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Multiple Tail Models Including Inverse Measures for Structural Design under Uncertainties

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0021707/00001

Material Information

Title: Multiple Tail Models Including Inverse Measures for Structural Design under Uncertainties
Physical Description: 1 online resource (126 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Ramu, Palaniappan
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: inverse, optimization, reliability, tail
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Aerospace Engineering thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Sampling-based reliability estimation with expensive computer models may be computationally prohibitive due to a large number of required simulations. One way to alleviate the computational expense is to extrapolate reliability estimates from observed levels to unobserved levels. Classical tail modeling techniques provide a class of models to enable this extrapolation using asymptotic theory by approximating the tail region of the cumulative distribution function (CDF). This work proposes three alternate tail extrapolation techniques including inverse measures that can complement classical tail modeling. The proposed approach, multiple tail models, applies the two classical and three alternate extrapolation techniques simultaneously to estimate inverse measures at the extrapolation regions and use the median as the best estimate. It is observed that the range of the five estimates can be used as a good approximation of the error associated with the median estimate. Accuracy and computational efficiency are competing factors in selecting sample size. Yet, as our numerical studies reveal, the accuracy lost to the reduction of computational power is very small in the proposed method. The method is demonstrated on standard statistical distributions and complex engineering examples.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Palaniappan Ramu.
Thesis: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2007.
Local: Adviser: Kim, Nam Ho.
Local: Co-adviser: Haftka, Raphael T.

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2007
System ID: UFE0021707:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0021707/00001

Material Information

Title: Multiple Tail Models Including Inverse Measures for Structural Design under Uncertainties
Physical Description: 1 online resource (126 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Ramu, Palaniappan
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: inverse, optimization, reliability, tail
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Aerospace Engineering thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Sampling-based reliability estimation with expensive computer models may be computationally prohibitive due to a large number of required simulations. One way to alleviate the computational expense is to extrapolate reliability estimates from observed levels to unobserved levels. Classical tail modeling techniques provide a class of models to enable this extrapolation using asymptotic theory by approximating the tail region of the cumulative distribution function (CDF). This work proposes three alternate tail extrapolation techniques including inverse measures that can complement classical tail modeling. The proposed approach, multiple tail models, applies the two classical and three alternate extrapolation techniques simultaneously to estimate inverse measures at the extrapolation regions and use the median as the best estimate. It is observed that the range of the five estimates can be used as a good approximation of the error associated with the median estimate. Accuracy and computational efficiency are competing factors in selecting sample size. Yet, as our numerical studies reveal, the accuracy lost to the reduction of computational power is very small in the proposed method. The method is demonstrated on standard statistical distributions and complex engineering examples.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Palaniappan Ramu.
Thesis: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2007.
Local: Adviser: Kim, Nam Ho.
Local: Co-adviser: Haftka, Raphael T.

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2007
System ID: UFE0021707:00001


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1fd7c909d9797eeb033d07d7407aeae1abb39ca9







MULTIPLE TAIL MODELS INCLUDING INVERSE MEASURES FOR STRUCTURAL
DESIGN UNDER UNCERTAINTIES




















By

PALANIAPPAN RAMU


A DISSERTATION PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT
OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

2007


































O 2007 Palaniappan Ramu



































Dedicated to my parents Meenakshi and Ramu










ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This dissertation would not have been possible if not for the help, support and motivation

by my teachers, family and friends. I am extremely thankful to my advisors Dr. Nam Ho Kim

and Dr. Raphael T. Haftka for, providing me this wonderful opportunity to pursue a Ph.D, their

constant encouragement, patience and excellent guidance. I learnt a lot both in academics and

personal life from them. They have been more than mere advisors friends, philosophers and

mentors. I have always admired their in-depth understanding and knowledge and feel that I am

fortunate to have worked under their guidance.

I would like to thank Dr. Peter Ifju, Dr. Tony Schmitz and Dr. Stanislay Uryasev for

agreeing to serve on my committee, reviewing my dissertation and for providing constructive

criticism that helped to enhance the quality of this work. I would like to thank Dr.Choi,

Dr.Missoum, Dr.Qu, and Dr.Youn, for collaborating with me. I also thank the staff of the

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering department for their help with administrative support

Thanks are due to my former and present colleagues in the Structural and Multidisciplinary

Optimization group. I thank all my friends, especially Gators for Asha group members, for

making my life outside work wonderful and enj oyable. I greatly appreciate the financial support

that I received from the Institute for Future Space Transport

Last, but not the least, I would not have completed this work if not for the unconditional

love, emotional understanding and support of my family. To you, I dedicate this work!












TABLE OF CONTENTS


page

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS .............. ...............4.....


LIST OF TABLES ............ ...... ._._ ...............7....


LIST OF FIGURES .............. ...............9.....


NOMENCLATURE ........._..... ...............11.____........


AB S TRAC T ............._. .......... ..............._ 13...


CHAPTER


1 INTRODUCTION ................. ...............14.......... ......


2 RELIABILITY BASED DESIGN OPTIMIZATION ................. ............... ......... ...18


Introducti on ................. ...............18.................
Standard Formulations ................. ...............18.................
Moment-Based Methods .............. ...............21....
Monte Carlo Simulation .............. ...............22....


3 INVERSE RELIABILITY MEASURES .............. ...............26....


Literature Review .............. ...............26....

Birger Safety Factor............... ...............31.
Probabilistic Sufficiency Factor .............. ...............31....
Probabilistic Performance Measure ................. ...............33........... ....
Inverse Measure Calculation ................. .. ........ ............3
Simulation Approach- Monte Carlo Simulation ................. ...............35.............
Analytical Approach- Moment-based Methods .............. ...............37....
Reliability based Design Optimization with Inverse Measures ................. ............... ....39
Beam Design Example ............... ...............39....
Design for Stress Constraint ................. ...............40................
Comparison of Inverse Measures ................ ............ ......... ....... ........ ... ...... ..........41
Use of PSF in Estimating the Required Change in Weight to Achieve a Safe Design ..........42
System Reliability Estimation Using PSF and MCS ................ .............. ......... .....43
Design for System Reliability by MCS and PSF ................. ...............44.............

4 TAIL MODELLING AND RELIABILITY ANALYSIS ................... ...............4


Tail Equivalence and Generalized Extreme Value Theory .............. ..... ............... 4
Generalized Pareto Distribution .............. ...............50....
Threshold Selection .............. ...............52....
Parameter Estimation ................ .............54..................











