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Applying a Heuretic Generator within Architectural Education

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0021780/00001

Material Information

Title: Applying a Heuretic Generator within Architectural Education Reevaluating the City Plans Viability
Physical Description: 1 online resource (16 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Mitchell, Lauren Miche
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: big, box, heuretics, korzybski, ungers
Architecture -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Architecture thesis, M.S.A.S.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Neurosis is characterized by outbreaks and disturbances of sensory motor functions not attributable to any known neurological or organic dysfunction. Scientists induce nervous breakdowns in lab rats to unveil this phenomenon. When forced to react in a certain way long enough these rats become unable to react in accordance to primal desires even when they are set free. They may see food in front of them, but are paralyzed. The inability to move toward what they desire causes convulsions which can result in death. Neurosis, occurring naturally only in humans, is a visual which has driven my work. One must ask; why do scientists seek to understand such paralysis? The answer is simple. They would like to know how to fix it. The thesis excites various conversational threads consisting of complex fibers and filaments that twist and tie us together. Thus, there is an assumed similarity in responses to circumstances and bodies of knowledge based on the reality of words within specific cultural situations. Our experience and perception of the world conforms to the words, metaphors, and images we use to discuss them. This is problematic in the digitized culture of 2007, where more experiences exist than do words. The literate apparatus, grounded in reason, is no longer sufficient alone for the academic institution - especially in urban analysis today. The target of this research, a digital culture of rapidly expanding urban conditions of the United States (rapid urbanism), combats 'the author.' It is difficult for architects and designers to look at rapid urbanism without feeling frustration because of this. Nostalgia, the desire for control or authorship, is brought on by a 'compare and contrast' mentality seen through the lens of the Utopian European city plan. I am proposing that architects must free themselves from the habitual roles of 'author,' and 'problem solver' in order to become useful within rapid urbanism. The work of Dr. Gregory Ulmer and the study of heuretics have provided me with a methodological approach to invent new ways of 'seeing' rapid urbanism, attracting precipitation to the ideas which have been floating in the clouds of my thesis. Now, something may fall to the earth in a form that will nurture 'health' and grow.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Lauren Miche Mitchell.
Thesis: Thesis (M.S.A.S.)--University of Florida, 2007.
Local: Adviser: Hofer, Adeline.
Local: Co-adviser: Hailey, Charles L.

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2007
System ID: UFE0021780:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0021780/00001

Material Information

Title: Applying a Heuretic Generator within Architectural Education Reevaluating the City Plans Viability
Physical Description: 1 online resource (16 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Mitchell, Lauren Miche
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: big, box, heuretics, korzybski, ungers
Architecture -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Architecture thesis, M.S.A.S.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Neurosis is characterized by outbreaks and disturbances of sensory motor functions not attributable to any known neurological or organic dysfunction. Scientists induce nervous breakdowns in lab rats to unveil this phenomenon. When forced to react in a certain way long enough these rats become unable to react in accordance to primal desires even when they are set free. They may see food in front of them, but are paralyzed. The inability to move toward what they desire causes convulsions which can result in death. Neurosis, occurring naturally only in humans, is a visual which has driven my work. One must ask; why do scientists seek to understand such paralysis? The answer is simple. They would like to know how to fix it. The thesis excites various conversational threads consisting of complex fibers and filaments that twist and tie us together. Thus, there is an assumed similarity in responses to circumstances and bodies of knowledge based on the reality of words within specific cultural situations. Our experience and perception of the world conforms to the words, metaphors, and images we use to discuss them. This is problematic in the digitized culture of 2007, where more experiences exist than do words. The literate apparatus, grounded in reason, is no longer sufficient alone for the academic institution - especially in urban analysis today. The target of this research, a digital culture of rapidly expanding urban conditions of the United States (rapid urbanism), combats 'the author.' It is difficult for architects and designers to look at rapid urbanism without feeling frustration because of this. Nostalgia, the desire for control or authorship, is brought on by a 'compare and contrast' mentality seen through the lens of the Utopian European city plan. I am proposing that architects must free themselves from the habitual roles of 'author,' and 'problem solver' in order to become useful within rapid urbanism. The work of Dr. Gregory Ulmer and the study of heuretics have provided me with a methodological approach to invent new ways of 'seeing' rapid urbanism, attracting precipitation to the ideas which have been floating in the clouds of my thesis. Now, something may fall to the earth in a form that will nurture 'health' and grow.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Lauren Miche Mitchell.
Thesis: Thesis (M.S.A.S.)--University of Florida, 2007.
Local: Adviser: Hofer, Adeline.
Local: Co-adviser: Hailey, Charles L.

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2007
System ID: UFE0021780:00001


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Professor Avigdor Cahaner of Hebrew University in Israel has bread a featherless chicken
from one which has a recessive gene of being featherless with a larger typical broiler
chicken.







Graduate Studio option_ Ideas Work Society (IWS)
Instructor Associate Professor Jason Young
"The Featherless Chicken," Idea of the year as advertised by New
York Times Magazine; Practicing How to Forget













What has happened:


_The New York Times has been publishing "the year in ideas" for the past four years, curating what they feel
are emerging situations/conditions that define the contemporary.
_I edited from their published ideas (over 200 of them) down to 22 that Ifelt had that certain something.
12 students each drew one idea (blind draw) from a hat that contained the 22.


_Students have been asked to explore the idea, its implications for culture (i.e. Why is this an "idea of the
year?"), and also the degree to which those implications might be spatial, or better yet, explored spatially.

_I gave the students three simultaneous exercises to work through. It was really one exercise to be done
three times, on three distinct "indifferent subjects." By "indifferent subject," I mean that there is no real
causal relationship between the collection of ideas and the things I asked them to
work on/through.

The three were: one Idaho baking potato; one copy of a Sunday edition of the New York Times from two
years ago (each student had consecutive Sundays); and a collection of 7 "captures," images of a strange
lineage and obtuse nature. The exercise prompted them to map the "indifferent subject", to speculate based
on the mappings, and to develop (something).




Why, or to what end:

Many of the ideas being explored in the studio have overlapping implications having to do with the change
in cultural relationships brought along with the onslaught of the digital. Various prognosticators are claim-
ing that physicality and specific spatiality will wane as digital operating procedures are advanced. This
studio remains committed to the notion that if physical ordering proves to be a fiction, the architect would
(still) have the irreducible strangeness of building at the core of any project. And, further, that the practice
of architecture might be reconsidered under this crushing pressure, and that each architect might work as a
production studio, finding methods from the onslaught as opposed to claiming resistance as a viable model.
Resultant "modes" of research would best be understood as "modes" of design.


-]ason Young













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Actuary (Property & Casualty)
and Barber Shop (uni-sex)
and Business Innovatrium (best practices)
and Business Incubator (next practices)
and Decommissioned Stealth Fighter (F-117A Nighthawk)
and Parking (37 vehicles)
and Supply Chain Logistics Company (Trucking and Distribution)
and Restaurant (Sushi)
and Traffic Reporting Service (serving metro Detroit)
and 20 terabyte Server Farm (Wal-Mart extranet )


































Four weeks ago, I introduced a specific highway/office research park site near Plymouth Michigan as yet
another "indifferent object" to by milled and mined. That introduction was accompanied by a list of _atmo-
spheric inputs_ which could (also) be thought of conventionally as "program," but I have gotten more and
more interested in how it is that architecture exceeds program on many levels, so I renamed (and therefore
recalibrated) the list. I am tricky that way. See the attachment for the atmospheric inputs.

The studio is trying out a few things that might bear on your comments:

First, we want to move, to produce, to propose, to game, to stretch, to swell, to forget, we want to be fast
with the work, emphasizing ways and beating the shit out of "the way" as a conceptual limit.

Second, we want to be relational, to practice AND. We want for our inevitable "insides" to be soiled by their
"outsides." We want sticky surfaces, we like leaks, we are leaking.

Third, we want stress.

Fourth, this is dirty realism. This is not abstract. When we go home for thanksgiving, our families ask us
what we are doing in studio and we studder, stammer, pause in mid thought. "My friend is doing a library,
a prefab house, a landscape in the city," we say.... "I am working on a ." We explain, "My teacher
wants to teach the way Bob Dylan produces a song. He wants to starting the middle with a clowns mask,
and a guitar riff. He wants us to be a production studio. He thinks each one of us are many, maybe even
too many, a crowd, a production studio." "He is listening to too much RL Burnside, and frequently shouts
Bonaroo_... It is worth the money though, Dad... I mean I can't tell you about all the things I don't know,
he wants us to know more and to forget more."


-]ason Young

























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BUSINESS INNOVATRIUM


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BARBORSHOP(UNI SE)
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CHAIN LOGISTICS CO (TRUCKING AND DISTRIBUTION)


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Considering the economic contributions made by the poultry industry and Americans undeniable love of chicken, I found it fitting that
in September of 2005, my studio work joined in the celebration of September as national chicken month. In its 16th year of observance
this celebration sought to highlight the health benefits, ease of preparation, and the versatility of chicken. Avigdor Chaner, with his
molecular shuffling of chicken DNA was a guest of honor. Thus, we now enjoy, "The featherless chicken," an idea of the year as adver-
tised by New York times magazine.

An error bias, the kind and degree of scientific uncertainty an activity might have, has implications for the process agencies use to
reach sound and publicly acceptable decisions. This notion of public acceptance is interesting in its ability to accelerate and decelerate.
In lieu of the featherless chicken, it seems that societies rather than agencies make these decisions based on a system base on want
and desire in correlation with the speeds that these desirables are able to reach them. The featherless chicken acts as an agent of
understanding this condition.
The injection of Chaner's accepted oddity into the media created a delay of kind within evaluation, accelerating this sliding precaution-
ary error bias window, thus pushing public acceptance.
When I look at this red bird, the abstract notion of farm no longer registers. I feel the reality of my situation, and position within it.
This is a quote I came across online which sited Chaner's name.
"And then there's parsley. What a great bit of design: grow some parsley in the garden and you can cut some off happy in knowledge
it will grow back. How about a sheep with the same feature? I'll bet Chaner is already working on it. Just splice in some axolotl genes
and we could all keep one sheep in the backyard. Leg of lamb for dinner? Just hand me that knife, and give me a moment."
Axolotl is studied for its rapid regeneration rate. It is in a sense, a tiger salamander which never undergoes metamorphoses. It
reaches sexual maturity within the larvae stage of development. They live much longer than metamorphosis salamanders, and can
regenerate entire limbs.
The axolotl gene is studied very heavily for this reason. It has been found that male humans are attracted to neotenous or childlike
features within females.















-f








Growth Chart Diagram:

I began to think of growth in a new way after inves-
tigating the featherless chicken as a cultural inven-
tion. I began to understand the intricate systems of
circulation and reservior within a capitalistic society.
This chart tracks the variation of growth and impact
each programmatic element might yield.
























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Work of four students (Jennifer Hinesman, David Karle, Lauen Mitchell, and Zach Rose) within IWS
stduio displayed at the 2006 Annual Student Exhibition, "Somethin' Somethin' Architecture."


4W





PAGE 1

Graduate Studio option_ Ideas Work Society (IWS) Instructor Associate Professor Jason Young “The Featherless Chicken,” Idea of the year as advertised by New York Times Magazine; Practicing How to ForgetProfessor Avigdor Cahaner of Hebrew University in Israel has bread a featherless chicken from one which has a recessive gene of being featherless with a larger typical broiler chicken.

PAGE 2

What has happened: _The New York Times has been publi shing “the year in ideas” for the past four years, cura ting what they feel are emerging situations/conditions that de ne the contemporary. _I edited from their published ideas (over 200 of them) down to 22 that I felt had that certain something. _12 students each drew one idea (blind draw) from a hat that contained the 22. _Students have been asked to explore the idea, its implications for culture (i.e. Why is this an “idea of the year?”), and also the degree to which those implications migh t be spatial, or better yet, explored spatially. _I gave the students three simultaneous exercises to work through. It was really one exercise to be done three times, on three distinct “indifferent subjects.” By “indifferent subject,” I mean that there is no real causal relationship between the collection of ideas and the things I asked them to work on/through. The three were: one Idaho baking potato; one copy of a Sunday edition of the New York Times from two years ago (each student had consecutive Sundays); and a collection of 7 “captures,” images of a strange lineage and obtuse nature. The exercise prompted t hem to map the “indifferent subject”, to speculate based on the mappings, and to develop (something). Why, or to what end: Many of the ideas being explored in the studio have overlapping implicatio ns having to do with the change in cultural relationships brought along with the onslaught of the digital. Various prognosticators are claiming that physicality and speci c spatiality will wane as digital operating procedures are advanced. This studio remains committed to the notion that if physical ordering proves to be a ction, the architect would (still) have the irreducible strangeness of building at the core of any project. And, further, that the practice of architecture might be reconsidered under this crush ing pressure, and that each architect might work as a production studio, nding methods from the onsla ught as opposed to claiming resistance as a viable model. Resultant “modes” of research would best be understood as “modes” of design. ~Jason Young

PAGE 3

Mapping of an Idaho Baked Potato: This material i nvestig ation yielded an in terest in neutrality and non-neutrality. It marked the start of an emergent process to be carried out through the semester; to nd latencies. I wanted to see something else in addition to what I would have seen anyway.

PAGE 5

“Biopsy” and “Xrays” of New York Times Sunday E ddition. Within this study I was able to experience the space of the newspaper in a new way. I became aware of its beauty.

PAGE 7

iwsatmospheric input doesn’t remind me (of anything) _Actuary (Property & Casualty) and Barber Shop (uni-sex) and Business Innovatrium (best practices) and Business Incubator (next practices) and Decommissioned Stealth Fighter (F-117A Nighthawk) and Parking (37 vehicles) and Supply Chain Logistics Company (Trucking and Distribution) and Restaurant (Sushi) and Traffic Reporting Service (serving metro Detroit) and 20 terabyte Server Farm (Wal-Mart extranet )

PAGE 8

Four weeks ago, I introduced a speci c highway/of ce research park site near Plymouth Michigan as yet another “indifferent object” to by milled and mined. That introduction was accompanied by a list of _atmospheric inputs_ which could (also) be t hought of conventionally as “pr ogram,” but I have g otten more and more interested in how it is that architecture exceeds program on many levels, so I renamed (and therefore recalibrated) the list. I am tricky that way. See the attachment for the atmospheric inputs. The studio is trying out a few things that might bear on your comments: First, we want to move, to produce, to propose, to game, to stretch, to swell, to forget, we want to be fast with the work, emphasizing ways and beating the shit out of “the way” as a conceptual limit. Second, we want to be relational, to practice AND. We want for our inevitable “insides” to be soiled by their “outsides.” We want sticky surfaces, we like leaks, we are leaking. Third, we want stress. Fourth, this is dirty realism. This is not abstract When we go home for thanksgiving, our families ask us what we are doing in studio and we studder, stammer, pause in mid thought. “My friend is doing a library, a prefab house, a landscape in the city,” we say.... “I am working on a .” We explain, “My teacher wants to teach the way Bob Dylan produces a song. He wants to start in the middle with a clowns mask, and a guitar riff. He wants us to be a production studio. He thinks each one of us are many, maybe even too many, a crowd, a production studio.” “He is listening to too much RL Burnside, and frequently shouts _Bonaroo_... It is worth the money though, Dad... I mean I can’t tell you about all the things I don’t know, he wants us to know more and to forget more.” ~Jason Young

PAGE 9

P r oduc t io n The gradual beginning or commin rise. A progression from simpler to more complex fo r ms; unfolding of events. A process of becomming larger or longer or numerous or more impo r tant. A tangible and visible entity; an entity that can cast a shado w P r ocess M ar k Place Direct Dit T arget T T Pla n e M a ss Shadow S hap e S t r uc t u r e An abno r mal proliferation of tissue; Impair ment of no r mal physical function affecting pa r t or all of the whole. py py s s e l r e h t a e F P oc h e Condition Lo f t E mer g enc e T H P ARKIN G B USINESS INNOVATRIU M B USINESS INNOVATRIU M B USINESS INNOVATRIU M BUSINESS INCUBATOR B USINESS INCUBATOR B ARBOR SHOP ( UNI-SEX ) D E CO MMI SS I O NED S TEALTH FI G HTER ( F-117A NI G HTHAWK ) R ESTAURANT ( SUSHI ) T RAFFI C REP O RTIN G S ERVI C E (METR O DETR O IT) S ERVER FAR M S UPPLY CHAIN LOGISTICS CO. ( TRUCKING AND DISTRIBUTION ) S UPPLY CHAIN LOGISTICS CO. ( TRUCKING AND DISTRIBUTION ) S ERVER FAR M S ERVER FAR M S UPPLY C HAIN L OG I S TI CS CO (TRU C KIN G AND DI S TRIBUTI O N ) B U S INE SS INN O VATRIU M PARKIN G R E S TAURANT (S U S HI )a B ARB O R S H O P (UNIS EX ) ACTUARY (PROPERTY & CASUALTY) SSS T RAFFIC REPORTING SERVICE ( METRO DETROIT ) DECOMMISSIONED STEALTH FIGHTER ( F-117A NIGHTHAWK ) A CTUARY ( PROPERTY & CASUALTY ) A CTUARY ( PROPERTY & CASUALTY ) ACTUARY (PROPERTY & CASUALTY) BUSINESSINCUBATOR A C TUARY ( PR O PERTY & C A S UALTY ) P ARKIN G

PAGE 10

Growth Chart Diagram: I began to think of growth in a new way after investigating the featherless chicken as a cultural invention. I began to understand the intricate systems of circulation and reservior within a capitalistic society. This chart tracks the variation of growth and impact each programmatic element might yield. Considering the economic contributions made by the poultry industry and Americans undeniable love of chicken, I found it tting that in September of 2005, my studio work joined in the celebration of Sept ember as national chicken month. In its 16th year of ob servance this celebration sought to highlight the health bene ts, ease of preparation, and the versatility of chicken. Avigdor Chaner, with his molecular shuf ing of chicken DNA was a guest of honor. Thus, we now enjoy, “The featherless chicken,” an idea of the year as advertised by New York times magazine. An error bias, the kind and degree of scienti c uncertainty an activity might have, has implications for the process agencies use to reach sound and publicly acceptable decisions. This notion of public acceptance is interesting in its ability to accelerate an d decelerate. In lieu of the featherless chicken, it seems that societies rather than agencies make these decisions based on a system base on want and desire in correlation with the speeds that these desirables are able to reach them. The featherless chicken acts as an age nt of understanding this condition. The injection of Chaner’s accepted oddity into the media created a delay of kind within evaluation, accelerating this sliding p recautionary error bias window, thus pushing public acceptance. When I look at this red bird, the abstract notion of farm no longer registers. I feel the reality of my situation, and positio n within it. This is a quote I came across online which sited Chaner’s name. “And then there’s parsley. What a great bit of design: grow some parsley in the garden and you can cut some off, happy in kno wledge it will grow back. How about a sheep with the same feature? I’ll bet Chaner is already working on it. Just splice in some ax olotl genes and we could all keep one sheep in the backyard. Leg of lamb for dinner? Just hand me that knife, and give me a moment.” Axolotl is studied for its rapid regeneration rate. It is in a sense, a tiger salamander which never undergoes metamorphoses. It reaches sexual maturity within the larvae stage of development. They live much longer than metamorphosis salamanders, and can regenerate entire limbs. The axolotl gene is studied very heavily for this reason. It has been found that male humans are attracted to neotenous or chi ldlike features within females.

PAGE 16

Work of four students (Jennifer Hinesman, David Karle, Lauen Mitchell, and Zach Rose) within IWS stduio displayed at the 2006 Annual Student Ex hibition, “Somethin’ Somethin’ Architecture.”








COMPANY PROJECTS AWARDS LOCATION CONTACT










DESIRE






DESIRE






DESIRE


file:///C:/Documents%20and%20OSettings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/id.html [11/29/2007 5:04:29 PM]




the facade


COMPANY PROJECTS AWARDS LOCATION CONTACT
The Facade


View or Print
the GUIDE


View or Print the
INSTRUCTIONS


\/ \\


o Adobe
View or Print the
RESOURCES


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the facade


jump to

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DESIRE





. DESIRE





. DESIRE


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LINE: The irreducible unit


COMPANY PROJECTS AWARDS LOCATION CONTACT
the line





SAdobe
View or Print
the GUIDE /


i i N


Adob .......- -.
View or Print the "---
INSTRUCTIONS





Adobe
View or Print the
RESOURCES







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LINE: The irreducible unit


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. DESIRE





. DESIRE





. DESIRE





/
..,.. ..


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awards


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tn


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awards


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. DESIRE





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. DESIRE





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W.I.G.O


COMPANY PROJECTS AWARDS LOCATION CONTACT
What is (actually) going on?777


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contact


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the GUIDE


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ImitcheII26@gmaiI.com


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contact


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Lauren Mitchell
Lmitchell26(a)qmail.com CEO
Image Metaphysician


Guide:

This guide is intended to help you notice things about the images which are looming at the
I- bottom of each of the categories below (forces that loom within me). I am very happy with the
results of my gathering, and I think that something has appeared. There are a few prize
moments I hope you will enjoy. The guide is meant to be a suggestion on how to move
through the site. It is not imperative that you move through in this order. At some point in my
gathering I discovered three patterns within my internal disturbances. These three categories
are represented by the three images that remain in the site information bar at the bottom of
my CSS template. The sensation of the image reveals the sensation of the internal
disturbance. These are always links within each of the categories below, and I have labeled
them a, b, and c, below from left to right for the purposes of this guide. When you click on
one, you will always have the option to go back to that particular category. I think in the next
phase of this project I would like to start adding links to other pages within the site (cross
pollinating).

Move the mouse over the images in a swirly motion so that you understand the lines. If I new
flash well enough the line would be incorporated more in a tactile way with sound. This will
come later.

Patterns repeat infinitely. The flowing movement within each of the images shapes the
contour. Color and image processing are the repeating actions in my process which allow for
the discovery of resemblances and to see what make things have in common that make their
identities ambiguous. The


"In the paintings, the human figure is the "unit of measure." Bacon uses the figure as a
vehicle to track the sensations. When we see anatomically correct traits which are distorted
smeared and truncated, feelings emerge. Bacon then introduces an asignifying trait which is
again some graphic. It is something that is analogous to the figure only through our
diagrammatic analogy. The meat is in its situation what the figure is in its. We begin to feel
like the meat when we look at the paintings," (project 1.)

"Using free marks, and smudging, Bacon feels his way into understanding the forces within
the figure he paints. Bacon states that there is no chance except "manipulated" chance, and
no accident except "utilized" accident. The contour mediates this process, and is where
"gathering" takes place within the art work. It is within the contour of Bacon's paintings that
associations are made between an open mouth, a cut artery and a jacket sleeve. These all
share a contour. The gathering principle of Bacon's contour is that it gathers asignified traits,"
(project 1.)


Additionally I wanted to form a gathering device for some of my personal thesis work, while
learning about myself. I see this site as the construction lines for a larger ongoing project.
Two of my worlds have emerged as actually one.

In making this site I have learned something about the forces within me I hope that you are
able to do the same.






Lauren Mitchell
Lmitchell26(a)qmail.com CEO
Image Metaphysician



***Note: Rollovers are almost always links.

Company:
a. Notice the delicate veil. Click when the mouse touches a spot that elicits a sound.
Pop the balloon.
b. Trace the line which separates the inside from the outside to sense the feeling of the
flowing mark which is the irreducible unit within everything (lazylb.html).
c. Pop open the corset, pierce the skin, and fold the tab.

Projects:
a. Burst the clot, and trace the roller coaster.
b. Pop the balloon, drink the milk, and circle the baby.
c. Pop the bubble, and trace the life line and feel its force.

Awards:
a. Pop the pimple, pop the bubble, and trace the gentle flowing force of the water.
c. Experience a climax.

Location:
Click on and go "Home."
a. Relax and release.

Contact:
This page allows you to e mail me with comments or questions.






Lauren Mitchell
Lmitchell26(a)qmail.com CEO
Image Metaphysician


Instructions:

( Image category = Inner distraction

Instruction 1: AUDIE/CE(analogy artists = Rovner and Ritchie) Maintaining that viewers
naturally seek instructive premises, target their curiosity and ego by imposing responsibility
onto the viewer, rendering them effectively involved.

It was my intention for the site to be seductive. I wish to target architects and graphic
designers, but more generally those who hide behind a shared facade of some kind. The look
of the site comes from a place inside of me which I hide behind. This wispy filter tends to be
gray scaled, and filters out anything that might be jarring to the nervous system in anyway.
Here I am genderless. My inspirations must remain hidden behind this neutrality. I have tried
to trick the eye into feeling comfortable within the facade of a company web site. This notion
comes right out of Deleuze.

Within the project I use this mask to gently reveal my inner distractions. The inner distractions
have gathered into three main categories which are looming at the bottom of Company,
Projects, Awards, and Location. The processing which the images go through is resultant of
the habitual grid of the facade layer. I found patterns in my gathering which will be discussed
in the Guide more directly.

Specifically target an audience that holds a delusion about your message/ art/ image trait.

"Realize that you are in a situation a historical moment where flows of forces are acting on
you. Heidegger takes an active position with the Nazi party in his situation similarly. In so
doing, he thought he could influence the masses. The pattern to our lives can be seen and
felt. The apparatus of our Dasein now supports a Logic of distributed categories. The media
flood is for us what the all abiding sway of nature was to the Greeks. They gathered with
words. We now gather in a new way to learn and bring forth," (project 1).

"'One issue of the New York Times contains more information than people in medieval times
received in a lifetime. Yet we get it in a flash. We are expert information managers,' He
believes that viewers naturally seek instructive premises and that curiosity provides a
frequently neglected opportunity for art to engender a lasting influence," (Weintraub P. 55).

"When Ritchie amasses diverse systems of knowledge, he is mirroring his life experience. The
exponential proliferation of information is a distinguishing characteristic of today's
environment. Managing this glut of information is a recent addition to the challenge of
human survival. Ritchie describes the anxiety and bewilderment that result from the relentless
bombardment with information as "the future unknown, the past as labyrinth of
contradictions, our powers of description have failed us." His artistic endeavor seems
designed to rescue a populace in distress," (Weintraub P. 55).

She utilizes metaphors and symbols to accomplish the task of communicating complex,
interwoven perspectives. Rovner offers her audience opportunities to go beyond first
impressions and undertake an active search for meaning... It explores how audiences discern
meanings that are obscured by metaphors and camouflaged as symbols. This imposes a
responsibility upon viewers. They must recognize this difference, deduce its relationship with






Lauren Mitchell
Lmitchell26(a)qmail.com CEO
Image Metaphysician

the subject, and interpret the manner in which it enriches the work's significance. (Weintraub
P. 45).

"Rovner states that processing proceeds until she discovers 'resemblances among mutual
parts, what things have in common that make their identity ambiguous,'" (Weintraub P. 47).



2a. INSPIRATION (analogy artist = LaVerdiere) Collect a childhood memory and document it.
Authenticity is important in the usefulness of what will be rendered, thus look inside to feel
what is triggering this memory as you proceed.

This is where I found a motivating spark. What you uniquely come to understand in your
gathering happens based on a logic within yourself which is predetermined based on your
sensory inputs to date. If this event had not happened, the project would definitely look very
different.

The memory
Methodist preschool in central Florida somewhere around 1984:

We were inside a large space where we went to play games
occasionally. Unsure of why we were there, I followed the feet of
the person in front of me in line. This part is very blurry. At some
point we were instructed to make two lines, one for boys and one for
girls. Of course, I went into the "girl" line. The girl in front of me
was wearing a pink dress (I think my mind made that up). Anyway,
she turned around and made a mean face at me while saying, "This
is the girl line! You have to go over there to the boy line!"

Confusion set in as I looked down at my pink Kangaroo tennis shoes.
In that moment I hated my mom for cutting my hair. I don't
remember anything else from that day, except for telling my mom
what had happened. I told her that I wanted to grow my hair out. I
did so, and it remained very long until high school age. I also
refused to wear anything but dresses until I was in 3rd grade, which
stopped only because another child pointed out that this was "not
normal."


"He believes that we are ready to go back and actually experience 'Being' before it was
crushed under the pressure of the infinitive "is," and to utilize practical based reasoning to
seek out logics that are affect driven. These logics would find "truths" grounded within the
erotic forces that flow through our bodies. Heidegger suggests that it is within these forces -
the recognition of beauty and what generates the golden section that the sway can be felt.
This is the sway that was felt and perceived by the Greeks in their confrontation with nature at
the onslaught of the logic of written language (literacy). Heidegger maintains that there are
fundamental truths that are driven by the recognition of beauty," (project one).

Bacon's process depicts the metaphysics of an individual within a very particular situation.
Bacon tracks the affect produced on his own body by a force and studies those affects and
forces at the same time. His paintings are a document of his procedure," (project one).






Lauren Mitchell
Lmitchell26(a)qmail.com CEO
Image Metaphysician

"It is from the past that he discovers inspirational models of creative genius... He is inspired by
the missing chapters in recorded history. He is intrigued by the gaps in the official chronicles,
the unsavory facts expunged from idealized narratives, all the stuff that has either been
suppressed, forgotten or rejected," (Weintraub P. 142).

"LaVerdiere's challenge is to distract us from the perpetual renewal of available and glittering
enticements so we can develop our own creative potential," (Weintraub P. 142).



2b. ARTISTIC SELF (analogy artist = Lambert):
Find a link between this memory and a personal facade that you utilize today or some
catastrophe during your lifetime. This can actually be an exaggerated or made up experience.

I realized that my memory determined my attitude about my current projects as architecture
academic. I have come to see that in my partner relationships as well as in my academic life, I
repeatedly force others to reevaluate their concept about what their roles are. I would like to
build up this portion of the site, by using more of my work within the "company" links. For
now, there are a few major connections that are highlighted by rollover text boxes within the
main facade pages.

"As Foucault reminds us in his "history of sexuality" series, the "self" was constructed with
practices of writing and thinking (a grammatological take, in fact). The practice we are
inventing has relevance for a new mode of subject formation. This ability to "take up an
"attitude" different from some "natural stance" is relevant in this larger historical shift," (Dr.
Ulmer: response to an e mail I posted about the pattern of my partner choices manifesting in
my career choices.)


2c. ATTITUDE (analogy artists = Maggi and Yanagi):
Exhibit or transpose the unfamiliar onto a grid of the familiar.

In my experiment, the grid of the familiar is driven by my academic facade. The more
successfullam at expressing this image, the more room Igive to otherness. As the facade's
logic becomes transparent, it breaks apart and begins to bend. You can see this happen
within the CSS template. Ihave been seeking to understand whyI only like what is familiar.

"Certainly -giving up the ordinary and going back into questioning interpretation is a leap.
"Only one who takes the right running start can leap," (188). I have tried to make this leap.
Heidegger suggested that as the proper running start one must first comprehend their
situation. Secondly, we must step out of what Heidegger refers to as the canny, the familiar,
what we are accustomed to. In other words, see ourselves within the situation. In
'unconcealing' or making appear what we forgot how to see, we might actually begin
experiencing again the fundamental questioning of Beign, and Phusis. We will feel the all-
abiding-sway we are in and that is within us," (from project 1).

"We only like what is familiar. In reference to human nature Heidegger says, 'they get bogged
down in their routes, get stuck in ruts, and by getting stuck they draw in the circle of their
world, get enmeshed in seeming, and thus shut themselves out of Being. In this way they turn
around and around within their own circle. They can turn aside everything that threatens the
circuit,' (168). He refers to this as being Canny," (from project 1).






Lauren Mitchell
Lmitchell26(a)qmail.com CEO
Image Metaphysician


"Certain physical postures correlate with shock while others are associated with humility.
Maggi's mode of work brings his shoulders forward and his gaze downward. Likewise, the act
of looking at his diminutive creations requires his audience to assume a position of
reverence," (Weintraub p. 273).

"Maggi perpetually postpones completion. Because he conceives of beginning devoid of
endings, his works propel toward infinite generation. This model applies to his career and
also to individual pieces. They usually originate with a random mark. This mark suggests
another, and another. They proliferate, expanding exponentially into the surrounding spaces.
Those lines that do not produce further patterns often continue as dots or dashes to imply
further growth," (Weintraub p. 274).

"Maggi actually produces works of art like generations of offspring from single sources,"
(Weintraub p. 277).



3. MISSION (analogy artists = Wearing and Ritchie):
-Rescue a populace in distress by exposing that they are in distress. This requires authenticity
on the part of the image metaphysician. This further explains using the artists' methods as an
analogy in my invention. In order for this to work, my emotions and feelings directing my
gathering of images has to be real. In so doing, the image category effectively teaches the
audience about this internal distress.

I want people to realize that they aren't as simple as they think they are. The image that they
wish to put forth is not static. It could change based on whether you had pepperoni pizza the
night before or not. What determines our actions is much more tenuous that we think it is.

"Heidegger conveys how the trajectory of the Greek's experience, conception, and
interpretation of language essentially their definite understanding of "Being" has set a very
narrow standard for the West. This narrowness, as Heidegger has established, leaves out
some fundamental traits of 'Being' which were present at its inception. We hope to unhinge
our obsession with the infinitive form of the verb 'to be,' 'is,'" (project 1).

"As an artist, Wearing adopts the demeanor of a social scientist. She constructs a catalogue of
true identities, thereby exposing the distortions inherent in most projections and assumptions.
Her work attempts to mitigate the psychological damage most people both cause and suffer,"
(Weintraub p. 118).

"we all control each other's patterns and we all have ideas of ethics and morals and PC. But
then that gets exploited, and everyone exploits each other, an that creates limitations to what
we feel we can do," (Weintraub p. 118).

"When Ritchie amasses diverse systems of knowledge, he is mirroring his life experience. The
exponential proliferation of information is a distinguishing characteristic of today's
environment. Managing this glut of information is a recent addition to the challenge of
human survival. Ritchie describes the anxiety and bewilderment that result from the relentless
bombardment with information as "the future unknown, the past as labyrinth of
contradictions, our powers of description have failed us." His artistic endeavor seems
designed to rescue a populace in distress," (Weintraub P. 55).






Lauren Mitchell
Lmitchell26(a)qmail.com CEO
Image Metaphysician


4. SUCCESS:
The Image Category appears. This means there must be recognizable patterns that emerge
which can be repeatable. Use found materials, and utilize chance.

This structuring element, the diagram, is a fundamentally repeating operation. Bacon had
one, so we will try to find one as well. There are a few operations within Bacons diagram
relate particularly well to our situation, namely his use of found materials... Rather, two
things may resemble by analogy such that a friend of Bacon, within his situation, is like the
beef or the bird in its situation.

"The diagram ends the preparatory work and begins the act of painting.... It is a violent chaos
in relation to the figurative givens, but it is a germ of rhythm in relation to the new order of
the painting," (83).






Lauren Mitchell
Lmitchell26(a)qmail.com CEO
Image Metaphysician


Resources:


S-1. Martin Heidegger, "Introduction to Metaphysics."
2. Gilles Deleuze, Francis Bacon: "The Logic ofSensation."

The poetics for this project grew out of the first project of the semester. Using the two
texts above Ihave begun to understand the potential and importance of becoming
electorate. lam no longer literate; lam now also working towards ecectracy. Specifically,
in the classes' efforts to invent this new way of understanding and communicating about
the world, we have been working with the notion oflmage Metaphysics.

http://www.nwe.ufl.edu/-lmitchel

Please spend some time reading over the first project to get a more comprehensive
understanding of what this exhibit is about (see above link).

"There is a dimension that is opened up within the artwork of Francis Bacon which is not accessible
through sheer literate forms of metaphysics. Deleuze portrays Bacon's work in its process of
functioning; suggesting that image metaphysics is not static. Its gathering devises are not fixed as are
the gathering devices within literate metaphysics. In this dimension, Bacon actually thinks with his
desires and feelings. He makes the affect smart."

3. Linda Weintraub, "In The Making: Creative Options for ContemporaryArt."

In the first half of the semester we looked at one artists process as an analogy. Using
Weintraub's book we have looked at 17 more. My instructions have been generated out of
this reading. I have named the artists of particular interests, and have used the format of
her book to create basic instructions so that you will be able to do what I did.

"'Inspire' is associated with the originating breath that infuses an organism with the energy that is so
distinct from mundane experience, it is described by Ovid as 'the deity within us who breathes that
divine fire by which we are animated,' Inspiration marks a significant beginning, particularly one laden
with risks and exhilaration. Artists pursue this initiating spark. Art historians contemplate its effects.
Still, inspiration remains a mysterious component of the artistic process." (p. 122).

4. Google image search:

Disclaimer: I do not claim responsibility for the images in this web site; however I do feel
entitled to use them in my image metaphysics. I have spent quite a bit of time
constructing the way they interact with each other. Becoming curious about the "image
flood" we are now a part of, I have used this as the main pool from which to gather.




