children's proper behaviors indicate that she is effectively interacting with children,

since she defines children's positive reaction to what teachers are saying as effective teacher-

child interaction. She also says that using positive words contributes to boosting children's self-

esteem by developing children's decision-making skills. These advantages of using positive

words enable her not to use negative words, and thus, she has changed her way of interacting

with children. This indicates that her way of interacting with children is strongly influenced by

the characteristics of the words she uses. As a result, in terms of emphasis on the importance of

words, the fact that her words play a critical role in her way of interacting with children is

relevant to the fact that she attaches a lot of importance to children's ability to use their own

words.

8. What systems of knowledge and ways of knowing are relevant (or irrelevant) in the
situation? How are they made relevant (and irrelevant), and in what ways?

One of the ways of knowing is repetition, and it is relevant to answering a question in the

situation when she gives a child an opportunity to answer her questions in order to check if the

child remembers what children have already learned. For example, during whole-group time, she

asks one child a question, saying, "Charlie, can you name what is starting with 'R'?" Since

children have experience of making an "R" collage with the letter "R" as their homework, she

says, "You made the projects. You guys put on a whole lot of stuff that starts with 'R' as your

homework." However, the child gives a wrong answer to her, and she says, "Butterfly? It starts

with 'B.' We made 'R's." And then she gives another child a chance to answer the question,

saying, "With 'R'? Celina?" She continually gives children a chance to answer the same question

by calling on each child's name and moves to a question about the vowels in English, saying,

"This is the letter 'E.' What's special about this letter? Who remembers?" She encourages

children to raise their hands to answer the question and asks, "What is that called, Sally, when a









letter has two sounds?" The child does not give her a right answer, and she says, "It's called a

'Vowel.' Are all of you remembering that word?" Finally, she asks some children questions,

saying, "Sally, what is it called? Austin, what is it called? What is it called, Emily?"

This situation shows that she repeatedly reminds children about what they have already

learned and wants children to remember what they need to know to go to kindergarten. In order

to check if each child remembers what children have already learned, she asks every single child

the same question and responds to the child's answer. In particular, during the second formal

interview, she says that repetition through children's daily routine is helpful for children to learn

what children need to know to go to kindergarten. Thus, she believes that children are able to

successfully remember what they have already learned by repeating the same thing. Also, the

situation demonstrates that children are able to have an opportunity to express their thoughts by

answering teachers' questions. This opportunity enables children to get feedback from teachers

by showing where they are, as well as to share their ideas with other children and teachers. Thus,

both repetition and answering a question are considered ways of knowing and are relevant in the

situation when teachers provide each child with an opportunity to answer their questions in order

to check if the child remembers what children have already learned.

9. What languages in the sense of "national" languages like English, Russian, or Hausa,
are relevant (or irrelevant) in the situation?

English and Japanese are irrelevant in the situation when she is concerned that one

Japanese girl in her classroom is very shy and quiet. According to her speech, the Japanese girl is

brand new to the school and her classroom, and teachers are just working with the girl and are

hoping that the girl actively speaks with others. Teachers give the girl a chance to say the

answers, and the girl has answered when she knows the answer, but is quiet for the rest of the

day. Teachers try to facilitate the girl to engage in a conversation with others by talking to her









and having her talk to them. Teachers think that the girl is very smart and has no problem with an

understanding of what teachers are saying, and thus, teachers treat her like every other child in

the classroom. For example, when the whole class was making a storybook, the Japanese girl

wrote her own sentence and drew pictures for the sentence on her own. When teachers asked her

questions, she expressed her opinion and gave her own following story. Therefore, teachers'

major concern for the Japanese girl is not that she will not understand what teachers are saying

because of the language barrier but that she is very shy and quiet. In other words, teachers

consider the Japanese girl as only one of the children who are shy and quiet rather than as one of

the children who come from other countries.

During the first formal interview, she says that teachers have concerns about one boy

who speaks English very well, but is very quiet and does not speak much. Teachers have trouble

conversing with the boy and figuring out his thoughts and feelings. Teachers are very worried

about the boy because they believe that children need to be confident enough to be able to speak

so as to go to kindergarten. That is to say, teachers believe that children need to be prepared to

confidently express their thoughts and feelings to go to kindergarten. Thus, teachers make every

effort to help shy and quiet children express what they are thinking and feeling in order to get

them ready for kindergarten. As a result, the reason that teachers are mainly worried about the

Japanese girl is the same as the reason that teachers are concerned about shy and quiet children.

Since teachers' major concern for the Japanese girl does not result from the language barrier,

English and Japanese are irrelevant in the situation when she is concerned that one Japanese girl

in her classroom is very shy and quiet.

The Third Participant, Cindy

My main interest in Cindy's interview is to see how she is concerned with the effects of a

teacher-child ratio on teacher-child interactions. This main interest comes from the fact that









Cindy considers the high teacher-child ratio as the biggest barrier to effective teacher-child

interactions. Her previous experience of teaching children in a classroom that provided a low

teacher-child ratio made her understand the importance of a low teacher-child ratio in teacher-

child interactions. Cindy thinks that the teacher-child ratio set by the VPK standards is high and

the ratio does not reflect different classroom situations. However, since she cannot change the

ratio, she has to teach children in the classroom with the ratio. In other words, she has to follow

the rules set by dominant academics and institutions and is powerless to modify her teaching

environment.

From her experiences, she knows that a low teacher-child ratio enables teachers to have

more one-on-one interactions with children. That is to say, teachers are able to easily pay

attention to each child and successfully help each child learn new skills or facts. Along with a

low teacher-child ratio, she emphasizes a small class size because it contributes to improving

children's learning environments by making children feel calmer and more relaxed. In addition,

she considers free-play time as the best time for effective teacher-child interaction, since children

are more relaxed during that time than during whole-group or meal time. As a result, her way of

interacting with children is strongly influenced by external factors, including teacher-child ratio,

class size, and time.

Cindy's narrative shows what makes her attach a lot of importance to a low teacher-child

ratio and how a low teacher-child ratio affects teacher-child interactions as well as children's

learning. Also, her narrative points out why the teacher-child ratio set by the VPK standards is

not reasonable and how policy makers or researchers have to decide an appropriate teacher-child

ratio. Thus, Cindy's narrative demonstrates how her discourses controlled by the hierarchical

organizations of school systems influence her way of interacting with children.









Cindy's Narrative

FRAME: Stanza 1: She goes to children who seem to be unhappy

1. If they're unhappy,

2. if I see they're unhappy,

3. I'll bring them over to me

4. or I'll go to them.

Story: Many benefits of a low teacher-child ratio

Sub-story 1: Need of a low teacher-child ratio for more one-on-one time with children

Sub-sub-story 1: She has one-on-one interaction with children in different ways

Stanza 2: She asks what happened to the children

5. If I, if I'm able to get up from wherever I'm at,

6. I'll go to them,

7. and get down on their level

8. and ask them, "What's wrong?"

9. "Why do you have a sad face on?"

Stanza 3: She hugs the children to make them happy

10. And usually they'll tell me

11. and I, if I can offer,

12. I'll wait for them to be happy,

13. I'll give them hugs always,

Stanza 4: She lets the children sit on her lap to converse with them

14. but they're, it's like missing their mommy,

15. I'll say, "When will we see mommy again?"

16. And usually they'll say after nap, after free-play,









17. I'll let 'em sit on my lap

Stanza 5: She allows the children to get their stuff that makes them comfortable

18. if they need to go get their stuff,

19. if they have stuffed animals usually that they sleep with,

20. I'll let them go get that

21. if they truly need it,

22. that'll give them some comfort.

23. Or I'll just let them sit on my lap and cuddle.

Sub-sub-story 2: A low teacher-child ratio offers more one-on-one time with children

Stanza 6: A low teacher-child ratio provides children with many benefits

24. If, if we could have less kids

25. I think it would be beneficial for the students

26. if we had, like, like if we had a ratio

27. instead of two teachers to eighteen kids,

28. we had two teachers to ten or twelve kids,

Stanza 7: The low ratio enables children to have more one-on-one time with teachers

29. I think it would be a lot easier and a lot better for the children

30. because then you can have more one-on-one time with the child

31. rather than I have, I have eighteen kids and two teachers,

32. and obviously you can't be everywhere at once.

33. So if the ratios for the kids to teachers were at least like ten kids to two teachers,

34. then the kids I'm sure would benefit more

35. because they would have more one-on-one time.









Stanza 8: The high teacher-child ratio lets her simply give directions to children

36. Instead of like when I do my work, my daily worksheets,

37. instead of like all my kids sat at the tables in their spots.

38. And I just give, I hold up a piece of the paper, the worksheet,

39. and I give them, the direction on what to do

40. and I pass out the worksheets.

Stanza 9: A low teacher-child ratio enables her to give her full attention to each child

41. If I have three or four kids who need help,

42. obviously I'm not gonna be able to get three or four kids,

43. I have to start with one kid and then I work my way on.

44. But if the ratio was smaller,

45. then I will be able to help more kids quicker and

46. I don't know.

47. Ijust think it would be better,

48. but the state says one, two teachers, eighteen kids.

Sub-story 2: The current teacher-child ratio ignoring different classroom situations

Sub-sub-story 3: The current teacher-child ratio in every school is high

Stanza 10: The teacher-child ratio regulated by the VPK program is high

49. Basically, the state says one to ten or one to eleven,

50. but since we have, that's for, VPK,

51. but you can have up to eighteen,

52. so that's why we have the second teacher come in.

53. But the state says the ratio is one to eleven,









54. I think it should be two to eleven.

Stanza 11: The current teacher-child ratio in every school is high

55. I think this, it would be nice if the state would lower the ratio.

56. Even an elementary school,

57. I mean a teacher can have thirty kids sometimes in the classroom,

58. and be by herself or himself.

Stanza 12: A low teacher-child ratio enables children to get better results

59. And I think it would be beneficial to the child

60. if they had less children in their classroom that they had dealt with

61. and you would get more one-on-one

62. and I think you would get better results out of the children,

Stanza 13: The low ratio enables teachers to spend more time with each child

63. if they had less competition per se

64. and if they had more one-on-one time,

65. and the teacher could spend more time with individual students

66. if she needed to or he needed to.

Sub-sub-story 4: The current teacher-child ratio ignores different classroom settings

Stanza 14: The high teacher-child ratio is a barrier to effective teacher-child interaction

67. Some barriers? Probably the ratio,

68. where I, where I would, I would only be there,

69. the only barrier I can think of is having so many kids.

Stanza 15: A low teacher-child ratio enables teachers to freely interact with children

70. If you had less kids,









71. you can interact more freely with them,

72. you can interact more one-on-one

73. and that's really important

74. I think it's the, more one-on-one attention

75. that I would think it could be the only barrier's the ratio of kids to teachers.

76. Otherwise, I don't really think there is a barrier within an interaction.

Stanza 16: Researchers need to go to different classroom settings

77. The ratios come from researchers,

78. I think they're wrong (ha, ha).

79. If somebody is actually in the classroom and not just one classroom,

80. if they go all over Florida

81. and go from different classroom settings to different classroom setting,

Stanza 17: Researchers need to ask teachers their ideas about a teacher-child ratio

82. I think they would have a better idea of ratios with kids

83. than just sitting at a desk and typing up the paper

84. and, researching it that way,

85. if they would ask the teachers,

86. "What do you think?"

Sub-story 3: Beneficial effects of a low teacher-child ratio on children's development

Sub-sub-story 5: She saw that children had benefited greatly from a low teacher-child ratio

Stanza 18: She taught children in the classroom with a low teacher-child ratio

87. I came, I used to live in Pinellas County, in Florida Pinellas County,

88. and the ratio, that of day care I worked at,









89. we doubled the standards' meaning,

90. I was in a two-year-old room

91. and the, you can have ten two-year-olds to one teacher,

92. we only had two teachers with ten two-year-olds.

93. We doubled the teacher standards

94. and that really was effective.

Stanza 19: She saw the benefits of a low teacher-child ratio

95. But Pinellas County is also one of the strictest counties in Florida,

96. when it comes to children.

97. And that is more effective than what we have here.

98. Even though it's a state-regulated ratio,

99. the state puts out the ratio, but.

100. Surely nothing I can do about it when the state says, "Can't fight them."

Sub-sub-story 6: Some children make teachers prefer a low teacher-child ratio

Stanza 20: The teacher-child ratio regulated by the state is high

101. The state is probably the factor,

102. because they, the way they have made the ratios

103. so high in preschool

104. I know in school it's even higher,

105. and public school's higher.

Stanza 21: Teachers usually have some children who disrupt the class

106. You have different discipline problems that you have to deal with,

107. if I'm constantly giving my attention









108. to two or three students who have a discipline problem,

109. then that's gonna affect all my other kids

110. who are not getting my attention.

Stanza 22: The children prevent her from effectively interacting with other children

111. That's, that's the factor why someone,

112. why you don't get effective teacher interaction with the kids.

113. If you have discipline problems

114. and you're constantly stopping and dealing with,

115. if you have other things going on,

116. like right now I have Apple accreditation

117. I'm trying to do along with teaching my kids.

Sub-story 4: Positive influences of a low teacher-child ratio on teacher-child interactions

Sub-sub-story 7: Many responsibilities prevent her from freely interacting with children

Stanza 23: She is currently responsible for many things

118. I have another teacher,

119. and another VPK teacher who just got put into a VPK room

120. and doesn't understand her job,

121. so I'm doing her work load plus my work load

122. plus Apple plus try to find fun.

Stanza 24: Many responsibilities influence her way of interacting with children

123. So more stuff you have to load onto you,

124. and more responsibilities

125. I think it is, affects the teacher-child interaction.









Stanza 25: She has so much work to do during the VPK time

126. The best? It's probably before we start work at 9 o'clock.

127. My kids I can,

128. because I have so much to do

129. and things that need to be done from me as a teacher,

130. and just different things are going on, 9 to 12,

131. it's pretty busy.

Stanza 26: She is able to freely interact with children before the VPK time

132. But before 9 o'clock,

133. I get here at 7:00, a lot of my kids get here early,

134. also interaction at the table

135. and we're talking and playing, all day long.

136. But then there's just stuff we have to get done.

Sub-sub-story 8: A relaxed atmosphere helps her to effectively interact with children

Stanza 27: She is sometimes busy when children eat breakfast

137. Before 9 o'clock? Breakfast is it.

138. We have breakfast between like 8:15 to 8:30,

139. and, that, sometimes that could be a little hectic

140. depending on how many kids actually want to eat,

Stanza 28: She has to feed many children at once

141. and if it's like all twenty,

142. you can imagine trying to feed twenty kids at one time,

143. 'cause we have breakfast in the room,









144. not in the lunch room.

145. But otherwise they're playing from 7:00 to 9:00,

146. it's just play time.

Stanza 29: She feels more relaxed during free-play time

147. During the VPK time? Probably play time,

148. 'cause that's what the, more what they wanna do

149. and they're more relaxed,

150. you're more relaxed usually,

151. unless you're trying to do something else

152. like an art activity or something.

Stanza 30: She prefers eating in her classroom to in the cafeteria

153. I prefer in my room,

154. there's been days like when our cook isn't here,

155. and we have to eat in our room,

156. I think I'm the only one of the teachers in the building

157. that likes to have to eat in the room.

Stanza 31: She has difficulty in leading many children to the cafeteria

158. I cheer when I don't have to walk over there,

159. 'cause it is a hassle, a hassle trying to walk over there,

160. 'cause I have eighteen kids sometimes or twenty in line,

161. get 'em over there,

162. get 'em fed to where and,

Stanza 32: Her classroom provides her with more opportunities to talk to children









163. 'cause in my room it's more relaxed.

164. I don't have to be, the, the, the, the, with them.

165. I can just, you can sit down

166. and talk more with them

167. when it's in the room rather than over there.

Sub-sub-story 9: Fewer children make a big difference to teacher-child interactions

Stanza 33: A low teacher-child ratio enables her to effectively interact with children

168. Overcome some barriers?

169. Lower the ratio (ha, ha)?

170. That's my big one is lower the ratio.

171. I think if there's less kids,

172. you can obviously talk with them more,

Stanza 34: A low teacher-child ratio makes teachers easily interact with children

173. 'cause you don't have eighteen to contend with,

174. you could, you have ten or twelve.

175. That's always a lot easier,

176. you're always gonna,

177. you could be able to have more one-on-one with them,

Stanza 35: Fewer children in the classroom make a totally different atmosphere

178. and it'll be less hectic in here when, there,

179. I noticed when there's fewer kids in here,

180. the whole atmosphere of the classroom is completely different.

Stanza 36: There is less disruption when there are fewer children in the classroom









181. Everybody is calmer,

182. it's not as loud,

183. there's not loud, as many disruptions when there's fewer kids,

184. and then there's, less disruptions

End of Story: A low teacher-child ratio contributes to effective teacher-child interactions

by providing teachers with more one-on-one time with children

FRAME: Stanza 37: Fewer children make her spend more time talking to each child

185. and there's less times I'm correcting somebody or,

186. talking to somebody, about what they're doing wrong

187. or not making a good choice.

188. When there's fewer kids, everyone just learns easier.

189. It's happier in a classroom (ha, ha),

190. you could talk more.

Table 4-3. Cindy's class schedule
7:00 Free-play
8:15 Breakfast
8:30 Clean-up and read
9:00 Outside-time (Beginning of the VPK time)
9:30 Wash hands
9:40 Circle time
10:15 Worksheets
11:00 Centers
12:00 End of the VPK time

Seven Building Tasks

Building significance

How and what different things mean the sorts of meaning and significance they are given is a

component of any situation.

1. What are the situated meanings of some of the words and phrases that seem important
in the situation?









During the interviews and observations, she often uses the word "understand," and it has

four different situated meanings. First, the word "understand" means that teachers and children

know the meaning of what someone says. The situation when children "understand" what

teachers are saying means that children are acquainted with the meaning of something that

teachers are saying.

You get positive feedback from the kids, they smiled, they (3.0) understand what you're
saying, what you're talking, like for the circle time, and I'm giving them something new.

So we just ask them, basically we will ask them for confirmation that they understand what
I just said.

Second, the meaning of "understand" is to know what is going on. The situation when

teachers and children "understand" something means that they have knowledge of how

something happens.

I'll understand that they understand, you know, by them answering my questions and
smiling and they're happy and (3.0) I guess that's how I would know interaction has been
effective.

You win, 'cause you don't have any cards left. Do you understand?

Third, the word "understand" has the meaning that teachers and children have

information about something. She uses the word "understand" in the situation when children do

not "understand" how to do something, and this means that children cannot do something

because they do not have any information about how to do that.

We just let them do whatever they wanna do and then they just come to us, if they need
help with, they don't understand how to do a certain project, they're fighting with their
friends and they can't resolve it by themselves.

I have another teacher, and another VPK teacher who just got put into a VPK room and
doesn't understand her job, so I'm doing her work load plus my work load plus Apple plus
try to find fun.

Fourth, the meaning of "understand" is to be familiar with how someone is feeling and

what someone is thinking about. In the situation when teachers "understand" children, the word









"understand" means that teachers are acquainted with how children are feeling, what children are

considering, and what makes children behave in a particular way.

I'm not sure I understand completely (1.0), 'cause I have a good relationship, I think my
relationship with all of my kids is good.

Next, she frequently uses the word "know," and it has four different situated meanings.

First, the meaning of "know" is to realize that something is happening. Teachers give children

instruction on how to do something and "know" whether the instruction is successful or not by

observing how children are doing something. In this situation, the word "know" means that

teachers realize whether or not children are doing something under the instruction.

When (1.0) I see them doing it and following my directions, then I know, and if they do
something, if they don't do it right, I will say, "You didn't quite understand my directions,
did you?"

I'll write a parent, for instance, saying, "Your, you know, so-and-so, had a hard time
keeping their hands to themselves or they forgot their listening ears today." So the parents
always knows how their behavior was, they always know it every day.

Second, the word "know" means that teachers and children are familiar with something

because they have already experienced something. The situation when children "know" their

classroom schedule means that children are familiar with their daily routine because they have

already experienced what they have to do every day.

They know when they come in, what they're supposed to do, they know after they wash
their hands, they sit for circle, they know after circle we do work, after work they have free
time until the end.

Or sometimes on the first day, if they're acting like a clown on the first day (ha, ha), you
kind of already know what they're gonna be like.

Third, the word "know" has the meaning that teachers and children keep in mind a fact or

a piece of information. She uses the word "know" in the situation when teachers need to keep in

mind what they should do for children or when children remember a fact.









I think the teacher should know that you just can't come in here, just tell the kids what to
do and be done with it, you have to be able to talk to kids, you have to be able to get down
on their level and talk with them.

I know you know, let's just listen for me instead of just (1.0) yelling 'em out. You're a
smart boy, you know all of these words.

Fourth, the word "know" is to have information about something. The situation when

teachers and children do not "know" something means that they have no information about

something.

I don't know exactly how long, I know it's been more than ten years, it's probably, it
probably could have been around for twenty years.

You got eczema? Do you have eczema? Do you know what that is?

Building activities

Some activity or set of activities is a component of any situation (the specific social activity or

activities in which the participants are engaging; activities are, in turn, made up of a sequence of

actions).

2. What is the larger or main activity (or set of activities) going on in the situation?

The main activity is to get children ready for kindergarten, and it consists of several sub-

activities. A major sub-activity is to give children an opportunity to develop reading and writing

skills. This sub-activity is made up of several different actions, including having children do a

spelling test, teaching children a different letter each week, reading children a book on the theme

of the week, and helping children build a lot of words. In the case of a spelling test, children in

her pre-kindergarten classroom have the test once or twice a month. Teachers first send home the

words that they choose, for example, "HAVE," "AM," "DID," "A," and "ONCE." Then teachers

allow children to practice the words at home for at least two whole weeks as well as to go over

the words in class. Before taking a spelling test, teachers give children a chance to review the

words. Children sit at their seats and take the test, and immediately after taking the test, they









know the results. As for grading the children's work, she says, "I don't like I grade them, but

even if they got them all wrong, I'm still telling them 'good job' or writing 'good job' on their

paper. I don't put it in the book, but I'm just putting it up on the board, sent home, just they get

ready for kindergarten, 'cause the kindergartens have a spelling test." Also, she says, "I just try

to get them (1.0), you know, more prepared for kindergarten, that way when they get to

kindergarten and they've had a spelling test, they won't have the anxiety of taking a test, they'll

already know what a spelling test is." Thus, in her pre-kindergarten classroom, having children

do a spelling test is considered one of the most successful ways of preparing children for

kindergarten.

A second sub-activity is to involve children in different classroom activities. This sub-

activity consists of a number of different actions, for example, providing children with

opportunities to have a lot of hands-on experiences of puzzles, blocks, and circle stackers; to

develop small motor skills, such as coloring, cutting, tracing, and gluing; and to participate in a

math activity like counting, adding, and subtracting. These actions enable teachers to get children

ready for kindergarten by helping children develop the necessary skills for kindergarten. For

example, during free-play time, she plays "UNO" with two children at a table. This game enables

each child to have five cards and to check if he or she has a card that has the same color or

number as the card that has already been at the table. If he or she has the card that has the same

color or number, he or she puts that card down. Thus, this game enables children to develop the

ability to distinguish a particular color or number from various colors and numbers.

A third sub-activity is to get children to be accustomed to a kindergarten lifestyle and is

composed of many different actions, including lining up and cleaning up. In particular, during

meal time, teachers and children go outside and travel to the cafeteria. While they are travelling,









teachers get children to line up, to walk fast, and to be quiet. In the cafeteria, teachers allow

children only to eat their lunch rather than talking to each other or teachers because they have

only thirty minutes for lunch. After eating lunch, teachers have children throw trash away, move

their chairs to the corner of the cafeteria, and pile them up. They come back to their classroom,

and children take a nap immediately. As a result, the VPK classroom has its own structured

schedule and makes both teachers and children busy keeping the schedule. By having children

experience the structured schedule, teachers get children to be accustomed to a kindergarten

lifestyle and prepare children for kindergarten.

Building identities

Any situation involves identities as a component, the identities that the people involved in the

situation are enacting and recognizing as consequential.

3. What identities (roles, positions), with their concomitant personal, social, and cultural
knowledge and beliefs (cognition), feelings (affect), and values, seem to be relevant
to, taken for granted in, or under construction in the situation?

According to the interview data, she has different identities based on her belief that

teachers should help children to develop the necessary skills for kindergarten as well as to

succeed in school by providing enriching environments that maximize children's learning. First

of all, she is very proud of the school curriculum because she believes that the school curriculum

enables children in her pre-kindergarten classroom to be well prepared for kindergarten. She is

confident in the school curriculum more than in the guidelines for the VPK program. As for the

school curriculum, she says, "I mean VPK says like kids should have these standards, you know,

A, B, C, and D, and I do A, B, C, and D, but I go all the way to G per se." That is to say, the

school curriculum includes more learning materials and more necessary skills for kindergarten

than the guidelines for the VPK program do and needs children to do a lot of worksheets. Thus,

she believes that the school curriculum enables teachers to get children ready for kindergarten









more than the guidelines do, saying, "All of my kids (2.0) practically all of my kids, my eighteen

kids right now can skip kindergarten. If you go to another school and see what my kids can do

versus another school who just plays all day, there's gonna be a big difference. My kids can

write their name, my kids can (2.0) do spelling test and ace them, my kids can do a lot of stuff

that other kids can't." That is to say, she enjoys teaching children using the school curriculum

because the curriculum provides children with a lot of opportunities for academic achievement

and success in school. She, as a teacher in the school, is very proud of the school curriculum as

well as teaching children in the school using the curriculum. Also, as a pre-kindergarten teacher,

she feels absolutely sure that her children are prepared for kindergarten better than children in

other schools. These facts give her a sense of her own identity.

Second, she considers the high teacher-child ratio as the biggest barrier to effective

teacher-child interactions. She thinks that the teacher-child ratio set by the state is high, and the

ratio does not reflect the conditions of different classroom settings. Thus, she believes that the

ratio does not enable teachers to have enough one-on-one interactions with children or to provide

children with a stable classroom atmosphere. As for the benefits of a low teacher-child ratio, she

says, "Everybody is calmer, you know, it's not as loud, there's not loud, as many disruptions

when there's fewer kids, and then there's, you know, less disruptions, and there's less times I'm

(2.0) correcting somebody or talking to somebody, you know, about what they're doing wrong or

not making a good choice. When there's fewer kids, everyone just learns easier. It's happier in a

classroom (ha, ha), you could talk more." That is to say, she is dissatisfied with the teacher-child

ratio set by the state, but she cannot change the ratio since the ratio is based on the researchers'

findings and controlled by the state. This fact shows that she is powerless to modify her teaching

environment, but gives her a sense of identity.









Third, she has no chance to talk to other teachers in the school and develops teaching

methods on her own. The school has three VPK classrooms, and each classroom is based on the

same curriculum. The pre-kindergarten teachers do the same kind of work, but have different

teaching styles. For example, a spelling test in her pre-kindergarten classroom is not part of the

school curriculum but one of the teaching strategies that she uses to get children ready for

kindergarten. As for the relationships between teachers in the school, she says, "We don't have

time like we don't (1.0) get a break at the same time to go," and "There's usually no time to talk

to the other teachers so (1.0), kind of come in and do our work and then leave when it's time to

leave." That is to say, teachers in the school do not have an opportunity to share their ideas about

how to teach or interact with children with other teachers. Teachers develop their own teaching

styles by themselves rather than learning from other teachers' experiences. Each classroom is

isolated from all the other classrooms and is operated by each teacher's independent judgment.

These facts make teachers feel isolated from all the other teachers and give them a sense of

identity.

As a result, as a teacher in the school, she is proud of the school curriculum because she

believes that the school curriculum enables teachers to successfully get children ready for

kindergarten, but she feels isolated from all the other teachers because she has no time to talk to

other teachers and develops teaching methods on her own. In addition, as a pre-kindergarten

teacher, she is strongly convinced that children in her pre-kindergarten classroom are well

prepared for kindergarten, but she complains about the high teacher-child ratio in her pre-

kindergarten classroom because the ratio prevents her from having enough one-on-one

interactions with children. Thus, her different identities seem to be relevant in the situation when









she makes every effort to get children ready for kindergarten by using her own teaching style

based on limited one-on-one interactions with children.

Building relationships

Any situation involves relationships as a component, the relationships that the people involved

enact and contract with each other and recognize as operative and consequential.

4. What sorts of social relationships seem to be relevant to, taken for granted in, or
under construction in the situation?

A teacher-child relationship and a teacher-parent relationship seem to be relevant in the

situation when she tries to deal with the problem of a child's misbehavior by means of a daily

report. According to her words, children in her pre-kindergarten classroom get a daily report, and

the report includes information about their behaviors, for example, their disposition like happy,

sad, quiet, and tired; their lunch; and their nap. Also, she says, "If they had a bad day with

hitting, I'll write a parent, for instance, saying, 'Your, you know, so-and-so, had a hard time

keeping their hands to themselves or they forgot their listening ears today.' So the parents always

knows how their behavior was, they always know it every day." That is to say, she

communicates with parents through a daily report. Moreover, she uses a daily report as a way of

correcting children's misbehavior, saying, "If I had like a bad time with a child, I'll call the

parents myself while I'm here and say, you know, 'So-and-so has had a hard day, can you please

talk to them?' and so forth." By informing parents of their child's misbehavior and asking

parents to help her solve the problem, she deals with the problem of a child's misbehavior. This

indicates that a teacher-parent relationship contributes to improving a teacher-child relationship.

Thus, a teacher-child relationship and a teacher-parent relationship seem to be relevant in the

situation when she tries to deal with the problem of a child's misbehavior by means of a daily

report.









In addition, she uses a daily report as a way of encouraging children not to behave badly,

saying, "I'll just give 'em a head's up, 'Hey, this is what I'm just gonna say on the note home.'"

For example, during whole-group time, she finds that one child does not follow the directions

and says, "Adam, I'm writing a note home to your mommy and daddy saying that you're not, um

(2.0), you're having a hard time listening and following the directions. I don't think that you're

gonna be too happy with that." In her pre-kindergarten classroom, a daily report is used as a

warning that if children break the rules, their parents are deeply disappointed about that. Since

children are afraid that their parents will be disappointed by their misbehavior, she frequently

uses a daily report as this kind of a warning whenever she finds children's misbehavior. This

indicates that she tries to improve the relationships with children through a parent-child

relationship. As a result, a parent-child relationship and a teacher-child relationship seem to be

relevant in the situation when she uses a daily report as a way of preventing children from

behaving badly.

Building politics (the distribution of social goods)

Any situation involves social goods and views on their distribution as a component.

5. What social goods (e.g., status, power, aspects of gender, race, and class, or more
narrowly defined social networks and identities) are relevant (and irrelevant) in this
situation? How are they made relevant (and irrelevant), and in what ways?

Her teaching experience and the VPK program are relevant in the situation when the

VPK program has not fundamentally changed her way of working with children. According to

her words, she has six years of teaching experience, and her way of working with children has

changed over time. She says that she really did not know how to teach and interact with children

when she first started a teaching job. As an assistant, she learned how to teach and interact with

children by observing a lead teacher. She was not comfortable with her job because she did not

know what she was supposed to do, but she is currently more comfortable with what she is doing









and more open with children. That is to say, her way of teaching or interacting with children has

changed positively over time, and this indicates that her teaching experience strongly influences

how and why her way of working with children has changed.

However, she says that the VPK program did not change her teaching style, saying, "It

made me (2.0) a little bit stricter on my lesson plans like actually I had to write out what I was

doing for (2.0), we added, um (1.0), like skills development isn't something we had before and

now we have in the VPK you have like skills development, they want you reading every day

which is something I think almost every teacher always did anyway but they want you to read

and write out more stuff now." Also, she says that the VPK program did not fundamentally

change her way of interacting with children even though the VPK program gave her new ideas

about what to teach or how to assess children's work; for example, she has children do a spelling

test in the VPK program, but she did not do that before the VPK program. That is to say, the

VPK program gives her information about what to teach or how to assess children's work rather

than about how to teach or interact with children. Moreover, the VPK program makes her teach

children more learning stuff according to more structured lesson plans, but she thinks that what

the VPK program makes teachers teach children is not basically different from what most of the

teachers have usually taught children by means of their own teaching styles. As a result, her way

of working with children has changed over time, and how and why her way of working with

children has changed is more strongly influenced by her teaching experience than by the VPK

program. In the situation when the VPK program has not fundamentally changed her way of

working with children, her teaching experience and the VPK program as social goods are

relevant.









Building connections

In any situation things are connected or disconnected, relevant to or irrelevant to each other, in

certain ways.

6. What sorts of connections looking backward and/or forward are made within and
across utterances and large stretches of the interaction?

As for typical teacher-child interactions during meal time, she says, "There's, um,

unfortunately usually not a lot of time for interaction that I have found, because we're so busy,

we only have a set amount of time that we're allowed in there." In order to feed eighteen to

twenty children, teachers have to give them their plates and milk, see what they need when they

finish eating, have them put away their chairs, and clean the tables. She spends the majority of

the meal time encouraging children not to talk, to finish eating, and to throw trash away. For

example, she says, "Are you eating or talking? If you don't have a clear plate in front of you, you

are not talking. We're eating and leaving. When you're done, throw it out. If there's plenty on

your plate, don't ask me for more." Thus, she says that she has little time to interact with

children during meal time. These utterances are considered teachers' directives because teachers

need children only to follow the directions rather than expecting any feedback from children.

Since teachers and children have to do so much work within a restricted time frame, teachers

allow children only to understand what teachers are saying and to do what teachers expect

immediately.

In addition, among whole-group, free-play, and meal time, she considers free-play time

as the best time for effective teacher-child interactions, saying, "That's what the, you know,

more what they wanna do and they're more relaxed, you're more relaxed usually, unless you're

trying to do something else like an art activity or something." During free-play time, she allows

children to decide for themselves where they want to go and what they want to play with. In









other words, children have no work to do within a limited time frame and do not need to follow

the directions. She just walks around the classroom, asks children what they are making, plays

with them, or helps children solve problems or arguments. For example, she talks to one child,

"You've gotten a two-story house now? You have a two-story house? Yeah. Where you have one

floor to go upstairs and there is another one on the top? No? Are there bedrooms upstairs? That

means you have a two-story house." Or she asks, "What are you girls playing? Oh, it's a kind of

carnival or a zoo? Have you guys already combined it? Who might get in?" These utterances

show that she freely talks to children and their discussion ranges over various topics, since she is

able to have time to get feedback from children and respond to it during free-play time. Thus,

during free-play time, teachers and children have sufficient time to think about and talk about

something since they are not rushed.

As a result, compared to the previous utterances characterized as teachers' directives,

these utterances are based on mutual respect and understanding. This difference mostly results

from the question of whether teachers and children have work to do within a limited time frame.

Pressure to do so much work within a restricted time frame makes teachers and children feel

upset and have few opportunities to initiate talk or introduce new topics. This kind of pressure

makes teachers rush children by giving orders or using commanding words without waiting for

children's responses. Thus, her utterances during meal time are connected to the utterances

during free-play time, since both utterances show the fact that pressure to do so much work

within a restricted time frame directly influences what kinds of words she uses.

Building significance for sign systems and knowledge

In any situation, one or more sign systems and various ways of knowing are operative, oriented

to, and valued or disvalued in certain ways.









7. What sign systems are relevant (or irrelevant) in the situation (e.g., speech, writing,
images and gestures)? How are they made relevant (and irrelevant), and in what
ways?

As for the ways teachers can promote effective teacher-child interactions, she says,

"Have more time. My kids that are up here all day long get more from me than do the kids out

here just for three hours a day. If we had all day to teach rather than (1.0) with VPK this training

teaching three hours, it will be a lot better, 'cause we have time frame on everything, on how

long can we do this, how long can we do that, this only should take this long." Also, she says that

she can effectively interact with children before 9 o'clock, saying, "Because I have so much to

do and things that need to be done from me as a teacher, and just different things are going on, 9

to 12, it's pretty busy." In addition, she says that she has no idea how other teachers teach

children or interact with children because she has no time to observe other teachers. She attaches

a lot of importance to time, and time strongly affects her way of teaching and interacting with

children. Even though she does not directly mention that time constraints prevent her from

effectively interacting with children, her speech demonstrates that she is under pressure to do so

many things within a short time frame, and this makes her have few opportunities to effectively

interact with children.

In particular, she considers children's positive reaction to what teachers are saying as

effective teacher-child interaction. That is to say, the situation when teachers give children new

information about something and then get positive feedback like enjoyment, happiness, or

satisfaction from children is considered effective teacher-child interaction. Thus, the time frame

set by the guidelines for the VPK program prevents her from effectively interacting with

children, since the time frame does not allow her enough time to give and take feedback from

children. Also, the time frame allows her few opportunities to learn good examples of effective

teacher-child interactions from other teachers' experiences. As a result, the time frame set by the









guidelines for the VPK program is considered a barrier to effective teacher-child interactions.

This is relevant to the fact that time plays an important role in teachers teaching and interacting

with children in the situation when she has to do so many things within a short time frame and

thus has trouble effectively interacting with children.

8. What systems of knowledge and ways of knowing are relevant (or irrelevant) in the
situation? How are they made relevant (and irrelevant), and in what ways?

One way of knowing is one-on-one interaction, and another way of knowing is repetition.

Both ways of knowing are relevant in the situation when she deals with children's behavioral

problems through repeated instruction. For example, she says, "One I have a child who wants to

hit constantly and I sit down with him one-on-one and redirect him, I'm still interacting with

him, even though I'm redirecting him." If she sees that the child hits somebody, she encourages

him to go to a quiet corer and read a book or to do what he wants. Also, she tells him to hit his

jacket or his pillow instead of hitting somebody else. From her previous experiences, she says

that this strategy to deal with the problem really works. This is because she sees children not

hitting anymore, not getting aggressive anymore, or not getting angry anymore. When children

need to just talk to her, they say, "I need to talk to you," and she just sits down next to them and

listens to what they are saying. Thus, in order to correct children's misbehavior, she talks one-

on-one with children and teaches them repeatedly how to control their negative feelings.

In the case of a child who always disrupts the class and moves to another room, she

encourages the child to participate in different classroom activities, saying, "Oh, let's do this, or

let's do this." However, the child still displays his behavioral problems, and she has trouble

dealing with the problem. As for the reason that she does not have a good relationship with the

child, she says, "Sometimes you just don't get along with another adult and you just don't know

why. And for some reason it was like this with this child, and I know that's sad to say, but for









this child, him and I, for some reason, just could not make it work." She has not discovered the

best way of solving the problem yet, but she is still interacting with the child by continually

talking to him and repeatedly using the same methods.

As a result, in the case of children who display behavioral problems, she first talks one-

on-one with the children in order to know what makes them behave badly or to teach them how

to control their negative feelings. Then she encourages the children to engage in a new activity

for the purpose of correcting their bad behaviors. She repeatedly uses this strategy to deal with

children's behavioral problems until she confirms that children's bad behaviors are corrected. In

other words, through repeated conversations with teachers, children are able to know what kinds

of behavioral problems they have as well as how and why they have to correct their bad

behaviors. Thus, as a way of knowing, both one-on-one interaction and repetition are relevant in

the situation when she deals with children's behavioral problems through repeated instruction.

9. What languages in the sense of "national" languages like English, Russian, or Hausa,
are relevant (or irrelevant) in the situation?

English and all the other languages are irrelevant in the situation when she interacts with

children who speak English as a second language in her pre-kindergarten classroom. She says

that there are several children who speak English as a second language in her pre-kindergarten

classroom, but they speak English very well and have no trouble understanding what teachers are

saying as well as communicating with teachers. In other words, the children who speak English

as a second language in her classroom are able to fluently express their thoughts and feelings,

and she is able to easily figure out what their reactions to her words mean. Thus, she does not

consider the language barrier as a barrier to effective teacher-child interactions.

In addition, she is very well acquainted with her children and what feedback from her

children about her words means. Since most of the children in her classroom have attended the









school over one year, she has already observed the majority of her children and learned their

characteristics. As for the reason that teachers are able to easily figure out each child's

characteristics, she says, "You can tell them by just watching 'em. You just watch 'em and

observe for even just a few hours, you kind of get an idea of how they're gonna be (5.0), they

don't hide anything like adults do (ha, ha), it's all out there." That is to say, teachers are able to

understand what children are thinking and feeling through their verbal and nonverbal language

because children express their thoughts and feelings very frankly. Thus, she is able to understand

well what the reactions of her children, including children who speak English as a second

language, mean. In terms of her definition of effective teacher-child interaction children's

positive reaction to what teachers are saying, she is able to effectively interact with every single

child in her classroom. As a result, in the situation when she interacts with children who speak

English as a second language in her pre-kindergarten classroom, English and all the other

languages are irrelevant.









CHAPTER 5
DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS

This qualitative research project aims to investigate barriers to and facilitators of effective

teacher-child interactions, as defined from a critical perspective, in voluntary pre-kindergarten

programs in child care settings. In this chapter I will demonstrate barriers to and facilitators of

effective teacher-child interactions based on the results of data analysis in Chapter 4. The

findings of this study show that teachers mainly interact with children in the VPK classroom to

have them understand what they need to know to go to kindergarten. Teachers enthusiastically

teach children the rules and standards for kindergarten through their daily routine, but are

powerless to modify their working environments. Thus, the findings of this study support two

contrasting hypotheses: one is that teachers as the oppressed are forced to teach children a white,

male, European-American model through diverse techniques of normalization, such as

measurement, regulation, and evaluation; the other is that teachers as the oppressors force

children to learn such a model through the unilateral interactions between themselves and

children. In addition, I will address how the findings of this study are connected with the results

of previous research, and make some recommendations for further research, which are intended

to overcome several limitations of this study as well as to lead further research to focus on

improving educational practice. Finally, I will show how the findings of this study can be

employed by interested practitioners, including teachers, policy makers, and researchers.

Summary of Findings

First, the teachers' words that are frequently used in the classroom including talk, tell

see, learn, understand, and know have many different situated meanings. Nonetheless, these

words are commonly used for two purposes: one is to have children do what teachers expect; the

other is to give children a chance to be aware of something new or already known. That is to say,









the three teachers use these words when they want to check if children are acquainted with what

teachers are saying or remember what children have been already taught; when they need

children to pay attention to what is going on and to follow the directions; and when they need

children to change how to behave or speak, such as a way of interacting with other children.

Also, the three teachers use these words to provide children with an opportunity to express their

thoughts and feelings, to get information about a new subject or activity, and to use any

knowledge of what they have already experienced. As a result, the teachers' words that are

frequently used in the classroom indicate that the three teachers mainly interact with children to

transmit a body of knowledge and to confirm if children are aware of or keep in mind the

knowledge.

In particular, the teachers' primary purpose in having children acquire certain knowledge

is to get children ready for kindergarten and make sure that children are familiar with what they

need to know to go to kindergarten. Even certain skills that children usually learn in other regular

classrooms in child care settings such as numbering, coloring, gluing, cutting, and tracing are

emphasized as the necessary skills for kindergarten. Children need to practice and attain

proficiency in these skills because their abilities need to be rated by kindergarten teachers as

good or outstanding. The three teachers especially give emphasis to children's literacy readiness

since the VPK program focuses on developing pre-kindergarten children's early literacy skills.

Thus, the three teachers make every effort to have children build a good vocabulary by talking to

children as often as possible, reading children a new book every week, or having children do a

spelling test. Also, the three teachers attach a lot of importance to children's ability to

independently solve problems by using their own words, especially when they have a problem

with other children. This ability is directly related to children's social and emotional competence









considered essential for successful school readiness. As a result, the three teachers need children

to succeed in kindergarten by having a good vocabulary or using their own words.

The teachers' emphasis on children's literacy readiness is strongly related to the fact that

they are concerned about the school's accountability. The VPK program that is aiming at results-

based accountability judges the quality of a VPK provider by how well pre-kindergarten

graduates fare in kindergarten. Thus, pre-kindergarten teachers need to be accountable to the

state as well as the parents by showing that children will fare well in spelling tests or other

examinations in kindergarten. The VPK program's results-based accountability makes the three

teachers give priority to the standards for kindergarten. For example, children practice writing

their names in a particular way that is used in kindergarten classrooms or are accustomed to a

kindergarten lifestyle, such as traveling different activity rooms. By having children think and

behave according to the rules and standards for kindergarten, teachers expect that children will

get good test results in kindergarten because children are already familiar with any kind of test

and what kindergarten teachers expect. As a result, the three teachers mostly interact with

children in order to have children succeed in kindergarten by being accustomed to the rules and

standards for kindergarten through their daily routine in the VPK classroom.

Second, the three teachers have different identities as a pre-kindergarten teacher,

employee, and colleague. As a pre-kindergarten teacher, they are proud of preparing children for

kindergarten and of seeing children acquire the necessary skills for kindergarten. However, as an

employee, they show their limited abilities to decide the curriculum of their classroom and to

change their teaching environments, including the teacher-child ratio and time frame of the VPK

program. Since the curriculum of their classroom is based on both the VPK standards and the

school curriculum that has developed over the years, it hardly reflects their own opinions or









thoughts. In particular, the time frame of the VPK program prevents teachers from creatively

thinking about and developing their own curriculum. Since the three teachers have to carry out so

much work related to instruction within only three hours, they cannot spend time doing things

other than teaching children and doing paperwork. Thus, the three teachers complain about the

time frame of the VPK program directly or indirectly; that is, they say that they do not have

enough time to talk to each child or they speak fast, especially during whole-group time, in order

to transmit too much information to children within a short time frame. However, teachers

cannot change the time frame because it is set by the VPK standards. This indicates that teachers

have limited access to decision-making processes, including the curriculum and schedule of their

classroom, as well as few opportunities to voice their opinions on educational reform.

The time frame also prevents teachers from sharing information with other teachers since

they are too busy to talk to each other. Even though the relationships among teachers vary

according to the three teachers' working environments, they commonly have insufficient time to

talk to other teachers about each child's needs or a way of interacting with individual child. By

observing other teachers, teachers are able to reflect on their own ways of teaching or interacting

with children as well as to find ways to overcome their weaknesses and reinforce their strengths.

Moreover, teachers can discuss the organization and management of school systems with other

teachers and search for a better way of modifying their working environments. Therefore, the

fact that the three teachers have little time to talk to each other indicates that they have few

opportunities to correct a real problem that impacts their own as well as children's lives,

including the negative effects of the state core curriculum represented by the VPK standards on

teacher-child interactions. As a result, the teachers' limited time to talk to each other indicates









that the teachers have few opportunities to develop their own critical-thinking and problem-

solving skills through active conversations with other teachers.

Finally, the three teachers consider children's positive reaction to what teachers are

saying as effective teacher-child interaction. Children's positive reaction to teachers' words

means that children demonstrate their understanding of the meaning of teachers' words and what

is expected of them through enjoyment, happiness, or satisfaction. From the same perspective,

the situation when children do not understand what teachers are saying or do not perform what is

expected of them is considered ineffective teacher-child interaction. Thus, the three teachers are

concerned about children who do not speak English well or who do not express their thoughts or

feelings because of their shyness or silence. This concern is because the teachers have trouble

making these children understand what teachers expect or figuring out what they are thinking

and feeling. In particular, since the teachers need to get children ready for kindergarten, they are

seriously worried that these children will not succeed in kindergarten because of their

misunderstanding of teachers' words. Similarly, the teachers are concerned about children who

have mental or behavioral problems, since they have difficulty interacting with the children and

preparing the children for kindergarten.

The three teachers make an effort to have one-on-one interaction with children in order to

deal with the situation when they have trouble interacting with children. By enabling the teachers

to figure out and respond to each child's needs, one-on-one interaction with children helps them

understand what a child is thinking and feeling as well as what kind of problem the child has. For

example, when teachers need to know if a child understands the directions or to make sure that a

child follows the directions, they ask the child a question about the directions and give the child a

chance to answer the question. In addition, when a child displays a behavioral problem like









hitting somebody or getting aggressive frequently, teachers talk to the child, listen to the child's

words, point out the child's problem, and suggest another activity or read the child a book. When

a child looks upset, teachers come to the child, ask what is happening to the child, and help the

child find ways to solve the problem. In short, the three teachers attach a lot of importance to

one-on-one interaction with children and make an effort to have one-on-one interaction with

children as often as possible.

The three teachers' understanding of the importance of one-on-one interaction with

children mainly results from their teaching experiences. The three teachers have very different

teaching experiences, but their teaching experiences positively influence their own ways of

interacting with children. First of all, their teaching experiences make the teachers more relaxed

when they are working with children; that is, the teachers are more comfortable with what they

are doing than in the past, since they know what they are supposed to do. They are less

embarrassed by and are more open-minded about children's unexpected behaviors or fluctuating

emotions, making children feel comfortable and thus be able to freely talk to teachers about their

own interests or problems. Teachers' one-on-one interaction with children enables children to

more freely discuss their own needs with teachers, since more one-on-one time with teachers

they have, the more comfortable they feel, and the more often they talk to teachers about their

personal matters. Thus, the three teachers believe that one-on-one interaction with children is

essential for effective teacher-child interaction because it enables teachers to quickly figure out

and respond to what children are thinking and feeling.

Despite the teachers' putting a high value on one-on-one interaction with children, the

teacher-child ratio and class size set by the VPK standards prevent teachers from having

sufficient one-on-one time with children. In their classrooms two teachers are usually responsible









for 18 children, and the three teachers think that this teacher-child ratio does not enable them to

frequently talk to each child and facilitate his or her learning. Since their hectic schedules have

further increased this situation, the teachers have little time to converse with each child, listen to

his or her story, and stimulate him or her to create new ideas. Thus, even though the teachers

make an effort to have one-on-one time with children, most of the one-on-one interactions with

children take place in the situation when teachers call on one child and ask the child a question in

order to confirm if the child understands or remembers teachers' words. One-on-one interaction

with children, along with singing a song and repetition, is mainly used as one of the most useful

ways of transmitting certain knowledge to children in their classrooms rather than of giving

children a chance to develop their critical-thinking and problem-solving skills. In conclusion, the

three teachers cannot help but have limited one-on-one interaction with children because the

teachers themselves cannot modify the several factors that impede one-on-one interaction with

children, including the time frame of the VPK program as well as the teacher-child ratio and

class size set by the VPK standards.

Discussion of Findings

Barriers to Effective Teacher-Child Interactions

First of all, the teachers' understanding of effective teacher-child interaction is considered

a barrier to effective teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child

care settings, according to the definition of "effective" teacher-child interaction used in this

project the process that leads both teachers and children to solve their own problems through

critical thinking. Teachers consider children's positive reaction to teachers' words as effective

teacher-child interaction. Teachers need children to understand what they are saying and follow

the directions; that is, teachers need to see if each lesson works well, if children remember the

lesson, or if children tell teachers about what they are listening to. Through homework or a









spelling test, children are tested to see if they practice or remember the lesson well, even though

they are taught in pre-kindergarten classrooms in child care settings. Such a practice prevents

children from seeking a better understanding of different aspects of the lesson because they are

too busy to think about things other than what teachers expect. Children are forced to think and

behave within teachers' values and ideologies, which result from their own past experiences and

reflect particular ideological patterns like the guidelines for the VPK program. Since the VPK

program especially requires teachers to make children understand what they need to know to go

to kindergarten, both teachers and children are forced to think and behave according to the

guidelines for the VPK program. Thus, the teachers' understanding of effective teacher-child

interaction prevents both teachers and children from enhancing new ideas and remaining open to

the unforeseen and unexpected and thus from critically thinking and independently solving their

own problems.

Second, the teachers' powerlessness to modify their teaching environments is considered

another barrier to effective teacher-child interactions, as defined from a critical perspective, in

voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings. Teachers are suffering from the time

frame of the VPK program as well as the teacher-child ratio and class size set by the VPK

standards. These factors directly influence their ways of teaching or interacting with children; for

example, teachers cannot have sufficient one-on-one time with children, and teachers have to

constantly teach children and do paperwork. Since teachers are always rushed to do so much

work within a restricted time frame, they speak fast, especially during whole-group time, and

cannot feel relaxed. The teachers' uncomfortable status is likely to lead teachers to passively

respond to children's requests and lose interest in children's needs. During whole-group time,

teachers transmit a wealth of knowledge to children through daily routine by continually having









children pay attention to their words and learn new skills or facts. Teachers also need children to

sit and listen rather than speak, to give expected answers to teachers' questions, or to say the

right words that teachers already know. Thus, teachers prefer free-play time or meal time to

whole-group time, since they are able to feel more relaxed and freely talk to children about

diverse issues during that time. Nevertheless, teachers cannot change the time frame of the VPK

program as well as the teacher-child ratio and class size set by the VPK standards, and thus, this

prevents teachers from having sufficient one-on-one time with children and effectively

interacting with children.

Third, the teachers' lack of confidence in what is right and what is good is considered one

of the barriers to effective teacher-child interactions, as defined from a critical perspective, in

voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings. Especially in the VPK program,

teachers use prepackaged curricula, which focus on children's literacy readiness, include

continuous assessments of children's abilities, and demand the school's accountability to the

state and the parents. Even though the prepackaged curricula are based on both the guidelines for

the VPK program and the school curriculum that has developed over the years, they reflect the

standards for kindergarten more than the school curriculum. Teachers have children write their

names in a particular way that is used in kindergarten, do a spelling test, do homework with their

parents, and practice a kindergarten lifestyle like traveling classrooms. In order to make sure that

their children will fare well in kindergarten, teachers involve children in these classroom

activities by depending on the prepackaged curricula that control children's different

developmental domains, including health and social/emotional/motor development, language and

communication, emergent literacy (reading readiness), cognitive development, and general

knowledge. Thus, the prepackaged curricula that strongly reflect the standards for kindergarten









are considered a standard for what is right and what is good in the VPK program in child care

settings. The prepackaged curricula as a standard control the teachers' abilities to think and know

and thus make teachers lose their confidence in their ways of thinking and behaving. As a result

of this lack of confidence, teachers have few opportunities to create their own lesson plans and

negotiate them with children as well as their parents, and thus, both teachers and children have

few opportunities to develop their own critical-thinking and problem-solving skills.

Facilitators of Effective Teacher-Child Interactions

First, teachers are able to facilitate effective teacher-child interactions, as defined from a

critical perspective, in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings by encouraging

children to use their own words. Teachers teach children how to say their thoughts and feelings

when children need to solve their own problems like arguments with other children. For example,

when a child complains about another child's misbehavior, teachers can encourage the child to

directly tell another child that another child's misbehavior makes the child feel bad by reminding

the child about how to say his or her feelings. Teachers help the child to apply information that

he or she has already learned to a real situation rather than solving the child's problem. By

practicing a way of expressing his or her feelings, the child is able to develop his or her own way

of solving this kind of problem as well as getting along with other children. Especially in the

VPK program that emphasizes children's early literacy skills, children are able to successfully

develop the ability to express their own thoughts and feelings because teachers help them build a

good vocabulary. Even though the emphasis of the VPK program on children's early literacy

skills aims to prepare children for kindergarten, having a good vocabulary enables children to be

confident in their words, successfully understand what others are saying, and explain what is

going on. Taking into account the fact that all kinds of interactions in classrooms happen through

the medium of talk, children are able to effectively interact with other children as well as









teachers by clearly expressing their own thoughts and feelings by means of a good vocabulary.

Thus, by giving children a chance to use their own words as often as possible, teachers help them

to differently understand what is happening, to critically think about how to solve problems, and

to independently solve their own problems through critical thinking.

Second, teachers are able to facilitate effective teacher-child interactions, as defined from

a critical perspective, in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings by improving

their relationships with other teachers. Teachers are able to learn different examples of teacher-

child interactions by observing other teachers, ask other teachers a question about how to deal

with their ineffective interactions with children, and suggest other methods of interacting with

children. In particular, the teachers' teaching experience strongly influences their own ways of

teaching and interacting with children. Therefore, experienced teachers are likely to have more

knowledge about how to interact with children or are less likely to change their values and

ideologies, which are deeply rooted in their own past experiences, and to learn new ideas about

teacher-child interactions. By talking to each other, teachers are able to reflect on their own ways

of interacting with children and find ways to overcome their weaknesses and reinforce their

strengths. However, many teachers have not been aware of the importance of the relationships

among teachers, since their working environments have provided them with few opportunities to

communicate with other teachers. For example, the teachers' different schedules prevent teachers

from seeing each other at the same place at the same time, or the teachers' workplaces do not

provide teachers with a place to meet and discuss something. In particular, the hectic schedules

of the VPK program have further increased this situation and make teachers have fewer

opportunities to talk to each other than in the past. Thus, teachers need to actively take an

opportunity to communicate with other teachers and improve their relationships with other









teachers. This process itself facilitates effective teacher-child interactions by giving teachers a

chance to search for a better way of modifying their working environments and to enhance their

own critical-thinking and problem-solving skills.

Third, teachers are able to facilitate effective teacher-child interactions, as defined from a

critical perspective, in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings by

understanding children's diverse ethnic, racial, cultural, and socioeconomic backgrounds. One of

the limitations of state-funded pre-kindergarten programs is that the population of pre-

kindergarten teachers is not nearly as diverse as the population of children; that is, most of the

pre-kindergarten teachers are still White and are not well matched with the ethnic/racial diversity

of children in state-funded pre-kindergarten programs. In reality, teachers in the VPK program

have difficulty in communicating with children who speak English as a second language and in

effectively interacting with them. After the children pick up English and understand what

teachers are saying, teachers still have difficulty in effectively interacting with the children

because of their parents' limited English proficiency. Their parents have trouble completely

understanding the content of the VPK program and successfully discussing the children's

individual needs with teachers. Teachers currently interact with children from much more

diverse ethnic, racial, cultural, and socioeconomic backgrounds than in the past, and these

children come to school with much different learning experiences and varied developmental

needs (Zimiles, 2000). Therefore, the teachers' misunderstanding of children's diverse cultural

and socioeconomic backgrounds prevents teachers from being aware of children's individual

needs and correctly interpreting each child's thoughts and feelings. Through an understanding of

knowledge, identity, and culture in children's own lives, teachers are able to help children to









construct and articulate their own knowledge as well as to aggressively solve their own problems

as active subjects.