Maximum Likelihood Estimation............... ...............5
Least Square Regression............... .. ... ...... ................5
Accuracy and Convergence Studies for the Quantile Estimation............... ...............5
Cantilever Beam Example .............. ...............57....
Tuned Mass-Damper Example .............. ...............59....
Alternate Tail Extrapolation Schemes ............ .....__ ...............61..

5 MULTIPLE TAIL MODELS .............. ...............71....


M multiple Tail M odel ............ ..... .._ ...............71...
Numerical Examples.................... .............7
Standard Statistical Distributions .............. ...............72....
Engineering Exam ples .............. ...... ....... ...... ...._ .. .. .. ..........7
Application of multiple tail models for reliability estimation of a cantilever beam........76
Application of multiple tail models for reliability estimation of a composite panel.......77

CONCLUSION S............... ..............9


APPENDIX


A PSF ESTIMATION FOR A SYSTEM RELIABILITY ....._____ .........__ ...............94


B GENERALIZED EXTREME VALUE THEORY ....__ ......_____ ...........___.........9

C MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD ESTIMATION ....__ ......_____ .......___ ............9


D ERROR ANALYSIS FOR GPD .............. ...............100....


E ACCURACY AND CONVERGENCE STUDIES FOR NORMAL AND
LOGNORMAL DISTRIBUTIONS ................. ...............103................

F ACCURACY AND CONVERGENCE STUDIES FOR THE CANTILEVER BEAM......108


Stress Failure M ode ................ ...............108................
Deflection Failure Mode ................. ...............108................


G STATISTICAL DISTRIBUTIONS ERROR PLOTS ................. .............................111

REFERENCES .............. ...............121....


BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH ................. ...............126......... ......











LIST OF TABLES


Table page

3-1 Different approaches to prescribe the probabilistic constraint .............. ....................3

3-2 Random variables for beam problem ................. ...............40...............

3-3 Comparison of optimum designs for the stress constraint ................. .......................41

3-4 Comparison of inverse measures for w=2.4526 and t-3.8884 (stress constraint) .............42

3-5 Comparison of MPP obtained from calculation of PSF. ......____ ... ....._ ..............42

3-6 Design for System Reliability by PSF, Qu and Haftka (2004)** ........... .....................45

5-2 Summary of the performance of individual methods and MTM for different
di stributi ons ................. ...............75........... ....

5-3 Summary of the error to range ratio for different distributions ................. ................ ..75

5-4 PSF reciprocal estimates and standard deviation at different reliability indices ..............77

5-5 Mechanical properties of the composite laminates ................. ............... ......... ...80

5-6 Coefficient of variation for random material properties ................ ............... ...._...80

5-7 Mean of random variables .......... ...._._.....__ ................ ........._.__.....80

5-8 Deterministic optima found by Qu et al (2003)............... ...............80.

5-9 Composite laminate. S, reciprocal estimates and standard deviation at different
reliability indices............... ...............80

A-1 Distribution of random variables. Multiple failure modes example ............... ............._....95

A-2 Contribution of failure modes to the system failure ................. ............... ........ ...95

A-3 P SF at different target failure prob abiliti es .....__.....___ ..........._ .........9


D-1 Modelling error(F,(z)-F-, (z)*....... ) ..... .. ......... ........ ...._ .... ........102


D-2 Sampling error (F ~(z)* -F ~(zS) )........_........._ ......... ...._..... ...._........102

E-1 Accuracy of the tail modeling approach to estimate quantiles. Normal distribution....... 104











E-2 Accuracy of the tail modeling approach to estimate quantiles. LogNormal
di stributi on ................. ...............105................

E-3 Accuracy of the tail modeling approach to estimate quantiles. Higher thresholds.
LogNormal distribution .............. ...............106....










LIST OF FIGURES


figure page

2-1 Reliability analysis and MPP. Subscript refers to iteration number ................. ...............25

3-1 Schematic probability density of the safety factor S. ............. ...............46.....

3-2 Schematic probability density of the limit state function. ................ .......................46

3-3 Illustration of the calculation of PPM with Monte Carlo Simulation for the linear
performance function ................. ...............47.................

3-4 Inverse reliability analysis and MPP for target failure probability 0.00135 ( P = 3)........47

3-5 Cantilever beam subj ected to horizontal and vertical loads. ...........__... ...._._...........47

4-1 Tail modeling of F(u) using the threshold u. The region of y>0 is failure ........................64

4-2 Convergence of PSF at different thresholds. A) MLE B)Regression. Cantilever beam
system failure mode. 500 Samples. 100 repetitions............... ..............6

4-3 Tuned vibration absorber ........._.__ ......._._ ...............66...

4-4 Normalized amplitude vs rl and rz............... ...............66...

4-5 Contour of the normalized amplitude ................. ......... ...............67. ...

4-6 Convergence of PSF at different thresholds. Tuned Mass Damper ................. ...............68

4-7 Tuned Mass Damper. Comparison of tail models using regression and ML method...._...69

4-8 Transformation of the CDF of PSF reciprocal (S,-). A) CDF of S,. B) Inverse
Standard normal cumulative distribution function applied to the CDF. C )
Logarithmic transformation applied to the reliability index. .............. ....................7

5-1 Lognormal distribution. Classical tail modeling techniques MLE and Regression........8 1

5-2 Lognormal distribution. Linear fit to tail (LT) and Quadratic fit to half of the data
(QH) ........._.__...... ._ __ ...............82....

5-3 Lognormal distribution. Quadratic fit to the tail (QT) ................. ......... ................83

5-4 Lognormal distribution. Multiple tail models ......___ .... ... ._ ......___........8

5-5 Lognormal distribution. Multiple tail models-extrapolation region ................. ...............85

5-6 Normal distribution. 1000 repetitions. Boxplot comparison of eind and eMTM at
different reliability indices ................. ...............86........... ....











5-7 Normal distribution. Boxplot of r ratio. ............. ...............87.....


5-8 Cantilever Beam. 1000 repetitions. Boxplot comparison of eind and eMTM at different
reliability indices............... ...............88

5-9 Normal QQ plot of the residuals for the normal distribution ................. .....................89

5-10 Cantilever beam. Boxplot of rl ratio ................. ...............90........... ..


5-11 Geometry and loading for the composite laminate. X-hoop direction, Y-axial
direction .............. ...............90....

5-12 Composite laminate of cryogenic tank. 1000 repetitions. Boxplot comparison of eind
and eMTM at different reliability indices... ........... ...............91......