Facade


COMPANY
Non-neutrality passing through a fragile facade of neutrality creates confusion


jump to

I I


file ///C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/dizzyl html [11/29/2007 5 04 39 PM]




no more work, Ijust want to play


COMPANY
woof which way do I go?


jump to
I I


file ///C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/lazyl html [11/29/2007 5 04 39 PM]




choke collar


COMPANY
I'm feeling all wound up I just want to relax





C


jump to
r I


file ///C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/lustl html [11/29/2007 5 04 40 PM]




spinning spinning spinning


PROJECTS
My head is spinning, I don't know if I can handle it


jump to

I I


file ///C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/dizzy2 html [11/29/2007 5 04 40 PM]




no more work, Ijust want to play


PROJECTS


jump to
I I


file ///C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/lazy2 html [11/29/2007 5 04 42 PM]




she wants to play


PROJECTS
Oh, I forgot about you


jump to
I I


file /C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/lust2 html [11/29/2007 5 04 43 PM]




seeking release from myself


AWARDS


















jump to


EZZlo


file ///C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/dizzy3 html [11/29/2007 5 04 44 PM]




no more work, Ijust want to play


AWARDS
DUD



























jump to
I I


file ///C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/lazy3 html [11/29/2007 5 04 45 PM]




sexuality


AWARDS
sexuality



























jump to

E I


file ///C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/lust3 html [11/29/2007 5 04 46 PM]




















































































u*


-/le- Cuocumenrs/zuancv/zusemng katnk De keep ie i jiacelitml (1 01 1) [11/l-/LI/ L U4 46 'M)


























































































































file IC /Documents%O2and%/20Settings/kartk s/Desktop/Thess/space html (2 of2) [11/29/2007 5 04 46 PM]




I seek the OM point


LOCATION
Eastring Theory- Doug Dickeson (String Theory)


jump to
r z


file ///C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/dizzy4 html [11/29/2007 5 04 47 PM]




patterns repeat infinitely


LOCATION
OM
















-D


jump to
I I


file ///C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/lazy4 html [11/29/2007 5 04 48 PM]




OM


LOCATION
OM















D


jump to
I I


file /C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/lust4 html [11/29/2007 5 04 48 PM]








COMPANY


jump to
I I


file ///C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/dizzyla html [11/29/2007 5 04 49 PM]




dormant within


COMPANY
the female stirs under a neutralizing veil


jump to
I I


file /C /Documents%20ando20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/lazy a html [11/29/2007 5 04 51 PM]




choke collar


COMPANY
there is nothing neutral about it


jump to
I I


file ///C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/lustl a html [11/29/2007 5 04 52 PM]




inside resembles the outside


PROJECTS

Are the inner forces constructed like things which have been given labels on the outside?


jump to
I I


file /C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/dizzy2a html [11/29/2007 5 04 54 PM]








PROJECTS


jump to
r I


file ///C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/lazy2a html [11/29/2007 5 04 57 PM]




life preserver


PROJECTS
rescue yourself from yourself


jump to

I I


file ///C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/lust2a html [11/29/2007 5 04 57 PM]


''









AWARDS
flutter
























jump to
E I


file ///C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/dizzy3a html [11/29/2007 5 04 58 PM]




YES I


AWARDS


























jump to
r I


file ///C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/lust3a html [11/29/2007 5 04 59 PM]




POP


COMPANY
*POP*


(O ru iON_____ o
a feeling of embarrassment
that leaves you confused

discombobulationD


embarrassment


jump to

I I


file /C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/dizzylb html [11/29/2007 5 05 00 PM]




choke collar


COMPANY
resemblance


























jump to
II
I -


file ///C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/lustlb html [11/29/2007 5 05 01 PM]




mother


PROJECTS


jump to


rrzzo


file ///C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/lazy2b html [11/29/2007 5 05 02 PM]




Play time


PROJECTS
My head is spinning, I don't know if I can handle it


jump to
I I


file ///C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/lust2b html [11/29/2007 5 05 03 PM]




float away


AWARDS
float away


























jump to
E I


file /C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/dizzy3b html [11/29/2007 5 05 05 PM]




mother


PROJECTS
calm


jump to
I I


file ///C /Documents%20and%20Settmgs/karthik s/Desktop/Thesis/lazy2c html [11/29/2007 5 05 06 PM]


r

lp";l





PAGE 1

ID COMPANY | PROJECTS | AWARDS | LOCATION | CONTACT................................................................................................................................................... DESIRE DESIRE DESIRE ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/id.html [11/29/2007 5:04:29 PM]

PAGE 2

the facade COMPANY | PROJECTS | AWARDS | LOCATION | CONTACTThe Facade file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/company.html (1 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:04:31 PM]

PAGE 3

the facade jump to DESIRE DESIRE DESIRE ID | | | | ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/company.html (2 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:04:31 PM]

PAGE 4

LINE: The irreducible unit COMPANY | PROJECTS | AWARDS | LOCATION | CONTACTthe line file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/projects.html (1 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:04:32 PM]

PAGE 5

LINE: The irreducible unit jump to DESIRE DESIRE DESIRE ID | | | | ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/projects.html (2 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:04:32 PM]

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awards COMPANY | PROJECTS | AWARDS | LOCATION | CONTACT................................................................... file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/awards.html (1 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:04:32 PM]

PAGE 7

awards jump to DESIRE DESIRE DESIRE ID | | | | ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/awards.html (2 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:04:32 PM]

PAGE 8

W.I.G.O COMPANY | PROJECTS | AWARDS | LOCATION | CONTACTWhat is (actually) going on???? HOME file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/location.html (1 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:04:34 PM]

PAGE 9

W.I.G.O jump to DESIRE DESIRE DESIRE ID | | | | ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/location.html (2 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:04:34 PM]

PAGE 10

contact COMPANY | PROJECTS | AWARDS | LOCATION | CONTACT................................... lmitchell26@gmail.com jump to DESIRE DESIRE DESIRE file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/contact.html (1 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:04:34 PM]

PAGE 11

contact | ID | file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/contact.html (2 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:04:34 PM]

PAGE 12

La u r e n M i t chel l Lmi t c h ell 2 6 @g mail c om C EO Image Metaphysici a n Guide: This guide is intended t o help you noti c e th ings about the images whic h a r e looming a t the bottom of each of the categories below (forces that loom within me). I am very happy with the results of my gathering, and I think that so mething has appeared. There are a few prize moments I hope you will enjoy The g u ide i s meant to be a su g gestion on how to move through the site. It is not impe rative that you move t h rough in t h is order At s ome point in my gathering I discovered three patter ns within my interna l disturbances. These three categories are r e pr e s e n t ed by the t h r ee i m ages that remain in the site in formation bar at the bottom of my CSS template. The sensati on of the image reveals th e sensation of the internal disturbance. These are always link s within each of t he categ o rie s below, a n d I have la b e le d them a, b and c, below f r om lef t to ri g h t f o r th e pu r poses o f this guide. W h en you click o n one, you will always have the op tion to go back to that particular category. I t hink in t he next phase of this project I would l ike to st a r t addin g links to o t he r p a ges within t h e si t e (cros s pollinating). Move the mouse over the images in a s w irly moti on so that you u n derstan d the lines I f I new flash well enough the line would be in c orporate d more in a tactile way with s o und. Thi s will come later. Patterns repeat infinitely. T he flowing movement wi thin each of t he images shapes the contour. Color an d image proce ssing are the repeating actions in my proces s which a llow for the d i scover y of resembl a nces an d to s ee wh a t make things have in common t h at make their iden t itie s ambiguous. The the painti n gs, the human figure is the "u nit of measure." Bacon uses the figure as a vehicle to track the sensations. When we see an atomically correct traits which are d i storted smeared and truncated, feelings emerge. Bacon th en introduces an as i gnifying trait which is again some graphic. It is s o mething that i s analogous t o the figure on l y through our diagrammatic analogy. The meat is in it s s i tuation wha t t he figure is in its. W e begi n t o fee l like the meat when we look at the paintin g (project 1.) free marks, and sm u dging, Bacon feels hi s way into understanding the forces within the figure he paints. Bacon states that th e r e is no chance except "manipulated" chance, and no accident except "utilized" accident. The contour mediates this process, and is where "gathering" takes place w i thin the art work. I t is wi t h i n t h e c o nt o u r o f B a c o n 's paint i n g s tha t associations a r e made between an open mouth, a cut a r tery and a ja c k et sleeve. T h ese all share a contour. The gathering principle of Bacon's con t our is tha t i t g athers asignified ( p r o jec t 1 .) Additionally I wanted to form a gathering device for some of my personal thesis work, while learnin g ab o ut myself. I s ee t his s i te a s the co nstr u c tion lines f o r a l a rge r ongoing p roject. Two of my worlds have emer ged as a c tually one. In making this site I h a ve learne d somethin g abo ut t he forces wi t hin me I ho p e tha t you a r e able to do the same.

PAGE 13

Lauren Mitchell Lmitchell26@gmail.com CEO Image Metaphysician ***Note: Rollovers are almost always links. Company: a. Notice the delicate veil. Click when the mouse touches a spot that elicits a sound. Pop the balloon. b. Trace the line which separates the inside from the outside to sense the feeling of the flowing mark which is th e irreducible unit within everything (lazy1b.html). c. Pop open the corset, pierce the skin, and fo ld the tab. Projects: a. Burst the clot, and trace the roller coaster. b. Pop the balloon, drink the milk, and circle the baby. c. Pop the bubble, and trace the li fe line and feel its force. Awards: a. Pop the pimple, pop the bubble, and trace the gentle flowing force of the water. c. Experience a climax. Location: Click on and go “Home.” a. Relax and release. Contact: This page allows you to e mail me with comments or questions.

PAGE 14

Lau r en Mitchell Lmit c h ell26@gmail. c om CEO Image Metaphysici a n I n s t r u c t i o n s : I m a g e c a t e g o r y = I n n e r d i s t r a c t i o n Instruction 1: AUDIENCE (analogy artists = Rovner and Ri tchie) Maintaining t h at viewer s naturally s e ek instructive premises, t a r get their curiosity an d eg o by imposing respon s ibilit y onto t he viewer, r enderin g t hem a ffectively inv o lved. It was my in t enti o n for t h e si t e t o be s e duct ive. I w i sh t o targe t architects and graphic designers, but more generally those who hide behin d a shared faade of s ome kind. The look of the s i te c o mes from a p l ace inside of me whic h I hide behind This wispy filter tends t o b e gray scaled, and filters o u t anything that might b e jarrin g to t he nervous system in anyway. Here I am genderless. My inspir ations must remain hidden behind t his neutrality. I have tried to trick the eye into feeling comfortable within the faade of a company we b site. This notion comes right out of Deleu z e Within t he p r oject I use this mask to g e ntly r eve a l m y inner d i str a c tions. The inne r distractions have gathered into three main categories whic h are looming at the bo ttom of Company, Projects, Awards, and Lo c ation. The processing which the images go through is resultant of the habitual grid of th e faade layer. I foun d patterns in my gathering which will be discussed in t he Guide more di r e ctl y Specifically t arget an audience t h at holds a d e l u s i o n a b o u t y o u r m e s s a g e / a r t / i m a g e t r a i t R e a l i z e t h a t y o u a r e i n a s i t u a t i o n a h i s t o r i c a l m o m e n t w h e r e f l o w s o f f o r c e s a r e a c t i n g o n y o u Heideg g er takes an active pos i tion w i th the Nazi p a rty in his s i tu a t ion s i milarly. In s o doing, he tho u ght he could influence the masses. The pattern to our lives can be s e en and felt. The apparatus of our Dasein now su p ports a Lo g i c of distributed c ategories. T h e media flood i s for us what the al l abiding sway o f na ture was t o the Greeks. T hey gathered with words. We n o w gather in a new way to l e arn and bring (project 1). issue of the New York Times contains more information than pe o ple in mediev a l time s received in a l i fe t ime. Yet w e get i t i n a flash W e a r e e x p e r t i n f o r m a t i o n m a n a g e r s He believes that v i ewers naturally seek instru c t ive premises and that curiosity provides a frequently ne g l ected opportunity for art to engender a l a sting influence (Weintraub P. 55). Ritchie amasses div e rse systems of knowledge, he is mirroring his l i fe experience. The exponential proliferation of i nformation is a dis t inguish i ng characteri s t ic of t o environment. Managing this glut of informat ion i s a recent addition to the challenge of human survi v al. Ritchie describes the a n xiety an d bewilderment that result from the relentles s bombardment with information as fu t ure unknown, the past a s la b yrinth of contradictions, our powers of description h ave failed us. Hi s artis t ic e n deavor seems designed to rescue a popul a ce in distress (Weintraub P. 55). She util i zes m etaphors and symbols to ac c o mp lish the t a sk of commun i cating compl e x, interwoven perspectives. Rovner off e rs he r a u dien c e op p or t uni t ies to g o beyond first impressions a nd undertake an active search fo r It explores how audiences discern meanings that are obscured by metaphors an d c amo u fla g ed as sym b o l s. Thi s imp o s e s a responsibil i ty upon viewers. They must recogniz e thi s di f f erence, deduce it s relation s h ip with

PAGE 15

Lauren Mitchell Lmitchell26@gmail.com CEO Image Metaphysician the subject, and interpret the manner in which it enriches the work’s significance. (Weintraub P. 45). “Rovner states that processing proceeds unt il she discovers ‘resemblances among mutual parts, what things have in common that make their identity ambiguous ,’” (Weintraub P. 47). 2a. INSPIRATION (analogy artist = LaVerdiere) – Collect a childhood mem ory and document it. Authenticity is important in the usefulness of what will be rendered, thus look inside to feel what is triggering this memory as you proceed. This is where I found a motiv ating spark. What you uniquely come to understand in your gathering happens based on a logic within your self which is predetermined based on your sensory inputs to date. If this event had not happened, the proj ect would definitely look very different. The memory Methodist preschool in central Florida somewhere around 1984: We were inside a large space where we went to play games occasionally. Unsure of why we we re there, I followed the feet of the person in front of me in line. This part is very blurry. At some point we were instructed to make two lines, one for boys and one for girls. Of course, I went into the “girl” line. The girl in front of me was wearing a pink dress (I think my mind made that up). Anyway, she turned around and made a mean face at me while saying, “This is the girl line! You have to go over there to the boy line!” Confusion set in as I looked down at my pink Kangaroo tennis shoes. In that moment I hated my mom for cutting my hair. I don’t remember anything else from that day, except for telling my mom what had happened. I told her that I wanted to grow my hair out. I did so, and it remained very long until high school age. I also refused to wear anything but dresses until I was in 3rd grade, which stopped only because another child pointed out that this was “not normal.” “ He believes that we are ready to go back and actually experience ‘Being’ before it was crushed under the pressure of the infinitive "is," and to utilize practical based reasoning to seek out logics that are affect driven These logics would find "truths" grounded within the erotic forces that flow through our bodies. Heid egger suggests that it is within these forces the recognition of beauty and what generates th e golden section that the sway can be felt. This is the sway that was felt and perceived by the Greeks in their confrontation with nature at the onslaught of the logic of written language (literacy). Heidegger maintains that there are fundamental truths that are driven by th e recognition of beauty,” (project one). Bacon's process depicts the metaphysics of an in dividual within a very particular situation. Bacon tracks the affect produced on his own body by a force and studies those affects and forces at the same time. His paintings are a document of his procedure,” (project one).

PAGE 16

Lauren Mitchell Lmitchell26@gmail.com CEO Image Metaphysician “It is from the past that he discovers inspirationa l models of creative genius… He is inspired by the missing chapters in recorded history. He is intrigued by the gaps in the official chronicles, the unsavory facts expunged from idealized narra tives, all the stuff that has either been suppressed, forgotten or rejected,” (Weintraub P. 142). “LaVerdiere’s challenge is to distract us from th e perpetual renewal of available and glittering enticements so we can develop our own creative potential,” (Weintraub P. 142). 2b. ARTISTIC SELF (analogy artist = Lambert): Find a link between this mem ory and a personal faade that you utilize today or some catastrophe during your lifetime. This can actually be an exagger ated or made up experience. I realized that my memory de termined my attitude about my current projects as architecture academic. I have come to see that in my partner relationships as well as in my academic life, I repeatedly force others to reevaluate their conce pt about what their roles ar e. I would like to build up this portion of the site, by using more of my work within the “company” links. For now, there are a few major connections that ar e highlighted by rollover text boxes within the main faade pages. “As Foucault reminds us in his "history of se xuality" series, the "self" was constructed with practices of writing and thinking (a grammatological take, in fact). The practice we are inventing has relevance for a new mode of subject formation. This ability to "take up an “attitude" different from some "natural stance" is re levant in this larger historical shift,” (Dr. Ulmer: response to an e mail I posted about th e pattern of my partner choices manifesting in my career choices.) 2c. ATTITUDE (analogy artists = Maggi and Yanagi): Exhibit or transpose the unfamiliar onto a grid of the familiar. In my experiment, the grid of the familiar is driven by my acade mic facade. The more successful I am at expressing this image, the m ore room I give to other ness. As the faade’s logic becomes transparent, it br eaks apart and begins to be nd. You can see this happen within the CSS template. I have been seeking to un derstand why I only like wh at is familiar. "Certainly -giving up the ordinary and going back into questioning interpretation is a leap. “Only one who takes the right running start can le ap," (188). I have tried to make this leap. Heidegger suggested that as the proper running start one must first comprehend their situation Secondly, we must step out of what Heidegger refers to as the canny, the familiar, what we are accustomed to. In other words, see ourselves within the situation. In ‘unconcealing’ or making appear what we fo rgot how to see, we might actually begin experiencing again the fundamental questioning of Beign, and Phusis. We will feel the allabiding-sway we are in and that is within us,” (from project 1). “We only like what is familiar. In reference to human nature Heidegger says, ‘they get bogged down in their routes, get stuck in ruts, and by getting stuck they draw in the circle of their world, get enmeshed in seeming, and thus shut th emselves out of Being. In this way they turn around and around within their own circle. They can turn aside everything that threatens the circuit,’ (168). He refers to this as being Canny,” (from project 1).

PAGE 17

Lauren Mitchell Lmitchell26@gmail.com CEO Image Metaphysician “Certain physical postures correlate with shoc k while others are associated with humility. Maggi’s mode of work brings his shoulders forw ard and his gaze downward. Likewise, the act of looking at his diminutive creations requir es his audience to assume a position of reverence,” (Weintraub p. 273). “Maggi perpetually postpones completion. Because he conceives of beginning devoid of endings, his works propel toward infinite gene ration. This model applies to his career and also to individual pieces. They usually orig inate with a random mark. This mark suggests another, and another. They proliferate, expand ing exponentially into the surrounding spaces. Those lines that do not produce further patterns often continue as dots or dashes to imply further growth ,” (Weintraub p. 274). “Maggi actually produces works of art like ge nerations of offspring from single sources,” (Weintraub p. 277). 3. MISSION (analogy artis ts = Wearing and Ritchie): -Rescue a populace in distress by exposing that they are in distres s. This requires authenticity on the part of the image metaphysic ian. This further explains us ing the artists’ methods as an analogy in my invention. In order for this to work, my emotions an d feelings directing my gathering of images has to be re al. In so doing, the image c ategory effectively teaches the audience about this internal distress. I want people to realize that they aren’t as simple as they think they are. The image that they wish to put forth is not static. It could change based on whet her you had pepperoni pizza the night before or not. What determines our actions is much more tenuous that we think it is. “Heidegger conveys how the trajectory of the Greek's experience, conception, and interpretation of language essentially their definite understanding of "Being" has set a very narrow standard for the West. This narrowness, as Heidegger has established, leaves out some fundamental traits of ‘Being’ which were present at its inception. We hope to unhinge our obsession with the infinitive form of the verb ‘to be,’ ‘is,’” (project 1). “As an artist, Wearing adopts the demeanor of a so cial scientist. She constructs a catalogue of true identities, thereby exposing the distortions inherent in most projections and assumptions. Her work attempts to mitigate the psychological damage most people both cause and suffer ,” (Weintraub p. 118). “we all control each other’s patterns and we all have ideas of ethics and morals and PC. But then that gets exploited, and everyone exploits ea ch other, an that creates limitations to what we feel we can do ,” (Weintraub p. 118). “When Ritchie amasses diverse systems of knowledge, he is mirroring his life experience. The exponential proliferation of information is a distinguishing characteristic of today’s environment. Managing this glut of informat ion is a recent addition to the challenge of human survival. Ritchie describes the anxiety an d bewilderment that result from the relentless bombardment with information as “the future unknown, the past as labyrinth of contradictions, our powers of description have failed us.” His artistic endeavor seems designed to rescue a populace in distress ,” (Weintraub P. 55).

PAGE 18

Lauren Mitchell Lmitchell26@gmail.com CEO Image Metaphysician 4. SUCCESS: The Image Category appears. This means there must be recognizable patterns that emerge which can be repeatable. Use found materials, and utilize chance. This structuring element, the diagram, is a fundamentally repeating operation. Bacon had one, so we will try to find one as well. Th ere are a few operations within Bacons diagram relate particularly well to our situation, name ly his use of found materials… Rather, two things may resemble by analogy such that a frien d of Bacon, within his situation, is like the beef or the bird in its situation. "The diagram ends the preparatory work and begi ns the act of painting.... It is a violent chaos in relation to the figurative givens, but it is a germ of rhythm in relation to the new order of the painting," (83).

PAGE 19

Lau r en Mitchell Lmit c h ell26@gmail. c om CEO Image Metaphysici a n Resources: 1. Martin Heidegger, 2. Gille s Deleuze, poe t ics this pr o je c t gr ew out o t the s e mester. Usin g the two texts above I have begun to understand the potential an d import a n m ing electrate I a m no longer literate ; I am now als o wo r kin g toward s ecectracy. in the to invent this new way unde rstanding and communicating about the wo r l d, w e h a ve b e en workin g with the no t i on Image Met a physics. Plea s e spen d some time r e adin g over t he s t project to get a more comprehensive understanding what this exhibit is about (see above link). is a d i m e nsion that is o pened up with i n the ar t w ork Francis B a con wh i c h is not a cc e ssible through sheer li t erate metaphys i cs. D e le uze p ortr a ys Bac o n's w ork in its pr o cess o suggesting that image metaphy s i cs is not static. Its gath ering d e vises a r e not x e d as ar e the gatherin g d e v i ces withi n li t erate metap h ys i c s. In this di m e nsion, B a con a c tuall y thinks wi t h his desires an d He makes the smart. 3. Linda Weintraub, In he Making: Creative Options Contemporary In the the semeste r we looked at one artists proc ess as an analogy. Using Wein t at 17 more. My instructions have b this reading. I have named the interests, and have used the her b ook to c r eate ba s ic instructions so that you will be abl e to do what I did. is as s ocia t ed with th e originatin g br e a th th at an orga n i sm wi t h the e n ergy t h at is so distinct mundane experience, it is d e scribed by Ovi d as d e ity withi n us wh o br e a th e s that divi n e e by which w e a r e a n i mated, Inspir a t ion marks a beginn i ng, particularly one lade n with risks and e x hi l a ration. Artists pursue this initia tin g spark. Art historians contemplate its inspi r atio n re m a ins a mys t erious comp on e nt the artisti c (p. 1 2 2). 4. Google image search: Disclaimer: I do no t claim respon s ibilit y r the images in this web site; however I do enti t led t o u s e them in my image met a ph ysics. I h a ve s p ent qui t e a b i t o ti m e constructing the way they interact wi t h each other. Becoming curious about t he i mage we a r e now a part I have used this as the main po o l o m which to g ather.

PAGE 20

Facade | COMPANY | Non-neutrality passing through a fragile facade of neutrality creates confusion. jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/dizzy1.html [11/29/2007 5:04:39 PM]

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no more work, I just want to play | COMPANY | woof...which way do I go? jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/lazy1.html [11/29/2007 5:04:39 PM]

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choke collar | COMPANY | I'm feeling all wound up...I just want to relax. jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/lust1.html [11/29/2007 5:04:40 PM]

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spinning spinning spinning | PROJECTS | My head is spinning, I don't know if I can handle it. jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/dizzy2.html [11/29/2007 5:04:40 PM]

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no more work, I just want to play | PROJECTS | ............................... jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/lazy2.html [11/29/2007 5:04:42 PM]

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she wants to play | PROJECTS | Oh, I forgot about you. jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/lust2.html [11/29/2007 5:04:43 PM]

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seeking release from myself | AWARDS | ............................ jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/dizzy3.html [11/29/2007 5:04:44 PM]

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no more work, I just want to play | AWARDS | DUD jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/lazy3.html [11/29/2007 5:04:45 PM]

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sexuality | AWARDS | sexuality jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/lust3.html [11/29/2007 5:04:46 PM]

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home file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/space.html (1 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:04:46 PM]

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home file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/space.html (2 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:04:46 PM]

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I seek the OM point | LOCATION | Eastring TheoryDoug Dickeson (String Theory) jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/dizzy4.html [11/29/2007 5:04:47 PM]

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patterns repeat infinitely | LOCATION | OM jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/lazy4.html [11/29/2007 5:04:48 PM]

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OM | LOCATION | OM jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/lust4.html [11/29/2007 5:04:48 PM]

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pop | COMPANY | ......................... jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/dizzy1a.html [11/29/2007 5:04:49 PM]

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dormant within | COMPANY | the female stirs under a neutralizing veil jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/lazy1a.html [11/29/2007 5:04:51 PM]

PAGE 36

choke collar | COMPANY | there is nothing neutral about it jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/lust1a.html [11/29/2007 5:04:52 PM]

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inside resembles the outside | PROJECTS | Are the inner forces constructed like things which have been given labels on the outside? jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/dizzy2a.html [11/29/2007 5:04:54 PM]

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happy | PROJECTS | ............................ jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/lazy2a.html [11/29/2007 5:04:57 PM]

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life preserver | PROJECTS | rescue yourself from yourself jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/lust2a.html [11/29/2007 5:04:57 PM]

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flutter | AWARDS | .....flutter..... jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/dizzy3a.html [11/29/2007 5:04:58 PM]

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YES!! | AWARDS | ........................ jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/lust3a.html [11/29/2007 5:04:59 PM]

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POP | COMPANY | *POP* jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/dizzy1b.html [11/29/2007 5:05:00 PM]

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choke collar | COMPANY | resemblance jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/lust1b.html [11/29/2007 5:05:01 PM]

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mother | PROJECTS | ............................ jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/lazy2b.html [11/29/2007 5:05:02 PM]

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Play time | PROJECTS | My head is spinning, I don't know if I can handle it. jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/lust2b.html [11/29/2007 5:05:03 PM]

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float away | AWARDS | float away jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/dizzy3b.html [11/29/2007 5:05:05 PM]

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mother | PROJECTS | calm jump to 2007 ID file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/lazy2c.html [11/29/2007 5:05:06 PM]


stroll outside in the loggia


Enjoy a moment outside in the loggia...


take
a
walk

what's
it
like
out
today?

check
on
whats
new?

check
it
out.

nutella


Enter The Exhibit



Enter The Exhibit

Enter The Exhibit


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you are in the lobby


PRESENTING: IMAGING METAPHYSICS 3/3/07

Guide
Book Opening credits.
Heidegger I would like to begin by thanking Martin
Heidegger. Without his support this event
Truth l would not be possible. Within the brilliant
and text, Introduction to Metaphysics,
Essence Heidegger single handedly valorizes the mission of
this exhibit. He conveys how the trajectory of the
The Greek's experience, conception, and interpretation
Fall of language essentially their definite
understanding of "Being" has set a very narrow
,How standard for the West. This narrowness, as
to Heidegger has established, leaves out fundamental
Unhinge traits of Being which were present at its inception.
He suggests that we look away from the normative
literate metaphysics for a while. He shifts our gaze
Deleuze in the fundamental question of Being away from
on
Bacon gathering with words towards gathering with art in
hopes that we might unhinge our obsession with
the infinitive form of the verb "to be," "is."
The
Situation
I would also like to thank Gilles Deleuze for
The h his generous contribution to this event.
Diagram Within, "The logic of sensation," it is clear
that Deleuze is making something up. In addition to
More meticulously citing Bacons work he, in a sense,
on invents a portrayal of the artist's methodology. A
Method logic emerges out of Deleuze's, close reading of
Bacon's process. Deleuze offers a unique
main perspective. In my exhibit, I have attempted to
show crawl along the surface of Deleuze, to make my
own image of his vocabulary of concepts. But I
local have also placed Deleuze into contact with other
artist forces and lines of thought.
takes
the
Floor Much thanks also goes out to Francis
f'lo Bacon. In shamelessly sharing with us his
*what obsessions and neuroses, we experience
and example of an image metaphysics in


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you are in the lobby


iis action. His diagram and method portray his sheer
to genius.
come


ly-
Without further ado, lets begin the show. Your guide book is to the left.
'The exhibit has no direct itinerary. The intent here would be that you are
t free to revisit a particular point once the thought begins to "gell" as you
move through.



take a breather


























r-


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Thank you Martin Heidegger


MARTIN HEIDEGGER: INTRODUCTION TO METAPHYSICS
p .


guide Martin Heidegger, without you our mission would
book not be justified. Thank you for pointing us toward
Heideqqer the inceptive moment of the questioning of Being.

Truh Several points are critical in understanding this text,
Tu which have been categorized into the three main
and sub categories within your itinerary, "Truth and
Essence Essence," "A Choice and the Fall," and "How to
Unhinge." Browse around in this gallery for a while,
Choice but you may want to come back later when you
and feel you can teach and share the methods you will
-The gain from this site. You will also want to read the
Fall book for yourself, as this is a very narrow section
cut.


How
to
Unhinqe

Deleuze
on
Bacon


The
Situation

The
Diagram

More
on
Method

Image
Metaphysics


local
artist
takes


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HF I DFGGF P




Thank you Martin Heidegger


ithe
floor

what
is
come
come


bench


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p .

guide
;book
Heideqqc

Truth
and
Essen

Choice
and
The
Fall

How
to
Unhin


Deleuze
on
Bacon

The
Situation

The
Diaqram

More
on
Method

Image
Metaphysics

local
artist
takes
the
floor


Deleuze gives us Francis Bacon: The logic of sensation


Hopefully you are now able to see that
"knowledge," as per Heidegger, took a foothold
er suppressing Being under the weight of beings. In
this room we will experience the insights given by
Gilles Deleuze in his text, Francis Bacon: The Logic
of sensation. As such, we will begin to understand
ce how Bacon began to convey a logic of the
manifestations of his particular inner forces.
Deleuze helps us to see that internal forces such as
desire contain fundamental truths which hold as
much weight as fundamental truths of substance
ousia for example. He moves out of literate
cognitively based ontology into an image based
ontology, demonstrating a means for gathering and
unconcealing alethia these deeper forces which
Heidegger wished to understand.
ge


There is a dimension that is opened up within the
artwork of Francis Bacon which is not accessible
through sheer literate forms of metaphysics.
Deleuze portrays Bacon's work in its process of
functioning, suggesting that image metaphysics is
not static. Its gathering devises are not fixed as are
the gathering devices within literate metaphysics.
In this dimension, Bacon actually thinks with his
desires and feelings. He makes the affect smart.
The choice Bacon is making resides deeply within
the history of existentialism, which you can ponder
on your own time. Just remember that from Bacon
we pull an inference system which can be studied
and utilized to find many new forms of image
metaphysics.

Bacon's paintings move beyond both abstract and
abstract expressionism. His process depicts the
metaphysics of an individual within a very particular
situation. Bacon tracks the affect produced on his
own body by a force and studies those affects and
forces at the same time. His paintings are a
document of his procedure. In reading his work,


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Deleuze




Deleuze


you become aware of the process of its
what construction which becomes a window into the
is possibility of electorate metaphysics.
to
come The method is very clear for Bacon. We understand
that he is saying something to us, but we don't feel
exactly like bacon, so we will just take his method. If we begin with
literary conventions in our process, literary actions will follow and anything
out that known territory is unlikely to take place. We are interested in the
Uncanny.
h


i -

Frrcll BKco








Within this gallery experience how a contour gathers, see Bacon fight the
cliche, and most importantly begin to experience Being a new. We are
seeking balance, in hopes that our society will even out the huge left brain
that it is.


take a breather



r~


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I.-'


My Diagram = a)ZOOM OUT B) ZOOM IN C)REPEAT AGAIN AND AGAIN


. guide
book
Heidegger


Truth
and
Essence

Choice
and
The
Fall

How
to
Unhinge


Deleuze
on
Bacon


The
Situation

The
Diagram


~/
'r\
S/


S/_


'^ \ *"

J^\\
fi I \

"i \


More
on
Method

Image
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Metaphysics


local
artist
takes
the
floor

what
is
to
come


restrooms
















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II




Truth and Essence of Being


Returning to the Truth and Essence of Being

guide
book Heidegger shows us the latent power within the
written word. He first questions the Being of
Heideqqer beings, and tracks this question back to its
inception. The Greek's fundamental questioning of
Truth Being of their great historical Dasein once pertained
and to nature's overwhelming, all-abiding-sway, which
e was once conceived of as phusis. This notion
Essence
collapsed into the verb "to be," which became a
primary structuring element of Western
Choice metaphysics. Before this inceptive moment of
and literate Metaphysics the "thing" had not yet been
The invented. Ones ability to use language in a very
Fall particular way to describe a thing did not exist
before Aristotle. Unfortunately we got so obsessed
How with things, gathering them, categorizing them,
to testing them, and shelving them in very particular
Unhinge ways, that we forgot about the essence of Being
and we can no longer even conceive of questioning
the essence of Being. This curiosity no longer
Deleuze registers within our minds. "We involuntarily explain
F on the infinitive "to be" to ourselves on the basis of the
Bacon
n "is," almost as if nothing else were possible," (96)
and this has long ruled our historical Dasein.
The
Situation Phusis

The
Diagram

More
on
Method

Image
Metaphysics

local
artist
takes
the
floor

what
is
to


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Truth and Essence of Being


come Critical for our interest, is that in Heidegger's
beautiful portrayal of the logic of cognition literate
metaphysics, i.e. gathering with the written word, he maintains that this
means of finding "truths" is A way, and not THE way. Pure reason is too
S abstract for Heidegger. He believes that we are ready to go back and
actually experience Being before it was crushed under the pressure of the
,infinitive "is," and to utilize practical based reasoning to seek out logics
that are affect driven. These logics would find "truths" grounded within
the erotic forces that flow through our bodies. Heidegger suggests that it
is within these forces the recognition of beauty and what generates the
golden section that the sway can be felt. This is the sway that was felt
and perceived by the Greeks in their confrontation with nature. Heidegger
maintains that there are fundamental truths that are driven by the
recognition of beauty.

-It is important to note here that this mode of ontology pushes beyond the
substance/ousia of a thing. For example, it moves into territory beyond
the definable essence of a thing such that a cup contains, or a chair
supports the weight of a person.

NOT THIS...

MORE LIKE THIS

It is ok if this doesn't make sense to you. It is not the norm, and as the
clip above suggest, we only like what is familiar. In reference to human
nature Heidegger says, ")they get bogged down in their routes, get stuck
in ruts, and by getting stuck they draw in the circle of their world, get
enmeshed in seeming, and thus shut themselves out of Being. In this way
they turn around and around within their own circle. They can turn aside
everything that threatens the circuit," (168). He refers to this as being
Canny. Heidegger admits right from the start, that "we are now asking
about something that we hardly grasp, something that is now no more
than the sound of a word)" (35). His question is: Why are there beings at
all instead of nothing? He states that this question forces us to the prior
question: "how does it stand with Being?" The point is to get beyond the
level of meaning and to get at the thing itself. Due to our canny nature,
and the forcefulness of the all-abiding-sway of capitalism getting to the
thing itself is not so easy. This requires a violence-doing which is what
establishes the routs of these circuits.


bench





I i


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A choice was made


Guide
book
Heideqqer

Truth
and
Essence

Choice
and
The
Fall

How
to
Unhinqe

Deleuze
on
Bacon

The
Situation

The
Diagram

More
on
Method

Image
Metaphysics

local
artist
takes
the


A choice was made


Let us look more closely at the narrowing of Being
which took place. To simplify matters think of it as
a choice that was made for you long ago. A window
into understanding this choice grows directly from
the collapse of unconcealment or alethia "This
essence of truth could not be held fast and
preserved in its inceptive originality.
Unconcealment, the space founded for the
appearing of beings, collapsed. (203). Placing a
complexity of Heidegger's argument under one
large umbrella, Logos (our present day logic), one
aspect of the originary understanding of Being, is
generally what is accepted as the foundation of
how the west has come to find fundamental truths.
Unconcealment flattened out to mean correctness.
In effect, Being becomes singularly an idea such
that "the grass is green," or "the grass is wet;"
forgetting that "The grass (simply) is."

Heidegger says that because "neither beings nor
gathering could be preserved and understood on
the basis of unconcealment, only one possibility
remained: that which had fallen apart and lay there
as something present at hand could be brought
back together only in a relation that itself had the
character of something present at hand. A present
at hand logos must resemble something else
present at hand beings as the object of the logos
- and be directed by these," (203) Thus, the tickyy
tacky" seen earlier in this gallery, which turns in on
itself.


THE OFFICE doxa belongs to this
2,I 7D, A oD unconcealed truth (alethia)
and is also a type of logos.
SIt is an ambiguous concept
referring to the view
V humans have and the view
in which they proffer
themselves. I like to think of


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A choice was made


Floor this as a kind of popular opinion for a particular
time, which is evident by looking at a society by
what and large.
is
to See for yourself, just click zip code look up.
come
Exploiting the power of their apparatus, the Greeks
Used these WORDS as a recording device,
gathering up truths about nature's substance. This is not a bad thing, we
Scan now fly to the moon, but Heidegger insists that we become aware
; how and when we got stuck in the trajectory of Logos as the only form of
questioning the Being of beings. He demonstrates through poetry that
there is another direction this "choice" could have taken us.

