Working Girls

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Working Girls Fictional Representation of Female Office Workers in Weimar Germany
Physical Description:
1 online resource (181 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Meier, Aneka
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
German, Germanic and Slavic Studies
Committee Chair:
Bullivant, Keith
Committee Members:
Futterknecht, Franz O.
Hasty, Willard R.
Watt, Mary A.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
collar, culture, mass, new, republic, urbanization, weimar, white, woman, workers
Germanic and Slavic Studies -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
German thesis, Ph.D.
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )

Notes

Abstract:
The focus of this study is the depiction of young female white-collar workers in popular fiction in Germany and particularly in Berlin during the turbulent Weimar years, an era of intense social upheaval and economic transformation, and a time when discourses of class and gender appeared to be in flux. It traces the facets of popular culture and visual perception, women's experience of modernity and urbanity, and the correlation of the term 'working girl' and issues of sexuality. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, the study explores the iconography of the so-called New Woman in the modernized office in terms of gender, labor, technology, mass culture, and consumption through the lens of popular novels and fashion magazines of the Weimar period, as well as prominent studies by contemporaries. Illuminating female office workers' private and public spheres, their workplaces, and how they spend their leisure time, the study brings out the discrepancies between the glamorized New Woman as a media-generated phenomenon and her actual social reality during the interwar years. Situating this legendary New Woman within the context of a society which underwent a swift transition in the course of only fifteen years, I facilitate a broader understanding of the historical and cultural context within which this almost mythical figure is embedded, as well as contribute to ongoing discussions on complex junctions of modernity, subjectivity formation, and metropolitan space. The study concludes with an examination of the question as to whether the Nazi takeover in 1933 marks a complete and sudden change for this persona, and presents evidence of important transitional figures who belie the popular myth.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
General Note:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2008.
General Note:
Adviser: Bullivant, Keith.
General Note:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2016-08-31
Statement of Responsibility:
by Aneka Meier.

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Copyright Aneka Meier. Permission granted to the University of Florida to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2008
System ID:
UFE0022434:00001