5-13 Composite laminate of cryogenic tank. Boxplot of rl ratio. ................ ..................9


A-1 Two variable system. Algebraic multiple limit state functions example...........................95

F-1 Convergence of PSF at different thresholds. A) MLE B) Regression. Cantilever
beam stress failure mode. 500 Samples. 100 repetitions .............. .....................0

F-2 Convergence of PSF at different thresholds. A) MLE B) Regression. Cantilever
beam deflection failure mode. 500 Samples. 100 repetition ................. .........._.. .....110

G-1 Lognormal distribution ............ ...... .__ .............. 112..

G-2 Gamma Distribution ........._.___..... .___ ...............113...

G-3 Extreme Value type 1 Distribution ................. ......... ...............114 ...

G-4 Uniform Distribution. ................ ...............115................

G-5 Rayleigh Distribution. ........._.___..... .__. ...............116...

G-6 Exponential Distribution. ........._.___..... .__. ...............117...

G-7 Lognormal Distribution. ............ ...... ...............118..

G-8 Gamma Distribution ........._.___..... .___ ...............118...

G-9 Extreme Value-Type 1 Distribution. ............ .....__ ...............119

G-10 Uniform Distribution. ........._.___......_. ...............119....

G-11 Rayleigh Distribution. ........._.___..... .__. ...............120...

G-12 Exponential Distribution. ........._.___..... .__. ...............120...











NOMENCLATURE

A Cross sectional area

C Capacity

C Scaling factor

CDF Cumulative Density Function

DUU Design Under Uncertainties

FORM First Order Reliability Method

G Limit state function

GPD Generalized pareto distribution

M Number of failure modes

MCS Monte Carlo Simulation

MPP Most Probable Point

MPPIR MPP Inverse Reliability

MPTP Minimum Performance Target Point

MSE Mean square error

PMA Performance Measure Approach

PPM Probabilistic Performance Measure

PSF Probabilistic Sufficiency Factor

R Response

RBDO Reliability based Design Optimization

RIA Reliability Index Approach

RSA Response Surface Approximation

U Variables in standard normal space

u Threshold value

t Thickness









w Width

X Load in x direction

Y Load in Y direction

/7 Reliability Index

(D Standard Normal Cumulative Density Function

cr Scale parameter

5 Shape parameter

z Exceedance data

Fu(z) Conditional CDF

F~; (z) Conditional CDF approximated by GPD

Pftarget Target probability of failure









Abstract of Dissertation Presented to the Graduate School
of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the
Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy

MULTIPLE TAIL MODELS INCLUDING INVERSE MEASURES FOR STRUCTURAL
DESIGN UNDER UNCERTAINTIES


By

Palaniappan Ramu

December 2007

Chair: Nam Ho Kim
Cochair: Raphael T. Haftka
Major: Aerospace Engineering

Sampling-based reliability estimation with expensive computer models may be

computationally prohibitive due to a large number of required simulations. One way to alleviate

the computational expense is to extrapolate reliability estimates from observed levels to

unobserved levels. Classical tail modeling techniques provide a class of models to enable this

extrapolation using asymptotic theory by approximating the tail region of the cumulative

distribution function (CDF). This work proposes three alternate tail extrapolation techniques

including inverse measures that can complement classical tail modeling. The proposed approach,

multiple tail models, applies the two classical and three alternate extrapolation techniques

simultaneously to estimate inverse measures at the extrapolation regions and use the median as

the best estimate. It is observed that the range of the five estimates can be used as a good

approximation of the error associated with the median estimate. Accuracy and computational

efficiency are competing factors in selecting sample size. Yet, as our numerical studies reveal,

the accuracy lost to the reduction of computational power is very small in the proposed method.

The method is demonstrated on standard statistical distributions and complex engineering

examples.









CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION

Uncertainty is an acknowledged phenomenon in the process of structural design. In an

optimization framework design under uncertainties refers to a safe design that not only needs to

be optimal but should also warrant survivability against uncertainties. Traditionally safety factors

were used to account for the uncertainties. However, use of safety factors does not usually lead

to minimum cost designs for a given level of safety because different structural members or

different failure modes require different safety factors. Alternately, probabilistic approaches offer

techniques to characterize the uncertainties using a statistical method and have the potential to

provide safer designs at a given cost. However, the probabilistic approaches require solving an

expensive, complex optimization problem that needs robust formulations and efficient

computational techniques for stable and accelerated convergence. In addition, they also require

statistical information which may be expensive to obtain.

Structural reliability analysis requires the assessment of the performance function which

dictates the behavior of the structure. The performance function is called the limit state function

which is typically expressed as the difference between the capacity (e.g, yield strength, allowable

vibration level) and the response of the system (e.g, stress, actual vibration). Approaches

available for reliability assessment and analysis can be widely classified as analytical and

simulation approaches. Analytical approaches are simple to implement but are mostly limited to

single failure modes, whereas simulation methods like Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) are

computationally intensive but can handle multiple failure modes. Moreover, they can handle any

type of limit state functions unlike analytical approaches which are mostly appropriate for linear

limit state functions. Most real life applications exhibit multiple failure modes and the limit state

function is not available explicitly in closed form. Since there is no information on nonlinearity









of the limit state function, MCS is the obvious choice in such situations. In reliability-based

design optimization, a widely used probabilistic optimization approach (Rackwitz, 2000) in

structural engineering, reliability analysis is an iterative process and using crude MCS is

computationally prohibitive. Researchers develop variants of MCS or other approximation

methods like response surface that replaces the reliability analysis and obviate the need to

repeatedly access the expensive computer models

In reliability based design context, high reliability, typical of aerospace applications

translates to small probability in the tails of the statistical distributions. Reliability analysis when

dealing with high reliability (or low failure probability) designs is mostly dependent on how the

tails of the random variables behave. In few cases, the safety levels can vary by an order of

magnitude with slight modifications in the tails of the response variables (Caers and Maes,

1998). Therefore, the tails need to be modeled accurately. Limitations in computational power

prevent us in employing direct simulation methods to model the tails. One way to alleviate the

computational expense is to extrapolate into high reliability levels with limited data at lower

reliability levels. Statistical techniques from extreme value theory referred to as classical tail

modeling techniques here are available to perform this extrapolation. They are based on the

concept of approximating the tail portion of the cumulative distribution function (CDF) with a

generalized pareto distribution (GPD).