What is the other direction? Can we return to the point of this decision,
seeking what the Greeks sought? Yes. If you get anxious, move into the
next room and see how Bacon does this in Painting.




Clue: Become aware that in noticing one thing, other things disappear
from consciousness. A diluted truth thus becomes fixed in the mind which
results in a limited understanding of presence.


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How to unhinge


SHow to Unhinge
I
,-itinerary
guide Remember that Heidegger's role in all of this is very
important in the justification of our efforts. His
SHeidegqer Introduction to Metaphysics valorizes our mission.
Now that we can at least see the first beginning
Truth and that there are other options within metaphysics
and that were not taken, what do we do? What does
this mean for me now?
Essence
"Certainly -giving up the ordinary and going back
Choice into questioning interpretation is a leap. Only one
and who takes the right running start can leap," (188).
.The We are going to make this leap, and as the proper
Fall running start we must comprehend our situation.
Secondly, we must step out of the what Heidegger
How refers to as the canny, the familiar, what we are
to accustomed to. In unconcealing what we forgot
Unhinge how to see, we might actually begin experiencing
again the fundamental questioning of Beign, and
Phusis. We will feel the all-abiding-sway we are in
Deleuze and that is within us.
1n
Bacon
Realize that you are in a situation a historical
h moment where flows of forces are acting on you.
The For example, Heidegger takes an active position
Situation with the Nazi part in his situation similarly because
he thought he could influence the masses. Pure
The reason/ practical reason. We now see the power to
Diagram do stuff with written language, now what can we
do with graphic representations? We too are in
More flows of forces_ we have a pattern to our lives
on which can be seen on an affectal display. This is
Method what it looks like. The apparatus of our Dasein
(gursky) supports a Logic of distributed categories.
Image Our target is the interest and we are contrasting
Metaphysics literary forms such as the essay. Presently, we are
not simply confronted with nature, but rather with a
local flood of images. We are caught up in capitalistic bla
artist bla bla. We will still use categories, and we are not
takes suppressing the use of cognitive logic/ logos. This
the will actually help us. As mentioned, Heidegger


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How to unhinge


floor pointed to Art, particularly poetry, making the claim
that this vehicle of communication did not get
what sucked into the "fall." A connection is made to the
is work of Francis Bacon now. In doing, one sees a
to clear example of how one such logic has actually
come been played out. From this example we find that a
repeatable diagram becomes the basis for imaging
Metaphysics.

We might begin to understand what motivates people in these stories. We
already know strange things happen. Heidegger shows us that The Greeks
-ignored the accident when making their metaphysics. We are going to
'begin to understand how to feel systematically, and we love the accident.
Actually, we find that the accident is no accident at all, but that it is part
of the abiding sway. It might even be thought of as a moment which
exposes this forces within the sway.




CLUE: NOTICE A FORCE AND ZOOM INTO IS WHILE SIMULTANEOUSLY
ZOOMING OUT IN ORDER TO SEE THE BIGGER PICTURE.


water fountain








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The Situation


Here is the situation


'guide
book
Heidegger

Truth
and
Essence

Choice
and
The
Fall

How
to
Unhinge

Deleuze
on
Bacon

The
Situation

The
'Diaqram

More
on
Method

Image
Metaphysics

local
artist
takes
the
floor


The spectacle and media flood is for Bacon what
nature and natural poetic language was for Plato
and Aristotle. His paintings are gathering devices as
were their words. Remember the ticky tacky of
phusis that all abiding sway? Bacon steps back to
the inceptive moment of questioning the Being of
beings in his awareness and analysis of the
spectacle. That is, he is within "the sway" while
questioning it simultaneously. He senses the
structure of the forces driving that situation, and he
is creating for his apparatus a logical means to
mediate within it. He wants to find the intelligence
of his libido.

It is not enough to simply perceive the situation,
though this is important. We can't simply conceive
of the spectacle and its media flood as the Greeks
perceived the notion of phusis, we must also
understand how to gather it. Deluze posits that this
requires a purely aesthetic comprehension of the
unit of measure. The measure is subjectively
determined because the media flood is so fast.
Thus, it is subject to constant evaluation and
reevaluation. "Beneath the successive apprehension
of arts, there is a logical synthesis that requires a
purely aesthetic comprehension of the unit of
measure.... Aesthetic comprehension is the
grasping of a rhythm with regard to both the thing
to be measured and the unit of measure. Beneath
both the measure and the units, there is rhythm.
'Rhythms are always heterogeneous, we plunge
into them in a sort of exploration,' in
experimentation.... The foundation of perceptual
synthesis is aesthetic comprehension, but the
ground on which this foundation rests is the
evaluation of rhythm," (xvii, Trans. Intro)


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The Situation


what
is
to
come


In image metaphysics this is critical. We must zoom out, so that we are
able to place ourselves within a particular situation and the "rhythm of
that situation, but we must simultaneously zoom in at the same time.


ZOOM IN AND ZOOM OUT


The Gursky painting allows fot this to happen soley on the size that it is
printed. Scroll around this thing!


take a breather


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Diagram


Bacon's Diagram?

Guide
gbook Thus, the key is in understanding that Bacon's
work, though each very different in sensation, there
Heideqqer is a clear structural relationship found within the
root of each of his paintings. This structuring
Truth element, The diagram, is a fundamentally repeating
and operation. Bacon had one, so we will try to find one
Essence as well. There are a few operations within Bacons
diagram relate particularly well to our situation,
Choice namely his use of found materials. For our
and purposes, it is fundamental to understand that from
The the abstract painting of Bacon emerges an image
Fall ontology. He is not simply using the vernacular
photographic means of resemblance and
How representation. Rather, two things may resemble by
to analogy such that a friend of Bacon, within his
Unhine situation, is like the beef or the bird in its situation.
Unhinge

Deleuze
on
Bacon

The
Situation

The
Diaqram

More
on
Method
The panopticon is an example of such a diagram.
"Michel Foucault uses this notion in Disciplin and
Image
Metaphysics Punish as a metaphor for modern "disciplinary"
societies societies and its pervasive inclination to
observe and normalize. Foucault proposes that not
local only prisons but all hierarchical structures like the
artist army, the school, the hospital and the factory have
takes evolved through history to resemble Bentham's
the Panopticon."
floor


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Diagram


what
is
to
come


,, 'f";^ L
r$*1777
c vv^
&$ ^


Ui I+ 'lL


"The diagram ends the preparatory work and begins the act of painting....
It is a violent chaos in relation to the figurative givens, but it is a germ of
rhythm in relation to the new order of the painting," (83).

NOW LET THE GAMES BEGIN


restrooms


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Andreas Gursky


tf





go back




More on his Method


Guide
;book
Heidegger

Truth
and
Essence

Choice
and
The
Fall

How
to
Unhinge

Deleuze
on
Bacon

The
Situation

The
'Diaqram

More
on
Method

Image
Metaphysics

local
artist
takes
the
floor


What was his Method?


Cliche

Bacon arms himself with various methods to battle
the givens those things that are latent within the
canvas, the cliche.

The Cliche, the found object, for Bacon is often a
famous painting, a photo of a close friend, or a
photo of himself. This cliche establishes within the
audience a semblance of familiarity. An
understanding of the Doxa and Alethia have thus
been reestablished. "The most significant thing
about the photograph is that it forces upon us the
"truth" of the implausible and the doctored
images," (74). Within this unconcealment, we begin
to see the true uncannyness of existence through
these paintings. The motivating forces within the
action are Bacon's obsessions, and he relies on the
element of chance or accident.

Traits The Asignified

In the paintings, the human figure is the "unit of
measure." Bacon uses the figure as a vehicle to
track the sensations. When we see anatomically
correct traits which are distorted smeared and
truncated, feelings emerge. Bacon then introduces
an asignifying trait which is again some graphic. It
is something that is analogous to the figure only
through our diagrammatic analogy. The meat is in
its situation what the figure is in its. We begin to
feel like the meat when we look at the paintings.
For Bacon, Deleuze explains, "every man who
suffers is a piece of meat. Meat is the common
zone of man and the beast" (21). When he walked
into the butcher shop he wondered why he wasn't
hanging there.

Contour


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More on his Method


Using free marks, and smudging, Bacon feels his
what way into understanding the forces within the figure
is he paints. Bacon states that there is no chance
to except "manipulated" chance, and no accident
come except "utilized" accident. The contour mediates
this process, and is where "gathering" takes place
within the art work. It is within the contour of
Bacon's paintings that associations are made between an open mouth, a
Scut artery and a jacket sleeve. These all share a contour. The gathering
principle of Bacon's contour is that it gathers asignified traits. In a contour
there are no lines.

'Above are three irreducible units within Bacons process. Much like a
syllogism, his logic is a little machine which can churn out multifaceted
results. The process is a fundamentally repeatable operation; however we
can not forget that it can not be separated from bacons very particular
feelings and obsessions. In this way, each form of image metaphysics
might be considered a category.















CLUE: UTILIZE THESE IRREDUCIBLE UNITS WITHIN YOUR OWN
DIAGRAM TO ESTABLISH AN IMAGE METAPHYSICS.


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PAGE 1

stroll outside in the loggia Enjoy a moment outside in the loggia... take a walk what's it like out today? check on whats new? check it out. nutella Enter The Exhibit Enter The Exhibit Enter The Exhibit file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/loggia.html [11/29/2007 5:08:00 PM]

PAGE 2

you are in the lobby PRESENTING: IMAGING METAPHYSICS 3/3/07guide book HeideggerTruth and Essence The Fall How to Unhinge Deleuze on BaconThe Situation The Diagram More on Method main showlocal artist takes the floor what Opening credits. I would like to begin by thanking Martin Heidegger. Without his support this event would not be possible. Within the brilliant text, Introduction to Metaphysics, Heidegger single handedly valorizes the mission of this exhibit. He conveys how the trajectory of the Greek's experience, conception, and interpretation of language essentially their definite understanding of "Being" has set a very narrow standard for the West. This narrowness, as Heidegger has established, leaves out fundamental traits of Being which were present at its inception. He suggests that we look away from the normative literate metaphysics for a while. He shifts our gaze in the fundamental question of Being away from gathering with words towards gathering with art in hopes that we might unhinge our obsession with the infinitive form of the verb "to be," "is." I would also like to thank Gilles Deleuze for his generous contribution to this event. Within, "The logic of sensation," it is clear that Deleuze is making something up. In addition to meticulously citing Bacons work he, in a sense, invents a portrayal of the artist's methodology. A logic emerges out of Deleuze's, close reading of Bacon's process. Deleuze offers a unique perspective. In my exhibit, I have attempted to crawl along the surface of Deleuze, to make my own image of his vocabulary of concepts. But I have also placed Deleuze into contact with other forces and lines of thought. Much thanks also goes out to Francis Bacon. In shamelessly sharing with us his obsessions and neuroses, we experience and example of an image metaphysics in file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/lobby.html (1 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:01 PM]

PAGE 3

you are in the lobby is to come action. His diagram and method portray his sheer genius. Without further ado, lets begin the show. Your guide book is to the left. The exhibit has no direct itinerary. The intent here would be that you are free to revisit a particular point once the thought begins to "gell" as you move through. take a breather file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/lobby.html (2 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:01 PM]

PAGE 4

Thank you Martin Heidegger MARTIN HEIDEGGER: INTRODUCTION TO METAPHYSICSguide book Heidegger Truth and Essence Choice and The Fall How to Unhinge Deleuze on BaconThe Situation The Diagram More on Method Image Metaphysicslocal artist takes Martin Heidegger, without you our mission would not be justified. Thank you for pointing us toward the inceptive moment of the questioning of Being. Several points are critical in understanding this text, which have been categorized into the three main sub categories within your itinerary, "Truth and Essence," "A Choice and the Fall," and "How to Unhinge." Browse around in this gallery for a while, but you may want to come back later when you feel you can teach and share the methods you will gain from this site. You will also want to read the book for yourself, as this is a very narrow section cut. file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/H.html (1 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:02 PM]

PAGE 5

Thank you Martin Heidegger the floor what is to come bench file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/H.html (2 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:02 PM]

PAGE 6

Deleuze Deleuze gives us Francis Bacon: The logic of sensationguide book HeideggerTruth and Essence Choice and The Fall How to Unhinge Deleuze on Bacon The Situation The Diagram More on Method Image Metaphysicslocal artist takes the floor Hopefully you are now able to see that "knowledge," as per Heidegger, took a foothold suppressing Being under the weight of beings. In this room we will experience the insights given by Gilles Deleuze in his text, Francis Bacon: The Logic of sensation. As such, we will begin to understand how Bacon began to convey a logic of the manifestations of his particular inner forces. Deleuze helps us to see that internal forces such as desire contain fundamental truths which hold as much weight as fundamental truths of substance ousia for example. He moves out of literate cognitively based ontology into an image based ontology, demonstrating a means for gathering and unconcealing alethia these deeper forces which Heidegger wished to understand. There is a dimension that is opened up within the artwork of Francis Bacon which is not accessible through sheer literate forms of metaphysics. Deleuze portrays Bacon's work in its process of functioning, suggesting that image metaphysics is not static. Its gathering devises are not fixed as are the gathering devices within literate metaphysics. In this dimension, Bacon actually thinks with his desires and feelings. He makes the affect smart. The choice Bacon is making resides deeply within the history of existentialism. which you can ponder on your own time. Just remember that from Bacon we pull an inference system which can be studied and utilized to find many new forms of image metaphysics. Bacon's paintings move beyond both abstract and abstract expressionism. His process depicts the metaphysics of an individual within a very particular situation. Bacon tracks the affect produced on his own body by a force and studies those affects and forces at the same time. His paintings are a document of his procedure. In reading his work, file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/DB.html (1 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:02 PM]

PAGE 7

Deleuze what is to come you become aware of the process of its construction which becomes a window into the possibility of electrate metaphysics. The method is very clear for Bacon. We understand that he is saying something to us, but we don't feel exactly like bacon, so we will just take his method. If we begin with literary conventions in our process, literary actions will follow and anything out that known territory is unlikely to take place. We are interested in the Uncanny. Within this gallery experience how a contour gathers, see Bacon fight the cliche, and most importantly begin to experience Being a new. We are seeking balance, in hopes that our society will even out the huge left brain that it is. take a breather file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/DB.html (2 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:02 PM]

PAGE 8

ME My Diagram = a)ZOOM OUT B) ZOOM IN C)REPEAT AGAIN AND AGAINguide book HeideggerTruth and Essence Choice and The Fall How to Unhinge Deleuze on BaconThe Situation The Diagram More on Method Image file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/ME.html (1 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:03 PM]

PAGE 9

ME Metaphysics local artist takes the floor what is to come restrooms file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/ME.html (2 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:03 PM]

PAGE 10

Truth and Essence of Being Returning to the Truth and Essence of Beingguide book Heidegger Truth and Essence Choice and The Fall How to Unhinge Deleuze on BaconThe Situation The Diagram More on Method Image Metaphysicslocal artist takes the floor what is to Heidegger shows us the latent power within the written word. He first questions the Being of beings, and tracks this question back to its inception. The Greek's fundamental questioning of Being of their great historical Dasein once pertained to nature's overwhelming, all-abiding-sway, which was once conceived of as phusis. This notion collapsed into the verb "to be," which became a primary structuring element of Western metaphysics. Before this inceptive moment of literate Metaphysics the "thing" had not yet been invented. Ones ability to use language in a very particular way to describe a thing did not exist before Aristotle. Unfortunately we got so obsessed with things, gathering them, categorizing them, testing them, and shelving them in very particular ways, that we forgot about the essence of Being and we can no longer even conceive of questioning the essence of Being. This curiosity no longer registers within our minds. "We involuntarily explain the infinitive "to be" to ourselves on the basis of the "is," almost as if nothing else were possible," (96) and this has long ruled our historical Dasein.Phusis file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/Ha.html (1 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:04 PM]

PAGE 11

Truth and Essence of Being come Critical for our interest, is that in Heidegger's beautiful portrayal of the logic of cognition literate metaphysics, i.e. gathering with the written word, he maintains that this means of finding "truths" is A way, and not THE way. Pure reason is too abstract for Heidegger. He believes that we are ready to go back and actually experience Being before it was crushed under the pressure of the infinitive "is," and to utilize practical based reasoning to seek out logics that are affect driven. These logics would find "truths" grounded within the erotic forces that flow through our bodies. Heidegger suggests that it is within these forces the recognition of beauty and what generates the golden section that the sway can be felt. This is the sway that was felt and perceived by the Greeks in their confrontation with nature. Heidegger maintains that there are fundamental truths that are driven by the recognition of beauty. It is important to note here that this mode of ontology pushes beyond the substance/ ousia of a thing. For example, it moves into territory beyond the definable essence of a thing such that a cup contains, or a chair supports the weight of a person. NOT THIS... MORE LIKE THIS It is ok if this doesn't make sense to you. It is not the norm, and as the clip above suggest, we only like what is familiar. In reference to human nature Heidegger says, "they get bogged down in their routes, get stuck in ruts, and by getting stuck they draw in the circle of their world, get enmeshed in seeming, and thus shut themselves out of Being. In this way they turn around and around within their own circle. They can turn aside everything that threatens the circuit," (168). He refers to this as being Canny. Heidegger admits right from the start, that "we are now asking about something that we hardly grasp, something that is now no more than the sound of a word" (35). His question is: Why are there beings at all instead of nothing? He states that this question forces us to the prior question: "how does it stand with Being?" The point is to get beyond the level of meaning and to get at the thing itself. Due to our canny nature, and the forcefulness of the all-abiding-sway of capitalism getting to the thing itself is not so easy. This requires a violence-doing which is what establishes the routs of these circuits. bench file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/Ha.html (2 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:04 PM]

PAGE 12

A choice was made A choice was madeguide book Heidegger Truth and Essence Choice and The Fall How to Unhinge Deleuze on BaconThe Situation The Diagram More on Method Image Metaphysicslocal artist takes the Let us look more closely at the narrowing of Being which took place. To simplify matters think of it as a choice that was made for you long ago. A window into understanding this choice grows directly from the collapse of unconcealment or alethia "This essence of truth could not be held fast and preserved in its inceptive originality. Unconcealment, the space founded for the appearing of beings, collapsed. (203). Placing a complexity of Heidegger's argument under one large umbrella, Logos (our present day logic), one aspect of the originary understanding of Being, is generally what is accepted as the foundation of how the west has come to find fundamental truths. Unconcealment flattened out to mean correctness. In effect, Being becomes singularly an idea such that "the grass is green," or "the grass is wet;" forgetting that "The grass (simply) is." Heidegger says that because "neither beings nor gathering could be preserved and understood on the basis of unconcealment, only one possibility remained: that which had fallen apart and lay there as something present at hand could be brought back together only in a relation that itself had the character of something present at hand. A present at hand logos must resemble something else present at hand beings as the object of the logos and be directed by these," (203) Thus, the "ticky tacky" seen earlier in this gallery, which turns in on itself. doxa belongs to this unconcealed truth (alethia) and is also a type of logos. It is an ambiguous concept referring to the view humans have and the view in which they proffer themselves. I like to think of file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/Hb.html (1 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:04 PM]

PAGE 13

A choice was made floor what is to come this as a kind of popular opinion for a particular time, which is evident by looking at a society by and large. See for yourself, just click zip code look up. Exploiting the power of their apparatus, the Greeks used these WORDS as a recording device, gathering up truths about nature's substance. This is not a bad thing, we can now fly to the moon, but Heidegger insists that we become aware how and when we got stuck in the trajectory of Logos as the only form of questioning the Being of beings. He demonstrates through poetry that there is another direction this "choice" could have taken us. What is the other direction? Can we return to the point of this decision, seeking what the Greeks sought? Yes. If you get anxious, move into the next room and see how Bacon does this in Painting. Clue: Become aware that in noticing one thing, other things disappear from consciousness. A diluted truth thus becomes fixed in the mind which results in a limited understanding of presence. bench file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/Hb.html (2 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:04 PM]

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How to unhinge How to Unhingeitinerary guide Heidegger Truth and Essence Choice and The Fall How to Unhinge Deleuze on BaconThe Situation The Diagram More on Method Image Metaphysicslocal artist takes the Remember that Heidegger's role in all of this is very important in the justification of our efforts. His Introduction to Metaphysics valorizes our mission. Now that we can at least see the first beginning and that there are other options within metaphysics that were not taken, what do we do? What does this mean for me now? "Certainly -giving up the ordinary and going back into questioning interpretation is a leap. Only one who takes the right running start can leap," (188). We are going to make this leap, and as the proper running start we must comprehend our situation. Secondly, we must step out of the what Heidegger refers to as the canny, the familiar, what we are accustomed to. In unconcealing what we forgot how to see, we might actually begin experiencing again the fundamental questioning of Beign, and Phusis. We will feel the all-abiding-sway we are in and that is within us. Realize that you are in a situation a historical moment where flows of forces are acting on you. For example, Heidegger takes an active position with the Nazi parti in his situation similarly because he thought he could influence the masses. Pure reason/ practical reason. We now see the power to do stuff with written language, now what can we do with graphic representations? We too are in flows of forces_ we have a pattern to our lives which can be seen on an affectal display. This is what it looks like. The apparatus of our Dasein (gursky) supports a Logic of distributed categories. Our target is the interent and we are contrasting literary forms such as the essay. Presently, we are not simply confronted with nature, but rather with a flood of images. We are caught up in capitalistic bla bla bla. We will still use categories, and we are not suppressing the use of cognitive logic/ logos. This will actually help us. As mentioned, Heidegger file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/Hc.html (1 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:05 PM]

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How to unhinge floor what is to come pointed to Art, particularly poetry, making the claim that this vehicle of communication did not get sucked into the "fall." A connection is made to the work of Francis Bacon now. In doing, one sees a clear example of how one such logic has actually been played out. From this example we find that a repeatable diagram becomes the basis for imaging metaphysics. We might begin to understand what motivates people in these stories. We already know strange things happen. Heidegger shows us that The Greeks ignored the accident when making their metaphysics. We are going to begin to understand how to feel systematically, and we love the accident. Actually, we find that the accident is no accident at all, but that it is part of the abiding sway. It might even be thought of as a moment which exposes this forces within the sway. CLUE: NOTICE A FORCE AND ZOOM INTO IS WHILE SIMULTANEOUSLY ZOOMING OUT IN ORDER TO SEE THE BIGGER PICTURE. water fountain file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/Hc.html (2 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:05 PM]

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The Situation Here is the situationguide book HeideggerTruth and Essence Choice and The Fall How to Unhinge Deleuze on Bacon The Situation The Diagram More on Method Image Metaphysicslocal artist takes the floor The spectacle and media flood is for Bacon what nature and natural poetic language was for Plato and Aristotle. His paintings are gathering devices as were their words. Remember the ticky tacky of phusis that all abiding sway? Bacon steps back to the inceptive moment of questioning the Being of beings in his awareness and analysis of the spectacle. That is, he is within "the sway" while questioning it simultaneously. He senses the structure of the forces driving that situation, and he is creating for his apparatus a logical means to mediate within it. He wants to find the intelligence of his libido. It is not enough to simply perceive the situation, though this is important. We can't simply conceive of the spectacle and its media flood as the Greeks perceived the notion of phusis, we must also understand how to gather it. Deluze posits that this requires a purely aesthetic comprehension of the unit of measure. The measure is subjectively determined because the media flood is so fast. Thus, it is subject to constant evaluation and reevaluation. "Beneath the successive apprehension of arts, there is a logical synthesis that requires a purely aesthetic comprehension of the unit of measure.... Aesthetic comprehension is the grasping of a rhythm with regard to both the thing to be measured and the unit of measure. Beneath both the measure and the units, there is rhythm. 'Rhythms are always heterogeneous, we plunge into them in a sort of exploration,' in experimentation.... The foundation of perceptual synthesis is aesthetic comprehension, but the ground on which this foundation rests is the evaluation of rhythm," (xvii, Trans. Intro) file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/DBa.html (1 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:05 PM]

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The Situation what is to come In image metaphysics this is critical. We must zoom out, so that we are able to place ourselves within a particular situation and the "rhythm of that situation, but we must simultaneously zoom in at the same time. ZOOM IN AND ZOOM OUT The Gursky painting allows fot this to happen soley on the size that it is printed. Scroll around this thing! take a breather file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/DBa.html (2 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:05 PM]

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Diagram Bacon's Diagram?guide book HeideggerTruth and Essence Choice and The Fall How to Unhinge Deleuze on Bacon The Situation The Diagram More on Method Image Metaphysicslocal artist takes the floor Thus, the key is in understanding that Bacon's work, though each very different in sensation, there is a clear structural relationship found within the root of each of his paintings. This structuring element, The diagram, is a fundamentally repeating operation. Bacon had one, so we will try to find one as well. There are a few operations within Bacons diagram relate particularly well to our situation, namely his use of found materials. For our purposes, it is fundamental to understand that from the abstract painting of Bacon emerges an image ontology. He is not simply using the vernacular photographic means of resemblance and representation. Rather, two things may resemble by analogy such that a friend of Bacon, within his situation, is like the beef or the bird in its situation. The panopticon is an example of such a diagram. "Michel Foucault uses this notion in Disciplin and Punish as a metaphor for modern "disciplinary" societies societies and its pervasive inclination to observe and normalize. Foucault proposes that not only prisons but all hierarchical structures like the army, the school, the hospital and the factory have evolved through history to resemble Bentham's Panopticon." file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/DBb.html (1 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:06 PM]

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Diagram what is to come "The diagram ends the preparatory work and begins the act of painting.... It is a violent chaos in relation to the figurative givens, but it is a germ of rhythm in relation to the new order of the painting," (83). NOW LET THE GAMES BEGIN restrooms file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/DBb.html (2 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:06 PM]

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The spectacle Andreas Gursky file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/DB_spectacle.html (1 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:29 PM]

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The spectacle go back file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/DB_spectacle.html (2 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:29 PM]

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More on his Method What was his Method?guide book HeideggerTruth and Essence Choice and The Fall How to Unhinge Deleuze on Bacon The Situation The Diagram More on Method Image Metaphysicslocal artist takes the floor Cliche Bacon arms himself with various methods to battle the givens those things that are latent within the canvas, the cliche. The Cliche, the found object, for Bacon is often a famous painting, a photo of a close friend, or a photo of himself. This cliche establishes within the audience a semblance of familiarity. An understanding of the Doxa and Alethia have thus been reestablished. "The most significant thing about the photograph is that it forces upon us the "truth" of the implausible and the doctored images," (74). Within this unconcealment, we begin to see the true uncannyness of existence through these paintings. The motivating forces within the action are Bacon's obsessions, and he relies on the element of chance or accident. Traits The Asignified In the paintings, the human figure is the "unit of measure." Bacon uses the figure as a vehicle to track the sensations. When we see anatomically correct traits which are distorted smeared and truncated, feelings emerge. Bacon then introduces an asignifying trait which is again some graphic. It is something that is analogous to the figure only through our diagrammatic analogy. The meat is in its situation what the figure is in its. We begin to feel like the meat when we look at the paintings. For Bacon, Deleuze explains, "every man who suffers is a piece of meat. Meat is the common zone of man and the beast" (21). When he walked into the butcher shop he wondered why he wasn't hanging there. Contour file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/DBc.html (1 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:30 PM]

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More on his Method what is to come Using free marks, and smudging, Bacon feels his way into understanding the forces within the figure he paints. Bacon states that there is no chance except "manipulated" chance, and no accident except "utilized" accident. The contour mediates this process, and is where "gathering" takes place within the art work. It is within the contour of Bacon's paintings that associations are made between an open mouth, a cut artery and a jacket sleeve. These all share a contour. The gathering principle of Bacon's contour is that it gathers asignified traits. In a contour there are no lines. Above are three irreducible units within Bacons process. Much like a syllogism, his logic is a little machine which can churn out multifaceted results. The process is a fundamentally repeatable operation; however we can not forget that it can not be separated from bacons very particular feelings and obsessions. In this way, each form of image metaphysics might be considered a category. CLUE: UTILIZE THESE IRREDUCIBLE UNITS WITHIN YOUR OWN DIAGRAM TO ESTABLISH AN IMAGE METAPHYSICS. take a breather file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/karthik.s/Desktop/Thesis/proj1/DBc.html (2 of 2) [11/29/2007 5:08:30 PM]







APPLYING A HEURETIC GENERATOR WITHIN ARCHITECTURAL EDUCATION:
REEVALUATING THE CITY PLAN'S VIABILITY





















By

LAUREN MITCHELL


A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT
OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF
MASTERS OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

2007

































2007 Lauren Mitchell





























To my teachers









ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I thank my parents for their unending support. I also thank Nina Hofer, Dr. Greg Ulmer,

and Jason Young for all that they have helped me to understand in the last two years.









TABLE OF CONTENTS
page

A CK N O W LED G M EN T S ................................................................. ........... ............. .....

LIST OF FIGURES .................................. .. ..... ..... ................. .7

L IST O F O B JE C T S ............................................................................... 8

ABSTRAC T .........................................................................................

CHAPTER

1 APPLYING A HEURETIC GENERATOR........................ ..................11

H eu retic s .............. ............ .. ...................11.........
H euristic G generator, the "CA TTt".......... ................... ......... .................................14

2 FREEDOM FROM THE "EYEPIECE"................................................... ...............19

3 CIRCULATION AND RESERVOIR ............................................................................25

C contrast: U n g ers' F ilter ............................................................................................2 5
M ethod of the Filter ....................................... .. ........... ........... ......... 27
Values of the Filter .... ........ ..................................... .................... 28
Electracy .......................................32
Target ............... ....... ................. .......... .. ... ..................33
Vibrations Above the Surface: Urbanism that Evades Perception.......................... ..............35

4 500 M L C H IC K EN ST O C K ......................................................................... ...................48

T h eo ry .. ..... ..............................................................................................4 8
H eidegger....................................................................50
P hu sis......... ................................................................50
Alethia .........................................52
S erre s--T h e S o u p ............. ......... .. ............. .. ................................................5 3

5 MEAT AND POTATOES; ANALGOY AND TALE ........... ....................62

Analogy, Standing on the Shoulders of Dr. Ulmer.................................. ............... 62
The Work of Francis Bacon ......... .... ..... ........ .......... 63
T h e S itu atio n .............................................................................6 4
D ia g ra m .............. .. .................................................................6 6
C liche .................................... ................... .................. 66
Traits--The Asignified ...................................................................... ... .......................... 67
Contour ......... ..... .... ......... ............. ............... 67
Science ................................. ................... ...... .... .................69
Tale of a Journey, Featherless Chicken Soup for the Suburban Sprawl ............................70









T a le : S te p 1 .........................................................................7 1
T ale : Step 2 ......... ..................................................................... 72

L IST O F R E F E R E N C E S ...................................................................................... ...................74

B IO G R A PH IC A L SK E T C H .............................................................................. .....................76


















































6









LIST OF FIGURES


Figure page

1-1 Greg Ulmer's Apparatus Diagram. .............. ............. ........... ............. 18

3-1 An example of Ungers' "interpretations,"titled, "City with independent satellites."........41

3-2 An example of Ungers' "interpretations," titled "Ideal city on an island, Joseph
Furttenbach, 1620.". ..............................................................42

3-3 limage from Dolores Hayden's A field guide to sprawl. ...............................................43

3-4 An example of Ungers' "interpretations," titled "Plan for Victoria, J.S. Buckingham,
184 8 ." ................... .......................................................... ................. 44

3-5 An example of Ungers' "interpretations," titled, "La Ville Radieuse, Le Corbusier,
19 52 ." ................... ......................................................... ................ 4 5

3-6 Sampling of correspondence post cards taken as part of my research on big box
culture .................................. ..... .................................................... ............. 46

3-7 G reg U lm er's A pparatus II. ............... ......................... ......................... .......... ....47









LIST OF OBJECTS


Object page

5-1 "Inner disturbance" web site. This was the final project from "Imaging
M etaphysics," a course taken with Greg Ulmer. .................................... .................73

5-2 This was the first project from "Imaging Metaphysics."........ .......................... 73

5-3 Ideas Work Society project work and materials. ............. ...... ................... 73









Abstract of Thesis Presented to the Graduate School
of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the
Requirements for the Degree of Masters of Science in Architectural Studies

APPLYING A HEURETIC GENERATOR WITHIN ARCHITECTURAL EDUCATION:
REEVALUATING THE CITY PLAN'S VIABILITY

By

Lauren Mitchell

December 2007

Chair: Nina Hofer
Cochair: Charles Hailey
Major: Architecture

Neurosis is characterized by outbreaks and disturbances of sensory motor functions not

attributable to any known neurological or organic dysfunction. Scientists induce nervous

breakdowns in lab rats to unveil this phenomenon. When forced to react in a certain way long

enough these rats become unable to react in accordance to primal desires even when they are set

free. They may see food in front of them, but are paralyzed. The inability to move toward what

they desire causes convulsions which can result in death. Neurosis, occurring naturally only in

humans, is a visual which has driven my work. One must ask; why do scientists seek to

understand such paralysis? The answer is simple. They would like to know how to fix it.

The thesis excites various conversational threads consisting of complex fibers and

filaments that twist and tie us together. Thus, there is an assumed similarity in responses to

circumstances and bodies of knowledge based on the reality of words within specific cultural

situations. Our experience and perception of the world conforms to the words, metaphors, and

images we use to discuss them. This is problematic in the digitized culture of 2007, where more

experiences exist than do words. The literate apparatus, grounded in reason, is no longer

sufficient alone for the academic institution especially in urban analysis today.









The target of this research, a digital culture of rapidly expanding urban conditions of the

United States (rapid urbanism), combats "the author." It is difficult for architects and designers

to look at rapid urbanism without feeling frustration because of this. Nostalgia, the desire for

control or authorship, is brought on by a "compare and contrast" mentality seen through the lens

of the Utopian European city plan. I am proposing that architects must free themselves from the

habitual roles of "author," and "problem solver" in order to become useful within rapid

urbanism. The work of Dr. Gregory Ulmer and the study of heuretics have provided me with a

methodological approach to invent new ways of "seeing" rapid urbanism, attracting precipitation

to the ideas which have been floating in the clouds of my thesis. Now, something may fall to the

earth in a form that will nurture "health" and grow.









CHAPTER 1
APPLYING A HEURETIC GENERATOR

Heuretics

Heuretics is defined by Gregory Ulmer as the logic of invention by way of artistic thought

processes. 1 His work has rearranged the direction of traditional scholarship in altering its goals.

As such, his courses push traditional hermeneutics, the study and application of theory in

interpreting texts and systems of meaning, into heuretic methods. This subtle shift can be

thought of as moving from description (alone) into action. To study a theory traditionally

involves becoming aware of another person's point of view in order to interpret cultural artifacts

and most often texts, yielding new texts. Essentially the effect of a hermeneutic approach is

circular and remains solely within literacy. The theory provides a way to see, the application of

that theory in interpreting artifacts then yields more theories; questions provide answers which

generate more questions. Heuretics adds to hermeneutics the ability to produce. Ulmer states

that theory is assimilated into the humanities in two ways, by artistic experiment (heuretics), as

well as by critical interpretation (hermeneutics).2 In the academic arena one traditionally only

experiences the latter. He explains,

Vanguard artists, like their counterparts among academic critics, often base their projects
on the important theoretical texts of the day. The difference between the two applications
had to do with their respective modes of representation: the artists demonstrate the
consequences of the theories for the arts by practicing the arts themselves, generating
models of prototypes that function critically as well as aesthetically. 3

The architectural design studio often works this way, analyzing existing urban situations

and the theories which accompany those situations in order to generate methods of production.



1 Gregory Ulmer, Heuretics the Logic of Invention, p. 4.
2 Ibid, p. 3

3 Ibid, p. xii









In Chapter 3 I will look more closely at O.M. Ungers' canonical text, Morphologie/City/

Metaphors, an example of this. I feel that architectural design, generally tries to assimilate

theory into the discipline in two ways, operating both as critic and as "vangardist" who doesn't

primarily analyze what is existing, but rather composes alternatives by generating or inventing

new poetics. Academic architectural education is an interesting arena within which something

useful might be added to current heuretic thinking. This is because heuretics attempts to

integrate visual and verbal discourse, which is fundamental in design process. Heuretics is put

forth to develop workable methods for inventing image-based logics, drawing upon our ability to

make the "affect" smart, to augment verbal based logics of literacy which are well known.

Where better to begin inventing such logics than architecture?

Applying heuretics, with the help of Ulmer, to academic architectural education will offer

the discipline a chance to put forth its methods and approaches of seeing in a form which are

repeatable by others; methods and modes of operating within the world that move beyond

traditional theory and criticism. It is profound when it provides an understanding on one's

position within the flows of the universe, as well as a heightened awareness of that universe

regardless of the scale. In the words of Alberto Perez-Gomez,

Architectural beauty, like erotic love, bums itself into our soul; it inspires fear and
reverence through a "poetic image," one that affects us primarily though our vision and yet
is fully sensuous if not synaesthetic. It is thus capable of seducing and elevating us to
understand our embodied soul's participation on wholeness.4

Architectural discourse might augment the study of heuretics; how can we use an image

intelligently to inspire "fear or reverence." Working heuretically invites the student to imagine

actively rather than to simply describe or criticize. Methods currently developed in architectural

design may be heuretic in essence, however they are generally isolated individualized practices

4 Parez-Gomez, "Ethics and Poetics in Architectural Education," from Architectural Ethics and the Personhood of
Place p. 121.









that are rarely revealed. Emphasis is placed on the authorship of a given solution, (i.e. the

building, the plan etc.), and the intricacy of design process is rarely fully established and

comprehensible beyond studio walls if at all.