Summary

The findings of this study support two contrasting hypotheses: one is that teachers as the

oppressed are forced to teach children a white, male, European-American model through diverse

techniques of normalization, such as measurement, regulation, and evaluation; the other is that

teachers as the oppressors force children to learn such a model through the unilateral interactions

between themselves and children. Both the teachers' powerlessness to modify their teaching

environments and the teachers' lack of confidence in what is right and what is good, which are

considered barriers to effective teacher-child interactions, as defined from a critical perspective,

in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings, show that teachers as the oppressed

are forced to teach children the norms and standards set by dominant academics and institutions

within the hierarchical structure of schools. Even though teachers attach a lot of importance to

one-on-one interaction with children, they are forced to teach children these norms and standards

through measurement or assessment. In particular, since the VPK program requires teachers to

show the school's accountability, teachers are forced to teach children the necessary skills for

kindergarten and to make sure that children are prepared for kindergarten. Thus, teachers as the

oppressors force children to learn what they need to know to go to kindergarten and consider the

situation when children understand teachers' words and perform what is expected of them as

effective teacher-child interaction. This definition of effective teacher-child interaction

demonstrates unilateral characteristics resulting from teacher authority over children and is

considered another barrier to effective teacher-child interactions, as defined from a critical

perspective, in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings.









As a result, the above barriers to effective teacher-child interactions prevent both teachers

and children from critically thinking and independently solving problems. However, teachers are

able to facilitate effective teacher-child interactions, as defined from a critical perspective, in

voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings by encouraging children to use their

own words; improving their relationships with other teachers; and understanding children's

diverse ethnic, racial, cultural, and socioeconomic backgrounds. These facilitators of effective

teacher-child interactions reflect the unique characteristics of the VPK program, such as focusing

on children's literacy readiness, setting a restricted time frame, and recognizing the ethnic/racial

diversity of children. These characteristics of the VPK program have both a positive and a

negative effect on teacher-child interactions; for example, its emphasis on children's literacy

readiness requires children to practice and memorize a lot of words, but such an emphasis leads

children to learn new words or to build a good vocabulary. Such a good vocabulary enables

children to express their thoughts and feelings and to solve their own problems using their own

words. The teachers' efforts to improve the relationships among teachers within a restricted time

frame help them enhance their own critical-thinking and problem-solving skills, and the

teachers' understanding of children's diverse cultures and identities enables both teachers and

children to construct their own knowledge and to solve their own problems as active subjects.

Thus, different strategies to facilitate effective teacher-child interactions enable teachers to find

ways to overcome several barriers to effective teacher-child interactions by being aware of the

unilateral teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings.

Connections with Previous Research

My interpretations of the findings are connected with the results of several previous

studies reviewed in Chapter 2. That is to say, my interpretations of the findings of this study are

based on the lessons learned in a number of previous, similar studies, and the hypotheses in this









study are supported by the findings of this study. At the same time, my findings have a positive

effect on my interpretations of previous research by providing a wealth of scientific evidence that

supports as well as expands the results of previous research. In particular, my interpretations of

the findings of this study make a major contribution to the previous research by consistently

interpreting the results of previous research based on the theoretical orientation of critical theory

and postmodernism.

First of all, a study by Giroux (1988) and a study by Brookfield (2005) give me a chance

to think about critical theory and to clarify the characteristics of the relationship between

teachers and children. Critical theory explains that teachers, as experts privileged over children,

exercise power in the classroom, and all social interactions between teachers and children are

characterized as hierarchically structured. Also, these studies help me create two contrasting

hypotheses for teacher-child interaction: one is that teachers as the oppressed are forced to teach

children a white, male, European-American model through diverse techniques of normalization,

such as measurement, regulation, and evaluation; the other is that teachers as the oppressors

force children to learn such a model through the unilateral interactions between themselves and

children. My interpretations of the findings of this qualitative research project are based on these

hypotheses, and my findings add rich, detailed descriptions of teacher-child interactions in the

VPK program to these hypotheses. For example, the findings of this study show that a white,

male, European-American model is represented by the VPK standards and is transmitted to

children through a spelling test or homework as a technique of normalization.

Second, an observational study by Dickinson (200 b) shows that teachers mainly interact

with children for the purpose of instruction, asking children to listen to teachers' words or

correcting children's incorrect responses. In particular, this fact is observed in the three teachers'









classrooms regardless of time and place, since the main activity of the three teachers is to get

children ready for kindergarten by making them understand what they need to know to go to

kindergarten. Also, Dickinson's (200 b) study enables me to figure out what kinds of words the

three teachers frequently use in the classroom and why the three teachers frequently use certain

words, including talk, tell, see, learn, understand, and know. I understand that these words are

commonly used for two purposes: one is to have children do what teachers need; the other is to

give children a chance to be aware of something new or already known. That is to say, from the

theoretical orientation of critical theory and postmodernism, the three teachers mainly interact

with children to transmit a body of knowledge and to confirm if children are aware of or retain

the knowledge. This interpretation of these words reinforces the results of Dickinson's (200 Ib)

study by offering scientific evidence as well as by showing how the results are interpreted by the

theoretical orientation of critical theory and postmodernism.

Third, a study by Gest et al. (2006) helps me choose three different activity settings -

whole-group, free-play, and meal time as the targets for observation by providing evidence that

teachers differently talk to children according to classroom activity settings. The study shows

that each activity setting includes distinctive patterns of"cognitively challenging talk" (Gest et

al., 2006, p. 309), and the amount and type of teacher talk are closely associated with children's

learning and development. Also, the study enables me to focus on the three teachers' behavior

and speech in their classrooms by showing that the majority of the teacher-child interactions in

child care settings consist of talk between teachers and children. The results of this study are

very similar to the results of a study by Gest et al. (2006), since they show that the three teachers

freely talk about different subjects with children during free-play time, while they mainly discuss

academic topics related to the classroom curriculum with children during whole-group time.









However, the findings of this study demonstrate that the conversations between teachers and

children in the VPK program mostly aim to have children build a good vocabulary in order for

children to succeed in kindergarten. Thus, my interpretation of the findings of this study is

different from the results of a study by Gest et al. (2006), since it clarifies the purpose of teacher

talk by using the theoretical orientation of critical theory and postmodernism.

Fourth, a study by Hayes and Matusov (2005) helps me interpret the three teachers'

understanding of effective teacher-child interaction as a barrier to effective teacher-child

interactions, as defined from a critical perspective, in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in

child care settings. The study, based on real-life conversations in a traditional school, shows that

when a child does not produce the expected answer, the teacher usually rejects the child's answer

as incorrect in order to elicit the correct answer she already knows. The teacher is concerned

with affirming the truth she already possesses, and thus, children have no opportunity to develop

their understanding of the world by reflecting on their answers and acting on their own

perspectives. Similarly, the three teachers in this study consider children's positive reaction to

teachers' words as effective teacher-child interaction; that is, they need children to understand

what they are saying and follow the directions. Thus, the three teachers' understanding of

effective teacher-child interaction makes children learn obedience to authority and follow orders

rather than thinking for themselves; these children have no opportunity to develop their own

critical-thinking and problem-solving skills. This interpretation of the three teachers'

understanding of effective teacher-child interaction is derived from the findings of Hayes and

Matusov's (2005) study, but goes beyond these findings by including from the conversations to

the interactions between teachers and children.









Fifth, a study by Leavitt and Power (1989), along with a study by Leavitt (1994), shows

how caregivers differently exercise power over children through daily routine in a day care

center. For example, caregivers deny the legitimacy of children's emotions and often treat the

children as if they cannot understand their own as well as others' emotions. Caregivers' routine

tasks, such as diaper changing and feeding, make them feel the emotional stresses of their work,

and this leads them to passively react to children's requests and to simply compel children's

surface behaviors. Leavitt and Power's (1989) study, based on postmodernism that includes

diversity, complexity, and multiple perspectives, enables me to see how teachers' power over

children is exercised differently within a specific classroom setting. For instance, the three

teachers use different strategies to make children understand and remember what teachers are

saying, according to each teacher's and school's characteristics. Susan prefers singing a song and

one-on-one interaction, while Veronica makes use of repetition and answering a question. Also,

the three teachers differentially use diverse techniques of normalization, such as a spelling test or

homework, in order to make children practice and keep in mind the norms and standards set by

dominant academics and institutions. This interpretation of such techniques reflects the unique

characteristics of the VPK program as well as the general characteristics of state-funded pre-

kindergarten programs. Thus, my interpretation expands the findings of Leavitt and Power's

(1989) study, since the study particularly focuses on problematic relations of power within a day

care center, while my interpretation includes power relations in voluntary pre-kindergarten

programs in child care settings.

Finally, a study by Gitlin (2001) enables me to understand how the three teachers are

powerless against the dominant ideology in classrooms. Gitlin's (2001) study shows that teachers

underutilize their autonomy because of the state core curriculum, textbooks, and prepackaged









curricula, and these limit their abilities to change educational relations or standards. The

teachers' limited abilities prevent them from stepping back from their classroom practices and

considering broader educational concerns or employing a more holistic view of teaching. In the

same way, the three teachers use the prepackaged curricula based on both the guidelines for the

VPK program and the school curriculum that has developed over the years, and are forced to

increase children's literacy readiness through continuous assessments of children's abilities. The

prepackaged curricula as a standard control the teachers' abilities to think and know and thus

make teachers lose their confidence in their ways of thinking and behaving. This finding is

consistent with the results of Gitlin's (2001) study on how teachers are powerless against the

dominant ideology in classrooms. Therefore, Gitlin's (2001) study contributes to my

interpretation of the prepackaged curricula in the VPK program and helps me realize how this

lack of confidence has an effect on teacher-child interaction. At the same time, the findings of

this study add a detailed description of the prepackaged curricula in the VPK program to Gitlin's

(2001) study.

Implications for Professional Practice

The findings of this study are very useful for teachers in state-funded pre-kindergarten

programs to interact more effectively with children. The findings of this study show the nature of

teacher-child interactions resulting from the characteristics of the VPK program in child care

settings, for example, how teachers interact with children within the time frame of the VPK

program, how the curriculum of each VPK classroom based on the guidelines for the VPK

program influences teacher-child interactions, and how the teacher-child ratio and class size set

by the VPK standards affect teacher-child interactions. Such information can be used by teachers

in other state-funded pre-kindergarten programs, including other VPK classrooms, even though

the levels of support services of state-funded pre-kindergarten programs as well as teacher









qualifications are very different according to where the classroom happens to be located.

Teachers are able to reflect on their own ways of interacting with children in their state-funded

pre-kindergarten classrooms as well as the effects of state-funded pre-kindergarten programs on

their interactions with children. Thus, by figuring out the nature and quality of their own

interactions with children, teachers in state-funded pre-kindergarten programs are able to find

ways to effectively interact with children.

In particular, the findings of this study are helpful for all teachers to be aware of the

importance of the effective teacher-child interactions that empower both teachers and children.

The findings of this study clarify three barriers to effective teacher-child interactions, as defined

from a critical perspective, in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings by

showing the causes and problems of the unilateral teacher-child interactions as well as the effects

of the barriers on both teachers' and children's critical-thinking and problem-solving skills. Also,

the findings of this study specifically suggest three facilitators of effective teacher-child

interactions by explaining what the rationale of the facilitators results from and how teachers can

promote effective teacher-child interactions in a real situation. The barriers to and facilitators of

effective teacher-child interactions are applied to voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child

care settings. Nevertheless, teachers in every classroom are able to use such information about

the barriers and facilitators, since most of the conversations between teachers and children in

classrooms are characterized as unilateral and reflect teacher authority over children. Such

information gives teachers a chance to be aware of the unilateral teacher-child interactions and to

overcome the notion that they are incapable of changing the status quo. Therefore, by searching

for specific strategies to develop effective teacher-child interactions within their own unique









situations, all teachers are able to be aware of the importance of the effective teacher-child

interactions that empower both teachers and children.

Moreover, the findings of this study are very useful for policy makers to improve the

quality of voluntary pre-kindergarten programs. Since there is little research on the nature and

quality of teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs, policy makers do

not have specific information about how voluntary pre-kindergarten programs influence teacher-

child interactions. For example, as described in Chapter 4, teachers are complaining that the

teacher-child ratio set by the VPK standards is a little bit high and does not reflect different

classroom situations. In other words, the ratio is based on researchers' opinions rather than on

teachers' voices and thus ignores different happenings that take place in real classroom situations.

Thus, the findings of this study provide policy makers with specific information about how

teachers are suffering from the ratio and how the ratio prevents teachers from effectively

interacting with children. Based on this information, policy makers are able to check if the ratio

is reasonable or to think about how they can change the ratio. Moreover, policy makers are able

to reflect on how the VPK program affects teacher-child interactions as a whole and how they

can decrease the negative effects of the VPK program on teacher-child interactions. As a result,

by figuring out the nature of teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs,

policy makers are able to find ways to improve the quality of voluntary pre-kindergarten

programs.

Finally, the findings of this study are helpful for researchers to put a new perspective on

the nature of teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care

settings. The findings of this study include a detailed description of the moment-to-moment

encounters between teachers and children using the theoretical orientation of critical theory and









postmodernism. Since this study describes teachers' behavior and speech through their actual

words, researchers are able to easily imagine how teachers interact with children in a natural

classroom setting. In particular, the theoretical orientation of postmodernism enables this study

to explain how teachers' power over children is exercised differently within a specific classroom

setting. That is to say, this study describes how the organization and management of daily

routines are implemented differently by each teacher's and school's characteristics as well as

how teachers interact with children differently within these different classroom settings. In

addition, this study identifies and classifies teachers' behavior and speech by means of consistent

theoretical orientation: critical theory and postmodernism. All of the teachers' behavior and

speech are identified and classified based on the notion that teachers as the oppressors force

children to learn the dominant culture and ideology through the interactions with children, and

teachers as the oppressed are forced to contribute to maintaining the social inequalities within the

hierarchical structure of schools. Thus, by using the theoretical orientation of critical theory and

postmodernism, researchers are able to develop their scholarly understanding of the nature of

teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings.

Recommendations for Further Research

This qualitative research project is a first attempt to investigate the nature of teacher-child

interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings by using the theoretical

orientation of critical theory and postmodernism. That is to say, as a theoretically important

foundation for further research, this study shows how educational research can improve

educational practice by making critical and systematic inquiries as well as describing what is

really happening. Thus, some recommendations for further research are made in order to lead

further research to focus on improving educational practice as well as to address several

limitations of this study mentioned in Chapter 3.









First of all, this qualitative research project offers partial evidence on internal validity

despite its several strategies to enhance internal validity, including "member checks," which

refers to taking data and tentative interpretations back to the people from whom they are derived

and asking them whether or not the interpretations are plausible (Merriam, 1998, p. 204).

Nevertheless, this research project provides insufficient evidence on the validity of the findings,

since the data were collected over a short period of time. In addition, since this research project

was conducted over a short period of time, I did not have sufficient time to establish a close

rapport with the participants. This indicates that both I and the participants partly understood and

shared reciprocal cultures and beliefs, and this research project is based on such an

understanding. Thus, one recommendation for further research is to examine the nature of

teacher-child interactions over a longer period of time, which would enable researchers to

observe the same phenomenon repeatedly and to establish a close rapport with participants. Such

research would enable researchers to explain participants' behavior and speech as well as what is

happening in more different and holistic ways. Also, researchers are able to offer more detailed

descriptions of the moment-to-moment encounters between teachers and children. Thus, further

research on the nature of teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in

child care settings over a longer period of time would contribute to increasing the internal

validity and trustworthiness of this research project.

Another limitation of this research project is that it does not provide sufficient evidence

on generalizability. I focused on the particular rather than the general and thus selected three

participants using the particular criteria that could serve the purpose of this study. As a result, the

situations of this study are not typical, and the findings of this study cannot be readily applied to

other situations. Therefore, another recommendation for further research is to investigate the









nature of teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in settings other than

child care settings. By focusing on where voluntary pre-kindergarten programs take place,

further research on the nature of teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten

programs in settings other than child care settings would offer more and deeper information

about the nature of teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs. Also, such

research would include different ways of empowering both teachers and children through

effective teacher-child interactions, as defined from a critical perspective. This is because such

research enables teachers to figure out their own as well as their workplaces' strengths and

weaknesses and to more successfully find ways to facilitate effective teacher-child interactions in

their classrooms. As a result, teachers are able to have more confidence that they are capable of

changing the status quo.

In fact, the notion that teachers are able to facilitate effective teacher-child interactions,

as defined from a critical perspective, does not directly indicate that they are able to overcome

several barriers to effective teacher-child interactions. However, the process of searching for and

using different strategies to facilitate effective teacher-child interactions directly contributes to

the empowerment of teachers and children, and this empowerment leads teachers to find ways to

overcome several barriers to effective teacher-child interactions. This is because this process is

based on the teachers' awareness of the causes and problems of the unilateral teacher-child

interactions in their classrooms; that is, this process comes from the teachers' awareness of the

fact that teacher authority over children prevents both teachers and children from critically

thinking and independently solving problems. By acknowledging the importance of effective

teacher-child interaction the process that leads both teachers and children to solve their own

problems through critical thinking, teachers are able to change their previous understanding of









effective teacher-child interaction. Also, teachers are able to negotiate their lesson plans or

learning methods with their children as well as to begin with children's words or understandings.

Teachers are able to take action to change their working environments and confidently voice

their opinions about the school curriculum. Thus, it is important for teachers to find ways to

facilitate effective teacher-child interactions, as defined from a critical perspective, in their

classrooms by figuring out their own as well as their workplaces' strengths and weaknesses. It is

also important for further research to include different ways of empowering both teachers and

children through effective teacher-child interactions.

As a result, this qualitative research project shows how educational research can improve

educational practice through critical and systematic inquiry as well as detailed descriptions of

what is really happening. Based on the theoretical orientation of critical theory and

postmodernism, this study defines "effective" teacher-child interaction as the process that leads

both teachers and children to solve their own problems through critical thinking. Through

effective teacher-child interactions, both teachers and children are able to develop their own

critical-thinking and problem-solving skills that are needed for them to eventually take their

places in a participatory, democratic society. In fact, by participating in this study, the three

teachers were able to realize the importance of teacher-child interactions as well as how they

interacted with children in the VPK program. Also, they were able to understand how their

behavior and speech were interpreted by the theoretical orientation of critical theory and

postmodernism. That is to say, they became aware of the fact that teacher authority over children

prevents both teachers and children from critically thinking and independently solving problems.

Thus, they are expected to more deeply think about their own ways of interacting with children

and more frequently talk about a way of changing several factors that impede effective teacher-









child interactions with other teachers. In addition, by getting information about barriers to and

facilitators of effective teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child

care settings, interested practitioners are able to figure out the nature of teacher-child interactions

in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs and find ways to improve the quality of voluntary pre-

kindergarten programs.

In short, by describing the moment-to-moment encounters between teachers and children

in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care settings based on the theoretical orientation

of critical theory and postmodernism, this qualitative research project shows that it is important

for educational research on teacher-child interactions to demonstrate or depend on its own

theoretical orientation consistently. Moreover, this study strongly suggests that educational

research on teacher-child interactions needs to be able to stimulate teachers to take action to

solve the problems they face when interacting with children; to lead interested practitioners,

including teachers, policy makers, and parents, to create new ways to improve the quality of

teacher-child interactions; and to provide various audiences with sufficient information about

what is really happening in learning situations. Thus, as a theoretically important foundation for

further research, this qualitative research project recommends that further research focus on

making critical and systematic inquiries as well as on describing what is really happening in

order to improve educational practice.









APPENDIX A
LETTER OF INVITATION AND CONSENT FORM FOR A TEACHER

Informed Consent


Protocol Title: Teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child care
settings: A critical analysis of barriers and facilitators

Please read this consent document carefully before you decide to participate in this study.

Purpose of the research study: The purpose of the study is to investigate barriers to and
facilitators of effective teacher-child interactions in voluntary pre-kindergarten programs in child
care settings.

What you will be asked to do in the study: To participate in two one-hour formal interviews
and three 10-minute informal interviews after each classroom observation, as well as to permit
three observations of your classroom during whole-group, free-play, and meal time. With your
permission, interviews will be audio-recorded, and you will wear a remote microphone during
the three observations.

Risks and Benefits: There is no direct benefit to the participant in this study. However, you are
likely to gain insight into the factors that impede and promote interactions with children.
Minimal risks to you are potentially anticipated, for example, fatigue resulting from two one-
hour interviews or feeling nervous about being observed.

Confidentiality: Your identity will be kept confidential to the extent provided by law.
Interviews will be audio tape recorded for the purpose of transcription. The audio tapes will be
accessible only to me for verification purposes. When the study is completed and the data have
been analyzed, the audio tapes will be destroyed. In addition, the observation data will be audio
tape recorded and transcribed, and the data will not include children's names and your name.
Results will be reported in my dissertation, and may be presented to education journals and
magazines for possible publication. Your name as well as children's names will not be used in
any report.

Voluntary participation: Your participation in this study is completely voluntary. You have the
right to withdraw from the study at any time without consequence. There is no compensation to
you for participating in the study.

Whom to contact if you have questions about the study: If you have any questions about the
study, I or my faculty supervisor, Dr. Kristen M. Kemple, will be happy to answer them.

Seunghee Kim, Ph.D. Student,
School of Teaching & Learning,
3527 S.W. 20TH Avenue, #113A, Gainesville, FL 32607,
(352) 371-8395,
seuhkim@ufl.edu









Kristen M. Kemple, Ph.D.,
School of Teaching & Learning,
Room 2207 Norman Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611,
(352) 392-9191 extension 250,
kkemple@coe.ufl.edu

Whom to contact about your rights as a research participant in the study:
UFIRB Office, Box 112250, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-2250; ph 392-0433

Agreement: I have read the procedure described above. I voluntarily agree to participate in the
procedure and I have received a copy of this description.


Participant's Signature and Date:




Principal Investigator's Signature and Date:









APPENDIX B
INTERVIEW PROTOCOL

Interview Guide for the First Formal Interview

I want to talk to you about barriers to and facilitators of effective teacher-child

interactions in your classroom. We know that teacher-child interactions are important, but we

also know that effective teacher-child interactions do not happen very often due to a variety of

factors. I want to understand why and what can be done to improve teacher-child interactions.

I would like to ask you a few questions:

1. Could you describe a typical teacher-child interaction during whole-group time in
your classroom?

2. Could you describe a typical teacher-child interaction during free-play time in your
classroom?

3. Could you describe a typical teacher-child interaction during meal time in your
classroom?

4. How do you know if an interaction has been effective?

5. Tell me about an example of an interaction you have had with a child that you would
consider effective.

6. Tell me about an example of an interaction you have had with a child that you would
consider ineffective. Why do you consider it ineffective?

7. What are some barriers to effective teacher-child interactions?

8. What conditions help you have more effective interactions with children?

9. What do teachers need to know about teacher-child interactions?

10. Is there anything you would like to add? Do you have any further comments or
questions?

Interview Guide for the First Informal Interview

I would like to ask you about teacher-child interactions during whole-group time:

1. I noticed that you ..... (an example of teacher-child interactions). Was this a typical
kind of interaction for whole-group time?









2. How effective was the interaction?

3. What made the interaction effective?

4. Were there factors that constrained the interaction? If so, what were they?

Interview Guide for the Second Informal Interview

I would like to ask you about teacher-child interactions during free-play time:

1. I noticed that you ..... (an example of teacher-child interactions). Was this a typical
kind of interaction for free-play time?

2. How effective was the interaction?

3. What made the interaction effective?

4. Were there factors that constrained the interaction? If so, what were they?

Interview Guide for the Third Informal Interview

I would like to ask you about teacher-child interactions during meal time:

1. I noticed that you ..... (an example of teacher-child interactions). Was this a typical
kind of interaction for meal time?

2. How effective was the interaction?

3. What made the interaction effective?

4. Were there factors that constrained the interaction? If so, what were they?

Interview Guide for the Second Formal Interview

I want to talk to you about the factors that promote effective teacher-child interactions in

your classroom as well as how to overcome some barriers to effective teacher-child interactions

you confront in your classroom.

1. You have ( ) years of teaching experience. Have you changed the way you interact
with children over time? If so, how have you changed the way you interact with
children? Why have you changed the way you interact with children?

2. What do you think are the ways teachers can promote effective teacher-child
interactions in their classrooms?

3. What do you expect are the factors that prevent you from promoting effective
teacher-child interactions?









4. Tell me about how you would/have overcome some barriers to effective teacher-child
interactions in your classroom.

5. Is there anything that you might not have thought about before, but has occurred to
you while participating in the study?

6. Tell me about your thoughts and feelings while participating in the study.

7. Is there anything you would like to add? Do you have any further comments or
questions?









REFERENCES


Adler, P. A., & Adler, P. (2003). The reluctant respondent. In J. A. Holstein & J. F. Gubrium
(Eds.), Inside interviewing: New lenses, new concerns (pp. 153-173). Thousand Oaks,
CA: Sage Publications, Inc.

Allen, J. (1999). Class actions: Teachingfor social justice in elementary and middle school.
New York: Teachers College, Columbia University.

Ashiabi, G. S. (2000). Promoting the emotional development of preschoolers. Early Childhood
Education Journal, 28(2), 79-84.

Bagnato, S. J., & Neisworth, J. T. (1991). Assessmentfor early intervention: Best practicesfor
professionals. New York: The Guilford Press.

Barksdale-Ladd, M. A., & Thomas, K. F. (1993). Eight teachers' reported pedagogical
dependency on basal readers. The Elementary School Journal, 94(1), 49-72.

Barnett, W. S., Lamy, C., & Jung, K. (2005). The effects of state prekindergarten programs on
young children's school readiness in five states. The National Institute for Early
Education Research, Rutgers University.

Barnett, W. S., Hustedt, J. T., Friedman, A. H., Boyd, J. S., & Ainsworth, P. (2007). The state of
preschool 2007: State preschool yearbook. The National Institute for Early Education
Research Supported by The Pew Charitable Trusts.

Baum, A. C., & McMurray-Schwarz, P. (2004). Preservice teachers' beliefs about family
involvement: Implications for teacher education. Early Childhood Education Journal,
32(1), 57-61.

Birch, S. H., & Ladd, G. W. (1998). Children's interpersonal behaviors and the teacher-child
relationship. Developmental Psychology, 34(5), 934-946.

Blatchford, P. (2003). A systematic observational study of teachers' and pupils' behaviour in
large and small classes. Learning & Instruction, 13(6), 569-595.

Blankemeyer, M., Flannery, D. J., & Vazsonyi, A. T. (2002). The role of aggression and social
competence in children's perceptions of the child-teacher relationship. Psychology in the
Schools, 39(3), 293-304.

Blumenfeld-Jones, D. (2004). The hope of a critical ethics: Teachers and learners. Educational
Theory, 54(3), 263-279.

Bogdan, R. C., & Biklen, S. K. (2003). Qualitative research for education: An introduction
it ii je\ and methods (4t ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson Education Group, Inc.

Boutte, G. S. (2002). Overview. In G. S. Boutte (Ed.), Resounding voices: School experiences of
people from diverse ethnic backgrounds (pp. 1-15). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.









Bowlby, J. (1969). Attachment and loss: Vol. 1 Attachment. New York: Basic Books, Inc.

Bowman, B. T., Stott, F. M. (1994). Understanding development in a cultural context: The
challenge for teachers. In Mallory, B. L. & New, R. S. (Eds.), Diversity &
developmentally appropriate practices: Challengesfor early childhood education (pp.
119-136). New York: Teachers College, Columbia University.

Breunig, M. (2005). Turning experiential education and critical pedagogy theory into praxis.
Journal ofExperiential Education, 28(2), 106-122.

Briggs, C. L. (2003). Interviewing, power/knowledge, and social inequality. In J. A. Holstein &
J. F. Gubrium (Eds.), Inside interviewing: New lenses, new concerns (pp. 495-506).
Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.

Britzman, D. P. (2001). Decentering discourses in teacher education: Or, the unleashing of
unpopular things. Journal ofEducation, 173(3), 60-80.

Brookfield, S. D. (2000). Transformative learning as ideology critique. In J. Mezirow (Ed.),
Learning as transformation (pp. 125-148). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, A Wiley
Company.

Brookfield, S. D. (2005). The power of critical theory: Liberating adult learning and teaching.
San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, A Wiley Imprint.

Burchinal, M. R., Peisner-Feinberg, E. S., Bryant, D. M., & Clifford, R. (2000). Children's social
and cognitive development and child-are quality: Testing for differential associations
related to poverty, gender, or ethnicity. Applied Developmental Science, 4(3), 149-165.

Burchinal, M. R., Peisner-Feinberg, E., Pianta, R., & Howes, C. (2002). Development of
academic skills from preschool through second grade: Family and classroom predictors
of developmental trajectories. Journal of School Psychology, 40(5), 415-436.

Burchinal, M. R., Roberts, J. E., Nabors, L. A., & Bryant, D. M. (1996). Quality of center child
care and infant cognitive and language development. Child Development, 67, 606-620.

Calderhead, J. (2003). Planning and thinking in junior school writing lessons: An exploratory
study. In M. Kompf& P. M. Denicolo (Eds.), Teacher thinking twenty years on:
Revisiting persisting problems and advances in education (pp. 53-60). Lisse, The
Netherlands: Swets & Zeitinger Publishers.

Campbell, S. (2005). Secret children's business: Resisting and redefining access to learning in
the early childhood classroom. In N. Yelland (Ed.), Critical issues in early childhood
education (pp. 146-162). New York: Open University Press.

Canella, G. S. (2005). Reconceptualizing the field (of early care and education): If 'western'
child development is a problem, then what do we do? In N. Yelland (Ed.), Critical issues
in early childhood education (pp. 17-39). New York: Open University Press.









Carspecken, P. F. (1996). Critical ethnography in educational research: A theoretical and
practical guide. New York: Routledge.

Chandler, M. (1997). Stumping for progress in a post-modern world. In E. Amsel & K. A.
Renninger (Eds.), Change and development: Issues of theory, method, and application
(pp. 1-26). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.

Chapman, R. B., Larsen, S. C., & Parker, R. M. (1979). Interactions of first-grade teachers with
learning disordered children. Journal ofLearning Disabilities, 12(4), 225-230.

Chow, V. T., & Kasari, C. (1999). Task-related interactions among teachers and exceptional, at-
risk, and typical learners in inclusive classrooms. Remedial & Special Education, 20(4),
226-232.

Churchill, S. L. (2003). Goodness-of-fit in early childhood settings. Early Childhood Education
Journal, 31(2), 113-118.

Cicchetti, D., Ganiban, J., & Barnett, D. (1991). Contributions from the study of high-risk
populations to understanding the development of emotion regulation. In J. Garber, & K.
A. Dodge (Eds.), The development of emotion regulation and dysregulation (pp. 15-48).
New York: Cambridge University Press.

Clifford, R. M., Bryant, D., & Early D. M. (2005). A pre-K programs status report. The
Education Digest, 50-53.

Colwell, M. J., & Lindsey, E. W. (2003). Teacher-child interactions and preschool children's
perceptions of self and peers. Early ChildDevelopment and Care, 173(2-3), 249-258.

Connell, R. W. (1994). Poverty and education. HarvardEducational Review, 64(2).

Coolahan, K., Fantuzzo, J., Mendez, J., McDermott, P. (2000). Preschool peer interactions and
readiness to learn: Relationships between classroom peer play and learning behaviors and
conduct. Journal of Educational Psychology, 92(3), 458-465.

Coplan, R. J., & Prakash, K. (2003). Spending time with teacher: Characteristics of preschoolers
who frequently elicit versus initiate interactions with teachers. Early Childhood Research
Quarterly, 18, 143-158.

Cote, L. R. (2001). Language opportunities during mealtimes in preschool classrooms. In D. K.
Dickinson & P. O. Tabors (Eds.), Young children learning at home and school:
Beginning literacy i iih language (pp. 205-221). Baltimore, MA: Paul H. Brookes
Publishing Co.

Cugmas, Z. (2004). Representations of the child's social behavior and attachment to the
kindergarten teacher in their drawing. Early ChildDevelopment and Care, 174(1), 13-30.

Dahlberg, G., Moss, P., & Pence, A. (1999). Beyond quality in early childhood education and
care: Postmodern perspectives. Philadelphia, PA: Falmer Press, Taylor & Francis Inc.









Davies, B. (1993). .\h,/i, / of glass: Children reading & writing beyond gendered identities.
Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press, Inc.

DeMulder, E. K., Denham, S., Schmidt, M., & Mitchell, J. (2000). Q-sort assessment of
attachment security during the preschool years: Links from home to school.
Developmental Psychology, 36(2), 274-282.

Denzin, N. K. (1987). Postmodern children. Society, March/April, 32-35.

Denzin, N. K., & Lincoln, Y. S. (2003). The landscape of qualitative research: Theories and
issues (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.

DeVries, R., & Zan, B. (2005). A constructivist perspective on the role of the sociomoral
atmosphere in promoting children's development. In C. T. Fosnot (Ed.), Constructivism:
Theory, perspectives, andpractice (2nd ed.) (pp. 132-149). New York: Teachers College
Press.

Dewalt, K. M., & Dewalt, B. R. (2002). Participant observation. Lanham, MD: Altamira Press,
A division of Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

Dickinson, D. K. (2001a). Book reading in preschool classrooms: Is recommended practice
common? In D. K. Dickinson & P. O. Tabors (Eds.), Young children learning at home
and school: Beginning literacy in ith language (pp. 175-203). Baltimore, MA: Paul H.
Brookes Publishing Co.

Dickinson, D. K. (2001b). Large-group and free-play times: Conversational settings supporting
language and literacy development. In D. K. Dickinson & P. O. Tabors (Eds.), Young
children learning at home and school: Beginning literacy in ith language (pp. 223-255).
Baltimore, MA: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

Edward, A. D., & Westgate, D. P. G. (1994). Investigating classroom talk (21d ed.). New York:
The Falmer Press.

Eisner, E. W. (1999). Educational reform and the ecology of schooling. In A. C. Ornstein & L. S.
Behar-Horenstein (Eds.), Contemporary issues in curriculum (21d ed.) (pp. 403-415).
Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Espinosa, L. M., & Laffey, J. M. (2003). Urban primary teacher perceptions of children with
challenging behaviors. Journal of Children & Poverty, 9(2), 135-156.

Estes, C. A. (2004). Promoting student-centered learning in experiential education. Journal of
Experiential Education, 27(2), 141-160.

Evans, T. D. (1991). Encouragement in the classroom. In G. M. Gazda, F. R. Asbury, F. J.
Balzer, W. C. Childers, & R. P. Walters (Eds.), Human relations development: A manual
for educators (4th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.









Fantuzzo, J. W., Bulotsky-Shearer, R., Fusco, R. A., & McWayne, C. (2005). An investigation of
preschool classroom behavioral adjustment problems and social-emotional school
readiness competencies. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 20, 259-275.

Feldstein, S., Hane, A. A., Morrison, B. M., & Huang, K. Y. (2004). Relation of the postnatal
attachment questionnaire to the attachment Q-set. Journal of Reproductive andInfant
Psychology, 22(2), 111-121.

Fenimore-Smith, J. K. (2004). Democratic practices and dialogic frameworks: Efforts toward
transcending the cultural myths of teaching. Journal of Teacher Education, 55(3), 227-
239.

Figueroa-Britapaja, J. R. (2002). Education in the United States: Puerto Rican perspectives. In G.
S. Boutte (Ed.), Resounding voices: School experiences ofpeople from diverse ethnic
backgrounds (pp. 247-273). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Finn Jr., C. E. Voluntary Prekindergarten. Hoover Press: Peterson/Florida (pp. 229-244), from
http://www.teachmorelovemore.org/PDF/ktffloridabook_229.pdf.

Fisher, R. (2005). Teacher-child interaction in the teaching of reading: A review of research
perspectives over twenty-five years. Journal ofResearch in Reading, 28(1), 15-27.

Florida's voluntary prekindergarten program. Office of Early Learniug. Florida Department of
Education, from http://www.fldoe.org/earlyleaming/vpkparent.asp.

Foucault, M. (1975/1995). Discipline &punish: The birth of the prison. New York: Vintage
Books.

Foucault, M. (1980). Poi~ e, knii,, ledge Selected interviews & other writings 1972-1977 (C.
Gordon, Ed.). New York: Pantheon Books.

Francis, B. (1999). Modernist reductionism or post-structuralist relativism: Can we move on? An
evaluation of the arguments in relation to feminist educational research. Gender and
Education, 11(4), 381-393.

Francis, D. R. (2006). Does prekindergarten improve school preparation and performance?
Retrieved June 19, 2006 from http://www.nber.org/digest/mar05/w10452.html.

Frankenstein, M. (1997). Breaking down the dichotomy between learning and teaching
mathematics. In J. W. Fraser, D. Macedo, T. McKinnon, & W. T. Stokes (Eds.),
Mentoring the mentor: A critical dialogue i iih Paulo Freire (pp. 59-87). New York:
Peter Lang Publishing, Inc.

Fregean, L. A., & Leier, R. D. (2002). In J. J. Slater, S. M. Fain, & C. A. Rossatto (Eds.), The
Freirean legacy: Educating for social justice (pp. 172-183). New York: Peter Lang
Publishing, Inc.









Freire, P. (1970/2001). Pedagogy of the oppressed (30th ed.). New York: The Continuum
International Publishing Group Inc.

Freire, P. (1993). Pedagogy of the city. New York: The Continuum Publishing Company.

Freire, P. (1997). Pedagogy of the heart. New York: The Continuum International Publishing
Group Inc.

Gale, T. (2000). Rethinking social justice in schools: How will we recognize in when we see it?
International Journal ofInclusive Education, 4(3), 253-269.

Gale, T., & Cosgrove, D. (2004). 'We learnt that last week': Reading into the language practices
of teachers. Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice, 10(2), 125-134.

Gay, G. (2000). Culturally responsive teaching: Theory, research, andpractice. New York:
Teachers College Press.

Gee, J. P. (2005/1999). An introduction to discourse analysis. Theory and method (2nd ed.). New
York: Routledge.

Gest, S. D., Holland-Coviello, R., Welsh, J. A., Eicher-Catt, D. L., & Gill, S. (2006). Language
development subcontexts in Head Start classrooms: Distinctive patterns of teacher talk
during free play, mealtime, and book reading. Early Education andDevelopment, 17(2),
293-315.

Gilliam, W. S. (2005). Prekindergarteners left behind: Expulsion rates in state prekindergarten
systems. New Haven: Yale University Child Study Center.

Gilliam, W. S., & Zigler, E. F. (2000). A critical meta-analysis of all evaluations of state-funded
preschool from 1977 to 1998: Implications for policy, service delivery and program
evaluation. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 15(4), 441-473.

Girolametto, L., & Weitzman, E. (2002). Responsiveness of child care providers in interactions
with toddlers and preschoolers. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 33,
268-281.

Girolametto, L., Weitzman, E., van Lieshout, R., & Duff, D. (2000). Directiveness in teachers'
language input to toddlers and preschoolers in day care. Journal of Speech, Language,
and Hearing Research, 43, 1101-1114.

Giroux, H. A., & Simon, R. I. (1988). Schooling, popular culture, and a pedagogy of possibility.
Journal of Education, 170(1), 9-26.

Giroux, H. A. (1988). Teachers as intellectuals: Toward a critical pedagogy of learning.
Granby, MA: Bergin & Garvey Publishers, Inc.

Giroux, H. A. (1988a). Postmodernism and the discourse of educational criticism. Journal of
Education, 170(3), pp. 5-30.









Giroux, H. A. (1993). Disturbing the peace: Writing in the cultural studies classroom. College
Literature, 20(2), 13-26.

Giroux, H. A. (1999). Teacher, public life, and curriculum reform. In A. C. Ornstein & L. S.
Behar-Horenstein (Eds.), Contemporary issues in curriculum (2nd ed.) (pp. 36-44).
Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Giroux, H. A. (2001). Theory and resistance education: Towards a pedagogyfor the opposition.
Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey.

Giroux, H. A. (2005). Border crossings: Cultural workers and the politics of education (2nd ed.).
New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.

Gitlin, A. (2001). Bounding teacher decision making: The threat of intensification. Educational
Policy, 15(2), 227-257.

Gormley Jr., W. T., Gayer, T., Phillips, D., & Dawson, B. (2005). The effects of universal pre-k
on cognitive development. Developmental Psychology, 41(6), 872-884.

Gormley Jr., W. T., & Phillips, D. (2005). The effects of universal pre-k in Oklahoma: research
highlights and policy implications. The Policy Studies Journal, 33(1), 65-82.

Grieshaber, S., & Ryan, S. (2006). Beyond certainties: Postmodern perspectives, research, and
the education of young children. In B. Spodek & O. N. Sasacho (Eds.), Handbook of
research on the education ofyoung children (2nd ed.) (pp. 533-553). Mahwah, NJ:
Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.

Hamre, B. K., & Pianta, R. C. (2001). Early teacher-child relationships and the trajectory
children's school outcomes through eighth grade. ChildDevelopment, 72(2), 625-638.

Hankins, K. (1999). Silencing the lambs. In J. Allen (Ed.), Class actions: Teaching for social
justice in elementary and middle school (pp. 61-71). New York: Teachers College,
Columbia University.

Hatch, J. A. (1995). Qualitative research in early childhood settings. Westport, CT: Greenwood
Publishing Group, Inc.

Hatch, J. A. (2002). Doing qualitative research in education settings. Albany, NY: State
University of New York Press.

Hayes, R., & Matusov, E. (2005). Designing for dialogue in place of teacher talk and student
silence. Culture & Psychology, 11(3), 339-357.

Hinchey, P. H. (2001). Finding freedom in the classroom: A practical introduction to critical
theory. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, Inc.

Hinchey, P. H. (2004). Becoming a critical educator: Defining a classroom identity, designing a
critical pedagogy. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, Inc.









Holstein, J. A., & Gubrium, J. F. (2004). The active interview. In D. Silverman (Ed.), Qualitative
research. Theory, method andpractice. 2nd ed. (pp. 140-161). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage
Publications.

Howes, C. (2000). Social-emotional classroom climate in child care, child-teacher relationships
and children's second grade peer relations. Social Development, 9(2), 191-204.

Howes, C., Burchinal, M., Pianta, R., Bryant, D., Clifford, R., & Barbarin, O. (2008). Ready to
learn? Children's pre-academic achievement in pre-Kindergarten programs. Early
Childhood Research Quarterly, 23, 27-50.

Howes, C., & Hamilton, C. E. (1992a). Children's relationships with caregivers: Mothers and
child care teachers. ChildDevelopment, 63, 859-866.

Howes, C., & Hamilton, C. E. (1992b). Children's relationships with child care teachers:
Stability and concordance with parental attachments. Child Development, 63, 867-878.

Howes, C., Hamilton, C. E., & Matheson, C. C. (1994). Children's relationships with peers:
Differential associations with aspects of the teacher-child relationship. Child
Development, 65, 253-263.

Howes, C., & Ritchie, S. (2002). A matter of trust: Connecting teachers and learners in the early
childhood classroom. New York: Teachers College, Columbia University.

Hyun, E. (2003). What does the no child left behind act mean to early childhood teacher
educators? A call for a collective professional rejoinder. Early Childhood Education
Journal, 31(2), 119-125.

Jacobs, G. M. (2004). A classroom investigation of the growth of metacognitive awareness in
kindergarten children through the writing process. Early Childhood Education Journal,
32(1), 17-23.

Jacobson, L. (2003). State-financed pre-k shows positive effects, new research says. Education
Week, 23(12), 14.

Johnson, D. J., Jaeger, E., Randolph, S. M., Cause, A. M., Ward, J., & NICHD Early Child Care
Research Network (2003). Studying the effects of early child care experiences on the
development of children of color in the United States: Toward a more inclusive research
agenda. Child Development, 74(5), 1227-1244.

Kagan, J. (1994). The nature of the child (10th anniversary ed.). New York: Basic Books, A
Division of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.

Kaplan, J. (1998). State-funded prekindergarten programs. Welfare Information Network, 2(9),
from http://www.financeproject.org/publications/preschoo.htm.

Katz, L. G., & McClellan, D. E. (1997). Fostering children's social competence: The teacher's
role. Washington, D. C.: The National Association for the Education of Young Children.









Keenan, E. K. (2004). From sociocultural categories to socially located relations: Using critical
theory in social work practice. Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social
Services, 85(4), 539-548.

Kincheloe, J. L., & McLaren, P. (2005). Rethinking critical theory and qualitative research. In N.
Denzen & Y. Lincoln (Eds.), The Sage Handbook of Qualitative Research (3rd ed.) (pp.
303-342). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

King, J. T. (2004). Service-learning as a site for critical pedagogy: A case of collaboration,
caring, and defamiliarization across borders. Journal ofExperiential Education, 26(3),
121-137.

Kontos, S. (1999). Preschool teachers' talk, roles, and activity settings during free play. Early
Childhood Research Quarterly, 14(3), 363-382.

Kontos, S., Howes, C., Shinn, M., & Galinsky, E. (1995). Quality in family child care & relative
care. New York: Teachers College Press.

Ladd, G. W., & Profilet, S. M. (1996). The child behavior scale: A teacher-report measure of
young children's aggressive, withdrawn, and prosocial behaviors. Developmental
Psychology, 32(6), 1008-1024.

La Paro, K. M., Pianta, R. C., & Stuhlman, M. (2004). The classroom assessment scoring
system: Findings from the prekindergarten year. The Elementary School Journal, 104(5),
409-426.

Lather, P. (1984). Critical theory, curricular transformation and feminist mainstreaming. Journal
ofEducation, 166(1), 49-62.

Leonardo, Z. (2003). Ideology, discourse, and school reform. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers.

Leavitt, R. L., & Power, M. B. (1989). Emotional socialization in the postmodern era: Children
in day care. Social Psychology Quarterly, 52(1), 35-43.

Leavitt, R. L. (1994). Power and emotion in infant-toddler day care. Albany, NY: State
University of New York Press.

Lidz, C. S. (2003). Early childhood assessment. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Lincoln, Y. S., & Guba, E. G. (1985). Naturalistic inquiry. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage
Publications, Inc.

Lobman, C. L. (2006). Improvisation: An analytic tool for examining teacher-child interactions
in the early childhood classroom. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 21, 455-470.

MacLeod, J. (1995). Ain't no making' it: Aspirations & attainment in a low-income
neighborhood. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.









Massey, S. L. (2004). Teacher-child conversation in the preschool classroom. Early Childhood
Education Journal, 31(4), 227-231.

McCollum, J. A., Bair, H. (1994). Research in parent-child interaction: Guidance to
developmentally appropriate practice for young children with disabilities. In Mallory, B.
L. & New, R. S. (Eds.), Diversity & developmentally appropriate practices: Challenges
for early childhood education (pp. 84-106). New York: Teachers College, Columbia
University.

McIntyre, A. (1997). Making meaning of whiteness: Exploring racial identity i ith white
teachers. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

McKinney, J. D., & Feagans, L. (1983). Adaptive classroom behavior of learning disabled
students. Journal ofLearning Disabilities, 16(6), 360-367.

McLaren, P. (1998). Life in schools: An introduction to critical pedagogy in the foundations of
education (3rd ed.). New York: Addison Wesley Longman, Inc.

McLaren, P., & Farahmandpur, R. (2002). In J. J. Slater, S. M. Fain, & C. A. Rossatto (Eds.),
The Freirean legacy: Educating for social justice (pp. 37-56). New York: Peter Lang
Publishing, Inc.

Merriam, S. B. (1998). Qualitative research and case study applications in education: Revised
and expanded from case study research in education. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass
Publishers.

Merriam, S. B. (2002). Introduction to qualitative research. In S. B. Merriam (Ed.), Qualitative
research in practice: Examples for discussion and analysis (pp. 3-17). San Francisco,
CA: Jossey-Bass, A Wiley Company.

National Center for Education Statistics (2003). Prekindergarten in U.S. public schools: 2000-
2001, statistical analysis report. U. S. Department of Education, Institute of Education
Sciences.

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Early child care research network
(2002). The Relation of Global First-Grade classroom Environment to Structural
Classroom Features and Teacher and Student Behaviors. Elementary School Journal,
102(5), 367-387.

National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) (2006). Op-ed: What kind of pre-k
house hath Florida built? National Institute for Early Education Research. Retrieved
August 23, 2006 from www.nieer.org.

National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) (2008). State-funded preschool
enrollment passes one million mark, yet most 3- and 4-year-olds are denied access to
public preschool programs. National Institute for Early Education Research. Retrieved
March 19, 2008 from www.nieer.org.









National Prekindergarten Center (2004). NPC prekindergartenframework. Chapel Hill, NC: The
University of North Carolina, National Prekindergarten Center, FRG Child Development
Institute.

Neuman, S. B. (2003). From rhetoric to reality: The case for high-quality compensatory
prekindergarten programs. Phi Delta Kappan, 286-291.

Neuman, S. B., & Roskos, K. (2005). The state of state pre-kindergarten standards. Early
Childhood Research Quarterly, 20, 125-145.

NICHD Early Child Care Research Network (2000). The relation of child care to cognitive and
language development. Child Development, 71(4), 960-980.

NICHD Early Child Care Research Network (2002). Child-care structure -* process -* outcome:
direct and indirect effects of child-care quality on young children's development.
Psychological Science, 13(3), 199-206.

NICHD Early Child Care Research Network (2003). Does quality of child care affect child
outcomes at age 4 1/2? Developmental Psychology, 39(3), 451-269.

NICHD Early Child Care Research Network & Duncan, G. J. (2003). Modeling the impacts of
child care quality on children's preschool cognitive development. Child Development,
74(5), 1454-1474.

NICHD Early Child Care Research Network (2004a). Are child developmental outcomes related
to before- and after-school care arrangements? Results from the NICHD study of early
child care. ChildDevelopment, 75(1), 280-295.

NICHD Early Child Care Research Network (2004b). Type of child care and children's
development at 54 months. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 19, 203-230.

NICHD Early Child Care Research Network (2005). Duration and developmental timing of
poverty and children's cognitive and social development from birth through third grade.
Child Development, 76(4), 795-810.

Nias, J. (1984). The definition and maintenance of self in primary teaching. British Journal of
Sociology ofEducation, 5(3), 267-280.

Park, K. A., & Waters, E. (1989). Security of attachment and preschool friendships. Child
Development, 60, 1076-1081.

Parke, R. D. (2004). The society for research in child development at 70: Progress and promise.
Child Development, 75(1), 1-24.

Patton, M. Q. (2002). Qualitative research & evaluation methods (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA:
Sage Publications.









Peisner-Feinberg, E., Burchinal, M. R., Clifford, R. M., Culkin, M. L., Howes, C., Kagan, S. L.,
& Yazejian, N. (2001). The relation of preschool child-care quality to children's
cognitive and social developmental trajectories through second grade. Child
Development, 72(5), 1534-1553.

Pianta, R. C., & Stuhlman, M. W. (2004). Teacher-child relationships and children's success in
the first years of school. School Psychology Review, 33(3), 444-458.

Quintero, E. P. (2004). Problem-pt,,inig ni ith multicultural children's literature: Developing
critical early childhood curricula. New York: Peter Lang Publishing Inc.

Reagan, T. G., Case, C. W., & Brubacher, J. W. (2000). Becoming a reflective educator: How to
build a culture of inquiry in the schools (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, Inc.

Reynolds, A., & Temple, J. A. (2006). Economic returns of investments in preschool education.
In E. Zigler, W. S. Gilliam, & S. M. Jones (Eds.), A vision for universal preschool
education (pp. 37-68). New York: Cambridge University Press.

Riseborough, G. F. (1988). Pupils, recipe knowledge, curriculum and the cultural production of
class, ethnicity and patriarchy: A critique of one teacher's practices. British Journal of
Sociology ofEducation, 9(1), 39-54.

Roselli, A. M. (2005). Dos & don 'ts of education reform: Toward a radical remedy for
educational failure. New York: Peter Lang Publishing Inc.

Ryan, S. (2005). Freedom to choose: Examining children's experiences in choice time. In N.
Yelland (Ed.), Critical issues in early childhood education (pp. 99-114). New York:
Open University Press.

Saluja, G., Early, D. M., & Clifford, R. M. (2002). Demographic characteristics of early
childhood teachers and structural elements of early care and education in the United
States. Early Childhood Research & Practice, 4(1). Retrieved Spring, 2002 from
http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v4nl/saluja.html.

Sandlin, J. A. (2002). The politics of consumer education materials used in adult literacy
classrooms. In S. B. Merriam (Ed.), Qualitative research in practice: Examples for
discussion and analysis (pp. 352-370). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, A Wiley
Company.

Sattler, J. M. (1988). Assessment of behavior by observational methods. In J. M. Sattler (Ed.),
Assessment of children (pp. 472-530). San Diego, CA: Jerome M. Sattler, Publisher.

Seidman, I. E. (1991). Interviewing as qualitative research: A guide for researchers in education
and the social sciences. New York: Teachers College Press.









Seifer, R., & Schiller, M. (1995). The role of parenting sensitivity, infant temperament, and
dyadic interaction in attachment theory and assessment. In E. Waters, B. E. Vaughn, G.
Posada, & K. Kondo-Ikemura (Eds.), Caregiving, cultural, and cognitive perspectives on
secure-base behavior and working models: New growing points of attachment theory and
research (pp. 146-174). Chicago, IL: Monographs of the Society for Research in Child
Development.

Shor, I. (1992). Empowering education: Critical teaching for social change. Chicago, IL: The
University of Chicago Press.

Shulman, L. S. (1999). Knowledge and teaching: Foundations of the new reform. In A. C.
Ornstein & L. S. Behar-Horenstein (Eds.), Contemporary issues in curriculum (2nd ed.)
(pp. 103-121). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Smith, V. (2004). Empowering teachers: Empowering children? How can researchers initiate and
research empowerment? Journal ofResearch in Reading, 27(4), 413-424.

Sroufe, L. A. (1996). Emotional development: The organization of emotional life in the early
years. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Starkey, P., Klein, A., & Wakeley, A. (2004). Enhancing young children's mathematical
knowledge through a pre-kindergarten mathematics intervention. Early Childhood
Research Quarterly, 19, 99-120.

State of Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation (2008). Voluntary prekindergarten program.
State of Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation. Retrieved 2008 from
http://www.floridajobs.org/earlylearning/VPK/FAQs.html &
http://www.floridajobs.org/earlylearning/VPK/WhyPreKimportant.html.

Stipek, D. (2004). Teaching practices in kindergarten and first grade: Different strokes for
different folks. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 19, 548-568.

Stokes, W. T. (1997). Progressive teacher education: Consciousness, identity, and knowledge. In
J. W. Fraser, D. Macedo, T. McKinnon, & W. T. Stokes (Eds.), Mentoring the mentor: A
critical dialogue i/ ith Paulo Freire (pp. 201-227). New York: Peter Lang Publishing, Inc.

Strauss, A., & Corbin, J. (1998). Basics of qualitative research: Techniques and procedures for
developing grounded theory (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.

Stuhlman, M. W., & Pianta, R. C. (2001). Teachers' narratives about their relationships with
children: Associations with behavior in classrooms. School Psychology Review, 31(2),
148-163.

Swann, J., & Pratt, J. (2003). Educational research in practice: Making sense of methodology.
New York: Continuum.

Usher, R., & Edwards, R. (1994). Postmodernism and education: Different voices, different
worlds. New York: Routledge.









Villaverde, L. E. (2004). Developing curriculum and critical pedagogy. In J. L. Kincheloe & D.
Weil (Eds.), Critical thinking and learning: An encyclopedia for parents and teachers
(pp. 131-135). Westport, CO: Greenwood Press.

Van Bakel, H. J. A., & Riksen-Walraven, J. M. (2004). AQS security scores: What do they
represent? A study in construct validation. Infant Mental Health Journal, 25(3), 175-193.

Van Dam, M., & Van Ijzendoorn, M. H. (2001). Measuring attachment security: Concurrent and
predictive validity of the parental attachment Q-set. Journal of Genetic Psychology, 149,
447-457.

Votruba-Drzal, E., Coley, R. L., & Chase-Lansdale, P. L. (2004). Child care and low-income
children's development: Direct and moderated effects. Child Development, 75(1), 296-
312.

Walker, S., & Meighan, R. (1986). The hidden curriculum of language. In R. Meighan (Ed.), A
sociology of educating (2nd ed.) (pp. 142-162). Portsmouth: Cassell Education Ltd.

Weber, E. K. (2002). Rules, right and wrong, and children. Early Childhood Education Journal,
30(2), 107-111.

Webster-Stratton, C. (1999). How to promote children's social and emotional competence.
London: Paul Chapman Publishing Ltd.

Westwood, P., Knight, B. A., & Redden, E. (1997). Assessing teachers' beliefs about literacy
acquisition: The development of the teachers' beliefs about literacy questionnaire
(TBALQ). Journal ofResearch in Reading, 20(3), 224-235.

White, J. J., & Mims 11, J. L. (2002). Narratives from a rural, southern, white woman: The
education and work ethic of a member of the class of 1931. In G. S. Boutte (Ed.),
Resounding voices: School experiences ofpeople from diverse ethnic backgrounds (pp.
215-245). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Wilkins, A. (2005). Half empty or half full? Florida's voluntary pre-kindergarten standards:
Arresting insights in education. Thomas B Fordham Foundation andInstitute, 2(1), 1-5.

Williams-Boyd, P. (2004). Empowerment: A transformative process. In J. L. Kincheloe & D.
Weil (Eds.), Critical thinking and learning: An encyclopedia for parents and teachers
(pp. 207-211). Westport, CO: Greenwood Press.

Wortham, S. C. (1995). Informal measures: Observation. In S. C. Wortham (Ed.), Measurement
and evaluation in early childhood education (pp. 93-120). Englewood Cliffs, NJ:
Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Wylie, C., & Thompson, J. (2003). The Long-term contribution of early childhood education to
children's performance--evidence from New Zealand. International Journal of Early
Years Education, 11(1), 69-78.









Yelland, N., & Kilderry, A. (2005). Against the tide: New ways in early childhood education. In
N. Yelland (Ed.), Critical issues in early childhood education (pp. 1-13). New York:
Open University Press.