In structural engineering, reliability is measured by quantities like probability of failure or

reliability index. Recently, alternate safety measures like the inverse measures in performance

space have cornered enough interest because of their multifaceted advantages (Ramu et al,

2006). The inverse measures in performance space ties the concepts of safety factor and target

failure probability. The inverse measures translate the deficiency in failure probability to









deficiency in performance measure and hence provide a more quantitative measure of the

resources needed to satisfy safety requirements. Among the several advantages they exhibit,

inverse measures like probabilistic sufficiency factor (PSF) help in stable and accelerated

convergence in optimization, better response surface approximations compared to surfaces fit to

other reliability measures. Since inverse measure exhibit several advantages, its usefulness in tail

modeling is explored in this work. Here we develop 3 alternate tail extrapolation schemes

including inverse measures that can complement the classical tail modeling techniques. The

alternate extrapolation schemes are based on variable transformations and approximating the

relationship between the inverse measure and transformed variable.

The primary motivation of this work is to develop an efficient reliability estimation

procedure employing tail modeling techniques including inverse measures that can estimate

reliability measures corresponding to high reliability with samples that are only sufficient to

assess reliability measure corresponding to low reliability levels. This is a tradeoff between

accuracy and computational power. Yet, as the studies reveal, the accuracy lost to the reduction

of computational power is very reasonable. The reduction in computational cost is about a

minimum of 3 orders of magnitude for the same level of accuracy.

Goel et al., (2006) developed a method to extend the utility of an ensemble of surrogates.

When faced with multiple surrogates, they explored the possibility of using the best surrogate or

a weighted average surrogate model instead of individual surrogate models. In a similar fashion,

in order to take advantage of both the classical tail modeling techniques and alternate

extrapolation schemes and still come up with the best prediction, we propose to apply all the

techniques simultaneously and use the median of the five estimates as the best estimate. Here, we

call using all the techniques simultaneously as multiple tail models (MTM). In addition to









arriving at the estimate, the range of the five techniques can be used to approximate the error

associated with the median estimate. Moreover, the MTM approach can be used to replace the

reliability analysis in reliability based design framework.









CHAPTER 2
RELIABILITY BASED DESIGN OPTIMIZATION

Introduction

Optimization is the process of minimizing a cost which is a function of design variables

(and other variables) subj ect to constraints that prescribe the design requirement. Often times, the

variables involved are uncertain and probabilistic approaches are called for to account for the

uncertainty as an alternate to the traditional safety factor approach, to obtain better designs.

Several probabilistic approaches has been proposed in the last decade like Robust Design

Optimization (Phadke, 1989, Gu, 2000), Reliability-based Design Optimization(Frangopal, 1985,

Tu, 1999), Fuzzy optimization (Sakawa 1993, Maglaras et al, 1997), Reliability design using

evidence theory (Soundappan et al., 2004). Reliability-based Design Optimization (RBDO) is

widely used because it allows the designer to prescribe the level of reliability required. This

section presents a review of the standard reliability-based design formulations and reliability

estimation methods.

Standard Formulations

Primarily, reliability-based design consists of minimizing a cost function while satisfying

reliability constraints. The reliability constraints are based on the failure probability

corresponding to each failure mode or a single failure mode describing the system failure. The

estimation of failure probability is usually performed by reliability analysis.

In structural engineering, the system performance criterion is described by the limit state

function which is typically expressed as the difference between the capacity of the system and

the response of the system, which is expressed as:

G(x) = G,(x) G(x) (2-1)
where, G is the limit state function and Gc, Gr are the capacity and the response respectively. All

the three quantities are functions of a vector x which consists of design (and random) variables









and other parameters. The system is considered failed if G < 0 and safe if G > 0. If x is random,

the design is considered a failure if the probability of failure is unacceptably high.

Often times, RBDO is formulated as a double loop (nested loop) problem. The outer loop

performs the optimization with respect to design variables, while the inner loop performs the

reliability analysis estimating the failure probability. This is mathematically expressed as:

min cost(x)

subj ect to Pf = P(G" < 0) <; P~,, ,, j = 1, 2...nna(22
where the cost is a function of design variables, nm is the number of failure modes, G is the limit

state function. Pyre,,wer is the prescribed failure probability levels to which the designer intends to

design the structure. Here, estimation of probabilistic constraint requires reliability analysis.

Often times the magnitude of failure probability is low and hence engineers prefer to

work with reliability index as the alternate measure of reliability. The reliability index and failure

probability are related as:

Pf = CI(-f ) (2-3)
where, # is the standard normal cumulative density function (CDF). Since the inverse of the

standard normal CDF is required to estimate the reliability index, it is an inverse measure.

Probabilistic constraints in Eq.(2-2) can be written as:

P" >Pt,,,t"(2-4)
Employing Eq. (2-4) for prescribing the probabilistic constraint is called the Reliability Index

Approach (RIA). In RIA, the failure reliability measure is usually calculated via FORM which is

an iterative process and so computationally expensive and sometimes features convergence

problems (Tu et al., 1999) In order to reduce the computational cost of double loop, various

techniques has been proposed which can be classified into two categories as: (i) techniques that

improve the efficiency of uncertainty analysis like fast probability integration (Wu 1994) and

two-point adaptive non linear approximations (Grandhi and Wang 1998) (ii) techniques that









modify the formulation of the probabilistic constraints, for instance, using inverse reliability

measures in the probabilistic constraint. Sometimes, researchers formulate a single loop RBDO

that avoids nested loops. The idea of single loop formulations rests on the basis of formulating

the probabilistic constraint as deterministic constraints by either approximating the Karush-

Kuhn-Tucker conditions at the MPP or approximating the relationship between probabilistic

design and deterministic design safety factors. A detailed survey of both single and double loop

methods in RBDO is presented in the literature survey of Chapter 3.

Kharmanda et al (2002, 2004, and 2007) developed RBDO solution procedures relative to two

views points: reliability and optimization. From an optimization view point, Kharmanda et al

(2002) developed a hybrid method based on simultaneous application of the reliability and the

optimization problem that reduced the computational time. The hybrid method, compared to

classical RBDO, minimizes a new form of the obj ective function which is expressed as the

product of the original obj ective function and the reliability index in the hybrid space. Since the

minimization of the obj ective function is carried out in both the deterministic variables and

random variable space, it is referred to as hybrid design space. The reliability index in the hybrid

space is the distance between the optimum point and the design point in the hybrid space

However, the hybrid RBDO problem was more complex than that of the deterministic design and

may not lead to local optima In order to address both the challenges, Kharmanda et al (2004)

propose an optimum safety factor approach that computes safety factors satisfying a reliability

level without demanding additional computing cost for the reliability evaluation. Kharmanda et

al (2007) developed the hybrid design spaces and optimal safety factor equations for three

distributions namely, the normal, lognormal and uniform. The optimal safety factors are

computed by sensitivity analysis of the limit state function with respect to the random variables.