Ulmer's work has helped to ground my conception of "the eyepiece" (discussed in the

following chapter) pedagogically. As a student in his theory course, "Imaging metaphysics," (in

spring 2007), I was asked not to follow in the footsteps of the masters, but to seek what they

sought. Below is Ulmer's course description,

These discussions are a symptom of a shift underway in the language apparatus away from
literacy toward electracy. The Classical Greeks invented metaphysics in the context of the
new institution of school (the Academy, the Lyceum), as part of their development of the
possibilities of alphabetic writing. Aristotle produced a set of categories (beginning with
Substance) and topics (headings for guiding the generation of propositions). These
categories and topics, codified in a tradition of commonplaces, provided the core of
education up to the early modern period. Our goal this semester is to begin doing for
electracy what Aristotle did for literacy. 5

Rather than learning how to execute the perfect essay, we were asked to invent for the electorate

apparatus,6 analogous to the essay for the literate apparatus, a cultural invention and a method

for experiencing the world. We temporarily ignored our traditional mind set temporarily. For

the sake of progress, we traded into new assumptions, applying art strategies to problems of

textual production to make something appear. We did for the electorate apparatus what Greeks

did at the inceptive moment of the literate apparatus. A heuretic curriculum looks at theory,

teaching its applications, while communicating the circulation of a cultural invention. As I have

come to understand from Dr. Ulmer however, theory is only one ingredient in the recipe of a

cultural invention. Architecture is for me a cultural invention which, when successful, provides

its inhabitants the ability to understand their position within the flows of the universe, as well as

5 Gregory Ulmer, course description from 'Imaging Metaphysics', ENG 6077. I participated in this course in Spring
2007 Semester, where I was first introduced to heuretics and Electracy.
6 Electracy is expanded upon more fully in the following chapter.









provide for them a heightened awareness of that universe. I would like to share with the

discipline an investigation of the other ingredients operating in the creation of cultural

inventions.

Our current cultural situation, along with the the technological apparatus which continues

to emerge at an incomprehensible speed, requires inventive pedagogical strategies. If the

academic institution becomes involved in the electorate apparatus, I feel that the increasing

"specialization" of the world may slow as more people become electorate. As an educator of

Architectural design in 2007, it is critical to understand the appropriate ingredients necessary in

formulating productive and successful cultural inventions, as well as how to effectively cultivate

these ingredients into replicable methods which might be widely utilized. I think that academic

architectural education should play an active role in constructing new methods within the

electorate apparatus. Heuretics will enable the discipline to find repeatable operations rendering

generative inventive logics that are both actionable and describable.

Heuristic Generator, the "CATTt"

Ulmer posits that working heuretically necessitates the use of the method being invented

while inventing it, exemplifying the use of "hyperrhetoric," which is considered akin to the

dream logic of surrealism.7 From Ulmer's pedagogical approach, I have adopted a heuristic

generator. This generator facilitates my aim--to produce a repeatable method by which urban

research can be as generative as it is analytical. Ulmer suggests that the system of most

intellectual inventions can become accessible through this heuristic generator which is

mnemonically identified by the acronym "CATTt." He reveals that all of the manifestos of the

avant-garde, including "The Manifesto of Surrealism," belong to the tradition of the discourse on



7 Gregory Ulmer, Heuretics the Logic of Invention, p.8.









method, and that they tend to include a common set of elements found in the "CATTt," which

includes these operations:8

C = Contrast (opposition, inversion, differentiation)
A= Analogy (figuration, displacement)
T= Theory (repetition, literalization)
T= Target (application, purpose)
t= Tale (secondary elaboration, representability)

This generator offers the discipline of architecture an academically rigorous method of

approaching design projects that will help us to realistically look at the situation that we are

currently in (2007), fully immersed in an electronic culture. Looking more realistically at a

situation by working inventively within it will also ground us more productively in history. With

the "CATTt" as my generator I will attempt to invent a practice of urban analysis appropriate for

the complexity of such culture.9 Developing an awareness of the electorate epoch within

academic architectural education reestablishes the architect's role as part of "the everyday circus

of big box culture."10

The Contrast for my "CATTt" is O.M. Ungers' Morphologie City Metaphors. I am using

Ungers' anthology in order to identify a clear example within the discipline that may no longer

be useful, or from which I wish to move beyond. Ulmer suggests that "the components of the

selected contrast provide an inventory of qualities for a new method."11 I am questioning the



8 Ibid.

9 It isn't my intention for the thesis to be primarily an addition to heretic curricula, nor am I interested in becoming a
master of the theories I am utilizing. Both of these avenues would be more appropriately suited for a Ph.D. in my
field. I simply wish to work in an interdisciplinary manner, proving that rigor in architectural academia can happen
inventively.

10 Jason Young, Architectural Design professor at University of Michigan. During "Labyratorium" my first
graduate studio at Michigan which took part in a larger class wide focus on "the perimeter," we were asked to
correspond with the condition of big box. Jason sometimes referred to this condition as the everyday circus of big
box. The everyday circus was adopted as common nomenclature within the studio culture.

1 Ibid.









ability to understand the filter that Ungers has created so that we can understand other filters. I

sense that if architects can look at the rapidly developing urban conditions within the United

States with a critical understanding of our own filters, we may feel more capable of operating

within it.

The Target concerns rapidly developing urban conditions, which constitutes much of the

United States. I am suggesting that within this "split second urbanism," "the plan" as it is

utilized by Ungers, is no longer a viable starting position for the architect. This kind of urbanism,

in which the inhabitants are the authors, grows in response to complex forces of these

inhabitants' desires. Thus, the formal character has little significance to the apprehension of

organization. The designer, I feel, must understand his or her own inner desires in order to

understand organizing principles within a condition where formal/ structural character are nearly

insignificant in contrast to the dominant presence of the "atmospheric" pressures of the

inhabitant's desire.

The Theory is Michel Serres' Hermes Literature, Science, Philosophy, focusing on the

essay, "Michelet: The Soup." With the help of Serres' recipe, I aim to generate an approach to

urban analysis which isn't dependent upon the city plan. Serres' work is perpetually founded

upon illustrating the existence of a complicated passage between "science," and the science of

man,"humanities." The gathering of knowledge for Serres is more like making soup than

shelving information. In this experiment, electracy provides the techne for the establishment of

such a passage.

Serres points to a bridge between science and art, which begins to establish the Analogy for

my experiment. I will apply both a scientific and an artistic lens in order to displace aspects of

both of these fields into my architecture, establishing figuration for the new approach to urban









analysis. Art establishes the complexity of the individual as significant in the development of

urban analysis. Additionally, it brings forward the importance of process and development and

suppresses the importance of final results. Science has provides new methods and "procedures,"

(such as biopsy) to reevaluate the level at which one "sees." The realm of scientific knowledge

provides a specific intensity to the way I perceive taxonomy.

The targeted condition offers an exaggerated example from which to start breaking our

addiction to reductive logics. Ulmer's "CATTt" will help to generate a method topractice

operating in a new way. The element of practice is extremely important. As with learning a

language or a musical instrument, the development of one's ability to trade into or out of filters

at will require discipline and practice. Ulmer is known for the following quote,

Electrate logic proposes to design these atmospheres into affective group intelligence.
Literacy and electracy in collaboration produce a civilizational left-brain right-brain
integration. If literacy focused on universally valid methodologies of knowledge
(sciences), electracy focuses on the individual state of mind within which knowing takes
place (arts).12

In order to conceive of the architect's role in such affective group intelligence, it is necessary to

examine the lenses through which we see and conceive of ourselves. This will be discussed as

the "eyepiece" more comprehensively within the following chapter.














12 Gregory Ulmer. The quote is found on www.wikipedia.com, under 'Greg Ulmer.' Typically I would utilize a
more rigorous source. Due to the playful nature of the course, and Ulmer's interest in the internet, it is fitting to use
this as a source.










APPARATUS


TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTION IDENTITY


Literacy


Electrary


.Alip.hablet
Frt-uit


DLiital
riternet


F.eligi-.nr Trilbe
Kstual Spint


c,-h,,.l Iati .nii
M.4erth.d Self


Etitert uninit ?
Sthie Lo..-.


Figure 1-1. Greg Ulmer's Apparatus Diagram depicts the technological, institutional, and
identification transformations from the oral epoch to the literate epoch and into an
electorate epoch. This was presented as additional material within his course. This
diagram, as well as many others is generously available on Ulmer's web page under
curriculum.


EPOCH









CHAPTER 2
FREEDOM FROM THE "EYEPIECE"

In my attempt to loosen my own rigidly woven and predetermined synaptic reactions, my

mantra has been, "neurons that fire together wire together." 1 I have been operating under the

assumption that if individuals live architecture within the current state of their own minds, they

will have no fertile ground to sprout and cultivate creative active energies the muse has no

space within these beings on which to perform. I would like to fire as many neurons as possible

in my creative process--trading into complexity--in order to avoid common and easy habits of

reduction. The concept of "Eyepiece" is expanded upon in this chapter in order to express the

depth of my interest in unpacking the work I have done with Gregory Ulmer in studying

heuretics within the realm of architectural Pedagogy.

I have noticed an emerging awareness of a claustrophobic feeling among architects and

architectural academics, bound by their current methods of formally communicating/

representing ideas, (translation). Additionally, I am intrigued by the saturated cultural condition

in areas of rapid expansion. In merging these two interests, I have developed a deep admiration

for the complexity in thought which is necessary to conceive of and work spatially and

aesthetically within accelerated conditions of information networks of mixture and desire. These

conditions are not imageablee" in the way we typically conceive of urban analyses. Applying a

heuretic generator, I attempt to fuel a mental model with which one is able to produce urban

analyses without simply reducing the thinking to a new set of terms.





1 Mark Bear, Barry Connors, and Michael Paradiso, Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain, pp. 724-725. When an axon
of cell A is near enough to excite a cell B and repeatedly or persistently takes part in firing it, some growth process
or metabolic change takes place in one or both cells such that A's efficiency, as one of the cells firing B, is
increased.









The ability to instantly visualize levels of abstraction or entire systems of logic, allows us

the use of available "knowledge," while remaining free to go beyond this in search of accelerated

alternatives. I begin to ask myself: how Do I Translate [My] Reality in 2007?

Just as a tangent touches a circle lightly and at one point, with this touch rather than with
the point setting the law according to which it is to continue on its straight path to infinity,
a translation touches the original lightly and only at the infinitely small point of the sense,
thereupon pursuing its own course according to the laws of fidelity in the freedom of
linguistic flux. 2

Translation requires a reworking of representational systems at hand. According to Hebbian

postulate, "neurons that fire together wire together." This suggests that our semantic reactions

neurologically occur and are predetermined based on previously repeated thoughts and actions.

Repetition of a particular system or thought pattern accelerates wiring, establishing fixed

connections and perpetuating predetermined habits and assumptions. Thus, one is able to

ascertain that the semantic structure or, "eyepiece" within each of us, constitutes that which we

are able to perceive and conceive. Subsequently, it constitutes the deployment of the

representational systems which will collectively be rendered. The representational systems

deployed become the "images appearing substantive" that are conceived of as reality.3

The "eyepiece" is the device that each of us carries around to peek out at the noumenal

configuration or "thing-in-itself."4 What we see of the world is what it lets us. The scientific

phrase used to describe the potential for synaptic structures and predetermined semantic

reactions to rewire is "synaptic plasticity." An early exploration of synaptic plasticity, and its



2 Walter Benjamin, "The Task of the Translator," from Illuminations, p. 80.

3 Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity, pp. 198-203. This notion comes from a recurring theme in most of
Korzybski's work, often referred to simply as, "the map is not the territory." I have practiced remembering that the
map is not the territory by calling the things I see within the world image appearing substance or substantive.

4 Ibid, pp. 386-411. In order to fully grasp this concept it I suggest studying Korzybski's Structural Differential, a
three dimensional diagram which explains the abstraction process in humans.









implications, was illuminated by A. Korzybski in the 1930's. His general semantics theory offers

methods to thalamically process ventures into the study of complexity, loosening the semantic

structures constituting the archaic devices which we carry around to look through. To drop this

device, or even parts of it, would be dramatic for the discipline of architecture; for to make a

change in an object is insignificant in comparison to a change made in the lenses it is viewed

through.

As noted by Sanford Kwinter architecture plays, or should play, a privileged role in the

study of complexity, called by Bergson the science of intuition.

Through materialization of actualization, architecture has the capacity to free the
imagination from three-dimensional experience, to free it from the curse of so-called
"invisible processes" and hidden diagrams and to show us that processes and events, the
ones that give form to our world and our lives, have shapes of their own.

Such a (time based) space or science of intuition requires self reflexive practice. To

illustrate, Manuel Gausa's introduction in Operative Optimism resonates within the discipline of

architecture, an awareness of the binding nature of our current modes of communication,

translation, and representation. A claustrophobia which binds in expressive ability has surfaced

within the image heavy books like Gausa's headlined by Koolhaas and Bruce Mau's efforts,

nakedly illustrating that more experiences exist than do words.6 These examples reveal the

saturated state of our economic evolution and beautifully depict the relevance of this thesis.

Gausa's plea is stimulating in what it suggests for the evolutionary state of even a small

percentage of humans. He seems subconsciously aware of a vertical evolutionary shift in the

semantic reactions which shape our collective behavioral structures or manifold of values.


5 Sanford Kwinter, "The Hammer and the Song," from OASEArchitectural Journal, No. 48. p.41.

6 I am referring also to a number of books within the discipline which invent new terms to deal with the
claustrophobia. A clear example of this is found within the text by Lebbeus Woods within Pamphlet Architecture,
"Some of them are Killers" #24. Here he describes a new type of space, giving it the name "data space."









Korsybski identifies three "stages of civilization," historically illustrating the shift from one-

valued semantics to two-valued semantics when the "laws of identity" were established by

Aristotle.7 This shift should be conceived of as rolling or folding in on itself, vertical rather than

horizontal. For Korsybski, marking this dramatic shift in the collective semantic structure proves

the necessity for conceiving the shift which is currently occurring.8 Gausa calls for a new way of

understanding old notions of architecture and culture. He asks us to shift our gaze from a

defensive (or over-vigilant) vision of architectural action which in his view is the most

traditional.9 I agree, a shift needs to and will take place, but to simply ask a generation of

architects to shift into a new gaze perpetuates a two-valued, identity based collective mentality.

Korzybski shows that this wreaks havoc on our ability to operate within the space of intuition.

Operative optimism is not so much about a "new" gaze or "new" logic, but rather, a logic and

gaze "in addition to." 10 To simply drop "new" from this plea might be a start

Practicing conscious abstracting, according to Korzybski, is a self reflexive process will

result in an elimination of serious fixities and blockages, which disallow fluid negotiation within

representational systems. Korsybski renders the words and languages we use as nothing more

than semantic maps to correspond with the configuration of complex reality. Consider Gaston

Bachelard's "Dialectics of Outside and Inside" in light of this discussion. He might see

Korsybski's methods of loosening rigidly woven semantic reactions as "little pieces of

experimental folly, like virtual grains of hashish without which it would be impossible to fully



7 Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity, pp.133-287.

8 Sanford Kwinter, "The Hammer and the Song," from OASEArchitectural Journal, No. 48. pp. 31-43.
9 Manuel Gausa, from the introduction to Operative Optimism, pp. 19-27.

10 Samuel Ichiye Hayakawa and Alan Hayakawa, Language in Thought andAction, pp. 112-124. Also see Alfred
Korzybski, Science and Sanity, pp. 452.









enter into the reign of "imagination." 1 Bachelard excites a similar convergence of

conversational threads when he suggests that phenomenology is what gives us the psychic

positivity of the image. I would ask that you pause to truly grasp the statement. A phenomenon,

or process that is known through the five senses, and thus understood as we have seen through a

predetermined synaptic structure, is what gives us the substantive of a mental image. In other

words, "the map is not the territory."12 Bachelard's essay provides a beautiful portrayal of the

complexity with which it is necessary to use our current state of communication, to become

aware of "our body" and "not our body," or more clearly, what we see through the "eyepiece"

and what is actually going on.

Many people are convinced that, as science proceeds, we are learning to perceive better,

and we are coming nearer and nearer to the point where we will be able to describe reality in

very exact terms. They miss the fact that describing something is to distort it, shrink it, and

betray it. With even a loose understanding of Hebbian theorem, one sees that to break restrictive

mental habits would in fact cause a neurological rewiring within the brain. Shifting semantic

structures allows for involutionary understandings of situations, and the ability to break apart

representational systems, resulting in the shift in gaze required in Operative Optimism. Simply, I

am suggesting that part of the translation process in architecture must account for some form of

self reflexive action, which for me begins with the acceptance of one's own Eyepiece.





11 Gaston Bachelard, "The dialectics of Outside and Inside," from The Poetics of Space, p. 219. This sentence
marks the beginning of one of my favorite passages by Bachelard, of which the following quote has been the most
impactful. "But if reduction is easy, i. \.u, ... i,.- is all the more .,ri.,,. ,, i.. from the standpoint of
phenomenology. I have begun to exaggerate images in order to disassemble my eyepiece.

12Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity, pp.133-287.









A model that is much simpler than the phenomenon it is intended to illustrate shrinks our

thinking to the model's dimensions and causes us to miss the complexity of the phenomenon.13

The structure we see and represent is made by the instrument inside through which we use to

look at the configuration outside. Thus, the more interesting voyage of discovery consists not in

seeking new landscapes and gazes, but in freeing ourselves from the addiction we have the

singular "eyepiece."

In the remaining chapters I attempt to invent a pedagogically relevant method to

understand and practice shifting the lenses of "the eyepiece". I don't associate myself with the

success or failure of the project, thus I remain optimistic about the outcome regardless. I

understand that there are certain aspects of my being which limit my creativity. My motivation

isn't derived solely by the outcome (how well I did and how well "I" am received). It is also a

result of my willingness to adhere to the challenge of breaking free from the addiction that I have

to solidifying my narrow view of the universe, expanding the aspects of myself which restrict or

limit my creativity.





















13 Samuel Bois, The Art ofAwareness, p. 146.









CHAPTER 3
CIRCULATION AND RESERVOIR

Contrast: Ungers' Filter

Contrast for the "CATTt," in this case, ensures the viability of the architectural

connection. The contrast helps identify a clear example within the discipline that may no longer

be useful, or from which we wish to move beyond. "The components of the selected contrast

provide an inventory of qualities for a new method."1 Of course, because the Target is very

specific and very loaded, the Contrast necessitates a certain level of specificity. I am concerned

with the current state of urban analysis, thus the image play selected involves urban analysis. I

have chosen O.M. Ungers' Morphologies City Images. Ungers has deposited this canonical form

of image play into the architectural arena, forming one layer or filter of an "Eyepiece". To

understand the filter that Ungers has created will allow us to understand more of these filters. I

sense that if architects were able look at the rapidly developing urban "big box" conditions

within the United States without such filters, they may feel more capable of operating within it.

Filters are formed in a twofold operation. First, parameters of values are set up. Ungers

determines, for example, what is looked at and what isn't. He chooses: 1, a city plan, 2, a very

particular image, 3, a German word, and 4, the English translation. Secondly, a powerful form or

shape is given to thinking, establishing method. The method, for Ungers is emphatic. I will

discuss a few of these examples in order to better explain the mechanism of Ungers' filter,

developing enough awareness to engage and disengage from these filters at will.

Morphology is derived from the Greek term morphe meaning shape or form. Used in

biology for example, morphology refers to the basic outward appearance or form of an organism,

relating to its size, shape, or structure. Morphology can be applied to the whole or any part of an


1 Gregory Ulmer, Heuretics the Logic of Invention, p. 8.









organism. Because morphological classification pertains to external characteristics and

observable appearance, it seems that using it in urban analysis runs the risk of grouping together

pieces of information that are actually relatively unrelated. 2

Through the use of molecular biology, genetic similarity is now considered in addition to

morphology in modem systems of taxonomy. Those who believe in morphological logics like

Ungers prioritize the meaning of form in architecture and urban analysis. I feel that forming

metaphorical connections and associations between two very different things based only on form

or a surface reading is not productive. In rapid urbanism, this form of thought process is too

slow, miring one down into predetermined thoughts and memories, eliciting a compare and

contrast thought process that is hard to deviate from.

Working fromform, for example, is very different from working from texture. Textural

understanding is an area I have focused on in developing freehand drawing exercises for

undergraduate design students. Drawing becomes useful in architecture when there is discovery

of a repeatable action; when one uncovers a system of representation to convey a spatial or

structural condition they have observed in life. When this form of discovery occurs, one is

essentially uncovering or unconcealing a truth a repeatable action and importantly not

representing a concept. Once the student uncovers the repeatable action, the irreducible unit

involved in the given system of representation, they own it. It becomes a part of them in the way

that their "handwriting" might.3




2 Samuel Bois, The Art ofAwareness, pp. 134-178.

3 Roland Barthes outlines several levels of meaning in an image; an informational level, a symbolic level, and a third
level, which is transcendent of psychology, anecdeote and function. For Barthes this level is significant. This third
level (thirdness) pertains to the individual memory. Barthes felt that it was important to understand the logic of this
third level which exists within each of us.









Becoming conscious of the irreducible unit, the kind of mark made, reveals a greater

understanding of both measure and contour within representation. This concept is actually the

link between these two modes of analytical drawing. Becoming aware of the implications that

one kind of mark has over another is important in laying basic proportions as well as in

establishing scale, and depth within drawing. When looking at form alone, all of what emerges

out of understanding texture and "finding" appropriate texture is missed. The breadth of

understanding texture in architectural endeavors adds a taxonomical layer to the study of form in

the way that genetic similarities radically change morphological readings in science. It is

actually only in texture that that concept is lost enough to uncover (something interesting).

Method of the Filter

The method of the filter that Ungers presents provides an approach to interpreting city

plans. He calls such image play "interpretations." The method consists of what he considers,

"three levels of reality: the factual reality -the object; the perceptual reality -the analogy; and

the conceptual reality the idea, shown as the plan the image the word." 4 He focuses on the

integration of object, analogy, and idea to talk about thinking processes. He is addressing the

nature of communication, which has helped me to determine the Theory for the "CATTt." He is

imposing a very particular format or method for categorizing the three layers together in order to

establish a gestalt. In this method, thinking happens between image and plan. The words form a

bridge that creates an awareness of connotations that may differ between the German idea and its

English translation. Ungers attempts to open up the readings of each city plan by the image and

word / idea it is paired with in order to embed "meaning" into the transformed reading of city

plan. In essence he is pushing back on functionalism, fighting the reductive logic of functionalist



4 O.M. Ungers, Morphologies City Images, P 14.









and behaviorist tropes. He claims not to be interested in analyzing simply in accordance to

function or measurable criteria. He would rather think qualitatively than quantitatively, by way

of "thinking and designing in images, metaphors, models, analogies, symbols, and allegories." 5

He wishes to transition from purely pragmatic approaches of thinking about cities to a more

creative mode of thinking. It seems that he felt claustrophobic within his situation over 30 years

ago at the books inception, predating the internet and the image flood of our current situation. I

am not engaging Ungers on his own field of battle. It helps that Ungers also utilizes a strategy of

contrast. On some level we have similar intentions. I also feel claustrophobic in my situation;

however I don't seek a functionalist or a formalist view of the world. My views are much

soupier.

Values of the Filter

The values that Ungers sets up within the filter are equally as absolute as the method. I

would like to focus specifically on the use of city plan for the sake of this discussion. Remember

that he exposes, "three levels of reality: the factual reality the object; the perceptual reality -

the analogy; and the conceptual reality the idea, shown as the plan the image the word."6 I

am curious if plan really describes "factual reality." Considering where the city plans come from,

I suggest that, the analogy images which Ungers has dubbed "perceptual reality" are more

closely tied to fact. The subjects of these images are generally biological, mechanical, or tactile.

Any of the images could be found in an encyclopedia. In figure 3-1 Ungers has shown a cat with

nursing kittens accompanied by a plan by Raymond Unwin from 1910 titled, "City with

independent satellites."7 The city plan in this example is not a fact it is a concept. More directly,


5 Ibid, p. 14.
6 Ibid.

7 Ibid, p. 58.









it is a utopian ideal. This can actually be said of the majority of plans within the anthology. The

use of utopian city plans draw upon a nostalgic premise that the architect is a hero whose role is

to solve problems with grand narratives. Michael De Certeau, discusses this in comparing "the

concept city," (the experience of Manhattan from the 110th floor of the World Trade Center),

with "urban practices," (the experience of wandering the streets of Manhattan). He asks,

Is the immense texturology spread out before one's eyes anything more than a
representation, an optical artifact? It is the analogue of the facsimile produced, through a
projection that is a way of keeping aloof, by the space planner urbanist, city planner or
cartographer. The panorama-city is a "theoretical" (that is visual) simulacrum, in short a
picture, whose condition of possibility is an oblivion and a misunderstanding of practices.
The Voyeur-god created by this fiction... must disentangle himself from the murky
intertwining daily behaviors and make himself alien to them. 8

Most of the city plans that Ungers uses within his book are utopian city plans or concept cities,

as described by De Certeau in the above quote. Generally, the plan drawing is an orthographical

cut that reveals an intangible experience of space, for that reason it is actually one of the most

difficult to understand. Often, it is a planning document which contains information about future

project as prescribed by the author. It is a concept. For Ungers, the city image, "factual reality" is

always depicted at a very small scale, rendering gestalt formal information. Embracing

authorship, Ungers' filter disentangles all who have been influenced by his filter from murky

intertwining daily behaviors of those "down below." Down in the streets of Manhattan, nursing

kittens exist as fact. figure 3-2 depicts clearly the "Voyeur-god" vantage point. Here the title is

"Ideal city on an island, Joseph Furttenbach, 1620."

The interpretations of "CITY" within Ungers' pages raise the question: what happens

when an urban situation, is not "imagable? By this I mean; if the plan isn't an accurate

indicator of anything, an analogy-image of the plan wouldn't be useful. My Target, the rapid


8 Michel de Certeau The Practice of Everyday Life, pp. 92-93.









urbanism taking over much of the United States provides an example of a "non-imageable"

condition. The plan or aerial view of this condition will not render anything productive in design

processes. In fact, I suggest that to look at these conditions, as seen in figure 3-3, as "voyeur-

god" raises the nostalgic hero complex filter expressed above. When utilizing this filter it is hard

to operate outside of the tendency to compare what we see to that which we know.

In order to understand the organizing principles within rapidly forming urban conditions, I

an understanding of the powerful forces of capitalism is necessary. This has no plan as we know

it. It actually doesn't have much form at all. Starting with "the plan" in this condition isn't a

viable starting condition for the architect. There is no author; the inhabitants are the authors. It

grows in response to complex forces of these inhabitants' desires, and the formal character has

little significance in the comprehension of organization. This complexity cannot be paired with a

formal analogy. Pairing this "fact" with an analogy and/or phrase can only cause disruption

within the nervous system, because it shrinks reality, creating a model that is not complex

enough to comprehend all that was involved in creating that space.9 It is no surprise that looking

at "sprawl" in this reductive manner brings up the familiar comparative lens of the European

city, typically accompanied by nostalgia. We don't know how to look at it any other way.

Ungers' filter embraces authorship. Our targeted condition, a digital culture, combats the author.

I want to deviate from Ungers' authoritative decision to use plan, however I will bring part

of his filter into the "CATTt." I am interested in how he has "morphed" the interpretation of each

city plan in accordance to the aesthetic principles within his own web of fired and wired neurons.

He chooses each image very particularly to solidify the form or morphe of each thought. Figure

3-4 depicts "Plan for Victoria, J.S. Buckingham, 1848," paired with an image of mirrors


9 Samuel Bois, The Art ofAwareness, pp. 134-178.









reflected into one another. The English word used in the morphology is Reflection. Ungers

chooses the images very particularly. For example, the patterns on the wall behind the mirror

have been selected aesthetically, reinforcing the thought. They are repetitive and they alternate

similarly to the pattern in the city image. The manner in which the frame of the mirror turns the

corner at a 45 degree angle and the size of the mirror in relationship to the plan does this as well.

The connection brings form to the idea of reduction. Figure 3-5 a very different example of an

"interpretation." We see, "La Ville Radieuse, Le Corbusier, 1952," paired with an image of

Coca-Cola bottles organized rationally. The word used here is Succession. It is obvious in this

example that Ungers, whether subconsciously or not, reinforces his critique of functionalism in

this pairing. The image play, as described in the example above, makes the reader feel like the

inhabitants of La Ville Radieuse, would feel, in their situation, like the Coca-Cola bottles exist in

theirs--within the systematic chain or force of the factory, unable to deviate. Modem utopias are

paired with mechanical or rational images such as the example above. In contrast, the historical

utopias--the plans which have the most pure formal characteristics--tend to be paired with 'feel

good' images like roses, doughnuts, kittens, and children. I understand the book as a reading of

Unger's eyepiece more than anything else. Examining Ungers' filter has helped me to understand

that such aesthetic decisions are more influential (to thinking) than it might seem. Gilles Delueze

calls this undervalued and underdeveloped logic "aesthetic comprehension."

Aesthetic comprehension is the grasping of a rhythm with regard to both the thing to be
measured and the unit of measure. Beneath both the measure and the units, there is
rhythm. 10

In chapter 5 I will discuss "aesthetic comprehension" further while exploring the artwork of

Francis Bacon, as presented by Deleuze in The Logic of Sensation.



10 Gilles Deleuze, Francis Bacon The Logic ofSensation, from the translators introduction, p. xvii.









Electracy

To fully understand the contrast we must understand our situation. Looking at figure 3-1,

an elaboration of the table from chapter two of this thesis, it becomes clear what has happened.

Introducing Greg Ulmer's notion of electracy, the apparatus or epoch which followed literacy is

underway; however much of the world is "anelectrate". Anelectracy is to electracy what

illiteracy is to literacy. Ulmer writes of electracy:

What literacy is to the analytical mind, electracy is to the affective body: a prosthesis that
enhances and augments a natural or organic human potential. Alphabetic writing is an
artificial memory that supports long complex chains of reasoning impossible to sustain
within the organic mind. Digital imaging similarly supports extensive complexes of mood
atmospheres beyond organic capacity. Electrate logic proposes to design these atmospheres
into affective group intelligence. Literacy and electracy in collaboration produce a
civilizational left-brain right-brain integration. If literacy focused on universally valid
methodologies of knowledge (sciences), electracy focuses on the individual state of mind
within which knowing takes place (arts).11

Ulmer's tables help to understand that our target is embedded within the electorate apparatus. The

grounding element is of particular interest to architecture. Notice that what has determined

"foundation" or form has shifted from "God," within the oral epoch, to "reason" within Literacy,

and now to "body" within electracy. If we were able to trace this idea through architectural

history, I believe it would become very obvious. Aesthetics, desire, entertainment, play etc.

coalesce in the individual body, which is now apparently the grounding element within our

epoch. I am going to assume for this experiment that the body provides the grounding of

architecture within our situation. It is hard to operate outside of our preferred pathways. Thus,

developing an approach to design within the transient dreams of the individual body feels absurd.

The following chapter will help in explaining this point. Traditionally, the systems we utilize



11 Gregory Ulmer. This quote has been taken directly from www.wikipedia.com under 'Greg Ulmer.' Typically I
would utilize a more rigorous source. Due to the playful nature of the course, and Ulmer's interest in the internet, it
is fitting to use this as a source. Additionally, I find that the quote is very beautiful.









have always been structured around the notion that one should privilege order over disorder.

This is because ground in the literate apparatus was reason, as it was once God. Using Michel

Serres as our primary theorist of the "CATTt" I would like to further explores the reorganization

ofUngers' filter.

Target

Target for the "CATTt," provides an "area of study" which the emergent method is

intended to address within architecture. Ulmer writes, "The target is often identifiable in terms of

an institution whose needs have motivated the search for the method." 12 It is puzzling to me why

there is no (A)rchitecture found in the rapidly developing urban conditions constituting much of

the United States. My curiosity is more than likely a result of having grown up outside of

Orlando Florida, embedded deeply within a ubiquitous "ticky-tacky." In my view, the absence of

architecture within rapid urbanism suggests that our institution is in need of a method which will

allow creative operability within these urban conditions. It doesn't feel like an exaggeration to

say that the situation is ignored, even within rigorous architectural curricula. Students

understand that what they learn will be useful once they graduate. This is, of course true.

However their experience is applicable only in a very small number of situations across the

country; those which constitute the level of density required for what has been studied. The fact

that modes of operation within "sprawl" are not present within architectural curricula is not due

to a lack of creativity on the parts of either the architect, nor of the institution in my view.

Rather, I see it as an inability to function within a situation that is not "imagable," as discussed

above. I arrive again at the imagery of the lab rat.


12 Gregory Ulmer, Heuretics The Logic of Invention, p. 9









"The Florida Landscape" project within the University of Florida's School of Architecture

curriculum addresses the issue of a "non-imagable" situation. In this project the students develop

an ability to construct context models and drawings which are more about revealing deliberate

and accessible descriptions of physical and spatial aspects of the context (i.e. fluidity and

looseness) than the image or exactness of it. Depictions of context/ landscape are typically

constructed texturally, of and with spatial and architectural intent. The students are pushed

beyond romanticized portrayals of the landscape. Working intimately within the varied

landscapes that make up "ground" in Florida provides the students an opportunity to become

aware of measured and immeasurable aspects of site. The students might be asked in an initial

study to capture various spatial phenomena that define the site by challenging perception at all

levels of sensory modality; exteroceptoin, proprioception, and interoception. This project

contrasts an intense urban "infill" project that occurs in the semester immediately prior,

providing students the ability to understand that generating from "context" modes and methods

of operation can happen in many ways.

I propose that we must become both literate and electorate in order to design within the

targeted condition. We have to understand capitalisms effect on architecture in order to teach it

something. Aaron Betsky captures my sentiment. He states,

We are real bodies in real space. As sprawl saps meaning and form away from our
experience, we need to build back a sense of who we are as physical beings inhabiting a
space we have made for ourselves. The artifice of human construction is what makes us
real. To make us aware of this condition, designers should create forms with expressed
connections and delightful surfaces that dance over the land like a spider's web of
suggestive spaces. Tents rather than palaces are the model for a world disconnected from
one particular time or place. The shapes by which we can know ourselves are, moreover,
deformed. Drinking into themselves the fast flows of capital, they resist consumption.









They give back a sense of a body that is both like us and wholly new, unfamiliar and
strange. This is the architecture of the self that replaces us with what we have made.13

Vibrations Above the Surface: Urbanism that Evades Perception

Sanford Kwinter suggested 10 years ago:

as the world continues to vary and flow, to aggregate, self-organize, and to re-break apart,
that most modern humans operated within a girded metaworld of abstraction, ratiocination,
and the crudest approximations to nature, and the arrested world, blind to the dimensions
of time, was producing an equally blind architecture, thrown from the metaworld into the
real one, like a lead boot into time's refreshing river.14

Seeing ourselves in the reflection of our filters, we are unable simply to look out at the

process world of constant change and "see." As discussed in chapter one, our "Eyepieces" are

not suitable to perceive the complexity of the territories that we represent. A mental model that is

much simpler than the phenomenon it is intended to illustrate shrinks our thinking to the model's

dimensions and causes us to miss the complexity of the phenomenon. 15 By establishing the

necessity for heuretic invention, and introducing the "CATTt" I am suggesting that exaggerated

mental processes, which go beyond our contrast, would render us more apt to deal with our

reality in productive and positive ways. To follow the movements of matter in its free and

irregular flow, and to tap into the vast subtle potential of the fluid universe, one must first start

with a break from the limitations of daily language. We have to invent something new.

Ungers' model suggests that we have been forgetting relevant vibrations of urbanism

within the reductions and abstractions we make. We could apply heuretics to many veins of

architecture; however my explicit architectural interest in the split second urbanism of my



13 Aaron Betsky, Architecture Must Burn, p. 3.0. The quote expresses the way I will talk about 'the body' as
grounding element for architecture within digitalized cultures of 2007.
14 Sanford Kwinter, "Flying the Bullet. Or When did the Future Begin." from Louis Kahn: Conversations with
Students(Architecture at Rice), p. 71. This essay resonates with my thesis on many levels. The experience of Yager,
a fighter pilot, exposes Kwinter's interest in complexity and intuition.

15. Samuel Bois, The Art ofAwareness, p. 146.









current situation offers an exaggerated ("un-imageable") example from which to start breaking

our addition to reductive logics. The "fact" within Ungers' morphological approach will have no

use within the contemporary manifestations of urbanism within the United States. These forces,

illustrated often by Kwinter as potential or incorporeal, are the ones which result in formal

residues into which, as seen through Ungers' model; we place our interests and effort.16 Within

the discipline of architecture, it is singularly this residue, the plan or aerial view of sprawl, which

is reacted to critically and defensively. Visually, the layer of urbanism I am interested in

targeting can be visualized as vibrations above the surface of the energies appearing substantive.