Young, I. M. (2000). Five faces of oppression. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, R. Castaneda, H.
W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readingsfor diversity and social justice
(pp. 35-49). New York: Routledge.

Zigler, E., Gilliam, W. S., & Jones, S. M. (2006). A vision for universalpreschool education.
New York: Cambridge University Press.

Zigler, E., Gilliam, W. S., Jones, S. M., & Malakoff, M. (2006). The need for universal
prekindergarten for children in poverty. In E. Zigler, W. S. Gilliam, & S. M. Jones (Eds.),
A vision for universalpreschool education (pp. 69-88). New York: Cambridge University
Press.

Zimiles, H. (2000). On reassessing the relevance of the child development knowledge base to
education. Human Development, 43, 235-245.

Zuniga, X. (2000). Working for social justice: Visions and strategies for change. In M. Adams,
W. J. Blumenfeld, R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.),
Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 447-449). New York: Routledge.









BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

I was born and raised in Seoul, South Korea. I am the eldest of four children, and my

parents have definitely put high expectations on me. I graduated from Sacred Heart Women's

High School and got a bachelor' degree in earth science education from Seoul National

University in Seoul, South Korea. I have 10 years of experience teaching science to middle- and

high-school students in South Korea. I was motivated to become a teacher through my

participation in various social reform actions in my native country, such as demands for the

release of political offenders and the protection of low-income families' rights. My social

experiences led to my interest in early childhood education programs benefiting children from

low-income families and to pursue a master's degree in early childhood education. I got a

master's degree in early childhood education from Indiana University at Bloomington. As a

recipient of the Alumni Fellowship at the University of Florida, I have participated in several

educational conferences and tried to publish a journal article. I volunteered at First Presbyterian

Preschool in Gainesville, Florida for 3 years, extending my experience working with culturally

diverse children and their families.





PAGE 1

nnrnrnrrnr r nrnnrnnrn nr nn rn nnrr rnnnnrnnr nr n rnnn

PAGE 2

!"#$ %&

PAGE 3

' r(r n)* + ,-$%"#-)&."/ )/0 *$)$.+ "1)!,.# 2& -)1)&/0 &2)1),.)+ ,-$ .,342 / 3--$."53#)-)&3!/ ,+%3),1)&&%-& &6 ,34n .& 7-, & 0 #,.8!0-)&3!/ ,+%3),1)&&%-1$.%,9,4,%3" &/0 98), $ "1)!,.# & "-."2 #!%2."1 %" + ,/% 1 )8&2%33 ,-.-%)"43.& "-),."2.2+%3),93$ $.3 /,)+%2 2& *%-$ &."%2 .3."2)//),-!"%-% 3-$.-$.+ -,!0$ 0/ 2-)#!%2 &/,)8 33%)".01 ., ,8),8)!, .,34)&)-$ ,)!-3-."2%"#3!/ ,+%3),1)&&%-& &6 ,39,4$,%3-% .+.".!#$9,4 0%:.6 -$)"29."2,4.: 0;)" 39n*%3$-) 7/, 33&#,.-%-!2 8),-$ %,%&& "3 /,.1-%1.0 $ 0/."21)&& "-3.6)!-&2%33 ,-.-%)"4$ %,1)&& "-3$ 0/ 2& 6,.%"3-),& + ,3/)8 -$ *.8,)&-$ 8%,3-3-.# )8&2%33 ,-.-%)"/,)/)3.0!"-%0-$ 8% ".02%33 ,-.-%)"2 8 "3 403)9 n*)!020%5 -) 7/, 33&-$."53-),400 ",."-0%"# ,9,4$%0.,3/ 15 "9."2,4%,5. ),)*),5/0.1 39*$)%"-,)2!1 2-$ -$, .1$ ,3-)& ."2#.+ & / &%33%)"-) 1)"2!1--$%33-!24

PAGE 4

? n-$."5&8.&%08), "1)!,.#%"#& -)/!,3! &.1.2 &%1#).034n #%+ -$."53 + 2.-)&&)-$ ,."28.-$ ,9*$)%"3-%00 2.0)+ )80 .,"%"#."2.3 "3 )83 081 )"8%2 "1 %" & 4$."53.03)-)&3%3,96,)-$ ,396,)-$ ,%"0.*9."23%3,%"0 .*4$ %, "2!,%"#0)+ 9 3!//),-9."2.11 /-."1 )8*$.-n.&2)%"#$.+ .0*.3/,)+%2 2& *%-$$ %"3/%,.-%)"8),& 3-!2."22%33 ,-.-%)"4n".22%-%)"9n)* .2 6-)8-$."53-)&" -*),5)88,% "23."2" %#$6),39*$)$.+ 0%3" 2-)&*),239&.2 ." 88),--)1$ ,& !/9."2#%+ "& 0 )-3)8 $ 0/8!03!## 3-%)"38),-$ 1)&/0 -%)")8&2%33 ,-.-%)"4%".009n2 2%1.&2% 33 ,-.-%)"-) &3$%"%"#"% 1 ."2" /$ *3;!"#%"."9;!"#())5."9."2!"#;. %&4$ %,$.//3&%0%"#8.1 3 ".60 2& -))+ ,1)& 3 + ,.02%88%1!0-% 3."2*), ,% 3n1)"8,)"2*$%0 n *.3*,%-%"#&2%33 ,-.-%)"4(.-1$%"#-$ &#,)*9n, .0%: .* .0-$)8 3/)"3%6%0%--)$ 0/ )!"#1$%02, "# -.#, .-8!-!, .$ .2)8-$ &4

PAGE 5

@ rr /.# r(r444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444' n44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444A nrnr44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 0),%2.>3)0!"-.,, %"2 ,#.,"BC,)#,.&444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 %&%-.-%)"3)80),%2.>3)0!"-.,, %"2 ,#.,"BC,)#,.& 444444444444444444444444444444444D 8%"%-%)"3444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444A $ ,)60 &444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 n&/),-."1 )8-$ -!2444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 !,/)3 )8-$ -!244444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 !%2%"# 3 .,1$! 3-%)"444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 !6< 1-%+%--.& "-44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444' n(n4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444D ,%-%1.0$ ),44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444D )3-&)2 ,"%3&44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 .-%)".0 )8, %"2 ,#.,",)#,.&34444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444' 88 1-%+ 33)8-.!"2 2, %"2 ,#.,",)#,.&344444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444'? %&%-.-%)"3)8-.!"2 2, %"2 ,#.,",)#,.&344444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444'D .1$ ,$%02n",.1-%)"3%"$%02., --%"#34444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444? r.-!, )8 .1$ ,$%02n",.1-%)"3444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444?? "%0.,.0n",.1-%)"36 -* .1$ ,3."2$%02, "44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444? .!3 3)8-$ "%0.,.0n",.1-%)"36 -* .1$ ,3."2$%02, "4444444444444444444444444444444444 @ ,)60 &3)8-$ "%0.,.0n",.1-%)"36 -* .1$ ,3."2$%02, "444444444444444444444444444444@? !&&.,44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444@E 'r4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444D !.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$ -$)2)0)#4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444D .&/0%"#-,.#444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444DD .&/0%"#,)1 2!, 344444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444DE 31,%/-%)")8.,-%1%/."-3."2)"7-44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444D .-.)00 1-%)" -$)234444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444E n",+% *3444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444E 63 ,+.-%)"34444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444E'

PAGE 6

D .-.".03%3 -$)2444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444E? ,!3-*),-$%" 334444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444EE %&%-.-%)"3)8-$ -!2444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444E ?rnrrrn44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 $ %,3-.,-%1%/."-9!3."444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 !3.">3r.,,.-%+ 444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444' + "!%02%"#.35344444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444A@ !%02%"#3%#"%8%1."1 44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444A@ !%02%"#.1-%+%-% 34444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444AE !%02%"#%2 "-%-% 34444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444A !%02%"#, 0.-%)"3$%/344444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 !%02%"#/)0%-%13B-$ 2%3-,%6!-%)")83)1%.0#))23C44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 !%02%"#1)"" 1-%)"3444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 !%02%"#3%#"%8%1."1 8),3%#"33&3."25")*0 2# 44444444444444444444444444444444444444444? $ 1)"2.,-%1%/."-9 ,)"%1.4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444A ,)"%1.>3r.,,.-%+ 44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 + "!%02%"#.353444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 !%02%"#3%#"%8%1."1 444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 !%02%"#.1-%+%-% 344444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444' !%02%"#%2 "-%-% 344444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444@ !%02%"#, 0.-%)"3$%/344444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444E !%02%"#/)0%-%13B-$ 2%3-,%6!-%)")83)1%.0#))23C44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444A !%02%"#1)"" 1-%)"3444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444' !%02%"#3%#"%8%1."1 8),3%#"33&3."25")*0 2# 44444444444444444444444444444444444444444' $ $%,2.,-%1%/."-9%"244444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444'D %"2>3r.,,.-%+ 4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444' + "!%02%"#.353444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444? !%02%"#3%#"%8%1."1 444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444? !%02%"#.1-%+%-% 344444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444@ !%02%"#%2 "-%-% 344444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444@' !%02%"#, 0.-%)"3$%/344444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444@D !%02%"#/)0%-%13B-$ 2%3-,%6!-%)")83)1%.0#))23C44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444@E !%02%"#1)"" 1-%)"3444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444@A !%02%"#3%#"%8%1."1 8),3%#"33&3."25")*0 2# 44444444444444444444444444444444444444444D @nnrrrnr4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444D@ !&&.,)8%"2%"#344444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444D@ %31!33%)")8%"2%"#3444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444E .,,% ,3-)88 1-%+ .1$ ,$%02n",.1-%)"34444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444E .1%0%-.-),3)888 1-%+ .1$ ,$%02n",.1-%)"34444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444E? !&&.,44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444EE )"" 1-%)"3*%-$, +%)!3 3 .,1$44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444E n&/0%1.-%)"38),,)8 33%)".0,.1-%1 444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444' 1)&& "2.-%)"38),!,-$ 3 .,1$444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444D

PAGE 7

E rnF nrnnrrrr44444444444444444444444A nrn(4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444A' n",+% *!%2 8),-$ %,3-),&.0n",+% *4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444A' n",+% *!%2 8),-$ %,3-n"8),&.0n",+% *4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444A' n",+% *!%2 8),-$ 1)"2n"8),&.0n",+% *444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444A? n",+% *!%2 8),-$ $%,2n"8),&.0n",+% *444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444A? n",+% *!%2 8),-$ 1)"2),&.0n",+% *44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444A? r4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444AD nn444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444

PAGE 8

n .60 /.# ?!3.">310.3331$ 2!0 4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444A? ? ,)"%1.>310.3331$ 2!0 444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 ?'%"2>310.3331$ 2!0 4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444?

PAGE 9

A 63-,.1-)8%33 ,-.-%)", 3 "2-)-$ ,.2!.1$))0 )8-$ "%+ ,3%-)80),%2.%".,-%.0!08%00& "-)8-$ =!%, & "-38),-$ #, )8)1-),)8$%0)3)/$ nnrnrnrrnr r nrnnrnnrn nr nn !"#$ %& !#!3$.%,,%3" &/0 .<),!,,%1!0!&."2n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

PAGE 10

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n"/.,-%1!0.,9& 3!6< 1-%+%-3-.& "-3$)*3*$n.&%", 32%"-$%3=!.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$/,)< 1-.3* 00.3 *$n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

PAGE 11

nrnr .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3%"+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3%"1 $%021., 3 --%"#3 80 1--$ 1$.,.1,%3-%13)8+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)# ,.&3.3* 00.3)81$%021., 3 --%"#34 )0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3 &/$.3%: 31$))0, .2%" 339%"3.2)8.22, 33%"#.1$%02 1., 3 ,+%1 8),8)!, .,)021$%02, "4r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n"/.,%1!0.,9 3%"1 &)3-)8-$ /,)+%2 ,3$.+ .0, .2/, /., 21$%02, "8),5%"2 ,# .,"6 8), -$ )88 ,-$ /,)#,.&9-$ !3 -$ 3-."2.,23.3* 00.3-$ %,)*"0 33 )"/0."3-$.--$ $.+ 2 + 0)/ 2)+ ,-$ .,34$ 3-."2.,23%"10!2 3 + ,.02)&.%"393!1$. 3$ .0-$."2 3)1%.0I &)-%)".0I&)-),2 + 0)/& "-."2 & ,# "-0%,.196!--$ 2)")-3!## 3-.*.)8 .1$%"#),%",.1-%"#*%-$1$%02, "43., 3!0-9.1$ ,1$%02%",. 1-%)"3%"-$ /,)#,.&

PAGE 12

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n"$%31$./,n*%00 7/0.%"-$ !"%=! 1$.,.1,%3-%13)80),%2.>3+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#., "BC/,)#,.&."2%-3 0%&%-.-%)"393!1$.3."%".2 =!..11)!"-.6%0%-33&)8-$ /,)#, .&403)9n*%0010.,%8 -$ /!,/)3 )8-$ 3-!29.0)"#*%-$.3-.& "-)8-$ /,)60 &."2-$ %&/),."1 )8-$ 3-!24 %".009n*%00&.5 &3!6< 1-%+%-3-.& "-%"),2 ,-)%"1, .3 -$ %",".0+.0%2%-)8-$%3 3-!24 nrnrrnnn 0),%2.>3+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"BC/,)#,.&9.3-$ 3!0-)8. 1)"3-%-!-%)".0 .& "2& "-/.33 26DJ)80),%2.+),3%"r)+ &6 ,96 #."%"-$ @D31$))0 .,43." .,01$%02$))22 + 0)/& "-."2 2!1.-%)"/,)#,.&9-$ /,)#, .&%3+)0!"-.,9 $%#$=!.0%-9."28, 8), 0%#%60 1$%02, ", #.,20 33)88.&%0%"1)& 4% &%0.,-))-$ ,3-.3> /, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&39-$ /,)#,.&%36.3 2)"%-3)*" .,00 ., "%"#3-."2.,239*$%1$ 80 1-%-3)*"),#."%:.-%)"393-,!1-!, 39."2, 3)!,1 34%,3-)8.009!"0%5 &.")-$ ,3-.8!"2 2/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&39-$ /,)#,.&%3%"2 / "2 "-8,)&/!60%1 31$))033&3 B%"";,49 $--/II***4.1$&), 0)+ &), 4),#II5-8K80),%2.K6))5KA4/28 C4$.-%3-)3.9-$

PAGE 13

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n".22%-%)"9/,)+%2 ,380 7%603-,!1-!, -$ $)!,3/ ,2.."22.3/ ,* 59.3 0)"#.3-$ & --$ =!%, 2%"3-,!1-%)".0$)!,3B-.)80),%2.# "1 8),(),58),1 n"")+.-%)"9 $--/II***480),%2.<)634),#I .,00 .,"%"#II34$-&0 C4), 7.&/0 9%8. /,)+%2 ,)88 ,3.31$))0 .,/,)#,.&9%-*)!02)88 ,'$)!,3)8%"3-,!1-%)" .1 $2.-)& --$ @?$)!,, =!%, & "-4n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

PAGE 14

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

PAGE 15

@ 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&32)B-.)80),%2.# "18),(),58),1 n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n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n"),2 ,-) 7.&%" .00%"3-,!1-),3>&),.01$.,.1, 9-$ /,)#,.&

PAGE 16

D =!%, 3.00%"3-,!1-),3-)6 31, 26 8), &/0)& "-."2, 31, 2.-0 .3-)"1 + ,@ .,34 ), )+ ,9-$ /,)#,.&/0.1 33-,%1-0%&%-3)".1$ ,1$%02,.-% )3."210.333%: 34 .3 2)"-$ ")-%)"-$.-0)*.1$ ,1$%02,.-%)3."23&.00#,)!/3%: 30 .2).$%#$=!.0%-/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&9-$ /,)#,.&, =!%, 3)" .1$ ,-)6 3/)"3%60 8),.-&)31$%02, "9*%-$.10.333%: ")--) 71 21$%02, "4n8)" 10.33$.3),&), 1 $%02, "9 -$ 10.33&!3-$.+ .-0 .3-)" .22%-%)".0%"3-,!1-),*$)%3")-, =!%, 2-)$.+ .$%02 + 0)/& "-33)1%.),1)&/0 ." & ,# "-0%,.1-,.%"%"#1 )!,3 B-.)80),%2. # "18),(),58),1 n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rnnnrnrrnnn $%3%3-$ -$%,2 .,-$.--$ 3-.$.3)88 2-$ /,)#,.&9*$%1$/ ,)+%2 3 + 8)!, .,)021$%02%"0),%2.*%-$8, 9/!60%108!"2 2 2!1.-%)"%"-$ .,/,%),-) 5%"2 ,#.,"4)* + ,9-$ /,)#,.&3-%003$)*3&."0%&%-.-%)"3 + "$)!#$&." /., "-3., /!--%"#-$ %,1$%02%"-$ /,)#,.&4)3-)8.009-$ 3-."2.,2 3., /)),L-$.-%39 .&)"#"&%"%&!&3-."2.,23-$.-$.+ 6 "2 + 0)/ 26-$ r.-%)".0n"3%-!8),.,0 2!1.-%)" 3 .,1$BrnC8),3-.8!"2 2/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&39 -$ /,)#,.& & -3)"08)!,3-."2.,23 .,00 .,"%"#3-."2.,239&.7%&!&10.3 33%: 93-.881$%02,.-%)9."2

PAGE 17

E &)"%-),%"#B.," --9!32-9,% 2&."9)29M%"3*),-$9EC40),%2.%3.&)"# )"03 + 3-.3-$.-& -0 33-$."$.08)8rn>3=!.0%-6 "1$&.,539."2-$ /,)#,.&%3 1)"3%2 2-)$.+ 3 ,%)!3/,)60 &36rnBrn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r.-%)".0n"3-%-!8),.,02!1.-%)" 3 .,1$BDC/)%"-3)!--$.--$ 0), %2.%"2 ,#.," .2%" 331, ,N.-))08),.33 33%"#-$ 31$))0, .2%" 33)8.00 ",%"#5%"2 ,#.," ,3N%3 ")-10.33%8% 2.3.,%#),)!3 +.0!.-%)"2 3%#"6 1.!3 G-$ 1, ,&. ),&.")-/,)+ -) % 02.11!,.%"8),&.-%)".6)!-*$.-1$%02, "5")**$ "-$ 3-.,-5%"2 ,#.,"HBrn9 DC4$!39-$ rn3-.3-$.-%-%3!"8.%,."2!"*%3 -)0%"51$%02, ">3%"2 ,#. ," 1, ,31), 36.15-)*$.-1$%02, "0 .," 22!,%"#-$ .,),-)-$ /,)+%2 ,>3 .11)!"-.6%0%-4n".22%-%)"9-$ 0.*, =!%, 3-$.--$ 3-./.,-& "-)82!1.-%)"&!3.33 33-$ 31$))0, .2%" 33)8.00 ",%"#5%"2 ,#.," ,3.11),2%"#-)3-., .2%" 333-."2.,23 ."2&!3-G 3-.60%3$5%"2 ,#.,", .2%" 33,.3HB(%05%"39@9/4?C4"2 ,-$ 0 ),%2. 33&9./,)+%2 ,%3/!-)"/,)6.-%)"."2%33!6< 1--)%",+ "-%)"9%8 -$ /,)+%2 ,2) 3 ")-& -%-331$))0, .2%" 33-.,# -38),-*) .,34n8./,)+%2 ,8. %03-)& -%-3-.,# -38), 8)!, .,39-$ /,)+%2 ,0)3 3%-3 0%#%6%0%--)/.,-%1%/.%"-$ /,)#,.&4$%3 .11)!"-.6%0%-33&&%#$-0 .2/,)+%2 ,3-)/, 8 ,1$%02, "8, )&!// ,."2&%220

PAGE 18

%"1)& 8.&%0% 3-)1$%02, "8,)&0)*%"1)& 8.&%0% 34$%3%36 1.!3 -$)3 1)")&%1.00 .2+."-.# 21$%02, "., 0%5 0-)$.+ 3!88%1% "-.1.2 &%135%003."26 0, .2/, /., 28), 5%"2 ,#.,"9."2./,)+%2 ,%3.60 -) .3%0& -%-331$))0, .2%" 3 3-.,# -36 ",)00%"# -$)3 .2+."-.# 21$%02, "4 3., 3!0-96)-$-$ /)),3-."2.,23."2."%".2 =!..11)!"-.6%0%-33 &)8-$ /,)#,.&., 0%5 0-)" #.-%+ 0%"80! "1 -$ 31$))0, .2%" 33)81$%02, "8 ,)&0)* %"1)& 8.&%0% 34n"/.,-%1!0.,9-$ /,)#,.&9!"0%5 &)3-)8-$ 3-.8!"2 2/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3-$.-&.5 ." 88),--)2 1, .3 -$ .1$% + & "#./6 -* 2%3.2+."-.# 21$%02, "."2-$ %,.2+."-.# 2/ ,392) 3")-3-.10 .,0),3/ 1 %8%1.00$)*-) %&/,)+ 2%3.2+."-.# 21$%02, ">331$))0, .2%" 334), 7.&/0 9r *; ,3 ."2 "-!15.%& -)/,)+%2 1$%02, "%"/)+ ,-*%-$8, /, 31$))0 2!1.-%)"9."2r *; ,3 0.* 3/ 1%.00 &."2.38, 9$%#$=!.0%-/, 31$))08),'."2? .,)0230%+%"#%"-$ 3-.>3$%#$ 3-/)+ ,2%3-,%1-3%"),2 ,-), & 2-$ %,3)1%) 1)")&%12%3.2+."-.# 3B-.) 80),%2.# "18), (),58),1 n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

PAGE 19

A %"1, .3 26-$ /,)#,.&-$.-2) 3")-&.5 .10 .,3-.& "-.6)!$)*-)%&/,)+ 2%3.2+."-.# 21$%02, ">331$))0, .2%" 33."2%3")-3!//),26-$ 3-.>30. ,# ,%"+ 3-& "-4 rrnn n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

PAGE 20

2 + 0)/-$ %,1,%-%1.0-$%"5%"#."2/,)60 &3)0+%"#35%003-$,)!#$ 88 1 -%+ .1$ ,1$%02 %",.1-%)"3."2 + "-!.00-.5 -$ %,/0.1 3%"./.,-%1%/.-),92 & )1,.-%13)1% -4$.-%3-)3.9 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"1)"-,%6!3-)2 + 0)/%"#-$ 5%"23)81, %-%1.0-$%"5%"#."2 /,)60 &3)0+%"#35%003-$.-., 2 28),1$%02, "-) + "-!.00-.5 -$ % ,/0.1 3%". /.,-%1%/.-),92 &)1,.-%13)1% -43., 3!0-9%"-$%3/,)< 1-G 88 1-%+ H.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)" %32 8%" 28,)&.1,%-%1.0/ ,3/ 1-%+ 9."2-$ 2 8%"%-%)")8G 88 1-%+ H .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"N -$ /,)1 33-$.-0 .236)-$.1$ ,3."21$%02, "-)3)0+ -$ %,)*"/,)60 &3 -$,)!#$1,%-%1.0 -$%"5%"#N%32%88 "-8,)&-$ -,.2%-%)".02 8%"%-%)")8 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1 $%02%",.1-%)"4 nnn 3%"#.8 &%"%3-I1,%-%1.0-$ ),%",/, -.-%)"92*.,2."2( 3-#.BAA?C/)%"2)!-$.--$ %",.1-%)"36 -* ".1$ ,3."21$%02, "%"10.33,))&3* "),& .00G$%#$%"/)* ."20)*%"3)0%2.,%-HB/4C9."21)"10!2 2-$.-&)3-)8-$ 1)"+ ,3.-%)"36 -* ".1$ ,3."2 1$%02, "3$)* 2/)* ,, 0.-%)"36 -* "-$ &4$.-%3-)3.9.1$ ,3 7 ,1%3 !"%0.,.0 .1$ ,.!-$),%-)+ ,1$%02, "%"),2 ,-)8),1 1$%02, "-)/.33%+ 00 ., ".6)2)85")*0 2# -$,)!#$!" =!.01)&&!"%1.-%)"6 -* ".1$ ,3."21$%02, "4 n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n1.00)!,".& HB.-:M 10 00."9AAEC4

PAGE 21

n"-$ 1.3 )8-,.2%-%)".0*$)0 10.33%"3-,!1-%)"9.1$ ,3&)3-00 .21 0.33,))&-.05%"#9 2 1%2 *$)%3-)-.059."2"),&.00 +.0!.*$.-1$%02, "., =!%, 2),/ ,& %-2-)3.403)9 .1$ ,3.351$%02, ".0)-)8=! 3-%)"3."21$%02, "."3* ,+ ,6,% 809." 2&)31)&&!"%1.-%)")11!,3*%-$%".G1 "-,.0.1-%)":)" 4H$%35%"2)83-,!1-!, 29.1$ 2%, 12 %"3-,!1-%)"0 .231$%02, "-)1)&/0*%-$*$.--$ 0 .2 ,3)83)1% --$%"5. 3* 00.3-$ 3-.-!3 =!)93%"1 .1$ ,38),1 .001$%02, "-)&)+ -$,)!#$G-$ 3.& 0 .,"%"# 3 =! "1 HB( 3-*))29 "%#$-9M 22 "9AAE9/4EC4n".22%-%)"91$%02, "$.+ -,)!60 # --%"#)//),-!"%-% 3-) 1)&&!"%1.-$ %,)*"-$)!#$-39%2 .39."28 0%"#3.3* 00.3-)3$., -$ %,)*"3),% 3."2 7/ ,% "1 3*%-$)-$ ,34 3., 3!0-9-$ 1)"+ ,3.-%)"36 -* ".1$ ,3."21$%02, ", 3!0-%"#8, )&-$ !"%0.,.0 .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3/, + "-)!"#1$%02, "8,)&2 + 0)/%"#-$ % ,.6%0%-% 3-)3)0+ /,)60 &3L8,)&, 1)#"%:%"#."22 .0%"#*%-$-$ %,)*"/,)60 &3%"-$ %,2.%00%+ 3L."28,)& .,-%1!0.-%"#-$ %, 7/ ,% "1 39-$)!#$-39" 239%2 .39."2/,)60 &3%"10. 33,))&34 r nnn!nn $ !"%0.,.0.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3%"1$%021., 3 --%"#3.00)*1 $%02, "8 )//),-!"%-% 3-) "#.# %"2 + 0)/%"#-$ %,2%88 "-.6%0%-% 3%"2 / "2 "0."2.1-%+ 06 /, + "-%"#.1$ ,38,)& 88 1-%+ 0%",.1-%"#*%-$1$%02, "4.5%"# %"-).11)!"--$ 8.1--$.88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3%"1$%021., 3 --%"#33%#"%8%1. "-01)"-,%6!-)1$%02, ">3 .,00 .,"%"#."22 + 0)/& "-9-$%3/,)60 &%31)"3%2 2.-$, .--)%& /,)+%"#-$ =!.0%-)8 1$%021., ."2)-$ .,01$%02$))2/,)#,.&34 n"/.,-%1!0.,9+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3%"1$%021., 3 --% "#3"2-)8)1!3)" 1$%02, ">3.1.2 &%11)&/ "1 ,.-$ ,-$."-$ *$)0 )8 33 "-%.035%00 38),3!11 338!031$))0 .2%" 3393!1$.33 08, #!0.-),35%0034$%3"2 "10 .23-$ 1)"+ ,3.%)"36 -* ".1$ ,3 ."21$%02, "-).%&.-%&/,)+%"#1$%02, ">3.1.2 &%1)!-1)& 3,.-$ ,-$.",. "#%"#)+ ,+.,%)!3

PAGE 22

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nnn!nn $ /!,/)3 )8-$%3, 3 .,1$/,)< 1-%3-)%"+ 3-%#.6.,,% ,3-)."28 .1%0%-.-),3)8 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"39.32 8%" 28,)&.1,%-%1.0/ 3/ 1-%+ 9%"+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3%"1$%021., 3 --%"#34$%3!0-%&.0.%&3-) $ 0/.1$ ,38%"2*.3-) )+ ,1)& -$ !"%0.,.0.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3%"+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,# .,"/,)#,.&3%" 1$%021., 3 --%"#3."2 &/)* ,6)-$-$ &3 0+ 3."21$%02, "-$,)!#$ 88 1%+ .1$ ,1$%02 %",.1-%)"34 "rn# n$rnn .3 2)"-$ -$ ), -%1.0),% "-.-%)")81,%-%1.0-$ ),."2/)3-&)2 ,"%3& 9-$ #!%2%"# 3 .,1$=! 3-%)"%39G($.-5%"23)86.,,% ,3-)."28.1%0%-.-),3)8 88 1 -%+ .1$ ,1$%02 %",.1-%)"32).1$ ,38.1 %"+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3% "1$%021., 3 --%"#3PH$%3

PAGE 23

' =! 3-%)"%36.3 2)"-$ ")-%)"-$.-.1$ ,3.3-$ )//, 33),38),1 1$%02, "-)0 .,"-$ 2)&%"."-1!0-!, ."2%2 )0)#+%.-$ %",.1-%)"36 -* "-$ &3 0+ 3."21$%02, "9."2 .1$ ,3.3-$ )//, 33 2., 8),1 2-)1)"-,%6!-)&.%"-.%"%"#-$ 3)1% .0%" =!.0%-% 3*%-$%"-$ $% ,.,1$%1.03-,!1-!, )831$))034 !% &n!rn n*.36),"."2#, *!/%"-$ ), ."3)1% -9*$%1$*.3 7-, & 0$)&)# )!3%" ,&3)8 -$"%1%-91!0-!, 9."2$%3-),9."2*.3./--)6 .3%02)&%".26 -$ %2 )0)#)8-$ &.%"3-, .&3)1% -4n-3$)&)# %-&.5 3/ )/0 8)00)*2)&%"."-,!0 3),+% */)%"-3,.-$ -$."/!,3!%"#-$ %,)*")/%"%)"3),0%8 3-0 393%"1 / )/0 ., .8 ,.%2)86 %"#%3)0.28,)&-$ &.<),%-#,)!/62%3)6 %"#-$ "),&3)8-$ 2)&%"."-#,)!/4), 7.&/0 9n$.+ 6 "-.!#$-), 3/ 1-."2")-2%3)6 3 "%),39%"10!2%"#.1$ ,39/., "-39."2.2&%"%3-, .-),343/ 1%.00 *$ "n*.3.3-!2 "-%"), .9n1)!02")-%&.#%" -$ /)33%6%0%--$.-.1$ ,3>%"3-,!1-%)"*.3 *,)"#),-$.-n1)!02.35..1$ ,3)& -$%"#6 8), 6 %"#1.00 2)"6 -$ .1$ ,4 !,-$ ,&), 9&/., "-3.63)0!03!//),2.1$ ,3>%"3-,!1-%)".3 00.331$))02%, 1-%)"3 ."2&.2 -$ %,1$%02, "8)00)*-$ 3 2%, 1-%)"3*%-$)!-." 71 /-%)"34),%"3."1 9&/., "-3 6)!#$-& *$%1$ + ,6))53.1$ ,3, 1)&& "2 2."2.0*.30 -& /.,-%1% /.%"%"3%2 .3 00.3)!-3%2 10.33,))&.1-%+%-% 343., 3!0-9n-)-.00-,!32.1$ ,3>)" 3%2 2/ ,3/ 1-%+ 3 ."2)" *.%"3-,!1-%)"%"10.33,))&3."20 .," 21)"8),&%-."2/.33%+ 33, .-$ ,-$." 1,%-%1.0-$%"5%"#35%0034 )"-,.,-)&3-,)"#6 0% 83.6)!-.1$ ,3."231$))0%"#9n*.33)& -%& 3 2%3.//)%"2-$.-.1$ ,38, =! "-0 7/, 33 2-$ %,1)&/0.%"-3.6)!--$ .1$%"#/,)8 33%)"%" 10.33,))&34n"/.,-%1!0.,9.1$ ,31)&/0.%" 2-$.--$ %,3.0.,% 3* 0)* ,-$."-$)3 )8)-$ <)63."2-$.--$ 3!88 28,)&.0)-)8&%31 00." )!32!-% 34n$ .,2-$ 3 5%"23)8 1)&/0.%"-3 &), 8, =! "-0*$ "n.-"2 2-$ /,%+.$%#$31$))0-$."*$ "n.-"2 2-$ /!60%1&%220

PAGE 24

? 31$))04$%3%36 1.!3 ), ."/,%+.31$))03., 1)"-,)00 266)-$-$ %, 8)!"2.-%)"3."2-$ ), ."#)+ ,"& "-9*$%0 ), ."/!60%131$))03., 2)&%".2)"06-$ ), ."#)+ ,"& "%",&3)8.1$ ,397-6))539/$3%1.0 "+%,)"& "-398.1%0%-% 39 =!% /& "-9."21!,,%1!0.4$%3 & ."3-$.--$ 3 31$))033&3., + ,$% ,.,1$%1.003-,!1-!, 2."2/ + "-.1$ ,38,)& -$%"5%"#1, .-%+ 0."21,%-%1.00.3* 00.3 7/, 33%"#-$ %,-$)!#$3."2)/%"%)"38, 04$!39n 8 0--$.-.1$ ,3* %2 "-%8% 2.3-$ 0)* 3-/ ,3)"3%"-$ $% ,.,1 $%1.0),#."%:.-%)"3)8 31$))03 + "-$)!#$-$ 10.33%8% 2.3-$ $%#$ 3-/)3%-%)"%" .1$10.33 ,))&4 n".22%-%)"9%"-$ AE3."2A39n$.26 "-.!#$-3!6< 1-3*%-$3%7-),3 + "3-!2 "-3%"-$ 10.33,))&%"), .4$%3/$3%1.0 "+%,)"& "-8),1 2.1$ 3-)1)"3%2 ,)" *.91,.&&%"#& -$)23)8.1$%"#.3-$ 6 3-*.)8%"3-,!1-%)"L8), 7 .&/0 9.1$ ,3$.2 3-!2 "-3& &),%: + ,-$%"#%"7-6))539."23-!2 "-3* ")-.00)* 2-).35-$ % ,.1$ ,3 =! 3-%)"3.6)!--$ 1)""-)8-$ 7-6))534 .1$ ,3.0*.33.%23)& -$%"#%"),2 ,-)-,."3&%5")*0 2# 9."23-!2 "-3)"00%3" 2-)-$ %,%"3-,!1-%)"%"),2 ,-)# -.#))2#,.2 4n$. 2 + 7/ ,% "1 2),%&.#%" 2.1$ ,3>%"3-,!1-%)"6.3 2)"2%.0)#! 9, 80 1-%)"9."2 1)&&!"%1.-%)"4n$.2)"0*,%-"2)*".1$ ,3>0 1-!, 38,)&-$ 6 #%""% "#-)-$ "24)& )8-$ .1$ ,3, #!0.,01$ 15 2%83-!2 "-3-))5")3."21)"3%2 23-!2 "-3> .6%0%-% 3-)*,%2)*"10 .,0."2.11!,.0.3)" )8-$ 71 00 "-3-!2 "-3>-.0 "-34n& .2 + 88),--) 7.1-0*,%2)*".1$ ,3>0 1-!, 3%"10.33."23/ "-.0)-)8-%& ),#."%:%"#."2, *,%-%"#-$ 0 1-!, 3.-$)& .8,10.334), )+ ,9n*.33)& -%& 3.60 -)1)"-.1 -.1$ ,3%"),2 ,-)-.05 .6)!-&8!-!, 0%5 ",%"#&" 7-31$))096!-,., 0#)-%"-)!1$*%-$.1$ ,3%"),2 ,-) 2%31!33/ ,3)".0&.-,34($ "n*.31.00 2)"6.1$ ,39n 7/ 12-$.-n*)!026 6!5 2 ),*.," 2,.-$ ,-$."/,.%3 2), "1)!,.# 24

PAGE 25

@ n"3$),-9n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
PAGE 26

D n(n n"-$%31$./,n*%00, +% *-$ 0%,.-!, )".1$ ,1$%02%",.1 -%)"3.3* 00.3)"/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&39 3/ 1%.003-.8!"2 2/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,) #,.&396!3%"#-$ -$ ), -%1.0),% "-.-%)")81,%-%1.0-$ ),."2/)3-&)2 ,"%3&4 7.&%"% "#-$ 88 1-%+ 33."2 0%&%-.-%)"3)83-.8!"2 2/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&39-$%30%,.-!, +% *3$)*3-$ # ,.0 1$.,.1,%3-%13)83-.8!"2 2/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3-$.-+)0!".,/, 5%"2 ,#.," /,)#,.&3%"1$%021., 3 --%"#3., 6.3 2)"4$%30%,.-!, +% *%"10 !2 3$)*.1$ ,1$%02 %",.1-%)"3%"1$%021., 3 --%"#3/0..3%#"%8%1."-,)0 %"1$%02, "> 3 .,00 .,"%"#."2 2 + 0)/& "-403)9-$%3, +% */, 3 "-3$)*.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3., %"80! "1 26 2%88 "-8.1-),3)81$%021., 3 --%"#3."2&.%"01)"3%3-)8-.056 ".1$ ,3."21$%02, "4 n".22%-%)"9-$%3, +% *0))53.-$)*.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3., 1$.,.1,%: 2.3!"%0.,.09.3 00.3$)*-$ !"%0.,.0.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3/, + "-1$%02, "8, )&6 %"#.*., )8-$ %, 3)1%.0, .0%-."2-.5%"#.1-%)"-)&.5 1$."# 3%"-$.-, .0%-4%". 009-$%3, +% *1)"3%2 ,3 $)*.1$ ,3.3-$ )//, 33 2."2)//, 33),3., .60 -))+ ,1)& -$ !"%0., .0.1$ ,1$%02 %",.1-%)"3%"1$%021., 3 --%"#36-.5%"#.11)!"-)8-$ 1.!3 3."2/, )60 &3)8-$ !"%0.,.0 .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"34 nnnn ,%-%1.0-$ ), 7.&%" 3G-$ /.-,"3."2& ."%"#3 ".12*%-$% "."2.&)"#/ )/0 %" 3/ 1%8%13)1%.00)1.-%)"3.-3/ 1%8%1/)%"-3%"$%3-),H."2 7/, 33 3 G/.,-%1!0.,, 0.-%)"3)8 1!0-!, 9/)* ,9."2%2 "-%-HB "."9?9/4@?C4n-.03).33!& 3-$.-G-$ 0. -%)"3$%/ 6 -* "1)"1 /-."2)6< 1-."26 -* "3%#"%8% ,."23%#"%8% 2%3" + ,3.60 ),8%7 2."2%3 )8"& 2%.26-$ 3)1%.0, 0.-%)"3)81./%-.0%3-/,)2!1-%)"."21)"3!&/-% )"L-$.-1 ,-.%" #,)!/3%"."3)1% -."2/.,-%1!0.,3)1% -% 3., /,%+%0 # 2)+ )-$ ,3L-$.-&.%"3-, .&

PAGE 27

E 3 .,1$/,.1-%1 3., # ,.009.0-$)!#$&)3-)8"!"*%--%"#09%&/ 0%1.2%"-$ /,)2!1-%)" )833&3)810.339,.1 9."2# "2 ,)//, 33%)"HB%"1$ 0) M1., "9@9 /4'?C4,)& -$%3/ ,3/ 1-%+ 9.003)1%.0%",.1-%)"36 -* ".1$ ,3."23-!2 "3., 1$.,.1,%: 2.3 $% ,.,1$%1.003-,!1-!, 293%"1 3-!2 "-3*."--)6 *.,2 28), 7$%6%%"#2%31%/0%" 9 %"00 1-!.06 $.+%),9),$.,2*),5B%,)!79AC4 .1$ ,39.3 7/ ,-3G/)33 33%"#5")*0 2# )8."2
PAGE 28

11),2%"#-)%,)!7BC9%2 )0)#G2%#36 .-$-$ /$ ")& ".08),&3)810.33 ,))& 5")*0 2# ."23)1%.0/,.1-%1 3."2$ 0/3-)0)1.-$ 3-,!1-!,%"#/,%"1%/0 3."2%2 .3-$.& 2%.6 -* "-$ 2)&%"."-3)1% -."2-$ + ,2. 7/ ,% "1 3)8.1$ ,3."23-!2 "-3HB/4 DC403)9%2 )0)#%3.0*.3/,)2!1 29 7/, 33 29."2.11 /2-$,)!#$/.,-%1!0 .,3)1%.0 /,.1-%1 3*%-$%".3/ 1%8%13)1%.01)"7-3!1$.3.1$ ,3>2.%0, )!-%" 3%"10.33,))&3&.5%"# 1!,,%1!0.9/0.""%"#."2.1$%"#0 33)"393-%"#3-!2 "-39."21)&&!"%1.-%"#*%$3-!2 "-3 B%,)!79C4n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rnn ,%-%1.0-$ ), 7/0.%"3-$.-.1$ ,39.3 7/ ,-3/,%+%0 # 2)+ ,1$%02, "9 7 ,1%3 /)* %"-$ 10.33,))&L-$.-%39.1$ ,3-,."3&%--$ 2)&%"."-%2 )0)#)8."3)1% -)-$ %,1$%02, -$,)!#$1!,,%1!0.."2-$ %",.1-%)"36 -* ".1$ ,3."21$%02, "41) "3%2 ,%"#-$ 0.-%)"3$%/6 -* ".1$ ,3."21$%02, "-)6 %"1)&/.-%60 91,%-%1. 0-$ ),10.,%8% 3-$ 1$.,.1,%3-%13)8-$ 0.-%)"3$%/6 -* ".1$ ,3."21$%02, "4)* + ,91,%-%1.0-$ ),2) 3 ")-#%+ 2 -.%03.6)!-$)*.1$ ,3>/)* ,)+ ,1$%02, "%3 7 ,1%3 2-$,)!#$.1$ ,3>."2

PAGE 29

A 1$%02, ">3.1-%+%-% 3),,)!-%" 3*%-$%"2%88 "-10.33,))&3 --%"#34 n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n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

PAGE 30

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n")-$ ,*),239-$ %",.1-%)"36 -* ".1$ ,3."21$%02, "%"10!2 +.,% -)8 2%31)!,3 39."2-$ 2%31)!,3 3., #)+ ," 26-$ /)* ,-$.-2 ,&%" 3G *$.-1)!"-3.3 5")*0 2# H."2G*$.-1."6 3.%2."22)" 6*$)&HB."9@9/4C9.3* 00.36-$ /)* ,-$.-1)"-,)033!1$5")*0 2# L8), 7.&/0 9.1$ ,3>.!-$),%-&.5 3 7-%",/, 2

PAGE 31

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rnnrrnnn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n"/.,-%1!0.,9/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3 /!,3! %&/,)+%"#-$ 31$))0, .2%" 33)8.-,%351$%02, "6/,)+%2%"#-$ &*%$ ",%1$%"# 0 .,"%"# 7/ ,% "1 34$%3%3, 0.2-)-$ 8.1--$.-1$%02, "8,)&1$,)"% 1.00/)),8.&%0% 3., &), 3 ,%)!30."21)"3%3"-02%3.2+."-.# 2-$."-$)3 %"-,."3%-),/)+ ,-."2$. + -$ 0)* 3-31), 3)"3-3)80."#!.# ."231$))0, .2%" 3335%003Brn. ,0$%02.,

PAGE 32

' 3 .,1$r -*),59@L)-,!6.,:.09)0 9M$.3 ."32.0 9?C4$%3%3 6 1.!3 -$ $.+ ,., 0 7/ ,% "1 2.2 =!.3-%&!0%2!,%"#-$ 1,%-%1.0/ ,%)2)8-$ %,1)#"%-%+ 2 + 0)/& "-4n"-$ 1.3 )8-$ 1)&6%".-%)")80)*=!.0%-1$%021., ."2/)),$)& 0 .,"%"# "+%,)"& "-39%"10!2%"#&.,".0 2!1.-%)"."21)#"%-%+ 3-%&!0.-%)"91$%02, "2%3/ 0.3 ,%)!3 7,".0%:%"#6 $.+%),/,)60 &3."20)*0 + 01)#"%-%+ 2 + 0)/& "-4 $!396/,)+%2%"#.-,%35 1$%02, "*%-$)//),-!"%-% 3-)2 + 0)/-$ %,, .2%" 338),31$))09/, 5%"2 ,#. ,"/,)#,.&3 /, + "-.-,%351$%02, "8,)& 7/ ,% "1%"#.2+ ,3 )!-1)& 3, 3!0-%"#8 ,)&1$%02$))2/)+ ,-9 8), 7.&/0 90)*3 08 3&9!"2 ,.1$% + & "-9."2."-%3)1%.06 $.+%),4 $ &/$.3%3)8/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3)"31$))0, .2%" 33%36.3 2) "-$ ")-%)" -$.--$ 0 .,"%"#-$.--.5 3/0.1 6 8), -$ 8),&.031$))0%"#3%#"%8% 1."-0%"80! "1 3-$ 0 .,"%"# -$.--.5 3/0.1 .8,*.,2BO%#0 ,9%00%.&9M;)" 39DC4n")-$ ,*),23 9%"2%+%2!.01$%02, ">3 3!11 33-$,)!#$)!-31$))0%"#."2%".2!0-0%8 %31,%-%1.00.88 126-$ / ."2=!.0%-)8 0 .,"%"# 7/ ,% "1 3/,)+%2 22!,%"#-$ /, 31$))0 .,3411),2%"#-)1 )3-6 8%-.".03%3 BC9/, 31$))0.-"2."1 $.33$),-."20)"#,&/)3%-%+ 88 1-3)". +.,% -)8.1.2 &%1 ."23)1%.01)&/ "1% 393!1$.3 2!1.-%)".0.1$% + & "-."2 1)")&%1* 006 % "#%"-) .2!0-$))2B ")023M &/0 9DC4n"2 -.%09/, 31$))0/,)#,.&30 .2-).0. ,# 2!1-%)"%" #,.2 "-%)"93/ 1%.0 2!1.-%)"/0.1 & "-9."2$%#$31$))02,)/)!-,.34$!3 9/, 31$))0 /,)#,.&31)"-,%6!-), 2!1%"#-$ 28),8!-!, & 2%.031$))03 ,+%1 3%"10 !2%"#3/ 1%.0 2!1.-%)"."2#,.2 "-%)".3* 00.31)3-38),.2&%"%3-,.-%)"."2/,)1 33 %"#)81,%& 1.3 3), %"1.,1 ,.-%)"6/, /.,%"#/, 31$))0#,.2!.38),0 332 0%"=! "1 ."28 ,.,, 3-3%" .2!0-$))24n"/.,-%1!0.,9$%#$=!.0%-1$%021., /)3%-%+ 0.88 1-3-$ 2 + 0)/& "-.0)!-1)& 3)8 .-,%351$%02, "."2%30%5 0-)$.+ .0.3-%"#%&/.1-)".1.2 &%1/ 8),&."1 )8-$ 1$%02, "4 $%3%36 1.!3 $%#$=!.0%-1$%021., .00)*3.-,%351$%02, "-)$.+ ")//),-!"%--)&.5 !/

PAGE 33

'' 8),-$ %,/)),0 .,"%"# 7/ ,% "1 3, 3!0-%"#8,)&-$ %,/)),$)& "+%, )"& "-39 + "-$)!#$ $%#$=!.0%-1$%021., 2) 3")-2%, 1-00 .2-)1$%02, ">3/)3%-%+ 2 + 0)/ & "-.0)!-1)& 34), 7.&/0 9$%#$=!.0%-1$%021., 1."$ 0/ -$"%1&%"),%-1$%02, "-)2 + 0 )/2%88 "-35%003-) $."20 -$ 1!,, "-."2!"/, 2%1-.60 /,)60 &3, 3!0-%"#8,)&,.1%3&),2%31 ,%&%".-%)"%"-$ 3)1% -.3* 00.3-), %"8),1 -$ %,,.1%.0."2/ ,3)".0%2 "-%-% 3B ;)$"3)"9;. # ,9."2)0/$9 .!3 9(.,29Mrn.,0$%02., 3 .,1$r -*),59'C43., 3!0-9 /, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3., ,))2%"-$ ")-%)"-$.-/, 31$))0/,)#,.&3/0. ."%&/),-."-,)0 %" $ 0/%"#1$%02, 7/."2-$ %,2 + 0)/& "-.0)!-1)& 3-$,)!#$ ",%1$%"#0 ., "%"# 7/ ,% "1 3 ."29%"/.,-%1!0.,9$ 0/%"#2%3.2+."-.# 21$%02, ",31$))0.3* 00/, /., 2.3-$ %, .2+."-.# 2/ ,34 1$))0, .2%" 33" 23&!0-%2%& "3%)".03!//),-.3* 00.3-$ .6%0%-% 3)8 1$%02, -$ &3 0+ 393!1$.3.# .//,)/,%.&)-),35%0039 &)-%)".0."26 $.+%),.0, # !0.-%)"9.2!0-."2 / ,%",.1-%)"35%00391)&&!"%1.-%)"35%0039."21)#"%-%+ ."2.1.2 &%135% 003Br !&."M )35)39@LO%#0 ,9%00%.&9M;)" 39DC4$ &!0-%2%& "3%)".03!//),-%"10!2 38.&%0 3)!,1 30%5 #))2/$3%1.0."2& "-.0$ .0-$931$))0, 3)!,1 33!1$.3/, )8 33%)".0 2 + 0)/& "-8),.1$ ,39."21)&&!"%-, 3)!,1 3%"10!2%"#$%#$=!.0%-1$%021 ., BO%#0 ,9 %00%.&9M;)" 39DC4), 7.&/0 91$%02, ">30."#!.# ."21)#"%-%+ 35%003 9*$%1$., %&/),-."-/, 2%1-),3)8-$ %,31$))0, .2%" 339., 0%" .,0.33)1%.2 *%-$1$%021., =!.0%-9 %"10!2%"#.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"34B!,1$%".09 %3" %"6 ,#9,. "-9M0%88),29L !,1$%".09)6 ,-39r.6),39M,."-9AADLrn.,0$%02., 3 .,1$r -*),59L rn.,0$%02., 3 .,1$r -*),59'Lrn.,0$%02., 3 .,1$r -*),59 ?.Lrn.,0$%02., 3 .,1$r -*),59?6Lrn.,0 $%02., 3 .,1$ r -*),5M!"1."9'L.,5 9?L %3" %"6 ,#9!,1$%".090%88),29!05%"9)* 39

PAGE 34

'? .#."9M.: <%."9C4$.-%3-)3.91., #%+ ,3>0."#!.# 3-%&!0.-%)" 3-,)"#0%"80! "1 3 1$%02, ">30."#!.# ."21)#"%-%+ 2 + 0)/& "-9."2$%#$=!.0%-1$%021., %30% 5 0-)/,)+%2 1$%02, "*%-$&), )//),-!"%-% 3-)+ ,6.00%",.1-*%-$1., #%+ ,34 )* + ,9G&), $%#$ =!.0%-1., 2) 3")-0 .2-)6 -,)!-1)& 3."2&), 0)*=!.0%-1., 2) 3 ")-0 .2-)*),3 )!-1)& 3%"."3%&/0 0%" .,*.9H."2 .,0."2 7"3%+ 1$%021., 9% "."2)8%-3 089%3" %-$ 2 0 ,%)!3"),.2+."-.# )!38),1$%02, ">31)#"%-%+ ."20."#!.# 2 + 0)/& "-B rn.,0 $%02., 3 .,1$r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rnn!rnrrnnn 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3$.+ #,)*".3)" -/ )8 88 1-%+ /, 31$))0 /,)#,.&-) & --$ 31$))0, .2%" 33" 23)8.001$%02, "9."23-.8!"2 2/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3$.+ 6 1)& %"1, .3%"#01)&&)".1,)33-$ ".-%)"4 + ,.03-!2% 33$)*-$.-3-.8!"2 2/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3/)3%-%+ 0.88 1-1$%02, ">32 + 0)/& "-.01)& / "1 9%"10!2%"#3)1%.09 0."#!.# 9."2.1.2 &%135%003B.," --9.&9M;!"#9@L%00%.&MO%#0 ,9L),&0 ;,49. ,9$%00%/39M.*3)"9@L),&0 ;,4M$%00%/39@L;.1)63)"9'L)* 39!,1$%".09%."-.9,."-90%88),29M.,6.,%"9L..,)9%."-.9M-!$0 &."9?L -.,5 90 %"9M(.5 0 9?C4.3 2)"1$%02, ">33-31), 39.3-!26 %00%.&."2O%#0 BC2 &)"3-,.3-$.-3-.8!"2 2/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3$.+ .#, .88 1-)"

PAGE 35

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r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n".22%-%)"9%0 0%.&."2 O%#0 ,BC3.9Gn&/.1+.0!.-%)"3)83-.8!"2 2/, 31$))0/,)#,. &3+.,1)"3%2 ,.60%" -$ %,2)&.%"3)8%", 3-9 +.0!.-%)"& -$)2)0)#% 39."28%"2%"#3HB/4?D@C4), 7.&/0 93)&

PAGE 36

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r + ,-$ 0 3393 + .03-!2% 3/,)+%2 31% "-%8%1 +%2 "1 -$.-3-.8!"2 2/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3/)3%-%+ 01)"-, %6!-)%&/,)+%"#-$ 0 .,"%"#."22 + 0)/& "-)8.-,%351$%02, ".3* 00.3)-$ ,1$%02, ."2%&/,)+%"#-$ %, /, /.,.-%)"8),-$ %"1, .3%"#0,%#),)!31$.00 "# 3)85%"2 ,#.,"4 rnn!rnrrnnn %,3-93-.8!"2 2/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3"2-)8)1!3)"1$%02, ">31 )#"%-%+ 2 + 0)/& "-,.-$ ,-$."-$ *$)0 )81$%021$.,.1,%3-%131)"3%2 2 33 "-%.08),3!11 338!0 31$))0, .2%" 3390%5 3 08, #!0.-),35%003B,."1%39DLr !&."9'C4n" /.,-%1!0.,9,."1%3 BDC/)%"-3)!--$.--$ /,)#,.&3$ 0/1$%02, "%"1, .3 -$ %,, .2%"#."2&.$ &.-%1335%003.31$))0 "-,96!--$ /,)#,.&36))3-1$%02, ">310.33,))&6 $.+%),.0/,) 60 &393!1$.38%#$-%"#9 .,#!%"#9),2%3-!,6%"#)-$ ,39."2, 2!1 -$ %,3 081)"-,)093!1$.31)"-,)00%"# -$ %,&/ ,9 .11 /-%"#/ ,%2 .38),#,)!/.1-%+%-% 39),, 3/)"2%"#-)/ ,/, 33!, %".".//,)/,%.*.4 $ 3 #.-%+ 6 $.+%),.0 88 1-31)"-%"! !"-%0-$ 3/,%"#)88%,3-#,. 2 9*$%0 -$ /)3%-%+ 88 1-3)8-$ /,)#,.&3)"35%0030.,# 02%33%/.4n"8.1-9-$ 3 #.-%+ 6 $.+%),3., 0%5 0-) 2)3)& 2.&.# -)-$ %,.1.2 &%1.1$% + & "-%"0., .,396 1.!3 3)1%.00" #.-%+ 6 $.+%),3%"10.33,))&3., .33)1%.2*%-$/)), ,.--%-!2 -)*.,20 .,"% "#."20)*

PAGE 37

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r !&."M)35)39@C4n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n"/.,-%1!0.,98)!, ,)023., 7/ 00 2.-.,.