They report that the optimal safety factor approach has several advantages like smaller number

of optimization variables, good convergence stability, lower computing time and satisfaction of

required reliability levels. In order to estimate the reliability measure for reliability analysis, one

need to use analytical or simulation approaches which are described below.

Moment-Based Methods

In standard reliability techniques, an arbitrary random vector x is mapped to an

independent standard normal vector U (variables with normal distribution of zero mean and unit

variance). This transformation is known as Rosenblatt transformation (Rosenblatt, 1952,

Melchers, 1999, pp. 118-120). The limit state function in the standard normal space can be

obtained as G(U) = G(T(X)) where T is the transformation. If the limit state function in the

standard normal space is affine, i.e., if G(U) = aTU + y then failure probability can be exactly


calculated as P, = O -I This is the basis for moment based methods.



Moment-based methods provide for less expensive calculation of the probability of failure

compared to simulation methods, although they are limited to a single failure mode. The First

Order Reliability Method (FORM) is the most widely used moment-based technique. FORM is

based on the idea of the linear approximation of the limit state function and is accurate as long as

the curvature of the limit state function is not too high. In the standard normal space the point on

the first order limit state function at which the distance from the origin is minimum is the MPP.

When the limit state has a significant curvature, second order methods can be used. The

Second Order Reliability Method (SORM) approximates the measure of reliability more

accurately by considering the effect of the curvature of the limit state function (Melchers, 1999,

pp 127-130).









Figure 2-1 illustrates the concept of the reliability index and MPP search for a two variable

case in the standard normal space. In reliability analysis, concerns are first focused on the

G(U) = 0 curve. Next, the minimum distance to the origin is sought. The corresponding point is

the MPP because it contributes most to failure. This process can be mathematically expressed as:


To find /7 = U1


Minimize IT
(2-5)
Subject to G(U)= 0
Where U* is the MPP. The calculation of the failure probability is based on linearizing the limit

function at the MPP. It is to be noted that reliability index is the distance to the limit state

function from the origin in the standard normal space. That is, it is an inverse measure in the

input space (standard normal).

Monte Carlo Simulation

Variants of Monte Carlo methods were originally practiced under more generic names such

as statistical sampling. The name and the method were made famous by early pioneers such as

Stainslaw Ulam and John von Neumann and is a reference to the famous casino in Monaco. The

methods use of randomness and repetitive nature is similar to the casino' s activities. It is

discussed in Metropolis (1987) that the method earns its name from the fact that Stainslaw Ulam

had an uncle who would borrow money from relative just to go to Monte Carlo.

Monte Carlo integration is essentially numerical quadrature using random numbers. Monte

Carlo integration methods are algorithms for the approximate evaluation of definite integrals,

usually multidimensional ones. The usual algorithms evaluate the integrand at a regular grid.

Monte Carlo methods, however, randomly choose the points at which the integrand is evaluated.

Monte Carlo Methods are based on the analogy between volume and probability. Monte Carlo

calculates the volume of a set by interpreting the volume as probability. Simply put, it means,

22









sampling from all the possible outcomes and considering the fraction of random draws that in a

given set as an estimate of the set' s volume. The law of large numbers ensures that this estimate

converges to the correct value as the number of draws increases. The central limit theorem

provides information about the likely magnitude of the error in the estimate after finite number

of draws.

For example, consider estimating the integral of a function f over a unit interval. The


a =f (x)dx (2-6)

integral can be expressed as an expectation E;[ f(Ul)], with Uuniformly distributed between 0

and 1. The Monte Carlo estimate for the integral can be obtained as:


& = f(U,)(2-7)

If fis continuous and integrable over [0, 1], then, by the strong law of large numbers, the

estimate in Eq. (2-7) converges to the actual value with probability 1 as n+ 00. In fact, if fis

square integrable and we set


"f = ( f(x) a2- )d (2-8)

then the error & a in the Monte Carlo estmate is approximately normally distributed with zero

mean and standard deviation of of /~ the quality of this approximation improving as n

increases. The parameter of in Eq.(2-8) will not be known in a real setting but can be

approximated by the sample standard deviation. Thus, we not only obtain the estimate but also

the error contained in the estimate. The form of the standard error is the main feature of the

MCS. Reducing this error to half require about increasing the number of points by four;

increasing the precision by one decimal point requires 100 times as many points. Yet, the

advantage of MCS lies in the fact that its O(n- /) convergence rate is not restricted to integrals









over the unit interval and can be extended to any dimension. The standard error will still have the

same form irrespective of dimension. This advantage is unlike other numerical methods. Thus,

Monte Carlo simulation is attractive to solve integrals in higher dimension.

In structural reliability estimation, MCS involves sampling each random variable to give a

sample value. Then, the limit state function is computed at every realization. If the limit state is

violated, the structure has failed. The experiment is repeated many times with a randomly chosen

vector. If Ntrials are conducted, the estimate Pf of the probability of failure is given

approximately as:

n(G(x,)~ < )
Pf = N (2-9)
Where n(G(x) <; 0) denotes the number of trials n for which the structure failed. The number of

trails Nis related to the desired accuracy of failure probability. MCS need at least 100*N

samples when the failure probability is of the order of l over N. One can find the standard

deviation of failure probability in Eq. (2-9) using the following expression:


Pf (1 Pf )
0-= (2-10)
There are many variants to the abovementioned crude MCS. Researchers use several

variance reduction techniques like importance sampling (Glasserman, 2004) to make better use

of MCS and extract more information from the same level of simulation. Importance sampling

requires one to find a sampling PDF which uses the information of greatest probability density in

the failure zone. This is conceptually similar to MPP which is essentially a point that contributes

most to failure. An alternate formulation of the MCS is used by Smarslok et al (2006) to exploit

the advantage of separable Monte Carlo simulations. This integration method takes advantage of

a special form of the limit state function in which the limit state is composed of difference

between capacity and response.























ff2 (GU)=0(linear)
Failure Region
G(U)=0.2 G(U)<0





Figure 2-1. Reliability analysis and MPP. Sub script refers to iteration number









.CHAPTER 3
INVERSE RELIABILITY IVEASURES

In probabilistic approaches the difference between the computed probability of failure or

reliability index and their target values does not provide the designer with easy estimates of the

change in the design cost needed to achieve these target values. Alternately, inverse reliability

measures are capable of providing this information. Several inverse reliability measures (e.g.,

probabilistic performance measure and probabilistic sufficiency factor) that are essentially

equivalent have been introduced in recent years. The different names for essentially the same

measure reflect the fact that different researchers focused on different advantages of inverse

measures. This chapter reviews the various inverse measures and describes their advantages

compared to the direct measures of safety such as probability of failure and reliability index.