17 Energy appearing substantive, or substance, is a term which I have used in reference to

"objects" I see "outside". Doing this reminds me "objects" within urban conditions are not the

abstractions used to communicate with others about them. Rather, the stuff I see, abstract, and

give names to, are in reality, dynamic configurations of units of energy. However, one should

not deny or reject "the image" or its abstraction. The image is real, it is a projection of the mind,

but "reality configures infinitely always." 18 To avoid abuse of one's nervous system, it is best to

always remain conscious of this.

"Neurons that fire together wire together." The Hebbian postulate has been useful in

conceptualizing vibrational urbanism--mapping potential trajectories of desire. However, I

realize that I am using the Hebbian Postulate within this thread of the thesis work more loosely.

Here, this analogy should not be used too rigidly, as analogies give our thinking processes a

pattern from which it is not easy to break free.19 Gausa would agree that as architects we tend to


16 Sanford Kwinter, "The Hammer and the Song," from OASEArchitectural Journal, No. 48. pp.31-43.

17 These are the layers I am claiming we forget to represent.

18 Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity, pp. 386-411.
19 Samuel Bois, The Art ofAwareness, p. 137.









work "from" complexity.20 We saw in chapter one that to work "with" complexity would mean

to work "with" yourself; conceiving of having multiple selves (within ones semantic structure).21

If an aim is to expand the capacity to experience more of the process world of constant

change in the study of urbanism than one's filter would already allow, then representations and

translations made must reflect that aim. Additonally, the assignments we give ourselves must

have elements which develop this expansion embedded within them. Often, because we easily

digest what we are used to, that which flows through the preferred pre-fired synapses, we feel

most comfortable having discussions which are extremely reductive. Korsybski offers his

structural differential to practice this break from common-sense daily language, and to become

conscious of one's abstractions. In our Heuretic invention we intend to do the same. Seeking to

work outside of common-sense language tends to make one layer of the self very frustrated and

stressed. It takes practice not to default to the old lens. However, as the world of economics has

shown, stress is the healthy state of capital. The saturation of one aspect of the production of

stress allows us the ability to perceive of the forces which are rendered unto us, and those which

we render. And as we give up these frustrations little by little, we will come to a position where

we can turn around and look back to find out that we didn't give up a thing. In severing the

"Eyepiece" there is nothing to lose except the values that are given to images appearing

substantive.22



20 Manuel Gausa, Operative Optimism, pp. 4-31.

21 Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity, pp. 386-411.
22 Consider, for a moment, the middle. Find a writing pen lying around, it doesn't matter what kind. Now, balance it
on your index finger. You will see that in this case "the middle" is a balancing point which is only found with
inclusion of all of both sides. This exercise, presented to me first by a Zen priest, is interesting in its application to
the study of urbanism, to the discipline of architectural education, as well as Heuretics. The "plan" in our contrast is
not a balancing point It is not middle, rather it attempts to be a whole or gestalt. It has one author. I want to start in
the middle in order to make something appear. I don't want to be in control.









Advanced capitalism, as Neil Leach maintains, has turned the world into a mythologized

dream world, based on fantasy and escapism. He maintains that throughout his article,

"Wallpaper* person," his argument was intended to be deliberately exaggerated, so as to become

less a representation of [objective] "reality" than a transcendence of it. In so doing, he uncovers

certain truths about the world and demonstrates an accelerated ability to map extensional

relationships and accounts of these relationships. 23 He practices, through exaggeration, the

ability to see something else, along with what he would have seen anyway. The article

transcends canonical approaches via Leach's self-reflexive account of the/his current condition,

it requires and allows, simultaneously, the manipulation of his daily language. His notion of

"aesthetic cocoon," the isolated state of being cosseted from reality and locked into some dream

world is not farfetched in relationship to the heuretic invention we are cooking up. The cocoon

offers another angle from which to conceive of the addiction we have to our predetermined

semantic reactions, and beautifully illustrates Hebbian theorem. Wallpaper* person provides a

more psychological angle invested in the original story of narcissus, but as we will see, all angles

are relevant. It actually offers an interesting model for much of contemporary life. Leach poses

that the habitat of the Wallpaper* person is an extension of that very individual, or rather it is

even an inverted mould.

At this point, it becomes clear that we are looking at an individual body in order to unpack

a new way of "seeing" American Urbanism. Again, we want to conceive of design processes

which factor in the complexity of contemporary manifestations of urbanism. Urbanism

understood with an architectural mentality of an autonomous and purely phenomenological

interest in mediums of mass, space, light and organization is not sufficient. We are always going

23. Neil Leach, "Wallpaper* Person: Notes on the Behavior of a New Species," from This is Not Architecture:
Media Constructions, pp. 231-243.









to be interested in those things. We want to see something else in addition to what we would

have seen anyway. Thinking in this way might allow for designs which awaken a new layer of

evolution. With that mentality we will no longer habitually seek monumental axis, and position

of center. Nostalgia will not drive our motivations. We will be inventive and positive about

sprawl.

In my research, I have practiced "looking" at sprawling big box landscape by

corresponding within them. In so doing, I developed an awareness of five spatial "tendencies,"

within this deported landscape. These tendencies provided a very productive launching point for

the design project that followed. There was no need to impose a reductive model or method to

read this landscape, the method was within it. Rather than assume the role of "wanderer" or

"voyeur," roles that have been studied in the past, I became more of a "hawker-barker." I

developed over a hundred postcards which listed the potentials within this deport landscape, (See

figure 3-5). I gave myself no set boundary, I simply began to look and observe; and then I listed.

I advocated; I sold. I wanted to see something else, in addition to what I would have seen

anyway. The tendencies I came to see are as follows:

1. Rapidly developing (big box) urbanism is an ethereal context of transient dreams.

2. Loose mediums and connectors sanction loose associations within context.

3. A loose impulse results in overabundance, indulgence and a lack of restraint.

4. Large modulated context creates an immediate loose fit with what is desired, resulting in the
hunt for something new.

5. The immediate trucking of portable modules of context responds to these transient dreams,
which can never be fulfilled.

While uncovering these truths or tendencies, it became clear that the plan, what Ungers

refers to as the "fact" within his morphological method of communication is not useful. This is

because, as I have discussed, there is a dimension within these territories that is not imageablee."









As such, seeking the perfect analogy, even aesthetically, is reductive and harmful to ones mental

processes. Found within the tendencies stated above one begins to sense the emergence of the

influence the individual "body" has on the forms which manifest. We see that impulses are

responded to with immediacy. A beautiful logic of looseness reigns within the mathematically

sublime landscape. Gathering information within these landscapes must allow for slippage. If it

is too fixed and rigid, then it will not be accurate. Thus, there is a rift or unknowable

characteristic within the aggregation and self replication of sprawl that is determined by our

desires rendering any form of plan as we know it useless. How does the architect operate when

the "plan" is no longer a viable tool? To answer this we must make a new method appear. This

is our task.



























I .IT"









Figure 3-1. Above is an example of Ungers' "interpretations." Here, he has shown a cat with
nursing kittens accompanied with a plan by Raymond Unwin from 1910 titled, "City
with independent satellites." This image is found on pages 58-59. [Reprinted with
permission from Publisher]














































I _



Figure 3-2. Above is another example of Ungers' "interpretations," titled "Ideal city on an
island, Joseph Furttenbach, 1620."This image can be found on pages 20-21.
[Reprinted with permission from Publisher]


. .. ............






































Figure 3-3. The image from Dolores Hayden's A field guide to sprawl, depicts the standard view
that designers take of rapid urbanism. I am suggesting that this vantage point is not a
useful place to begin analysis of these sprawling conditions. This image/ spread can
be found within the second chapter, "An illustrated Vocabulary of Sprawl. [Reprinted
with permission from Publisher]






















I I

















Figure 3-4. Above is another example of Ungers' "interpretations," titled "Plan for Victoria, J.S.
Buckingham, 1848." The plan is paired with an image of mirrors reflected into one
another, and the word used in the morphology is Reflection. This example expresses
how Ungers uses aesthetic intelligence to make a point. This image can be found on
pages 90-91. [Reprinted with permission from Publisher]


















1'
U .---


Figure 3-5 This example is titled, "La Ville Radieuse, Le Corbusier, 1952," and is paired with
an image of Coca-Cola bottles organized rationally. The "idea" used here is
Succession. Ungers' choices obviously reinforce his critique of functionalism in this
pairing. The image play makes the reader feel like the inhabitants of La Ville
Radieuse would feel, in their situation, like the Coca-Cola bottles exist in theirs. This
image can be found on pages 108-109. [Reprinted with permission from Publisher].


W


T- T V


INA&e















tsi


Figure 3-6. Sampling of correspondence post cards taken as part of my research on big box
culture. During this research I began to "correspond with the condition of big-box." I
temporarily dispelled my preconceptions, and thus began to understand the condition
as an ethereal context of transient dreams.










APPARATUS-2



Apparatus Orality Literacy Electracy


Practice Feb.-. cieice? Ei-irerrtiur-ient


Ins itutioiin :-'C i.in: l i .1:11:0 :1 E' i. Lul I .l


State or M ind F'ehe- ki-riln:mtr Etii :.trIeTir


Behavior I.'".:Il E::p. runii it P l'j


Plhilosophy The :.,?. El: irtei I ;1 iAetrlieriL: 3


G round '-*:.: F.e :.:n E...1v


Ontolo-gy TI:teri A- re..:.i'. '-'hi [I



Figure 3-7. Greg Ulmer's Apparatus II. This expands upon the one provided in the first The
above diagram adds more specificity within the areas of ontology, ground,
philosophy, state of mind, and practice in the transformation over time from the oral
epoch to the literate epoch and into an electorate epoch. This was presented as
additional material within his course. This diagram, as well as many others is
generously available on Ulmer's web page under curriculum.









CHAPTER 4
500 ML CHICKEN STOCK

Theory

Theory for the "CATTt," will be Michel Serres' Hermes Literature, Science, Philosophy,

focusing on the essay, "Michelet: The Soup," with a detour through Martin Heidegger's

Introduction to Metaphysics. Ulmer states, "In each case the theorist generates a new theory

based on the authority of another theory whose argument is accepted as a literal rather than

figurative analogy," 1 Serres provides an ample medium from which to base the conception of

the new invention. I felt that using this particular essay for theory was perfect because the

"CATTt" itself is soupy. Working must take place in all categories at once. As was discussed in

the previous chapter, gathering information within our targeted context must allow for slippage.

If it is too fixed and rigid, then it will not be accurate. I like to imagine having the pleasure of

operating under the authority of Serres.

Harari and Bell list Serres' five theorems within the introduction of the book. I will discuss

the work through these theorems to provide structure for this chapter. The first of Serres'

theorems, as presented by Harari and Bell, suggests that an encyclopedia which omits any of the

multiple dimensions of knowledge would render an encyclopedia false from the moment of its

realization. Within Serres' work, this common thread of the assimilation of all knowledge,

suggests a kind of soupy "ultimate encyclopedia," not unlike the internet. The soupiness is a

result of a shift from descriptive categorization to active categorization. Serres moves beyond a

typical scientific mentality of categorization, taking description into the realm of procedure by

uncovering similarities between seemingly dissimilar subjects to reveal deeper fundamental

truths about the structure of the universe. His intentions are fundamentally scientific though they


1 Gregory Ulmer, Heuretics the Logic ofSensation, p. 9.









are reliant upon poetic and narrative. Serres' work provides ample imagery from which to begin

gathering knowledge inventively within the Electrate apparatus. It reinforces the nature and

structure of a "distributive" or "additive "gathering mechanisms.

In short, Serres' work is truly interdisciplinary. It is perpetually founded upon illustrating

the existence of a complicated passage between "science," and the science of man,"humanities."

Serres shows us that this path is complicated by the essential nature of knowledge as well as by

the evolution of modern knowledge. He places the reader back into a time within which

philosophy and science were singular. Philosophy is derived from the Greekphilia meaning love

and sophia meaning wisdom.2 The increasing complexity of our environment seems to call for

an increasing complexity of specialization.3 However, from the theory for this experiment,

The tendency to divide in order to conquer has brought science to a critical point at which
it is slowly becoming more of a trade the scientist practices than a scientia whose object is
knowledge.4

We are not taking advantage of the electorate apparatus, which is capable of supporting a

more complex and distributed gathering of knowledge, one that is a mixture. A soupy gathering

of knowledge would not divide, it would unify. I will dive deeper into this question about the

nature and evolution of knowledge by taking a brief detour into Martin Heidegger's Introduction

to Metaphysics. From Heidegger I will establish a few key phrases which will augment my

ability to articulate an understanding of the evolution of modern knowledge.







2 Ibid

3 This issue has been ripe and ready to be tackled in architecture for decades. I'm optimistic about addressing this
issue because, like Serres and many others I am skeptical of the specialist.

4Michel Serres, Hermes Literature, Science, Philosophy, from the translator's introduction, p. xii.









Heidegger


Phusis

Heidegger shows us that the Greek's fundamental questioning of Being of their great

historical Dasein5 (situation) once pertained to nature's overwhelming, all-abiding-sway, which

was conceived of as phusis.6 The all-abiding-sway of nature that the Greeks faced in their

gathering of knowledge is like the flood of images and desire machines of capitalism that we

face in our own historical Dasein. Heidegger shows us that the notion of phusis collapsed into

the verb "to be," which became a primary structuring element of Western metaphysics. Before

this inceptive moment of literate Metaphysics the "thing" had not yet been invented. One's

ability to use language in a very particular way to describe a thing did not exist before Aristotle.

Unfortunately once the "thing" became a method of gathering, we became obsessed. The

obsession with things--gathering them, categorizing them, testing them, and shelving them in

very particular ways--got so out of hand that Heidegger suggests we forgot about the essence of

Being and we can no longer even conceive of questioning the essence of Being as the Greeks

once did. I believe that Serres simultaneously demonstrates and calls for an understanding of the

essence of Being. For most of us however, this curiosity is no longer indexed within our minds

because our Eyepieces do not register that frequency. "We involuntarily explain the infinitive "to

be" to ourselves on the basis of the "is," almost as if nothing else were possible," 7 In this quote,

Heidegger expresses that this has long ruled our historical Dasein. The addiction we have to our

preferred mental processes begins here. The Photograph by Andreas Gursky titled "Salerno


5 Martin Heidegger, Introduction to Metaphysics, pp. 1-6. The use of Heidegger within the theory of this "CATTt"
comes directly out of the work that I have done with Ulmers. Within "Imaging Metaphysics," we used only
Heidegger as our theorist.

6 Ibid, pp. 10-13.

7 Ibid, p. 96.









1990,"8 beautifully captures the notion of of phusis, the all-abiding-sway of our situation. I am

interested in this image because of the juxtaposition between both nature, phusis within the

Greeks historical dasien as well as the power and complexity of the current historical dasien.

Heidegger maintains that the logic of cognition, literate metaphysics, i.e. gathering with

the written word as means of finding "truths" is A way, and not THE way. He valorizes our

mission. Pure reason, as for Serres, is too abstract for Heidegger. He believes that we are ready

to go back and actually experience Being before it was crushed under the pressure of the

infinitive "is," and to utilize a more practical based reasoning to seek out logics that are affect

driven. As mentioned in the previous chapter, these logics would find "truths" grounded within

the erotic forces that flow through our bodies. Heidegger suggests that it is within these forces or

sensations--the recognition of beauty and what generates the golden section--that the sway of

phusis can be felt.

This mode of ontology, necessarily, pushes beyond the substance or ousia of a thing. For

example, it moves into territory beyond the definable essence of a thing (i.e. a cup contains, or a

chair supports the weight of a person). It is not like this, but more like this. The point is to get

beyond the level of meaning and to get at the thing itself. Due to our canny nature, and the

forcefulness of the all-abiding-sway of capitalism, getting to the thing itself is not so easy.

Heidegger suggests that breaking out of what is familiar would require a violence-doing to that

which establishes the routes of these circuits. We arrive again at the necessity to conceive of the

"eyepiece."







8 This image is printed withinAndreas Gursky: Images by Fiona Bradly of Tate Gallery Publications, pg. 31.









Alethia

Looking more closely at the narrowing of Being which took place, one might imagine it as

a choice that was made by the Greeks long ago. A window into understanding this choice grows

directly from the Greek's notion of unconcealment or alethia9. "This essence of truth could not

be held fast and preserved in its inceptive originality. Unconcealment, the space founded for the

appearing of beings, collapsed." 10

Unconcealment flattened out to mean correctness, and its essence was thus abandoned. I

would like to imagine the re-emergence of this concept of alethia. It is in the unconcealed truth

(alethia) that the Greeks established fundamental truths about their existence within their

situation. They were commonly in the practice of inventing ways to exist within the all-abiding-

sway. Exploiting the power of their apparatus, the Greeks used WORDS as recording devices,

gathering up truths about nature's substance. Heidegger insists that we become aware how and

when we got stuck in the trajectory of logic or logos" as the only form of questioning the Being

of beings. Working our way back to Serres, we see that he also noticed the choice that was made.

Serres states,

My body (I cannot help it) is not plunged into a single, specified space. It works in
Euclidean space, but it only works there. It sees in a projective space; it touches, caresses,
and feels in a topological space; it suffers in another; hears and communicates in a third;
and so forth,.. Euclidean space was chosen in our work-oriented cultures because it is the
space of work of the mason, the surveyor, or the architect. 12

In effect, Being becomes singularly an idea such that "the grass is green," or "the grass is

wet;" forgetting that "The grass (simply) is." Serres points to the realization our bodies are not


9 Ibid, pp. 75-88.

10 Ibid, p. 203.

" Ibid, pp. 94-133.
12 Michel Serres, Hermes Literature, Science, Philosophy, p.44.









plunged into a single space, but rather into "difficult intersections and sets of connections and

junctions which always need to be constructed." 13

Heidegger demonstrates through poetry that there is another direction this "choice" could

have taken us. He points to art, making the claim that this specific vehicle of communication did

not get sucked into the "fall." Heidegger's interest in art as a form of communication allows us to

use art as part of the analogy of the "CATTt," looking specifically at the work of Francis Bacon.

In doing, we will see a clear example of how a" logic of sensation" has actually been achieved.

We will use the analogy to invent a way to move beyond Ungers' morphological model which

uses the plan, the image, and the word, together to think about "CITY." The target is complex,

and requires the use of the electorate apparatus of our dasein (see figure 4-1) which supports a

complex logic of distributed categories.

From all of this, we gather that in noticing one thing, other things disappear from

consciousness. If we are not careful, a limited and diluted truth then becomes fixed in the mind

which results in a fractt understanding of Being. Also, we must realize that we are in a situation,

a historical moment where flows of forces are acting on us.14

Serres--The Soup

Understanding Heidegger's perception has provided a greater understanding of Serres'

complex passage between "science" and "art." I will move onto his essay, Michelet: The Soup.

Serres does not simply make elaborate claims, leaving one to contemplate how to utilize the

material presented. He operates more like the vanguardistt" that was described in chapter two

on the Heuretic method. In his work he is preoccupied not simply by an object or a domain, but


13 Ibid.
14 For example, Heidegger takes an active position with the Nazi party in his situation because he thought he could
influence the masses.









most importantly with sets of operations, methods, and strategies which are applicable to

formations of all kinds. These methods are illustrated clearly by Serres' five theorems listed by

Harari and Bell in the Introduction of the book. The theorems collectively render Serres'

conception of the "ultimate knowledge gathering mechanism," and most importantly, how it

operates. The theorems offer fuel for the setting up of heuretic inventions and reflect the

potential of an electorate apparatus. I am intrigued specifically with how they might be used in

formulating our ability to understand how the subtleties of individual bodies influence the form

of American urbanism. I will be using the theorems for clarity and structure in order to talk

about The Soup.

Theorem 1: In order for there to be an encyclopedic totality, this totality must be
constituted as a theory providing access not only to a field of knowledge but to the world
as well. (An encyclopedia that omits any of the multiple dimensions of knowledge is a
false encyclopedia at the very moment of its realization: this explains, in Serres's view, the
repeated failure of all philosophers of totality.)15

This theorem provides a point from which to deviate from Ungers the contrast. Serres' would

consider Ungers' anthology a false encyclopedia because it includes only one view of "CITY."

In using the city plan, Ungers omitted certain dimensions of experiencing "the City." Because

Serres is combating a reductive encyclopedic gathering of knowledge, he proposes that new

theoretical operations must be discovered and defined. If the separation of knowledge into

compartmentalized units of specialization is no longer applicable to our epoch, then we must

define new ones. We want to invent new techne within the electorate epoch in the way that the

Greeks began to gather knowledge (about nature) with words in the literate epoch; without

preconceptions





15 Michel Serres, Hermes Literature, Science, Philosophy, from the translators introduction, p. xvi.









Most of Serres' work is concerned with Information theory. He investigates the

structuring of information, with a preoccupation with the nature of communication.

Modem science is thus specifically concerned with the study of all aspects of the
transmission and propagation of messages information, noise, and redundancy. (Literary
criticism understands these same problems in terms of theories or code, language, writing,
and translation.).16

I am interested in how Serres focuses on the message to talk about the structure of

communication, bringing in the specificity of each body or receiver. Ungers, in contrast, focuses

on a morphological integration of analogy, fact, and idea to talk about "thinking." He is

imposing a particular arrangement of these three simple components to establish a whole or

Gestalt. He celebrates the gestalt of his own authorship one mind. Serres' celebrates a rich soup

that can account for all knowledge many minds.

For Serres, the way that Ungers presents fact is too "dry." The taxonomic absolute

format is reductive and restrictive; it dries the skin, it will not nurture health and growth. Serres

might actually enjoy Ungers' use of image and word; however for Serres, divisions of

information are never (only) taxonomical. Rather, communication is a "journey" and the

message is a bridge. The message is transmitted at specific nodes or intersections along the

"journey". The journey forges new paths between man and the world. The journey has infinite

potential, it can be tracked and has access through all areas of the encyclopedia, past present and

future. Thus it is continuous and all inclusive. Serres states,

One might assume a gap between the so-called physical sciences and the sciences of
living beings. No such gap is to be found in The Sea. The world is a static machine, a
compression engine, an electrical engine, a chemical machine, a steam engine; the world
is an organism all without contradiction. The basic philosophy is hylozoism. What is
hylozoism if not mechanism coupled with vitalism in a synthesis in which there are no
gaps? ...For Michelet the synthesis of mechanism and vitalism is justified by the


16 Ibid, p. xxiii.









succession of areas of knowledge within the encyclopedia. Why should sciences be
contradictory among themselves? 1

Serres teaches about science and its history without focusing on one specific area. He is able to

expose all areas of the encyclopedia at once by taking the reader on a journey through the

structure of information. In this case it is journey through The Sea as it is presented by

Michelet through Serres.

The nature of the journey or story is the most productive for my purpose. In the

transmission of each message, one can see down the trajectory of each converging axis of

information including where the axis came from and where it might be going. My theory is that

because what is being expressed is formulated as a narrative, the filter which is typically used to

understand "science" isn't turned on the ubiquitous eyepiece isn't on guard. It is as if one

exists in the arms of mother, calm and relaxed, taking in the world as if it were the first time.

Serres tells a story, specifically playing on Michelet's obsession with the repetition of the

feminine theme to intensify the flavor of the soup. Again, for Michelet, the moist/warmth theme

is beneficent, whereas the dry, scholastic themes are maleficent.

For Serres the only thing to note about the nature of the soup is this, there are reservoirs for

its circulation. More clearly, Serres provides this list claiming,

To understand the prebiotic soup ... I have only to perform the following simple addition.

1. The centers defined by geometric and differential properties are the poles of the
circulation of movements in general.

2. They are the poles of circulation of fluids in general, through the interaction of high
and low pressures.

3. They are the positive and negative poles for the circulation of electric current.

4. They are the hot and cold sources of the Carnot cycle, which functions for all kinds of
liquids.

17 Michel Serres, Hermes Literature, Science, Philosophy, p. 35.









5. They are concentrations for the circulation of saline solutions.

6. They are hearts for the circulation of the blood.

7. They are breasts or uteri for the circulation of milk or for menstrual circulation in
which we can recognize, as in a circle, the cycle of the planets and the first factor of
the addition.

What is the Soup? It is the sum of all elements analyzed in relation to the areas of the
encyclopedia cited above. It is milk, blood, a solution of mineral salts, and electrical flux
etc., all at the same time. It has reservoirs for its circulation. 18

Rather than study the Carnot cycle separately from the menstrual cycle, Serres suggests that we

gather them together, with all other circulation "centers," as described above, in order to

understand a latent structuring reality which operates more deeply at the root of knowledge; there

are reservoirs for the circulation of the soup. For Serres, these two notions remain structurally

stable through all the divisions of the encyclopedia. He is not defining a structure, he is defining

structure itself. In grasping this more deeply, one might feel again, the "all-abiding-sway" of

phusis, and begin again questioning the essence of being.

Theorem 2: Any theoretical exigency is inextricably linked to a moral or political
exigency. (Theory always borders on terror something that has always been known in
academic circles that engage exclusively in theory.)19

This theorem might help demonstrate how the political and the entertainment industries are

already utilizing the internet in inventive ways. I have come to see from Dr. Ulmer, that as an

aspiring educator in 2007, I am responsible for engaging in the process of developing an electorate

society. He suggests that we can figure out, by becoming electorate, how to teach capitalism

something. I think that this is an important area of research, especially in application to the

realm of rapidly expanding urban conditions expanded upon in the previous chapter. Finding a

way to teach capitalism something which might enable architects more operational ground within

18 Ibid.
19 Michel Serres, Hermes Literature, Science, Philosophy, from the translators introduction, p. xvii.









sprawl is a longer term goal. Thus, for the sake of this exercise, I will not be focusing on this

theorem in particular, as I feel it must come later, once the tale has become productive.

Theorem 3: there is no hierarchy of cultural formations. Science and myth are never on
two sheets.
3.1 Science is a cultural formation equivalent to any other.
3.2 There is no "natural" hierarchy within sciences. Myth informs science.20

Theorem 4: Science is the totality of the worlds' legends. The world is the space of their
inscription. To read and to journey are one and the same act" 21

Serres' envisions and renders within this essay a method of communication that goes

beyond metaphor/ model/ analogy/ symbol in their singular relationship with fact. He claims

that each time he has gone through an area of the encyclopedia he has found a concrete model

involving a circulation and a reservoir.

The same scheme is found in the primary cycle of the eternal return or in the last cycle of
generation: the mother soup engenders the mother siren. Woman is the genetic reservoir.22

The Vedic texts long ago recommended the use of a similar recipe for the reparations of
the "amrta" of immortality: a pot was needed--this was the sea; it was to be stirred by
means of a certain number of utensils--among them, a mountain--and the nature of the
mixture was defined. Now the recipe for the soup is the encyclopedia, which, since Hegel
at least, is a cycle. ... 23

Both of the quotes provide explanations of the third theorem. Science and myth are never on two

separate sheets. Science is actually informed by myth. Serres sets up the existence of a chain,

where mother emerges from mother, a circular generation of the eternal feminine, an earth that is

in labor (genetically speaking). He then asks what the conditions are for the achievement of this

aim, as well as what happens in the course of this labor. His point is that in answering specific

questions about reservoir and circulation, one will find themselves in every area of the

20 Ibid, p. xix.

21 Ibid, p. xxi.

22 Ibid, p. 36.

23 Ibid, p. 31.









encyclopedia--geography, geometry, astronomy, oceanography, gravity, barolgoy, biology,

gnoseology, neptunism, heterogeny etc. Discussing all of these areas within the encyclopedia, as

they exist together in the soup, Serres gives no distinction in the level of importance between

myth and "fact." This obliteration of hierarchy perfectly opposes our contrast, whose format

resides upon the "fact" vs. the "analogy." In this experiment the plan is actually a myth that

needs to be read as part of a story within which the individual body and its messages become the

grounding elements forming foundation within rapid urbanism. To don this filter will yield a

soupy reading of "CITY" more fitting for the analysis of the sprawling landscapes of the United

States. I hope it might allow a designer to operate more comfortably in this condition, without

the injunction of a (compare and contrast) logic. Additionally the designer would not feel

burdened by the need for authorship.

We begin with a myth, or a story of a journey with no specified plan or territory. Our

situation is the soup. The internet is the pot. Bodies and messages form "ground."

Theorem 5: Order is not the law of things but their exception.

Consequently, it is necessary to rethink the world not in terms of its laws and its
regularities, but rather in terms of perturbations and turbulences, in order to bring out its
multiple forms, uneven structures, and fluctuating organizations. ... The introduction of
the notion of parasite puts into question the crypto-egalitarian ideology of exchange...

The parasite invents something new. It intercepts energy and pays for it with information.
It intercepts roast beef and pays for it with stories. These would be two ways of writing
the new contract. The parasite establishes an agreement that is unfair, at least in terms of
previous accounting methods; it constructs a new balance sheet. It expresses a logic that
was considered irrational until now, it expresses a new epistemology, another theory of
equilibrium. 24

This Theorem reiterates the break from the format of our contrast. The form of the plan is

not fact "the law of things". The plan is "an exception" a concept or utopia. This distinction



24 Ibid, p. xxvii.









is important. Heidegger shows that The Greeks ignored the accident when making their

metaphysics. Because of this, it is hard to see any other way. In allowing ourselves to look at

communication as a journey, and to think of an information gathering that is soupy, it seems the

accident is no longer an accident, but is part of the "abiding sway" of our situation. It might even

be thought of as a moment which exposes the forces within the sway, yielding part of our goal -

to see something else when analyzing urbanism in addition to what we would have seen anyway.

I would like to conceive of knowledge "not in terms of order and mastery, but in terms of chance

and invention."25

Roland Barthes discusses Michelet's use of "themes" within his work. "The themes are

repetitive, they are substantial, and they are reducible."26 Substance, for example, can always be

divided into beneficent and maleficent states. Serres points out that Michelet uses the themes

moist-warmth and dry repeatedly to make truths about communication appear. Scholastics

(historical encyclopedic gathering) and Hegel are dry and maleficent. Moisture, incubation, and

mother are beneficent. Michelet's repetitious obsession with substance is particularly interesting

for us in relationship to our wish for a "re-grounding" of the body. If the body is the new

grounding element of this epoch, and the message--the node along the journey of communication

- within which learning happens, we must always consider good and evil in relation to its effect

on the body as the following quote suggests.

Contrary to current opinion, Michelet's morality is not at all rhetorical; it is a morality of
the body; History is judged at the tribunal of the flesh: good is determined by virtue of its
seamless, fluid, rhythmic nature, and evil as a consequence of its dryness and its
discontinuity,2


25 Ibid, p. xxxiv.
26 Roland Barthes' Michelet gives an interesting account of Michelet's use of themes.

27 Roland Barthes, Michelet, p. 203.









I will now ask a question. Is it the body in our epoch that determines "fact?" The body creates

the soup (the gathering of information) for itself, and for the well being of others. The soup is

never maleficent; it is prepared, heated, mixed, ingested, and digested. It is a mixture which

requires movement to disperse the solute through the solvent. In our situation, the reservoir is

internet, or the electorate apparatus. Circulation is produced by the desire machines play,

aesthetics, and entertainment. To understand the messages, we must take a journey through the

sea (the internet), mapping circulation and reservoir. There are hot and cold sources. Below

Serres gives us some examples of how to begin.

Now consider the reservoir and the circulation and ask yourself questions like these: where
is the reservoir? What is the reservoir? What is in the reservoir? What are its elements and
what is their configuration? How does this reservoir function? Is it stable or metaphorical,
open or closed? And so forth...

Ask yourself a second series of questions: what is circulation? What are the circulating
elements? What is the plan of the transportation system? How do the elements circulate
according to this plan? By what law? In a stable manner, or transformationally? And so
forth...28

Here are examples of some answers: the reservoir is capital, the quantity of enery, the
constancy of force, the libidinal reservoir, and so forth; what can be applied to the pattern
of general circulation or the circle of circles is language, speech, words, vocabulary, values
money, desire. Here are some examples of related questions: What blocks circulation?
What stimulates it? Who or what governs or forms the reservoir? And so on. With these
questions and these answers, varied and multiplied into several voices, you will reconstruct
the entire set of interpretive organons formed in the nineteenth century.29

These questions and answers will be applied within the following chapter on the analogy of this

"CATTt:." I will be adding the work of Serres (science) to the work of Francis Bacon as

presented by Gilles Deleuze (art).





28 Michel Serres, Hermes Literature, Science, Philosophy, p. 37.
29 Ibid.









CHAPTER 5
MEAT AND POTATOES; ANALOGY AND TALE

Ulmer suggests that the heuretic method becomes invention when it relies upon analogy

and chance. Analogy provides the tale (the new alternative) figuration by displacing a method

from one area of study into another. Finding analogies for emerging method from within other

realms of knowledge offers an opportunity to practice breaking the habitual use of the normative

filter by temporarily donning a new one. This practice taps into an imaginative realm of Being

that is childlike and playful. "If methods tend to be practiced as algorithms, their invention is

heuristic (heuretics is a heuristic approach to theory.)" 1

Analogy for the sake of this experiment is derived both from science as well as from art.

I look at my problem as a scientist as well as an artist simultaneously. In my tale I will be

building upon the final project that I completed within Ulmers' course offering "Imaging

Metaphysics," as described in chapter 1, as well as work that was completed in a graduate design

studio at the University of Michigan, titled "Ideas work society." In this chapter I will discuss

Ulmer's course, which provides a base for my understanding of heuretics, as well as expresses

one's ability to track, in a repeatable way, ones eyepiece. It is a part of my research, and in a

way, both of these courses have provided training wheels for the success of my own "CATTt."

Analogy, Standing on the Shoulders of Dr. Ulmer

The analogy for the "CATTt" within the project completed within Ulmer's course was art.

As Heidegger suggested, within the realm of art and poetry, questioning the essence of the being

of beings remained. In Ulmers' course we used the process of 18 artists as an analogy for our

own process. I will only bring forth the work of Francis Bacon within this thesis, in order to

expose how analogy becomes algorithmic.


1 Gregory Ulmer, Heuretics the Logic of Invention, p. 8.









Within the heuretic invention, I developed an image category "inner disturbance," in order

to track inner forces. In retrospect I see that the project became a process of finding the second

half of my body developing the "left-brain right-brain integration" necessary for the journey of

my new tale which begins to bridge science and art.2

In developing this image category, I feel that I was developing an ability to trust and

understand the forces within my being in the way that an artist does. For the "CATTt" tale, I am

constructing a design competition. The competition begins with a selection process. One must

develop and submit their own image category before final invitations are sent out. From the

image categories submitted, only 10 designers will be chosen to participate in the competition

(the tale).

The Work of Francis Bacon

In his text, Francis Bacon: The Logic of sensation, Gilles Deleuze demonstrates how

Bacon began to convey a logic of the manifestations of his particular inner forces. Deleuze helps

us to see that internal forces such as desire contain fundamental truths which hold as much

weight as fundamental truths of substance for example. He moves out of literate cognitively

based ontology into a more image based ontology, demonstrating a means for gathering and

unconcealing (alethiafrom the previous chapter) these deeper forces which Heidegger and I

wish to understand. Heidegger was calling for another form of metaphysics, one which

questions the essential being of Beings. Ulmer's course description, "Imaging metaphysics"

suggests that within this new metaphysics, images have as much weight and influence as reason

and logic. In light of the previous discussion, Serres would definitely approve. The electorate

2 1 don't intend to explain the project in full. For full access of this project please see Objects 5-1 and 5-2. I am
operating under the assumption within the current thesis that I now have an ability to utilize an electorate ability. The
instructions within my project (.pdf on left column of web site pages) provide a means by which someone else may
develop their own image category. The guide comes directly out of the art analogy, and provides access into my
thought process while developing my image category.









apparatus is an advanced gathering mechanism which can allow for a distributed gathering of

information which goes beyond a literate gathering.

Bacon's work provides an understanding of how this might be so. His work contains a

dimension which is not accessible through sheer literate forms of metaphysics. Deleuze portrays

Bacon's work in its process of functioning, suggesting that image metaphysics is not static. Its

gathering devices are not fixed like the gathering devices within literate metaphysics. In this

dimension, Bacon actually thinks with his desires and feelings. He makes the affect smart,

developing his other half.

Using Francis Bacon in the course, we pulled an inference system which can be studied

and utilized to find many new forms of image metaphysics. This is evident in my experiment

provided by the link above. His process depicts the metaphysics of an individual within a very

particular situation by tracking the affect produced on his own body by given forces. He studies

those affects and forces simultaneously. His paintings are both document and procedure. In

reading his work, one can become aware of the process of its construction which becomes a

window into the possibility of electorate metaphysics, while at the same time exposing something

very specific about the workings of one individual body.

The Situation

The spectacle and media flood is for Bacon what nature and natural poetic language was

for Plato and Aristotle. His paintings are gathering devices in the way that words once were.

Rememberphusis from chapter 3, that all abiding sway? Bacon steps back to the inceptive

moment of questioning the Being of beings in his awareness and analysis of the spectacle. That

is, he is within "the sway" while questioning it simultaneously. His paintings expose that he is

aware of his position within the sway through his use of cliche. He senses the structure of the

"circulating" forces driving his situation, and he is creating for his apparatus a logical means to









mediate within it. He wants to find the intelligence of his libido. It is not enough to simply

perceive the situation, (though this is important). It isn't enough to conceive of the spectacle and

its media flood as the Greeks perceived the notion of phusis. It is important also to understand

how to gather. The Greeks gathered with words. The image categories which were developed in

Ulmers course gave glimpses of an electorate gathering mechanism.