PAGE 38

' .6)!-4@-%& 3#, .,-$."-$, .,)023L6)3., 7/ 00 2..,.)+ ,?4@-%& 3-$.-)8 #%,03L."28,%1."& ,%1."1$%02, "*$).-"23-.8!"2 2/, 5%"2 #.,"/,)#,.&3., .6)!--*%1 .30%5 0-)6 7/ 00 2.3.-%")."2.!1.3%."1$%02, "4 $ 0)* 37/!03%)",.3 ., /),26-$ .1$ ,3-$.-$.+ .")"#)%"#9, #!0.,, 0.-%)"3$%/ *%-$.& "-.0$ .0-$ 1)"3!0-."-9*$)%3.60 -)/,)+%2 10.33,))&6.3 23-,.#% 38),2 .0%"# *%-$1$.00 "#%"# 1$%02, "6 $.+%),34n")-$ ,*),239-$ $%#$ 7/!03%)",.3., 1.!3 26-$ 3/ 1%.01)"2%-%)"3 )8 .1$/, 5%"2 ,#.,"10.33,))&),.1$ ,3>3!6< 1-%+ 32 #, L8)!,3-.3 =!%, .-*) .,1)00 # 2 #, L 0 + "3-.3, =!%, .$%02 + 0) /& "-33)1%.3 1, 2 "-%.0L."2.0%8),"%., =!%, 3-* "-8)!,1, 2%-3, 0.2-) ,01$%02$))2 2!1.-%)" Br.-%)".0, 5%"2 ,#.," ",9?C4n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

PAGE 39

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r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n"8.1-9.1$ ,3

PAGE 40

? *$)., &), 2!1.2., /.%2&), ."2., 0%5 0-)3-..--$ %,<)63 0)"# ,-$."-$)3 *$) ., 0 33 2!1.2."2/.%20 33Br.-%)".0, 5%"2 ,#.," ",9?C4$!39$ 0%"56 -* *.# 3."2-!,")+ ,%3!"2 ,3-."2.60 ."2!"2 "%.60 6 1.!3 6 -,*.# 3."26 8%-3, 2!1 .1$ ,-!,")+ ,4)-$*.# 3."2-!,")+ ,., 10 .,0.33)1%.2*%-$/,)#, .&=!.0%-."21$%02 2 + 0)/& "-3%"1 #))2/,)#,.&3., 1$.,.1,%: 263&.00 ,#,)!/ 3%: 390)* ,.1$ ,1$%02 ,.-%)39&), 3 1!, .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"39."2&), 2!1.-%)".0.1-%+% -% 34 %".009-$ /)/!0.-%)")8/, 5%"2 ,#.,".1$ ,3%3")-" .,0.32%+ ,3 .3-$ /)/!0.-%)")81$%02, "%"3-.8!"2 2/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3L8), 7 .&/0 9??J)81$%02, ., 0.15),.-%")96!-
PAGE 41

? /, 5%"2 ,#.,".1$ ,3%"10!2 -,.%"%"#%"!"2 ,3-."2%"#98.1%0%-.-%"#9. "2.33 33%"#1$%02, ">3 3 1)"20."#!.# .1=!%3%-%)"9."2-$ ., 8 *=!.0%8% 2.1$ ,3*$)3/ 5-$ 2%88 "0."#!.# 3!3 261$%02, "8,)&&."2%88 "-1!0-!, 34$%3%"2%1.3 -$.-/, 5%"2 ,#.," .1$ ,3$.+ 2%88%1!0-%" 88 1-%+ 0.22, 33%"#1$%02, ">32%+ ,3 1!0!,.0."20%"#!%3-%1" 23 *%-$.*%2 ,."# )8 7/ ,% "1 3."235%003.3* 00.3%"6 %"#1)&/ "-), 3 "3%-%+ -) &!0-%0%"#!.0I&!0-%1!0-!,.0%33! 34 'nr rnrn'n'n!rnn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n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

PAGE 42

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n"-$ 1 .3 )8)* 3>8%+ .,0)"#%-!2%".0 3-!2BC9.1$ ,3# ,.006 0% + -$.--$ 3 1)"2#,.2 1$%0 2, "*$)3$)*0 33.##, 33%+ ."22%3,!/-%+ 6 $.+%),3*%-$/ ,3"2-)5 /10)3 ,.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"39."21$%02, *$)$.+ $%#$6 $.+%),.0/,)60 &3."20)*.1$ ,1$%0210)3 33%"/, 3 1$))010.33,))&3., &), 0%5 0-)3$)*$%#$.##, 33%+ 6 $.+%),3*%-$/ ,3."20)*.1$ ,1 $%0210)3 33.3 3 1)"2#,.2 ,343-!260."5 & ,90."" ,9."2.:3)"%BC.0 3)2 &)"3-,.3-$.1$%02, "*$)$%#$0+.0! -$ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3., 0 330%5 0-) 6 $.+ .##, 33%+ 0 ."2&), 0%5 0-)3$)*-$ %,3)1%.01)&/ "1 4 3/ 1%.00%"1$%021., 3 --%"#39/)3%-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-% )"3 "1)!,.# 1$%02, "-) /.,-%1%/.%"2%88 "-1))/ ,.-%+ .1-%+%-% 3%"10.33,))&3.3* 00.3-).1-%+ 0.11)&/0%3$-$ %, 0 .,"%"#.-31$))0B( 63,-,.--)"9AAAC4."20.,# 91$%02, "%"1$%021., 3 --%"#35 / 2%88 "-/.-,"3)8%",.1-%)"3*%-$2%88 "-.1$ ,3B)* 3M% -1$% 9C4$.-%3-)3.9

PAGE 43

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n"

PAGE 44

?? .22%-%)"9%."-.."2-!$0&."B?C &/$.3%: -$.-.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3.8 8 1-1$%02, ">3 .6%0%-% 3-).1=!%, -$ 1 33.,35%0038),31$))03!11 33."2., 3-,)" #0.33)1%.2*%-$ 1$."# 3%" .1$1$%02>3.1=!%,%"#3)1%.0."2.1.2 &%135%0034n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nn 'nr rn %,3-)8.009-$ =!.0%-)8.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3%3%"80! "1 263 + ,.08.1-),39 %"10!2%"#10.333%: 9.1$ ,1$%02,.-%)9."2.1$ ,3>/ ,1 /-%)"3.6)!.1$ ,1$%02 %",.1-%)"34n"-$ 1.3 )810.333%: ."2.1$ ,1$%02,.-%)9&."3!2% 33$)*-$.-.1$ 1$%02%",.1-%)"3., &), 7"3%+ ."2/ ,3)".0%: 2%"3&.00 ,10.33 39."2/ ,%",.1-%)"3 ., &), 7"3%+ ."2/ ,3)".0%: 2%"0.,# ,10.33 3B0.-1$8),29'L)"-)3 -.049AA@L r.-%)".0%"3-%-!)81$%02$ .0-$."2$!&."2 + 0)/& "-9.,01$%021., 3 .,1$" -*),59 L-%/ 59?L(0% M$)&/3)"9'C4n".22%-%)"9.0)*.1$ ,1$%02,.-%)0 .23 -)-$ 10.33,))&3-$.-/,)+%2 &), &)-%)".03!//),-L1$%02, "%"-$ 3 10.33,))& 3 "#.# %"

PAGE 45

?@ .1.2 &%1.1-%+%-% 3&), .1-%+ 0."2%",.1-*%-$/ ,3&), / )3%-%+ 0Br.-%)".0n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n"-$ 1.3 )86))5, .2%"#.3. #,)!/.1-%+%-9.")63 ,+.-%)".03-!26%15%"3)"B6C3$)*3-$.-. 1$ ,3&.%"0%",.1*%-$1$%02, "8),-$ /!,/)3 )8%"3-,!1-%)"98), 7.&/0 9G.35%"#1$%02, "-)."29-.5%"#3/3 -)1)"-,)0-$ %,6 $.+%),9 +.0!.-%"#1$%02, ">3, 3/)"3 39."29*$ "" 1 33., 91),, 1-%"#-$ %, %"1),, 1-, 3/)"3 3HB/4?EC4$.-%3-)3.9.1$ ,3-/%1.00%",. 1-*%-$1$%02, "%"6))5

PAGE 46

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n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

PAGE 47

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

PAGE 48

? ., 10)3 0.33)1%.2*%-$1$%02, ">30 .,"%"#."22 + 0)/& "-."2/0 .."%&/),-."-,)0 %" /, 2%1-%"#$)*3 "3%-%+ 0-$ "+%,)"& "-3-%&!0.31$%02, "-)0 .,"4 3., 3!0-9.1$ ,3 2%88 "-0-.05-)1$%02, ".11),2%"#-)10.33,))&.1-%+%-3 --%"#39 + -$)!#$-$ # ,.00 !3 .1 ,-.%"8.&%0%.,3-0 )83/ 1$&)2 3."20."#!.# /.-,"34 *rnr rn+rn nrn'rnn ,)&-$ -$ ), -%1.0),% "-.-%)")81,%-%1.0-$ ),."2/)3-&)2 ,"%3&9.1$ ,1$%02 %",.1-%)"3%"1$%021., 3 --%"#32 &)"3-,.!"%0.,.01$.,.1,% 3-%13, 3!0-%"#8,)&.1$ .!-$),%-)+ ,1$%02, "9."2-$ !"%0.,.0.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3%"1$%021. 3 --%"#3 #.-%+ 0%"80! "1 1$%02, ">32 + 0)/& "-.0)!-1)& 34n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

PAGE 49

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

PAGE 50

@ 61., #%+ ,3.00)*31., #%+ ,3-) 7 ,1%3 #.-%+ /)* ,9*$%1$ 8 ,3-)G-$ *.3-$ 1)"-,)09/!"%3$9."2%#"), 1$%02, "H%"),2 ,-)3%&/01)&/ 01$%02, ">33!,8.1 6 $.+%),3B/4 D@C4 n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

PAGE 51

@ -$,)!#$2%31)!,3 3-$.-1)"+ -$ 3/ 1%8%1" 239/,)60 &39."21)"1 ,"3)8 + ,2.0%8 9.3 00.3, /, 3 "-."%2 )0)#%1.03-,!1-!, 0.2-)/.,-%1!0., %", 3-3."23)1%.0, 0.-%)"34 'nnn*rnr rn+rn nrn' rnn %,3-)8.009.1$ ,3-$ &3 0+ 3., G2)& 3-%1.26-$ %,)*"31$))0% "#HB-)5 39AAE9 /4?C9*$%1$8),1 33-!2 "-3-)8)00)*G")-.05%"#,!0 3H.002.0)"#9*$%1$0 .2-) -$ .63 "1 )83 08 7/, 33%)"B."5%"39AAA9/4D?C4-!2 "-3., "1)!,.# 2-)3%."20%3",.-$ -$."3/ .59.3* 00.3-)3%&/0)6-.%"./% 1 )8%"8),&.-%)"-$.-$.3.0 .26 "2%31)+ 2 ."21.#),%: 26 7/ ,-3B%"1$ 9C4$!393-!2 "-3*$)., .11!3-) & 2-)G-$ 6)"2)8 3$., 23%0 "1 3H2)")7/, 33-$ %,)*" 7/ ,% "1 3B."5%"39AAA9/4D?C4n-%3$., 20 3!,/,%3%"#-$.--$%3 7/ ,% "1 8),1 33-!2 "-.1$ ,3-)G6 /.33% + 91)"8),&%"#9.!-$),%-.-%+ 9 %"80 7%60 9!"%&.#%".-%+ 9./)0%-%1.09."23%0 "-H%"31$))039%"10!2%"#1)00 # 3)8 2!1.-%)" B%"1$ 99/4'?C9.3* 00.3-)0 .,"-$ 1!0-!,.0+.0! 33&-$.-G-$ %,* ),5%38.,0 33 %&/),-."--$."-$.-)82)1-),39)80.* ,3N."2 + "96 $.+%),3B/4C4n"3!&&.,9.1 $ ,3-$ &3 0+ 3., -.!#$-.6)2)85")*0 2# 9*$%1$%3#!.,."26-$ .!-$),%-."2/)* ,)831$))039-$,)!#$

PAGE 52

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n"-, 9AAE9/4'@C9."231$))03, *.,2."2, %"8),1 G-$ "),&393-."2., 239 ."2 2!1.-%)".0&)2 033 -6*$%.1.2 &%13."2%"3-%-!-%)"3H-$,)!#$2%+ ,3 1$"%=! 3)8 "),&.0%:%"#93!1$.3)63 ,+.-%)"9& .3!, & "-910.33%8%1.-%)"9, #!0.-% )"9."2.33 33& "B1n"-, 9AAE9/4'C43-!26%-0%"BC3$)*3-$.-.1$ ,3!"2 ,!-%0%: -$ %, .!-)")&6 1.!3 )8-$ 3-.1), 1!,,%1!0!&97-6))539."2/, /.15.# 21!, ,%1!0.9."2-$ 3 0%&%--$ %,.6%0%-% 3-)G.1-)"."2 + "-,."38),&/ 2.#)#%1.0, 0.-%)"3 98),&3)80 #%-%&.5")*0 2# 9."21!0-!,.01.")"3HB/4@?C4), )+ ,93%"1 .1$ ,3$.+ 0)-3)8G10 5%"#-/ -.353H0%5 #,.2%"#/,.1-%1 32!,%"#-$ 31$))02.9-$ 2)")-$.+ -%& -))6-. %"G."%"-%&.5")*0 2# )8-$ %,3-!2 "-3H."21."")-$ 0/6!-, / .-G.2 8 "3%+ 98.1-),% "21!,,%1!0!&H B/4@?C4n"3$),-9-$ .1$ ,3>*),56 1)& 31$.,.1,%: 2.3.2 35%00%"# <)6-$,)!#$G-%#$, &.".# & "-1)"-,)0."2/.15.# 21!,,%1!0.HB)"" 009AA?C9."2/, + "-3.1$ 38,)& 3//%"#6.158,)&-$ %,10.33,))&/,.1-%1 3."21)"3%2 ,%"#6,).2 2!1.-%)".01)"1 ,"3), &/0)%"#.&), $)0%3-%1+% *)8.1$%"#B%-0%"9C43., 3!0-9-$ .1$ ,3>

PAGE 53

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n")-$ ,*),239.1$ ,3.3G+%1-%&3)8.33&.-%11!0-!, )8) //, 33%)" ."2&%3%"8),&.-%)"H$.+ 6 "G3)1%.009/)0%-%1.009."21!0-!,.00)/ /, 33 2%"-)-$%"5%"#-$.-$ ., %"1./.60 )81$."#%"#-$ %,*),5%"# "+%,)"& "-3),-$ %,.//,).1 $ 3-).1$%"#."2 0 .,"%"#HB%#! ,).,%-./.<.99/4D?C4), 7.&/0 9-$,)!#$31$))03-,!1-!, 30%5 31$))0 & -%"#N8.1!0-& -%"#39/., "-.1$ ,& -%"#39."23!6< 1-. .),%",2%31%/0%".,.& & -%"#39.1$ ,38.1 -$ !" =!.02%3-,%6!-%)")8/)* ,*%-$%"-$ 31$))0),-$ %" =!%-)8 31$))02 1%3%)"&.5%"#/,)1 33 34 .1$ ,38 0-$ %,0.15)81)"8%2 "1 95")*0 2# 9."2/)* -$,)!#$-$ & -%"#393%"1 -$ 8.1 -$ 7/ 1-.-%)"3)8/., "-3."231$))0. 2&%"%3-,.-),3),-$ .11)!"-.6%0%-8),3-!2 "-3>31), 3)", =!%, 23-3B.,532.0 .22M$)& .39AA'L%-0%"9 C4$ .1$ ,3>.!-)")&9%",&3)8#).039/ 2.#)#9."21)""-9%31)"3-,.%" 26-$ 3 1)&&)"3-,!1-!, 39 + "-$)!#$31$))0& -%"#33%&/0.%&-)1)&&!"%1.93)0+ -,%+%.0 /,)60 &39."28.1%0%-./0.""%"#B%-0%"9C4n"-$ 1.3 )81$%021., 3 --%"#39.1$ ,3., )8" 710!2 28,)&2 1%3%)"&.5%"#/,)1 33 398), 7.&/0 92 1%2%"#)"$)*&." %"8."-3-$ 1., #%+ ,3*%006 3/)"3%60 8),B .+%--9AA?C403)9.1$ ,3%",.1-*%-$/., "-33)& *$.-

PAGE 54

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n"3.29.1$ ,3., ./-)5 /-$ !"%0.,.0 %",.1-%)"36 -* "-$ &3 0+ 3."21$%02, "9.3-$ ., .11!3-)& 2-) -$ 3-,!1-!, )8 2)&%".-%)".0, .2 7%3-%"#%"31$))034 nnn*rnr rn+rn nrn' rnn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

PAGE 55

@@ .1$ ,3!-,."2-)0 .,"5")*0 2# *$%1$1)"3-%-!3G*$.-%3-.5 "-)6 -,! H ,.-$ ,-$." 5")*0 2# *$%1$.!-$ "-%1.00, + .03."2, /, 3 "-3-$ .0*),02B3$ ,M2*.,239AA?9/4 EC4n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r>3Br.-%)". 033)1%.-%)"8),

PAGE 56

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

PAGE 57

@E )81$%02, "H, 3!0-38,)&-$ %,)*"8 0%"#3."2& &),% 3)8-$ %,1$%02$))29),.1$ ,3G!3 )"0-$ %,)*" 7/ ,% "1 3.3-$ $.00&.,538),-$ 7/ ,% "1 3)8)-$ 3HB)*&."M-)--9 AA?9/4C4n"-$ "29-$ 2)&%"."-2%31)!,3 ."2/,.1-%1 3%"-,.2%-%)".010.33,))&30% 5 G.1$ ,-.059, .2%"#-$ ,%)-.1-9."2-$ 0.3-*),2H.00)*.1$ ,3) .3%0 7 ,1%3 !"%0.,.0 .1$ ,.!-$),%-)+ ,1$%02, "."2-)/, + "-1$%02, "8,)&6!%02%"#)"%"00 1-!.01!,%)3%-.3 00.38,)&/!,3!%"#-$ %,%"=!%,% 3%"2%88 "-*.3B$),9AA9/4'C4 !nn $ /.3--* ".,3$.+ 3 ".")-.60 #,)*-$%"."!"2 ,3-."2%"#)8-$ ".!, )8 .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3%"1$%021., 3 --%"#39%"10!2%"#-$ /, 1!,3),39 1)"1)&%-."-39."2 )!-1)& 3, 0.2-)-$ =!.0%-)8.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"34n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

PAGE 58

@ %",.1-%)"36/,)+%2%"#.*$)0 /%1-!, )8.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3* %-$%".3/ 1%8%11)"7%"+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3%"1$%021., 3 --%"#3!3%"#=!.0% -.-%+ 3 .,1$& -$)234 n".22%-%)"9-$%3=!.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$/,)< 1-*%00&.5 .&.<),1)"-,%6 !-%)"-)-$ 7%3-%"# 0%,.-!, )".1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"36 7/0),%"#."22 31,%6%"#6 .,,% ,3-)."28.1%0%-.-),3)8 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3%"+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#, .&3%"1$%021., 3 --%"#3 !3%"#-$ -$ ), -%1.0),% "-.-%)")81,%-%1.0-$ ),."2/)3-&)2 ,"%3&4,)&$ -$ ), -%1.0 ),% "-.-%)")81,%-%1.0-$ ),."2/)3-&)2 ,"%3&9.1$ ,3., #)+ ," 26 )//, 33%+ /,.1-%1 3 ."2%2 )0)#% 3."2-$!3., %3)0.28,)&-$ ".,,.-%+ )8&.%"3-, .&$%3-),. "21!0-!, 4 / 1%8%1.009.1$ ,3., 8),1 2-)8)00)*G-$ "),&393-."2.,239."2 2!1.%)".0&)2 033 -6 *$%.1.2 &%13."2%"3-%-!-%)"3H.3* 00.3-)1)"3%2 ,-$ &-)6 -/%1. 09*),02*%2 9."2 ),2%".,B1n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

PAGE 59

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

PAGE 60

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

PAGE 61

D r $%3%3.=!.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$/,)< 1--$.-!3 2%",+% *3."2)63 ,+ .-%)"3%"-$, .1$ ,3>*),5/0.1 39%"),2 ,-)%"+ 3-%#.6.,,% ,3-)."28.1%0%.-),3)8 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02 %",.1-%)"39.32 8%" 28,)&.1,%-%1.0/ ,3/ 1-%+ 9%"+)0!"-.,/, 5% "2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3%" 1$%021., 3 --%"#34n"-$%3, 3 .,1$/,)< 1--$ & -$)23)8%"2 /-$% ",+% *%"#."2/.,-%1%/.")63 ,+.-%)"., 1)"3%2 2-$ &)388 1-%+ *.3-)1)00 1-2.-.93%"1 -$ & -$)23 ".60 -$%3 3-!2-)2 31,%6 *$.-%3, .00$.// "%"#68)1!3%"#)"-$ -$, .1 $ ,3>6 $.+%),."2 3/ 1$%"-$ %,10.33,))&34n"),2 ,-) "$."1 %",".0+.0%2%-9, 0%.6% 0%-9# ,.0%:.6%0%-9."2 -,!3-*),-$%" 339n!3 2."!&6 ,)83-,.#% 39%"10!2%"#G& &6 ,1$ 153 9H*$%1$, 8 ,3-) -.5%"#2.-.."2"-.-%+ %",/, -.-%)"36.15-)-$ / )/0 8,)&*$)&-$ ., 2 ,%+ 2."2 .35%"#-$ &*$ -$ ,),")--$ %",/, -.-%)"3., /0.!3%60 B ,,%.& 9AA9/4?C4 r + ,-$ 0 339-$%3=!.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$/,)< 1-3$)*33 + ,.00%&% -.-%)"3, 3!0-%"#8,)&-$ # ,.01$.,.1,%3-%13)8=!.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$."2-$ !"%=! 8 .-!, 3)8-$%3, 3 .,1$/,)< 1-4n" -$%31$./,n*%00 7/0.%"-$ !"%=! 1$.,.1,%3-%13)8=!.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$."2$)** 00-$ 3 1$.,.1,%3-%138%--$ /!,/)3 )8-$%3, 3 .,1$/,)< 1-4n*%00 2 31,%6 -$ -$, /.,-%1%/."-3*$) 3 0 12.11),2%"#-)-$ /.,-%1!0.,1,%,%.-$.-1)!023 ,+ -$ /!,/)3 )8-$%3, 3 .,1$ /,)< 1-403)9n*%00#%+ 2 -.%03.6)!--$ & -$)23)81)00 1-%"#."2. ".0:%"#-$ 2.-..3* 00.3 &."3-,.#% 3!3 2-)%"1, .3 -$ -,!3-*),-$%" 33)8-$%3, 3 .,1$/ ,)< 1-4%".009n*%00 /, 3 "-3 + ,.00%&%-.-%)"3)8-$%33-!2%",&3)8%",".0+.0%2%-9, 0 %.6%0%-9# ,.0%:.6%0%-9 ."2-,!3-*),-$%" 334 $&n# n,nn 11),2%"#-))#2."."2%50 "B'C9=!.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$$.3-$ 8)00) *%"#8%+ 8 .-!, 3".-!,.0%3-%11$.,.1,92 31,%/-%+ 2.-.91)"1 ,"*%-$/, )1 339%"2!1-%+ & -$)29."2

PAGE 62

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n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

PAGE 63

D' !6.9A@9/4EC4n")-$ ,*),239-$ G$!&.".3%"3-,!& "-H%3/,%&.,%0 6.3 2)"-$ ")-%)" -$.-G + ,-$%"#%3 H%".".-!,.03 --%"#."2)"0-$ $!&."%"3-,!& "-%3.60 -) 2 .0*%-$."%"2 ,&%".3%-!.-%)"B/4A'C438),-$ 1$.,.1,%3-%13)8-$ G$!& .".3 %"3-,!& "-9H%"1)0"."2!6.BA@C0%3--$ 8)00)*%"#3 + 0 & "-3B C nnrnn -$ G$!&.".3%"3-,!& "-H1.", .1--).00/ ,3)".0."2 "+%,)"& "-.01)"7-3 BC -$ G$!&.".3%"3-,!& "-H1."1)00 1-.+.,% -)82.-.-$,)!#$2%88 "-& -$)23.--$ 3.& -%& B'C nnn -$ G$!&.".3%"3-,!& "-H%3)"01./.60 )83 %"#." /$ ")& ")"."2%-33!,,)!"2%"#1)"7-%")" +% B?C nn -$ G$!&.".3%"3-,!& "-H%3.60 -)!3 -$ 5")*0 2# )86)-$, .3)"."2#)33% /.3* 00.3-$ 5")*0 2# #.%" 28,)& 7/ ,% "1 *%-$)6< 1-3."2 + "-3 B@C nn -$ G$!&.".3%"3-,!& "-H%31./.60 )8$."20%"#2.-..33))".3-$ 6 1)& .+. %0.60 91, .-%"# $/)-$ 3 3)"-$ 3/)-9."2 7.&%"%"#-$)3 $/)-$ 3 3%"-$ 1)"7-%"*$%1$-$ 1, .2 BDC nn )"0-$ G$!&.".3%"3-,!& "-H1." 3!&&.,%: 2.-.."2$.+ "-.-%+ %",/, -.-%)"3),1)"10!3%)"3326 -$ / )/0 8,)& *$)&-$ ., 2 ,%+ 28),10.,%8%1.-%)"9, 1-%8%1.-%)"9."2%""3%8%1.%)" ."2BEC nnnn -$ G$!&.".3%"3-,!& "-H1."%"+ 3-%#..-/%1.0 ."2%2%)3"1,.-%1, 3/)"3 3%"),2 ,-) 7.&%" -$ %,+.0%2%-."2-)&), 2 / 0!"2 ,3-."2 -$ &-$,)!#$2%88 "-/)%"-3)8+% *B//4A'A?C4 n"/.,-%1!0.,9*.""."2,.--B'C& "-%)"-$.--$ /!,/)3 )8 2!1.-%)".0, 3 .,1$%3 -)%&/,)+ 2!1.-%)".0.1-%)"6%"8),&%"# 2!1.-%)".0
PAGE 64

D? /.,-%1%/."-3PHG) 3-$%3& ."*$.-%-.// .,3-)& ."PH),G, 3 ,1$ ,3)63 ,+%"#*$.-$ -$%"5-$ ., 0))5%"#.-PH$!39*.""."2,.--B'C &/$.3%: -$.2!1 .-%)".0 3 .,1$&!3-6 6.3 2)", 3/ 1-8),/ )/0 6/,)+%2%"#-$ &*%$%"8),&.-%)".6)!-*$.-%3 ."2*$.-%3")-$%1.0/,.1-%1 403)9%-3)!-1)& 3&!3-6 %&/),-."--)%", 32/,.1-%-%)" ,39 %"10!2%"#.1$ ,39/)0%1&.5 ,39/., "-39."20 .," ,393)-$.--$ 1." &/0)-$ &%"" ."21, .-%+ *.3%"),2 ,-)%&/,)+ 2!1.-%)".0/,.1-%1 4n".22%-%)"9." 2!1.%)".0, 3 .,1$ /),-&!3-6 & ."%"#8!0."2, .2.60 -)-$ +.,%)!3.!2% "1 362 &)"3-,. -%"#*$.-%3, .00 $.// "%"#-$,)!#$&!0-%/0 %"+ 3-%#.-),39&!0-%/0 3)!,1 3)82.-.9),&!0-%/ 0 & -$)239.3* 00 .3610.,%8%"#-$ 3 .,1$ ,>3.33!&/-%)"3),6%.3 343. 3!0-9-$ /),".60 3, .2 ,3-) 38%"2%"#3."21)"10!3%)"3."2-)2 ,&%" *$ -$ ,-$ 3 .,1$ ,>38%"2%"#38%--$ %,3%-!.-%)"3),")-4 n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

PAGE 65

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n"/.,-%1!0.,9-$%3, 3 .,1$/,)< 1-%"10!2 3G& &6 ,1$ 153HN-$ /,)1 33)8-.5%"#2.-. ."2"-.-%+ %",/, -.-%)"36.15-)-$ .1$ ,3."2.35%"#-$ &*$ -$ ,),")-$ %",/, -.-%)"3., /0.!3%60 4, .2%"#."2!"2 ,3-."2%"#-$ %",/, .-%)"39-$ -$, .1$ ,3 .*., )8$)*-$ %",.12*%-$1$%02, ".3* 00.3)8$)*-$ + "-3 ."2$.// "%"#3%" 2.-.* %",/, 24,.%3%"#-$ %,)/%"%)"3.6)!--$ %",/, -.-%)"3 9-$ .1$ ,3$.2."

PAGE 66

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rn!n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n 1$)3 .1,%,%)"3.&/0%"#3-,.#3%"1 -$ 3-,.#/,)+%2 2& *% -$.")//),-!"%--)8!00 7/0), -$ 1 "-,.0%33! 3)8-$%3=!.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$/,)< 1-N6., ,% ,3-)."28.1%0%-.-),3)8

PAGE 67

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rn nn n"),2 ,-)%"+)0+ .1$ ,3*$)& --$ .6)+ 1,%,%.%"-$ 3-!29n2%, 1-0 +%3%2 3 + ,.01$%021., 1 ",3%".%" 3+%00 -$.-)88 2-$ /,)#,.& ."2& -33&2%, 1-),34 n 7/0.%" 2-$ /!,/)3 ."2/,)1 2!, 3)8-$%33-!2-)-$ &."2.35 2-$ &-), 1 )&& "2. .1$ ,*$)& --$ .6)+ 1,%,%.4" )8-$ 2%, 1-),3, < 12&, =! 393.%"#-$.--$ 3-!2*)!02, =!%, .1$ ,3-)3/ "2-))&!1$-%& ."2.1$ ,3&%#$-6 -%, 2)8 /.,-%1%/.-%)" %"-$ 3-!24")-$ ,2%, 1-),3.%2-$.-3$ 1)!02")-.00)*.1$ ,3-)2)-$%"#3)-$ -$." .1$%"#1$%02, "2!,%"#*),5%"#$)!,36 1.!3 3$ /.%28),-$ $)!,34)& 2%, 1-),3, 8!3 2 &, =! 3-93.%"#-$.-.1$ ,3* -))6!3-)/.,-%1%/.%"-$ 3 -!248,3 + ,.0+%3%-3-)

PAGE 68

D 1$%021., 1 ",39n8%".003 0 12-$, .1$ ,3-$.-& --$ 6)+ 1,%,%.."2%"+%2-$ &-) .".!2%)-./ 1),2%"#+%..0 -,)8%"+%-.-%)"."21)"3 "-8),&4 3n 7/ 128,)&-$ / ,3/ 1-%+ )8.1,%,%)"3.&/0%"#3-,.#9-$ -$, .1$ ,3 /,)+%2 2& *%-$.* .0-$)8%"8),&.-%)".6)!-6.,,% ,3-)."28.1%0%-.-),3)8 88 1-%+ .1$ 1$%02%",.1-%)"39.32 8%" 28,)&.1,%-%1.0/ ,3/ 1-%+ 9.3* 00.33 + ,.033&.-%1), /,)#,.&&.-%18.1-),3-$.-%&/ 2 2 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-% )"3%"+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3%"1$%021., 3 --%"#34n"/.,-%1!0.,93%"1 -$ .1$ ,3$.2&." 7/ ,% "1 3)8.1$%"#1$%02, "%"2%88 "-10.33,))&3 --%"#3)-$ ,-$. "10.33,))&39-$ .60 -)1)&/., -$ 1$.,.1,%3-%13)8-$ /,)#,.&*%-$$)3 )8)-$ ,/, 31$))0 /,)#,.&34$%3%"2%1.3-$.--$ %,3.# 3.3* 00.3 $)*-).1$ .1$1$%02.11),2%"#-)$%3),$ ,!"%=! / ,3)".0%-4n"/.,-%1!0.,93 %"1 &)3-)8 -$ 1$%02, "%"$ ,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"10.33,))&$.+ .-"2 2-$ 31$))0)+ ,)" .,93 $ ."2 &)3-)8-$ &$.2.0, .25")*" .1$)-$ ,6-$ -%& -$ 3-.,2-$ 10.334$ + ,* 00 !"2 ,3-."23*$.-5%"2)81!,,%1!0!&%3#))28),1$%02, "."2$)*-)&.".# 10.33,))&36 1.!3 3$ $.2$.2$ ,)*"1$%021., 1 ",8),3%7 .,34$ $.3.6.1$ 0),>32 #, %"&!3%1 2!1.-%)"."2!3 3&!3%1.3." 88 1-%+ .1$%"#-))093%"1 3$ 6 0% + 3-$. -3%"#%"#.3)"# ".60 3.1$ ,3-), %"8),1 *$.--$ ., -.05%"#.6)!-."2-)$ 0/1$%02 ", & &6 ,-$

PAGE 69

DA 0 33)"8),.0)"#-%& 4), 7.&/0 91$%02, "%"$ ,10.33,))&.35$ ,-)3%"#3)" #3-$.--$ $.+ 0 .," 26 8), )+ ,."2)+ ,.#.%"403)93%"1 3$ -$%"53-$.-.1$ ,3" 2-)$ 0/ 1$%02, "6!%02.#))2+)1.6!0.,."21$%02, "" 2-)$.+ .#))2+)1.6!0.,8),3!11 3 3%" 31$))093$ !3 3 .1$-%& 3$ -.053-)1$%02, ".3.1$."1 -).1$1$%02, "" *+)1.6 !0.,% 34 $ %3+ ,/,)!2-$.-3$ $.3.#))2, 0.-%)"3$%/*%-$)-$ ,.1$ ,3%"-$ 31$))04 $ 8, =! "-0-.053-))-$ ,.1$ ,3.6)!-$)*-)*),5*%-$1$%02, "."20 .,"38,)&)$ .1$ ,3> 7/ ,% "1 34n".22%-%)"9-$ 31$))06 #.")88 ,%"#-$ /, )#,.&%"D9."2-$ 1!,,%1!0!&)8$ ,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"10.33,))&%36.3 2)"6)-$-$ #!%2 0%" 3 8),-$ /,)#,.&."2-$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!&-$.-$.32 + 0)/ 2)+ ,-$ .,3411),2%"#-)-$ #!%2 0%" 393$ &.5 3 + 88),--)# -1$%02, ", .28),5%"2 ,#.," 68)1!3%"#)" 1$%02, ">30%,.1."25 /%"#-,.15)8 .1$1$%02>3/,)#, 334n"/.,-% 1!0.,93$ %31)"1 ," 2 .6)!--$ 31$))0>3.11)!"-.6%0%-."2-$!3" 23-)&.5 3!, -$.+ ,3%"#0 1 $%02%"$ ,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"10.33,))&%3/, /., 28),5%"2 ,#.,"4 $ 3 1)"2/.,-%1%/."-9 ,)"%1.9$.36 "*),5%"#*%-$1$%02, "8),-*) .,39."2$ 1!,, "-*),5/0.1 %3$ ,8%,3-.1$%"# 7/ ,% "1 4n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

PAGE 70

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n".22%-%)"9-$ 31$))0$.3)88 2-$ /,) #,.&3%"1 @."2$.3-$, 10.33,))&34$ 10.33,))&3!3 -$ 3.& 1!,,%1!0!&6.3 2)" 6)-$-$

PAGE 71

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n' rn,n r&+nn *)8),&.0%"2 /-$%",+% *3* 1)"2!12%"-$ -$, .1$ ,3>*),5/0.1 36 8), ."2.8,-$ 3 ,% 3)8)63 ,+.-%)"39."2-$ %",+% *2.-.* .!2%)-./ 1),2 2."2 -,."31,%6 24!2%)-./ 1),2%"#*.31)"2!12.--$ .1$ ,3>*),5/ 0.1 39."2-$ .!2%)-./ 1),2%"#3 33%)"30.32)" $)!, .1$4n"-$ 1.3 )8-$ 8%,3-."2-$%,2/.,%1%/."-39n %",+% 2-$ &2!,%"#1$%02, ">3"./-%& 4)* + ,9n%",+% 2 ,)"% 1.B-$ 3 1)"2 /.,-%1%/."-C.8,.001$%02, "%"$ ,10.33,))&* "-$)& 93%"1 $ ,10 .33,))&.3.$.082. /,)#,.&*.3)/ ")"08,)&A-)403)9n1)"2!12-$, )63 ,+.-%)"3%"-$ 1$ ,3> 10.33,))&3*%-$."%"8),&.0%",+% *-)8)00)* .1$10.33,))&)63 ,+.-%)"4 $ %"8),&.0 %",+% *30.32.//,)7%&.0@&%"!3 .1$9."2-$ 2.-.* .!2%)-./ 1),2 2."2 -,."31,%6 24n"/.,-%1!0.,9-$ %"8),&.0%",+% *3* + ,$ 0/ 8!08),& -)%&& 2%.0 !"2 ,3-."2-$ & ."%"#)8 .1$ + "-."2$.// "%"#-$.--))5/0.1 2!,%"# .1$10 .33,))& )63 ,+.-%)"4$ %",+% *3.33 &%3-,!1-!, 2%"10!2 2.8 */,)6%"#=! 3 -%)"393/ 1%8%1.00G.

PAGE 72

E 0%3-)8=! 3-%)"3."2/,)&/-3%"),2 ,-)%"1, .3 -$ 0%5 0%$))2-$.-.00-)/%13* %006 1)+ 2%" .1$%",+% *%"&), ),0 33-$ 3.& *.HB *.0-M *.0-99/4C 4n",+% *#!%2 3 ., %"10!2 2%"-$ // "2%74 $ .3)"-$.-n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n-,% 2-)&.5 %",+% *%"#6 %"8),&.09")"2% 1-%+ 9."2 8, *$ 0%"#6 1.!3 n6 0% + 2-$.-.0 333-,!1-!, 2.-&)3/$ 1)!02 "$."1 ,.//),-*%-$ /.,-%1%/."-3B20 ,M20 ,9'C4n"),2 ,-) 3-.60%3$-$ 0 333-,!1-!, 2.-&)3/$ 9n 3)& -%& 3!3 2, /$,.3%"#)8-$ =! 3-%)"33%"1 G1., 8!00*),2 2=! 3-%)"3H 1."&.5 /.,-%1%/."-38 00 33-$, ." 2B20 ,M20 ,9'9/4DEC403)9n!3 2 G3!&&., 8 26.159H*$%1$& ."3-$.--$ %",+% ,G3!&&.,%: 3-$ 0.3-3 -)8 3-.& "-3H 7/, 33 2 6-$ /.,-%1%/."-393%"1 G3!&&.,8 26.15H&.5 3/.,-%1%/. "-36 .*., -$.--$ %",+% $.3$ .,2*$.--$ ., 3.%"#."2 "1)!,.# 3-$ &-)1)"-%"! ."2 7/."2-$ %, ."3* ,3 B *.0-M *.0-99/4'C4n"-$ "29n.3.0%3" ,3$)* 2.# "!%" %", 3-%"-$ /.,-%1%/."-3>3-),% 3."2*.31.!-%)!3.6)!-!3%"#&# 3-!, 3),6)20 ."#!.# 98), 7.&/0 9

PAGE 73

E' ,.%3%"#& 6,)*3),1$."#%"#&-)" )8+)%1 4$%3%36 1.!3 3!1$.&)-% )"&., /, 3 "-$ /)* ,)8-$ %",+% ,9*$%1$1."1)"-,)0G*$.--.5 3/0.1 %"-$ %" ,+% *%-3 08H B,%##39'9/4@C4.&rnn 3-$ 3 1)"2& -$)2)81)00 1-%"#2.-.9-$, )63 ,+.-%)"3)810.33,))&32!,%"#* $)0 #,)!/98, /0.9."2& .0-%& 1)"2!12/ ,.1$ ,4)* + ,9 n)63 ,+ 2 ,)"%1.>3 10.33,))&2!,%"#3".15-%& %"3.2)8& .0-%& 93%"1 1$%02, "%"$ ,10.33, ))&3-. 2)"0 8,)&A-)."2$.2")& .0-%& 4$ .3)"-$.-n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n"/.,-%1!0.,9 /.,-%1%/."-)63 ,+.-%)"%3!3 8!0-)!"2 ,3-."2*$.-%3#)%"#)"%"-$ $ ."2")* 9."2-$!39%-

PAGE 74

E? %3 88 1-%+ 0!3 2-)!"2 ,3-."2/$ ")& ".-$.-$.// ".-.3/ 1%8%1-%& "2/0.1 .3* 00.3-) G2%31)+ ,-$ 7%3"1 )8/.-,"3)8-$)!#$-."26 $.+%),HB *.0-M *.0-99/4C4 3., 3!0-9/.,-%1%/."-)63 ,+.-%)" ".60 2& -)!"2 ,3-."2-$ -$, .1 $ ,3>6 $.+%),."2 3/ 1$%".3/ 1%8%11)"7-.3* 00.3-$ /.-,"3)8-$ %,6 $.+%), ."23/ 1$%"-$ %,2.%0 10.33,))&3*$ "%",.1-%"#*%-$1$%02, "4$%3%3-$ .3)"-$.-n1$)3 / .,-%1%/."-)63 ,+.-%)" .3-$ 3 1)"2& -$)2)82.-.1)00 1-%)"4 !,%"#-$ 10.33,))&)63 ,+.-%)"39n&%"%&.00/.,-%1%/.2%"-$ 3 .,1$3%L-$.-%39n *.3/, 3 "-.--$ 31 )8-$ .1-%)"."2%2 "-%8%.60 .3., 3 .,1$ ,96!-n2%2")-.1-%+ 0 /.,-%1%/.),)"0)11.3%)".00%",.12*%-$/ )/0 %"%-4$%3%3 6 1.!3 -$ 6%## 3--$, .--) 0%.6%0%-%"=!.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$%3, 3 .,1$ ,3>6%.3 393!1 $.3, 3 .,1$ ,3> 71 33%+ %"+)0+ & "-%"-$ 3%4--$ 6 #%""%"#)8-$ 8%,3-)63 ,+.-%)"9-$ -$, .1$ ,3%"-,)2!1 2 & -)-$ %,1$%02, "9.0)"#*%-$.3$),7/0.".-%)")8*$n*.3-$ 4($%0 n*.3)63 ,+%"# -$ .1$ ,3>6 $.+%),."23/ 1$9-$ 1$%02, "* 3 02)&%", 32% "& 96!-3)& 1$%02, 3)& -%& 3.35 2-$ %,.1$ ,*$3$ *), ., &)&%1,)/$)" 4$.-%3 -)3.9.001$%02, ."2.1$ ,3* $.,201)"31%)!3)8&/, 3 "1 ."22%3/0. 2-$ %,!3!. 06 $.+%),."2 3/ 1$%"2.%010.33,))&34n".22%-%)"9n&.2 ." 88),--)6 .#))2."21. 8!00%3" ,9 3$)* 2, 3/ 1-8),/.,-%1%/."-3%".3 --%"#9."2*.3/, /., 2-)00-$ -,!-$93%"1 -$ =!.0%-)8 /.,-%1%/."-)63 ,+.-%)"*)!02+.,2 / "2%"#)", 3 .,1$ ,3>/ ,3)".0 1$.,.1,%3-%130%5 # "2 ,."2.# 9-$ %,-,.%"%"#."2 7/ ,% "1 9."2-$ %,-$ ), -%1.0),% "-.-%)"B *.0-M *.0-9 C4 n/rn,nn n!3 2-$ & -$)2)82%31)!,3 .".03%36 1.!3 2%31)!,3 .3.1$")0)#)8/)* ,%3 .,-%1!0.2%"-$ 8),&3)85")*0 2# -$.-1)"3-%-!-$ 8),&.01!,,%1!0. .3* 00.3-$ 3)1%.0 %",.1-%)"36 -* ".1$ ,3."21$%02, "%"10.33,))&34n"-$ 1.3 )82%31 )!,3 .".03%39%-3

PAGE 75

E@ 8,.& *),5/,)+%2 3."!"2 ,3-."2%"#)8& ."%"#&.5%"#33&3."22%31)!,3 -*),53%" 3/ 1%8%13%-!.-%)"3-$,)!#$-$ 2 31,%/-%)"."2%",/, -.-%)")8& ."%"#&.5%"#. 3* 00.3-$ 1,%-%1.0.".03%3)8%2 )0)#4,)&-$%3/ ,3/ 1-%+ 9n*.31)"1 2*%-$$)*.1$ ,3> 2%31)!,3 3* 1)"3-,!129, /,)2!1 29."21)"-,)00 26-$ $% ,.,1$%1.0 ),#."%:.-%)"3)8 31$))033&3403)9n*.3%", 32%"$)*-$ 2%31)!,3 3-$.-1)"3-%-!2$ 3)1%.0 %",.1-%)"36 -* ".1$ ,3."21$%02, "%"+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.," /,)#,.&3%"1$%021., 3 --%"#3* ".12."21)"8%,& 2-$,)!#$-$ 8),&3)80.*39,!0 39"),&3 9),$.6%-34$%3%3 6 1.!3 n1)"3%2 ,/)* ,-$.-%3 7 ,1%3 29, /,)2!1 29& 2%.29."2, 3%3 2-$,)!#$ 2%31)!,3 3%"10.33,))&3.3-$ 6%## 3--$, .--) 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%0 2%",.1-%)"39.32 8%" 2 8,)&.1,%-%1.0/ ,3/ 1-%+ 9%"+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.& 3%"1$%021., 3 --%"#34 n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n8),&!0.2-*) 1)"-,.3-%"#$/)-$ 3 3)" %3-$.-.1$ ,3.3-$ )//, 33 2., 8),1 2-).1$1$%02, ".*$%9 &.0 9!,)/ ."& ,%1."&)2 0-$,)!#$2%+ ,3 1$"%=! 3)8"),&.0%:.-%)"93!1$.3 & .3!, & "-9, #!0.-%)"9."2 +.0!.-%)"L-$ )-$ ,%3-$.-.1$ ,3.3-$ )//, 33),38),1 1$%02, "-)0 .,"3!1$.&)2 0-$,)!#$-$ !"%0.,.0%",.1-%)"36 -* "-$ &3 0+ 3."2 1$%02, "4)* + ,9.3 B@C &/$.3%: 39n.&.0*.3)/ "-)8!,-$ ,% "+ 3-%#.-%)")8&

PAGE 76

ED $/)-$ 3 3."2-)8%"2%"# +%2 "1 .#.%"3-&/, 8 ,, 2+% *393%"1 n .3-$ /,%&.,%"3-,!& "8),2.-.1)00 1-%)".&0%5 0-)8%0,2.-.-$,)!#$&-$ ), -%1.0/)% "-)8+% *4 11),2%"#-) >3B@C& -$)2)82%31)!,3 .".03%39n, .2%",+% *."2 )63 ,+.-%)"2.-.9*$%1$* .!2%)-./ 1),2 2."2-,."31,%6 29."2!"2 ,0%" 2G-$ *),2), /$,.3 *%-$-$ &)3-3-, 33H."2G-$ *."2&)3-3.0% "-%"8),&.-%)"HB 9@9 /4@C4 "2-$ "n),#."%: 2-$ 2.-.%"-)."!&6 ,)83-.":.39*$%1$& ."G3 -3)80%" 32 +)2-). 3%"#0 -)/%19 + "-9%&.# 9/ ,3/ 1-%+ 9),-$ & HB 9@9/4EC4n"),2 ,-). ".0: -$ 2.-..-.&.1,)0 + 09n, .2-$ 3-.":.3."2&.2 3!63!63-),% 393!6 3-),% 39."28,.& 3*%-$%" 3-),% 39%"-$.-),2 ,4($ "&.5%"#-$ 3-),% 39n!3 2 n 96, &)+%"#&." 2%88 "-3),-3)8G3/ 1$$ 3%-.-%)"3."22380! "1% 3H8,)&-$ .1 -!.00%" 3B 9@9/4AC4 $%3%36 1.!3 %2 .0%: 20%" 3., !3 8!08),G2%31)+ ,%"#& ."%"#8!0 /.-,"3%"/ )/0 >3 3/ 1$H."2G# --%"#.--$ %,6.3%1-$ & 3."2$)*-$ ., ),#."%: 2 HB 9@9/4AC4 %".009n1)&/0 23 + "6!%02%"#-.353%#"%8%1."1 91-%+%-% 39 n2 "-%-% 39 0.-%)"3$%/39 )0%-%13B-$ 2%3-,%6!-%)")83)1%.0#))23C9)"" 1-%)"39."2%#"33&3."25")* 0 2# 4($ 1, .-%"#6!%02%"#-.3539n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

PAGE 77

EE .35%"#-$ =! 3-%)")8$)*-$%3/% 1 )80."#!.# %3!3 2%"-$ .1-%+%-),*$. -* ., !3%"#-$%3 /% 1 )80."#!.# -)2)$ 92%31)!,3 .".03%3%3.60 -)%"+ 3-%#.-$ .0%--$.-* ., .1-%+ 06!%02%"#-$,)!#$0."#!.# %"-$ .1-%+%-4n"3!&&.,93-!2%"# 0."#!.# ".60 3 2%31)!,3 .".03%3-), 80 1-G, .0%-H6 7/0),%"#2%88 "-%2 "%-% 3."2.1-%+%-% 3 ".12 -$,)!#$0."#!.# .3* 00.3/ )/0 >32%88 "-.11 33-)2%88 "%2 "-%-% 3."2.1-%+%-% 30%"5 2 -)2%88 "-5%"23)83-.-!3."23)1%.0#))234 +rn .-.1)00 1-%)"."22.-..".03%3%"=!.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$., 0%5 0-) /, 3 "-$%1.0 2%0 &&.34n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n".22%-%)"9 2.-..".03%3&./, 3 "-$%1.02%0 &&.33%"1 -$ 3 .,1$ .3-$ /,%&.,%"3-,!& "-8), 2.-.1)00 1-%)"$.38%0, 22.-.-$,)!#$$%3),$ ,/.,-%1!0.,-$ ), -%1. 0),% "-.-%)"."26%.3 34 n"),2 ,-).+)%2-$ 3 5%"23)8 -$%1.0/,)60 &39n8%,3-$ 0/ 2/.,-%1%/ ."-3!"2 ,3-."2 -$ & ."%"#)8%"8),& 21)"3 "-4$%3%36 1.!3 /.,-%1%/."-3$.+ -$ G,%#$--)8, 01$))3 *$ -$ ,-)/.,-%1%/.%"., 3 .,1$/,)< 1-),")-H*%-$., .3 )".60 !"2 ,3-."2%"#)86)-$,%353

PAGE 78

E ."26 8%-3-$.-., %"+)0+ 2%"-$ 3 .,1$/,)< 1-B *.0-M *.0 -99//4AAAC4 03)9n3 1!, 2),1)"1 .0 2.00/ ,3)".02.-.6!3%"#/3 !2)"&3)8/. ,-%1%/."-3%"8% 02")3 .3* 00.3%"/)33%60 /!60%1.-%)"93%"1 G"))" 2 3 ,+ 3$.,&), &6.,, .33& "-.3., 3!0-)8 %"3 "3%-%+ 3 .,1$/,.1-%1 3HB ":%"M%"1)0"9'9/4C4$!39n-,% 2-)% "1, .3 -$ -,!3-*),-$%" 33)8-$%3=!.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$/,)< 1-61)"-%"!.00.3 5%"#-$ =! 3-%)"3)8*$ -$ /.,-%1%/."-3$.26 "#%+ "8!00%"8),&.-%)".6)!-*$.--$ 3-!2%"+)0+ 29*$ -$ ,/.,-%1%/."-3 *%00%"#0$.2#%+ "-$ %,1)"3 "--)/.,-%1%/.9."2*$ -$ ,/.,-%1 %/."-3%"-$ 3-!2* 2 1 %+ 2%"."*.),")-4 rnnn!nn n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n8)1!3 2)"-$ /.,-%1!0.,,.-$ ,-$."-$ # ,.0."2-$!33 0 12-$, /.,-%1%/."-3!3%"#-$ /.,-%1!0., 1,%,%.-$.-1)!023 ,+ -$

PAGE 79

EA /!,/)3 )8-$%3, 3 .,1$/,)< 1-43., 3!0-9-$ 3%-!.-%)"3)8-$%33-!2 ., ")--/%1.09."2-$ 8%"2%"#3)8-$%33-!21."")-6 .2%0.//0% 2-))-$ ,3%-!.-%)"34 )* + ,9%"),2 ,-)%"1, .3 # ,.0%:.6%0%-9-$%3, 3 .,1$/,)< 1 -!3 22%88 "3-,.#% 39%"10!2%"#,%1$9-$%152 31,%/-%)"."2&.7%&!&+.,%.-%)"9*$%1$, 8 ,3-)!3%"#3 + ,.0 3%391.3 39),3%-!.-%)"34n"),2 ,-)&.7%&%: 2%+ ,3%-%".1$ ,1 $%02%",.1-%)"3%"-$ /,)#,.&9n1)"2!12-$, )63 ,+.-%)"3)810.33,))&32!,%"#*$)0 #,)!/98 /0.9."2& .0 -%& / ,.1$ ,4n"),2 ,-)/,)+%2 ")!#$2 -.%0 2%"8),&.-%)".6)!-10. 33,))& + "-39n 1),2 2-$ )63 ,+.-%)"3%"-$ 8),&)88% 02")3."2%"10!2 2+ ,2 -.%0 22 3 1,%/-%)"3)8-$ )63 ,+.-%)"3%"$./,?4$ ,%1$92 -.%0 2%"8),&.-%)".6)!-.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3%"-$ /,)#,.& ".60 3, .2 ,3-)2 ,&%" $)*10)3 0-$ %,3%-!.-%)"3&. -1$-$%3, 3 .,1$ 1)"7-),*$ -$ ,-$ 8%"2%"#3)8-$%33-!21."6 -,."38 ,, 2-)-$ %,3%-!.%)"34 ")-$ ,0%&%-.-%)")8-$%3=!.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$/,)< 1-%3-))88 ,/.,%.0 +%2 "1 )" %",".0+.0%2%-2 3/%%-33 + ,.03-,.#% 3-) "$."1 %",".0 +.0%2%-4n"),2 ,-)10.,%8& .33!&/-%)"3."2*),02+% *6.3 2)"&/ ,3)".0 7/ ,% "1 39n%"+)0+ 2&3!6 < 1-%+%3-.& "-%"$./,403)9n1)"2!12G& &6 ,1$ 153H.8,1)&/0 -%"#-$ 8%,3-2,.8-)8 2.-..".03%3L-$.-%39n.35 2-$ -$, /.,-%1%/."-3*$ -$ ,),")-&"-.-%+ %",/, -.-%)"3 /0.!3%60 4r + ,-$ 0 339-$%3, 3 .,1$/,)< 1-/,)+%2 3 %"3!88%1% "+%2 "1 )"-$ +.0%2%)8-$ 8%"2%"#393%"1 -$ 2.-.* 1)00 12)+ ,.3$),-/ ,%)2)8-%& 4$.-% 3-)3.9-$ 2.-. ")-1)00 12-$,)!#$G0)"#,&)63 ,+.-%)".--$ 3 .,1$3%), / .2)63 ,+.-%)"3 )8-$ 3.& /$ ")& ")"HB ,,%.&9AA9/4?C4$%3/, + "-3-$%3, 3 .,1$/,) < 1-8,)&8!00 7/0.%"%"#G-$ 1)&/0 7%-)8$!&."6 $.+%),%".1)"7-!.08,.& *),5H), 8,)&/, 3 "-%"#G. $)0%3-%1%",/, -.-%)")8*$.-%3$.// "%"#HB ,,%.&9AA9/4'C4$!39-$%3, 3 .,1$/,)< 1-

PAGE 80

2) 3")-#%+ ./)3%-%+ ."3* ,-)-$ =! 3-%)")8*$ -$ ,-$ 3 .,1$2 &)"3-, .3*$.-%3 .00$.// "%"#4 ,)&.-,.2%-%)".0/ ,3/ 1-%+ )", 0%.6%0%-%"., 3 .,1$2 3%#"9 -$ 8.1--$.--$ 2.-. 1)00 12)+ ,.3$),-/ ,%)2)8-%& %3, 0.2-)-$ 0%.6%0%)8-$%3, 3 .,1$/,)< 1-4$%3 %36 1.!3 -$ -,.2%-%)".0/ ,3/ 1-%+ .33!& 3-$.-.3-!21."%"1 .3 +.0%2%--$,)!#$, / .2 )63 ,+.-%)"3%"-$ 3.& 3-!2-$.-0 .2-)-$ 3.& 3!0-34)* + ,93%"1 $!&."6 $.+%),%3 + ,3-.-%1."2, .0%-%"10!2 3&."%",/, -.-%)"3)8*$.-%3$.// "%" #9.=!.0%-.-%+ 3-!2 *%00")-% 02-$ 3.& 3!0-3, / .20B ,,%.&9AAC4$!39%"=!.0%-. -%+ 3 .,1$9-$ 3!0-3., 0%.60 %8-$ ., G1)"3%3"-."22 / "2.60 H,.-$ ,-$." 7.1-0-$ 3.& B ,,%.&9 AA9/4DC4 0%.6%0%-%"=!.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$%3# ,.00%&/,)+ 26 3 .,1$ ,3>2 -.%0 2 2 31,%/-%)"3)8$)*2.-.., 1)00 129$)*1.#),% 3., 2 ,%+ 29."2$)*2 1% 3%)"3., &.2 -$,)!#$)!--$ %"=!%,4,)&-$%3+% */)%"-9-$%3=!.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$/,)< 13!88%1% "-03$)*3 %-3, 0%.6%0%-."2 ".60 3, .2 ,3-)!"2 ,3-."2$)*-$ 3!0-3., / ,)2!1 2."2-)1)"8%,&-$ 8%"2%"#3)8-$%33-!2%"2 / "2 "-0403)96&%"%&.00/.,-%1%/.-%"#% "-$ 3 .,1$3%9n2 .0*%-$-$ 6%## 3--$, .--), 0%.6%0%-%"=!.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$, 3 ,1$ ,3>6%.3 393!1$.3 3 .,1$ ,3> 71 33%+ %"+)0+ & "-%"-$ 3%4)* + ,93%"1 )"0n.3 .$!&."%"3-,!& "/.,-%1%/.2%"-$ 3 .,1$3%9-$%3, 3 .,1$/,)< 1-%"10!2 3)6 3 ,+ ,>36%.3 3, 3!0-%"#8,)& &/ ,3)".01$.,.1,%3-%130%5 1!0-!,.0."2.1.2 &%16.15#, )!"239&0.15)8 7/ ,% "1 )8 1)"2!1-%"#, 3 .,1$9."2&-$ ), -%1.0),% "-.-%)"4$%3%3.")-$ ,0%&%.-%)")8-$%3=!.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$/,)< 1-4 %".009n!3 2&."3-,.#% 3-)%"1, .3 -$ -,!3-*),-$%" 33)8-$%3=!. 0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$ /,)< 1-4)* + ,93%"1 -$%3, 3 .,1$/,)< 1-*.31)"2!12)+ ,.3$),-/ ,%)2)8-%& 9n2%2")$.+ 3!88%1% "--%& -) 3-.60%3$.10)3 ,.//),-*%-$-$ /.,-%1%/."3403)9&0.15)8

PAGE 81

7/ ,% "1 )81)"2!1-%"#, 3 .,1$/, + "2& 8,)&6!%02%"#." 71 00 ",.//),-4$%3 %"2%1.3-$.-6)-$n."2-$ /.,-%1%/."-3/.,-0!"2 ,3-))2."23$., 2, 1 %/,)1.01!0-!, 3."2 6 0% 839."2-$%3, 3 .,1$/,)< 1-%36.3 2)"3!1$."!"2 ,3-."2%"#4$%3 /)%"-" 23-)6 .22, 33 268!-!, 3 .,1$6.3 2)"0)"#,&, 0.-%)"3$%/36 -* ", 3 .,1$ ,3."2 /.,-%1%/."-3),, 3 .,1$ ,3>,%1$ 7/ ,% "1 )86!%02%"#,.//),-4