Methods to compute the inverse measures are also described. Reliability-based design

optimization with inverse measure is demonstrated with a beam design example.

Literature Review

In deterministic approaches, a safety factor is defined as the ratio of the capacity to

resistance of a system, typically calculated at the mean values. However, in probabilistic

approaches, as both capacity and response are random, the safety factor is also a random number.

One safety measure that combines the advantages of the safety factor and probability of failure

was proposed by Birger (1970, as reported by Elishakoff, 2001). Birger relates the safety factor

and the fractile of the safety factor distribution corresponding to a target probability of failure. It

belongs to a class of inverse reliability measures, which carry that name because they require use

of the inverse of the cumulative distribution function. Several researchers developed equivalent

inverse reliability methods (Lee and Kwak 1987; Kiureghian et al. 1994; Li and Foschi 1998; Tu

et al. 1999; Lee et al. 2002; Qu and Haftka 2003; Du et al. 2003) that are closely related to the









Birger measure. These measures quantify the level of safety in terms of the change in structural

response needed to meet the target probability of failure.

Lee and Kwak (1987) used the inverse formulation in RBDO and showed that it is preferable for

design when the probability of failure is very low in some region of the design space so that the

safety index approaches infinity. Kiureghian et al. (1994) addressed the inverse reliability

problem of seeking to determine one unknown parameter in the limit state function such that a

prescribed first order reliability index is attained. To solve the inverse reliability problem, they

proposed an iterative algorithm based on the Hasofer-Lind-Rackwitz-Fiessler algorithm. Li and

Foschi (1998) employed the inverse reliability strategy in earthquake and offshore applications to

solve for multiple design parameters. They show that it is an efficient method to estimate design

parameters corresponding to target reliabilities. Kirjner-Neto et al. (1998) reformulated the

standard RBDO formulation similar to Lee and Kwak (1987) except that they use an inequality

constraint. They developed a semi-infinite optimization algorithm to solve the reformulated

problem. This formulation does not require second order derivatives of the limit state functions

and obviates the need for repeated reliability indices computation. However, they found that the

approach can result in conservative design. Royset et al. (2001) extended the reformulation

technique discussed in Kirjner-Neto et al. (1998) for reliability-based design of series structural

systems. The required reliability and optimization calculations are completely decoupled in this

approach. Tu et al. (1999) dubbed the inverse measure approach the Performance Measure

Approach (PMA) and called the inverse measure probability performance measure (PPM). Lee

et al. (2002) adopted the same procedure as Tu et al. (1999) and named it target performance

based approach, calling the inverse measure the target performance. They compared the

reliability index approach and inverse measure based approach and found that the latter was









superior in both computational efficiency and numerical stability. Youn et al. (2003) showed that

PMA allows faster and more stable RBDO compared to the traditional Reliability Index

Approach (RIA).

When accurate statistical information is not available for input data, it is not appropriate to

use probabilistic method for stochastic structural analysis and design optimization and

researchers resort to possibility based design optimization (PBDO) methods in such situations.

Mourelatos and Zhou, 2005, discuss a PMA based PBDO. They formulate the inverse possibility

analysis problem for the possibilistic constraint. Unlike FORM based RBDO which is based on

linear approximation, the PBDO is exact. To perform the inverse possibility analysis, Du et al

(2006b) proposes a maximal possibility search (MPS) method with interpolation to address the

challenges of accuracy and computational expense exhibited by traditional methods like the

multilevel cut and alpha level optimization method respectively. They report that the MPS

evaluates possibility constraint efficiently and accurately for nonlinear structural applications.

Often times industry design problems deal with uncertainties with sufficient data and

uncertainties with insufficient data simultaneously. To address such situations Du et al., (2006a)

extend the possibility-based design optimization (PBDO) method. They propose a two step

approach to generate membership function from the available data. Initially, they develop a

temporary PDF using the available data and then generate a membership function from the

temporary PDF. They report that PMA based PBDO combined with MPS method can adequately

address design problems with mixed input variables and demonstrates that it evaluates possibility

constraint efficiently, stably and accurately for nonlinear structural applications.

Qu and Haftka (2003, 2004) called the inverse measure probability sufficiency factor

(PSF) and explored its use for RBDO with multiple failure modes through Monte Carlo









Simulation (MCS) and response surface approximation (RSA). They showed that PSF leads to

more accurate RSA compared to RSA fitted to failure probability, provides more effective

RBDO, and that it permits estimation of the necessary change in the design cost needed to meet

the target reliability. Moreover, PSF enables performing RBDO in variable-fidelity fashion and

sequential deterministic optimization fashion to reduce the computational cost (Qu and Haftka,

2004a and 2004b). An initial study of using PSF to convert RBDO to sequential deterministic

optimization was performed to solve problems with reliability constraints on individual failure

modes (Qu and Haftka, 2003). An improved version for system reliability problems with

multiple failure modes was developed for reliability-based global optimization of stiffened

panels (Qu and Haftka, 2004b).

Du et al. (2003, 2004) employed PMA to formulate RBDO, but used percentile levels of

reliability (1 minus failure probability) in the probabilistic constraint and called the inverse

measure as percentile performance. Traditionally, design for robustness involves minimizing the

mean and standard deviation of the performance. Here, Du et al. (2003) proposed to replace the

standard deviation by percentile performance difference, which is the difference between the

percentile performance corresponding to the left tail of a CDF and the right tail of that CDF.

They demonstrated increased computational efficiency and more accurate evaluation of the

variation of the obj ective performance. In an effort to address reliability-based designs when

both random and interval variables are present, Du and Sudijianto (2003) proposed the use of

percentile performance with worst-case combination of the interval variables for efficient RBDO

solutions.