Deleuze posits that this requires a purely aesthetic comprehension of the unit of measure.

Measure is subjectively determined because the media flood is so fast. Thus, it is subject to

constant evaluation and re-evaluation.

Beneath the successive apprehension of arts, there is a logical synthesis that requires a
purely aesthetic comprehension of the unit of measure Aesthetic comprehension is the
grasping of a rhythm with regard to both the thing to be measured and the unit of measure.
Beneath both the measure and the units, there is rhythm. 'Rhythms are always
heterogeneous, we plunge into them in a sort of exploration,' in experimentation ... The
foundation of perceptual synthesis is aesthetic comprehension, but the ground on which
this foundation rests is the evaluation of rhythm,"3

In image metaphysics this is critical. We zoom out, to place ourselves within a particular

situation and the "rhythm" of that situation, but we must simultaneously zoom into ourselves at

the same time. In my experiment, for example, I was pasting images from within the media

flood onto a filter of the familiar. I was able to observe and make sense of the forces within my

being. Loosely, within the site, these are "confusion," "lust/crave," and "suppression." They

have been labeled a, b, and c, because in the end they were not easily split based on category. I

found that leaving a degree of looseness within the gathering provided a space for serendipitous

chance.







3 Gilles Deleuze, Francis Bacon the Logic ofSensation, from the translators introduction, p. xvii.









Diagram

Within Bacon's work a clear structural relationship roots each of his paintings, although

each contains very different sensations. This structuring element, the diagram, is a fundamentally

repeating operation which is used in order to elicit another possible world in a work of art. The

diagram is used to battle figurative givens which exist within the artist.

The diagram is indeed chaos, a catastrophe, but it is also a germ of order or rhythm. It is a
violent chaos in relation to the figurative givens, but it is a germ of rhythm in relation to
the new order of painting. As Bacon says, it "unlocks areas of sensation.4

Bacon had a diagram, so in the course, we tried to find one as well. I have elaborated upon the

elements within Bacon's diagram in the sections which follow. In my project the diagram took

on a triptych format much like that of Bacon's famous triptych paintings. Beyond the triptych

format, there are operations within Bacons diagram which relate particularly well to our

situation, namely his use of found materials, which Deleuze has dubbed "the cliche." Within the

diagram there is always a cliche, an asignified trait, and some form of contour.

The diagram ends the preparatory work and begins the act of painting ... It is a violent
chaos in relation to the figurative givens, but it is a germ of rhythm in relation to the new
order of the painting.
Clich6

Bacon arms himself with various methods to battle the givens--those things that are latent

within the canvas. Delueze describes Bacon's selections of such givens as "cliches." Bacon's

"Cliche" may be a famous painting, a photo of a close friend, or a photo of himself. It establishes

within the audience a semblance of familiarity. Bacon forces himself not to paint what he

considers is already present; a battle takes place which is captured on the canvas. Bacon uses the

figure as a vehicle to track his inner sensations. The motivating forces within the action of


4Gilles Deleuze, Francis Bacon the Logic of Sensation, p. 102.
5 Gilles Deleuze, Francis Bacon the Logic of Sensation, p. 83.









painting are Bacon's obsessions, and he relies on the element of chance or accident. When we see

anatomically correct traits which are distorted smeared and truncated, feelings emerge. Deleuze

suggests that the terrain is sensation and that the enemy is figuration. I used the notion of facade

and company logo in the development of my image category which can be understood more

completely by referencing objects 5-1 and5-2. "The most significant thing about the photograph

is that it forces upon us the "truth" of the implausible and the doctored images." 6

Traits--The Asignified

Bacon also introduces an "asignifying" trait which is a graphic or image. It is analogous to

the figure only through its diagrammatic mapping of sensation. Bacon is not simply using

vernacular photographic means of resemblance and representation. Rather, he has constructed a

gathering mechanism. Two things may resemble by analogy such that a friend of Bacon, (within

his situation), is like the beef or the bird in its situation. The friend in this case would be the

cliche, (the figural locked to representation), and the hanging meat would be the asignified trait.

One might begin to "feel" like the meat when looking at the paintings. For Bacon, Deleuze

explains, "every man who suffers is a piece of meat. Meat is the common zone of man and the

beast." 7

Contour

Using free marks and smudging, (chance) Bacon feels or senses his way into

understanding forces within himself which are associated with the figure he paints. Bacon states

that there is no chance except "manipulated" chance, and no accident except "utilized" accident.

Thus, in order to understand that his inner forces have intelligence, he must track these forces.

The contour mediates this process, and is the gathering mechanism within the art work. It is

6 Ibid, p 74.

7 Ibid, p. 21.









within the contour of Bacon's paintings that associations are made between an open mouth, a cut

artery and a jacket sleeve. In mapping seemingly dissimilar images onto one another, Bacon

reveals that they share a similar "contour." He exposes that by exaggerating the similar formal or

morphological characteristics of each of these "hangings" the painter is able to unlock areas of

sensation which move beyond simple illustration. At the moment something appears within the

contour one can see that Bacon has moved from the synthesis of perception, into aesthetic

comprehension or rhythm, to the catastrophe or chaos, and then back again. He must trust each

level within his being to create such a gathering principle. Bacon gathers asignified traits, and

maps them onto the cliche. He distorts the cliche, revealing something which could not have

been seen before the violent act of fighitng what is already within the canvas. Within this new

"CATTt" we are fighting the habitual reliance on the plan in order to find a way to fight other

habits that we would like to forget.

In Ulmer's course we began to understand that Bacon was revealing something within his

method, and that the method is clear. Above are three irreducible units within Bacons process.

Much like a syllogism, his logic is a little machine which can churn out multifaceted results. The

process is a fundamentally repeatable operation; however it is imperative not to forget that his

work cannot be separated from Bacon's very particular feelings and obsessions. In this way, each

form of image metaphysics developed during the project was considered an "image category."

Within my tale I use art algorithmically to explain a specific artist's methodologies.

Typically I do not utilize the artist's specific subject or interest to drive the analogy; however

Bacon provides an interesting example because his method is about capturing inner forces.

Bacon provides one example of an "image category." I have done the same, (see objects 5-1 and

5-2 at the end of this chapter).









Science

Science is used also as analogy for its methodologies in contrast to its scientific intentions.

For example, I do not use "biopsy" in my tale in order to search for "lymphoma." Rather, I apply

"biopsy" an unfamiliar method- to something that is familiar in order to let a connection

between the two emerge. Simultaneously, I am tracking many scientific "circulation centers," in

order to make new associations about that particular area within a Serresian encyclopedia.

Theory and analogy become blurred because my theorist is also a scientist. The use of science as

analogy differs dramatically because it is a gathering mechanism which is born directly out of

literacy. Serres suggests that we view communication as a journey, and to conceive of

information or knowledge as being soupy. He shows us that science and myth are one and the

same, obliterating the rigid hierarchy of dry storage that has taken place for so long.

In allowing ourselves to look at communication as a journey, and to think of an

information gathering that is soupy, I have begun to see that the accident no longer registers as

such. Rather, an accident is part of the "abiding sway" of our situation. It might even be thought

of as a moment which exposes the forces within the sway, yielding part of our.

As stated, the tale builds upon two projects within my past. The first I have revealed to you

in objects 5-1 and 5-2. The journey of which the tale will be told occurred two years ago at the

University of Michigan. I began to generate a soupy gathering of knowledge using science as

analogy within the project. For this reason alone, the project perfectly suites my "CATTt,"

particularly Serres. Incredibly, it also included meat and potatoes the perfect ingredients for

soup. The voyage was piloted by Professor Jason Young, who helped me to realize that Ideas

rather than plans "work" society. Young's use of the idea is synonymous with my use of the

message within the tale and it also acted much like the diagram from Deleuze on Bacon. Below

is a list of the areas of science "within the encyclopedia" that I encountered along my journey.









* Biopharmaceuticals: Insertion/ injection of additives helpful to human health.

* The Axolotl

* Poultry genetics

* Scientific uncertainty: Uncertainty is a common feature of regulatory decision making.

* Error Bias: The potential harms or benefits of an activity. Molecular breeding by DNA
shuffling will result in at least some outcomes that fundamentally are uncertain and
always will be virtually impossible to predict. We will remain ignorant of them until they
occur, and even then, might only identify them if we search in sensitive ways. Attempts
to estimate the probability of harm (or benefit) from such a fundamentally uncertain
activity must be undertaken with great care since ignorance of ignorance might lead to
serious errors. The kind and degree of scientific uncertainty have implications for the
processes agencies use or devise to reach sound and publicly acceptable decisions.

* Cell replication

* Biopsy

For a more comprehensive understanding of the work that took place within the Ideas Work

Society studio please see Object 5-3.

Tale of a Journey, Featherless Chicken Soup for the Suburban Sprawl

Considering the economic contributions made by the poultry industry and Americans

undeniable love of chicken, I found it fitting that in September of 2005, my studio work joined in

the celebration of September as national chicken month. In its 16th year of observance this

celebration sought to highlight the health benefits, ease of preparation, and the versatility of

chicken. Avigdor Chaner, with his molecular shuffling of chicken DNA was a guest of honor.

Thus, we now enjoy, "The featherless chicken," an idea of the year as advertised by New York

Times magazine.

An error bias, the kind and degree of scientific uncertainty an activity might have, has

implications for the process agencies use to reach sound and publicly acceptable decisions. This

notion of public acceptance is interesting in its ability to accelerate and decelerate.









Regarding the featherless chicken, it seems that societies rather than agencies make these

decisions based on a system of want and desire in correlation with the speeds that these

desirables are able to reach them. The featherless chicken acts as an agent of understanding this

condition.

The injection of Chaner's accepted oddity into the media created a delay of kind within

evaluation, accelerating this sliding precautionary error bias window, thus pushing public

acceptance. When I look at this red bird, the abstract notion of farm no longer registers. I feel

the reality of my situation, and position within it.

This is a quote I came across online which sited Chaner's name:

"And then there's parsley. What a great bit of design: grow some parsley in the garden

and you can cut some off, happy in knowledge it will grow back. How about a sheep with the

same feature? I'll bet Chaner is already working on it. Just splice in some axolotl genes and we

could all keep one sheep in the backyard. Leg of lamb for dinner? Just hand me that knife, and

give me a moment."

Axolotl is studied for its rapid regeneration rate. It is in a sense, a tiger salamander which

never undergoes metamorphoses, a trait which is known as neoteny. It reaches sexual maturity

within the larvae stage of development. They live much longer than metamorphosis

salamanders, and can regenerate entire limbs. The axolotl gene is studied very heavily for this

reason understandably.

Tale: Step 1

Candidates are asked to construct a diagram in order to develop an image category. The

candidate will know it is done when something appears. The diagram, or catastrophe, is used to

battle figurative givens which exist within the candidate.









The diagram is indeed chaos, a catastrophe, but it is also a germ of order or rhythm. It is a
violent chaos in relation to the figurative givens, but it is a germ of rhythm in relation to
the new order of painting. As Bacon says, it "unlocks areas of sensation.

In developing the diagram and image category, the candidate will find a rhythm or measure

which is specific to them. That is, they will develop an ability to unlock areas of sensation which

move beyond simple illustration. At the moment something appears within the candidates

"gathering," they will have moved from the synthesis of perception, into aesthetic

comprehension (rhythm), to the catastrophe or chaos, and then back again. In order to be

considered for the competition the candidate must trust each level within his/her being to create

such a gathering principle.

The image category should acts as an interface guide or "legend" which will allow the

organizing principle of the creation to be discernable. This is very different from finding

"measure" for a design or composition from normative external sources such as Euclidean

Geometry or the golden section. The development of an image category necessitates that the

candidate rethink architecture through all of the realms of knowledge and life in order to form a

"violent" practice of learning how to forget.

Tale: Step 2

Soupiness is a result of a shift from description into action. Serres' gathering mechanism

takes description into the realm of procedure by creating a recipe for soup. In the development

of an assignment (a recipe) morphological concerns ease up and interest in informing sets in. In

other words, meaning of process is more important in the act of developing the recipe than the

meaning of form. Because Serres' and Bacon focus on the recipe rather than the form of how the

information is presented, they are demonstrating a unique practice. They have discovered an



8Gilles Deleuze, Francis Bacon the Logic of Sensation, p. 102.









understanding of another part of themselves by practicing their ability to forget the givens. The

candidate must present their proposal only in the form of a recipe for soup (an assignment). In

addition, the recipe should come with a tale to tell about the journey which was taken to develop

this recipe. To insure that focus remains on the individual, messages must be tracked and

explained. The first and second place recipients will demonstrate that they understand the latent

structuring reality which operates more deeply at the root of knowledge; there are reservoirs for

the circulation of the soup.

Object 5-1. "Inner disturbance" web site. This was the final project from "Imaging
Metaphysics," the course taken with Greg Ulmer. This site is a critical piece in
understanding the breath of this thesis work. It marks the first step within the tale of
my heuretic generator.

Object 5-2. This was the first project from "Imaging Metaphysics." The project, using art as
analogy, is suggestive of an art gallery presenting Heidegger's Introduction to
Metaphysics, and Gilles Deleuze's Francis Bacon: The Logic of Sensation. This site
sets up the work

Object 5-3. Ideas Work Society project work and materials. This link provides a glimpse of the
journey that I took, comprising the science portion of analogy as described above.
This work further expresses the story of my journey as described above. It is through
this work that I began to see urbanism in a soupy way rather than viewing it as an
author.










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Hayden, Dolores. Afieldguide to sprawl. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2004.

Heidegger, Martin. Introduction to Metaphysics. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2000.

Korzybski, Alfred. Science and Sanity. New York: Institute of General Semantics, 1958.

Kwinter, Sanford. "The Hammer and the Song." OASE Architectural Journal No. 48, 1998: 31-
43.

Lerup, Lars and Michael Bell. Louis Kahn (Architecture at Rice S.): Conversations n i/h Students
(Architecture at Rice). New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 1999.

Rattenbury, Kester. This is Not Architecture: Media Constructions. London: Routledge, 2001.









Serres, Michel. Hermes Literature, Science, Philosophy. Baltimore: The John Hopkins
University Press, 1992.

Ulmer, Gregory. Heuretics the Logic ofInvention. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University
Press, 1994.

Ungers, Oswald. Morphologie City Metaphors. Cologne: Konig, 1982.









BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

My interest in American urbanism was accelerated by exposure to the larger interest in

"the perimeter" at the University of Michigan, marked specifically by the course offering,

"SUB_situation urbanism big box," by Jason Young. Within this course I was first exposed to

the true benefit of "trading in or out of a certain mentality." We were encouraged to temporarily

break some modes of thinking in order to explore new ones. Because I was well versed in this

mind set, the heuretics work that I began with Ulmer last spring was exciting. I am currently

pursuing a Master of Science in Architectural Studies, with emphasis on pedagogy.





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1 APPLYING A HEURETIC GENERATOR WI THIN ARCHITECTURAL EDUCATION: REEVALUATING THE CITY PLANS VIABILITY By LAUREN MITCHELL A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLOR IDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTERS OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2007

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2 2007 Lauren Mitchell

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3 To my teachers

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4 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I thank m y parents for their unending support. I also thank Nina Hofer, Dr. Greg Ulmer, and Jason Young for all that they have helped me to understand in the last two years.

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5 TABLE OF CONTENTS page ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...............................................................................................................4LIST OF FIGURES.........................................................................................................................7LIST OF OBJECTS.........................................................................................................................8ABSTRACT.....................................................................................................................................9CHAPTER 1 APPLYING A HEURETIC GENERATOR...........................................................................11Heuretics.................................................................................................................................11Heuristic Generator, the CATTt.......................................................................................... 142 FREEDOM FROM THE EYEPIECE................................................................................. 193 CIRCULATION AND RESERVOIR.................................................................................... 25Contrast: Ungers Filter....................................................................................................... ...25Method of the Filter.........................................................................................................27Values of the Filter.......................................................................................................... 28Electracy...................................................................................................................... ...........32Target......................................................................................................................................33Vibrations Above the Surface: Urba nism that Evades Perception......................................... 354 500 ML CHICKEN STOCK.................................................................................................. 48Theory.....................................................................................................................................48Heidegger................................................................................................................................50Phusis...............................................................................................................................50Alethia.............................................................................................................................52Serres--The Soup............................................................................................................. 535 MEAT AND POTATOES; ANALGOY AND TALE........................................................... 62Analogy, Standing on the Shoulders of Dr. Ulmer................................................................. 62The Work of Francis Bacon.................................................................................................... 63The Situation...................................................................................................................64Diagram...........................................................................................................................66Clich...............................................................................................................................66Traits--The Asignified..................................................................................................... 67Contour............................................................................................................................67Science....................................................................................................................................69Tale of a Journey, Featherless Chicken Soup for the Suburban Sprawl.................................70

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6 Tale: Step 1.............................................................................................................................71Tale: Step 2.............................................................................................................................72LIST OF REFERENCES...............................................................................................................74BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH.........................................................................................................76

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7 LIST OF FIGURES Figure page 1-1 Greg Ulmers Apparatus Diagram.....................................................................................18 3-1 An example of Ungers interpretations, titled, City with independent satellites. ........ 41 3-2 An example of Ungers interpretations titled Ideal city on an island, Joseph Furttenbach, 1620. ............................................................................................................42 3-3 Iimage from Dolores Haydens A field guide to sprawl. ...................................................43 3-4 An example of Ungers interpretations, titled Plan for Victoria, J.S. Buckingham 1848..................................................................................................................................44 3-5 An example of Ungers interpretations, titled, La Ville Radieuse, Le Corbusier, 1952..................................................................................................................................45 3-6 Sampling of correspondence post cards take n as part of m y research on big box culture................................................................................................................................46 3-7 Greg Ulmers Apparatus II................................................................................................47

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8 LIST OF OBJECTS Object page 5-1 Inner disturbance web site. This was the final p roject from Imaging Metaphysics, a course taken with Greg Ulmer................................................................ 735-2 This was the first project from Imaging Metaphysics.................................................... 735-3 Ideas Work Society project work and materials................................................................ 73

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9 Abstract of Thesis Presen ted to the Graduate School of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Masters of Science in Arch itectural Studies APPLYING A HEURETIC GENERATOR WI THIN ARCHITECTURAL EDUCATION: REEVALUATING THE CITY PLANS VIABILITY By Lauren Mitchell December 2007 Chair: Nina Hofer Cochair: Charles Hailey Major: Architecture Neurosis is characterized by outbreaks and di sturbances of sensory motor functions not attributable to any known neurol ogical or organic dysfunction. Scientists induce nervous breakdowns in lab rats to unveil this phenomenon. When forced to react in a certain way long enough these rats become unable to react in accordan ce to primal desires even when they are set free. They may see food in front of them, but ar e paralyzed. The inability to move toward what they desire causes convulsions which can result in death. Neurosis, occurring naturally only in humans, is a visual which has driven my wor k. One must ask; why do scientists seek to understand such paralysis? The answer is simp le. They would like to know how to fix it. The thesis excites various conversational threads consisting of complex fibers and filaments that twist and tie us together. Thus, there is an assu med similarity in responses to circumstances and bodies of knowle dge based on the reality of words within specific cultural situations. Our experience and perception of th e world conforms to the words, metaphors, and images we use to discuss them. This is problem atic in the digitized culture of 2007, where more experiences exist than do words. The literate apparatus, grounded in reason, is no longer sufficient alone for the academic institution especially in urba n analysis today.

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10 The target of this research, a digital culture of rapidly expanding urban conditions of the United States (rapid urbanism), co mbats the author. It is di fficult for architects and designers to look at rapid urbanism without feeling frustration because of th is. Nostalgia, the desire for control or authorship, is brought on by a compare and contrast mentality seen through the lens of the Utopian European city plan. I am proposi ng that architects must free themselves from the habitual roles of author, and problem solv er in order to become useful within rapid urbanism. The work of Dr. Gregory Ulmer and th e study of heuretics have provided me with a methodological approach to invent new ways of seeing rapid urbanism, attracting precipitation to the ideas which have been floa ting in the clouds of my thesis. Now, something may fall to the earth in a form that will nurture health and grow.

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11 CHAPTER 1 APPLYING A HEURETIC GENERATOR Heuretics Heuretics is defined by Gregory Ulm er as the logic of invention by way of artistic thought processes. 1 His work has rearranged the direction of trad itional scholarship in altering its goals. As such, his courses push traditional hermeneutic s, the study and application of theory in interpreting texts and systems of meaning, into heuretic methods This subtle shift can be thought of as moving from description (alone) into action. To study a theory traditionally involves becoming aware of another persons point of view in order to interpret cultural artifacts and most often texts, yielding new texts. Essentially the effect of a he rmeneutic approach is circular and remains solely within literacy. The theory provides a way to see, the application of that theory in interpreting artifacts then yields more theories; questions provide answers which generate more questions. Heuretics adds to he rmeneutics the ability to produce. Ulmer states that theory is assimilated into the humanities in two ways, by artistic experiment (heuretics), as well as by critical interpretation (hermeneutics).2 In the academic arena one traditionally only experiences the latter. He explains, Vanguard artists, like their counterparts among academic critics, often base their projects on the important theoretical texts of the day. The difference between the two applications had to do with their respective modes of re presentation: the ar tists demonstrate the consequences of the theories for the arts by practicing the arts themselves, generating models of prototypes that function critically as well as aesthetically. 3 The architectural design studio often works this way, analyzin g existing urban situations and the theories which accompany those situations in order to ge nerate methods of production. 1 Gregory Ulmer, Heuretics the Logic of Invention p. 4. 2 Ibid, p. 3 3 Ibid, p. xii

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12 In Chapter 3 I will look more closel y at O.M. Ungers canonical text, Morphologie/City/ Metaphors, an example of this. I feel that architec tural design, generally tries to assimilate theory into the discipline in two ways, operating bo th as critic and as v angardist who doesnt primarily analyze what is existing, but rather co mposes alternatives by generating or inventing new poetics. Academic architectural education is an interesting arena within which something useful might be added to current heuretic thin king. This is because heuretics attempts to integrate visual and verbal disc ourse, which is fundamental in de sign process. Heuretics is put forth to develop workable methods for inventi ng image-based logics, drawing upon our ability to make the affect smart, to augment verbal base d logics of literacy which are well known. Where better to begin inventing su ch logics than architecture? Applying heuretics, with the he lp of Ulmer, to academic architectural education will offer the discipline a chance to put forth its methods and approaches of seeing in a form which are repeatable by others; methods and modes of operating within the world that move beyond traditional theory and criticism. It is pr ofound when it provides an understanding on ones position within the flows of the universe, as well as a heightened awareness of that universe regardless of the scale. In the words of Alberto Perez-Gomez, Architectural beauty, like erotic love, burns itself into our soul; it inspires fear and reverence through a poetic image, one that affects us primarily though our vision and yet is fully sensuous if not synaesthetic. It is thus capable of seducing and elevating us to understand our embodied souls participation on wholeness.4 Architectural discourse might augment the st udy of heuretics; how can we use an image intelligently to inspire fear or reverence. Work ing heuretically invites the student to imagine actively rather than to simply de scribe or criticize. Methods curre ntly developed in architectural design may be heuretic in essence, however they are generally isolated individualized practices 4 Parez-Gomez, Ethics and Poetics in Architectural Education, from Architectural Ethics and the Personhood of Place p. 121.

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13 that are rarely revealed. Emphasis is placed on the authorship of a given solution, (i.e. the building, the plan etc.), and the intricacy of design process is rarely fully established and comprehensible beyond studio walls if at all. Ulmers work has helped to ground my concep tion of the eyepiece (discussed in the following chaper) pedagogically. As a student in his theory course, Imaging metaphysics, (in spring 2007), I was asked not to follow in the footsteps of the masters, but to seek what they sought. Below is Ulmers course description, These discussions are a symptom of a shift unde rway in the language apparatus away from literacy toward electracy. The Classical Greeks invented meta physics in the context of the new institution of school (the Academy, the Ly ceum), as part of their development of the possibilities of alphabetic writ ing. Aristotle produced a set of categories (beginning with Substance) and topics (headings for gui ding the generation of propositions). These categories and topics, codified in a trad ition of commonplaces, provided the core of education up to the early modern period. Our goal this semester is to begin doing for electracy what Aristotle did for literacy. 5 Rather than learning how to execu te the perfect essay, we were as ked to invent for the electrate apparatus, 6 analogous to the essay for the literate a pparatus, a cultural i nvention and a method for experiencing the world. We temporarily ignored our traditional mind set temporarily. For the sake of progress, we traded into new assump tions, applying art strate gies to problems of textual production to make something appear. We did for the electrate apparatus what Greeks did at the inceptive moment of the literate appara tus. A heuretic curriculum looks at theory, teaching its applications, while communicating the circulation of a cultural invention. As I have come to understand from Dr. Ulmer however, theory is only one ingredient in the recipe of a cultural invention. Architecture is for me a cu ltural invention which, when successful, provides its inhabitants the ability to unde rstand their position with in the flows of the universe, as well as 5 Gregory Ulmer, course description from Imaging Metaphysic s, ENG 6077. I participated in this course in Spring 2007 Semester, where I was first intr oduced to heuretics and Electracy. 6 Electracy is expanded upon more fully in the following chapter.

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14 provide for them a heightened awareness of th at universe. I would like to share with the discipline an investigation of the other ingredients operati ng in the creation of cultural inventions. Our current cultural situation, along with the the technological apparatus which continues to emerge at an incomprehensible speed, requ ires inventive pedagogical strategies. If the academic institution becomes involved in the elec trate apparatus, I feel that the increasing specialization of the world ma y slow as more people become el ectrate. As an educator of Architectural design in 2007, it is critical to understand the appropriate ingredients necessary in formulating productive and successful cultural inventions, as well as how to effectively cultivate these ingredients into replicable methods which might be widely utilized. I think that academic architectural education should play an active role in constructing new methods within the electrate apparatus. Heuretics will enable the discipline to find repeatable operations rendering generative inventive logics that ar e both actionable and describable. Heuristic Generator, the CATTt Ul mer posits that working heuretically necessi tates the use of the method being invented while inventing it, exemplifying the use of hyperrhetoric, whic h is considered akin to the dream logic of surrealism.7 From Ulmers pedagogical appro ach, I have adopted a heuristic generator. This generator faci litates my aim--to produce a re peatable method by which urban research can be as generative as it is analyt ical. Ulmer suggests that the system of most intellectual inventions can b ecome accessible through this heuristic generator which is mnemonically identified by the acronym "CATTt." He reveals that all of the manifestos of the avant-garde, including The Manifesto of Surreal ism, belong to the tradit ion of the discourse on 7 Gregory Ulmer, Heuretics the Logic of Invention p.8.

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15 method, and that they tend to include a common set of elements found in the CATTt, which includes these operations:8 C = Contrast (opposition, inversion, differentiation) A= Analogy (figuration, displacement) T= Theory (repetit ion, literalization) T= Target (application, purpose) t= Tale (secondary elabor ation, representability) This generator offers the discipline of architecture an academically rigorous method of approaching design projects that will help us to realistically look at the situation that we are currently in (2007), fully immersed in an electronic culture. Looking more realistically at a situation by working inventively within it will al so ground us more productively in history. With the CATTt as my generator I will attempt to inve nt a practice of urban an alysis appropriate for the complexity of such culture.9 Developing an awareness of the electrate epoch within academic architectural education reestablishes the architects role as part of the everyday circus of big box culture.10 The Contrast for my CATTt is O.M. Ungers Morphologie City Metaphors I am using Ungers anthology in order to identify a clear ex ample within the discipline that may no longer be useful, or from which I wish to move be yond. Ulmer suggests that the components of the selected contrast provide an inventory of qualities for a new method.11 I am questioning the 8 Ibid. 9 It isnt my intention for the thesis to be primarily an ad dition to heretic curricula, nor am I interested in becoming a master of the theories I am utilizing. Both of these avenues would be more appropriately suited for a Ph.D. in my field. I simply wish to work in an interdisciplinary ma nner, proving that rigor in ar chitectural academia can happen inventively. 10 Jason Young, Architectural Design pr ofessor at University of Michigan. During Labyratorium my first graduate studio at Michigan which took part in a larger class wide focus on the perimeter, we were asked to correspond with the condition of big box. Jason sometimes re ferred to this condition as the everyday circus of big box. The everyday circus was adopted as common nomenclature within the studio culture. 11 Ibid.

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16 ability to understand the filter th at Ungers has created so that we can understand other filters. I sense that if architects can look at the rapidly de veloping urban conditions within the United States with a critical understanding of our own filters, we may feel more capable of operating within it. The Target concerns rapidly developing urban conditions, which constitutes much of the United States. I am suggesting that within this split second urbanism, the plan as it is utilized by Ungers, is no longer a viable starting position for the architect. This kind of urbanism, in which the inhabitants are the authors, grows in response to complex forces of these inhabitants desires. Thus, the formal character has little significance to the apprehension of organization. The designer, I feel, must understa nd his or her own inner desires in order to understand organizing principles w ithin a condition where formal/ st ructural character are nearly insignificant in contrast to the dominant presen ce of the atmospheric pressures of the inhabitants desire. The Theory is Michel Serres Hermes Literature, Science, Philosophy focusing on the essay, Michelet: The Soup. With the help of Serre s recipe, I aim to generate an approach to urban analysis which isnt dependent upon the c ity plan. Serres work is perpetually founded upon illustrating the existence of a complicated pa ssage between science, and the science of man,humanities. The gathering of knowledge for Serres is more like making soup than shelving information. In this ex periment, electracy provides the techne for the establishment of such a passage. Serres points to a bridge between science and art, which begins to establish the Analogy for my experiment. I will apply both a sc ientific and an artistic lens in order to displace aspects of both of these fields into my architecture, esta blishing figuration for the new approach to urban

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17 analysis. Art establishes the complexity of the indivi dual as significant in the development of urban analysis. Additionally, it brings forward the importance of process and development and suppresses the importance of final results. Science has provides new methods and procedures, (such as biopsy) to reevaluate the level at whic h one sees. The realm of scientific knowledge provides a specific intensity to th e way I perceive taxonomy. The targeted condition offers an exaggerate d example from which to start breaking our addiction to reductive logics. Ulmers C ATTt will help to generate a method to practice operating in a new way. The element of practice is extremely important. As with learning a language or a musical instrument, the development of ones ability to trade into or out of filters at will require discipline and practice. Ulmer is known for the following quote, Electrate logic proposes to design these atmospheres into affective group intelligence. Literacy and electracy in collaboration pr oduce a civilizational left-brain right-brain integration. If literacy focused on unive rsally valid methodologies of knowledge (sciences), electracy focuses on the individual state of mi nd within which knowing takes place (arts).12 In order to conceive of the archite cts role in such affective group intelligence, it is necessary to examine the lenses through which we see and conceive of ourselves. This will be discussed as the eyepiece more comprehensively within the following chapter. 12 Gregory Ulmer. The quote is found on www.wikipedia.com under Greg Ulmer. Typi cally I would utilize a more rigorous source. Due to the playful nature of the course, and Ulmers interest in the internet, it is fitting to use this as a source.

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18 Figure 1-1. Greg Ulmers Apparatus Diagram depicts the technological, institutional, and identification transformations from the oral epoch to the literate epoch and into an electrate epoch. This was presented as addi tional material within his course. This diagram, as well as many others is gene rously available on Ulmers web page under curriculum.

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19 CHAPTER 2 FREEDOM FROM THE EYEPIECE In m y attempt to loosen my own rigidly w oven and predetermined synaptic reactions, my mantra has been, neurons that fire together wire together. 1 I have been operating under the assumption that if individuals live architecture w ithin the current state of their own minds, they will have no fertile ground to sprout and cultivate creative active energies the muse has no space within these beings on which to perform. I would like to fire as many neurons as possible in my creative process--trading into complexity-in order to avoid common and easy habits of reduction. The concept of Eyepiece is expanded upon in this chapter in order to express the depth of my interest in u npacking the work I have done with Gregory Ulmer in studying heuretics within the realm of architectural Pedagogy. I have noticed an emerging awareness of a claustrophobic feeling among architects and architectural academics, bound by their current methods of formally communicating/ representing ideas, (translation) Additionally, I am intrigued by the saturated cultural condition in areas of rapid expansion. In merging these two interests, I have developed a deep admiration for the complexity in thought which is necessary to conceive of and work spatially and aesthetically within accelerated conditions of information ne tworks of mixture and desire. These conditions are not imageable in the way we typically conceive of urban analyses. Applying a heuretic generator, I attempt to fuel a mental model with whic h one is able to produce urban analyses without simply reducing the thinking to a new set of terms. 1 Mark Bear, Barry Connors, and Michael Paradiso, Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain, pp. 724-725. When an axon of cell A is near enough to excite a cell B and repeatedly or persistently takes part in firing it, some growth process or metabolic change takes place in one or both cells such that As efficiency, as one of the cells firing B, is increased.

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20 The ability to instantly visualize levels of abst raction or entire systems of logic, allows us the use of available knowledge, while remaini ng free to go beyond this in search of accelerated alternatives. I begin to as k myself: how Do I Translat e [My] Reality in 2007? Just as a tangent touches a circle lightly and at one point, with this touch rather than with the point setting the law according to which it is to continue on its straight path to infinity, a translation touches the original lightly and only at the infinitely small point of the sense, thereupon pursuing its own course according to the laws of fidelity in the freedom of linguistic flux. 2 Translation requires a reworking of representational systems at hand. According to Hebbian postulate, neurons that fire toge ther wire together. This sugges ts that our semantic reactions neurologically occur and are predetermined ba sed on previously repeated thoughts and actions. Repetition of a particular system or thought pattern accelerates wiring, establishing fixed connections and perpetuating pred etermined habits and assumpti ons. Thus, one is able to ascertain that the semantic structure or, eyepiece within each of us, constitutes that which we are able to perceive and conceive. Subse quently, it constitutes th e deployment of the representational systems which will collectively be rendered. The representational systems deployed become the images appearing substa ntive that are conceived of as reality.3 The eyepiece is the device that each of us carries around to peek out at the noumenal configuration or thing-in-itself.4 What we see of the world is what it lets us. The scientific phrase used to describe the pot ential for synaptic structures and predetermined semantic reactions to rewire is synaptic plasticity. An early exploration of synaptic plasticity, and its 2 Walter Benjamin, The Task of the Translator, from Illuminations p. 80. 3 Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity pp. 198-203. This notion comes from a recurring theme in most of Korzybskis work, often referred to simply as, the map is not the territory. I have practiced remembering that the map is not the territory by calling the things I see with in the world image appearing substance or substantive. 4 Ibid, pp. 386-411. In order to fully grasp this concept it I suggest studying Korzybskis Structural Differential, a three dimensional diagram which explains the abstraction process in humans.

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21 implications, was illuminated by A. Korzybski in the 1930s. His general semantics theory offers methods to thalamically process ventures into the study of complexity, loosening the semantic structures constituting the archaic devices whic h we carry around to look through. To drop this device, or even parts of it, woul d be dramatic for the discipline of architecture; for to make a change in an object is insignifi cant in comparison to a change ma de in the lenses it is viewed through. As noted by Sanford Kwinter architecture plays, or should play, a privileged role in the study of complexity, called by Bergs on the science of intuition. Through materialization of actualization, architecture ha s the capacity to free the imagination from three-dimensional experien ce, to free it from the curse of so-called invisible processes and hidden diagrams and to show us that processes and events, the ones that give form to our world and our lives, have shapes of their own.5 Such a (time based) space or science of intu ition requires self reflexive practice. To illustrate, Manuel Gausas introduction in Operative Optimism resonates within the discipline of architecture, an awareness of the binding na ture of our current modes of communication, translation, and representation. A claustrophobia which binds in expr essive ability has surfaced within the image heavy books like Gausas head lined by Koolhaas and Bruce Maus efforts, nakedly illustrating that more experiences exist than do words.6 These examples reveal the saturated state of our economic e volution and beautifully depict th e relevance of this thesis. Gausas plea is stimulating in what it suggest s for the evolutionary state of even a small percentage of humans. He seem s subconsciously aware of a verti cal evolutionary shift in the semantic reactions which shape our collective be havioral structures or manifold of values. 5 Sanford Kwinter, The Hammer and the Song, from OASE Architectural Journal, No. 48. p.41. 6 I am referring also to a number of books within the discipline which invent new terms to deal with the claustrophobia. A clear example of this is f ound within the text by Lebbeus Woods within Pamphlet Architecture Some of them are Killers #24. Here he describes a new type of space, giving it the name data space.