PAGE 82

? rnrrrn n"-$%31$./,n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n".22%-% )"93 + "6!%02%"# -.3531)"3%3-)8%#"%8%1."1 91-%+%-% 39n2 "-%-% 39 0.-%)"3$%/39 )0%-%13B-$ 2%3-,%6!-%)")8 3)1%.0#))23C9)"" 1-%)"39."2%#"33&3."25")*0 2# 4"0%5 -$ ".,,.-%+ 93 + 6!%02%"#-.353., 6.3 2)"%",+% *3.3* 00.3)63 ,+.-%)"2.-.."2%"10!2 $ 3%-.-%)"39 /.!3 392380! "1% 39."2")"10.!3 0%" 39*$%1$3$)*%&/),-."-%"8),&.-%)". 6)!--$ 2%31)!,3 34$!39 .1$.1$ ,>33 + "6!%02%"#-.3533$)*$)* .1$.1$ ,% ",.1-3*%-$ 1$%02, "%"$ ,10.33,))&L*$.-&.5 3$ ,6 $.+ ."23/ .5%"./.,-%1!0., *.L*$.-$ 6 $.+%),."23/ 1$& ."*%-$%".3/ 1%8%11)"7-L."2$)*-$ + "-3."2$.// "%"#3%"2. -. ., 1)"" 12."2%",/, 24 nn r0n!rnn &.%"%", 3-%"!3.">3%",+% *%3-)3 $)*3$ %31)"1 ," 2.6)!--$ 31$))0 >3 .11)!"-.6%0%--$,)!#$$ ,.1-!.0*),234$%3&.%"%", 3-1)& 38,)&-$ 8 .1--$.-.3)" )8-$ %33! 3&)3-8, =! "-0& "-%)" 22!,%"#-$ %",+% *3 33%)"39-$ 31$))0>3.11)!"-. 6%0%3 &3-)3%#"%8%1."-0%"80! "1 !3.">36 $.+%),."23/ 1$4!3."8, =! "-0-.05 2-)1$%02,

PAGE 83

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n"/.,-%1!0.,9$ ,"., ,.-%+ %"10!2 3$)*-$ /,)#,.&1$."# 3."21)"3-,.%"3$ ,*.)8.1$%"#."2%",.1-%"# *%-$1$%02, "43. 3!0-9!3.">3".,,.-%+ 3$)*3$)*$ ,2%31)!,3 3., 1)"3-,!12."21)"-,)0 0 26-$ $% ,.,1$%1.0),#."%:.-%)"3)831$))033&3."2$)*$ ,%",.1-%)"3*%-$1$%02, "., %"80! "1 26-$ 2%31)!,3 34!rn)&n-.":. .1$ ,31)"3%2 ,3)& /,)60 &3)8-$ .,-$.3.* 50 -$ & 4 n-%3./,)#,.&-$.-* $.2, .2.6)!4 ."2* 5")*-$.--$ .,-$%3$.+%"#/,)60 &39 '4 -$ ., 3)&."/ )/0

PAGE 84

? ?4 ."2.0)-)8/ )/0 ., ")-, !3%"#-$%"#3."2, 110%"#%&3 @4 ."2-$,)*%"#.*.3)&."-$%"#39 D4 -$ #.,6.# /%0 3., /%0%"#!/$%#$ ,."2$%#$ E4 ."2%-R3./,)60 &9-$.--$ .,-$$.34 !1n n r rnnn n rnnn!n2 /,)#,.&>33/ 1%8%1%"8),&.-%)".6)!--$ 1 33.,35%0038),5% "2 ,#.," !63!63-),($.--)2)*%-$.-$ & %36.3 2)"-$ 1 33.,35%0038),5% "2 ,#.," -.":. .1$ ,3.223)& /,)60 &3)8-$ .,-$-)-$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!& 4 )9-$.-R3)" .3)"* R+ .22 2-$.--))!,1!,,%1!0!&4 A4 "2-$ "1 ,-.%"*,%-"/,)#,.&3., .6)!-%4 ."200)!3)& -$%"#)!1."2)*%-$-$ 1$%02, "4-.":.' .1$ ,33$)*1$%02, "$)*-), !3 3)& -$%"# 4 %5 0.3.,9* &.2 /./ ,9 4 -$ .006,)!#$-%"0%"-8,)&-$ %,2, ,3 '4 ."2* &.2 /./ ,)!-)8%--)3$)*-$ & ?4 $)** 1.", !3 3)& -$%"#-$.-3)& )" &%#$--$,)*.*.9 @4 1."!3 %--)&.5 3)& -$%"# 03 4 D4 n->3.#))2-$%"#8),-$ &-)5")*."2-$%"5.6)!-%-4-.":.? .1$ ,32 1%2 .* 50-$ & 6.3 2)"-$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!& E4 ( $.+ 1!,,%1!0!&$ .-&31$))0 4 -$.-*.32 + 0)/ 2)+ ,9)+ ,3)& .,36.1$ ,3 A4 ."2* !3!.00#)6-$.-96-$.--$ & .1$* 5-.":.@ .1$ ,31$))3 *$.--)2)*%-$.-$ &

PAGE 85

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

PAGE 86

D 'A4 ( $.+ .0)-)83-."2.,234 ?4 $ ., + ,$ 0/8!09 ?4 -$ R33)&!1$93)-$ R33)&!1$ ?4 6 1.!3 $)*9nR00$.+ -)3$)*)!-$ 6))5%8)!*."-9 -.":.A$ %"8),&.-%)"%3+ ,3/ 1%8%1 ?'4 6!--$ R3.!"%-.3.*$)0 3 1-%)")"-$ %,/$3%1.0.6%0%-% 39 ??4 %8-$ 9%8-$ 1."2)3&.00&)-),-$%"#390.,# &)-),-$%"#39 ?@4 /$3%1.009$)*., -$ /$3%1.009 ?D4 $)*-$ >, %"#))2$ .0-$9 ?E4 2)-$ 3 &-) .-#))28))24-.":./,)#,.& &/$.3%: 31$%02, ">30%,.1 ?4 $.->33/,)#, 33 @4 ."2)!$.+ -)9)!$.+ -)-,.15 + ,1$%02."23 4 @'4 ),%"3-."1 98),!3%->30%5 %8)!* .1$%02%"&10.33 @?4 n*)!02*.-1$)!2,.*%"# @@4 ."23 *$.-)!" 2 2-)*),5)"4-.":. .1$ ,3.33 33&."2%88 "-.3/ 1-3)81$%02, ">32 + 0) /& "@D4 n*)!02.35)!9G($.-0 -,%3-$%3PH @E4 ."23 $)*&."0 -,3)!5")*

PAGE 87

E @4 ."2-$.-%8)!2%2"R-5")*+ ,&." @A4 *)!02*,%-$.-2)*"9* 009" 23-)*),5)"0 -,3 D4 ."2* *)!02*),5*%-$)!&), )"0 -,, 1)#"%-%)"4 D4 n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

PAGE 88

E@4 3)-$.-* 9* -,.15 .1$1$%02 ED4 ."2* 31.88)02)"*$.--$ .0, .25")*4 EE4 ( 6!%02)"-$.-4 E4 )-$ >3&), ."2&), /./ ,*),59 EA4 ."2&), .2%"#9 4 &), .002)%"#*%-$ .1$1$%02)" )")" -))4 4 "2* 2%2%-6 8), 9 4 6!-%->39* 2)">-, .002)-$.-&."&), 2%88 "--$%"#34 -.":.E$ %31)"1 ," 2.6)!--$ 31$))0>3.11)!"-.6%0%'4 n-$%"53.11)!"-.6%0%-")*4-.":./),-8)0%)3$)*3$)*1$%02, "2 + 0)/-$ %,.6%0%-% 3 A4 ),-8)0%)P5.4( 2)9* 5 /-$ 3.&/0 3)8-$ %,.,-*),54 A'4 ),%"3-."1 9.--$ 6 #%""%"#)8-$ .,9 A?4 3.9G,.*)!,3 089H3)-$ 2,.*9 A@4 ."2-$ ". .,0.,* 3..#.%"G,.*./%1-!, )8)!,3 084H

PAGE 89

A AD4 "2-$ "-$ 2,.*.&), 2 -.%0 2/%1-!, 4-.":.A/),-8)0%) ".60 3.1$ ,3-)5 /-,.15)81$%02, ">3/,)#, 33 AE4 --$ "2)8-$ .,9 A4 1."5 /-,.15)8-$ %,/,)#, 339 AA4 ."2.03)9* $.+ 9-$%"#3-$.--$ -,-)*,%9 4 -$ 1."*,%-$ 0 -,34 4 ($ "-$ *,%-$ %,".& 9 4 /!--$.-%".--$ 6 #%""%"#)8-$ .,9 '4 ."2-$ + ,8 ** 53/!-%".")-$ ,-,-)*,%-$ %,".& 9 ?4 ."2* -,.15-$ %,/,)#, 33)"-$.-4 !63!63-),?./ ,*),5$ 0/3.1$ ,35")**$.--$ $.+ -)2)8),1$%02, -.":../ ,*),5 ".60 3.1$ ,3-)6 .*., )8*$.--$ ., 2)%" # @4 n2)">-0%5 %-4 D4 !-9%-, .009n& ."%-9!0-%&.0%-%3.#))2-$%"# E4 6 1.!3 %-2) 35 /)!.*., )89 4 $)*&!1$-$ 2-)0 .,"9 -.":../ ,*),5$ 0/3.1$ ,3!"2 ,3-."23)& -$%"# A4 )!$.+ -)6 5%"2)83)& )8%->393!6< 1-%+ 9 4 0%5 -$ &.")-5")*3)& -$%"#)" 2. 4 ."2%8)!.35-$ &.")-$ ,2.-$ 5")*%4 ."293)& -%& 3-$ 2)"R-5")*%-,%#$--$ "9 '4 6!--$ "0.,-$ & &6 ,9 ?4 B3$ !3 3.1$%02>3+)%1 CG$9 .$9n5" *-$.-4H

PAGE 90

A -.":../ ,*),5%31)"3%2 26!,2 "3)& @4 )-$.-&.5 3%-.0%--0 6%-2%88%1!0D4 6!-9n-$%"5%"-$ 0)"#,!"%-R3#))29 E4 %-2) 3-.5 &), )8)!,-%& ."2&), 9 4 -$ >3&), /, 33!, )"!39 A4 -)&.5 3!, -$.--$ R, 2)%"#*$.--$ 2-)2)4 4 )-$.-9-$.-/.,-)8%-%3$.,29 -.":.'./ ,*),5$ 0/3.1$ ,31., .6)!--$ %,1$%02, 4 6!-n-$%"5%-%3.#))2-$%"#9 4 6 1.!3 9-$ ., .0)-)8.1$ ,3 '4 n-$%"5-$.-%8-$ 2)"R-, .001., .6)!--$ 1$%02, "-$.-&!1$9 ?4 -$ *)">-2)."-$%"#9 @4 -$ --.05-)-$ &9 E4 -$ 2)"R-2)."-$%"#4 -.":.?./ ,*),5 ".60 3.1$ ,3-)5")*$)*-).33 331$%02, ">3/,)#, 33 4 !-")*%8-$ R, 2)%"#-$ 9 A4 -$ $.+ -)$.+ .8)02 ,8), .1$1$%02-$.-3$)*39-$ %,/,)#, 334 '4 $ $.+ -).33 33 .1$1$%029 '4 -$ $.+ 3)& 5%"2)88),&-$.--$ 8%00)!-4 -.":.@./ ,*),5%3$ 0/8!08),.1$ ,3%"-$ "2 '4 )-$ $.+ -)6 92)%"#*$.--$ R, 3!//)3 2-)6 2)%"#4 ''4 )n-$%"5%-R3, .00#))2%"-$ 0)"#,!"9

PAGE 91

A '?4 %-R3$.,2 ,B$.9$.C%-R3&), 8),!36!-9 '@4 n-$%"5%-R39.#))2-$%"#4 !n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

PAGE 92

A @4 / )/0 *$)5")*9.1$ ,3*$)5")*9 @'4 G$9-$%31$%021.& 8,)&3)."23)31$))09H @?4 ."2$ 5")*3.0)-93)-$ &!3-$.+ .00*),5 24 @@4 "2-$ &.2 3!, -$.-$ 5" + ,-$%"#4 -.":.A$ 31$))0>3.11)!"-.6%0%-%3%&/),-."@D4 $.-R3.")-$ ,*.* $ 02.11)!"-.60 6-$ )-$ ,31$))039 @E4 -$ *%009n2)">-5")*%8-$ >00, /),--$.-9 @4 6!--$ *%005")*4 @A4 n>&")-3!, %8-$ ., 3)& 5%"23)8#,.2%"#33&3 -9 D4 6!--$.-&%#$-6 1)&%"#4 -.":.'$ 31$))0" 23-)6 .11)!"-.60 -)/., "-3 D4 )93)* >, $ 02.11)!"-.60 ."2.03)-)-$ /., "-3 D4 $.+ .1)"8 "1 *%-$.00-$ /., "-3%";."!.,9%";."!.,), 6,!.,9 D'4 n-$%"5 6,!.,-$%3 .,4 -.":.' .1$ ,3%"8),&/., "-3)8*$.--$ %,1$%025")*3 D?4 "2* *%0000-$ &9 D@4 )!,1$%025")*3-$.-95")*3.00)8-$%39 DD4 6!-%8)!1)!02*),5*%-$$%&)"-$%3 DE4 *$%0 )!* 3-%00*),5%"#)"9 D4 $%&0 .,"%"#.00)8$%30 -,3),*$.+ ,4 -.":.'., "-3" 2-)&.5 3!, -$ %,1$%02%3, .28),5%"2 ,#.," DA4 )* >, .11)!"-.60 -)-$ /., "-3.03) E4 6 1.!3 -$ *."--$ %,1$%02, .28),5%"2 ,#.,"

PAGE 93

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n->3-$.--$ *$)0 9*$)0 %2 .6 $%"2-$%34 E4 n->3-$.-&), 1$%02, "*%002)* 00%"5%"2 ,#.,"4 4 3)& -%& 3%-&.5 3%-.0%--0 $.,2 A4 6 1.!3 )!$.+ -)6 3!, -$.-)!R, 2)%"# ")!#$9

PAGE 94

A? -.":.'D .1$ ,3$.+ -)*),5*%-$1$%02, "*$)2)")-!"2 ,3-."20 -,3 A4 )!0))5.-)!,, 1),233.9 A4 $ 3-%002) 3"R-9$ 3-%002) 3"R-!"2 ,3-."29 A4 -$ 3 2%88 "-0 -,3."2-$ 3)!"23)8-$ 0 -,33)4 A'4 $ ")!$.+ -)8%"2-$ -%& A?4 *$ ")!1."*),5*%-$-$ &)"-$.A@4 ),&.5 3!, -$.--$ R, /.,-%1%/.-%"#%" AD4 .#.& -$.--.053.6)!-9-$)3 3)!"23)8-$)3 0 -,34 (rnn!1nn n rn5n nnnnn rnnn 5rrnn -.":.'E .1$ ,3$.+ -), 1),2 + ,-$%"#-$.-$.// "3-) .1$1$%02 AE4 )%->393)%-R3.0)-&), B4C& "-.0/, /.,.-%)" A4 ."2.03))"/./ AA4 ."2* $.+ -)*,%.00-$ 3 -$%"#32)*" 4 ."2$.+ ., 1),2)8 .1$1$%024 4 )9-$.-.88 1-3.0)-4 .60 ?4!3.">310.3331$ 2!0 A,)!/-%& )001.0090 2# )8.00 #%."1 9.0 "2.,9-),9 0/ 1$.,-9) &M )"#3 A, /0.,-9,.&.-%1/0.."2)-$ ,1 ",3 @ *%-1$,))&3")-$ ,#,)!/-%& *%-$3-),9 +% *."2 1.00 @ 0 ."!/")-$ ,#,)!/-%& N +% *."2 1.0092!1.-%)".0#.& !-3%2 "2)8-$ -%&

PAGE 95

A@ !&rn6rn5n6rnr r nn)*."2*$.-2%88 "--$%"#3& ."N-$ 3),-3)8& ."%"#."23%#"%8%1."1 -$ #%+ "N%3. 1)&/)" "-)8."3%-!.-%)"4 4 ($.-., -$ 3%-!.2& ."%"#3)83)& )8-$ *),23."2/$,.3 3-$.-3 &%&/),."%"-$ 3%-!.-%)"P n"-$ 8%,3-."23 1)"28),&.0%",+% *393$ 8, =! "-0!3 3-$ *),2G-.05 9H."2-$ *),2G-.05H%32%88 "-0%",/, 2.11),2%"#-) .1$3%-!.-%)"4%,3 -9-$ & ."%"#)8G-.05H%3 -$.-.1$ ,3."21$%02, "3%&/0 7/, 33-$ %,-$)!#$-3."28 0%"#34$.-% 3-)3.9-$ *),2 G-.05H& ."3-$.-.1$ ,3."21$%02, "3.3)& -$%"#,.-$ ,-$."1)"+ %"#$ /.,-%1!0.,4 n8-$ 2)">--.05 ."20%3".0)-9-$ &%#$-")-!"2 ,3-."2-$ 3-=! 3-%)"39)!5")*9 -$.-3 &3-)$.// "4n->39!$9%->3.0).3% ,8),.1$%02-)3-.,-, .2%"#."2*,%-%"#%8-$ 1. "-.05 00."2-$ 1."$ .,/ )/0 -.05%"# .0)-4 1)"29-$ *),2G-.05H& ."3-$.-.1$ ,3%"+)0+ 1$%02, "%"2%31!33%"#.1 ,-.%"-)/%1 6&.5%"#1$%02, "/..-"-%)"-)-$ -)/%14n"-$ 3%-!.-%)"*$ ".1$ ,3 .1$1$%02, ". 1 ,-.%"3!6< 1-6#%+%"#1$%02, ".1$."1 -)3.-$ %,%2 .3.6)!--$ 3 !6< 1-9-$ 3%-!.2 & ."%"#)8G-.05H%3-)2%31!333)& -$%"#4 ( -.05 .6)!-9!&98),%"3-."1 9-$%3* 5* -.05%"# .6)!-, 110%"#."2, !3%"# %&39)!5")*93.+%"#9-,%"#-)5 /-$ .,-$10 ."4( -.05 .6)!--$.-3!6< 1-.#.%"9G($)-.05 2 .6)!--$ 110%"#PH.,)"-)2.n
PAGE 96

AD n.35-$ &)/ "2 2=! 3-%)"39*$%1$& ."3-$ 1."R-, 3%--%"#10)3 -)-$ &9* !3!.00-,-)-.05 .6)!-9)!5")*9-.05 .6)!--$%"#3-) #)-)-$ +)1.6!0.,4 %".009-$ & ."%"#)8G-.05H%33)& -%& 31)"3%2 2-)6 =!.0-)-$ & ."%"#)8 G%",.1-4HG.05H& ."3-$.-.1$ ,3."21$%02, "#%+ ."2-.5 -$ %, -$)!#$-3."28 0%"#3 6.3 2)"&!-!.0, 3/ 1-9-,!3-9."2!"2 ,3-."2%"#403)9-$ *),2G-.05H& ."3-$.-.1$ ,3 3$., -$ %,-$)!#$-3."28 0%"#3*%-$)-$ ,.1$ ,3*$ ".1$ ,3G-.05H -) .1$)-$ ,4 ( , $.+%"#9!$9.6.5 ,3$)/9* &%#$--.05 -)-$ &.6)!-%-9G($.-2))!-$%"5* 2-) &.5 .6.5 ,3$)/PH( -.05 -) .1$)-$ ,.6)!-*$.-* 0 .,"9)!5")*9-)$ 0/-$ )-$ ,.1$ ,39-)6 .60 -)2)3)& )8-$)3 -$%"#3-$.-* *%006 3!11 338!0*%-$4 r 7-93$ 8, =! "-0!3 3-$ *),2G00H2!,%"#-$ %",+% *3."2)63 ,+.-%)"3 9."2%$.3-$, 2%88 "-3%-!.2& ."%"#34%,3-9*$ "3$ *."-31$%02, "-) 7/, 33-$ %,-$)!#$-3 ."28 0%"#3)6+%)!30."2/)3%-%+ 093$ !3 3-$ *),2G004H3/ 1%. 00*$ "1$%02, 1)&/0.%".6)!-)-$ ,1$%02, ">3&%36 $.+%),93$ .00)*31$%02, "-)3.-$ %,8 0%"#3!3%"#-$ *),2G004H$!39-$ *),2G00H& ."3-$.-.1$ ,3."21$%02, ".,-%1 !0.-$ %,)/%"%)"3 / ,3!.3%+ 0."210 .,04 8,-$ 3-),9!$9* -.05.6)!-*$.-%-*.3.6)!-."2n0 --$ &00 & -$%"#3.6)!--$ 3-),4( 3-./0 -$ /./ ,-)# -$ ,9."2-$ 1."2,.*/%1-!, 3."2-$ "-$ 00 !3*$.--$ *,%8),-$ %,6))59* 2)-$.-.0)--))4 & &6 ,*$.-* -.05 2.6)!-4 00 $%&$)*)!>, 8 0%"#4)">-%3-) 7/0.%"),2 31,%6 3)& -$%"#4$.-%3-)3. 9-$ & ."%"#)8G00H%3-)/,)+%2 %"8),&.-%)".6)!-3)& -$%"#9."2-$!39.1$ ,3. "21$%02, "., .60 -)!3 %-4

PAGE 97

AE ,-.%"*,%-"/,)#,.&3., .6)!-%-."29!$900 )!3)& -$%"#)!1."2)*%-$-$ 1$%02, "4 $ -$%,2& ."%"#)8G00H%3-$.-.1$ ,3."21$%02, "!"2 ,3-."23)& -$%"#4n")$ *),239-$ *),2G00H& ."3-$.-.1$ ,3."21$%02, ", 1)#"%: *$.-3)& $%"#& ."3."2 .1--)%-4 n8-$ ., &.29* 1."00 -$.--$ ., &.24 )*1.")!00 8,)&$%38.1 -$.-$ >33.2P 6rn &nn)& .1-%+%-),3 -)8.1-%+%-% 3%3.1)&/)" "-)8."3%-!.-%)"B-$ 3/ 1% 8%13)1%.0.1-%+%-), .1-%+%-% 3%"*$%1$-$ /.,-%1%/."-3., "#.#%"#L.1-%+%-% 3., 9%"-!,"9&.2 !/)8.3 =! "1 )8 .1-%)"3C4 4 ($.-%3-$ 0.,# ,),&.%".1-%+%-B),3 -)8.1-%+%-% 3C#)%"#)"%"-$ 3%!.-%)"P $ &.%".1-%+%-%3-)/, /., 1$%02, "8),5%"2 ,#.,"%"-$ /,) #,.&%"1$%02 1., 3 --%"#34.3 2)"-$ 3-."2.,238),5%"2 ,#.,"9.1$ ,3.1$1$%02, "*$.-1$%02, "" 2 -)5")**$ "-$ #)-)5%"2 ,#.,"2!,%"#*$)0 #,)!/98, /0.9."2& .0-%& 4% "1 .1$ ,36 0% + -$.-/, /.,%"#1$%02, "8),5%"2 ,#.,"%310)3 0 0.2-)-$ 31$))0>3 .11)!"-.6%0%-9.1$ ,38)1!3)"1$%02, ">3.1.2 &%135%003."21, .-$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!&-) 7/."2-$)3 35%0034$%3&.%".1-%+%-1)"3%3-3)83 + ,.03!6.1-%+%-% 39*$%1$., &.2 !/)8. "!&6 ,)82%88 "-.1-%)"34 )8-$ 3!6.1-%+%-% 3%3-)8)1!3)"1$%02, ">30%,.14$%33!6.1-%+% -1)"3%3-3)8 8.1%0%-.-%"#1$%02, ">30 .,"%"#-), .2."2*,%9$ 0/%"#1$%02, "6!%0 2.#))2+)1.6!0.,9."2 #%+%"#1$%02, ".")//),-!"%--) 7/ ,% "1 2%88 "7/, 33%)"34n"/., -%1!0.,9.1$ ,3-,-) $ 0/.1$%02*$)3/ .53"#0%3$.3.3 1)"20."#!.# /,.1-%1 ./ ,8 1-3 ""1 61),, 1-%"# -$ 1$%02>36,)5 ""#0%3$4$%3%36 1.!3 .1$ ,3., 1)"1 ," 2-$.--$ 1$%02&%#$-$.+

PAGE 98

A -,)!60 !"2 ,3-."2%"#.1$ ,3>*),23%"5%"2 ,#.,"."2&%#$-")-6 !"2 ,3-))2 6)-$ 1$%02, "),.1$ ,34 3 1)"23!6.1-%+%-%3-).33 331$%02, ">3.6%0%-% 34$ .%&)8-$%33 !6.1-%+%-%3-) 8%#!, )!-*$..1$1$%02.0, .25")*3."2" 23-)5")*4$%33!6.1-%+%-1)"3%33)83 %"# *$..1$1$%02%32)%"#-$,)!#$)" )")" %",.1-%)"98%00%"#)!-2%88 "-8),&38), .1$ 1$%029."25 /%"#-,.15)8 .1$1$%02>3/,)#, 3398), 7.&/0 91)&/0 %"# .1$1$%02>3/),-8)0%)4 -$%,23!6.1-%+%-%3-)1, .-$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!&6.3 2)"-$ 3-."2.,2 38), 5%"2 ,#.,"."2-$ #!%2 0%" 38),-$ /,)#,.&4$%33!6.1-%+%-1)"3 %3-3)82%31!33%"#-$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!&*%-$)-$ ,.1$ ,39#.-$ ,%"#%"8),&.-%)"-$,)!#$2%88 "-3)!,1 33!1$.3 /.,-%1%/.-%)"%".1)"8 "1 9."23$.,%"#2%88 "7/ ,% "1 3*%-$)-$ ,.1$ ,34$,)!#$ -$ 3 5%"23)8.1-%)"39.1$ ,3)6-.%"3/ 1%8%1%"8),&.-%)".6)!-1$%02, ">30 .,"%"#."21, .-$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!&-$.-&.7%&%: 3-$ 1$%02, ">30 .,"%"#46rnrnn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n-$%"5%"-$%31)!"--$ 5 /-,.15)8*$.31$))0-$ .-"2 26 8), 4)-$%331$))0*%006 1)& 5")*"9)!5")*9.3 %-$ ,6 %" # 71 00 "-),")-9.11),2%"#-)$)*&."1$%02, "5")**$.--$ 2-)5")**$ "-$ #)-)5%"2 ,#.,"4H$!39$ ,%"3-,!1-%)"&)3-08)1!3 3)"%"1, .3%"#1$%02, ">30%,.1."2 .00)*%"#1$%02, "-).11)&/0%3$-$ %,-.353* 00%"5%"2 ,#.,"4), 7.&/0 92!,%"#*$)0

PAGE 99

AA #,)!/-%& 93$ 3.3-).1$%029G($ ")!# --)5%"2 ,#.,"."2)!>, #)"".2)%-9)!" 2 -)3-.,-2)%"#%-%"-$.-*.9.00,%#$-Pr)--$%3*.4$.->3)5.8),-)2.9 H."2G)!1.">-2) -$%3."&), S1.!3 5%"2 ,#.,".1$ ,32)">-*."--$.-4($ ")!6 #%"6% #31$))09)! $.+ -)2)%-.")-$ ,*.4H$.-%3-)3.9 + "-$)!#$1$%02, "., %"./, 5%"2 ,#.,"10.33,))&."2-$ %,6 $.+%),."23/ 1$., ")-*,)"#93$ 231$%02, "-)6 .*., )8."2 /,.1-%1 *$.-5%"2 ,#.,".1$ ,3 7/ 1-%".2+."1 4 n".22%-%)"9$ ,,)0 %"$ 0/%"#1$%02, "6!%02.#))2+)1.6!0.,3 &3-)6 0.2-) -$ 31$))0>3.11)!"-.6%0%-4$ 3.3-$.-1$%02, "&%#$-$.+ -,)!60 *% -$-$ 3-=! 3-%)"3 *$ "-$ .2-$ &%8-$ 2)")-!"2 ,3-."29%8-$ 2)")-$.+ .#))2+)1.6!0.,9),%8$ 2)")--.05."20%3".0)-4n")-$ ,*),2393$ %3*),,% 2-$.-$ ,1$%02, "., ")-.60 -)3!11 2 %"31$))06 1.!3 )8-$ %,/)),+)1.6!0.,9."26 0% + 3-$.-.1$ ,3., 3/)"3%60 8), 2 + 0)/%"#1$%02, ">3+)1.6!0.,4$!393$ $ 0/31$%02, "6!%02.#))2+)1.6!0., %"2%88 "*.34), 7.&/0 92!,%"#& .0-%& 93$ &.5 3$ ,3.0.26$ ,3 08*$% 0 1$%02, "., .-%"# 0!"1$."2.3531$%02, "*$.-5%"23)8+ # -.60 33$ $.393.%"#G($)5")*3.+ # -.60 n$.+ ")*PH$ .00)*31$%02, "-)."3* ,-$ =! 3-%)"."2#%+ 31$%02, ".=!%15 7/0.".-% )")8-$ + # -.60 343., 3!0-93$ -,% 3-)#%+ 1$%02, ".1$."1 -)2 + 0)/.#))2+)1 .6!0.,.3)8" .3/)33%60 #.,20 33)8-%& ."2/0.1 9%"),2 ,8),1$%02, "-)3!11 2% "31$))04 n"3!&&.,93$ .3..1$ ,&.5 3 + 88),--)2 + 0)/1$%02, ">3+)1.6!0 ., 6 1.!3 3$ 6 0% + 3-$.-1$%02, ">33!11 33%"31$))02 / "23)"-$ =!.0%)8-$ 1$%02, ">3 +)1.6!0.,4!,-$ ,&), 9.3./, 5%"2 ,#.,".1$ ,93$ # -31$%02, ", .28),5%"2 ,#.," 6#%+%"#1$%02, ".1$."1 -)/,.1-%1 -$ 3-."2.,238),5%"2 ,#.,"4$!3 9$ ,,)0 .3..1$ %"$ 0/%"#1$%02, "6!%02.#))2+)1.6!0.,."2$ ,,)0 .3./, 5%"2 ,#.,".1$ ,%"# --%"# 1$%02, ", .28),5%"2 ,#.,"3 &-)6 1)"3%3"-0, 0 +."--)-$ 31$))0 >3.11)!"-.6%0%-4

PAGE 100

6rnrnn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n>&#)""..5 -$.-4H$%3 %"2%1.3-$.-3$ *."-31$%02, "-)3)0+ -$ /,)60 &6-$ &3 0+ 396!-3 $ $ 0/31$%02, "3)0+ -$ /,)60 &6, &%"2%"#1$%02, ".6)!-$)*-) 7/, 33-$ %,8 0%"#34 11),2%"#-)-$ 8%,3%",+% *2.-.9$ ,1$%02, "$.+ .0, .20 .," 2$)*-)2 .0*%-$-$%35%"2)8/, )60 &."2$)* -)3.-$ %,8 0%"#34)* + ,93%"1 1$%02, "2)")-.0*.3, & &6 ,$)* -)3.3)& -$%"#9 3$ &%"231$%02, ".6)!--$.-4$ 8), 9-$%33%-!.-%)"3$)*3-$.-3$ 231$%0 2, "-)# -$,)!#$-$ 3%-!.-%)"6!3%"#-$ *.3-$.--$ $.+ .0, .2 7/ ,% "1 24n")-$ ,*),239-$%3 3%-!.-%)"%"+)0+ 3..1$ ,1$%02, 0.-%)"3$%/9*$%1$%"2%1.3-$.-.1$ ,3 21$%02, "-) !"2 ,3-."2."2/,.1-%1 *$.-.1$ ,3., 3.%"#9."21$%02, "" 2-)8)00)** $.-.1$ ,3 7/ 1-4 n".22%-%)"9-$%33%-!.-%)"%"+)0+ 3.1$%021$%02, 0.-%)"3$%/4$%02, "0 .,"-$ .3-) # -.0)"#*%-$)-$ ,1$%02, "8,)&.1$ ,3."2., .60 -)%&/,)+ -$ %,, 0 .-%)"3$%/3*%-$)-$

PAGE 101

1$%02, "!3%"#-$)3 *.34%"1 1$%02, "2)")-.0*.3, & &6 ,$)*-)3.-$ %, 8 0%"#39 -$ )8"" 2.1$ ,3>$ 0/%".3/ 1%8%13%-!.-%)"4$!39-$%33%-!.-%)"#%+ 3 1$%02, "." )//),-!"%--) 7/ ,% "1 2%88 "-1$%021$%02, 0.-%)"3$%/36/,.1-% 1%"#-$ *.3-$.--$ $.+ .0, .20 .," 2-$,)!#$..1$ ,1$%02, 0.-%)"3$%/4$ 3 3)1%.0, 0 .-%)"3$%/3., 3-.6%0%: 2%"-$%33%-!.-%)"4$%3%36 1.!3 *$ + ,-$%33%-!.-%)"-.5 3/0.1 91$%02, ".35 .1$ ,3>$ 0/."2.1$ ,3%"3-,!1--$ 3.& -$%"#46rn nnrnn nnn"3%-!.-%)"%"+)0+ 33)1%.0#))23."2+% *3)"-$ %,2%3-,%6!-%)".3.1)&/)" "-4 @4 ($.-3)1%.0#))23B 4#493-.-!39/)* ,9.3/ 1-3)8# "2 ,9,.1 9."210.339),& ), ".,,)*02 8%" 23)1%.0" -*),53."2%2 "-%-% 3C., 0 +."-B."2%,, 0 +."C%"-$%3 3%-!.-%)"P)*., -$ &.2 0 +."-B."2%,, 0 +."-C9."2%"*$.-*.3P $ 1!,,%1!0!&)8-$ 10.33,))&%36.3 2)"6)-$-$ #!%2 0%" 38),-$ /,)#,.&."2-$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!&-$.-$.32 + 0)/ 2)+ ,-$ .,34n"# ,.09-$ /, 5%"2 ,#.,".1$ ,32 1%2 .-$ & .1$* 56.3 2)"-$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!&."2-$ "1$))3 *$.--)2)*%-$-$.--$ & !3%"#-$ #!%2 0%" 38),-$ /,)#,.&4($ "-$ .1$ ,32 1%2 *$.--)2)9-$ -$%"5.6)!-*$.-1$%02, "" 2-)5")*-)#)-)5%"2 ,#.,"."2-$ "3 0 1-3)& 35%003.&)"#-$ 35%003-$.--$ /,)#,.&3!## 3-34$ /, 5%"2 #.,".1$ ,3 %"1),/),.-$)3 35%003%"-)-$ 1!,,%1!0!&)8-$ 10.33,))&4)* + ,9-$ &. <),%-)8-$ 1!,,%1!0!&)8-$ 10.33,))&1)"3%3-3)8-$ #!%2 0%" 38),-$ /,)#,. &,.-$ ,-$."-$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!&4$%3%36 1.!3 -$ .1$ ,38)1!3)"$.+%"#1$%02, "/,.1%1 -$ 35%003-$.1$%02, "" 2-)5")*-)#)-)5%"2 ,#.,"."21$%02, "3/ "2&!1$-%& /,.1-%1%"#-$)3 35%0034), 7.&/0 9%8-$ .1$ ,31$)3 110%"#.3.-$ & 9-$ .1$ ,3&%#$-$.+ 1$%02, 2,.*-$%"#3.6)!--$ .,-$9/.%"-.,%+ ,9-.05.6)!--$%"#3-$.-*)!020%+ %".,%+ ,9."2, .2 .6)!-, 110%"#43., 3!0-9-$ 1!,,%1!0!&)8-$ 10.33,))&%32)&%"."-0 1)"-,)00 26 -$ 3-."2.,238),5%"2 ,#.,"9 + "-$)!#$-$ 10.33,))&%3.1$%021., 3 --% "#4

PAGE 102

$ 2)&%"."-3-.-!3)8-$ 3-."2.,238),5%"2 ,#.,"%"-$ 1!,,%1!0!&)8-$ 10.33,))&.// .,3-$,)!#$$ ,3/ 1$4), 7.&/0 92!,%"#*$)0 #,)!/-%& 93$ 3 .39G)! 29n5")*)!1."2)%-9".& )"%-*%-$.00-$ 1./%-.034$.->3, .00#))296!-$ 5%"2 ,#.,".1$ ,390 -& 3$)*)!9-$ *."--$ 1./%-.0GH0%5 )!2)9-$ "0%--0 G.9H 0%--0 G69H0%--0 G,9H0%--0 G%9H0%--0 G 9H."20%--0 G09H+ 6 "$.+%"#)!2))!, ".& )"-$)3 9)!,".& /./ ,34)!" 2-)3-.,-2)%"#%-%"-$.-*.9)5.PH$%3%"2%1 .3 -$.--$ 3-."2.,238),5%"2 ,#.,"8%7-$ *.1$%02, "*,%-$ %,".& 3. "2" 21$%02, "-) 8)00)*-$.-*.4n"),2 ,-)#)-)5%"2 ,#.,"9/, 5%"2 ,#.,"1$%02, "" 2-)5")* ."2 /,.1-%1 -$ *.)8*,%-%"#-$ %,".& 34$!39.1$ ,3%"+)0+ -$ *.%"$ 1!,,%1!0!&)8-$ 10.33,))&3%"1 -$ 3$)!02/, /., 1$%02, "8),5%"2 ,#.,"4n")-$ ,*), 239-$ *.)8 *,%-%"#1$%02, ">3".& 36.3 2)"-$ 3-."2.,238),5%"2 ,#.,"%31)"3%2 2-) 6 /,)/ ,%" -$ 10.33,))&9."2-$%3%"2%1.3-$ 2)&%"."-3-.-!3)8-$ 3-."2.,238),5%"2 ,# .,"%" -$ 1!,,%1!0!&)8-$ 10.33,))&46rn rr rnnn"."3%-!.-%)"-$%"#3., 1)"" 12),2%31)"" 129, 0 +."--)),%,, 0 +."--) .1$)-$ ,9%" 1 ,-.%"*.34 D4 ($.-3),-3)81)"" 1-%)"3N0))5%"#6.15*.,2."2I),8),*.,2N., &.2 *%-$%"."2.1,)33!-,."1 3."20.,# 3-, -1$ 3)8-$ %",.1-%)"P !,%"#-$ 8%,3-8),&.0%",+% *93$ 3.3-$.-%-%3/, -.3 -)!"2 ,3-."2*$.1$%02, "., 8 0%"#6 1.!3 1$%02, "., 8, 0)/ "."22)")-$%2 -$ %,8 0% "#34 !"2 ,3-."2%"#)81$%02, ">38 0%"#3$ 0/3$ ,$.+ &), 88 1-%+ %",.1%)"3*%-$1$%02, 6 1.!3 3$ %3.60 -)-$%"5.6)!-*$.-1$%02, "., #)%"#-)2)."2, .1--)%-%".". //,)/,%.*.4n"/.,-%1!0.,93$ &/$.3%: 3-$.-$ ,.1$%"# 7/ ,% "1 ". 60 3$ ,-) .3%08%#!, )!*$.-1$%02, "., 8 0%"#93.%"#G$.->3-,! 9 7/ ,% "1 &.5 3. 6%#2%88 "1 4H$.-%3-)3.9

PAGE 103

' $ ,.1$%"# 7/ ,% "1 $ 0/3$ ,!"2 ,3-."21$%02, ">38 0%"#3."2$ ,!"2 3-."2%"# ".60 3 $ ,-) 88 1-%+ 0%",.1-*%-$1$%02, "4$!39-$)3 !-,."1 33$)*-$.-$ ,.1$%"# 7/ ,% "1 /)3%-%+ 0%"80! "1 3$ ,*.)8%",.1-%"#*%-$1$%02, "4 n".22%-%)"92!,%"#-$ 3 1)"28),&.0%",+% *93$ 3.3-$.-$ ,.1$%"# 7/ ,% "1 ".60 3$ ,-)6 1)& &), 0.7 2*%-$-$ *.)8.1$%"#."2-$ *.)88 0%"#4n83$ !3 2 .1 ,-.%"*.."28)!"2-$.--$ *.*.3")-*),5%"#93$ -,% 2.")-$ ,*.%"),2 ,-)8% "2-$ 6 3-*.-)%",.1-*%-$1$%02, "4$!393$ .00)*31$%02, "-)-.05.0%--0 6% -,.-$ ,-$." 8)1!3%"#)"10.33,))&2%31%/0%" 93.%"#9GnR+ 6 1)& 0.7 2."2n.&.6 0 -)$.+ &), 8!" *%-$-$ &3)& -%& 3-$."n!3 2-)4 1.!3 n>&9n!3 2-)6 .8,.%2)80)3%"#1)",)09)! 5")*9-$.--$ #)"".#)1,.:."2n*)!02">-6 .60 -)1)"-,)0%-4!-n2)">9n2)">-8 ., -$.-."&), 96 1.!3 nR+ $.23)&!1$ 7/ ,% "1 n5")*n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

PAGE 104

? .6)!--$ %,)*"*.3-)%",.1-*%-$1$%02, "."28%"2.6 -,*.)8%",.1%"#*%-$1$%02, "4 $!39-$ .1$ ,3$.+ #))2, 0.-%)"3$%/3*%-$)-$ ,.1$ ,363$.,%"#-$ %, 7/ ,% "1 3*%-$ )-$ ,.1$ ,39."2-$%3%"2%1.3-$.-.1$%"# 7/ ,% "1 /0.3."%&/ ),-."-,)0 %"&.%"-.%"%"# #))2, 0.-%)"3$%/36 -* ".1$ ,343., 3!0-9.1$%"# 7/ ,% "1 %31)"3%3"-01)"" 12-) -$ 0.-%)"3$%/3.&)"#.1$ ,3.3* 00.3-$ %",.1-%)"36 -* ".1$ ,3."21$%02, "4$%3 %36 1.!3 .1$ ,3., .60 -)0 .,"." 7.&/0 )8 88 1-%+ .1 $ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"8,)&)-$ .1$ ,3> 7/ ,% "1 39."2#))2, 0.-%)"3$%/3.&)"#.1$ ,3/,)+%2 1$ ,3*%-$.6 -, 1$."1 )83$.,%"#-$ %, 7/ ,% "1 3*%-$)-$ ,.1$ ,346rnr r nnrnnrn5r+nnn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

PAGE 105

@ 8),-$ /,)#,.&96!-3$ $.3-)8)00)*-$ #!%2 0%" 36 1.!3 -$ #!%2 0%" 3., +.0! 2."2 3$ %3/)* ,0 33.#.%"3--$ #!%2 0%" 3%"-$ 10.33,))&4 n".22%-%)"92!,%"#-$ 8%,3-8),&.0%",+% *93$ /)%"-3)!--$.-.1$ ,3$.+ & ), /./ ,*),5.8,-$ /,)#,.&3-.,293.%"#9G$ >3&), ."2& ), /./ ,*),59."2&), .2%"#9)!5")*9&), .002)%"#*%-$ .1$1$%02)" )")" -))4"2* 2%2%-6 8), 96 !%->39* 2)">-, .002)-$.-&."&), 2%88 "--$%"#34H$%3%&/0% 3-$.3$ 1)"3%2 ,3&!1$ /./ ,*),5.36!,2 "3)& 4)* + ,92!,%"#-$ 3 1)"28),&.0%",+% *93$ 3.3 9Gn-$%"5%" -$ 0)"#,!"%-R3#))29!&9%-2) 3-.5 &), )8)!,-%& ."2&), 9!$9-$ >3&), /, 33!, )" !39)!5")*9-)&.5 3!, -$.--$ R, 2)%"#*$.--$ 2-)2)4)-$.-9-$.-/.,-)8%-% 3$.,29 6!-n-$%"5%-%3.#))2-$%"#96 1.!3 -$ ., .0)-)8.1$ ,3n-$%"5-$.B4C%8-$ 2)"R, .001., .6)!--$ 1$%02, "-$.-&!1$9-$ *)">-2)."-$%"#9-$ --.05-)-$ &9-$ 2)"R-2)."-$%"#4!-")*%8-$ R, 2)%"#-$ 9B4C-$ $.+ ) $.+ .8)02 ,8), .1$1$%02-$.-3$)*3-$ %,/,)#, 334$ $.+ -).33 33 .1$1 $%029-$ $.+ 3)& 5%"2)88),&-$.--$ 8%00)!-4)-$ $.+ -)6 9)!5")*92)%"#*$.--$ R, 3!//)3 2 -)6 2)%"#4)n-$%"5%-R3, .00#))2%"-$ 0)"#,!"9%-R3$.,2 ,B$.9$.C%-R3&), 8 ),!36!-9 B4Cn-$%"5%-R3.#))2-$%"#4H$%33$)*3-$.-3$ 1)"3%2 ,3&!1$/./ ,*),5.36!, 2 "3)& 9 6!-3$ &.5 3." 88),--)# --$,)!#$-$ 2%88%1!0-3%-!.-%)"63 %"#-$ /)3 %-%+ .3/ 1-3)8-$ /,)#,.&4%&%0.,-)$ ,*),23.6)!--$ .1$ ,1$%02,.-%)9$ ,*),23.6)!/./ ,*),5 3$)*-$.--$ #!%2 0%" 38),-$ /,)#,.&., +.0! 29."23$ %3/)* ,0 3 3.#.%"3--$ #!%2 0%" 3%"-$ 10.33,))&4 4 ($.-33&3)85")*0 2# ."2*.3)85")*%"#., 0 +."-B),%,, 0 +."-C%"$ 3%-!.-%)"P)*., -$ &.2 0 +."-B."2%,, 0 +."-C9."2%"*$.-*.3P )-$3%"#%"#.3)"#."2)" )")" %",.1-%)"., 1)"3%2 2*.3)85")*%"#."2., 0 +."-%"-$ 3%-!.-%)"*$ ".1$ ,3-,-)&.5 1$%02, "!"2 ,3-."2."2, & &6 ,*$.-

PAGE 106

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n8)!"2, .00&.5 3-$%"#3&), 88 1-%+ 4H$.-%3-)3.96!3%"# .3)"#9.1$ ,3., .60 -) .3%0%"+)0+ 1$%02, "%".".1-%+%-6 1.!3 1$%02, "<)3%"#% "#.3)"#."2$.+ #))28 0%"#*$ "-$ ., 3%"#%"#.3)"#4), )+ ,93$ 3.39G( %"8),1 *$.-* >, -.05%"#.6)!-%")-$ ,*.34( 2)3)"#39.0)-)83)"#34%5 -)2.* 3-.,20 .,"% "# + 110%"#3)"#4$.->3.")-$ ,*.-$.-* & &6 ,-$.-9-$ >, 3%"# %"#9-$ & &6 ,-$.8),* 539-$ 0 .,"-$ 3)"#9."2-$ 0%5 %-4 .$9-$ 3-%00.35!38),-$ 3)"#3* >+ 2)" 6 8), 9)"-$ 2%88 "-3!6< 1-396 1.!3 %-3-.3%"-$ %,&%"23%8-$ 3% "#43/ 1%.009%8-$ &)+ -)%-9-$ 5")*8,)&-$ 0.3-, 3 .,1$-$.-%8.1$%023%"#33)& -$%"#."22) 33)& -$%"# /$3%1.09%-3-.3%"-$ %,6,.%"0)"# ,4H$.-%3-)3.9.1$ ,36 0 % + -$.-3%"#%"#.3)"#%3. 3!11 338!0*.-)&.5 1$%02, "!"2 ,3-."2."2, & &6 ,*$.-.1$ ,3., 3. %"#9."2-$!39 -$ 8, =! "-0%"1),/),.3%"#%"#.3)"#%"-)-$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!&43., 3 !0-93%"#%"#.3)"# %31)"3%2 2)" )8-$ *.3)85")*%"#4 ")-$ ,*.)85")*%"#%3)" )")" %",.1-%)"4$ 3.39Gn$.2.0, .2#%+ "-$ & 3)& 7.&/0 3 .,0% ,9."2-$ "*$ "n1.00 2)")" 1$%029."2-$ 3-.,2-)-.0 5.6)!-%-9."2 -$ "-$ 1)!02-$%"5)8-$ *),2393)n5%"2)8$ 0/-$ &."2-$ "-$ ., .60 -)#%+ -$.-% 2 .4 )* $.2)" )")" %",.1-%)"39)!5")*9n-.05-)-$ &."2-$ "-$ 3.-$%"#36.15)

PAGE 107

E & 4n-$%"59n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n-,-)-.05-)-$ &9."23)& -%& 3-$ -96 1.!3 -$ 2)"R-5")*"#0 %3$ + ,* 009-$ 2)">-!"2 ,3-."2*$.-n>&3.%"#4%5 -)2.9!&9B4C)" 0%--0 6 )1.& !/9 !$9n-$%"5$ R38,)&), .."29!$9$ "2n.35$%&9S($.-2))!*."--)2)*%-$-$ 1.,P> *."2-)# --$ 1.,3)!--)/0.*%-$-$ &96!-$ -

PAGE 108

#)*%-$S1.,4>"2-$ "nS 39>."2$ "n3.%29 S)!" 2-)3.-$.-4>"2$ !-n-$%"5$ 9$ 8 0-%"-%&%2.26 1.!3 $%3+ ,6.035% 003%""#0%3$., ")+ ,#))2 -4)n8 0--$.-n*.3">-+ 88 1-%+ 4H$.-%3-)3.9-$ 0."#!.# 6.,,% ,/, + "-3 -$ ), ."6)8,)&1)&&!"%1.-%"#*%-$.1$ ,3."28,)&!"2 ,3-."2%"#*$..1$ ,3., 3.%"#9."2-$!393$ 2 8%" 3-$%33%-!.-%)".3%" 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",. 1-%)"403)93$ 3.3 -$.-.1$ ,3-,-)-.05-)-$ ), ."6)&), ."2# -$%&-)-.05&), -)-$ &!3 %"#8!00 3 ""1 36 1.!3 .1$ ,3., *),,% 2-$.-$ %3#)%"#-)$.+ .0)-)8-,)!6 0 %"5%"2 ,#.,"4 )* + ,93$ 2) 3")-1)"3%2 ,-$ 0."#!.# 6.,,% ,.3)" )8-$ 6.,,% ,3-) 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"34$%3%36 1.!3 3$ 6 0% + 3-$.-)!"#1$%0 2, "., .60 -)/%15!/ "#0%3$=!%1506 1.!3 -$ %,6,.%"%3, .2-)0 .,"0."#!.# ."23 3 -$.-)!"#1$%02, "., !3!.00.60 -)3/ .5"#0%3$80! "-0%".6)!-3%7&)"-$34n")-$ ,*),239-$ 0."# !.# 6.,,% 1."6 .3%0)+ ,1)& %"$ ,10.33,))&-$,)!#$1$%02, ">3/,)#, 33-)*. ,23"#0%3$9."2 1$%02, "., .60 -)!"2 ,3-."2*$.-.1$ ,3., 3.%"#.8,.*$%0 4r + ,-$ 0 339-$ 3%-!.-%)" *$ "-$ ), ."6)2) 3")-!"2 ,3-."2*$.-.1$ ,3., 3.%"#%31)"3%2 2% 88 1-%+ 6 1.!3 3$ 2 8%" 3.1$%02>3&%3!"2 ,3-."2%"#)8*$.-.1$ ,3., 3.% "#.3%" 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"4$!393$ *."-3-$ ), ."6)-)/%15!/"#0%3$. 33))".3/)33%60 6 7/, 33%"#$ ,2%33.-%38.1-%)"*%-$$%33/ 2)80 .,"%"#"#0%3$98), 7.&/0 9Gn-$%"5$ 3/ .53), .".-$)& 9-$ 9-$ /., "-32)">-5")*"#0%3$+ ,* 004)-$.-&.5 3%$.,2 8),$%&96!-$ >00# -%-B$.9$.C4H3., 3!0-9.11),2%"#-)$ ,2 8%"%-%)")8 88 1-%+ .1$ 1$%02%",.1-%)"9"#0%3$."2), ."., 0 +."-%"-$ 3%-!.-%)"*$ ".1$ ,32)")88 1-%+ 0%",.1-*%-$)" ), ."6)6 1.!3 )8$%3&%3!"2 ,3-."2%"# )8*$.-.1$ ,3., 3.%"#4

PAGE 109

A n! rn r0nr n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n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

PAGE 110

".,,.-%+ 3$)*3$)*-$ %",.1-%)"36 -* "$ ,."21$%02, "., ".126 -$ #!%2 0%" 38), -$ /,)#,.&3$ $.3-)8)00)*.3* 00.3$)*-$ 2%31)!,3 3-$.-1)"3-%!-$ 3 %",.1-%)"3., 1)"8%,& 2-$,)!#$-$ 8),&3)8,!0 3),"),&34r n)&nn-.":. .1$ ,33 1$%02, ">3/)3%-%+ .1-%)"-)-$ %,*), 23 4 )!1."00*$.-%3 88 1-%+ 4 6 1.!3 )!3 -$ 1$%02%3$.//),3.-%38% 29 '4 ),-$ >, /,)!2)8-$ &3 0+ 38), ?4 *$.+ ,-$ 2%31!33 2.6)!-)!9*%-$)!4 !1n( nnnnnrnrn rnn5rr nnn !n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
PAGE 111

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

PAGE 112

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n!3!.00!3 $ 9 ?4 6.3%1.00n*)!02">-3. ?4 -$ >3.3/ 1%8%13-,.#.3n-.05-)-$ 5%239 ?'4 n-.05-)-$ &0%5 9n-.05-)."6)2 03 9 ??4 00-$ &*$.-n*."--.":.'$%02, "8 0+.0! 2*$ 7/, 33%"#-$ %,8 0%"#3 ?@4 ."2.35-$ &*$.--$ *)!020%5 -)9 ?D4 ."2
PAGE 113

' -.":.? .1$ ,3$ 0/1$%02, 7/, 33*$.--$ ., 8 0%"# ?4 "2* -,-)$ 0/-$ &-) 7/, 33*$.--$ >, 8 0%"#-))4 ?A4 "23)& -%& 3-$ 5%23*%00$.+ -$ *),23-)!3 9 @4 3)n, 8 0%"# @4 ."2-$ "00-$ &*$.-n>&8 0%"#9 @4 ."200-$ &*$.-n*)!020%5 -)$ 0/-$ &4-.":.@$%02, "0 .,"$)*-), 3/)"2-))-$ ,38,)&.1$ ,3 @'4 "2!3!.00n>&, 3/)"2%"#-)-$ &%"-$ 3.& *. @?4 -$.--$ >003 )!>, -.05%"#-)-$ &%".1 ,-.%"*.9 @@4 -$ "-$ >00-.05-))!%"-$ 3.& *.4-.":.D$%02, "0 .,"$)*-)%",.1-*%-$)-$ ,3 @D4 $ >, 90%5 9 ,)"%1.2) 3"R-0%5 -$%3 @E4 ."2n2)">-0%5 -$%3 %-$ ,3) @4 -$.->3$)*-$ %",.1-*%-$-$ %,3 0+ 39 @A4 *%-$-$ %,9-$ %,/ ,34 !n3 ,*.)82 .0%"#*%-$%" 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3 !63!63-),@"$.//1)"+ ,3.-%)"3*%-$1$%02, "., 1)"3%2 2%" 88 1 -%+ -.":.E"$.//%",.1-%)"3*%-$1$%02, "., 1)"3%2 2%" 88 1-%+ D4 ($.-n*)!021)"3%2 ,%" 88 1-%+ %39 D4 ."%",.1-%)"-$.-2) 3">-0 .+ 9 D4 & ."2-$ 1$%026 %"#$.//.8,*.,234-.":.$ -,% 3-)8%"2*$.-&.5 31$%02, "!/3 D'4 )-$.-*.39."3%-!.-%)"*$ n1)!02$ 0/-$ 1$%029

PAGE 114

? D?4 -)8%#!, )!-*$.-*.3&.5%"#-$ &!/3 D@4 ),*$.-*.31.!3%"#-$ &")--)&.5 -$ 1$)%1 3-$.-2.-.":.A$ $.3-,)!60 1)"+ ,3%"#*%-$.3$."2=!% -1$%02 DD4 ),90%5 /%3)2 ./.,-%1!0.,0=!% -1$%029 DE4 ")-6 %"#.60 -)1)"+ ,3 *%-$-$.-1$%029 D4 6 1.!3 -$ >, 9&.6 -$ >, 3$),2)">-*."--)-.05-)& 4 -.":."$.//1)"+ ,3.-%)"3*%-$1$%02, "., 1)"3%2 2%" 88 1-%+ DA4 $.->3*$.-n*)!021)"3%2 ,%" 88 1-%+ 9 E4 %8* >, ")-$.//.--$ "2)8-$ 1)"+ ,3.-%)"9 E4 )" )8!3%3")-$.//4 E4 ( 6)-$*."".*.05.*. E'4 ."2-)6 $.//%"-$ 3%-!.-%)"*%-$-$ /,)60 &3)0+ 29 E?4 n-$%"5%->3%" 88 1-%+ 4 !63!63-),D$ .353)-$ ,.1$ ,33)& 3!## 3-%)"3-)3)0+ -$ /,) 60 & -.":.$ 5 /3-,%"#-)3)0+ -$ /,)60 & E@4 ( >000%5 95 /-,%"#!"-%0n2)4 ED4 n5 /-,%"#!"-%0n2)9 EE4 2)">--8%#!, %-)!--$ "9 EA4 n*%00#)-).")-$ ,.1$ ,9."2-$ "90%5 9 4 G( 0091.")!$ 0/& *%-$-$%33%-!.-%)"PH-.":.'$ # -33)& %2 .3.6)!-$)*-)3)0+ -$ /,)60 &8,)&)-$ ,.1$ ,3

PAGE 115

@ 4 ),%8-$.-2) 3">-*),5)!-9 4 *$%1$-$.-$.3">+ ,6 "-$ 1.3 9 '4 -$ "n*%00#)-)9&.6 -$ 2%, 1-),4 ?4 33&2%, 1-),.3539G($.-2))!-$%"5PH @4 -)# -3)& 3!## 3-%)"3)"$)*1."n3)0+ -$ 3%-!.-%)"4 !n4 )3%-%+ 88 1-3)8-$ /,)#,.&)"# --%"#1$%02, ", .28),5%"2 ,#.," !63!63-),E/,)#,.&$ 0/31$%02, "0 .,"$)*-)%",.1-*%-$)-$ 3 -.":.? ,/ ,3)".0 7/ ,% "1 &.2 $ ,0)+ -$ /,)#,.& D4 n0)+ -$ /,)#,.&4 E4 ($ "%-8%,3-3-.,29n/!-&2.!#$,%"%4 6 1.!3 ")+ ,6)2" 23-)#)-)/, 31$))039 A4 3)-$ >3.0)-.-$)& *%-$&)&34-.":.@$%02, "0 .,"$)*-)%",.1-*%-$)-$ ,3-$,)!#$-$ /,)#,.& A4 "23)n0)+ $)*%-# -3-$ &, .28),5%"2 ,#.,"9n& ."4 A4 )n0)+ -$.-9-$ 5%23., 0 .,"%"# A4 $)*-)%",.1-*%-$)-$ ,5%23-$ %,)*".# A'4 *$ "-$ + 6 ".-$)& *%-$-$ %,&)&39 A?4 -$ >, ")-# --%"#."%",.1-%)"3*%-$&)&34-.":.D$%02, "0 .,"$)*-$ 3$)!026 $.+ %"31$))0-$,)!#$-$ /,)#,.& A@4 n0)+ $)*-$ >, 0 .,"%"# AD4 *$.-%3 7/ 12)8-$ &%".10.33,))&3 --%"#9-.":.E/,)#,.&$ 0/31$%02, "0 .,"$)*-)%",.1-*%-$)-$ ,.2!0-3 AE4 ."2n0)+ $)*-$ 0 .,"