Du and Chen (2004) developed the sequential optimization and reliability assessment

(SORA) to improve the efficiency of the probabilistic optimization. The method is a serial single










loop strategy, which employs percentile performance and the key is to establish equivalent

deterministic constraints from probabilistic constraints. This method is based on evaluating the

constraint at the most probable point of the inverse measure in Section IV below) based on the

reliability information from the previous cycle. This is referred to as "design shift"

(Chiralaksanakul and Mahadevan 2004; Youn et al. 2004). They show that the design quickly

improves in each cycle and is computationally efficient. The sequential optimization and

reliability assessment, however, is not guaranteed to lead to an optimal design. Single-level (or

unilevel) techniques that are equivalent to the standard RBDO formulation are based on

replacing the RIA or PMA inner loop by the corresponding Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions.

Here again, Agarwal et al. (2004) showed that the PMA approach is more efficient than the

unilevel RIA approach due to Kuschel and Rackwitz (2000). Since most commercial optimizers

are numerically unreliable when applied to problems accompanied by many equality constraints,

Agarwal et al (2007) use homotopy methods for constraint relaxation and to obtain a relaxed

feasible design. They solve a series of optimization problem as the relaxed optimization problem

is transformed via a homotopy to the original problem. They show that it is easier to solve the

relaxed problem and make a gradual progress towards the solution than solve the original

problem directly.

The several inverse measures discussed above are all based on the common idea of using

the inverse of the cumulative distribution function. The numerous names for the inverse

measures contemplate that they were developed by different researchers for different

applications. Since these inverse measures come under various names, it is easy to fail to notice

the commonality among them.









Birger Safety Factor

The safety factor, S is defined as the ratio of the capacity of the system Gc (e.g.,

allowable strength) to the response Grwith a safe design satisfying Gr < Gc To account for

uncertainties, the design safety factor is greater than one. For example, a load safety factor of 1.5

is mandated by FAA in aircraft applications. To address the probabilistic interpretation of the

safety factor, Birger (1970) proposed to consider its cumulative distribution function (CDF) Fs :

G~
F, (s) = Prob( c s) (3-1)

Note that unlike the deterministic safety factor, which is normally calculated for the mean

value of the random variables, Gc/Gr in Eq.(3-1) is a random function. Given a target

probability,Pftarget, Birger suggested a safety factor s*(which we call here the Birger safety

factor) defined in the following equation


F,(s*) = Prob( `
That is, the Birger safety factor is found by setting the value of cumulative distribution

function (CDF) of the safety factor equal to the target probability. That is, we seek to find the

value of the safety factor that makes the CDF of the safety factor equal to the target failure

probability. This requires the inverse transformation of the CDF, hence the terminology of

mnverse measure.

Probabilistic Sufficiency Factor

Qu and Haftka (2003, 2004) developed a similar measure to the Birger safety factor,

calling it first the probabilistic safety factor and then the probabilistic sufficiency factor (PSF).

They obtained the PSF by Monte Carlo simulation and found that the response surface for PSF

was more accurate than the response surface fitted to failure probability. Later, they found the









reference to Birger' s work in Elishakoff' s review (2001) of safety factors and their relations to

probabilities. It is desirable to avoid the term safety factor for this entity because the common

use of the term is mostly deterministic and independent of the target safety level. Therefore,

while noting the identity of the Birger safety factor and the probabilistic sufficiency factor, we

will use the latter term in the following.

Failure happens when the actual safety factor S is less than one. The basic design

condition that the probability of failure should be smaller than the target probability for a safe

design may then be written as:

P, = Prob(S < 1)= F, (1) < Pftarget (3-3)
Using inverse transformation, Eq.(3-3) can be expressed as:

1 < F/ (Pftarget )= s* (3 -4)
The concept of PSF is illustrated in Figure. 3-1. The design requirement Pftarge is known

and the corresponding area under the probability density function of the safety factor is the

shaded region in Figure.3-1.The upper bound of the abscissa s* is the value of the PSF. The

region to the left of the vertical line S = 1 represents failure. To satisfy the basic design condition

s* should be greater than or equal to one. In order to achieve this, it is possible to either increase

Gc or decreaseGr The PSF s*, represents the factor that has to multiply the response Gr or

divide the capacity Gc, so that the safety factor be raised to 1.

For example, a PSF of 0.8 means that Gr has to be multiplied by 0.8 or Gc be divided by

0.8 so that the safety factor ratio increases to one. In other words, this means that Gr has to be

decreased by 20 % (1-0.8) or Gc has to be increased by 25% ((1/0.8)-1) in order to achieve the

target failure probability. It can be observed that PSF is a safety factor with respect to the target

failure probability and is automatically normalized in the course of its formulation.









PSF is useful in estimating the resources needed to achieve the required target probability

of failure. For example, in a stress-dominated linear problem, if the target probability of failure is

10-' and a current design yields a probability of failure of 10-3, One cannot easily estimate the

change in the weight required to achieve the target failure probability. Instead, if the failure

probability corresponds to a PSF of 0.8, this indicates that maximum stresses must be lowered by

20% to meet the target. This permits the designers to readily estimate the weight required to

reduce stresses to a given level.

Probabilistic Performance Measure

In probabilistic approaches, instead of the safety factor it is customary to use a

performance function or a limit state function to define the failure (or success) of a system. For

example, the limit state function is expressed as in Eq(2-1). In terms of safety factor S, another

form of the limit state function is:

Gc (X)
G(X) = 1= S-12 > (3-5)
Gr (X)
Here, G (X) and G(X) are the ordinary and normalized limit state functions, respectively. Failure

happens when G (X) or G(X) is less than zero, so the probability of failure Pf is:

P, = Prob(G (X) < 0) (3 -6)

P, = Prob(G(X) < 0) (3 -7)
Using Eq. (3-6), Eq. (3-7) can be rewritten as:

P, = Prob(G (X) < 0) = FG (0) < Pftaerge (3-8)

P, = Prob(G(X) <;0) = FO (0) < Pftarge (3 -9)
where FG and FO are the CDF of G (X) and G(X), respectively. Inverse transformation allows

us to write Eqs. (3-8) and (3-9) as:










0 < FGl(Pftage ) = g* (3-10)


0 < Fii- (Pftage ) = g (3-11)
Here, g* and g are the ordinary and normalized Probabilistic Performance Measure (PPM, Tu

et al, 1999), respectively. PPM can be defined as the solution to Eqs. (3-8) and (3-9). That is, the

value in (*) (instead of zero) which makes the inequality an equality. Hence PPM is the value of

the limit state function that makes its CDF equals the target failure probability. Figure 3-2

illustrates the concept of PPM. The shaded area corresponds to the target failure probability. The

area to the left of the line G = 0 indicates failure. g* is the factor that has to be subtracted from

Eq. (3-6) in order to make the vertical line g* move further to the right of the G = 0 line and

hence facilitate a safe design.