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22 Korsybski identifies three stages of civilization, historically illustrating the shift from onevalued semantics to two-valued semantics when the laws of identity were established by Aristotle.7 This shift should be conceived of as rolling or folding in on itself, vertical rather than horizontal. For Korsybski, marking this dramatic shift in the collective semantic structure proves the necessity for conceiving the sh ift which is currently occurring.8 Gausa calls for a new way of understanding old notions of arch itecture and culture. He asks us to shift our gaze from a defensive (or over-vigilant) vision of architec tural action which in his view is the most traditional.9 I agree, a shift needs to and will take place, but to simply ask a generation of architects to shift into a new gaze perpetuates a two-valued, identity based collective mentality. Korzybski shows that this wreaks havoc on our abili ty to operate within the space of intuition. Operative optimism is not so much about a new gaze or new logic, but rather, a logic and gaze in addition to. 10 To simply drop new from this plea might be a start Practicing conscious abstracting, according to Korzybski, is a self reflexive process will result in an elimination of serious fixities a nd blockages, which disallo w fluid negotiation within representational systems. Kors ybski renders the words and languages we use as nothing more than semantic maps to correspond with the conf iguration of complex r eality. Consider Gaston Bachelards Dialectics of Outside and Inside in light of this discussion. He might see Korsybskis methods of loosen ing rigidly woven semantic r eactions as little pieces of experimental folly, like virtual grains of hashish without which it would be impossible to fully 7 Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity pp.133-287. 8 Sanford Kwinter, The Hammer and the Song, from OASE Architectural Journal No. 48. pp. 31-43. 9 Manuel Gausa, from the introduction to Operative Optimism pp. 19-27. 10 Samuel Ichiye Hayakawa and Alan Hayakawa, Language in Thought and Action, pp. 112-124. Also see Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity pp. 452.

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23 enter into the reign of imagination. 11 Bachelard excites a similar convergence of conversational threads when he suggests that phenomenology is what gives us the psychic positivity of the image. I would ask that you pause to truly grasp the statement. A phenomenon, or process that is known through the five senses, and thus understood as we have seen through a predetermined synaptic structure, is what gives us the substantiv e of a mental image. In other words, the map is not the territory.12 Bachelards essay provides a beautiful portrayal of the complexity with which it is necessary to us e our current state of communication, to become aware of our body and not our body, or more clearly, what we see through the eyepiece and what is actually going on. Many people are convinced that, as science proc eeds, we are learning to perceive better, and we are coming nearer and nearer to the point where we will be able to describe reality in very exact terms. They miss the fact that desc ribing something is to di stort it, shrink it, and betray it. With even a loose unde rstanding of Hebbian theorem, one sees that to break restrictive mental habits would in fact cause a neurologi cal rewiring within the brain. Shifting semantic structures allows for involutiona ry understandings of situations and the ability to break apart representational systems, resulting in the shift in gaze required in Operative Optimism Simply, I am suggesting that part of the translation proces s in architecture must account for some form of self reflexive action, which for me begins with the acceptance of ones own Eyepiece. 11 Gaston Bachelard, The dialectic s of Outside and Inside, from The Poetics of Space p. 219. This sentence marks the beginning of one of my favorite passages by Bachelard, of which the following quote has been the most impactful. But if reduction is easy, exaggeration is all th e more interesting, from the standpoint of phenomenology. I have begun to exaggerate images in order to disassemble my eyepiece. 12Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity pp.133-287.

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24 A model that is much simpler than the phenom enon it is intended to illustrate shrinks our thinking to the models dimensions and causes us to miss the complexity of the phenomenon.13 The structure we see and represent is made by th e instrument inside through which we use to look at the configuration outside. Thus, the more interesting voyage of disc overy consists not in seeking new landscapes and gazes, but in freeing ourselves from the addiction we have the singular eyepiece. In the remaining chapters I attempt to invent a pedagogically relevant method to understand and practice shifting the le nses of the eyepiece. I dont associate my self with the success or failure of the project, thus I remain optimistic about the outcome regardless. I understand that there are certain aspects of my being which limit my creativity. My motivation isnt derived solely by the outcome (how well I did and how well I am receiv ed). It is also a result of my willingness to adhere to the challenge of breaking free from the addiction that I have to solidifying my narrow view of the universe, expanding the aspect s of myself which restrict or limit my creativity. 13 Samuel Bois, The Art of Awareness p. 146.

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25 CHAPTER 3 CIRCULATION AND RESERVOIR Contrast: Ungers Filter Contrast for the CATTt, in th is case, ensu res the viability of the architectural connection. The contrast helps id entify a clear example within the discipline that may no longer be useful, or from which we wish to move be yond. The components of the selected contrast provide an inventory of qualities for a new method.1 Of course, because the Target is very specific and very loaded, the Contrast necessitates a certain level of specificity. I am concerned with the current state of urban an alysis, thus the image play sele cted involves urban analysis. I have chosen O.M. Ungers Morphologies City Images Ungers has deposited this canonical form of image play into the architectural arena, forming one layer or filter of an Eyepiece. To understand the filter that Ungers ha s created will allow us to unde rstand more of these filters. I sense that if architects were able look at the rapidly developing urban big box conditions within the United States without such filters, they may feel more capable of operating within it. Filters are formed in a twofold operation. Firs t, parameters of values are set up. Ungers determines, for example, what is looked at and wh at isnt. He chooses: 1, a city plan, 2, a very particular image, 3, a German word, and 4, the E nglish translation. Secondly, a powerful form or shape is given to thinking, establishing method. The method, for Ungers is emphatic. I will discuss a few of these examples in order to be tter explain the mechan ism of Ungers filter, developing enough awareness to engage and disengage from these filters at will. Morphology is derived from the Greek term morphe meaning shape or form. Used in biology for example, morphology refers to the basic outwar d appearance or form of an organism, relating to its size, shape, or stru cture. Morphology can be applied to the whole or any part of an 1 Gregory Ulmer, Heuretics the Logic of Invention p. 8.

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26 organism. Because morphological classification pertains to external characteristics and observable appearance, it seems that using it in ur ban analysis runs the risk of grouping together pieces of information that ar e actually relatively unrelated. 2 Through the use of molecular biology, genetic si milarity is now considered in addition to morphology in modern systems of taxonomy. Thos e who believe in morphological logics like Ungers prioritize the meaning of form in architecture and urban analysis. I feel that forming metaphorical connections and associations between two very different things based only on form or a surface reading is not productive. In rapid urbanism, this form of thought process is too slow, miring one down into predetermined thoughts and memories, eliciting a compare and contrast thought process that is hard to deviate from. Working from form for example, is very different from working from texture Textural understanding is an area I have focused on in developing freehand drawing exercises for undergraduate design students. Drawing becomes us eful in architecture when there is discovery of a repeatable action; when one uncovers a sy stem of representation to convey a spatial or structural condition they have obs erved in life. When this form of discovery occurs, one is essentially uncovering or unconcealing a truth a repeatable ac tion and importantly not representing a concept. Once the student uncove rs the repeatable acti on, the irreducible unit involved in the given system of representation, they own it. It becomes a part of them in the way that their handwriting might.3 2 Samuel Bois, The Art of Awareness pp. 134-178. 3 Roland Barthes outlines several levels of meaning in an image; an informational level, a symbolic level, and a third level, which is transcendent of psychology, anecdeote and function. For Barthes this level is significant. This third level (thirdness) pertains to the individual memory. Barthes felt that it was important to understand the logic of this third level which exists within each of us.

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27 Becoming conscious of the irreducible unit, the kind of mark made reveals a greater understanding of both measure and contour within representation. This concept is actually the link between these two m odes of analytical drawing. Becoming aware of the implications that one kind of mark has over another is importa nt in laying basic proportions as well as in establishing scale, and depth w ithin drawing. When looking at form alone, all of what emerges out of understanding texture and finding appropriate textur e is missed. The breadth of understanding texture in architectu ral endeavors adds a taxonomical layer to the study of form in the way that genetic similarities radically cha nge morphological readings in science. It is actually only in texture that that concept is lost enough to uncover (something interesting). Method of the Filter The m ethod of the filter that Ungers presents provides an approach to interpreting city plans. He calls such image play interpretations. The method consists of what he considers, three levels of reality: the f actual reality the object; the per ceptual reality the analogy; and the conceptual reality the idea, shown as the plan the image the word. 4 He focuses on the integration of object, analogy, and idea to talk about thinking processes. He is addressing the nature of communication, which has helped me to determine the Theory for the CATTt. He is imposing a very particular format or method for ca tegorizing the three layers together in order to establish a gestalt. In this method, thinking happ ens between image and plan. The words form a bridge that creates an awarene ss of connotations that may differ between the German idea and its English translation. Ungers attempts to open up th e readings of each city plan by the image and word / idea it is paired with in order to embe d meaning into the tran sformed reading of city plan. In essence he is pushing back on functiona lism, fighting the reductiv e logic of functionalist 4 O.M. Ungers, Morphologies City Images, P 14.

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28 and behaviorist tropes. He claims not to be interested in analyzing simply in accordance to function or measurable criteria He would rather think qualita tively than quantitatively, by way of thinking and designing in images, metaphors, models, analogies, symbols, and allegories. 5 He wishes to transition from purely pragmatic approaches of thinking about cities to a more creative mode of thinking. It seems that he felt claustrophobic within his situation over 30 years ago at the books inception, predating the internet and the image flood of our current situation. I am not engaging Ungers on his own field of battle. It helps that Ungers also utilizes a strategy of contrast. On some level we have similar intentio ns. I also feel claustrophobic in my situation; however I dont seek a functiona list or a formalist view of the world. My views are much soupier. Values of the Filter The values that Ungers sets up within the filt er are equally as absolute as the m ethod. I would like to focus specifically on the use of city plan for the sake of th is discussion. Remember that he exposes, three levels of reality: the factual reality th e object; the perceptual reality the analogy; and the conceptual reality the id ea, shown as the plan the image the word.6 I am curious if plan really describes factual real ity. Considering where the city plans come from, I suggest that, the analogy images which Unge rs has dubbed perceptual reality are more closely tied to fact. The subjects of these images are generally biological, me chanical, or tactile. Any of the images could be found in an encycloped ia. In figure 3-1 Ungers has shown a cat with nursing kittens accompanied by a plan by Raymond Unwin from 1910 titled, City with independent satellites.7 The city plan in this example is not a fact it is a concep t. More directly, 5 Ibid, p. 14. 6 Ibid. 7 Ibid, p. 58.

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29 it is a utopian ideal. This can ac tually be said of the majority of plans within the anthology. The use of utopian city plans draw upon a nostalgic prem ise that the architect is a hero whose role is to solve problems with grand narratives. Michael De Certeau, discusses th is in comparing the concept city, (the experience of Manhattan fr om the 110th floor of the World Trade Center), with urban practices, (the experience of wa ndering the streets of Manhattan). He asks, Is the immense texturology spread out be fore ones eyes anything more than a representation, an optical artifact? It is the an alogue of the facsimile produced, through a projection that is a way of keeping aloof, by the space planner urbanist, city planner or cartographer. The panorama-city is a theoreti cal (that is visual) simulacrum, in short a picture, whose condition of possibility is an oblivion and a misunderstanding of practices. The Voyeur-god created by this fiction must disentangle himself from the murky intertwining daily behaviors a nd make himself alien to them. 8 Most of the city plans that Unge rs uses within his book are utopian city plans or concept cities, as described by De Certeau in the above quote. Generally, the plan drawing is an orthographical cut that reveals an intangible experience of space for that reason it is actually one of the most difficult to understand. Often, it is a planning docum ent which contains information about future project as prescribed by the author. It is a concep t. For Ungers, the city im age, factual reality is always depicted at a very small scale, re ndering gestalt formal information. Embracing authorship, Ungers filter disent angles all who have been influe nced by his filter from murky intertwining daily behaviors of those down be low. Down in the streets of Manhattan, nursing kittens exist as fact. figure 3-2 de picts clearly the Voyeur-god vant age point. Here the title is Ideal city on an island, Joseph Furttenbach, 1620. The interpretations of CITY within Ungers pages raise the question: what happens when an urban situation, is not imagable? By this I mean; if the plan isnt an accurate indicator of anything, an analogy-image of the plan wouldnt be useful. My Target the rapid 8 Michel de Certeau The Practice of Everyday Life pp. 92-93.

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30 urbanism taking over much of the United Stat es provides an example of a non-imageable condition. The plan or aerial view of this condition will not rende r anything productive in design processes. In fact, I suggest th at to look at these conditions, as seen in figure 3-3, as voyeurgod raises the nostalgic hero complex filter expr essed above. When utilizing this filter it is hard to operate outside of the tendency to compar e what we see to that which we know. In order to understand the orga nizing principles within rapi dly forming urban conditions, I an understanding of the powerful forces of capita lism is necessary. This has no plan as we know it. It actually doesnt have much form at all. Starting with the plan in this condition isnt a viable starting condition for the ar chitect. There is no author; the i nhabitants are the authors. It grows in response to complex for ces of these inhabitants desires, and the formal character has little significance in the comprehe nsion of organization. This comple xity cannot be paired with a formal analogy. Pairing this fact with an an alogy and/or phrase can only cause disruption within the nervous system, because it shrinks reality, creating a model that is not complex enough to comprehend all that was involved in creating that space.9 It is no surprise that looking at sprawl in this reductive manner brings up the familiar comparative lens of the European city, typically accompanied by nostalgia. We dont know how to look at it any other way. Ungers filter embraces authorship. Our targeted condition, a digital culture, combats the author. I want to deviate from Ungers authoritative de cision to use plan, however I will bring part of his filter into the CATTt. I am interested in how he has morphed the interpretation of each city plan in accordance to the aesthetic principles within his own web of fired and wired neurons. He chooses each image very particul arly to solidify the form or morphe of each thought. Figure 3-4 depicts Plan for Victoria, J.S. Buckingha m, 1848, paired with an image of mirrors 9 Samuel Bois, The Art of Awareness pp. 134-178.

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31 reflected into one another. The English word used in the morphology is Reflection. Ungers chooses the images very particularly. For exam ple, the patterns on the wall behind the mirror have been selected aesth etically, reinforcing the thought. They are repetiti ve and they alternate similarly to the pattern in the city image. Th e manner in which the frame of the mirror turns the corner at a 45 degree angle and the size of the mirro r in relationship to the plan does this as well. The connection brings form to the idea of reduc tion. Figure 3-5 a very different example of an interpretation. We see, La Ville Radieuse, Le Corbusier, 1952, paired with an image of Coca-Cola bottles organized rationally. The word us ed here is Succession. It is obvious in this example that Ungers, whether subconsciously or not, reinforces his critique of functionalism in this pairing. The image play, as described in th e example above, makes the reader feel like the inhabitants of La Ville Radieuse, would feel, in their situation, like the Co ca-Cola bottles exist in theirs--within the systema tic chain or force of the factory, una ble to deviate. Modern utopias are paired with mechanical or rational images such as the example above. In contrast, the historical utopias--the plans which have the most pure formal characteristics--tend to be paired with feel good images like roses, doughnuts, kittens, and ch ildren. I understand th e book as a reading of Ungers eyepiece more than anything else. Examining Ungers filter has helped me to understand that such aesthetic decisions are more influentia l (to thinking) than it might seem. Gilles Delueze calls this undervalued and underdeveloped logic aesthetic comprehension. Aesthetic comprehension is the grasping of a r hythm with regard to both the thing to be measured and the unit of measure. Beneat h both the measure and the units, there is rhythm.10 In chapter 5 I will discuss aesthetic comprehens ion further while exploring the artwork of Francis Bacon, as presented by Deleuze in The Logic of Sensation 10 Gilles Deleuze, Francis Bacon The Logic of Sensation from the translators introduction, p. xvii.

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32 Electracy To fully understand the contrast we must unde rstand our situation. Looking at figure 3-1, an elabo ration of the table from chapter two of this thesis, it becomes clear what has happened. Introducing Greg Ulmers notion of electracy, the apparatus or epoch which followed literacy is underway; however much of the world is anel ectrate. Anelectracy is to electracy what illiteracy is to literacy. Ulmer writes of electracy: What literacy is to the analytical mind, electracy is to the affective body: a prosthesis that enhances and augments a natural or organi c human potential. Alpha betic writing is an artificial memory that supports long complex chains of reasoning impossible to sustain within the organic mind. Digital imaging sim ilarly supports extensive complexes of mood atmospheres beyond organic capacity. Electrate logic proposes to design these atmospheres into affective group intellig ence. Literacy and electracy in collaboration produce a civilizational left-brain right-brain integrati on. If literacy focuse d on universally valid methodologies of knowledge (sciences), electr acy focuses on the individual state of mind within which knowing takes place (arts).11 Ulmers tables help to understand that our target is embedded with in the electrate apparatus. The grounding element is of particular interest to architecture. Notice that what has determined foundation or form has shifted from God, within the oral epoch, to r eason within Literacy, and now to body within electracy. If we were able to trace this idea through architectural history, I believe it would become very obvious. Aesthetics, desire, entertainment, play etc. coalesce in the individual body, which is now apparently the grounding element within our epoch. I am going to assume for this expe riment that the body provides the grounding of architecture within our situation. It is hard to operate outside of our preferred pathways. Thus, developing an approach to design within the transient dreams of the individual body feels absurd. The following chapter will help in explaining this point. Traditionally, the systems we utilize 11 Gregory Ulmer. This quote has been taken directly from www.wikipedia.com under Greg Ulmer. Typically I would utilize a more rigorous source. Due to the playful nature of the course, and Ulmers interest in the internet, it is fitting to use this as a source. Additionally, I find that the quote is very beautiful.

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33 have always been structured around the notion that one should privilege order over disorder. This is because ground in the literate appara tus was reason, as it was once God. Using Michel Serres as our primary theorist of the CATTt I would like to furt her explores the reorganization of Ungers filter. Target Target for the CATTt, provides an area of study which the em ergent method is intended to address within architecture. Ulmer writes The target is often identifiable in terms of an institution whose needs have mo tivated the search for the method. 12 It is puzzling to me why there is no (A)rchitecture found in the rapidly developing urban c onditions constituting much of the United States. My curiosity is more than likely a result of having grown up outside of Orlando Florida, embedded deeply within a ubiquit ous ticky-tacky. In my view, the absence of architecture within rapid urbanism suggests that our institution is in need of a method which will allow creative operability within these urban conditi ons. It doesnt feel like an exaggeration to say that the situation is ignored, even within rigorous architectural curricula. Students understand that what they learn will be useful once they graduate. This is, of course true. However their experience is applicable only in a very small number of situations across the country; those which constitute the level of density required for what has been studied. The fact that modes of operation within s prawl are not present within ar chitectural curric ula is not due to a lack of creativity on the pa rts of either the architect, nor of the institution in my view. Rather, I see it as an inability to function within a situation that is not imagable, as discussed above. I arrive again at the imagery of the lab rat. 12 Gregory Ulmer, Heuretics The Logic of Invention p. 9

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34 The Florida Landscape project within the University of Floridas School of Architecture curriculum addresses the issue of a non-imagable situation. In th is project the students develop an ability to construct context models and drawings which are more about revealing deliberate and accessible descriptions of physical and spatia l aspects of the context (i.e. fluidity and looseness) than the image or exactness of it. Depictions of context/ landscape are typically constructed texturally, of and with spatial and architectural intent. The students are pushed beyond romanticized portrayals of the landscape Working intimately within the varied landscapes that make up ground in Florida prov ides the students an opportunity to become aware of measured and immeasurable aspects of site The students might be asked in an initial study to capture various spatial phenomena that define the site by chal lenging perception at all levels of sensory modality; exteroceptoin, proprioception, and interocep tion. This project contrasts an intense urban inf ill project that occurs in th e semester immediately prior, providing students the ability to understand that generating from context modes and methods of operation can happen in many ways. I propose that we must become both literate a nd electrate in order to design within the targeted condition. We have to understand capitalism s effect on architecture in order to teach it something. Aaron Betsky captures my sentiment. He states, We are real bodies in real space. As spra wl saps meaning and form away from our experience, we need to build back a sense of who we are as physical beings inhabiting a space we have made for ourselves. The artifice of human construction is what makes us real. To make us aware of this condition, designers should create forms with expressed connections and delightful surfaces that da nce over the land like a spiders web of suggestive spaces. Tents rather than palace s are the model for a world disconnected from one particular time or place. The shapes by which we can know ourselves are, moreover, deformed. Drinking into themselves the fast flows of capital, they resist consumption.

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35 They give back a sense of a body that is both like us and wholly new, unfamiliar and strange. This is the architecture of the self that replaces us with what we have made.13 Vibrations Above the Surface: Ur b anism that Evades Perception Sanford Kwinter suggested 10 years ago: as the world continues to vary and flow, to aggr egate, self-organize, a nd to re-break apart, that most modern humans operated within a gi rded metaworld of abstraction, ratiocination, and the crudest approximations to nature, and the arrested world, blind to the dimensions of time, was producing an equally blind archit ecture, thrown from the metaworld into the real one, like a lead boot into times refreshing river.14 Seeing ourselves in the reflecti on of our filters, we are unabl e simply to look out at the process world of constant change and see. As discussed in chapter one, our Eyepieces are not suitable to perceive the complexity of the terr itories that we represent. A mental model that is much simpler than the phenomenon it is intended to illustrate shrinks our thinking to the models dimensions and causes us to miss the complexity of the phenomenon.15 By establishing the necessity for heuretic invention, and introducing the CATTt I am suggesting that exaggerated mental processes, which go beyond our contrast, w ould render us more apt to deal with our reality in productive and positive ways. To foll ow the movements of matter in its free and irregular flow, and to tap into the vast subtle potential of the fluid universe, one must first start with a break from the limitations of daily langua ge. We have to invent something new. Ungers model suggests that we have been fo rgetting relevant vibr ations of urbanism within the reductions and abstra ctions we make. We could a pply heuretics to many veins of architecture; however my explicit architectural interest in the split second urbanism of my 13 Aaron Betsky, Architecture Must Burn, p. 3.0. The quo te expresses the way I will talk about the body as grounding element for architecture within digitalized cultures of 2007. 14 Sanford Kwinter, Flying the Bullet. Or When did the Future Begin. from Louis Kahn: Conversations with Students(Architecture at Rice) p. 71. This essay resonates with my thesis on many levels. The experience of Yager, a fighter pilot, exposes Kwinters interest in complexity and intuition. 15. Samuel Bois, The Art of Awareness, p. 146.

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36 current situation offers an exaggerated (un-im ageable) example from which to start breaking our addition to reductive logics. The fact within Ungers mor phological approach will have no use within the contemporary manifestations of urbanism within the United States. These forces, illustrated often by Kwinter as potential or incorporeal, are the ones which result in formal residues into which, as seen through Ungers model; we plac e our interests and effort.16 Within the discipline of architecture, it is singularly this residue, the plan or aeri al view of sprawl, which is reacted to critically and defensively. Visually, the layer of urbanism I am interested in targeting can be visualized as vibrations above the surface of the energies appearing substantive. 17 Energy appearing substantive, or substance, is a term which I have used in reference to objects I see outside. Doing this reminds me objects within urban conditions are not the abstractions used to communicate with others about them. Rather, the stuff I see, abstract, and give names to, are in reality, dynamic configura tions of units of energy. However, one should not deny or reject the image or its abstraction. The image is real, it is a projection of the mind, but reality configures infinitely always. 18 To avoid abuse of ones nervous system, it is best to always remain conscious of this. Neurons that fire together wire together. The Hebbian pos tulate has been useful in conceptualizing vibrational urbanism--mapping pot ential trajectories of desire. However, I realize that I am using the Hebbian Postulate within this thread of the thesis work more loosely. Here, this analogy should not be used too rigidly, as analogie s give our thinking processes a pattern from which it is not easy to break free.19 Gausa would agree that as architects we tend to 16 Sanford Kwinter, The Hammer and the Song, from OASE Architectural Journal No. 48. pp.31-43. 17 These are the layers I am clai ming we forget to represent. 18 Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity, pp. 386-411. 19 Samuel Bois, The Art of Awareness p. 137.

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37 work from complexity.20 We saw in chapter one that to work with complexity would mean to work with yourself; conceivi ng of having multiple selves (with in ones semantic structure).21 If an aim is to expand the capacity to experi ence more of the process world of constant change in the study of urbanism than ones filter would already allow, th en representations and translations made must reflect that aim. Additonally, the assi gnments we give ourselves must have elements which develop this expansion embedded within them. Often, because we easily digest what we are used to, th at which flows through the preferre d pre-fired synapses, we feel most comfortable having discus sions which are extremely reduc tive. Korsybski offers his structural differential to practice this break fr om common-sense daily language, and to become conscious of ones abstractions. In our Heuretic invention we intend to do the same. Seeking to work outside of common-sense lang uage tends to make one layer of the self very frustrated and stressed. It takes practice not to default to the old lens. However, as the world of economics has shown, stress is the healthy stat e of capital. The saturation of one aspect of the production of stress allows us the ability to perceive of the forces which are rendered unto us, and those which we render. And as we give up these frustrations little by little, we will come to a position where we can turn around and look back to find out that we didnt give up a thing. In severing the Eyepiece there is nothing to lose except the values that are given to images appearing substantive.22 20 Manuel Gausa, Operative Optimism pp. 4-31. 21 Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity, pp. 386-411. 22 Consider, for a moment, the middle. Find a writing pen lying around, it doesnt matter what kind. Now, balance it on your index finger. You will see that in this case the middle is a balancing point which is only found with inclusion of all of both sides. This exercise, presented to me first by a Zen priest, is interesting in its application to the study of urbanism, to the discipline of architectural education, as well as Heuretics. The plan in our contrast is not a balancing point It is not middle, rather it attempts to be a whole or gestalt. It has one author. I want to start in the middle in order to make something appear. I dont want to be in control.

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38 Advanced capitalism, as Neil Leach maintains, has turned the world into a mythologized dream world, based on fantasy and escapism. He maintains that th roughout his article, Wallpaper* person, his argument was intended to be deliberately exaggerated, so as to become less a representation of [ objective] reality than a transcendence of it. In so doing, he uncovers certain truths about the world and demonstrat es an accelerated ability to map extensional relationships and accounts of these relationships. 23 He practices, through exaggeration, the ability to see something else, along with what he would have seen anyway. The article transcends canonical approaches via Leachs self -reflexive account of th e/his current condition, it requires and allows, simultaneously, the manipul ation of his daily langu age. His notion of aesthetic cocoon, the isolated state of being co sseted from reality and locked into some dream world is not farfetched in relationship to the heuretic invention we ar e cooking up. The cocoon offers another angle from which to conceive of the addiction we have to our predetermined semantic reactions, and beautiful ly illustrates Hebbian theorem. Wallpaper* person provides a more psychological angle invested in the original st ory of narcissus, but as we will see, all angles are relevant. It actually offers an interesting model for much of contemporary life. Leach poses that the habitat of the Wallpaper* person is an exte nsion of that very indivi dual, or rather it is even an inverted mould. At this point, it becomes clear that we are l ooking at an individual body in order to unpack a new way of seeing American Urbanism. Agai n, we want to conceive of design processes which factor in the complexity of contempor ary manifestations of urbanism. Urbanism understood with an architectural mentality of an autonomous and purely phenomenological interest in mediums of mass, space, light and organization is not sufficient. We are always going 23. Neil Leach, Wallpaper* Person: Notes on the Behavi or of a New Species, from This is Not Architecture: Media Constructions, pp. 231-243.

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39 to be interested in those things. We want to see something else in addition to what we would have seen anyway. Thinking in this way might allow for designs which awaken a new layer of evolution. With that mentality we will no longer habitually seek monumental axis, and position of center. Nostalgia will not drive our motiv ations. We will be inve ntive and positive about sprawl. In my research, I have practiced loo king at sprawling big box landscape by corresponding within them. In so doing, I developed an awareness of five spatial tendencies, within this deported landscape. These tendencies provided a very productive launching point for the design project that followed. There was no need to impose a reductive model or method to read this landscape, the method was within it. Rather than assume the role of wanderer or voyeur, roles that have been studied in th e past, I became more of a hawker-barker. I developed over a hundred postcards which listed the potentia ls within this deport landscape, (See figure 3-5). I gave myself no set boundary, I simply began to look and observ e; and then I listed. I advocated; I sold. I wanted to see something else, in addition to what I would have seen anyway. The tendencies I came to see are as follows: 1. Rapidly developing (big box) ur banism is an ethereal context of transient dreams. 2. Loose mediums and connectors sanction l oose associations within context. 3. A loose impulse results in overabundance, indulgence and a lack of restraint. 4. Large modulated context creates an immediate l oose fit with what is desired, resulting in the hunt for something new. 5. The immediate trucking of por table modules of context responds to these transient dreams, which can never be fulfilled. While uncovering these truths or tendencies, it became clear that the plan, what Ungers refers to as the fact within his morphological method of communication is not useful. This is because, as I have discussed, there is a dimension w ithin these territories that is not imageable.

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40 As such, seeking the perfect anal ogy, even aesthetically, is reduc tive and harmful to ones mental processes. Found within the tend encies stated above one begins to sense the emergence of the influence the individual body has on the forms which manifest. We see that impulses are responded to with immediacy. A beautiful logic of looseness reigns within the mathematically sublime landscape. Gathering information within th ese landscapes must allow for slippage. If it is too fixed and rigid, then it will not be accu rate. Thus, there is a rift or unknowable characteristic within the aggregation and self re plication of sprawl that is determined by our desires rendering any form of plan as we know it useless. How does the architect operate when the plan is no longer a viable tool? To answer this we must make a new method appear. This is our task.

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41 Figure 3-1. Above is an example of Ungers interpretations. Here, he has shown a cat with nursing kittens accompanied with a plan by Raymond Unwin from 1910 titled, City with independent satellites. This image is found on pages 58-59. [Reprinted with permission from Publisher]

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42 Figure 3-2. Above is another ex ample of Ungers interpretati ons, titled Ideal city on an island, Joseph Furttenbach, 1620.This image can be found on pages 20-21. [Reprinted with permission from Publisher]

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43 Figure 3-3. The image from Dolores Haydens A field guide to sprawl depicts the standard view that designers take of rapid urbanism. I am suggesting that this vantage point is not a useful place to begin analysis of these sp rawling conditions. This image/ spread can be found within the second ch apter, An illustrated Vocabul ary of Sprawl. [Reprinted with permission from Publisher]

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44 Figure 3-4. Above is another exam ple of Ungers interpretations, titled Plan for Victoria, J.S. Buckingham, 1848. The plan is paired with an image of mirrors reflected into one another, and the word used in the mor phology is Reflection. This example expresses how Ungers uses aesthetic intelligence to make a point. This image can be found on pages 90-91. [Reprinted with permission from Publisher]

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45 Figure 3-5 This example is titled, La Ville Radi euse, Le Corbusier, 1952, and is paired with an image of Coca-Cola bottles organized rationally. The i dea used here is Succession. Ungers choices obvio usly reinforce his critique of functionalism in this pairing. The image play makes the reader feel like the inhabi tants of La Ville Radieuse would feel, in their situation, like the Coca-Cola bottles exist in theirs. This image can be found on pages 108-109. [Repri nted with permission from Publisher].

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46 Figure 3-6. Sampling of corres pondence post cards taken as part of my research on big box culture. During this research I began to correspond with the condition of big-box. I temporarily dispelled my preconceptions, a nd thus began to understand the condition as an ethereal context of transient dreams.

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47 Figure 3-7. Greg Ulmers Apparatus II. This expands upon the one provided in the first The above diagram adds more specificity within the areas of ontology, ground, philosophy, state of mind, and pr actice in the transformation over time from the oral epoch to the literate epoch and into an electrate epoch. This was presented as additional material within his course. Th is diagram, as well as many others is generously available on Ulmers web page under curriculum.

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48 CHAPTER 4 500 ML CHICKEN STOCK Theory Theory f or the CATTt, will be Michel Serres Hermes Literature, Science, Philosophy, focusing on the essay, Michelet: The Soup, with a detour through Martin Heideggers Introduction to Metaphysics Ulmer states, In each case the theorist generates a new theory based on the authority of another theory whose argument is accepted as a literal rather than figurative analogy, 1 Serres provides an ample medium fr om which to base the conception of the new invention. I felt that using this par ticular essay for theory was perfect because the CATTt itself is soupy. Working must take place in all categories at once. As was discussed in the previous chapter, gathering in formation within our targeted context must allow for slippage. If it is too fixed and rigid, then it will not be accurate. I like to imagine having the pleasure of operating under the auth ority of Serres. Harari and Bell list Serres five theorems w ithin the introduction of the book. I will discuss the work through these theorems to provide structure for this chapter. The first of Serres theorems, as presented by Harari and Bell, sugge sts that an encyclopedia which omits any of the multiple dimensions of knowledge would render an encyclopedia false from the moment of its realization. Within Serres work, this common thread of the assimilation of all knowledge, suggests a kind of soupy ultimate encyclopedia, not unlike the internet. The soupiness is a result of a shift from descri ptive categorization to active categorization. Serres moves beyond a typical scientific mental ity of categorization, taking descript ion into the realm of procedure by uncovering similarities between se emingly dissimilar subjects to reveal deeper fundamental truths about the structure of th e universe. His intentions are f undamentally scientific though they 1 Gregory Ulmer, Heuretics the Logic of Sensation p. 9.

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49 are reliant upon poetic a nd narrative. Serres work provides ample imagery from which to begin gathering knowledge inventively within the Electra te apparatus. It reinforces the nature and structure of a distributive or additive gathering mechanisms. In short, Serres work is truly interdisci plinary. It is perpetua lly founded upon illustrating the existence of a complicated passage between science, and the science of man,humanities. Serres shows us that this path is complicated by the essential nature of knowledge as well as by the evolution of modern knowledge. He places the reader back into a time within which philosophy and science were singular. Philosophy is derived from the Greek philia meaning love and sophia meaning wisdom.2 The increasing complexity of our environment seems to call for an increasing complexity of specialization.3 However, from the theory for this experiment, The tendency to divide in order to conquer has brought science to a crit ical point at which it is slowly becoming more of a tr ade the scientist practices than a scientia whose object is knowledge.4 We are not taking advantage of the electrate apparatus, which is capable of supporting a more complex and distributed gathering of knowle dge, one that is a mixture. A soupy gathering of knowledge would not divide, it would unify. I will dive deeper into this question about the nature and evolution of knowledge by taking a brief detour into Martin Heideggers Introduction to Metaphysics From Heidegger I will establish a few key phrases which will augment my ability to articulate an understanding of the evolut ion of modern knowledge. 2 Ibid 3 This issue has been ripe and ready to be tackled in architecture for decades. Im optimistic about addressing this issue because, like Serres and many othe rs I am skeptical of the specialist. 4Michel Serres, Hermes Literature, Science, Philosophy from the translators introduction, p. xii.

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50 Heidegger Phusis Heidegger shows us that the Greek' s fundame ntal questioning of Being of their great historical Dasein5 (situation) once pertained to nature's overwhelming, all-abiding-sway, which was conceived of as phusis.6 The all-abiding-sway of nature that the Greeks faced in their gathering of knowledge is like the flood of images and desire m achines of capitalism that we face in our own historical Dasein. Heidegger shows us that the notion of phusis collapsed into the verb "to be," which became a primary struct uring element of Western metaphysics. Before this inceptive moment of literate Metaphysics the "thing" had not yet been invented. Ones ability to use language in a very particular way to describe a thing did not exist before Aristotle. Unfortunately once the thing became a method of gathering, we became obsessed. The obsession with things--gathering them, categorizi ng them, testing them, and shelving them in very particular ways--got so out of hand that He idegger suggests we forgot about the essence of Being and we can no longer even conceive of questioning the essence of Being as the Greeks once did. I believe that Serres simultaneously dem onstrates and calls for an understanding of the essence of Being. For most of us however, this curiosity is no longer indexed within our minds because our Eyepieces do not register that fre quency. "We involuntarily explain the infinitive "to be" to ourselves on the basis of the "is," almost as if nothing else were possible," 7 In this quote, Heidegger expresses that this has long ruled our hi storical Dasein. The addiction we have to our preferred m ental processes begins here. The Photograph by Andreas Gursky titled Salerno 5 Martin Heidegger, Introduction to Metaphysics, pp. 1-6. The use of Heidegger within the theory of this CATTt comes directly out of the work that I have done with Ulmers. Within Imaging Metaphysics, we used only Heidegger as our theorist. 6 Ibid, pp. 10-13. 7 Ibid, p. 96.

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51 1990,8 beautifully captures the notion of of phusis, the all-abiding-sway of our situation. I am interested in this image because of the juxt aposition between both nature, phusis within the Greeks historical dasien as well as the power and complexity of the current historical dasien. Heidegger maintains that the l ogic of cognition, literate meta physics, i.e. gathering with the written word as mean s of finding "truths" is A way, and not THE way. He valorizes our mission. Pure reason, as for Serres, is too abstract for Heidegger. He believes that we are ready to go back and actually experience Being before it was crushed under the pressure of the infinitive "is," and to utilize a more practical ba sed reasoning to seek out logics that are affect driven. As mentioned in the previous chapter, these logics would find "truths" grounded within the erotic forces that flow through our bodies. Heide gger suggests that it is within these forces or sensations--the recognition of beauty and what ge nerates the golden section--that the sway of phusis can be felt. This mode of ontology, necessarily, pushes beyond the substance or ousia of a thing. For exam ple, it moves into territory beyond the definabl e essence of a thing (i.e. a cup contains, or a chair supports the weight of a person). It is not like this but more like this The point is to get beyond the level of m eaning and to get at the th ing itself. Due to our canny nature, and the forcefulness of the all-abidingsway of capitalism, getting to th e thing itself is not so easy. Heidegger suggests that breaking out of what is familiar would require a violence-doing to that which establishes the routes of these circuits. We arrive again at the necessity to conceive of the eyepiece. 8 This image is printed within Andreas Gursky: Images by Fiona Bradly of Tate Gallery Publications, pg. 31.