PAGE 116

D A4 -$.--$ 1.".1-!.00-,!3-.")-$ ,#,)*"!/9.")-$ ,.2!0AA4 -$.->33)& )" -$.-%3")--$ %,/., "-34-.":.$%02, "1."-,!3-."2$.+ #))2, 0.-%)"3$%/3*%-$)-$ ,.2!0-3 4 $ 1."9-$ 1."#,)*-)0)+ !3."2 + ,-$%"#9 4 $.+ #, .-, 0.-%)"3$%/3*%-$)!,5%234 4 n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

PAGE 117

E D4 )%->30 33-,.!&.-%18),-$ &*$ "5%"2 ,#.,"9 E4 *$ "-$ %,/., "-30 .+ 9 4 6 1.!3 ")*-$ >+ #)-"!3 2-)5")*%"# A4 -$.--$ %,/., "-3., #)%"#-)1)& 6.15.--$ "2)8-$ 2.9 -.":.'/,)#,.&$ 0/31$%02, "3!11 2%"31$))0 4 ."2-$ ., .28),%-9 4 n0)+ -$.-.353-$ &-)6 .28),5%"2 ,#.," 4 -)6 3!11 338!0%"-$ 31$))04 !63!63-),A/,)#,.& ".60 31$%02, "-)6!%02.#))2+)1.6!0., -.":.'' .1$ ,3-.05-)1$%02, ".3&!1$.3-$ 2)%")-$ ,10.33,))&3 '4 n*)!02">-3.-$.?4 -$.-%3."2%88 "--$.".", #!0.,/, 31$))0/,)#,.&39 @4 6 1.!3 3-%00-.05-)-$ 5%239 D4 -.05-)-$ &, %".)" .,)02,))& 4 .3-$ >, %".8)!, .,)02,))&9 -.":.'?$%02, "6!%02.+)1.6!0.,-$,)!#$1)"+ ,3.-%)"3*%-$.1$ ,3 A4 >, 1)"3-."-03/ .5%"#*%-$-$ 1$%02, '4 -$.->3$)*-$ 0 .,"-$ %,+)1.6!0., '4 ."2$)*-$ 0 .,"$)*-)%",.1-*%-$.2!0-3."2)-$ ,/ )/0 4 -.":.'@$%02, "$.+ -,)!60 6 %"#/, /., 28),5%"2 ,#.,".-$)& '4 )n3 6.3%1.00%39$.3$ 0/ 2-$ 5%23 ''4 *$)2%2">-$.+ ."/, 31$))06 8), $."2

PAGE 118

'?4 -$ 2%2">-$.+ 92)">-$.+ &."6,)-$ ,3."23%3,3.-$)& '@4 ),-$ 2)">-9-$ 2)">-$.+ .")-$ ,*.-)# -, .28),31$))04 'D4 n3 -$.->3*$.-/,)#,.&3$.+ 6 8%2.&)"#!34 !n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

PAGE 119

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

PAGE 120

DA4 .0-$)!#$-$ $.+ .002.-)6 *%-$-$ .1$ ,39 E4 S1.!3 -$ $.+ -$, $)!,3*%-$!39 E4 ."2-$ 3-%00$.+ -)# -, 1)"3-."-0*),5%"#9 E?4 >, 1)"3-."-0.1$%"#&), -$." E@4 %8* %".8!002./,)#,.&4 (rnn!1nnnnnnnn&rn n n &n r rn+n rnnnn&n nrnrn rnn n5rrnn -.":.?@ .1$ ,3" 2&), -%& -)1)"+ ,3 *%-$1$%02, "&), 8, =! "-0 ED4 ( 1."3-%00.1$-$ &1)"3-."-0-$ *),239 EE4 6!-* >00$.+ /0 "-)8-%& E4 -).03)1)"+ ,3 *%-$1$%02, "-))9 EA4 6 1.!3 $.+ .*$)0 2.-)# --$%"#32)" 4 %"3.2)8-$ -$, $)!,34 .60 ?4 ,)"%1.>310.3331$ 2!0 A ",3 A@$., -%& 90/$.6 -1$.00 "# 9,)< 1-A'/ 1%.010.33 @ .-$,))&6, .53 ".15 '@ 0 ."!/ ?@ n"2)),8% 02-,%/ %,10 -%& '@ ,)< 1-3 "2)8-$ -%&

PAGE 121

!&rn6rn5n6rnr r nn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n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n"/.,-%1!0.,93$ !3 3-$ *),2G3 H*$ "3$ 231$%02, "-)0% 3"-)$ ,3/ 1$

PAGE 122

."2-)!"2 ,3-."2*$.-3$ %33.%"#4$.-%3-)3.9*$ "3$ 8%"23)" 1$%02*$)2) 3")-1)"1 "-,.)"$ ,3/ 1$),./.,-%1!0.,.1-%+%-93$ !3 3-$ *),2G3 H ,.-$ ,-$."2%, 1-0 /)%"-%"#)!--$ 1$%02>3&%36 $.+%),93.%"#9Gn2)">-3 .00>3 3),; .& 3>34n2)">-3 1,%331,)33.//0 3.!1 8,)&!,0 4H .,)0%" 91."n3 )!, 39/0 .3 P.,)0%" 91."n3 )!, 3P + "%8-$ 2%2">-0%5 3)& -$%"#),-$ >, &.5%"#.6.21$)%1 ,%#$-")*90%3"*$ -$ R, 2)%"#-$.-9%8-$ 9)!5")*9-$ 3 .00n, .00*."2%-93)& 6)2-)/..-"-%)"-)& .--$.-&)& "-4 r 7-93$ 8, =! "-0!3 3-$ *),2G0 .,"9H."2%-$.38)!,2%88 "-3%-!.2& ."% "#34 %,3-9-$ *),2G0 .,"H& ."3-$.-.1$ ,3."21$%02, "3-.,--)!"2 ,3-."2-$ 8.1--$.--$ $.+ -)1$."# -$ *.-$ 6 $.+ 4$!39-$ 8.1--$.-1$%02, "G0 .,"H$)*-)%", .1-*%-$ )-$ ,3& ."3-$.-1$%02, "$.+ 6 #!".15")*0 2#%"#-$.--$ 2-)1$."# -$ %,)* "*.)8 %",.1-%"#*%-$)-$ ,36, 80 1-%"#)"-$.-*.4 n0)+ $)*B4C-$ 0 .," -$.--$ 1.".1-!.00-,!3-.")-$ ,#,)*"!/9.")-$ ,.2!0-$.->33)& )" -$.-%3")--$ %,/., "-34( >, 1)"3-."-03/ .5%"#*%-$-$ 1$%02, "9-$.->3$)*-$ 0 .," -$ %,+)1.6!0.,."2 $)*-$ 0 .," $)*-)%",.1-*%-$.2!0-3."2)-$ ,/ )/0 4 1)"29-$ & ."%"#)8G0 .,"H%3-)# -%"8),&.-%)".6)!-." *3!6< 1-),.1-%+% -4 11),2%"#-)$ ,3/ 1$91$%02, ".0*.3G0 .,"H3)& -$%"#9."2-$%3& ."3 -$.-1$%02, 1)"3-."-0#.%"" *8.1-38,)&-$ %,3!,,)!"2%"#34 n*."".3.-$.--$ 1."1$."# -$ %,1!,,%1!0!&%8-$ *)!020%5 -)3.9G 5.9* *."".0 .," .6)!--$.-9H6!-.00-$,)!#$)!--$ 2.9-$ >, 0 .,"%"# .6)!-3)& -$%"# 03 -$.-&%#$-")-6 )!,1!,,%1!0!&96 1.!3 -$ >00.353 + ,.0=! 3-%)"34( $.+ ">-$.2&."/., "-31)& %"B'4C."23.9G($ "1."-$ 0 .," .6)!--$%3."2 0 .," .6)!--$.-PH( $.+ $.2-$.-6!-* 3.9G 39)!>, 01)& .3* 004H $%,29-$ & ."%"#)8G0 .,"H%3-), & &6 ,3)& -$%"#-$,)!#$, / -%-%)"4,)& -$ %",+% *2.-.96)-$3%"#%"#.3)"#."2/., "-%"+)0+ & "-., 1)"3%2 2 88 1-%+ *.3-)

PAGE 123

' &.5 1$%02, ", & &6 ,.1$ ,3>*),234(%-$%"-$)3 1)"7-39-$ 8.1--$.-1 $%02, "G0 .,"H 3)& -$%"#%"10.33,))&3& ."3-$.-1$%02, "5 /%"&%"2*$.-.1$ ,3., 3 .%"#6, / .-%"# %-&."-%& 34 n->30%5 1)"8%,&%"#*$.-* ., .0, .2.1$%"#-$ 5%23."2-$ "9."2-$ "-$ /., "-3 .1$-$ &-))6 1.!3 -$ 5%230 .," -$,)!#$, / -%-%)"9."23)%-$ 0/3-$ 5%2)!-&), 9 ."2-$ 3 &0%5 -$ &), 3!11 338!0%"31$))0."2%"10.33*$ -$ %,/., "-3$ 0/-$ & .-$)& -)0 .," -$ 3.& -$%"#4 n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rn &nn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

PAGE 124

? &.<),3!6.1-%+%-%3-)%"+)0+ 1$%02, "%".".1-%+%--)2 + 0)/-$ %,.6%0 %--), .2 ."2*,%4), 7.&/0 92!,%"#*$)0 #,)!/-%& 9.1$ ,3.359G($.-%3-$ 0 -,-$.-3)!"23 S>PH),G($.-3-.,-3*%-$S>PH .1$ ,3/%15)" 1$%02.&)"#1$%02, "* $)*."--)."3* -$ =! 3-%)"."2,.%3 -$ %,$."24n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

PAGE 125

@ 1.8 ,%.9."22!,%"#8, /0.-%& 9-$ #))!-3%2 ."23/ "2-%& %"-$ /0 .#,)!"2403)9 1$%02, "#)-)2%88 "-,))&39%"10!2%"#./,)< 1-,))&9%"),2 ,-)/.,-%1%/.%"2%88 ".1-%+%-% 34$ 3.39Gn0%5 -$.-* $.+ -)&)+ .,)!"26 1.!3 -$.-R3&), B 4C%"&&%"29 -)*.,2-$ 5%"2 ,#.,"3 --%"#4+ ,-$%"#>3")-#)"".6 %"-$ %,,))&*$ "-$ >, %" 5%"2 ,#.,"9-$ >, #)"".$.+ -)0 .+ -)#)-)-$ 0!"1$9-$ >, #)"".$.+ -)0 + -)#)-) -$ 0%6,.,9-$ >, #)"".$.+ -)0 .+ 8),2%88 "-.1-%+%-% 34H$!393$ 3. 3-$.-1$%02, ">3 7/ ,% "1 )8-,.+ 0%"#8,)&)" /0.1 -).")-$ ,%3." 88 1-%+ *.-)# 1$%02, ", .28), 5%"2 ,#.,"43., 3!0-96.00)*%"#1$%02, "-) 7/ ,% "1 .5%"2 ,#.,"0%8 3-0 93!1$.3 -,.+ 0%"#-)2%88 "-0)1.-%)"3%"-$ 31$))09.1$ ,3/, /., 1$%02, "8) ,5%"2 ,#.,"4 6rnrn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n8 00 %"0)+ *%-$-$.-/,)#,.&9n0)+ 2%-9n8 0-%-#)--$ &, .28),31$))09!&9& !1$-)& 9n3*$ n*."".6 4H$.-%3-)3.93$ .3.&)-$ ,3 .*-$.--$ /,)#,.&/,)+%2 2$ ,2.!#$,*%-$)//),-!"%-% 3-)0 .,"-$ 1 33.,35%003 8),5%"2 ,#.,"9

PAGE 126

D 2 + 0)/$ ,2%88 "-.6%0%-% 39."26 .28),5%"2 ,#.,"4$!39-$%3 7/ ,% "1 &.2 $ -,!3--$ /,)#,.&9."23$ *.3# "!%" 0&)-%+.2-)6 1)& ./, 5%"2 ,#.,".1$ 6-$%3-,!3-4($ "-$ 31$))0#.+ .1$ ,3.1$."1 -)3 0 1-*$ -$ )!020%5 -)*),59 3$ 1$)3 -$ 10.33,))&6 1.!3 )8$ ,-,!3-%"-$ /,)#,.&4 1)"293$ .3./, 5%"2 ,#.,".1$ ,3-,)"#06 0% + 3-$.-3$ 3!11 338!00# -3 1$%02, ", .28),5%"2 ,#.,"%"-$ /,)#,.&4!,%"#-$ 8%,3-8),&.0 %",+% *93$ 3.39 G8,* 3 9)!5")*9-$ 5%23$.+ 0 .," 23)&!1$8),.*$)0 .,9* $.+ ")-$ .2 ./,)60 &*$ 8 0--$ 5%2*.3")-, .28),5%"2 ,#.,".--$ "2)8 -$ .,4( 3 -$.--$ 1$%02, "., 3) 71%2.6)!--$ 5%"2 ,#.,"."2")*-$ 9-$ >+ #)-"!3 2-)6 %"# %".10.33,))&3 --%"#4H03)92!,%"#-$ 3 1)"28),&.0%",+% *93$ 3.39GnB'4C 0)+ -$ ),#."%:.-%)")8-$ 96 1.!3 %-%3.8.3,/.1 -$."96 1.!3 %-%3&), 0%5 5%"2 ,#.,"."2 0%5 n3 -$ 2%88 "1 3%"-$)3 1$%02, "8,)&*$ "-$ 3-.,-*%-$!3-)*$ "-$ 0 .+ 4n-%3. -)-.02%88 "1 9-$.-n5")*n$.+ 1)&/0 8.%-$-$.--$ R, .28 ),31$))04H$.-%3-)3.9 3$ 3 3-$.-1$%02, "0 .,".0)-%"-$ 10.33,))&."2-$!3., .28),5%"2 ,# .,"43. 3!0-93$ 9.3./, 5%"2 ,#.,".1$ ,9%3+ ,/,)!2)8$ ,.1$%"#<)6 9."2-$%38.1-#%+ 3$ .3 "3 )8%2 "-%-4 $%,29.3." &/0) 93$ 8)00)*3-$ 31$ 2!0 )8-$ 10.33,))&6.3 2)"-$ #!%2 0%" 38),-$ /,)#,.&."2-$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!&4$ 31$ 2!0 )8-$ 1 0.33,))& &.5 3$ ,2)3)&!1$*),5*%-$%".3$),--%& 8,.& 96!-3$ 1."")-.+)%2-$%3$ 1-%131 $ 2!0 4 $%38.1-#%+ 3$ ,.3 "3 )8%2 "-%-.3." &/0) 4n"$ ,31$))0910.33 ,))&31$ 2!0 3., 2 1%2 2.--$ 6 #%""%"#)8-$ .,9."2.1$ ,3$.+ -)3-%15-)-$ %,10.33 ,))&31$ 2!0 4 ($ ".1$ ,3*."--)1$."# -$ 31$ 2!0 9-$ 2-)# --$ 2%, 1-),>3.//,)+. 0%"),2 ,-) #%+ -$ 2%, 1-),-%& -)0))5)+ ,-$ 31$ 2!0 ."2&.5 3!, + ,-$%"#*%00*), 5)!-4n"

PAGE 127

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rnrnn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n"),2 ,-)3)0+ -$%3/,)60 &93$ -,% 3-)&.5 6)-$$ ,."2-$ 1 $%028 0$.//%" 2%88 "-*.34), 7.&/0 93$ #) 3-))-$ ,.1$ ,3."2.3539G( 0091.")!$ 0/& *%-$ -$%33%-!.-%)"PH3., 3!0-93$ # -33)& 3!## 3-%)"3."2-,% 3-$ &!"-%03$ 8%"23-$ 6 3-*. -)3)0+ -$ /,)60 &4n83$ 8%"23-$.--$ 3!## 3-%)"3., ")-*),5%"#93$ #) 3-)$ 2%, 1-),

PAGE 128

."2# -33)& 8!,-$ ,%2 .3.6)!-$)*-)3)0+ -$ /,)60 &4n"/.,-%1!0.,93$ $.3)"0 -*) .,3 )8.1$%"# 7/ ,% "1 ."2-$%"53-$.-$ ,%"3!88%1% "7/ ,% "1 )8*),5%"# *%-$1$%02, "%3)" )8-$ 6.,,% ,3-) 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"34$ $.30 ., 2$)*-)2 .0*%-$1 ,-.%" 3%-!.-%)"3),$)*-)1)&&!"%1.*%-$1$%02, "8,)&)-$ 7/ ,% "1 2.1$ ,3."2-$!3 %3 &!1$&), 1)"8%2 "-%"$ ,3 08-$."%"-$ /.3-6)+ ,1)&%"#.8 .,)8Gn2)">-5")* *$.--) 2)4Hn"3$),-93$ 2 .03*%-$-$ 3%-!.-%)"%"*$%1$3$ $.3-,)!60 $.+%"#.$.//1)"+ ,3.-%)" *%-$.1$%026# --%"#3)& 3!## 3-%)"38,)&)-$ ,.1$ ,34$%3%"2%1.3$.-..1$ ,1$%02 0.-%)"3$%/."2..1$ ,.1$ ,, 0.-%)"3$%/3 &-)6 0 +."-%"$ 3%-!.-%)"*$ "3$ -,% 3 -)2 .0*%-$%" 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"34 n".22%-%)"9..1$ ,1$%02, 0.-%)"3$%/."2.1$%021$%02, 0.-%)"3$%/3 &-) 6 !"2 1)"3-,!1-%)"%"-$ 3%-!.-%)"*$ "3$ $.31$%02, "10./."21$ ,8),-$ %,8,% "23%"$ 10.33,))&4), 7.&/0 92!,%"#*$)0 #,)!/-%& 93$ "1)!,.# 31$%02, "-)/. ,-%1%/.%"." .1-%+%-93.%"#9Gn" 2.8,% "2-)2,.*.0%" 8,)&3%.-)-$ ,1-%14&%0 92))!*."".-, %-PHn8&%0.11 /-3$ ,)88 ,93$ 10./3$ ,$."23."21$ ,38),&%0 93.%"#9G .$9&%04H 38),-$ .3)"-$.-3$ 8, =! "-0!3 310.//%"#."21$ ,%"#93$ 3.3-$.-1 $%02, "., + !/3 -),#,!&/*$ "-$ ., ")-/%15 28),3)& -$%"#."2-$ "-$ 2)")-*."--)2)."-$%"# 03 8),-$ 2.4$!39.1$ ,33-.,-, *.,2%"#1$%02, "-)1$ 8),-$ %,8,% "239 3.%"#9G$9 .$9#))2<)69)!/,)// 28),%-8),)!,8,% "239)!5")*9* 0%5 -$.-9n0%5 -$.-9)!>, 3!1$.#))23/),-9)!5")*9")*n>&#)""./%15)!9S1.!3 )!2%23!1$.# ))2 <)64H$%3&.5 31$%02, "0 .,"#))23/),-3&."3$%/6 1.!3 -$ /,.%3 -$ %,8,% "23*%-$)!6 %"#!/3 --$.--$ ., ")-/%15 28),3)& -$%"#403)93$ 3.39G$ 6. 3%1.00&.5 -$ %, 8,% "23$.+ $%#$ ,3 08 3&-))96 1.!3 -$ R, 6 %"#1$ 28), 9S .$9 .$9-$ 2%2. #))2<)69)!,8,% "23., $.//8),& 4>H3., 3!0-9$.+%"#1$%02, "10./."21 $ ,8),-$ %,

PAGE 129

A 8,% "231)"-,%6!3-)%&/,)+%"#.1$ ,1$%02, 0.-%)"3$%/36 1.!3 %".60 31$%02, "-) 1)"-%"!.000%3"-)*$.-.1$ ,3., 3.%"#*%-$)!-6 %"#!/3 --$.-$ ., ")-/%15 28), 3)& -$%"#4n-.03)1)"-,%6!3-)%&/,)+%"#1$%021$%02, 0.-%)"3$%/36 1.!3 %".60 31$%02, -)0 .,"#))23/),-3&."3$%/.3* 00.3-)&.5 -$ %,8,% "23$.+ $%#$ ,3 08 3&4 6rn nnrnn nnn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

PAGE 130

' 3., 3!0-9-$%3/., "-%"+)0+ & "-%"-$ $)& *),5%31)"3%2 2.!3 8!0*.)8 # --%"#1$%02, "-)0 .,"*$.-.1$ ,3., 3.%"#4)* + ,9-$%3/., "-%"+)0+ & "-%"-$ $)& *),5&.5 3/., "-33/ "2&!1$-%& $ 0/%"#1$%02, "2)-$ %,$)& *),5."2-.05%"#.6)!-%-4n"/.,-%1!0.,93%"1 $ ,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"10.33,))&3 "23$)& -$ $)& *),5 + ,%2.9/., "-3."21$%02, "" 2-)3/ "2.0)-)8-%& 2)%"#-$ $)& *),5)+ ,-$ 5 "24$%3%&/0% 3-$.-/., "-3."21$%02, "8)1!3-$ %,.-"-%)")"-$ 31$))01!,,%1!0 !&.3* 00.3)" .1.2 &%1/ ,8),&."1 ,.-$ ,-$."3)1%.0."2 &)-%)".01)&/ "1 43. 3!0-9-$%3%"2%1.3 -$.--$ $.+ 0%--0 -%& -)-.05.6)!-8.&%0+.0! 3%"10!2%"#*$.-%3,%# $-."2*,)"#."2*$.%3&)3-%&/),-."-%"0%8 9."2-$ 31$))0.!-$),%-1)"-,)038.&%0+.0! 3403)93$ 3.39 G3!.00* >, /, --#))2*%-$-$ 1!,,%1!0!&* $.+ 9)!,/., "-3, 0 .,"%"#*$.-* >, .1$%"#-$ %,5%23-$.-2.9)!5")*9%->3.//,)+ 24H$.-%3-)3.9 /., "-3-,!3--$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!&."2.11 /-*$.+ ,.1$ ,3.1$-$ % ,1$%02, ",.-$ ,-$." .35%"#=! 3-%)"3.6)!--$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!&43/.,-)8-$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!&9-$ / ., "%"+)0+ & "-%"$)& *),5%3-.5 "8),#,."26/., "-39."2-$!39/., "-3,., 0 -$%"5.6)!-%-3 2!1.-%)".0 88 1-3)"-$ %,1$%02."2%-3.2+."-.# 3."22%3.2+."-.# 3%",&3)88.&% 0+.0! 34 3., 3!0-9-$ 31$))0.!-$),%-, /, 3 "26-$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!&%3, 0 +. "--)8.&%0+.0! 3 %"-$ 3%-!.-%)"*$ "/., "-3$ 0/1$%02, "2)-$ %,$)& *),546rn rr rnnn"."3%-!.-%)"-$%"#3., 1)"" 12),2%31)"" 129, 0 +."--)),%,, 0 +."--) .1$)-$ ,9%" 1 ,-.%"*.34 D4 ($.-3),-3)81)"" 1-%)"3N0))5%"#6.15*.,2."2I),8),*.,2N., &.2 *%-$%"."2.1,)33!-,."1 3."20.,# 3-, -1$ 3)8-$ %",.1-%)"P $ 1)"3%2 ,31$%02, ">3/)3%-%+ .1-%)"-)*$.-.1$ ,3., 3.%"#. 3 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"4), 7.&/0 9*$ ".1$%02.1-%+ 0."3* ,3. .1$ ,>3=! 3-%)"),.

PAGE 131

' .1$ ,*%00%"#0, 3/)"23-).1$%02>3=! 3-%)"9-$ 1$%023 &3-)6 3.-%38% 2*%-$-$ 1)"+ ,3.-%)"4$%3&.5 3-$ 1$%028 0+.0! 2."2/,)!2)8$%&),$ ,3 084n",&3)8 $ 2 8%"%-%)")8 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"93$ 1)"3%2 ,3 + ,1$."1 .1$ ,3# -.3-$ 6 3--%& 8), 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"393.%"#9G 1.!3 >, 1)"3-."-0-.05%"#-)-$ 1$%02, "$ 96 1.!3 -$ 9-$ 1$%02*%000%3"&), %8-$ 3 >, 0%3 "%"#-)-$ &-))4) -.05-)-$ &1)"3-."-04$ )"0-%& .00B@4C9n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n*."".1)& Pn*."".#))!,)/ 4."n 3 -$ %88 0-)* ,9-))P)!#)-)8,%1.Pn*."--)3 3)& #%,.88 34H$ .00)*31$%02, "-) 8, 0-.05.6)!-*$.-1)!"-,-$ *."--)#)-)4$%02, "<)-.05%"#.6)!-$ 3!6< 1-."2 3 &-)6 3.-%38% 2*%-$-$ 1)"+ ,3.-%)"4($%0 .1$ ,3."21$%02, "., .-%"#-$ %,3".1539 -$ -.05.6)!-*$.-&)+% -$ $.+ .0, .2*.-1$ 29%"10!2%"#G)&."2; ,9HG$.->3)

PAGE 132

' .+ "9H."2G!,%)!3 ),# 4H($ ".1$%02.353$ ,*$.-5%"2)86 + ,.# 3$ %32,%"5%"#93 $ ."3* ,3-$ =! 3-%)"."2 7/0.%"3*$ %-%38,)&."2*$.-%3%"10!2 2%"%-4$%31)"+ ,3.-%)" 2 + 0)/3%"-)2%31!33%)".6)!-*$ 1$%02, "* 6),"."2*$ -$ %,/., "31.& 8,)&4n" .22%-%)"92!,%"#8, /0.-%& 93$ /, "23-)6 .&)"3,."2 "1)!,.# 31$% 02, "-)/, "2 -)6 3)& -$%"# 03 93.%"#9G-.19*$.-., )!P, )!3-%00./)0. ,6 .,P($.-., )!P ($.-., )!#!3P, )!.3 .&)"3,3-%00Pn-$)!#$-)!#!3#)-,% 2)8-$ 3 .&)"3,4H "23$ 1$.3 31$%02, "0%5 .&)"3,9."21$%02, "<)/0.%"#*%-$$ ,."23 &-)6 .00<)8!04$ 3 !-,."1 33$)*-$.-3$ -,% 3-)-.05-)1$%02, ".3)8 ".3/)33%60 9."2 -$ %,2%31!33%)",."# 3)+ ,+.,%)!3-)/%1343., 3!0-9-$ 3 !-,."1 3. 1)"" 12-)-$ /, +%)!3!-,."1 36 1.!3 -$ 3 !-,."1 3/,)+%2 +%2 "1 -$.-3$ !3 3 + ,1$."1 3$ -.053-)1$%02, ".3-%& 8), 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"346rnr r nnrnnrn5r+nnn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

PAGE 133

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n"3!&&.,93$ 6 0% + 3-$.-1 $%02, "" 2-)2 + 0)/ -$ %,.6%0%--)!3 -$ %,)*"*),23%"),2 ,-)#)-)5%"2 ,#.,"6 1.!3 -$ .6%0 %-%"80! "1 3 -$ %,/,)60 &3)0+%"#35%003.3* 00.3-$ %,31$))0.1$% + & "-4 !,%"#-$ 3 1)"28),&.0%",+% *93$ 3.3-$.-3$ $.31$."# 2$ ,*.)8%",.1-%"# *%-$1$%02, ")+ ,-%& 6")-!3%"#" #.-%+ *),2393!1$.3G)">-H."2Gr)4H$ 3. 39 Gn"3.2)800%"#-$ &-$%"#3-$.--$ 1.">-2)900%"#-$ &-$%"#3-$.--$ 1."2)4%5 %8 -$ >, ,!""%"#%"-$ 10.33,))&90%5 n3.9S3 %"3%2 8 -9/0 .3 9>-$ 3-%00#%+ & -$ 2 3%, 26 $.+%),3*$.-n*."-4)%"3.2)8B'4C-$ %,-.05%"#.#.%"")*9%"3.2 )83.%"#9 S5.9 + ,6)26 =!% -4r)&), -.05%"#9>-$.->3" #.-%+ 4n"3.29n>0 03.9Sn"3%2 +)%1 39 /0 .3 9>-$ "-$ >00!3 %"3%2 +)%1 39B4C-$.->3/)3%-%+ 9S1.!3 n>&00%"#-$ &*$.--$ 1." 2)."2-$ >, 1$))3%"#-)2)-$ ,%#$-6 $.+%),8),-$ &3 0+ 34H!3%"#/)3%-%+ *),2393$ "1)!,.# 31$%02, "-)&.5 -$ ,%#$-1$)%1 )"-$ %,)*"."20 .231$%02, "-)6 $.+ %".

PAGE 134

'? /,)/ ,*.4$%02, ">3/,)/ ,6 $.+%),3%"2%1.-$.-3$ %3 88 1-% + 0%",.1-%"#*%-$1$%02, "9 3%"1 3$ 2 8%" 31$%02, ">3/)3%-%+ .1-%)"-)*$.-.1$ ,3., 3.% "#.3 88 1-%+ .1$ 1$%02%",.1-%)"4$ .03)3.3-$.-!3%"#/)3%-%+ *),231)"-,%6!3-)6))3%"#1$%02, ">33 08 3&62 + 0)/%"#1$%02, ">32 1%3%)"&.5%"#35%0034$ 3 .2+."-.# 3)8!3%"#/)3%-%+ *),23 ".60 $ ,")--)!3 #.-%+ *),239."2-$!393$ $.31$."# 2$ ,*.)8%",. 1-%"# *%-$1$%02, "4$%3%"2%1.3-$.-$ ,*.)8%",.1-%"#*%-$1$%02, "%33-,)"# 0%"80! "1 26 -$ 1$.,.1,%3-%13)8-$ *),233$ !3 343., 3!0-9%",&3)8 &/$.3% 3)"-$ %&/),-."1 )8 *),239-$ 8.1--$.-$ ,*),23/0..1,%-%1.0,)0 %"$ ,*.)8%",.1-% "#*%-$1$%02, "%3 0 +."--)-$ 8.1--$.-3$ .--.1$ 3.0)-)8%&/),-."1 -)1$%02, ">3.6%0 %--)!3 -$ %,)*" *),234 4 ($.-33&3)85")*0 2# ."2*.3)85")*%"#., 0 +."-B),%,, 0 +."-C%"$ 3%-!.-%)"P)*., -$ &.2 0 +."-B."2%,, 0 +."-C9."2%"*$.-*.3P )8-$ *.3)85")*%"#%3, / -%-%)"9."2%-%3, 0 +."--)."3* ,%"#.=! 3-% )"%"-$ 3%-!.-%)"*$ "3$ #%+ 3.1$%02.")//),-!"%--)."3* ,$ ,=! 3-%)"3%"),2 ,-)1$ 15%8-$ 1$%02, & &6 ,3*$.-1$%02, "$.+ .0, .20 .," 24), 7.&/0 92!,%"# *$)0 #,)!/-%& 93$ .353)" 1$%02.=! 3-%)"93.%"#9G$.,0% 91.")!".& *$.-%33-.,-%"#*% -$S>PH%"1 1$%02, "$.+ 7/ ,% "1 )8&.5%"#."GH1)00.# *%-$-$ 0 -,GH.3$ %,$)& *),593$ 3.39G)!&.2 -$ /,)< 1-34)!#!3/!-)".*$)0 0)-)83-!88-$.-3-.,3*%-$S>.3)!, $)& *),54H)* + ,9-$ 1$%02#%+ 3.*,)"#."3* ,-)$ ,9."23$ 3.39G!-,8 0Pn-3-.,-3 *%-$S4>( &.2 S>34H"2-$ "3$ #%+ 3.")-$ ,1$%02.1$."1 -)."3* ,$ =! 3-%)"9 3.%"#9G(%-$S>P 0%".PH$ 1)"-%"!.00#%+ 31$%02, ".1$."1 -)."3* ,-$ 3.& =! 3-%)" 61.00%"#)" .1$1$%02>3".& ."2&)+ 3-).=! 3-%)".6)!--$ +)* 03%""#0%3$93. %"#9 G$%3%3-$ 0 -,S4>($.->33/ 1%.0.6)!--$%30 -,P($), & &6 ,3PH$ "1)!,.# 3 1$%02, "-),.%3 -$ %,$."23-)."3* ,-$ =! 3-%)"."2.3539G($.-%3-$.-1.00 29. 009*$ ".

PAGE 135

'@ 0 -,$.3-*)3)!"23PH$ 1$%022) 3")-#%+ $ ,.,%#$-."3* ,9."23$ 3.39Gn ->31.00 2. S)* 04>, .00)8)!, & &6 ,%"#-$.-*),2PH%".0093$ .3533)& 1 $%02, "=! 3-%)"39 3.%"#9G.009*$.-%3%-1.00 2P!3-%"9*$.-%3%-1.00 2P($.-%3% -1.00 29&%0PH $%33%-!.-%)"3$)*3-$.-3$ / .20, &%"231$%02, ".6)!-*$.--$ $.+ .0 .2 0 .," 2."2*."-31$%02, "-), & &6 ,*$.--$ 2-)5")*-)#)-)5%"2 ,#.,"4n"),2 -)1$ 15%8 .1$1$%02, & &6 ,3*$.-1$%02, "$.+ .0, .20 .," 293$ 353 + ,3%"#0 1$%02 -$ 3.& =! 3-%)"."2, 3/)"23-)-$ 1$%02>3."3* ,4n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
PAGE 136

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n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nn r0n'rnn &.%"%", 3-%"%"2>3%",+% *%3-)3 $)*3$ %31)"1 ," 2*%-$-$ 88 1-3)8. .1$ ,1$%02,.-%))".1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"34$%3&.%"%", 3-1)& 38 ,)&-$ 8.1--$.-

PAGE 137

'E %"21)"3%2 ,3-$ $%#$.1$ ,1$%02,.-%).3-$ 6%## 3-6.,,% ,-) 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02 %",.1-%)"34 ,/, +%)!3 7/ ,% "1 )8.1$%"#1$%02, "%".10.33, ))&-$.-/,)+%2 2.0)* .1$ ,1$%02,.-%)&.2 $ ,!"2 ,3-."2-$ %&/),-."1 )8.0)*.1$ ,1$% 02,.-%)%".1$ 1$%02%",.1-%)"34%"2-$%"53-$.--$ .1$ ,1$%02,.-%)3 -6-$ 3-."2.,23%3$%#$."2 -$ ,.-%)2) 3")-, 80 1-2%88 "-10.33,))&3%-!.-%)"34)* + ,93%"1 3$ 1."")-1$."# -$ ,.-%)93$ $.3-).1$1$%02, "%"-$ 10.33,))&*%-$-$ ,.-%)4n")-$ ,*),2393$ $.3 -)8)00)* -$ ,!0 33 -62)&%"."-.1.2 &%13."2%"3-%-!-%)"3."2%3/)* ,0 33-)&)2% 8$ ,.1$%"# "+%,)"& "-4 ,)&$ 7/ ,% "1 393$ 5")*3-$.-.0)*.1$ ,1$%02,.-%) ".60 3. 1$ ,3-)$.+ &), )" )")" %",.1-%)"3*%-$1$%02, "4$.-%3-)3.9.1$ ,3., .60 -) 3%0/. .-"-%)"-) .1$1$%02."23!11 338!00$ 0/ .1$1$%020 .,"" *35%003), 8.1-340)"#*%-$. 0)*.1$ ,1$%02,.-%)93$ &/$.3%: 3.3&.0010.333%: 6 1.!3 % -1)"-,%6!3-)%&/,)+%"# 1$%02, ">30 .,"%"# "+%,)"& "-36&.5%"#1$%02, "8 01.0& ,."2&), 0.7 24n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

PAGE 138

' 'rn)&nn-.":.$ #) 3-)1$%02, "*$)3 &-)6 !"$.// 4 n8-$ >, !"$.//9 4 %8n3 -$ >, !"$.//9 '4 n>006,%"#-$ &)+ ,-)& ?4 ),n>00#)-)-$ &4 !1n,rnrnnn+n nnn!n2 r 2)8.0)*.1$ ,1$%02,.-%)8),&), )" )")" -%& *%-$1$%02, !63!63-),$ $.3)" )")" %",.1-%)"*%-$1$%02, "%"2%88 "-*.3 -.":.$ .353*$.-$.// 2-)-$ 1$%02, @4 n8n9%8n>&.60 -)# -!/8,)&*$ + ,n>&.-9 D4 n>00#)-)-$ &9 E4 ."2# -2)*")"-$ %,0 + 0 4 ."2.35-$ &9G($.->3*,)"#PH A4 G($2))!$.+ .3.28.1 )"PH-.":.'$ $!#3-$ 1$%02, "-)&.5 -$ &$.// 4 "2!3!.00-$ >0000& 4 ."2n9%8n1.")88 ,9 4 n>00*.%-8),-$ &-)6 $.//9 '4 n>00#%+ -$ &$!#3.0*.39-.":.?$ 0 -3-$ 1$%02, "3%-)"$ ,0./-)1)"+ ,3 *%-$-$ & ?4 6!--$ >, 9%->30%5 &%33%"#-$ %,&)&&9 @4 n>003.9G($ "*%00* 3 &)&&.#.%"PH D4 "2!3!.00-$ >003..8,"./9.8,8, /0.9

PAGE 139

'A E4 n>000 -S &3%-)"&0./-.":.@$ .00)*3-$ 1$%02, "-)# --$ %,3-!88-$.-&.5 3-$ &1)&8),-.60 4 %8-$ 2-)#)# --$ %,3-!889 A4 %8-$ $.+ 3-!88 2."%&.03!3!.00-$.--$ 30 /*%-$9 4 n>000 --$ &#)# --$.4 %8-$ -,!0" 2%-9 4 -$.->00#%+ -$ &3)& 1)&8),-4 '4 ,n>00-6 + ,*$ .-)"1 4 ''4 )%8-$ ,.-%)38),-$ 5%23-).1$ ,3* .-0 .3-0%5 "5%23-)-*).1 $ ,39 '?4 -$ "-$ 5%23nR&3!, *)!026 8%-&), '@4 6 1.!3 -$ *)!02$.+ &), )" )")" -%& 4

PAGE 140

? -.":.$ $%#$.1$ ,1$%02,.-%)0 -3$ ,3%&/0#%+ 2%, 1-%)"3)1$%02, 'D4 n"3.2)80%5 *$ "n2)&*),59&2.%0*),53$ -39 'E4 %"3.2)80%5 .00&5%233.-.--$ -.60 3%"-$ %,3/)-34 '4 "2n&")-#)"".6 .60 -)# --$, ),8)!,5%239 ?'4 n$.+ -)3-.,-*%-$)" 5%2."2-$ "n*),5&*.)"4 ??4 !-%8-$ ,.-%)*.33&.00 ,9 ?@4 -$ "n*%006 .60 -)$ 0/&), 5%23=!%15 ,."2 ?D4 n2)">-5")*4 ?E4 n38),99 @4 6!-)!1."$.+ !/-) %#$"9 @4 3)-$.->3*$* $.+ -$ 3 1)"2.1$ ,1)& %"4 @'4 !--$ 3-.3.3-$ ,.-%)%3)" -) 0 + "9

PAGE 141

? @?4 n-$%"5%-3$)!026 -*)-) 0 + "4-.":.$ 1!,, "-.1$ ,1$%02,.-%)%" + ,31$))0%3$%#$ @@4 n-$%"5-$%39%-*)!026 "%1 %8-$ 3-.*)!020)* ,-$ ,.-%)4 @D4 + "." 0 & "-.,31$))09 @E4 n& ."..1$ ,1."$.+ -$%,-5%233)& -%& 3%"-$ 10.33,))&9 @4 ."26 6$ ,3 08),$%&3 084-.":.0)*.1$ ,1$%02,.-%) ".60 31$%02, "-)# -6 -,, 3!03 @A4 "2n-$%"5%-*)!026 6 8%1%.0-)-$ 1$%02 D4 %8-$ $.20 331$%02, "%"-$ %,10.33,))&-$.--$ $.22 .0-*%-$ D4 ."2)!*)!02# -&), )" )")" D4 ."2n-$%"5)!*)!02# -6 -,, 3!0-3)!-)8-$ 1$%02, "9-.":.'$ 0)*,.-%) ".60 3.1$ ,3-)3/ "2&), -%& *%-$ .1$1$%02 D'4 %8-$ $.20 331)&/ -%-%)"/ ,3 D?4 ."2%8-$ $.2&), )" )")" -%& 9 D@4 ."2-$ .1$ ,1)!023/ "2&), -%& *%-$%"2%+%2!.03-!2 "-3 DD4 %83$ 2 2-)),$ 2 2-)4 !63!63-),?$ 1!,, "-.1$ ,1$%02,.-%)%#"), 32%88 "-10 .33,))&3 --%"#3 -.":.?$ $%#$.1$ ,1$%02,.-%)%3.6.,,% ,-) 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)" DE4 )& 6.,,% ,3P,)6.60-$ ,.-%)9 D4 *$ n9*$ n*)!029n*)!02)"06 -$ 9 DA4 -$ )"06.,,% ,n1."-$%"5)8%3$.+%"#3)&."5%234-.":.@0)*.1$ ,1$%02,.-%) ".60 3.1$ ,3-)8, 0%",.1*%-$1$%02, E4 n8)!$.20 335%239

PAGE 142

? E4 )!1."%",.1-&), 8, 0*%-$-$ &9 E4 )!1."%",.1-&), )" )")" E'4 ."2-$.-R3, .00%&/),-."E?4 n-$%"5%->3-$ 9&), )" )")" .-"-%)" E@4 -$.-n*)!02-$%"5%-1)!026 -$ )"06.,,% ,>3-$ ,.-%))85%23-).1$ ,34 ED4 -$ ,*%3 9n2)">-, .00-$%"5-$ %3.6.,,% ,*%-$%"."%",.1-%)"4 -.":.D 3 .,1$ ,3" 2-)#)-)2%88 "-10.33,))&3 --%"#3 EE4 $ ,.-%)31)& 8,)&, 3 .,1$ ,39 E4 n-$%"5-$ >, *,)"#B$.9$.C4 EA4 n83)& 6)2%3.1-!.00%"-$ 10.33,))&."2")-32 + 0)/& "!63!63-),@$ 3.*-$.-1$%02, "$.26 8%2#, .-08,)&.0)*. 1$ ,1$%02,.-%) -.":.$ -.!#$-1$%02, "%"-$ 10.33,))&*%-$.0)*.1$ ,1$%02,.-%) E4 n1.& 9n!3 2-)0%+ %"%" 00.3)!"-9%"0),%2.%" 00.3)!"-9 4 ."2-$ ,.-%)9-$.-)82.1., n*),5 2.-9

PAGE 143

?' A4 2)!60 2-$ 3-."2.,23>& ."%"#9 A4 n*.3%".-*) .,)02,))& A4 ."2-$ 9)!1."$.+ "-*) .,)023-))" .1$ ,9 A4 )"0$.2-*).1$ ,3*%-$"-*) .,)0234 A'4 ( 2)!60 2-$ .1$ ,3-."2.,23 A?4 ."2-$.-, .00*.3 88 1-%+ 4-.":.A$ 3.*-$ 6 8%-3)8.0)*.1$ ,1$%02,.-%) A@4 !-%" 00.3)!"-%3.03))" )8-$ 3-,%13-1)!"-% 3%"0),%2.9 AD4 *$ "%-1)& 3-)1$%02, "4 AE4 "2-$.-%3&), 88 1-%+ -$."*$.-* $.+ $ 4 A4 + "-$)!#$%->3.3-., #!0.2,.-%)9 AA4 -$ 3-./!-3)!--$ ,.-%)96!-4 4 !, 0")-$%"#n1."2).6)!-%-*$ "-$ 3-.3.39G."R-8%#$--$ &4H !63!63-),D)& 1$%02, "&.5 .1$ ,3/, 8 ,.0)*.1$ ,1$% 02,.-%) -.":.$ .1$ ,1$%02,.-%), #!0.26-$ 3-.%3$%#$ 4 $ 3-.%3/,)6.60-$ 8.1-),9 4 6 1.!3 -$ 9-$ *.-$ $.+ &.2 -$ ,.-%)3 '4 3)$%#$%"/, 31$))0 ?4 n5")*%"31$))0%->3 + "$%#$ ,9 @4 ."2/!60%131$))0>3$%#$ ,4 -.":. .1$ ,3!3!.00$.+ 3)& 1$%02, "*$)2%3,!/--$ 10.33 D4 )!$.+ 2%88 "-2%31%/0%" /,)60 &3-$.-)!$.+ -)2 .0*%-$9 E4 %8nR&1)"3-."-0#%+%"#&.-"-%)"

PAGE 144

?? 4 -)-*)),-$, 3-!2 "-3*$)$.+ .2%31%/0%" /,)60 &9 A4 -$ "-$.->3#)""..88 1-.00&)-$ ,5%23 4 *$)., ")-# --%"#&.-"-%)"4 -.":.$ 1$%02, "/, + "-$ ,8,)& 88 1-%+ 0%",.1-%"#*%-$)-$ ,1 $%02, 4 $.->39-$.->3-$ 8.1-),*$3)& )" 9 4 *$)!2)">-# 88 1-%+ .1$ ,%",.1-%)"*%-$-$ 5%234 '4 n8)!$.+ 2%31%/0%" /,)60 &3 ?4 ."2)!>, 1)"3-."-03-)//%"#."22 .0%"#*%-$9 @4 %8)!$.+ )-$ ,-$%"#3#)%"#)"9 D4 0%5 ,%#$-")*n$.+ //0 .11, 2%-.-%)" E4 n>&-,%"#-)2).0)"#*%-$.1$%"#&5%234 !n7 )3%-%+ %"80! "1 3)8.0)*.1$ ,1$%02,.-%))".1$ ,1$%02%",.1%)"3 !63!63-),E.", 3/)"3%6%0%-% 3/, + "-$ ,8,)&8, 0% ",.1-%"#*%-$1$%02, -.":.'$ %31!,, "-0, 3/)"3%60 8),&."-$%"#3 4 n$.+ .")-$ ,.1$ ,9 A4 ."2.")-$ ,.1$ ,*$)-!"2 ,3-."2$ ,<)69 4 3)n>&2)%"#$ ,*),50).2/0!3&*),50).2 4 /0!3//0 /0!3-,-)8%"28!"4 -.":.?.", 3/)"3%6%0%-% 3%"80! "1 $ ,*.)8%",.1-%"#*%$1$%02, '4 )&), 3-!88)!$.+ -)0).2)"-))!9 ?4 ."2&), 3/)"3%6%0%-% 3 @4 n-$%"5%-%39.88 1-3-$ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"4

PAGE 145

?@ -.":.@$ $.33)&!1$*),5-)2)2!,%"#-$ -%& D4 $ 6 3-Pn->3/,)6.606 8), 3-.,-*),5.-A)>10)154 E4 5%23n1."9 4 6 1.!3 n$.+ 3)&!1$-)2) A4 ."2-$%"#3-$.-" 2-)6 2)" 8,)&& .3..1$ ,9 '4 ."23/, --6!34 -.":.D$ %3.60 -)8, 0%",.1-*%-$1$%02, "6 8), -$ -%& '4 !-6 8), A)>10)159 ''4 n# -$ .-E9.0)-)8&5%23# -$ .,09 '?4 .03)%",.1-%)".--$ -.60 '@4 ."2* >, -.05%"#."2/0.%"#9.002.0)"#4 'D4 !--$ "-$ >310)15P, .58.3-%3%-4 '4 ( $.+ 6, .58.3-6 -* "0%5 @-)'9 'A4 ."29-$.-93)& -%& 3-$.-1)!026 .0%--0 $ 1-%1 ?4 2 / "2%"#)"$)*&."5%23.1-!.00*."--) .-9 -.":.$ $.3-)8 2&."1$%02, ".-)"1 ?4 ."2%8%->30%5 .00-* "-9 ?4 )!1."%&.#%" -,%"#-)8 2-* "-5%23.-)" -%& 9 ?'4 S1.!3 $.+ 6, .58.3-%"-$ ,))&9

PAGE 146

?D ??4 ")-%"-$ 0!"1$,))&4 ?@4 !-)-$ ,*%3 -$ >, /0.%"#8,)&E-)A9 ?D4 %->33*$.--$ 9&), *$.--$ *."".2) ?A4 ."2-$ >, &), 0.7 29 @4 )!>, &), 0.7 2!3!.009 @4 !"0 33)!>, -,%"#-)2)3)& -$%"# 03 @4 0%5 .".,-.1-%+%-),3)& -$%"#4 -.":.'$ /, 8 ,3 .-%"#%"$ ,10.33,))&-)%"-$ 1.8 ,%. @'4 n/, 8 ,%"&,))&9 @?4 -$ R36 "2.30%5 *$ ")!,1))5%3">-$ 9 @@4 ."2* $.+ -) .-%")!,,))&9 @D4 n-$%"5n>&-$ )"0)" )8-$ .1$ ,3%"-$ 6!%02%"# @E4 -$.-0%5 3-)$.+ -) .-%"-$ ,))&4 -.":.'$ $.32%88%1!0-%"0 .2%"#&."1$%02, "-)-$ 1.8 ,%. @4 n1$ ,*$ "n2)">-$.+ -)*.05)+ ,-$ 9 @A4 S1.!3 %-%3.$.330 9.$.330 -,%"#-)*.05)+ ,-$ 9 D4 S1.!3 n$.+ %#$"5%233)& -%& 3),-* "-%"0%" 9 D4 # -S &)+ ,-$ 9 D4 # -S &8 2-)*$ ."29 -.":.' ,10.33,))&/,)+%2 3$ ,*%-$&), )//),-!"%-% 3-)-.05-)1$%02,

PAGE 147

?E D'4 S1.!3 %"&,))&%->3&), 0.7 24 D?4 n2)">-$.+ -)6 9-$ 9-$ 9-$ 9-$ 9*%-$-$ &4 D@4 n1."3%"-$ ,))&,.-$ ,-$.")+ ,-$ 4 !63!63-),A ,1$%02, "&.5 .6%#2%88 "1 -).1$ ,1$%0 2%",.1-%)"3 -.":.''0)*.1$ ,1$%02,.-%) ".60 3$ ,-) 88 1-%+ 0%",.1*%-$1$%02, D4 + ,1)& 3)& 6.,,% ,3P DA4 )* ,-$ ,.-%)B$.9$.CP E4 $.->3&6%#)" %30)* ,-$ ,.-%)4 E4 n-$%"5%8-$ R30 335%239 E4 )!1.")6+%)!30-.05*%-$-$ &&), 9 -.":.'?0)*.1$ ,1$%02,.-%)&.5 3.1$ ,3 .3%0%",.1-*%-$1 $%02, E'4 S1.!3 )!2)">-$.+ %#$"-)1)""2*%-$9 E?4 )!1)!029)!$.+ "),-* 0+ 4 E@4 $.->3.0*.3.0).3% ,9 ED4 )!>, .0*.3#)"".9 EE4 )!1)!026 .60 -)$.+ &), )" )")" *%-$-$ &9 -.":.'@ ,1$%02, "%"-$ 10.33,))&&.5 .-)-.002%88 "-.-&)3/ $ E4 ."2%->006 0 33$ 1-%1%"$ *$ "9-$ 9 EA4 n")-%1 2*$ "-$ >38 ,5%23%"$ 9 4 -$ *$)0 .-&)3/$ )8-$ 10.33,))&%31)&/0 02%88 "-4 -.":.'D$ %30 332%3,!/-%)"*$ "-$ ., 8 ,1$%02, "%"-$ 10.3 3,))&

PAGE 148

? 4 + ,6)2%31.0& ,9 4 %->3")-.30)!29 '4 -$ >3")-0)!29.3&."2%3,!/-%)"3*$ "-$ >38 ,5%239 ?4 ."2-$ "-$ >390 332%3,!/-%)"3 (rnn!1n/n+n nn rnn &n nr rn n&rn n+nnrrrnn+n rnn-.":.'E ,1$%02, "&.5 $ ,3/ "2&), -%& -.05%"#-) .1$1$%02 @4 ."2-$ >30 33-%& 3n>&1),, 1-%"#3)& 6)2),9 D4 -.05%"#-)3)& 6)29.6)!-*$.--$ >, 2)%"#*,)"# E4 ),")-&.5%"#.#))21$)%1 4 4 ($ "-$ >38 ,5%239 + ,)" 3$.//% ,%".10.33,))&B$.9$.C9 A4 )!1)!02-.05&), 4 .60 ?'4%"2>310.3331$ 2!0 E, /0. @, .58.3-'0 ."!/."2, .2A!-3%2 -%& B #%""%"#)8-$ -%& CA'(.3$$."23A?%,10 -%& @(),53$ -3 ",3"2)8-$ -%& !&rn6rn5nn6rnr r nn)*."2*$.-2%88 "--$%"#3& ."N-$ 3),-3)8& ."%"#."23%#"%8%1."1 -$ #%+ "N%3. 1)&/)" "-)8."3%-!.-%)"4 4 ($.-., -$ 3%-!.2& ."%"#3)83)& )8-$ *),23."2/$,.3 3-$.-3 &%&/),."%"-$ 3%-!.-%)"P

PAGE 149

?A !,%"#-$ %",+% *3."2)63 ,+.-%)"393$ )8"!3 3-$ *),2G!"2 ,3-."29H. "2%-$.3 8)!,2%88 "-3%-!.2& ."%"#34%,3-9-$ *),2G!"2 ,3-."2H& ."3-$.-.1$ ,3."21$%02, 5")*-$ & ."%"#)8*$.-3)& )" 3.34$ 3%-!.-%)"*$ "1$%02, "G!"2 ,3-."2H*$.-.1$ ,3., 3.%"#& ."3-$.-1$%02, "., .1=!.%"2*%-$-$ & ."%"#)8 3)& -$%"#-$..1$ ,3., 3.%"#4 )!# -/)3%-%+ 8 26.158,)&-$ 5%239-$ 3&%0 29-$ B'4C!"2 ,3-."2 *$.-)!R, 3.%"#9*$.-)!>, -.05%"#90%5 8),-$ 1%,10 -%& 9."2nR&#%+%"#-$ &3)& -$%"#" *4 )* , $.//."2B'4Cn#! 33-$.-R3$)*n*)!025")*%",.1-%)"$.3 6 88 1-%+ 4)!*%"9S1.!3 )!2)">-$.+ ."1.,230 8-4))!!"2 ,3-."2 P $%,29-$ *),2G!"2 ,3-."2H$.3-$ & ."%"#-$.-.1$ ,3."21$%02, "$.+ %"8),&.-%)".6)!-3)& -$%"#4$ !3 3-$ *),2G!"2 ,3-."2H%"-$ 3%-!.-%)"*$ "1$%02, "2)")-G!"2 ,3-."2H$)*-)2)3)& -$%"#9."2-$%3& ."3-$.-1$%02, "1."")-2)3)& -$%"# 6 1.!3 -$ 2)")-$.+ ."%"8),&.-%)".6)!-$)*-)2)-$.-4 ( -!"2 ,3-."2 $)*-)2).1 ,-.%"/,)< 1-9-$ R, 8%#$-%"#*%-$-$ %, 8,% "23."2-$ 1."R-, 3)0+ %-6-$ &3 0+ 34n$.+ .")-$ ,.1$ ,9."2.")-$ ,.1$ ,*$)-!"2 ,3-."2 $ ,<)693)n>&2)%"#$ ,*),50).2/0!3&*),50).2/0!3//0 /0!3 -,-)8%"28!"4 )!,-$9-$ & ."%"#)8G!"2 ,3-."2H%3-)6 8.&%0%.,*%-$$)*3)& )" %38 0%"# ."2 *$.-3)& )" %3-$%"5%"#.6)!-4n"-$ 3%-!.-%)"*$ ".1$ ,3G!"2 ,3-."2H1$%02, "9-$ *),2

PAGE 150

@ G!"2 ,3-."2H& ."3-$.-.1$ ,3., .1=!.%"2*%-$$)*1$%02, "., 8 0% "#9*$.-1$%02, "., 1)"3%2 ,%"#9."2*$.-&.5 31$%02, "6 $.+ %"./.,-%1!0.,*.4 n>&")-3!, n!"2 ,3-."2 1)&/0 0B4C9S1.!3 n$.+ .#))2, 0.-%)"3$%/9n-$%"5& 0.-%)"3$%/*%-$.00)8&5%23%3#))24 r 7-93$ 8, =! "-0!3 3-$ *),2G5")*9H."2%-$.38)!,2%88 "-3%-!.2& ."%"#3 4 %,3-9-$ & ."%"#)8G5")*H%3-), .0%: -$.-3)& -$%"#%3$.// "%"#4 .1 $ ,3#%+ 1$%02, %"3-,!1-%)")"$)*-)2)3)& -$%"#."2G5")*H*$ -$ ,-$ %"3-,!1-%)"%33!11 338!0),")-6)63 ,+%"#$)*1$%02, "., 2)%"#3)& -$%"#4n"-$%33%-!.-%)"9-$ *),2G5")*H& ."3-$. .1$ ,3, .0%: *$ -$ ,),")-1$%02, "., 2)%"#3)& -$%"#!"2 ,-$ %"3-,!1%)"4 ($ "B4Cn3 -$ &2)%"#%-."28)00)*%"#&2%, 1-%)"39-$ "n5")* 9."2%8-$ 2) 3)& -$%"#9%8-$ 2)"R-2)%-,%#$-9n*%003.9G)!2%2">-=!%!"2 ,3-."2&2%, 1 -%)"39 2%2)!PHn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

PAGE 151

@ n-$%"5-$ .1$ ,3$)!025")* -$.-)!, 3&.,-6)9)!5")* .00)8-$ 3 *),234 )!,-$9-$ *),2G5")*H%3-)$.+ %"8),&.-%)".6)!-3)& -$%"#4$ 3%-!.-%)"*$ .1$ ,3."21$%02, "2)")-G5")*H3)& -$%"#& ."3-$.--$ $.+ ")%"8),&.-%)".6)!-3)& -$%"#4 n2)">-5")* 7.1-0$)*0)"#9n5")* %->36 "&), -$."" .,39%->3/,)6.609%/,)6.601)!02$.+ 6 ".,)!"28),-* ".,34 )!#)1: &.P))!$.+ 1: &.P))!5")* *$.--$.-%3P 6rn &nn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n"-$ 1.3 )8.3/ 00%"#3-91$%02, "%" $ ,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"10.33,))&$.+ -$ 3-)"1 ),-*%1 .&)"-$4 .1$ ,38% ,3-3 "2$)& -$ *),23-$.--$ 1$))3 98), 7.&/0 9G9HG9HGn9HG9H."2Gr4H$ ".1$ ,3 .00)*1$%02, "-)/,.1-%1 -$ *),23.-$)& 8),.-0 .3--*)*$)0 53.3* 00.3-)#))+ -$ *),23%"10.334 8), -.5%"#.3/ 00%"#3-9.1$ ,3#%+ 1$%02, ".1$."1 -), +% *-$ *),234$%02, "3%-.--$ %,3 .-3."2-.5 -$ 3-9."2%&& 2%.0.8, -.5%"#-$ 3-9-$

PAGE 152

@ 5")*-$ 3!0-3438),#,.2%"#-$ 1$%02, ">3*),593$ 3.39Gn2)">-0%5 n#,. 2 -$ &96!+ "%8-$ #)--$ &.00*,)"#9n>&3-%0000%"#-$ &S#))2<)6>),*,% -%"#S#))2<)6>)"-$ %, /./ ,4n2)">-/!-%-%"-$ 6))596!-n>&+ $.2.3/ 00%"#3-9-$ *)">-$.+ -$ ."7% -)8-.5%"# .3-9-$ >00 .0, .25")**$.-.3/ 00%"#3-%34H$!39%"$ ,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"10.33, ))&9$.+%"#1$%02, 2).3/ 00%"#3-%31)"3%2 2)" )8-$ &)3-3!11 338!0*.3)8/, /.,%"# 1$%02, "8), 5%"2 ,#.,"4 3 1)"23!6.1-%+%-%3-)%"+)0+ 1$%02, "%"2%88 "-10.33,))&.1-%+%-% 34 $%33!6 .1-%+%-1)"3%3-3)8."!&6 ,)82%88 "-.1-%)"398), 7.&/0 9/,)+%2%"#1$% 02, "*%-$ )//),-!"%-% 3-)$.+ .0)-)8$."23)" 7/ ,% "1 3)8/!::0 3960)1539."21%,10 3 -.15 ,3L-) 2 + 0)/3&.00&)-),35%00393!1$.31)0),%"#91!--%"#9-,.1%"#9."2#0!%"#L. "2-)/.,-%1%/.%". &.-$.1-%+%-0%5 1)!"-%"#9.22%"#9."23!6-,.1-%"#4$ 3 .1-%)"3 ".60 1$ ,3-)# -1$%02, .28),5%"2 ,#.,"6$ 0/%"#1$%02, "2 + 0)/-$ 1 33.,35%0038),5 %"2 ,#.,"4), 7.&/0 92!,%"#8, /0.-%& 93$ /0.3GrH*%-$-*)1$%02, ".-. -.60 4$%3#.& ".60 3 .1$1$%02-)$.+ 8%+ 1.,23."2-)1$ 15%8$ ),3$ $.3.1.,2-$.-$.3-$ 3.& 1)0), ), "!&6 ,.3-$ 1.,2-$.-$.3.0, .26 ".--$ -.60 4n8$ ),3$ $.3-$ 1.,2-$.-$.3-$ 3.& 1)0),),"!&6 ,9$ ),3$ /!-3-$.-1.,22)*"4$!39-$%3#.& ".60 31$%02, "-)2 + 0 )/-$ .6%0%--)2%3-%"#!%3$./.,-%1!0.,1)0),),"!&6 ,8,)&+.,%)!31)0),3."2"!&6 ,34 -$%,23!6.1-%+%-%3-)# -1$%02, "-)6 .11!3-)& 2-).5%"2 ,#.,"0 %8 3-0 ."2%3 1)&/)3 2)8&."2%88 "-.1-%)"39%"10!2%"#0%"%"#!/."210 ."%"#!/4n"/., -%1!0.,92!,%"# & .0-%& 9.1$ ,3."21$%02, "#))!-3%2 ."2-,.+ 0-)-$ 1.8 ,%.4($%0 -$ ., -,.+ 00%"#9

PAGE 153

@' .1$ ,3# -1$%02, "-)0%" !/9-)*.058.3-9."2-)6 =!% -4n"-$ 1.8 ,%. 9.1$ ,3.00)* 1$%02, ")"0-) .--$ %,0!"1$,.-$ ,-$."-.05%"#-) .1$)-$ ,),.1$ ,36 1.!3 -$ $.+ )"0-$%,-&%"!38),0!"1$48, .-%"#0!"1$9.1$ ,3$.+ 1$%02, "-$,)* -,.3$.*.9&)+ -$ %,1$.%,3-)-$ 1)," ,)8-$ 1.8 ,%.9."2/%0 -$ &!/4$ 1)& 6.1 5-)-$ %,10.33,))&9 ."21$%02, "-.5 ."./%&& 2%.043., 3!0-9-$ 10.33,))&$.3%-3 )*"3-,!1-!, 2 31$ 2!0 ."2&.5 36)-$.1$ ,3."21$%02, "6!35 /%"#-$ 31$ 2!0 4$.+% "#1$%02, 7/ ,% "1 -$ 3-,!1-!, 231$ 2!0 9.1$ ,3# -1$%02, "-)6 .11!3-)& 2-).5%"2 ,#.," 0%8 3-0 ."2/, /., 1$%02, "8),5%"2 ,#.,"46rnrnn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n& ."3.30%5 5%233$)!02$.+ -$ 3 3-."2.,239 )!5")*9 999."29."2n2)999."296!-n#).00-$ *.-)/ ,3 4H$.-%3-)3.9$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!&%"10!2 3&), 0 .,"%"#&.,%.03."2&), 1 33.,35%003 8),5%"2 ,#.," -$."-$ #!%2 0%" 38),-$ /,)#,.&2)."2" 231$%02, "-)2).0)-)8*),53$ 34$!39 3$ 6 0% + 3-$.--$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!& ".60 3.1$ ,3-)# -1$%02, ", .28),5%"2 ,#.,"

PAGE 154

@? &), -$."-$ #!%2 0%" 32)93.%"#9G00)8&5%23B4C/,.1-%1.00.00)8 &5%239& %#$" 5%23,%#$-")*1."35%/5%"2 ,#.,"4n8)!#)-).")-$ ,31$))0."23 *$.-&5%231."2)+ ,3!3.")-$ ,31$))0*$)3#)"".6 .6%#2%88 "1 45%231." *,%-$ %,".& 9&5%231."B4C2)3/ 00%"#3-."2.1 -$ &9&5%231."2).0)-)83 -!88 -$.-)-$ ,5%231.">-4H$.-%3-)3.93$ "<)3.1$%"#1$%02, "!3%"#-$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!& 6 1.!3 -$ 1!,,%1!0!&/,)+%2 31$%02, "*%-$.0)-)8)//),-!"%-% 38),.1.2 & %1.1$% + & "."23!11 33%"31$))04$ 9.3..1$ ,%"-$ 31$))09%3+ ,/,)!2)8-$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!& .3 00.3.1$%"#1$%02, "%"-$ 31$))0!3%"#-$ 1!,,%1!0!&403)9.3./, 5 %"2 ,#.,".1$ ,9 3$ 8 03.63)0!03!, -$.-$ ,1$%02, "., /, /., 28),5%"2 ,#.,"6 -,-$."1$%02, "%" )-$ ,31$))034$ 3 8.1-3#%+ $ ,.3 "3 )8$ ,)*"%2 "-%-4 1)"293$ 1)"3%2 ,3-$ $%#$.1$ ,1$%02,.-%).3-$ 6%## 3-6.,,% -) 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"34$ -$%"53-$.--$ .1$ ,1$%02,.-%)3 -6$ 3-.%3$%#$9."2-$ ,.-%)2) 3")-, 80 1--$ 1)"2%-%)"3)82%88 "-10.33,))&3 --%"#34$!393$ 6 0% + 3-$.--$ ,.-%)2) 3")".60 .1$ ,3-)$.+ ")!#$)" )")" %",.1-%)"3*%-$1$%02, "),-)/ ,)+%2 1$%02, "*%-$.3-.60 10.33,))&.-&)3/$ 438),-$ 6 8%-3)8.0)*.1$ ,1$%02,.-%)93$ 3.39G+ ,6)2%31.0& ,9)!5")*9%->3")-.30)!29-$ >3")-0)!29.3&."2%3 ,!/-%)"3 *$ "-$ >38 ,5%239."2-$ "-$ >39)!5")*90 332%3,!/-%)"39."2-$ >30 33-%& 3n>& B4C1),, 1-%"#3)& 6)2),-.05%"#-)3)& 6)29)!5")*9.6)!-*$.--$ >, 2)%"# *,)"#), ")-&.5%"#.#))21$)%1 4($ "-$ >38 ,5%239 + ,)" 3$.//% ,%". 10.33,))&B$.9$.C9)!1)!02-.05&), 4H$.-%3-)3.93$ %32%33.-%38% 2*%-$$ .1$ ,1$%02 ,.-%)3 -6-$ 3-.96!-3$ 1."")-1$."# -$ ,.-%)3%"1 -$ ,.-%)% 36.3 2)"-$ 3 .,1$ ,3> 8%"2%"#3."21)"-,)00 26-$ 3-.4$%38.1-3$)*3-$.-3$ %3/)* ,0 33-)&)2%8$ ,.1$%"# "+%,)"& "-96!-#%+ 3$ ,.3 "3 )8%2 "-%-4

PAGE 155

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
PAGE 156

@D 3$ &.5 3 + 88),--)# -1$%02, ", .28),5%"2 ,#.,"6!3%"#$ ,)*".1$%"#3-0 6.3 2)"0%&%2)" )")" %",.1-%)"3*%-$1$%02, "4 6rnrnn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n8-$ $.2.6.22.* %-$ $%--%"#9n>00*,%./., "-98),%"3-."1 93.%"#9S)!,9)!5")*93)."23 )9$.2.$.,2-%& 5 /%"#-$ %,$."23-)-$ &3 0+ 3),-$ 8),#)--$ %,0%3"%"# .,3-)2.4> )-$ /., "-3.0*.3 5")*3$)*-$ %,6 $.+%),*.39-$ .0*.35")*%+ ,2.4H$.-%3-)3.93$ 1)&&!"%1.3*%-$/., "-3-$,)!#$.2.%0, /),-4), )+ ,93$ !3 3.2.%0, /),-.3.*.)8 1),, 1-%"#1$%02, ">3&%36 $.+%),93.%"#9Gn8n$.20%5 .6.2-%& *%$.1$%029n>001.00-$ /., "-3&3 08*$%0 n>&$ ."23.9)!5")*9S)."23)$.3$.2.$.,22.91. ")!/0 .3 -.05-)-$ &P>."23)8),-$4H%"8),&%"#/., "-3)8-$ %,1$%02>3&%36 $.+%),. "2.35%"# /., "-3-)$ 0/$ ,3)0+ -$ /,)60 &93$ 2 .03*%-$-$ /,)60 &)8.1$%0 2>3&%36 $.+%),4$%3 %"2%1.3-$.-..1$ ,/., "-, 0.-%)"3$%/1)"-,%6!3-)%&/,)+%"#.. 1$ ,1$%02, 0.-%)"3$%/4 $!39..1$ ,1$%02, 0.-%)"3$%/."2..1$ ,/., "-, 0.-%)"3$%/3 &)6 0 +."-%"-$ 3%-!.-%)"*$ "3$ -,% 3-)2 .0*%-$-$ /,)60 &)8.1$%02>3&%36 $.+%),6 & ."3)8.2.%0 /),-4

PAGE 157

@E n".22%-%)"93$ !3 3.2.%0, /),-.3.*.)8 "1)!,.#%"#1$%02, "")--)6 $.+ 6.209 3.%"#9Gn>003!/9S 9-$%3%3*$.-n>&H ), 7.&/0 92!,%"#*$)0 #,)!/-%& 93$ 8%"23-$.-)" 1$%022) 3")-8)00)*-$ 2%, 1 -%)"3 ."23.39G2.&9n>&*,%-%"#.")$)& -))!,&)&&."22.223.%"#-$.-)!>, ")-9!& B4C9)!>, $.+%"#.$.,2-%& 0%3"%"#."28)00)*%"#-$ 2%, 1-%)"34n2)">--$%"5-$. -)!>, #)"".6 -))$.//*%-$-$.-4Hn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rn nnrnn nnn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

PAGE 158

@ ."2&), )/ "*%-$1$%02, "4$.-%3-)3.9$ ,*.)8.1$%"#),%",.1-%"#* %-$1$%02, "$.3 1$."# 2/)3%-%+ 0)+ ,-%& 9."2-$%3%"2%1.3-$.-$ ,.1$%"# 7/ ,% "1 3-,)"#0%"80! "1 3 $)*."2*$$ ,*.)8*),5%"#*%-$1$%02, "$.31$."# 24 )* + ,93$ 3.3-$.--$ /,)#,.&2%2")-1$."# $ ,.1$%"#3-0 93 .%"#9Gn&.2 & B4C.0%--0 6%-3-,%1,)"&0 33)"/0."30%5 .1-!.00n$. 2-)*,%)!-*$.-n*.3 2)%"#8),B4C9* .22 29!&B4C90%5 35%0032 + 0)/& "-%3"R-3)& -$%"#* $.26 8), "2 ")** $.+ %"-$ )!$.+ 0%5 35%0032 + 0)/& "-9-$ *."-)!, .2%"# + 2. *$%1$%33)& -$%"#n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n"-$ 3%-!.-%)"*$ "-$ /,)#,.&$.3")-8!"2.& "-.001$."# 2$ *.)8 *),5%"#*%-$1$%02, "9$ ,.1$%"# 7/ ,% "1 ."2-$ /,)#,.&.33 )1%.0#))23., 0 +."-4

PAGE 159

@A 6rn rr rnnn"."3%-!.-%)"-$%"#3., 1)"" 12),2%31)"" 129, 0 +."--)),%,, 0 +."--) .1$)-$ ,9%" 1 ,-.%"*.34 D4 ($.-3),-3)81)"" 1-%)"3N0))5%"#6.15*.,2."2I),8),*.,2N., &.2 *%-$%"."2.1,)33!-,."1 3."20.,# 3-, -1$ 3)8-$ %",.1-%)"P 38),-/%1.0.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"32!,%"#& .0-%& 93$ 3.39G $ R39!&9 !"8),-!".0!3!.00")-.0)-)8-%& 8),%",.1-%)"-$.-n$.+ 8)!"296 1.!3 > 3)6!39 )"0$.+ .3 -.&)!"-)8-%& -$.-* >, .00)* 2%"-$ 4Hn"),2 ,)8 2 %#$"-) -* "-1$%02, "9.1$ ,3$.+ -)#%+ -$ &-$ %,/0.3."2&%0593 *$.--$ 2*$ "-$ 8%"%3$ .-%"#9$.+ -$ &/!-.*.-$ %,1$.%,39."210 ."-$ -.60 34$ 3/ "23-$ &.<),%-)8 -$ & .0-%& "1)!,.#%"#1$%02, "")--)-.059-)8%"%3$ .-%"#9."2-)-$,)*-,.3$.*. 4), 7.&/0 93$ 3.39G, )! .-%"#),-.05%"#Pn8)!2)">-$.+ .10 ,/0.%"8,)"-)8)!9)! ., ")--.05%"#4( >, .-%"#."20 .+%"#4($ ")!>, 2)" 9-$,)*%-)!-4n8-$ >3 /0 "-)" )!,/0.92)">-.35& 8),&), 4H$!393$ 3.3-$.-3$ $.30%--0 -%& -)% ",.1-*%-$ 1$%02, "2!,%"#& .0-%& 4$ 3 !-,."1 3., 1)"3%2 2.1$ ,3>2%, 1%+ 36 1.!3 .1$ ,3 21$%02, ")"0-)8)00)*-$ 2%, 1-%)"3,.-$ ,-$." 7/ 1-%"#."8 26.158 ,)&1$%02, "4 %"1 .1$ ,3."21$%02, "$.+ -)2)3)&!1$*),5*%-$%"., 3-,%12-%& 8,.& 9.1$ ,3 .00)*1$%02, ")"0-)!"2 ,3-."2*$.-.1$ ,3., 3.%"#."2-)2)*$.-.1$ ,3 7/ 1%&& 2%.04 n".22%-%)"9.&)"#*$)0 #,)!/98, /0.9."2& .0-%& 93$ 1)"3%2 ,38, /0 .-%& .3-$ 6 3--%& 8), 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"393.%"#9G $.->3*$.--$ 9)!5")*9 &), *$.--$ *."".2)."2-$ >, &), 0.7 29)!>, &), 0.7 2!3!.009!"0 33)!>, -,%"#-)2)3)& -$%"# 03 0%5 .".,-.1-%+%-),3)& -$%"#4H!,%"#8, /0.-%& 93$ .00)*3 1$%02, "-)2 1%2 8),-$ &3 0+ 3*$ -$ *."--)#)."2*$.--$ *."--)/0. *%-$4n"

PAGE 160

D )-$ ,*),2391$%02, "$.+ ")*),5-)2)*%-$%".0%&%2-%& 8,.& ."22)")-" 2-)8)00)*-$ 2%, 1-%)"34$ + #)-".-*)3-),$)!3 ")*P)!$.+ .-*)3-),$)!3 P .$4($ )!$.+ )" 80)),-)#)!/3-.%,3."2-$ %3.")-$ ,)" )"-$ -)/Pr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rnr r nnrnnrn5r+nnn"."3%-!.-%)"9)" ),&), 3%#"33&3."2+.,%)!3*.3)85")*%"#., )/ ,. -%+ 9),% "2 -)9."2+.0! 2),2%3+.0! 2%"1 ,-.%"*.34

PAGE 161

D E4 ($.-3%#"33&3., 0 +."-B),%,, 0 +."-C%"-$ 3%-!.-%)"B 4#493/ 1 $9*,%-%"#9 %&.# 3."2# 3-!, 3CP)*., -$ &.2 0 +."-B."2%,, 0 +."-C9."2%"* $.*.3P 38),-$ *.3.1$ ,31."/,)&)88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1 -%)"393$ 3.39 G.+ &), -%& 45%23-$.-., !/$ .002.0)"## -&), 8,)&& -$. "2)-$ 5%23)!$ 10)1593.%"#9G 1.!3 n$.+ 3)&!1$-) 2)."2-$%"#3-$.-" 2-)6 2)" 8,)&& .3..1$ ,9."23/, --6!34Hn".22%-%)"93$ 3.3-$.-3$ $.3")%2 .$)*)-$ ,.1$ 3.1$ 1$%02, "),%",.1-*%-$1$%02, "6 1.!3 3$ $.3")-%& -))63 ,+ )-$ ,.1$ ,34$ .--.1$ 3 .0)-)8%&/),-."1 -)-%& 9."2-%& 3-,)"#0.88 1-3$ ,*.)8.1$%" #."2%",.1-%"#*%-$ 1$%02, "4+ "-$)!#$3$ 2) 3")-2%, 1-0& "-%)"-$.--%& 1)"3-,.%"-3/, + "-$ ,8 ,)& 88 1-%+ 0%",.1-%"#*%-$1$%02, "9$ ,3/ 1$2 &)"3-,.3-$.-3$ %3 !"2 ,/, 33!, -)2)3) &."-$%"#3*%-$%".3$),--%& 8,.& 9."2-$%3&.5 3$ ,$.+ 8 *)//),-!"%% 3-) 88 1-%+ 0 %",.1-*%-$1$%02, "4 n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

PAGE 162

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n$.+ 1$%02*$)*."-3-) $%-1)"3-."-0."2n3%-2)*"*%-$$%&)" )")" ."2, 2%, 1-$%&9n>&3-%00%",. 1-%"#*%-$ $%&9 + "-$)!#$n>&, 2%, 1-%"#$%&4Hn83$ 3 3-$.--$ 1$%02$%-33)& 6)2 93$ "1)!,.# 3 $%&-)#)-).=!% -1)," ,."2, .2.6))5),-)2)*$.-$ *."-3403)93$ 003$%&-)$%-$%3 <.15 -),$%3/%00)*%"3.2)8$%--%"#3)& 6)2 03 4,)&$ ,/, +%)!3 7/ ,% "1 393$ 3.3 -$.--$%33-,.#-)2 .0*%-$-$ /,)60 &, .00*),534$%3%36 1. !3 3$ 3 31$%02, "")$%--%"#."&), 9")-# --%"#.##, 33%+ ."&), 9),")-# --%"#."#,." &), 4($ "1$%02, 2-)3&%36 $.+% ),93$ -.053)" )")" *%-$1$%02, "."2.1$ 3-$ &, / .20$)*-)1)"-,)0-$ %," #.-%+ 8 0%"#34 n"-$ 1.3 )8.1$%02*$).0*.32%3,!/-3-$ 10.33."2&)+ 3-).")-$ ,,))&93$ "1)!,.# 3-$ 1$%02-)/.,-%1%/.%"2%88 "-10.33,))&.1-%+%-% 393. %"#9G$90 -R32)-$%39), 0 -R32)-$%34H)* + ,9-$ 1$%023-%002%3/0.3$%36 $.+%),.0/,)60 &39 ."23$ $.3-,)!60 2 .0%"#*%-$-$ /,)60 &438),-$ .3)"-$.-3$ 2) 3")-$.+ .#))2, 0.-%)"3 $%/*%-$-$ 1$%0293$ 3.39G)& -%& 3)!33.2-)3.9 6!-8),

PAGE 163

D' -$%31$%029$%&."2n98),3)& .3)"936 $.+%),.0/,)60 &3!"-%03$ 1)"8%,&3-$.-1$%02, ">36.26 $.+%),3., 1),, 124n" )-$ ,*),239-$,)!#$, / .21)"+ ,3.-%)"3*%-$.1$ ,391$%02, "., .60 -)5")**$.-5%"23 )86 $.+%),.0/,)60 &3-$ $.+ .3* 00.3$)*."2*$-$ $.+ -)1),, 1 --$ %,6.2 6 $.+%),34$!39.3.*.)85")*%"#96)-$)" )")" %",.1-%)"."2, / -%-%)"., 0 +."-%" -$ 3%-!.-%)"*$ "3$ 2 .03*%-$1$%02, ">36 $.+%),.0/,)60 &3-$,)!#$, / .2%"3-,!1-%)"4 A4 ($.-0."#!.# 3%"-$ 3 "3 )8G".-%)".0H0."#!.# 30%5 "#0%3$9!33%."9),.!3.9., 0 +."-B),%,, 0 +."-C%"-$ 3%-!.-%)"P "#0%3$."2.00-$ )-$ ,0."#!.# 3., %,, 0 +."-%"-$ 3%-!.-%)"*$ "3$ %",.1-3*%-$ 1$%02, "*$)3/ .5"#0%3$.3.3 1)"20."#!.# %"$ ,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"10.33,))& 4$ 3.3 -$.--$ ., 3 + ,.01$%02, "*$)3/ .5"#0%3$.3.3 1)"20."#!.# %"$ /, 5%"2 ,#.," 10.33,))&96!--$ 3/ .5"#0%3$+ ,* 00."2$.+ ")-,)!60 !"2 ,3-."2%"#*$.-.1$ ,3., 3.%"#.3* 00.31)&&!"%1.-%"#*%-$.1$ ,34n")-$ ,*),239-$ 1$%02, "*$)3/ .5"#0%3$ .3.3 1)"20."#!.# %"$ ,10.33,))&., .60 -)80! "-0 7/, 33-$ %, -$)!#$-3."28 0%"#39 ."23$ %3.60 -) .3%08%#!, )!-*$.--$ %,, .1-%)"3-)$ ,*),23& ."4$!3 93$ 2) 3")1)"3%2 ,-$ 0."#!.# 6.,,% ,.3.6.,,% ,-) 88 1-%+ .1$ 1$%02%",.1-%)"34 n".22%-%)"93$ %3+ ,* 00.1=!.%"2*%-$$ ,1$%02, "."2*$.-8 26.158,)&$ 1$%02, ".6)!-$ ,*),23& ."34%"1 &)3-)8-$ 1$%02, "%"$ ,10.33,))&$.+ .-"2 2-$

PAGE 164

D? 31$))0)+ ,)" .,93$ $.3.0, .2)63 ,+ 2-$ &.<),%-)8$ ,1$%02, "."20 .," 2-$ %, 1$.,.1,%3-%13438),-$ .3)"-$.-.1$ ,3., .60 -) .3%08 %#!, )!.1$1$%02>3 1$.,.1,%3-%1393$ 3.39G)!1."00-$ &6, #)"".6 B @4C9-$ 2)">-$%2 ."-$%"#0%5 .2!0-32)B$.9$.C9%->3.00)!--$ 4H$.-%3-)3.9. 1$ ,3., .60 -) !"2 ,3-."2*$.-1$%02, "., -$%"5%"#."28 0%"#-$,)!#$-$ %,+ ,6.0."2")"+ ,6 .00."#!.# 6 1.!3 1$%02, 7/, 33-$ %,-$)!#$-3."28 0%"#3+ ,8,."504$!393$ % 3.60 -)!"2 ,3-."2 00*$.--$ .1-%)"3)8$ ,1$%02, "9%"10!2%"#1$%02, "*$)3/ .5"#0%3$.3.3 1)"2 0."#!.# 9& ."4n",&3)8$ ,2 8%"%-%)")8 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1 -%)"N1$%02, ">3 /)3%-%+ .1-%)"-)*$.-.1$ ,3., 3.%"#93$ %3.60 -) 88 1-%+ 0 %",.1-*%-$ + ,3%"#0 1$%02%"$ ,10.33,))&43., 3!0-9%"-$ 3%-!.-%)"*$ "3$ %",.1-3*%-$1$%02, "* $)3/ .5 "#0%3$.3.3 1)"20."#!.# %"$ ,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"10.33,))&9"#0%3$."2.00-$ )-$ 0."#!.# 3., %,, 0 +."-4

PAGE 165

D@ @ nnrrrnr $%3=!.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$/,)< 1-.%&3-)%"+ 3-%#.6.,,% ,3)."28.1%0%-.-),3)8 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"39.32 8%" 28,)&.1,%-%1.0/ ,3/ 1-%+ 9%" +)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.," /,)#,.&3%"1$%021., 3 --%"#34n"-$%31$./,n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n".22%-%)"9n*%00.22, 33$)*-$ 8%"2%"#3)8-$%33-!2., 1)"" 12* %-$-$ 3!0-3 )8/, +%)!3, 3 .,1$9."2&.5 3)& 1)&& "2.-%)"38),8!,-$ ,, 3 .,1$ 9*$%1$., %""2 2 -))+ ,1)& 3 + ,.00%&%-.-%)"3)8-$%33-!2.3* 00.3-)0 .28!,-$ ,, 3 .,1$-)8)1!3)" %&/,)+%"# 2!1.-%)".0/,.1-%1 4%".009n*%003$)*$)*-$ 8%"2%"#3)8-$%3 3-!21."6 &/0) 26%", 32/,.1-%-%)" ,39%"10!2%"#.1$ ,39/)0%1&. 5 ,39."2, 3 .,1$ ,34 !nnrrnn %,3-9-$ .1$ ,3>*),23-$.-., 8, =! "-0!3 2%"-$ 10.33,))&N%"10!2%"#.05 900 9 3 90 .," 9!"2 ,3-."2 9."25")* N$.+ &."2%88 "-3%-!.2& ."%"#34r)" -$ 0 339-$ 3 *),23., 1)&&)"0!3 28),-*)/!,/)3 3)" %3-)$.+ 1$%02, "2)*$.-.1$ ,3 7 / 1-L-$ )-$ ,%3-)#%+ 1$%02, ".1$."1 -)6 .*., )83)& -$%"#" *),.0, .25")* "4$.-%3-)3.9

PAGE 166

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n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

PAGE 167

DE 1)"3%2 2 33 "-%.08),3!11 338!031$))0, .2%" 3343., 3!0-9-$ -$, .1$ ,3" 21$%02, -)3!11 2%"5%"2 ,#.,"6$.+%"#.#))2+)1.6!0.,),!3%"#-$ %,)*"*),234 $ .1$ ,3> &/$.3%3)"1$%02, ">30%,.1, .2%" 33%33-,)"#0 0.2-)-$ 8.1--$.-$ ., 1)"1 ," 2.6)!--$ 31$))0>3.11)!"-.6%0%-4$ /,)#,.&-$. -%3.%&%"#.-, 3!0-3 6.3 2.11)!"-.6%0%-3, 3!0-36.3 2.11)!"-.6 %0%-&.5 3-$ -$, .1$ ,3#%+ /,%),%--)-$ 3-."2.,238),5%"2 ,#.,"4), 7.&/0 91 $%02, "/,.1-%1 *,%-%"# -$ %,".& 3%"./.,-%1!0.,*.-$.-%3!3 2%"5%"2 ,#.,"10.33,))&3),., .11!3-)& 2-). 5%"2 ,#.,"0%8 3-0 93!1$.3-,.+ 0%"#2%88 "-.1-%+%-,))&34$. +%"#1$%02, "-$%"5."2 6 $.+ .11),2%"#-)-$ ,!0 3."23-."2.,238),5%"2 ,#.,"9.1$ ,3 7/ 1 --$.-1$%02, "*%00 # -#))23-, 3!0-3%"5%"2 ,#.,"6 1.!3 1$%02, "., .0, .28.&% 0%.,*%-$."5%"2)83."2*$.-5%"2 ,#.,".1$ ,3 7/ 1-43., 3!0-9-$ -$, .1$ ,3&)3-0 %",.1-*%-$ 1$%02, "%"),2 ,-)$.+ 1$%02, "3!11 2%"5%"2 ,#.,"66 %"#.11!3-)& 2-)-$ ,!0 3."2 3-."2.,238),5%"2 ,#.,"-$,)!#$-$ %,2.%0,)!-%" %"-$ 10.33,))&4 1)"29-$ -$, .1$ ,3$.+ 2%88 "-%2 "-%-% 3.3./, 5%"2 ,#.,".1$ ,9 &/0) 9."21)00 .#! 43./, 5%"2 ,#.,".1$ ,9-$ ., /,)!2)8 /, /.,%"#1$%02, "8), 5%"2 ,#.,"."2)83 %"#1$%02, ".1=!%, -$ 1 33.,35%0038),5%"2 ,#.,"4)* + ,9.3." &/0) 9-$ 3$)*-$ %,0%&%2.6%0%-% 3-)2 1%2 -$ 1!,,%1!0!&)8-$ %, 10.33,))&."2-) 1$."# -$ %,.1$%"# "+%,)"& "-39%"10!2%"#-$ .1$ ,1$%02,.-%)."2%& 8,.& )8-$ /,)#,.&4%"1 -$ 1!,,%1!0!&)8-$ %,10.33,))&%36.3 2)"6)-$-$ 3-."2. ,23."2-$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!&-$.-$.32 + 0)/ 2)+ ,-$ .,39%-$.,20, 80 1-3-$ %, )*")/%"%)"3),

PAGE 168

D -$)!#$-34n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

PAGE 169

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n"/.,-%1!0.,93%"1 -$ .1$ ,3" 2-)# -1$%02, ", .2 8),5%"2 ,#.,"9-$ ., 3 ,%)!30*),,% 2-$.--$ 3 1$%02, "*%00")-3!11 2%"5%"2 ,#.,"6 1.! 3 )8-$ %, &%3!"2 ,3-."2%"#)8.1$ ,3>*),234%&%0.,09-$ .1$ ,3., 1)"1 ," 2 .6)!-1$%02, "*$) $.+ & "-.0),6 $.+%),.0/,)60 &393%"1 -$ $.+ 2%88%1!0-%",.1-%"# *%-$-$ 1$%02, "."2 /, /.,%"#-$ 1$%02, "8),5%"2 ,#.,"4 $ -$, .1$ ,3&.5 ." 88),--)$.+ )" )")" %",.1-%)"*%-$1$%02, "%"),2 ,-) 2 .0*%-$-$ 3%-!.-%)"*$ "-$ $.+ -,)!60 %",.1-%"#*%-$1$%02, "4 ".60%"#-$ .1$ ,3 -)8%#!, )!-."2, 3/)"2-) .1$1$%02>3" 239)" )")" %",.1-%)"*%-$1$%02, "$ 0 /3-$ & !"2 ,3-."2*$.-.1$%02%3-$%"5%"#."28 0%"#.3* 00.3*$.-5%"2)8/,)60 &-$ 1$%02$.34), 7.&/0 9*$ ".1$ ,3" 2-)5")*%8.1$%02!"2 ,3-."23-$ 2%, 1-%)"3),-)&.5 3!, -$.-. 1$%028)00)*3-$ 2%, 1-%)"39-$ .35-$ 1$%02.=! 3-%)".6)!--$ 2%, 1-%)"3. "2#%+ -$ 1$%02. 1$."1 -)."3* ,-$ =! 3-%)"4n".22%-%)"9*$ ".1$%022%3/0.3.6 $.+%),.0/,) 60 &0%5

PAGE 170

E $%--%"#3)& 6)2),# --%"#.##, 33%+ 8, =! "-09.1$ ,3-.05-)-$ 1 $%0290%3"-)-$ 1$%02>3 *),239/)%"-)!--$ 1$%02>3/,)60 &9."23!## 3-.")-$ ,.1-%+%-),, .2-$ 1$%0 2.6))54($ .1$%020))53!/3 -9.1$ ,31)& -)-$ 1$%029.35*$.-%3$.// "%"#-)-$ 1$%029."2$ 0 /-$ 1$%028%"2*.3-)3)0+ -$ /,)60 &4n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n"-$ %,10.33,))&3-*).1$ ,3. !3!.00, 3/)"3%60

PAGE 171

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n"1)"10!3%)"9-$ -$, .1$ ,31."")-$ 0/6!-$.+ 0%&%2)" )")" %",.1-%)"*%-$1$%02, "6 1.!3 -$ .1$ ,3-$ &3 0+ 31."")-&)2%8-$ 3 + ,.08.1-),3-$.-%&/ 2 )" )" )" %",.1-%)"*%-$ 1$%02, "9%"10!2%"#-$ -%& 8,.& )8-$ /,)#,.&.3* 00.3-$ 1$ ,1$%02,.-%)."2 10.333%: 3 -6-$ 3-."2.,234 rnnrrn 6nn( &n 'nr rnn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

PAGE 172

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

PAGE 173

E' 1$%02, "/..-"-%)"-)-$ %,*),23."20 .,"" *35%003),8.1-34 .1$ ,3. 03)" 21$%02, "-) 3%-."20%3",.-$ ,-$."3/ .59-)#%+ 7/ 12."3* ,3-).1$ ,3>=! 3-%)"39),-)3.-$ ,%#$-*),23-$.-.1$ ,3.0, .25")*4$!39.1$ ,3/, 8 ,8, /0.-%& ),& .0-%& -) *$)0 #,)!/-%& 93%"1 -$ ., .60 -)8 0&), 0.7 2."28, 0.05-)1$%02, ".6)!2%+ ,3 %33! 32!,%"#-$.--%& 4r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n"),2 ,-)&.5 3!, -$.-$ %,1$%02, "*%008., 00%"5%"2 ,#.,"9.1$ ,3%"+)0+ 1$%02, "%"-$ 3 10.33,))& .1-%+%-% 362 / "2%"#)"-$ /, /.15.# 21!,,%1!0.-$.-1)"-,)01$%02, ">32%88 "2 + 0)/& "-.02)&.%"39%"10!2%"#$ .0-$."23)1%.0I &)-%)".0I&)-),2 + 0)/& "-90 ."#!.# ."2 1)&&!"%1.-%)"9 & ,# "-0%,.1B, .2%"#, .2%" 33C91)#"%-%+ 2 + 0 )/& "-9."2# ,.0 5")*0 2# 4$!39-$ /, /.15.# 21!,,%1!0.-$.-3-,)"#0, 80 1--$ 3-."2.,238),5% "2 ,#.,"

PAGE 174

E? ., 1)"3%2 2.3-."2.,28),*$.-%3,%#$-."2*$.-%3#))2%"-$ /,)#,. &%"1$%021., 3 --%"#34$ /, /.15.# 21!,,%1!0..3.3-."2.,21)"-,)0-$ .1$ ,3 >.6%0%-% 3-)-$%"5."25")* ."2-$!3&.5 .1$ ,30)3 -$ %,1)"8%2 "1 %"-$ %,*.3)8-$%"5%"#."26 $.+%"# 43., 3!0)8-$%30.15)81)"8%2 "1 9.1$ ,3$.+ 8 *)//),-!"%-% 3-)1, .-$ %,)* "0 33)"/0."3."2 #)-%.-$ &*%-$1$%02, ".3* 00.3-$ %,/., "-39."2-$!396)-$.1$ ,3 ."21$%02, "$.+ 8 *)//),-!"%-% 3-)2 + 0)/-$ %,)*"1,%-%1.0-$%"5%"#."2/,)60 &3)0+%"#3 5%0034 nn( &n 'nr rnn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

PAGE 175

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n"/.,-%1!0.,9-$ .1$ ,3>.1$%"# 7/ ,% "1 3-,)"# 0%"80! "1 3-$ %,)*"*.3)8 .1$%"#."2%",.1-%"#*%-$1$%02, "4$ 8), 9 7/ ,% "1 2.1 $ ,3., 0%5 0-)$.+ &), 5")*0 2# .6)!-$)*-)%",.1-*%-$1$%02, "),., 0 330%5 0-)1$."# -$ %,+.0 3."2 %2 )0)#% 39*$%1$., 2 /0,))2%"-$ %,)*"/.37/ ,% "1 39."2-)0 ,"" *%2 .3.6)!.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"34-.05%"#-) .1$)-$ ,9.1$ ,3., .60 -) 80 1-)"-$ %,)*"*.3 )8%",.1-%"#*%-$1$%02, "."28%"2*.3-))+ ,1)& -$ %,* .5" 33 3."2, %"8),1 -$ %, 3-, "#-$34)* + ,9&.".1$ ,3$.+ ")-6 ".*., )8-$ %&/),-."1 )8-$ 0.-%)"3$%/3 .&)"#.1$ ,393%"1 -$ %,*),5%"# "+%,)"& "-3$.+ /,)+%2 2-$ &*%-$8 *)//), -!"%-% 3-) 1)&&!"%1.*%-$)-$ ,.1$ ,34), 7.&/0 9-$ .1$ ,3>2%88 "31$ 2!0 3/, + "-.1$ ,3 8,)&3 %"# .1$)-$ ,.--$ 3.& /0.1 .--$ 3.& -%& 9),-$ .1$ 3>*),5/0.1 32)")/,)+%2 .1$ ,3*%-$./0.1 -)& -."22%31!333)& -$%"#4n"/.,-%1!0., 9-$ $ 1-%131$ 2!0 3 )8-$ /,)#,.&$.+ 8!,-$ ,%"1, .3 2-$%33%-!.-%)"."2&.5 .1$ 3$.+ 8 )//),-!"%-% 3-)-.05-) .1$)-$ ,-$."%"-$ /.3-4$!39.1$ ,3" 2-).1-%+ 0 -.5 ." )//),-!"%--)1)&&!"%1.*%-$)-$ ,.1$ ,3."2%&/,)+ -$ %,, 0.-%)"3$%/ 3*%-$)-$

PAGE 176

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n", .0%-9. 1$ ,3%"-$ /,)#,.& $.+ 2%88%1!0-%"1)&&!"%1.-%"#*%-$1$%02, "*$)3/ .5"#0%3$.3.3 1)"20 ."#!.# ."2%" 88 1-%+ 0%",.1-%"#*%-$-$ &48,-$ 1$%02, "/%15!/"#0% 3$."2!"2 ,3-."2*$..1$ ,3., 3.%"#9.1$ ,33-%00$.+ 2%88%1!0-%" 88 1-%+ 0% ",.1-%"#*%-$-$ 1$%02, 6 1.!3 )8-$ %,/., "-3>0%&%2"#0%3$/,)8%1% "14$ %,/ ., "-3$.+ -,)!60 1)&/0 0 !"2 ,3-."2%"#-$ 1)""-)8-$ /,)#,.&."23!11 338!002%31!33%"# -$ 1$%02, ">3 %"2%+%2!.0" 23*%-$.1$ ,34 .1$ ,31!,, "-0%",.1-*%-$1$%02, "8 ,)&&!1$&), 2%+ ,3 -$"%19,.1%.091!0-!,.09."23)1%) 1)")&%16.15#,)!"23-$."%"-$ /.3-9. "2-$ 3 1$%02, "1)& -)31$))0*%-$&!1$2%88 "-0 .,"%"# 7/ ,% "1 3."2+.,% 22 + 0)/& "-.0 23BO%&%0 39C4$ 8), 9-$ .1$ ,3>&%3!"2 ,3-."2%"#)81$%02, ">32% + ,3 1!0-!,.0 ."23)1%) 1)")&%16.15#,)!"23/, + "-3.1$ ,38,)&6 %"#.*., )81$%0 2, ">3%"2%+%2!.0 23."21),, 1-0%",/, -%"# .1$1$%02>3-$)!#$-3."28 0%"#34$,)!#$." !"2 ,3-."2%"#)8 5")*0 2# 9%2 "-%-9."21!0-!, %"1$%02, ">3)*"0%+ 39.1$ ,3., .60 -)$ 0/ 1$%02, "-)

PAGE 177

EE 1)"3-,!1-."2.,-%1!0.-$ %,)*"5")*0 2# .3* 00.3-).##, 33%+ 03)0+ -$ %,)*"/,)60 &3 .3.1-%+ 3!6< 1-34!nn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n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

PAGE 178

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rr rn+n&n# nn %",/, -.-%)"3)8-$ 8%"2%"#3., 1)"" 12*%-$-$ 3!0-3)83 + ,. 0/, +%)!3 3-!2% 3, +% 2%"$./,4$.-%3-)3.9&%",/, -.-%)"3)8-$ 8%"2%"#3)8 -$%33-!2., 6.3 2)"-$ 0 33)"30 .," 2%"."!&6 ,)8/, +%)!393%&%0.,3-!2% 39."2-$ $/)-$ 3 3%"-$%3

PAGE 179

EA 3-!2., 3!//),26-$ 8%"2%"#3)8-$%33-!24--$ 3.& -%& 9&8% "2%"#3$.+ ./)3%-%+ 88 1-)"&%",/, -.-%)"3)8/, +%)!3, 3 .,1$6/,)+%2%"#.* .0-$)831% "-%8%1 +%2 "1 -$.3!//),-3.3* 00.3 7/."23-$ 3!0-3)8/, +%)!3, 3 .,1$4n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n"/.,-%1!0.,9-$%38.1-%3 )63 ,+ 2%"-$ -$, .1$ ,3>

PAGE 180

10.33,))&3, #.,20 33)8-%& ."2/0.1 93%"1 -$ &.%".1-%+%-)8-$ -$, .1$ ,3%3-)# 1$%02, ", .28),5%"2 ,#.,"6&.5%"#-$ &!"2 ,3-."2*$.--$ 2-)5")*)#)-) 5%"2 ,#.,"403)9%15%"3)">3B6C3-!2 ".60 3& -)8%#!, )!-*$.-5%"23)8*),23 -$ -$, .1$ ,38, =! "-0!3 %"-$ 10.33,))&."2*$-$ -$, .1$ 38, =! "-0!3 1 ,-.%" *),239%"10!2%"#-.05 900 93 90 .," 9!"2 ,3-."2 9."25")* 4n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

PAGE 181

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

PAGE 182

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

PAGE 183

' 1!,,%1!0.9."2-$ 3 0%&%--$ %,.6%0%-% 3-)1$."# 2!1.-%)".0, 0.-%)"3), 3-."2.,234$ .1$ ,3>0%&%2.6%0%-% 3/, + "--$ &8,)&3//%"#6.158,)&-$ % ,10.33,))&/,.1-%1 3."2 1)"3%2 ,%"#6,).2 2!1.-%)".01)"1 ,"3), &/0)%"#.&), $)0%3-%1+% )8.1$%"#4n"-$ 3.& *.9-$ -$, .1$ ,3!3 -$ /, /.15.# 21!,,%1!0.6.3 2)"6)-$$ #!%2 0%" 38),-$ /,)#,.&."2-$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!&-$.-$.32 + 0)/ 2)+ ,-$ .,39."2., 8),1 2-) %"1, .3 1$%02, ">30%,.1, .2%" 33-$,)!#$1)"-%"!)!3.33 33& "-3 )81$%02, ">3.6%0%-% 34$ /, /.15.# 21!,,%1!0..3.3-."2.,21)"-,)0-$ .1$ ,3>.6%0%-% 3-)-$%"5."25")*."2-$!3 &.5 .1$ ,30)3 -$ %,1)"8%2 "1 %"-$ %,*.3)8-$%"5%"#."26 $.+%"#4$%3 8%"2%"#%3 1)"3%3"-*%-$-$ 3!0-3)8%-0%">3BC3-!2)"$)*.1$ ,3., /)* ,0 33.#.%"3--$ 2)&%"."-%2 )0)#%"10.33,))&34$ 8), 9%-0%">3BC3-!21)"-,%6!3 -)& %",/, -.-%)")8-$ /, /.15.# 21!,,%1!0.%"-$ /,)#,.&."2$ 0/3& .0%: $)*-$%3 0.15)81)"8%2 "1 $.3." 88 1-)".1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"4--$ 3.& -%& 9-$ 8%"2%"#3)8 -$%33-!2.22.2 -.%0 22 31,%/-%)")8-$ /, /.15.# 21!,,%1!0.%"-$ /,)#,.&-)%-0%">3 BC3-!24 rnnrn nn $ 8%"2%"#3)8-$%33-!2., + ,!3 8!08),.1$ ,3%"3-.8!"2 2/, 5% "2 ,#.," /,)#,.&3-)%",.1-&), 88 1-%+ 0*%-$1$%02, "4$ 8%"2%"#3)8-$%33-!2 3$)*-$ ".-!, )8 .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3, 3!0-%"#8,)&-$ 1$.,.1,%3-%13)8-$ /,)#,.&%"1$%021., 3 --%"#398), 7.&/0 9$)*.1$ ,3%",.1-*%-$1$%02, "*%-$%"-$ %& 8,.& )8-$ /,)#,.&9$)*-$ 1!,,%1!0!&)8 .1$10.33,))&6.3 2)"-$ #!%2 0%" 38),$ /,)#,.&%"80! "1 3.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"39."2$)*-$ .1$ ,1$%02,. -%)."210.333%: 3 6-$ 3-."2.,23.88 1-.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"34!1$%"8),&.-%)"1. "6 !3 26.1$ ,3 %")-$ ,3-.8!"2 2/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&39%"10!2%"#)-$ ,10.3 3,))&39 + "-$)!#$ -$ 0 + 03)83!//),-3 ,+%1 3)83-.8!"2 2/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.& 3.3* 00.3.1$

PAGE 184

? =!.0%8%1.-%)"3., + ,2%88 "-.11),2%"#-)*$ -$ 10.33,))&$.// "3 -)6 0)1.24 .1$ ,3., .60 -), 80 1-)"-$ %,)*"*.3)8%",.1-%"#*%-$1$%02, "%"-$ %,3-.8!"2 2 /, 5%"2 ,#.,"10.33,))&3.3* 00.3-$ 88 1-3)83-.8!"2 2/ 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3)" -$ %,%",.1-%)"3*%-$1$%02, "4$!3968%#!,%"#)!--$ ".-!, ."2=!.0%)8-$ %,)*" %",.1-%)"3*%-$1$%02, "9.1$ ,3%"3-.8!"2 2/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/, )#,.&3., .60 -)8%"2 *.3-) 88 1-%+ 0%",.1-*%-$1$%02, "4 n"/.,-%1!0.,9-$ 8%"2%"#3)8-$%33-!2., $ 0/8!08),.00.1$ ,3-) 6 .*., )8-$ %&/),-."1 )8-$ 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3-$.&/)* 6)-$.1$ ,3."21$%02, "4 $ 8%"2%"#3)8-$%33-!210.,%8-$, 6.,,% ,3-) 88 1-%+ .1 $ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"39.32 8%" 2 8,)&.1,%-%1.0/ ,3/ 1-%+ 9%"+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,. &3%"1$%021., 3 --%"#36 3$)*%"#-$ 1.!3 3."2/,)60 &3)8-$ !"%0.,.0.1$ ,1$%02%",.1 -%)"3.3* 00.3-$ 88 1-3 )8-$ 6.,,% ,3)"6)-$.1$ ,3>."21$%02, ">31,%-%1.0-$%"5%"#."2/,)60 &3)0+%"#35%003403)9 -$ 8%"2%"#3)8-$%33-!23/ 1%8%1.003!## 3--$, 8.1%0%-.-),3)8 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02 %",.1-%)"36 7/0.%"%"#*$.--$ ,.-%)".0 )8-$ 8.1%0%-.-),3, 3!0-38,)&."2$)*.1$ ,31." /,)&)88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3%"., .03%-!.-%)"4$ 6. ,,% ,3-)."28.1%0%-.-),3)8 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3., .//0% 2-)+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 #.,"/,)#,.&3%"1$%02 1., 3 --%"#34r + ,-$ 0 339.1$ ,3%" + ,10.33,))&., .60 -)!3 3!1$%"8),&.-%)".6)!-$ 6.,,% ,3."28.1%0%-.-),393%"1 &)3-)8-$ 1)"+ ,3.-%)"36 -* ".1$ ,3."21$%02, "%" 10.33,))&3., 1$.,.1,%: 2.3!"%0.,.0."2, 80 1-.1$ ,.!-$),% -)+ ,1$%02, "4!1$ %"8),&.-%)"#%+ 3.1$ ,3.1$."1 -)6 .*., )8-$ !"%0.,.0.1$ 1$%02%",.1-%)"3."2-) )+ ,1)& -$ ")-%)"-$.--$ ., %"1./.60 )81$."#%"#-$ 3-.-!3=!)4$ 8), 963 .,1$%"# 8),3/ 1%8%13-,.#% 3-)2 + 0)/ 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",. 1-%)"3*%-$%"-$ %,)*"!"%=!