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52 Alethia Looking m ore closely at the narrowing of Be ing which took place, one might imagine it as a choice that was made by the Greeks long ago. A window into understanding this choice grows directly from the Greeks notion of unconcealment or alethia9. "This essence of truth could not be held fast and preserved in its inceptive originality. Unconcealment the space founded for the appearing of beings, collapsed. 10 Unconcealment flattened out to mean correctness, and its essence was thus abandoned. I would like to imagine the re-e mergence of this concept of alethia It is in the unconcealed truth ( alethia ) that the Greeks established fundamental truths about their ex istence with in their situation. They were commonly in the practice of inventing ways to exist within the all-abidingsway. Exploiting the power of th eir apparatus, the Greeks used WORDS as recording devices, gathering up truths about nature's substance. Heidegger insists that we become aware how and when we got stuck in th e trajectory of logic or logos11 as the only form of questioning the Being of beings. Working our way back to Serres, we see that he also noticed the choice that was made. Serres states, My body (I cannot help it) is not plunged into a single, speci fied space. It works in Euclidean space, but it only works there. It se es in a projective space; it touches, caresses, and feels in a topological space ; it suffers in another; hear s and communicates in a third; and so forth,.. Euclidean space was chosen in our work-oriented cultures because it is the space of work of the mason, the surveyor, or the architect. 12 In effect, Being becomes singularly an idea such that "the grass is gree n," or "the grass is wet;" forgetting that "The grass (s imply) is." Serres points to the realization our bodies are not 9 Ibid, pp. 75-88. 10 Ibid, p. 203. 11 Ibid, pp. 94-133. 12 Michel Serres, Hermes Literature, Science, Philosophy p.44.

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53 plunged into a single space, but ra ther into difficult intersections and sets of connections and junctions which always need to be constructed. 13 Heidegger demonstrates through poetry that ther e is another directi on this "choice" could have taken us. He points to art, making the claim that this specific vehi cle of communication did not get sucked into the "fall." Heideggers interest in art as a form of communication allows us to use art as part of the analogy of the CATTt, looking specifically at the work of Francis Bacon. In doing, we will see a clear exampl e of how a logic of sensation has actually been achieved. We will use the analogy to invent a way to move beyond Ungers morphological model which uses the plan, the image, and the word, together to think about CITY. The target is complex, and requires the use of the electrate apparatus of our dasein (see figure 4-1) which supports a complex logic of distributed categories. From all of this, we gather that in noticing one thing, other things disappear from consciousness. If we are not careful, a limited an d diluted truth then becomes fixed in the mind which results in a fractt understanding of Bei ng. Also, we must reali ze that we are in a situation a histo rical moment where flow s of forces are acting on us.14 Serres--The Soup Understanding Heideggers perception has provided a greate r understanding of Serres com plex passage between science and art. I will move onto his essay, Michelet: The Soup. Serres does not simply make elaborate claims, l eaving one to contemplate how to utilize the material presented. He operates more like the vanguardist that was de scribed in chapter two on the Heuretic method. In his work he is preo ccupied not simply by an object or a domain, but 13 Ibid. 14 For example, Heidegger takes an active position with the Nazi party in his situation because he thought he could influence the masses.

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54 most importantly with sets of operations, met hods, and strategies which are applicable to formations of all kinds. These methods are illust rated clearly by Serres five theorems listed by Harari and Bell in the Introduction of the book. The theorems collectively render Serres conception of the ultimate knowledge gatherin g mechanism, and most importantly, how it operates. The theorems offer fuel for the setti ng up of heuretic inve ntions and reflect the potential of an electrate apparatu s. I am intrigued specifically with how they might be used in formulating our ability to understand how the s ubtleties of individual bodies influence the form of American urbanism. I will be using the theorems for clarity and structure in order to talk about The Soup Theorem 1: In order for there to be an en cyclopedic totality, this totality must be constituted as a theory providing access not onl y to a field of knowledge but to the world as well. (An encyclopedia that omits any of the multiple dimensions of knowledge is a false encyclopedia at the very moment of its r ealization: this explains in Serress view, the repeated failure of all philosophers of totality.)15 This theorem provides a point from which to deviate from Ungers the contrast Serres would consider Ungers anthology a false encyclopedia b ecause it includes only one view of CITY. In using the city plan, Ungers omitted certain dime nsions of experiencing the City. Because Serres is combating a reductive encyclopedic gathering of know ledge, he proposes that new theoretical operations must be discovered a nd defined. If the separation of knowledge into compartmentalized units of specialization is no longer applicable to our epoch, then we must define new ones. We want to invent new techne within the electrate ep och in the way that the Greeks began to gather knowledge (about nature) with words in the literate epoch; without preconceptions 15 Michel Serres, Hermes Literature, Science, Philosophy from the translators introduction, p. xvi.

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55 Most of Serres work is concerned with Information theory. He investigates the structuring of information, with a preocc upation with the nature of communication. Modern science is thus speci fically concerned with the study of all aspects of the transmission and propagation of messages information, noise, and redundancy. (Literary criticism understands these same problems in terms of theories or code, language, writing, and translation.).16 I am interested in how Serres focuses on th e message to talk about the structure of communication, bringing in the specificity of each body or receiver. Ungers, in contrast, focuses on a morphological integration of analogy, fact, and idea to talk about thinking. He is imposing a particular arrangement of these thre e simple components to establish a whole or Gestalt. He celebrates the gesta lt of his own authorsh ip one mind. Serres celebrates a rich soup that can account for all knowledge many minds. For Serres, the way that Ungers presents f act is too dry. The taxonomic absolute format is reductive and restrictive; it dries the skin, it will not nurture health and growth. Serres might actually enjoy Ungers use of image a nd word; however for Serres, divisions of information are never (only) taxonomical. Ra ther, communication is a journey and the message is a bridge. The message is transmitted at specific nodes or intersections along the journey. The journey forges new paths between man and the world. The journey has infinite potential, it can be tracked and ha s access through all areas of the encyclopedia, past present and future. Thus it is continuous a nd all inclusive. Serres states, One might assume a gap between the so-calle d physical sciences and the sciences of living beings. No such gap is to be found in The Sea. The world is a static machine, a compression engine, an electrical engine, a chemical machine, a steam engine; the world is an organism all without contradiction. The basic philosophy is hylozoism. What is hylozoism if not mechanism coupled with vita lism in a synthesis in which there are no gaps? For Michelet the s ynthesis of mechanism and vitalism is justified by the 16 Ibid, p. xxiii.

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56 succession of areas of knowledge within the encyclopedia. Why should sciences be contradictory among themselves? 17 Serres teaches about science and its history withou t focusing on one specific area. He is able to expose all areas of the encyclopedia at once by taking the reader on a journey through the structure of information. In this case it is a journey through The Sea as it is presented by Michelet through Serres. The nature of the journey or story is the most productive for my purpose. In the transmission of each message, one can see dow n the trajectory of each converging axis of information including where the ax is came from and where it might be going. My theory is that because what is being expressed is formulated as a narrative, the filter which is typically used to understand science isnt turned on the ubiquitous eyepiece isn t on guard. It is as if one exists in the arms of mother, calm and relaxed, ta king in the world as if it were the first time. Serres tells a story, specifically playing on Michelets obsession with the repetition of the feminine theme to intensify the flavor of the soup. Again, for Michelet, the moist/warmth theme is beneficent, whereas the dry, sc holastic themes are maleficent. For Serres the only thing to note ab out the nature of the soup is this, there are reservoirs for its circulation. More clearly, Serres provides this list claiming, To understand the prebiotic soup I have only to perform the following simple addition. 1. The centers defined by geometric and di fferential properties ar e the poles of the circulation of movements in general. 2. They are the poles of circulation of flui ds in general, through the interaction of high and low pressures. 3. They are the positive and negative poles for the circulation of electric current. 4. They are the hot and cold sources of the Ca rnot cycle, which functions for all kinds of liquids. 17 Michel Serres, Hermes Literature, Science, Philosophy p. 35.

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57 5. They are concentrations for th e circulation of saline solutions. 6. They are hearts for the circulation of the blood. 7. They are breasts or uteri for the circulat ion of milk or for me nstrual circulation in which we can recognize, as in a circle, the cy cle of the planets and the first factor of the addition. What is the Soup? It is the sum of all elements analyzed in relati on to the areas of the encyclopedia cited above. It is milk, blood, a solution of mineral salts, and electrical flux etc., all at the same time. It ha s reservoirs for its circulation.18 Rather than study the Carnot cycle separately fr om the menstrual cycle, Serres suggests that we gather them together, with all other circulati on centers, as described above, in order to understand a latent structuring real ity which operates more deeply at the root of knowledge; there are reservoirs for the circulation of the soup. Fo r Serres, these two notions remain structurally stable through all the divisions of the encyclopedia. He is not defi ning a structure, he is defining structure itself. In grasping this more deepl y, one might feel again, th e all-abiding-sway of phusis and begin again questioni ng the essence of being. Theorem 2: Any theoretical exigency is inextricably linked to a moral or political exigency. (Theory always borders on terror something that has always been known in academic circles that engage exclusively in theory.)19 This theorem might help demonstrate how the political and the entertainment industries are already utilizing the internet in inventive ways. I have come to see from Dr. Ulmer, that as an aspiring educator in 2007, I am responsible for enga ging in the process of de veloping an electrate society. He suggests that we can figure out by becoming electrate, how to teach capitalism something. I think that this is an important area of research, especially in application to the realm of rapidly expanding ur ban conditions expanded upon in th e previous chapter. Finding a way to teach capitalism something which might enable architects more operational ground within 18 Ibid. 19 Michel Serres, Hermes Literature, Science, Philosophy from the translators introduction, p. xvii.

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58 sprawl is a longer term goal. Thus, for the sake of this exercise, I will not be focusing on this theorem in particular, as I feel it must come later, once the tale has become productive. Theorem 3: there is no hierarchy of cultural formations. Science and myth are never on two sheets. 3.1 Science is a cultural formati on equivalent to any other. 3.2 There is no natural hierarchy with in sciences. Myth informs science.20 Theorem 4: Science is the totality of the worl ds legends. The world is the space of their inscription. To read and to j ourney are one and the same act 21 Serres envisions and renders within this essay a method of communication that goes beyond metaphor/ model/ analogy/ symbol in their si ngular relationship with fact. He claims that each time he has gone through an area of the encyclopedia he ha s found a concrete model involving a circulation and a reservoir. The same scheme is found in the primary cycle of the eternal return or in the last cycle of generation: the mother soup engenders the moth er siren. Woman is the genetic reservoir.22 The Vedic texts long ago recomm ended the use of a similar r ecipe for the reparations of the "amrta" of immortality: a pot was needed-this was the sea; it was to be stirred by means of a certain number of utensils--am ong them, a mountain--and the nature of the mixture was defined. Now the recipe for the s oup is the encyclopedia, which, since Hegel at least, is a cycle. 23 Both of the quotes provide explanations of the third theorem. Science an d myth are never on two separate sheets. Science is actually informed by myth. Serres sets up the existence of a chain, where mother emerges from mother, a circular generation of the eter nal feminine, an earth that is in labor (genetically speaking). He then asks what the conditio ns are for the achievement of this aim, as well as what happens in the course of this labor. His point is that in answering specific questions about reservoir and circulation, one will find themse lves in every area of the 20 Ibid, p. xix. 21 Ibid, p. xxi. 22 Ibid, p. 36. 23 Ibid, p. 31.

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59 encyclopedia--geography, geometry, astronomy, oceanography, gravity, barolgoy, biology, gnoseology, neptunism, heterogeny etc. Discussing all of these areas within the encyclopedia, as they exist together in the soup, Serres gives no distinction in the leve l of importance between myth and fact. This obliteration of hierarc hy perfectly opposes our contrast, whose format resides upon the fact vs. the anal ogy. In this experiment the plan is actually a myth that needs to be read as part of a story within which the individual body and its messages become the grounding elements forming foundation within rapid urbanism. To don this filter will yield a soupy reading of CITY more fitting for the analys is of the sprawling landscapes of the United States. I hope it might allow a designer to opera te more comfortably in this condition, without the injunction of a (compare and contrast) lo gic. Additionally the de signer would not feel burdened by the need for authorship. We begin with a myth, or a story of a journey with no specified pl an or territory. Our situation is the soup. The internet is th e pot. Bodies and messages form ground. Theorem 5: Order is not the law of things but their exception. Consequently, it is necessary to rethink th e world not in terms of its laws and its regularities, but rather in term s of perturbations and turbulence s, in order to bring out its multiple forms, uneven structures, and fluctuating organizations. The introduction of the notion of parasite puts into question the crypto-egalitarian ideo logy of exchange The parasite invents something new. It inter cepts energy and pays for it with information. It intercepts roast beef and pays for it with stories. These would be two ways of writing the new contract. The parasite establishes an ag reement that is unfair, at least in terms of previous accounting methods; it constructs a new balance sheet. It expresses a logic that was considered irrational until now, it expr esses a new epistemology, another theory of equilibrium. 24 This Theorem reiterates the break from the format of our contrast. The form of the plan is not fact the law of things. The plan is an exception a concept or utopia. This distinction 24 Ibid, p. xxvii.

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60 is important. Heidegger shows that The Greek s ignored the accident when making their metaphysics. Because of this, it is hard to see any other way. In allowing ourselves to look at communication as a journey, and to think of an in formation gathering that is soupy, it seems the accident is no longer an accident, but is part of the abiding sway of our situation. It might even be thought of as a moment which exposes the for ces within the sway, yielding part of our goal to see something else when analyzing urbanism in addition to what we w ould have seen anyway. I would like to conceive of knowle dge not in terms of order and mastery, but in terms of chance and invention.25 Roland Barthes discusses Michelet s use of themes within his work. The themes are repetitive, they are substantia l, and they are reducible.26 Substance, for example, can always be divided into beneficent and malefi cent states. Serres points out that Michelet uses the themes moist-warmth and dry repeatedly to make tr uths about communication appear. Scholastics (historical encyclopedic gatheri ng) and Hegel are dry and malefi cent. Moisture, incubation, and mother are beneficent. Michelets repetitious ob session with substance is particularly interesting for us in relationship to our wish for a re-grounding of the body. If the body is the new grounding element of this epoch, and the message--the node along the journey of communication within which learning happens, we must always c onsider good and evil in relation to its effect on the body as the following quote suggests. Contrary to current opinion, Michelets morality is not at all rhetorical; it is a morality of the body; History is judged at the tribunal of the fl esh: good is determined by virtue of its seamless, fluid, rhythmic nature, and evil as a consequence of its dryness and its discontinuity,27 25 Ibid, p. xxxiv. 26 Roland Barthes Michelet gives an interesting account of Michelets use of themes. 27 Roland Barthes, Michelet p. 203.

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61 I will now ask a question. Is it the body in our epoch that determines fact? The body creates the soup (the gathering of inform ation) for itself, and for the well being of others. The soup is never maleficent; it is prepared, heated, mixed, i ngested, and digested. It is a mixture which requires movement to disperse the solute through the solvent. In our situ ation, the reservoir is internet, or the electrate appara tus. Circulation is produced by the desire machines play, aesthetics, and entertainment. To understand the messages, we must take a journey through the sea (the internet), mapping circulat ion and reservoir. There are hot and cold sources. Below Serres gives us some examples of how to begin. Now consider the reservoir and the circulation and ask yourself questions like these: where is the reservoir? What is the reservoir? What is in the reservoir? What are its elements and what is their configuration? How does this rese rvoir function? Is it stable or metaphorical, open or closed? And so forth Ask yourself a second series of questions: what is circulation? What are the circulating elements? What is the plan of the transpor tation system? How do the elements circulate according to this plan? By what law? In a stable manner, or transformationally? And so forth28 Here are examples of some answers: the re servoir is capital, the quantity of enery, the constancy of force, the libidinal reservoir, and so forth; what can be applied to the pattern of general circulation or the ci rcle of circles is language, sp eech, words, vocabulary, values money, desire. Here are some examples of related questions: What blocks circulation? What stimulates it? Who or what governs or forms the reservoir? A nd so on. With these questions and these answers, varied and multiplied into several voices, you will reconstruct the entire set of interpretive organons formed in the nineteenth century.29 These questions and answers will be applied with in the following chapter on the analogy of this CATTt:. I will be adding the work of Serres (science) to the work of Francis Bacon as presented by Gilles Deleuze (art). 28 Michel Serres, Hermes Literature, Science, Philosophy p. 37. 29 Ibid.

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62 CHAPTER 5 MEAT AND POTATOES; ANALOGY AND TALE Ul mer suggests that the heuretic method b ecomes invention when it relies upon analogy and chance. Analogy provides the tale (the new alternative) fi guration by displacing a method from one area of study into another. Finding an alogies for emerging method from within other realms of knowledge offers an opportunity to pr actice breaking the habitu al use of the normative filter by temporarily donning a new one. This practi ce taps into an imaginative realm of Being that is childlike and playful. If methods tend to be practiced as algorithms, their invention is heuristic (heuretics is a heur istic approach to theory.) 1 Analogy for the sake of this experiment is derived both from science as well as from art I look at my problem as a scientist as well as an artist simultaneously. In my tale I will be building upon the final project that I comple ted within Ulmers course offering Imaging Metaphysics, as described in chap ter 1, as well as work that was completed in a graduate design studio at the University of Michig an, titled Ideas work society. In this chapter I will discuss Ulmers course, which provides a base for my unde rstanding of heuretics, as well as expresses ones ability to track, in a repeatable way, ones eyep iece. It is a part of my research, and in a way, both of these courses have provided traini ng wheels for the success of my own CATTt. Analogy, Standing on the Shoulders of Dr. Ulmer The analogy for the CATTt within the pro ject completed within Ulmers course was art As Heidegger suggested, within the realm of art and poetry, questioning the essence of the being of beings remained. In Ulmers course we used the process of 18 artists as an analogy for our own process. I will only bring forth the work of Francis Bacon within this thesis, in order to expose how analogy becomes algorithmic. 1 Gregory Ulmer, Heuretics the Logic of Invention p. 8.

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63 Within the heuretic invention, I developed an image category inner di sturbance, in order to track inner forces. In retros pect I see that the project beca me a process of finding the second half of my body developing the left-brain right-brain integrati on necessary for the journey of my new tale which begins to bridge science and art.2 In developing this image category, I feel that I was developing an ability to trust and understand the forces within my being in the way that an artist does. For the CATTt tale I am constructing a design competition. The competition be gins with a selection process. One must develop and submit their own image category before final invitations are sent out. From the image categories submitted, only 10 designers will be chosen to participat e in the competition (the tale ). The Work of Francis Bacon In his text, F rancis Bacon: The Logic of sensation, Gilles Deleuze demonstrates how Bacon began to convey a logic of the manifestations of his partic ular inner forces. Deleuze helps us to see that internal forces such as desire contain fundamental trut hs which hold as much weight as fundamental truths of substance for example. He moves out of literate cognitively based ontology into a more image based ontol ogy, demonstrating a means for gathering and unconcealing ( alethia from the previous chapter) these deeper forces which Heidegger and I wish to understand. Heidegger was calling fo r another form of metaphysics, one which questions the essential being of Beings. Ul mers course description, Imaging metaphysics suggests that within this new metaphysics, images have as much weight and influence as reason and logic. In light of the pr evious discussion, Serres would defi nitely approve. The electrate 2 I dont intend to explain the project in full. For full access of th is project please see Objects 5-1 and 5-2. I am operating under the assumption within the current thesis that I now have an ability to utilize an electrate ability. The instructions within my project (.pdf on left column of web site pages) provide a means by which someone else may develop their own image categor y. The guide comes directly out of th e art analogy, and provides access into my thought process while develo ping my image category.

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64 apparatus is an advanced gath ering mechanism which can allow for a distributed gathering of information which goes beyond a literate gathering. Bacons work provides an understanding of how this might be so. His work contains a dimension which is not accessible through sheer literate forms of metaphysics. Deleuze portrays Bacon's work in its process of functioning, sugge sting that image metaphysics is not static. Its gathering devices are not fixed lik e the gathering devices within literate metaphysics. In this dimension, Bacon actually thinks with his desire s and feelings. He makes the affect smart, developing his other half. Using Francis Bacon in the course, we pulle d an inference system which can be studied and utilized to find many new fo rms of image metaphysics. This is evident in my experiment provided by the link above. His pr ocess depicts the metaphysics of an individual within a very particular situation by tracking the affect produced on his own body by given forces. He studies those affects and forces simultaneously. His pa intings are both document and procedure. In reading his work, one can become aware of the process of its construction which becomes a window into the possibility of electrate metaphysics, while at the same time exposing something very specific about the worki ngs of one individual body. The Situation The spectacle and m edia flood is for Bacon what na ture and natural poetic language was for Plato and Aristotle. His paintings are gath ering devices in the way that words once were. Remember phusis from chapter 3, that all abiding sway ? Bacon steps back to the inceptive moment of questioning the Being of beings in hi s awareness and analysis of the spectacle. That is, he is within "the sway" wh ile questioning it simultaneously. Hi s paintings expose that he is aware of his position within the sway through his us e of clich. He senses the structure of the circulating forces driving his situation, and he is creating for his appara tus a logical means to

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65 mediate within it. He wants to find the intell igence of his libido. It is not enough to simply perceive the situation, (though this is important). It isnt enough to conceive of the spectacle and its media flood as the Greeks perceived the notion of phusis. It is important also to understand how to gather. The Greeks gathered with words. The image categories which were developed in Ulmers course gave glimpses of an electrate gathering mechanism. Deleuze posits that this requires a purely aesthetic comprehension of the unit of measure. Measure is subjectively determined because the media flood is so fast. Thus, it is subject to constant evaluation and re-evaluation. Beneath the successive apprehension of arts, th ere is a logical synthesis that requires a purely aesthetic comprehension of the unit of measure Aesthetic comprehension is the grasping of a rhythm with regard to both the thing to be measured and the unit of measure. Beneath both the measure and the units, there is rhythm. 'Rhythms are always heterogeneous, we plunge into them in a sort of exploration,' in experimentation The foundation of perceptual synthesis is aesth etic comprehension, but the ground on which this foundation rests is th e evaluation of rhythm,"3 In image metaphysics this is critical. We zoom out, to place ourselves within a particular situation and the "rhythm of that situation, but we must si multaneously zoom into ourselves at the same time. In my experiment, for example, I was pasting images from within the media flood onto a filter of the familiar. I was able to observe and make sense of the forces within my being. Loosely, within the site, these are conf usion, lust/crave, and suppression. They have been labeled a, b, and c, because in the e nd they were not easily split based on category. I found that leaving a degree of l ooseness within the gathering pr ovided a space for serendipitous chance. 3 Gilles Deleuze, Francis Bacon the Logic of Sensation from the translators introduction, p. xvii.

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66 Diagram W ithin Bacon's work a clear structural rela tionship roots each of his paintings, although each contains very different sensations. This stru cturing element, the diagram, is a fundamentally repeating operation which is used in order to elicit another possibl e world in a work of art. The diagram is used to battle figurative givens which exist within the artist. The diagram is indeed chaos, a catastrophe, but it is also a germ of order or rhythm. It is a violent chaos in relation to the figurative givens, but it is a ge rm of rhythm in relation to the new order of painting. As Bacon says, it unlocks areas of sensation.4 Bacon had a diagram, so in the course, we trie d to find one as well. I have elaborated upon the elements within Bacons diagram in the sections which follow. In my project the diagram took on a triptych format much like that of Bacon s famous triptych paintings. Beyond the triptych format, there are operations within Bacons diag ram which relate particularly well to our situation, namely his use of f ound materials, which Deleuze has dubbed the clich. Within the diagram there is always a clich, an asigni fied trait, and some form of contour. The diagram ends the preparatory work and begi ns the act of painting It is a violent chaos in relation to the figurative givens, but it is a germ of rhythm in relation to the new order of the painting. 5 Clich Bacon arm s himself with various methods to batt le the givens--those th ings that are latent within the canvas. Delueze describes Bacons sel ections of such givens as clichs. Bacons Clich may be a famous painting, a photo of a clos e friend, or a photo of himself. It establishes within the audience a semblance of familiarity. Bacon forces himself not to paint what he considers is already present; a ba ttle takes place which is capture d on the canvas. Bacon uses the figure as a vehicle to track his inner sensati ons. The motivating forces within the action of 4Gilles Deleuze, Francis Bacon the Logic of Sensation, p. 102. 5 Gilles Deleuze, Francis Bacon the Logic of Sensation, p. 83.

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67 painting are Bacon's obsessions, and he relies on the element of chance or accident. When we see anatomically correct traits which are distorted smeared and truncated, feelings emerge. Deleuze suggests that the terrain is sensation and that the enemy is figu ration. I used the notion of faade and company logo in the development of my image category which can be understood more completely by referencing objects 5-1 and5-2. "T he most significant thing about the photograph is that it forces upon us the "truth" of the implausible and the doctored images." 6 Traits--The Asignified Bacon also introduces an asignifying trait whic h is a graphic or im age. It is analogous to the figure only through its diagrammatic mapping of sensation. Bacon is not simply using vernacular photographic means of resemblance and representation. Rather, he has constructed a gathering mechanism. Two things may resemble by analogy such that a friend of Bacon, (within his situation), is like the beef or the bird in its situation. The friend in this case would be the clich, (the figural locked to re presentation), and the hanging meat would be the asignified trait. One might begin to feel like the meat when looking at the paintings. For Bacon, Deleuze explains, "every man who suffers is a piece of m eat. Meat is the common zone of man and the beast." 7 Contour Using free m arks and smudging, (chance) B acon feels or senses his way into understanding forces within himself which are associated with the figure he paints. Bacon states that there is no chance except "manipulated" chan ce, and no accident except "utilized" accident. Thus, in order to understand that his inner forces have intelligence, he mu st track these forces. The contour mediates this process, and is the gathering mechanism within the art work. It is 6 Ibid, p 74. 7 Ibid, p. 21.

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68 within the contour of Bacon's pa intings that associations are ma de between an open mouth, a cut artery and a jacket sleeve. In mapping seemingly dissimilar images onto one another, Bacon reveals that they share a similar contour. He ex poses that by exaggerating the similar formal or morphological characteristics of each of these hangings the painter is able to unlock areas of sensation which move beyond simple illustration. At the moment something appears within the contour one can see that Bacon has moved from the synthesis of perception, into aesthetic comprehension or rhythm, to the catastrophe or chaos, and then back again. He must trust each level within his being to create such a gatheri ng principle. Bacon gather s asignified traits, and maps them onto the clich. He distorts the clich, revealing something which could not have been seen before the violent act of fighitng what is already within the canvas. Within this new CATTt we are fighting the habitual reliance on th e plan in order to find a way to fight other habits that we would like to forget. In Ulmers course we began to understand that Bacon was revealing something within his method, and that the method is clear. Above are three irreducible units within Bacons process. Much like a syllogism, his logic is a little machine which can churn out multifaceted results. The process is a fundamentally repeatable operation; however it is imperative not to forget that his work cannot be separated from Bacons very part icular feelings and obses sions. In this way, each form of image metaphysics devel oped during the project was consid ered an image category. Within my tale I use art algorithmically to explain a specific artists methodologies. Typically I do not utilize the arti sts specific subject or interest to drive the analogy; however Bacon provides an interesting example because his method is about capturing inner forces. Bacon provides one example of an image categor y. I have done the same, (see objects 5-1 and 5-2 at the end of this chapter).

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69 Science Science is used also as analogy for its m ethodologies in contrast to its scientific intentions. For example, I do not use biopsy in my tale in order to search for lymphoma. Rather, I apply biopsy an unfamiliar methodto something that is familiar in order to let a connection between the two emerge. Simultaneously, I am track ing many scientific circulation centers, in order to make new associations about that particular area w ithin a Serresian encyclopedia. Theory and analogy become blurred because my theori st is also a scientist. The use of science as analogy differs dramatically because it is a gath ering mechanism which is born directly out of literacy. Serres suggests that we view comm unication as a journey, and to conceive of information or knowledge as being soupy. He show s us that science and myth are one and the same, obliterating the rigid hierarchy of dry storage that has taken place for so long. In allowing ourselves to look at communica tion as a journey, and to think of an information gathering that is soupy, I have begun to see that the accident no longer registers as such. Rather, an accident is part of the abiding sway of our s ituation. It might even be thought of as a moment which exposes the forces within the sway, yi elding part of our. As stated, the tale builds upon tw o projects within my past. The first I have revealed to you in objects 5-1 and 5-2. The journey of which the tale will be told occurred two years ago at the University of Michigan. I began to generate a soupy gathering of know ledge using science as analogy within the project. For this reason al one, the project perfectly suites my CATTt, particularly Serres. Incredibly, it also include d meat and potatoes the perfect ingredients for soup. The voyage was piloted by Professor Jason Young, who helped me to realize that Ideas rather than plans work society. Youngs use of the idea is synonymous with my use of the message within the tale and it also acted much like the diagram from Deleuze on Bacon. Below is a list of the areas of scie nce within the encyclopedia that I encountered along my journey.

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70 Biopharmaceuticals: Insertion/ injection of addi tives helpful to human health. The Axolotl Poultry genetics Scientific uncertainty: Uncertainty is a common feat ure of regulatory decision making. Error Bias: The potential harms or benefits of an activity. Molecular breeding by DNA shuffling will result in at least some out comes that fundamentally are uncertain and always will be virtuall y impossible to predict. We will remain ignorant of them until they occur, and even then, might only identify them if we search in sensitive ways. Attempts to estimate the probability of harm (or benefit) from such a fundamentally uncertain activity must be undertaken with great care si nce ignorance of ignorance might lead to serious errors. The kind and de gree of scientific uncertainty have implications for the processes agencies use or devise to r each sound and publicly acceptable decisions. Cell replication Biopsy For a more comprehensive understanding of the wo rk that took place with in the Ideas Work Society studio please see Object 5-3. Tale of a Journey, Featherless Chicken Soup for the Suburban Sprawl Considering the econom ic contributions ma de by the poultry industry and Americans undeniable love of chicken, I found it fitting that in September of 2005, my studio work joined in the celebration of September as national chicken month. In its 16th year of observance this celebration sought to highlight the health benef its, ease of preparation, and the versatility of chicken. Avigdor Chaner, with his molecular shuffling of chicken DNA was a guest of honor. Thus, we now enjoy, The featherl ess chicken, an idea of the year as advertized by New York Times magazine. An error bias, the kind and degree of scientif ic uncertainty an activity might have, has implications for the process agencies use to reach sound and publicly acceptable decisions. This notion of public acceptance is interesting in its ability to accelerate and decelerate.

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71 Regarding the featherless chicken, it seems that societies rather than agencies make these decisions based on a system of want and desire in correlation with the speeds that these desirables are able to reach them The featherless chicken acts as an agent of understanding this condition. The injection of Chaners accepted oddity into the media created a delay of kind within evaluation, accelerating this sliding precauti onary error bias window, thus pushing public acceptance. When I look at this red bird, the abstr act notion of farm no longer registers. I feel the reality of my situatio n, and position within it. This is a quote I came across onl ine which sited Chaners name: And then theres parsley. What a great bit of design: grow some parsley in the garden and you can cut some off, happy in knowledge it will grow back. How about a sheep with the same feature? Ill bet Chaner is already working on it. Just spli ce in some axolotl genes and we could all keep one sheep in the backyard. Leg of lamb for dinner? Just hand me that knife, and give me a moment. Axolotl is studied for its rapid regeneration rate. It is in a sense, a tiger salamander which never undergoes metamorphoses, a trait which is known as neoteny. It reach es sexual maturity within the larvae stage of de velopment. They live much longer than metamorphosis salamanders, and can regenerate entire limbs. The axolotl gene is studied very heavily for this reason understandably. Tale: Step 1 Candidates are asked to construct a diagram in order to develop an image category. The candidate will know it is done when something appears. The diagram, or catastrophe, is used to battle figurative givens which exist within the candidate.

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72 The diagram is indeed chaos, a catastrophe, but it is also a germ of order or rhythm. It is a violent chaos in relation to the figurative givens, but it is a ge rm of rhythm in relation to the new order of painting. As Bacon says, it unlocks areas of sensation.8 In developing the diagram and image category, the candidate will find a rhythm or measure which is specific to them. That is, they will develop an ability to unlock areas of sensation which move beyond simple illustration. At the moment something appears within the candidates gathering, they will have moved from th e synthesis of percep tion, into aesthetic comprehension (rhythm), to the catastrophe or chaos, and then back again. In order to be considered for the competition the candidate must trust each level within his/her being to create such a gathering principle. The image category should acts as an inte rface guide or legend which will allow the organizing principle of the creati on to be discernable. This is very different from finding measure for a design or composition from normative external sources such as Euclidean Geometry or the golden section. The developmen t of an image category necessitates that the candidate rethink architecture thr ough all of the realms of knowledge and life in order to form a violent practice of learning how to forget. Tale: Step 2 Soupiness is a result of a shift from description into action. Serres gathering mechanism takes description into the realm of procedure by creati ng a recipe for soup. In the development of an assignment (a recipe) morphological concerns ease up and inte rest in informing sets in. In other words, meaning of process is more important in the act of developing the recipe than the meaning of form. Because Serres and Bacon focus on the recipe rather than the form of how the information is presented, th ey are demonstrating a unique practice They have discovered an 8Gilles Deleuze, Francis Bacon the Logic of Sensation, p. 102.

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73 understanding of another part of themselves by practicing their ability to forget the givens. The candidate must present their propo sal only in the form of a recipe for soup (an assignment). In addition, the recipe should come with a tale to tell about the journey whic h was taken to develop this recipe. To insure that focus remains on the individual, messages must be tracked and explained. The first and second place recipients will demonstrate that they understand the latent structuring reality which operates more deeply at the root of knowledge; there are reservoirs for the circulation of the soup. Object 5-1. Inner disturbance web site. Th is was the final project from Imaging Metaphysics, the course taken with Greg Ul mer. This site is a critical piece in understanding the breath of this thesis work. It marks the first step within the tale of my heuretic generator. Object 5-2. This was the first project from I m aging Metaphysics. The project, using art as analogy, is suggestive of an art gallery presenting Heideggers Introduction to Metaphysics and Gilles Deleuzes Francis Bacon: The Logic of Sensation. This site sets up the work Object 5-3. Ideas Work Society project work an d m aterials. This link provides a glimpse of the journey that I took, compri sing the science portion of analogy as described above. This work further expresses th e story of my journey as de scribed above. It is through this work that I began to see urbanism in a soupy way rather than viewing it as an author.

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74 LIST OF REFERENCES Bachelard, Gaston. The Poetics o f Space. Boston: Beacon Press, 1958. Barthes, Roland. Michelet. New York: Hill and Wang, 1987. Bear, Mark, Barry Connors, and Michael Paradiso. Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2001. Benjamin, Walter. Illuminations Essays and Reflections. Edited by Hannah Arendt. Translated by Harry Zohn. New York: Scocken Books, 1968. Betsky, Aaron. Architecture Must Burn. Corte Madera: Gingko Press, 2000. Bois, Samuel J. The Art of Awaareness. Dubuque: WM.C. Brown Company Publishers, 1966. Caicco, Gregory. Architecture, Ethics, and the Personhood of Place: University Press of New England, 2007. De Certeau, Michel. The Practice of Everyday Life. Translated by Steven Rendall. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1984. Deleuze, Gilles. Francis Bacon The Logice of Sensation. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2003. Gausa, Manuel. Operative Optimism. Edited by Susanna Cros. Tran slated by Paul Hammond and Grahm Thomson. Barcelona: Actar, 2005. Hayakawa, Samuel Ichiye and Alan Hayakawa. Language in Thought and Action. San Diego: Harcourt Inc., 1991. Hayden, Dolores. A field guide to sprawl. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2004. Heidegger, Martin. Introduction to Metaphysics. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2000. Korzybski, Alfred. Science and Sanity. New York: Institute of General Semantics, 1958. Kwinter, Sanford. "The Hammer and the Song." OASE Architectural Journal No. 48 1998: 3143. Lerup, Lars and Michael Bell. Louis Kahn (Architecture at Rice S.) : Conversations with Students (Architecture at Rice). New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 1999. Rattenbury, Kester. This is Not Architecture: Media Constructions. London: Routledge, 2001.

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75 Serres, Michel. Hermes Literature, Science, Philosophy. Baltimore: The John Hopkins University Press, 1992. Ulmer, Gregory. Heuretics the Logic of Invention. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994. Ungers, Oswald. Morphologie City Metaphors. Cologne: Knig, 1982.

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76 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH My interest in Am erican urbanism was accele rated by exposure to the larger interest in the perimeter at the University of Michig an, marked specifically by the course offering, SUB_situation urbanism big box, by Jason Young. W ithin this course I was first exposed to the true benefit of trading in or out of a certain ment ality. We were encouraged to temporarily break some modes of thinking in order to explore new ones. Because I was well versed in this mind set, the heuretics work that I began with Ulmer last spring was exciting. I am currently pursuing a Master of Science in Archite ctural Studies, with emphasis on pedagogy.