PAGE 185

@ 3%-!.-%)"39.00.1$ ,3., .60 -)6 .*., )8-$ %&/),-."1 )8-$ 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02 %",.1-%)"3-$.&/)* ,6)-$.1$ ,3."21$%02, "4 ), )+ ,9-$ 8%"2%"#3)8-$%33-!2., + ,!3 8!08),/)0%1&.5 ,3-)%&/,)+ -$ =!.0%-)8+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&34%"1 -$ %30%--0 3 .,1$)"-$ ".-!, ."2 =!.0%-)8.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3%"+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,. &39/)0%1&.5 ,32) ")-$.+ 3/ 1%8%1%"8),&.-%)".6)!-$)*+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3 %"80! "1 .1$ 1$%02%",.1-%)"34), 7.&/0 9.32 31,%6 2%"$./,?9.1$ ,3., 1)& /0.%"%"#-$.--$ .1$ ,1$%02,.-%)3 -6-$ 3-."2.,23%3.0%--0 6%-$%#$."22) 3 ")-, 80 1-2%88 "10.33,))&3%-!.-%)"34n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

PAGE 186

D /)3-&)2 ,"%3&4%"1 -$%33-!22 31,%6 3.1$ ,3>6 $.+%),."23/ 1$-$, )!#$-$ %,.1-!.0 *),239, 3 .,1$ ,3., .60 -) .3%0%&.#%" $)*.1$ ,3%",.1 -*%-$1$%02, "%".".-!,.0 10.33,))&3 --%"#4n"/.,-%1!0.,9-$ -$ ), -%1.0),% "-.-%)")8/)3-&)2 "%3& ".60 3-$%33-!2 -) 7/0.%"$)*.1$ ,3>/)* ,)+ ,1$%02, "%3 7 ,1%3 22%88 "-0*% -$%".3/ 1%8%110.33,))& 3 --%"#4$.-%3-)3.9-$%33-!22 31,%6 3$)*-$ ),#."%:.-%)"."2&.".# & "-)82. %0 ,)!-%" 3., %&/0 & "22%88 "-06 .1$.1$ ,>3."231$))0>31 $.,.1,%3-%13.3* 00.3 $)*.1$ ,3%",.1-*%-$1$%02, "2%88 "-0*%-$%"-$ 3 2%88 "-10 .33,))&3 --%"#34n" .22%-%)"9-$%33-!2%2 "-%8% 3."210.33%8% 3.1$ ,3>6 $.+%),."23/ 1$6& ."3)81)"3%3"-$ ), -%1.0),% "-.-%)"1,%-%1.0-$ ),."2/)3-&)2 ,"%3&400)8-$ 1$ ,3>6 $.+%),."2 3/ 1$., %2 "-%8% 2."210.33%8% 26.3 2)"-$ ")-%)"-$.-.1$ ,3.3 -$ )//, 33),38),1 1$%02, "-)0 .,"-$ 2)&%"."-1!0-!, ."2%2 )0)#-$,)!#$-$ %",.1-%)"3*%-$ 1$%02, "9."2 .1$ ,3.3-$ )//, 33 2., 8),1 2-)1)"-,%6!-)&.%"-.%"%"#-$ 3)1% .0%" =!.0%-% 3*%-$%"-$ $% ,.,1$%1.03-,!1-!, )831$))034$!396!3%"#-$ -$ ), -%1.0),% "-.-%)" )81,%-%1.0-$ ),."2 /)3-&)2 ,"%3&9, 3 .,1$ ,3., .60 -)2 + 0)/-$ %,31$)0.,0!"2 ,3-. "2%"#)8-$ ".-!, )8 .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3%"+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3%"1$%0 21., 3 --%"#34 # rrnnn# nnn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

PAGE 187

E %,3-)8.009-$%3=!.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$/,)< 1-)88 ,3/.,-%.0 +% 2 "1 )"%",".0+.0%2%2 3/%%-33 + ,.03-,.#% 3-) "$."1 %",".0+.0%2%-9%"10!2%"#G& &6 ,1$ 1539H*$%1$ 8 ,3-)-.5%"#2.-.."2"-.-%+ %",/, -.-%)"36.15-)-$ / )/0 8 ,)&*$)&-$ ., 2 ,%+ 2 ."2.35%"#-$ &*$ -$ ,),")--$ %",/, -.-%)"3., /0.!3%60 B ,,%.&9AA9 /4?C4 r + ,-$ 0 339-$%3, 3 .,1$/,)< 1-/,)+%2 3%"3!88%1% "+%2 "1 )"-$ +. 0%2%-)8-$ 8%"2%"#39 3%"1 -$ 2.-.* 1)00 12)+ ,.3$),-/ ,%)2)8-%& 4n".22%-%)"93%"1 -$%3, 3 .,1$/,)< 1*.31)"2!12)+ ,.3$),-/ ,%)2)8-%& 9n2%2")-$.+ 3!88%1% "--%& -) 3-. 60%3$.10)3 ,.//),-*%-$-$ /.,-%1%/."-34$%3%"2%1.3-$.-6)-$n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n8)1!3 2)"-$ /.,-%1!0.,,.-$ ,-$."-$ # ,. 0."2-$!33 0 12-$, /.,-%1%/."-3!3%"#-$ /.,-%1!0.,1,%,%.-$.-1)!023 ,+ -$ /!,/ )3 )8-$%33-!243., 3!0-9-$ 3%-!.-%)"3)8-$%33-!2., ")--/%1.09."2-$ 8%"2%"#3)8-$%33-!21."")-6 .2%0.//0% 2-) )-$ ,3%-!.-%)"34$ 8), 9.")-$ ,, 1)&& "2.-%)"8),8!,-$ ,, 3 .,1$%3 -)%"+ 3-%#.-$

PAGE 188

".-!, )8.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3%"+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3 %"3 --%"#3)-$ ,-$." 1$%021., 3 --%"#348)1!3%"#)"*$ +)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#, .&3-.5 /0.1 9 8!,-$ ,, 3 .,1$)"-$ ".-!, )8.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3%"+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.," /,)#,.&3%"3 --%"#3)-$ ,-$."1$%021., 3 --%"#3*)!02)88 ,&), ."22 / ,%"8),&.-%)" .6)!--$ ".-!, )8.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3%"+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3403)93!1$ 3 .,1$*)!02%"10!2 2%88 "-*.3)8 &/)* ,%"#6)-$.1$ ,3."21$%0 2, "-$,)!#$ 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"39.32 8%" 28,)&.1,%-%1.0/ 3/ 1-%+ 4$%3%36 1.!3 3!1$ 3 .,1$ ".60 3.1$ ,3-)8%#!, )!--$ %,)*".3* 00.3-$ %,*),5/0 .1 3>3-, "#-$3."2 .5" 33 3."2-)&), 3!11 338!008%"2*.3-)8.1%0%-.88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3%" -$ %,10.33,))&343., 3!0-9.1$ ,3., .60 -)$.+ &), 1)"8%2 "1 -$.--$ ., 1./.60 )8 1$."#%"#-$ 3-.-!3=!)4 n"8.1-9-$ ")-%)"-$.-.1$ ,3., .60 -)8.1%0%-.88 1-%+ 1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"39 .32 8%" 28,)&.1,%-%1.0/ ,3/ 1-%+ 92) 3")-2%, 1-0%"2%1.-$.-$ ., .60 -))+ ,1)& 3 + ,.06.,,% ,3-) 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"34)* + ,9-$ /,)1 33)83 .,1$%"#8),."2 !3%"#2%88 "-3-,.#% 3-)8.1%0%-.88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02% ",.1-%)"32%, 1-01)"-,%6!3-) -$ &/)* ,& "-)8.1$ ,3."21$%02, "9."2-$%3 &/)* ,& "-0 .23.1$ ,3)8%"2*.3-) )+ ,1)& 3 + ,.06.,,% ,3-) 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"34 $%3%36 1.!3 -$%3/,)1 33%3 6.3 2)"-$ .1$ ,3>.*., 33)8-$ 1.!3 3."2/,)60 &3)8-$ !"%0., .0.1$ ,1$%02 %",.1-%)"3%"-$ %,10.33,))&3L-$.-%39-$%3/,)1 331)& 38,)&-$ .1 $ ,3>.*., 33)8-$ 8.1--$.-.1$ ,.!-$),%-)+ ,1$%02, "/, + "-36)-$.1$ ,3."21$%02, "8,)&1,%-%1.00 -$%"5%"#."2%"2 / "2 "-03)0+%"#/,)60 &34.15")*0 2#%"#-$ %&/),-."1 )8 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"N-$ /,)1 33-$.-0 .236)-$.1$ ,3."21$%02, "-)3)0+ -$ %,)*" /,)60 &3-$,)!#$1,%-%1.0-$%"5%"#9.1$ ,3., .60 -)1$."# -$ %,/ +%)!3!"2 ,3-."2%"#)8

PAGE 189

A 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"403)9.1$ ,3., .60 -)" #)-%. -$ %,0 33)"/0."3), 0 .,"%"#& -$)23*%-$-$ %,1$%02, ".3* 00.3-)6 #%"*%-$1$%02, ">3*) ,23),!"2 ,3-."2%"#34 .1$ ,3., .60 -)-.5 .1-%)"-)1$."# -$ %,*),5%"# "+%,)"& "-3."21)"8% 2 "-0+)%1 -$ %,)/%"%)"3.6)!--$ 31$))01!,,%1!0!&4$!39%-%3%&/),-."-8),.1$ ,3-)8%"2* .3-) 8.1%0%-.88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"39.32 8%" 28,)&.1 ,%-%1.0/ ,3/ 1-%+ 9%"-$ %, 10.33,))&368%#!,%"#)!--$ %,)*".3* 00.3-$ %,*),5/0.1 3>3 -, "#-$3."2* .5" 33 34n-%3 .03)%&/),-."-8),8!,-$ ,, 3 .,1$-)%"10!2 2%88 "-*.3)8 &/)* ,%" #6)-$.1$ ,3."2 1$%02, "-$,)!#$ 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"34 3., 3!0-9-$%3=!.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$/,)< 1-3$)*3$)* 2!1.-%)".0, 3 ., 1$1."%&/,)+ 2!1.-%)".0/,.1-%1 -$,)!#$1,%-%1.0."233&.-%1%"=!%,.3* 0 0.32 -.%0 22 31,%/-%)"3)8 *$.-%3, .00$.// "%"#4.3 2)"-$ -$ ), -%1.0),% "-.-%)")81,%-%1.0$ ),."2 /)3-&)2 ,"%3&9-$%33-!22 8%" 3G 88 1-%+ H.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-% )".3-$ /,)1 33-$.-0 .23 6)-$.1$ ,3."21$%02, "-)3)0+ -$ %,)*"/,)60 &3-$,)!#$1,%-%1.0-$%"5%"#4 $,)!#$ 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"396)-$.1$ ,3."21$%02, "., .60 -)2 + 0)/-$ %,)*" 1,%-%1.0-$%"5%"#."2/,)60 &3)0+%"#35%003-$.-., 2 28),-$ &-) + "-!.00-.5 -$ %, /0.1 3%"./.,-%1%/.-),92 &)1,.-%13)1% -4n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

PAGE 190

A 1$%02%",.1-%)"3*%-$)-$ ,.1$ ,34n".22%-%)"96# --%"#%"8),&.-%)". 6)!-6.,,% ,3-)."2 8.1%0%-.-),3)8 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3%"+)0!"-.,/, 5% "2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3%"1$%02 1., 3 --%"#39%", 32/,.1-%-%)" ,3., .60 -)8%#!, )!--$ ".-!, )8.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3 %"+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3."28%"2*.3-)%&/,)+ -$ =!.0%)8+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&34 n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

PAGE 191

A rnF nrnnrrrr rn'rr n n n1 .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3%"+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3%"1 $%021., 3 --%"#31,%-%1.0.".03%3)86.,,% ,3."28.1%0%-.-),3nnnn rrn rn nnn nn nrnn8nn nnn n1n $ /!,/)3 )8-$ 3-!2%3-)%"+ 3-%#.6.,,% ,3-)."2 8.1%0%-.-),3)8 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3%"+)0!"-.,/, 5% "2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&3%"1$%02 1., 3 --%"#349nn+nn5nnnrnn1n )/.,-%1%/.%"-*))" $)!,8),&.0%",+% *3 ."2-$, &%"!%"8),&.0%",+% *3.8, .1$10.33,))&)63 ,+.-% )"9.3* 00.3-)/ ,&%-$, )63 ,+.-%)"3)8)!,10.33,))&2!,%"#*$)0 #,)!/98, /0.9."2& 0-%& 4(%-$)!, / ,&%33%)"9%",+% *3*%006 .!2%), 1),2 29."2)!*%00* .,., &)&%1,)/$)" 2!,%"# -$ -$, )63 ,+.-%)"34#5nrn6r1n $ %3")2%, 1-6 8%--)-$ /.,-%1%/."-%"-$%33-!24)* + ,9)! ., 0%5 0-)#.%"%"3%#$-%"-)-$ 8.1-),3-$.-%&/ 2 ."2/,)&)%",.1-% )"3*%-$1$%02, "4 %"%&.0,%353-))!., /)"-%.00."-%1%/.298), 7.&/0 98.%#! 3!0-%"#8,)&-*))" $)!,%",+% *3),8 0%"#" ,+)!3.6)!-6 %"#)63 ,+ 24'rr1n )!,%2 "-%-*%006 5 /-1)"8%2 "-%.0-)-$ 7"-/,)+%2 260.*4 n",+% *3*%006 .!2%)-./ 1),2 28),-$ /!,/)3 )8-,."31,%/-%)"4 $ .!2%)-./ 3*%006 .11 33%60 )"0-)& 8),+ ,%8%1.-%)"/!,/)3 34($ "-$ 3-!2%31)&/0 2."2-$ 2.-.$.+ 6 ".".0: 29-$ .!2%)-./ 3*%006 2 3-,) 24n".22%-%)"9-$ )63 ,+.%)"2.-.*%006 .!2%) -./ 1),2 2."2-,."31,%6 29."2-$ 2.-.*%00")-%"10!2 1$%02, ">3".& 3."2 )!,".& 4 3!0-3*%006 /),2%"&2%33 ,-.-%)"9."2&.6 /, 3 "2-) 2!1 .-%)"<)!,".03."2 &.#.:%" 38),/)33%60 /!60%1.-%)"4)!,".& .3* 00.31$%02, ">3".& 3*%00")-6 !3 2%" .", /),-4rn r )!,/.,-%1%/.-%)"%"-$%33-!2%31)&/0 0+)0!"-.,4)!$.+ -$ ,%#$--)*%-$2,.*8,)&-$ 3-!2.-."-%& *%-$)!-1)"3 =! "1 4$ %3")1 )&/ "3.-%)"-) )!8),/.,-%1%/.-%"#%"-$ 3-!249nn r nnn&n:rnnn1n n8)!$.+ ."=! 3-%)"3.6)!--$ 3-!29n),&8.1!0-3!/ ,+%3),9,4,%3"4 &/0 9*%006 $.//-) ."3* ,-$ &4 !"#$ %&9$44-!2 "-91$))0)8 .1$%"#M .,"%"#9'@E4(4+ "! 9T'9.%" 3+%00 9'DE9 B'@C'E'A@9 3 !$5%&U!804 2!

PAGE 192

A ,%3"4 &/0 9$4491$))0)8 .1$%"#M .,"%"#9))&Er),&.".009"%+ ,3%-)80),%2.9.%" 3+%00 9'D9B'@C'AAA 7"3%)"@9 55 &/0 U1) 4!804 2! 9nn r nnnnnn n rnrnn1nnn88%1 9)7@9"%+ ,3%-)80),%2.9.%" 3+%00 9'D@L/$'A?''/r1n n$.+ .2-$ /,)1 2!, 2 31,%6 2.6)+ 4n+)0!"-.,%0.#, -)/.,-%1% /.%"-$ /,)1 2!, ."2n$.+ 1 %+ 2.1)/)8-$%32 31,%/-%)"4 .,-%1%/."->3%#".-!, ."2.,%"1%/.0n"+ 3-%#.-),>3%#".-!, ."2.

PAGE 193

A' rnF nrn( r&+n"nnnnnr&+n n*."--)-.05-))!.6)!-6.,,% ,3-)."28.1%0%-.-),3)8 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02 %",.1-%)"3%")!,10.33,))&4( 5")*-$.-.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3., %&/),-."-96!-* .03)5")*-$.88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"32)")-$.// "+ ,)8" 2! -).+.,% -)8 8.1-),34n*."--)!"2 ,3-."2*$."2*$.-1."6 2)" -)%&/,)+ .1$ ,1$%02% ",.1-%)"34 n*)!020%5 -).35)!.8 *=! 3-%)"34 )!02)!2 31,%6 .-/%1.0.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"2!,%"#*$)0 #,)!/-% & %" )!,10.33,))&P 4 )!02)!2 31,%6 .-/%1.0.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"2!,%"#8, /0.%& %")!, 10.33,))&P '4 )!02)!2 31,%6 .-/%1.0.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"2!,%"#& .0-%& %" )!, 10.33,))&P ?4 )*2))!5")*%8."%",.1-%)"$.36 88 1-%+ P @4 00& .6)!-." 7.&/0 )8."%",.1-%)")!$.+ $.2*%-$.1$%02-$.-)!*)!021)"3%2 88 1-%+ 4 D4 00& .6)!-." 7.&/0 )8."%",.1-%)")!$.+ $.2*%-$.1$%02-$.-)!*)!021)"3%2 ,%" 88 1-%+ 4($2))!1)"3%2 ,%-%" 88 1-%+ P E4 ($.-., 3)& 6.,,% ,3-) 88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3P 4 ($.-1)"2%-%)"3$ 0/)!$.+ &), 88 1-%+ %",.1-%)"3*%-$1$%02, "P A4 ($.-2).1$ ,3" 2-)5")*.6)!-.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3P 4 n3-$ ."-$%"#)!*)!020%5 -).22P))!$.+ ."8!,-$ ,1)&& "-3),=! 3-%)"3P r&+n"nnnnrnr&+n n*)!020%5 -).35)!.6)!-.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"32!,%"#*$)0 #,)!/-%& 4 n")-%1 2-$.-)!V 44B." 7.&/0 )8.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3C4(.3-$%3.-/%1.0 5%"2)8%",.1-%)"8),*$)0 #,)!/-%& P

PAGE 194

A? 4 )* 88 1-%+ *.3-$ %",.1-%)"P '4 ($.-&.2 -$ %",.1-%)" 88 1-%+ P ?4 ( -$ 8.1-),3-$.-1)"3-,.%" 2-$ %",.1-%)"Pn83)9*$.-* -$ P r&+n"nnn! rnrnr&+n n*)!020%5 -).35)!.6)!-.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"32!,%"#8, /0.-%& 4 n")-%1 2-$.-)!V 44B." 7.&/0 )8.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3C4(.3-$%3.-/%1.0 5%"2)8%",.1-%)"8),8, /0.-%& P 4 )* 88 1-%+ *.3-$ %",.1-%)"P '4 ($.-&.2 -$ %",.1-%)" 88 1-%+ P ?4 ( -$ 8.1-),3-$.-1)"3-,.%" 2-$ %",.1-%)"Pn83)9*$.-* -$ P r&+n"nnnnrnr&+n n*)!020%5 -).35)!.6)!-.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"32!,%"#& .0-%& 4 n")-%1 2-$.-)!V 44B." 7.&/0 )8.1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3C4(.3-$%3.-/%1.0 5%"2)8%",.1-%)"8),& .0-%& P 4 )* 88 1-%+ *.3-$ %",.1-%)"P '4 ($.-&.2 -$ %",.1-%)" 88 1-%+ P ?4 ( -$ 8.1-),3-$.-1)"3-,.%" 2-$ %",.1-%)"Pn83)9*$.-* -$ P r&+n"nnn! rnnr&+n n*."--)-.05-))!.6)!--$ 8.1-),3-$.-/,)&)88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$% 02%",.1-%)"3%" )!,10.33,))&.3* 00.3$)*-))+ ,1)& 3)& 6.,,% ,3-) 88 1-%+ 1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3 )!1)"8,)"-%")!,10.33,))&4 4 )!$.+ BC .,3)8.1$%"# 7/ ,% "1 4.+ )!1$."# 2-$ *. )!%",.1*%-$1$%02, ")+ ,-%& Pn83)9$)*$.+ )!1$."# 2-$ *.)!%",.1-*%-$1$%02, "P($$.+ )!1$."# 2-$ *.)!%",.1-*%-$1$%02, "P 4 ($.-2))!-$%"5., -$ *.3.1$ ,31."/,)&)88 1-%+ .1$ ,1$ %02 %",.1-%)"3%"-$ %,10.33,))&3P '4 ($.-2))! 7/ 1-., -$ 8.1-),3-$.-/, + "-)!8,)&/,)&)-%"# 88 1 -%+ .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3P

PAGE 195

A@ ?4 00& .6)!-$)*)!*)!02I$.+ )+ ,1)& 3)& 6.,,% ,3-) 88 1-%+ .1 $ ,1$%02 %",.1-%)"3%")!,10.33,))&4 @4 n3-$ ."-$%"#-$.-)!&%#$-")-$.+ -$)!#$-.6)!-6 8), 96!-$.3)11!,, 2-) )!*$%0 /.,-%1%/.-%"#%"-$ 3-!2P D4 00& .6)!-)!,-$)!#$-3."28 0%"#3*$%0 /.,-%1%/.-%"#%"-$ 3-!2 4 E4 n3-$ ."-$%"#)!*)!020%5 -).22P))!$.+ ."8!,-$ ,1)&& "-3),=! 3-%)"3P

PAGE 196

AD r 20 ,9449M20 ,94B'C4$ 0!1-."-, 3/)"2 "-4n";44)03%"M;44!6,%!& B234C9 nr!"nnn B//4@'E'C4$)!3."2.539 .# !60%1.-%)"39n"14 00 "9;4BAAAC4 #nnn!$n%nn 4 r *),5 .1$ ,3)00 # 9)0!&6%."%+ ,3%-4 3$%.6%944BC4,)&)-%"#-$ &)-%)".02 + 0)/& "-)8/, 31$))0 ,34 &# &' 9BC9EA?4 .#".-)94;49Mr %3*),-$9;44BAAC4 nnnnr!(nn nnn 4r *),5$ !%08),2, 334 .,532.0 .229449M$)&.3944BAA'C4%#$-.1$ ,3>, /),2/ 2.#)# %1.0 2 / "2 "1)"6.3.0, .2 ,34 $&)' 9A?BC9?AE4 .," --9(449.&949M;!"#94B@C4 $nn*n +nnnnrnn 4$ r.-%)".0n"3-%-!8),.,0 2!1.-%)" 3 .,1$9!-# ,3"%+ ,3%-4 .," --9(449!32-9;449,% 2&."9449)29;449M%"3*),-$94BEC4 $n n,--.!)n* 4$ r.-%)".0n"3-%-!8),.,02!1.-%)" 3 .,1$!//),26$ *$.,%-.60 ,!3-34 .!&9449M1!,,.1$*.,:94B?C4, 3 ,+%1 .1$ ,3>6 0% 83.6 )!-8.&%0 %"+)0+ & "-n&/0%1.-%)"38),.1$ 2!1.-%)"4 &#&' 9 'BC9@ED4 %,1$9449M.2294(4BAAC4$%02, ">3%",/ ,3)".06 $.+%),3."2-$ .1$ ,1$%02 0.-%)"3$%/4 /rn 9'?B@C9A'?A?D4 0.-1$8),294B'C433&.-%1)63 ,+.-%)".03-!2)8.1$ ,3>."2/! /%03>6 $.+%)!,%" 0.,# ."23&.0010.33 34 01 n 9'BDC9@DA@A@4 0."5 & ,9490."" ,94;49M.:3)"%944BC4$ ,)0 )8.##, 33%)"."23)1% .0 1)&/ "1 %"1$%02, ">3/ ,1 /-%)"3)8-$ 1$%02.1$ ,, 0.-%)"3$%/4 n )n 9'AB'C9A''?4 0!& "8 02;)" 394B?C4$ $)/ )8.1,%-%1.0 -$%13 .1$ ,3."20 ," ,34 & $ 9@?B'C9D'EA4 )#2."9449M%50 "944B'C4 2rn! nn B?-$ 24C4)3-)"9 .,3)"2!1.-%)",)!/9n"14 )!-944BC4+ ,+% *4n"44)!-B24C9 nrn!)n rn*n B//4@C4)3-)"900"M.1)"4

PAGE 197

AE )*069;4BADAC4 nn!345 4r *),5.3%1))539n"14 )*&."9449-)--944BAA?C4"2 ,3-."2%"#2 + 0)/& "-%".1!0-!,.01)"7-$ 1$.00 "# 8),.1$ ,34n".00),944Mr *944B234C9 /rn1 rn!#n B//4 A'DC4r *),5 .1$ ,3)00 # 9)0!&6%."%+ ,3%-4 !"%#94B@C4!,"%"# 7/ ,% "-%.0 2!1.-%)"."21,%-%1.0/ 2.#)#$ ),%"-)/,.7%34 '&& 9BC9D4 ,%##3944B'C4n",+% *%"#9/)* ,I5")*0 2# 9."23)1%.0%" =!.0%-4n";4 4)03%"M ;44!6,%!&B234C9 nr!"nnn B//4?A@@DC4 $)!3."2.539.# !60%1.-%)"39n"14 ,%-:&."944BC4 1 ",%"#2%31)!,3 3%".1$ 2!1.-%)",9-$ !"0 .3$% "#)8 !"/)/!0.,-$%"#34 '& 9E'B'C9D4 ,))58% 02944BC4,."38),&.-%+ 0 .,"%"#.3%2 )0)#1,%-%=! 4n";4 :%,)*B24C9 0nn B//4@?C4.",."1%31)9;)33 .339(%0 )&/."4 ,))58% 02944B@C4 $!0 4 .",."1%31)9;)33 .339(%0 n&/,%"-4 !,1$%".09449 %3" %"6 ,#9449,."-9449M0%88),294BC4$%02, ">33)1%.0 ."21)#"%-%+ 2 + 0)/& "-."21$%02., =!.0%3-%"#8),2%88 "-%. 0.33)1%.-%)"3 0.2-)/)+ ,-9# "2 ,9), -$"%1%-4 /r) 9?B'C9?AD@4 !,1$%".09449 %3" %"6 ,#949%."-.949M)* 394BC4 + 0)/& "-)8 .1.2 &%135%0038,)&/, 31$))0-$,)!#$3 1)"2#,.2 .&%0."210.33,))& /, 2%1-),3 )82 + 0)/& "-.0-,.< 1-),% 34 ')n 9?B@C9?@?'D4 !,1$%".09449)6 ,-39;449r.6),39449M,."-944BAADC4!.0%-)81 ",1$%02 1., ."2%"8."-1)#"%-%+ ."20."#!.# 2 + 0)/& "-4 #/r 9DE9DDD4 .02 ,$ .29;4B'C40.""%"#."2-$%"5%"#%"36!3%" 33 3%3-%"#."2, 2 8%"%"#.1 1 33-)0 .,"%"#%" -$ .,01$%02$))210.33,))&4n"r4 00."2B24C9 #nnn B//4?DDC4r *),5/ ""%+ ,3%-, 334 ." 00.944B@C4 1)"1 /-!.0%:%"#-$ 8% 02B)8 .,01., ."2 2!1.-%)"C n8S* 3,"> 1$%022 + 0)/& "-%3./,)60 &9-$ "*$.-2)* 2)Pn"r4 00."2B24C9 #nnn B//4E'AC4r *),5/ ""%+ ,3%-, 334

PAGE 198

A .,3/ 15 "944BAADC4 #n! 4r *),5)!-0 2# 4 $."20 ,94BAAEC4-!&/%"#8),/,)#, 33%"./)3-&)2 ,"*),024n"4&3 0M4 4 ""%"# ,B234C9 #r! nnn B//4DC4.$*.$9r;.*, "1 ,06.!&33)1%.39!60%3$ ,34 $./&."9449.,3 "9449M.,5 ,944BAEAC4n",.1-%)"3)88%,3-#,.2 .1$ ,3*%-$ 0 .,"%"#2%3),2 21$%02, "4 '0/nn 9B?C9@'4 $)*9449M.3.,%94BAAAC4.35, 0.2%",.1-%)"3.&)"#.1$ ,3."2 7 1 /-%)".09.,%359."2-/%1.00 .," ,3%"%"10!3%+ 10.33,))&34 1)& 9B?C9 D'4 $!,1$%00944B'C4))2" 33)88%-%" .,01$%02$))23 --%"#34 &#& 9'BC9'4 %11$ --%949."%6."9;49M.," --94BAAC4)"-,%6!-%)"38,)&-$ 3-!2)8$%#$,%3 5 /)/!0.-%)"3-)!"2 ,3-."2%"#-$ 2 + 0)/& "-)8 &)-%)", #!0.-%)"4n";4.,6 9M4 4)2# B234C9 $rn B//4@?C4 r *),5.&6,%2# "%+ ,3%-, 334 0%88),29449,."-949M.,044B@C4/, /,)#,.&33-.-!3, /), -4 $ &/n 9@@'4 )0* 0094;49M%"23 94(4B'C4 .1$ ,1$%02%",.1-%)"3."2/, 31$))01$%0 2, ">3 / ,1 /-%)"3)83 08."2/ ,34 &#/r# 9E'B'C9?A@4 )"" 0094(4BAA?C4)+ ,-."2 2!1.-%)"4 r&r 9D?BC4 ))0.$."949."-!::)9;49 "2 :9;491 ,&)--94BC4, 31$))0/ ,%",.1-%)"3." 2 .2%" 33-)0 .," 0.-%)"3$%/36 -* "10.33,))&/ ,/0.."20 .,"%"#6 $.+%),3."2 1)"2!1-4 '&n 9AB'C9?@?D@4 )/0."94;49M,.5.3$94B'C4/ "2%"#-%& *%-$.1$ ,$.,.1,%3-%1 3)8/, 31$))0 ,3 *$)8, =! "-0 0%1%-+ ,3!3%"%-%.%",.1-%)"3*%-$.1$ ,34 &#n 2 99?'@4 )944BC4."#!.# )//),-!"%-% 32!,%"#& .0-%& 3%"/, 31$))010.33,))& 34n"44 %15%"3)"M44.6),3B234C9 6n! ( B//4@C4.0-%&), 9.!04,))5 3 !60%3$%"#)4 !#&.39O4B?C4 /, 3 "-.-%)"3)8-$ 1$%02>33)1%.06 $.+%),."2.--.1$& "--)-$ 5%"2 ,#.,".1$ ,%"-$ %,2,.*%"#4 &#/r# 9E?BC9''4 .$06 ,#949)33949M "1 94BAAAC4 (7 !nnrn 4$%0.2 0/$%.9.0& ,, 339.0),M,."1%3n"14

PAGE 199

AA .+% 394BAA'C4 )nnn!#1n 4 335%009r;.&/-)", 339n"14 !02 ,9449 "$.&9491$&%2-949M%-1$ 009;4BC43),-.33 33& "-)8 .--.1$& "-3 1!,%-2!,%"#-$ /, 31$))0 .,3%"538,)&$)& -)31$))04 /rn 9'DBC9E?4 ":%"9r44BAEC4)3-&)2 ,"1$%02, "4 ) 9.,1$I/,%09''@4 ":%"9r449M%"1)0"944B'C4 $n7rn!$n nnn B"2 24C4$)!3."2.539.# !60%1.-%)"39n"14 ,% 3949MO."94B@C41)"3-,!1-%+%3-/ ,3/ 1-%+ )"-$ ,)0 )8-$ 3)1 %)&),.0 .-&)3/$ %"/,)&)-%"#1$%02, ">32 + 0)/& "-4n"44)3")-B24C9 #nrn! $nrn B"2 24CB//4'?AC4r *),5 .1$ ,3)00 # 334 *.0-9449M *.0-944BC4 nr 4."$.&90-.&%,., 339 2%+%3%)")8)*&."M%--0 8% 02!60%3$ ,39n"14 %15%"3)"944B.C4))5, .2%"#%"/, 31$))010.33,))&3n3, 1)&& "2 2/,. 1-%1 1)&&)"Pn"44%15%"3)"M44.6),3B234C9 6 n!( B//4E@'C4.0-%&), 9.!04 ,))5 3!60%3$%"#)4 %15%"3)"944B6C4.,# #,)!/."28, /0.-%& 3)"+ ,3.-%)".03 --% "#33!//),-%"# 0."#!.# ."20%,.12 + 0)/& "-4n"44%15%"3)"M44.6),3B234C9 6 n!( B//4'@@C4 .0-%&), 9.!04,))5 3!60%3$%"#)4 2*.,29449M( 3-#.9444BAA?C4 rnnn* B"2 24C4r *),5 $ .0& ,, 334 %3" ,94(4BAAAC42!1.-%)".0, 8),&."2-$ 1)0)#)831$))0%"#4n"44,"3%"M 44 $.,), "3%"B234C9 #nnn B"2 24CB//4?'?@C4 )3-)"900"M.1)"4 3/%")3.9449M.88 9;44B'C4,6."/,%&.,.1$ ,/ ,1 /-% )"3)81$%02, "*%-$ 1$.00 "#%"#6 $.+%),34 '#1r 9ABC9'@@D4 33944B?C4,)&)-%"#3-!2 "-1 ", 20 .,"%"#%" 7/ ,% "-%.0 2!1.%)"4 && 9EBC9?D4 +."3944BAAC4"1)!,.# & "-%"-$ 10.33,))&4n"44.:2.94436!,94;4 .0: ,9(44$%02 ,39M44(.0,3B234C9 nr! n B?-$ 24C4)3-)"900"."2.1)"4

PAGE 200

."-!::)9;4(49!0)-35$ ., ,949!31)9449M1(." 94B@C4"%"+ 3-%#.-%)")8 /, 31$))010.33,))&6 $.+%),.0.23+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&4 &08/ & 98,)& $--/II***4802) 4),#I .,00 .,"%"#I+/5/., "-4.3/ 4 )!1.!0-94BAE@IAA@C4 /n1n!$n 4r *),5%"-.# ))534 )!1.!0-94BAC4 9*!)rn1n5:.,;5:.. B4 ),2)"924C4r *),5."-$ )"))534 ,."1%394BAAAC4)2 ,"%3-, 2!1-%)"%3&),/)3-3-,!1-!,.0%3-, 0.-%+%3& ."* &)+ )"P" +.0!.-%)")8-$ .,#!& "-3%", 0.-%)"-)8 &%"%32!1.-%)".0, 3 .,1$4 < & 9B?C9''A'4 ,."1%3944BDC4 /n*rn= -,% + 2;!" A9D8,)& $--/II***4"6 ,4),#I2%# 3-I&.,@I*?@4$-&0 4 ,."5 "3%"94BAAEC4, .5%"#2)*"-$ 2%1$)-)&6 -* "0 .,"%"#."2.1$%" # &.-$ &.-%134n";4(4,.3 ,94.1 2)941%"")"9M(44-)5 3B234C9 >!8 B//4@AEC4r *),5 ,."#!60%3$%"#9n"14 # ."9449M % ,944BC4n";4;40.,944.%"9M44)33.--)B23 4C9 $ 8!&n%n B//4E'C4r *),5 ,."# !60%3$%"#9n"14

PAGE 201

, %, 94BAEIC4 nn B'-$ 24C4r *),5$ )"-%"!!& n",".-%)".0!60%3$%"#,)!/n"14 %, 94BAA'C4 4r *),5$ )"-%"!!&!60%3$%"#)&/."4 %, 94BAAEC4 4r *),5$ )"-%"!!&n",".-%)".0!60%3$%"# ,)!/n"14 .0 94BC4 -$%"5%"#3)1%.0 .2%"#%"-)-$ 0."#!.# /,.1-%1 3 )8.1$ ,34 $n$!$ 9BC9@'?4 .94BC4 #nnr!$n 4r *),5 .1$ ,3)00 # 334 9;44B@IAAAC4 nnnn!$ B"2 24C4r ),5)!-0 2# 4 3-9449)00."2)+% 00)949( 03$9;449%1$ ,.--9449M%0094BDC4. "#!.# 2 + 0)/& "-3!61)"7-3%" .2-.,-10.33,))&3%3-%"1-%+ /.-, "3)8.1$ ,-.05 2!,%"#8, /0.9& .0-%& 9."26))5, .2%"#4 &&/r 9EBC9 A''@4 %00%.&9(44B@C4 *n!&nnn* nnn4 r *.+ ".0 "%+ ,3%-$%02-!2 ",4 %00%.&9(449MO%#0 ,944BC41,%-%1.0& -..".03%3)8.00 +.0!.-%)"3)83-.8!"2 2 /, 31$))08,)&AEE-)AAn&/0%1.-%)"38),/)0%193 ,+%1 2 0%+ ,."2/,)#,.& +.0!.-%)"4 &#n2 9@B?C9???E'4 %,)0.& --)949M( %-:&."94BC4 3/)"3%+ 33)81$%021., /,)+%2 ,3% "%",.1-%)"3 *%-$-)220 ,3."2/, 31$))0 ,34 0))rn)n 9''9 D4 %,)0.& --)949( %-:&."949+."% 3$)!-949M!8894BC4%, 1-%+ 33%". 1$ ,3> 0."#!.# %"/!--)-)220 ,3."2/, 31$))0 ,3%"2.1., 4 ')0 n 9?'9?4 %,)!79449M%&)"94n4BAC41$))0%"#9/)/!0.,1!0-!, 9."2./ 2.#)#)8/)33 %6%0%-4 '& 9EBC9AD4 %,)!7944BAC4 $nnn!$ 4 ,."69 ,#%"M.,+ !60%3$ ,39n"14 %,)!7944BA.C4)3-&)2 ,"%3&."2-$ 2%31)!,3 )8 2!1.-%)".01,%-%1%3&4 & 9EB'C9//4@'4

PAGE 202

%,)!7944BAA'C4%3-!,6%"#-$ / .1 (,%-%"#%"-$ 1!0-!,.03-!2% 310.33, ))&4 # 0 9BC9'D4 %,)!7944BAAAC4 .1$ ,9/!60%10%8 9."21!,,%1!0!&, 8),&4n"44,"3% "M44 $.,), "3%"B234C9 #nnn B"2 24CB//4'D??C4 )3-)"900"M.1)"4 %,)!7944BC4 $nn!$nn 4 ( 3-/),-9 ,#%"M.,+ 4 %,)!7944B@C4 (nnn!#*nn B"2 24C4 r *),5)!-0 2# 9.0),M,."1%3,)!/4 %-0%"94BC4)!"2%"#.1$ ,2 1%3%)"&.5%"#$ -$, .-)8%""3%8%1.-%)"4 & 9@BC9E@E4 ),&0 ;,49(449. ,949$%00%/3949M.*3)"94B@C4$ 88 1-3)8!"%+ ,3.0/ 5 )"1)#"%-%+ 2 + 0)/& "-4 /rn 9?BDC9E?4 ),&0 ;,49(449M$%00%/394B@C4$ 88 1-3)8!"%+ ,3.0/, 5%"50.$)&. 3 .,1$ $%#$0%#$-3."2/)0%1%&/0%1.-%)"34 $)n' 9''BC9D@4 ,% 3$.6 ,949M."94BDC4 )"21 ,-.%"-% 3)3-&)2 ,"/ ,3/ 1-%+ 39, 3 .,1$9."2 -$ 2!1.-%)")8)!"#1$%02, "4n"4/)2 5M4r4.3.1$)B234C9 n B"2 24CB//4@''@@'C4.$*.$9r; .*, "1 ,06.!&33)1%.39!60%3$ ,34 .&, 9449M%."-.944BC4.,0.1$ ,1$%02, 0.-%)"3$%/3."2-$ -, .< 1-), 1$%02, ">331$))0)!-1)& 3-$,)!#$ %#$-$#,.2 4 #/r 9EBC9D@D'4 ."5%"394BAAAC4%0 "1%"#-$ 0.&634n";400 "B24C9 #nnn!$n %nn B//4DEC4r *),5 .1$ ,3)00 # 9 )0!&6%."%+ ,3%-4 .-1$9;44BAA@C4 2rnnn 4( 3-/),-9, "*))2 !60%3$%"#,)!/9n"14 .-1$9;44BC4 /7rnnn 406."9r-."%+ ,3%-)8r *),5, 334 3949M.-!3)+94B@C4 3%#"%"#8),2%.0)#! %"/0.1 )8.1$ ,-.05."23!2 "3%0 "1 4 #1n 9B'C9''A'@E4 %"1$ 944BC4 8nn! 4r *),5 ,."#!60%3$%"#9n"14 %"1$ 944B?C4 (!/nnn 4r *),5 ,."#!60%3$%"#9n"14

PAGE 203

' )03%"9;449M!6,%!&9;44B?C4$ .1-%+ %",+% *4n"4%0+ ,&."B24C9 2r n!$ 4"2 24B//4?DC4$)!3."2.539.# !60%1.-%)"34 )* 394BC4)1%.0 &)-%)".010.33,))&10%&.%"1$%021., 91$%02.1 $ ,, 0.-%)"3$%/3 ."21$%02, ">33 1)"2#,.2 / ,, 0.-%)"34 )/r 9ABC9A?4 )* 3949!,1$%".0949%."-.949,."-9490%88),2949M.,6.,%"94BC4 .2-) 0 .,"P$%02, ">3/, .1.2 &%1.1$% + & "-%"/, %"2 ,#.,"/ ,)#,.&34 & #n2 9'9E@4 )* 3949M.&%0-)"944BAA.C4$%02, ">3, 0.-%)"3$%/3*%-$1., #%+ ,3)$ ,3."2 1$%021., .1$ ,34 #/r 9D'9@ADD4 )* 3949M.&%0-)"944BAA6C4$%02, ">3, 0.-%)"3$%/3*%-$1$%021., .1$ 3 -.6%0%-."21)"1),2."1 *%-$/., "-.0.--.1$& "-34 #/r 9D'9DEE4 )* 3949.&%0-)"9449M.-$ 3)"944BAA?C4$%02, ">3, 0.-%)"3$%/3*%-$/ 3 %88 "-%.0.33)1%.-%)"3*%-$.3/ 1-3)8-$ .1$ ,1$%02, 0.-% )"3$%/4 # /r 9D@9@'D'4 )* 3949M%-1$% 94BC4 n!#nn nn 4r *),5 .1$ ,3)00 # 9)0!&6%."%+ ,3%-4 !"94B'C4($.-2) 3-$ ")1$%020 8-6 $%"2.1-& ."-) .,01$%02$))2.1$ 2!1.-),3P1.008),.1)00 1-%+ /,)8 33%)".0, <)%"2 ,4 &#& 9'BC9A@4 ;.1)63944B?C410.33,))&%"+ 3-%#.-%)")8-$ #,)*-$)8& -.1)#"%-%+ .*., 33%" 5%"2 ,#.,"1$%02, "-$,)!#$-$ *,%-%"#/,)1 334 &#&' 9 'BC9E'4 ;.1)63)"94B'C4-.8%"."1 2/, 53$)*3/)3%-%+ 88 1-39" *, 3 .,1$3.34 & ?* 9'BC9?4 ;)$"3)"94;49;. # ,949."2)0/$9449.!3 9449(.,29;49Mrn.,0$%02., 3 .,1$r -*),5B'C4-!2%"#-$ 88 1-3)8 .,01$%021., 7 / ,% "1 3)"-$ 2 + 0)/& "-)81$%02, ")81)0),%"-$ "%2-.3)*.,2.&), %"10!3%+ 3 .,1$ .# "2.4 #/r 9E?B@C9E??4 .#."9;4BAA?C4 $ B-$.""%+ ,3., 24C4r *),5.3%1))539 %+%3%)")8.,/ ,)00%"3!60%3$ ,39n"14 ./0."9;4BAAC4-.8!"2 2/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&34 ? "* 9BAC9 8,)& $--/II***48%"."1 /,)< 1-4),#I/!60%1.-%)"3I/, 31$))4$-& 4 .-:9449M10 00."944BAAEC4 8n+nn!$+n 4(.3$%"#-)"944$ r.-%)".033)1%.-%)"8),-$ 2!1.-%)")8)!"#$%02, "4

PAGE 204

? "."944B?C4,)&3)1%)1!0-!,.01.#),% 3-)3)1%.000)1.2, 0.-% )"33%"#1,%-%1.0 -$ ),%"3)1%.0*),5/,.1-%1 4 8n)!$'#) )rn 9@B?C9@'A@?4 %"1$ 0) 9;449M1., "94B@C4 -$%"5%"#1,%-%1.0-$ ),."2=!.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$4n"r4 ": "M4%"1)0"B234C9 $)*2rn B',2 24CB//4 '''?C4$)!3."2.539.# !60%1.-%)"34 %"#9;44B?C4 ,+%1 0 .,"%"#.3.3%8),1,%-%1.0/ 2.#)#1. 3 )81)00.6),.-%)"9 1.,%"#9."22 8.&%0%.,%:.-%)".1,)336),2 ,34 '&& 9DB'C9 'E4 )"-)394BAAAC4, 31$))0.1$ ,3>-.059,)0 39."2.1-%+%-3 --%"#32!,%"#8, /0.4 & #n2 9?B'C9'D''4 )"-)3949)* 3949$%""949M.0%"3594BAA@C4 21r 4r *),5 .1$ ,3)00 # 334 .2294(49M,)8%0 -944BAADC4$ 1$%026 $.+%),31.0 .1$ ,, /),-& .3!, )8 )!"#1$%02, ">3.##, 33%+ 9*%-$2,.*"9."2/,)3)1%.06 $.+%),34 /r n 9'BDC9?4 ..,)9449%."-.9449M-!$0&."94B?C4$ 10.33,))&.33 33& "-31),%"# 33&%"2%"#38,)&-$ /, 5%"2 ,#.," .,4 $&)' 9?B@C9 ?A?D4 .-$ ,94BA?C4,%-%1.0-$ ),91!,,%1!0.,-,."38),&.-%)"."28 &%"%3-&.% "3-, .&%"#4 & 9DDBC9?AD4 )".,2)9O4B'C4 nnn 4( 3-/),-9,. # ,!60%3$ ,34 .+%--9449M)* ,944BAAC4&)-%)".03)1%.0%:.-%)"%"-$ /)3-&)2 ," ,. $%02, %"2.1., 4 )n2 9@BC9'@?'4 .+%--944BAA?C4 ; 406."9r-."%+ ,3%-)8r *),5, 334 %2:944B'C4 &nnnn 4)6)5 "9r;;)$"(%0 M)"39n"14 %"1)0"9449M!6.944BA@C4 "n7 4$)!3."2.539.# !60%1.-%)"39n"14 )6&."944BDC4n&/,)+%3.-%)"".".0-%1-))08), 7.&%"%"#.1$ ,1$% 02%",.1-%)"3 %"-$ .,01$%02$))210.33,))&4 &#n2 99?@@?E4 .1 )29;4BAA@C4 +*+!nn1; 4)!02 ,9( 3-+% *, 334

PAGE 205

@ .33 944B?C4 .1$ ,1$%021)"+ ,3.-%)"%"-$ /, 31$))010.33,))&4 &# &' 9'B?C9E'4 1)00!&9;449.%,94BAA?C4 3 .,1$%"/., "-1$%02%",.1-%)"!%2."1 ) 2 + 0)/& "-.00.//,)/,%./,.1-%1 8),)!"#1$%02, "*%-$2%3. 6%0%-% 34n".00),94 4Mr *944B234C9 /rn1rn!#n B//4?DC4r *),5 .1$ ,3)00 # 9)0!&6%. "%+ ,3%-4 1n"-, 94BAAEC4 >*nn!& n 406."9r-."%+ ,3%-)8r *),5, 334 1%"" 9;449M .#."394BA'C42./-%+ 10.33,))&6 $.+%),)80 .,"%"#2%3. 60 2 3-!2 "-34 '0/nn 9DBDC9'D'DE4 1., "94BAAC4 0nn!n B',2 24C4r *),522%3)"( 30 )"#&."9n"14 1., "949M.,.$&."2/!,94BC4n";4;40.,944.%"9M44)33.--)B23 4C9 $8!&n%n B//4'E@DC4r *),5 ,."# !60%3$%"#9n"14 ,,%.&944BAAC4 2rnnnn!rn nnn 4.",."1%31)9;)33 .33 !60%3$ ,34 ,,%.&944BC4n"-,)2!1-%)"-)=!.0%-.-%+ 3 .,1$4n"44 ,,%.&B24C 9 2r n!&nnnnnn B//4'EC4.",."1%31)9 ;)33 .339(%0 )&/."4 r.-%)".0 ",8),2!1.-%)"-.-%3-%13B'C4 *@4)4nn!,---; ,--5nnnn 444 /.,-& "-)82!1.-%)"9n"3-%-!)82!1.-%)" 1% "1 34 r.-%)".0n"3-%-!)8$%02 .0-$."2!&." + 0)/& "-9.,01$%021., 3 .,1$" -*),5 BC4$ 0.-%)")80)6.0%,3-,.2 10.33,))&"+%,)"& "--)-,!1-!, .0 0.33,))& .-!, 3."2 .1$ ,."2-!2 "$.+%),34 &)' 9 B@C9'DE'E4 r.-%)".0n"3-%-!8),.,02!1.-%)" 3 .,1$BrnCBDC4/ 2 ($.-5%"2)8/, 5 $)!3 $.-$0),%2.6!%0-P n&&n 4 -,% + 2 !#!3-'9D8,)& ***4"% ,4),# 4 r.-%)".0n"3-%-!8),.,02!1.-%)" 3 .,1$BrnCBC4-.8! "2 2/, 31$))0 ",)00& "-/.33 3)" &%00%)"&.,59 -&)3-'."2? .,)023., 2 "% 2.11 33-) /!60%1/, 31$))0/,)#,.&34 n&&n 4 -,% + 2 .,1$A98,)& ***4"% ,4),# 4

PAGE 206

D r.-%)".0, 5%"2 ,#.," ",B?C4 "#** 4$./ 0%009r$ "%+ ,3%-)8r),-$.,)0%".9r.-%)".0, 5%"2 ,#.," ",9$%0 2 + 0)/& "n"3-%-!4 r !&."944B'C4,)&,$ -),%1-), .0%-$ 1.3 8),$%#$=!.0%-1)&/ "3.-), /, 5%"2 ,#.,"/,)#,.&34 / 9DA4 r !&."9449M)35)394B@C4$ 3-.)83-./, 5%"2 ,#.,"3-."2.,234 & #n2 99@?@4 rn.,0$%02., 3 .,1$r -*),5BC4$ 0.-%)")81$%021. -)1)#"%-%+ ."2 0."#!.# 2 + 0)/& "-4 #/r 9EB?C9ADA4 rn.,0$%02., 3 .,1$r -*),5BC4$%021., 3-,!1-!, W/,)1 33W)!-1)& 2%, 1-."2%"2%, 188 1-3)81$%021., =!.0%-)")!"#1$%02, ">32 + 0 )/& "-4 n) 9'B'C9AAD4 rn.,0$%02., 3 .,1$r -*),5B'C4) 3=!.0%-)81$%021 ., .88 1-1$%02 )!-1)& 3.-.# ?IP /rn 9'AB'C9?@DA4 rn.,0$%02., 3 .,1$r -*),5M!"1."94;4B'C4)2 0%"#-$ %&/. 1-3)8 1$%021., =!.0%-)"1$%02, ">3/, 31$))01)#"%-%+ 2 + 0)/& "-4 #/r 9 E?B@C9?@??E?4 rn.,0$%02., 3 .,1$r -*),5B?.C4, 1$%022 + 0)/& "-.0 )!-1)& 3, 0.2 -)6 8), ."2.8,31$))01., .,,."# & "-3P 3!0-38,)&-$ rn 3-!2)8 .,0 1$%021., 4 #/r 9E@BC9A@4 rn.,0$%02., 3 .,1$r -*),5B?6C4/ )81$%021., ."21 $%02, ">3 2 + 0)/& "-.-@?&)"-$34 &#n2 9A9''4 rn.,0$%02., 3 .,1$r -*),5B@C4!,.-%)"."22 + 0)/& "-. 0-%&%"#)8 /)+ ,-."21$%02, ">31)#"%-%+ ."23)1%.02 + 0)/& "-8,)&6%,-$-$,)!#$-$% ,2#,.2 4 #/r 9EDB?C9EA@4 r%.39;4BA?C4$ 2 8%"%-%)"."2&.%""."1 )83 08%"/,%&.,.1$%"#4 (n' )& 9@B'C9DE4 .,59449M(.,394BAAC4 1!,%-)8.--.1$& "-."2/, 31$))08,% "23$%/3 4 # /r 9D9ED4 .,5 944B?C4$ 3)1% -8),, 3 .,1$%"1$%022 + 0)/& "-.-E,)#, 33 ."2/,)&%3 4 #/r 9E@BC9?4 .--)"944BC4 2rn1rn B',2 24C4$)!3."2.539 .# !60%1.-%)"34

PAGE 207

E %3" %"6 ,#949!,1$%".094490%88),29449!05%"9449)* 3949.#."94 49 M.: <%."9r4BC4$ 0.-%)")8/, 31$))01$%021., =!.0%--)1$%02, ">3 1)#"%-%+ ."23)1%.02 + 0)/& "-.0-,.< 1-),% 3-$,)!#$3 1)"2#,.2 4 # /r 9EB@C9@'?@@'4 %."-.9449M-!$0&."94(4B?C4 .1$ ,1$%02, 0.-%)"3$%/3."21$%02, ">33!11 33%" -$ 8%,3.,3)831$))04 )nr 9''B'C9????@4 !%",)944B?C4 ;n+n!/r 4r *),5 ,."#!60%3$%"#n"14 .#."9449.3 94(49M,!6.1$ ,9;4(4BC4 (r! 7nn B"2 24C4$)!3."2.539),*%", 339n"14 ")023949M &/0 9;44BDC41)")&%1, -!,"3)8%"+ 3-& "-3%"/, 31$))0 2!1. -%)"4 n"4O%#0 ,9(44%00%.&9M44;)" 3B234C9 rnrnn B//4'EDC4r *),5.&6,%2# "%+ ,3%-, 334 %3 6),)!#$944BAC4!/%039, 1%/ 5")*0 2# 91!,,%1!0!&."2-$ 1!0-!,.0/ ,)2!1-%)")8 10.339 -$"%1%-."2/.-,%.,1$1,%-%=! )8)" .1$ ,>3/,.1%1 34 (n' )& 9ABC9'A@?4 )3 00%944B@C4 /n1+n!$ 4r *),5 ,."#!60%3$%"#n"14 ."94B@C4, 2)&-)1$))3 7.&%"%"#1$%02, ">3 7/ ,% "1 3%"1$)%1 %& 4n"r4 00."2B24C9 #nnn B//4AA?C4r *),5 / ""%+ ,3%-, 334 .0!<.949.,09449M0%88),2944BC4 &)#,./$%11$.,.1,%3-%13)8 .,0 1$%02$))2.1$ ,3."23-,!1-!,.0 0 & "-3)8 .,01., ."2 2!1.-%)"%"-$ "% 2 -.34 &#n1 9?BC4 -,% + 2/,%"#98,)& $--/II 1,/4!%!14 2!I+?"I3.0!<.4$-&0 4 ."20%"9;44BC4$ /)0%-%13)81)"3!& 2!1.-%)"&.,%.03!3 2%".2!0-0%,.1 10.33,))&34n"44 ,,%.&B24C9 2rn!&n nnnnn B//4'@'EC4.",."1%31)9;)33 .339(%0 )&/."4 .--0 ,9;44BAC433 33& "-)86 $.+%),6)63 ,+.-%)".0& -$)234n";44 .--0 ,B24C9 nnnn B//4?E@'C4."% #)9; ,)& 4.--0 ,9!60%3$ ,4 %2&."9n44BAAC4 rn7rn!nn nnn 4r *),5 .1$ ,3)00 # 334

PAGE 208

%8 ,949M1$%00 ,94BAA@C4$ ,)0 )8/., "-%"#3 "3%-%+%-9%"8."-&/ ,.& "-9."2 2.2%1%",.1-%)"%".--.1$& "--$ ),."2.33 33& "-4n"4(.,3944 .!#$"94 )3.2.9M4)"2)n5 &!,.B234C9 #rrnrn n;nr*n!"n n B//4?DE?C4$%1.#)9n)")#,./$3)8-$ )1% -8), 3 .,1$%"$%02 + 0)/& "-4 $),9n4BAAC4 &!#n 4$%1.#)9n$ "%+ ,3%-)8$%1.#), 334 $!0&."944BAAAC4")*0 2# ."2.1$%"#)!"2.-%)"3)8-$ *, 8),&4n"44 ,"3%"M44 $.,), "3%"B234C9 #nnn B"2 24C B//4'C4)3-)"900"M.1)"4 &%-$94B?C4&/)* ,%"#.1$ ,3&/)* ,%"#1$%02, "P)*1.", 3 ,1$ ,3%"%-%.."2 3 .,1$ &/)* ,& "-P 'n 9EB?C9?'??4 ,)!8 944BAADC4 &r!$ n 4r *),5.&6,%2# "%+ ,3%-, 334 -.,5 9490 %"949M(.5 0 94B?C4"$."1%"#)!"#1$%02, ">3&.-$ &.%1.0 5")*0 2# -$,)!#$./, 5%"2 ,#.,"&.-$ &.-%13%",+ "-%)"4 &# n2 9A9AA4 -.)80),%2.# "18),(),58),1 n"")+.-%)"BC4)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"/ ,)#,.&4 )8?* r 4 -,% + 28,)& $--/II***480),%2.<)634),#I .,00 .,"%"#II34$-&0 M $--/II***480),%2.<)634),#I .,00 .,"%"#II($, %&/),-."-4$&0 4 -%/ 594B?C4 .1$%"#/,.1-%1 3%"5%"2 ,#.,"."28%,3-#,.2 %88 "-3-,)5 38), 2%88 "-8)0534 &#n2 9A9@?@D4 -)5 39(44BAAEC4,)#, 33%+ .1$ 2!1.-%)")"31%)!3" 339%2 "-%-9."25")*0 2 # 4n" ;4(4,.3 ,94.1 2)941%"")"9M(44-)5 3B234C9 >! 8 B//4EC4r *),5 ,."#!60%3$%"#9n"14 -,.!33949M),6%"9;4BAAC4 (nn7rn!$7nn r B"2 24C4$)!3."2.539.# !60%1.-%)"39n"14 -!$0&."94(49M%."-.944BC4 .1$ ,3>".,,.-%+ 3.6)!--$ %,, 0.-%)"3$% /3*%-$ 1$%02, "33)1%.-%)"3*%-$6 $.+%),%"10.33,))&34 )nr 9'BC9 ?D'4 *.""9;49M,.--9;4B'C4 &n!>*nn 4 r *),5)"-%"!!&4 3$ ,949M2*.,2394BAA?C4 nn!/rn n 4r *),5)!-0 2# 4

PAGE 209

A %00.+ ,2 944B?C4 + 0)/%"#1!,,%1!0!&."21,%-%1.0/ 2.#)#4n"; 44%"1$ 0) M4 ( %0B234C9 #*!nn B//4''@C4( 3-/),-9, "*))2, 334 .".5 094;449M%53 "(.0,.+ "9;44B?C43 1!,%-31), 3($.-2)-$ /, 3 "-P3-!2%"1)"3-,!1-+.0%2.-%)"4 >' 9@B'C9E@A'4 .".&949M."n<: "2)),"944BC4 .3!,%"#.--.1$& "-3 1!,%-)"1!,, "-."2 /, 2%1-%+ +.0%2%-)8-$ /., "-.0.--.1$& "-3 -4 '32 + 0)/& "-%, 1-."2&)2 ,.2 88 1-34 #/r 9E@BC9AD '4 (.05 ,949M %#$."94BADC4$ $%22 "1!,,%1!0!&)80."#!.# 4n"4 %#$."B24C9 n B"2 24CB//4?DC4),-3&)!-$.33 002!1.-%)"-24 ( 6 ,944BC4!0 39,%#$-."2*,)"#9."21$%02, "4 &#&' 9 'BC9E4 ( 63,-,.--)"94BAAAC4 +nn 4 )"2)".!0$./&."!60%3$%"#-24 ( 3-*))2949"%#$-9449M 22 "94BAAEC433 33%"#.1$ ,3>6 0% 83.6)!-0 %,.1 .1=!%3%-%)"$ 2 + 0)/& "-)8-$ .1$ ,3>6 0% 83.6)!-0%,.1=! 3 -%)"".%, BC4 'n 9B'C9?'@4 ($%9;4;49M%&3 9;44BC4r.,,.-%+ 38,)&.,!,.093)!-$ ,"9*$%*)&."$ 2!1.-%)"."2*),5 -$%1)8.& &6 ,)8-$ 10.33)8A'4n"44)!-B24C9 nrn!)nrn *n B//4 @?@C4)3-)"900"M.1)"4 (%05%"394B@C4.08 &/-),$.088!00P0),%2.>3+)0!"-.,/, 5%"2 ,#.,"3-."2.,23 ,, 3-%"#%"3%#$-3%" 2!1.-%)"4 $n(88 n 9BC9@4 (%00%.&3)294B?C4&/)* ,& "--,."38),&.-%+ /,)1 334n";4 4%"1$ 0) M4 ( %0B234C9 #*!nn B//4EC4( 3-/),-9, "*))2, 334 (),-$.&944BAA@C4n"8),&.0& .3!, 363 ,+.-%)"4n"44(),-$.&B24C9 >n r B//4A'C4"#0 *))20%8839r; "-%1 .009n"14 (0% 949M$)&/3)"9;4B'C4$ )"#,&1)"-,%6!-%)")8 .,01$%02$))2 2!1.-%)") 1$%02, "R3/ ,8),&."1 +%2 "1 8,)&r *O .0."24 '& 6n& 9BC9DAE4

PAGE 210

00."29r49M%02 ,,94B@C4#.%"3--$ -%2 r **.3%" .,01$%0 2$))2 2!1.-%)"4n" r4 00."2B24C9 #nnn B//4'C4r *),5 / ""%+ ,3%-, 334 )!"#9n44BC4%+ 8.1 3)8)//, 33%)"4n"42.&39(4;40!& "8 0294.3-." 2. 94 (4.15&."944 ,39MF4O!"%#.B234C9 nrnn%n B//4'@?AC4r *),5)!-0 2# 4 O%#0 ,949%00%.&9(449M;)" 3944BDC4 rnrnn 4 r *),5.&6,%2# "%+ ,3%-, 334 O%#0 ,949%00%.&9(449;)" 39449M.0.5)8894BDC4$ 28),!"%+ ,3.0 /, 5%"2 ,#.,"8),1$%02, "%"/)+ ,-4n"4O%#0 ,9(44%00%.&9M44;)" 3 B234C9 rnrnn B//4DAC4r *),5.&6,%2# "%+ ,3%, 334 O%&%0 394BC4", .33 33%"#-$ 0 +."1 )8-$ 1$%022 + 0)/& "-5")*0 2# 6.3 -) 2!1.-%)"4 /r 9?'9'@?@4 O!"%#.9F4BC4(),5%"#8),3)1%.0
PAGE 211

nn n*.36),"."2,.%3 2%" )!09)!-$), .4n.&-$ 02 3-)88)!,1$%02, "9."2& /., "-3$.+ 2 8%"%0/!-$%#$ 7/ 1-.-%)"3)"& 4n#,.2!.28,)&.1, 2 .,-()& ">3 %#$1$))0."2#)-.6.1$ 0),>2 #, %" .,-$31% "1 2!1.-%)"8,)& )!0r .-%)".0 "%+ ,3%-%" )!09)!-$), .4n$.+ .,3)8 7/ ,% "1 .1$%"#31% "1 -)&%220 ."2 $%#$31$))03-!2 "-3%")!-$), .4n*.3&)-%+.2-)6 1)& ..1$ ,-$,)!#$& /.,-%1%/.-%)"%"+.,%)!33)1%.0, 8),&.1-%)"3%"&".-%+ 1)!"-,93!1$.32 &."238),-$ 0 .3 )8/)0%-%1.0)88 "2 ,3."2-$ /,)1-%)")80)*%"1)& 8.&%0% 3 >,%#$-343)1%.0 7/ ,% "1 30 2-)&%", 3-%" .,01$%02$))2 2!1.-%)"/,)#,.&36 8%-%"#1$%02, "8,)& 0)*%"1)& 8.&%0% 3."2-)/!,3! .&.3,>32 #, %" .,01$%02$))2 2!1 .-%)"4n#)-. &.3,>32 #, %" .,01$%02$))2 2!1.-%)"8,)&n"2%."."%+ ,3%-.-0 ))&%"#-)"43. 1%/% "-)8-$ 0!&"% 00)*3$%/.--$ "%+ ,3%-)80),%2.9n$.+ /. ,-%1%/.2%"3 + ,.0 2!1.-%)".01)"8 "1 3."2-,% 2-)/!60%3$.<)!,".0.,-%10 4n+)0!", 2.-%,3-, 36,%." 31$))0%".%" 3+%00 90),%2.8),' .,39 7"2%"#& 7/ ,% "1 *),5%"#*%-$1!0-!,.00 2%+ ,3 1$%02, "."2-$ %,8.&%0% 34