For example, a PPM of -0.8 means that the design is not safe enough, and -0.8 has to be

subtracted from G (X) in order to achieve the target probability of failure. A PPM value of 0.3

means that we have a safety margin of 0.3 to reduce while improving the cost function to meet

the target failure probability.

Considering g as the solution for Eq.(3-1 1), it can be rewritten in terms of the safety

factor as:

Prob(G(X)= S-1< g*)= Pftarget (3-12)
Comparing Eqs. (15), (23) and (24), we can observe a relationship between s* andg*. PSF

(s*) is related to the normalized PPM (g *) as:

s*= g*+1 (3-13)
This simple relationship between PPM and PSF shows that they are closely related, and the

difference is only in the way the limit state function is written. If the limit state function is

expressed as the difference between capacity and response as in Eq.(3-6), failure probability









formulation allows us to define PPM. Alternatively, if the limit state function is expressed in

terms of the safety factor as in Eq. (3-7), the corresponding failure probability formulation allows

us to define PSF. PSF can be viewed as PPM derived from the normalized form of Eq. (3-6). The

performance-measure approach (PMA) notation may appeal because of its generality, while the

PSF notation has the advantage of being automatically scaled and being expressed in terms that

are familiar to designers who use safety factors.

The PPM can be viewed as the distance from the G = 0 to target failure probability line, in

the performance function space. This is analogical to reliability index being a measure of

distance in the input variable space. The maj or difference is the measurement of distance in

different spaces, the performance function (or output) space and the input space.

Inverse Measure Calculation

Simulation Approach- Monte Carlo Simulation

Conceptually, the simplest approach to evaluate PSF or PPM is by Monte Carlo simulation

(MCS), which involves the generation of random sample points according to the statistical

distribution of the variables. The sample points that violate the safety criteria in Eq. (3-6) are

considered failed. Figure.3-3 illustrates the concept of MCS. A two-variable problem with a

linear limit state function is considered. The straight lines are the contour lines of the limit state

function and sample points generated by MCS are represented by small circles, with the

numbered circles representing failed samples. The zero value of the limit state function divides

the distribution space into a safe region and a failure region. The dashed lines represent failed

conditions and the continuous lines represent safe conditions.

The failure probability can be estimated using Eq.(2-9) In Figure. 3-3, the number of

sample points that lie in the failure region above the G = 0 curve is 12. If the total number of










samples is 100,000, the failure probability is estimated at 1.2x10-4. For a fixed number of

samples, the accuracy of MCS deteriorates with the decrease in failure probability.

For example, with only 12 failure points out of the 100,000 samples, the standard deviation

of the probability estimate is 3.5x10- more than a quarter of the estimate. When the probability

of failure is significantly smaller than one over the number of sample points, its calculated value

by MCS is likely to be zero.

PPM is estimated by MC S as the net'' smallest limit state function among the N sampled

functions, where n = Nx Pftarget For example, considering the example illustrated in Figure. 3-3,

if the target failure probability is 10-4, to satisfy the target probability of failure, no more than 10

samples out of the 100,000 should fail. So, the focus is on the two extra samples that failed.

PPM is equal to the value of the highest limit state function among the n (in this case, n = 10)

lowest limit state functions. The numbered small circles are the sample points that failed. Of

these, the three highest limit states are shown by the dashed lines. The tenth smallest limit state

corresponds to the sample numbered 8 and has a limit state value of -0.4, which is the value of

PPM. Mathematically this is expressed as:


g* = nth minz(G (Xi)) (3-14)
i= 1
where, net'' min is the n"i' smallest limit state function. So, the calculation of PPM in MCS

requires only sorting the lowest limit state function in the MCS sample. Similarly, PSF can be

computed as the nth smallest factor among the N sampled safety factors and is mathematically

expressed as *


s* =nri'' min (S(Xi)) (3-15)
i=1

** A more accurate estimate of PPM or PSF will be obtained from the average of the nt and (n+1)t smallest values.
So in the case of Figure. 4, PPM is more accurately estimated as 0.35.









Finally, probabilities calculated through Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) using a small

sample size are computed as zero in the region where the probability of failure is lower than one

over the number of samples used in MCS. In that region, no useful gradient information is

available to the optimization routine. On the other hand, PSF value varies in this region and thus

provides guidance to optimization.

MCS generates numerical noise due to limited sample size. Noise in failure probability

may cause RBDO to converge to a spurious minimum. In order to filter out the noise, response

surface approximations are fitted to failure probability to create a so-called design response

surface. It is difficult to construct a highly accurate design response surface because of the huge

variation and uneven accuracy of failure probability. To overcome these difficulties, Qu and

Haftka (2003, 2004) discuss the usage of PSF to improve the accuracy of the design response

surface. They showed that design response surface based on PSF is more accurate compared to

design response surface based on failure probability and this accelerates the convergence of

RBDO. For complex problems, response surface approximations (RSA) can also be used to

approximate the structural response in order to reduce the computational cost. Qu and Haftka

(2004b) employ PSF with MCS based on RSA to design stiffened panels under system reliability

constramnt.

Analytical Approach- Moment-based Methods

Inverse reliability measures can be estimated using moment based methods like FORM.

The FORM estimate is good if the limit state is linear but when the limit state has a significant

curvature, second order methods can be used. The Second Order Reliability Method (SORM)

approximates the measure of reliability more accurately by considering the effect of the

curvature of the limit state function (Melchers, 1999, pp 127-130).









Figure 3-4. illustrates the concept of inverse reliability analysis and MPP search. The

circles represent the p curves with the target p curve represented by a dashed circle. Here,

among the different values of limit state functions that pass through the Prose, curve, the one

with minimum value is sought. The value of this minimal limit state function is the MPP as

shown by Tu et al. 1999. The point on the target circle with the minimal limit state function is

sought. This point is also an MPP and in order to avoid confusion between the usual MPP and

MPP in inverse reliability analysis, Du et al. (2003) coined the term most probable point of

inverse reliability (MPPIR) and Lee et al. (2002) called it the minimum performance target point

(MPTP). Du et al. (2003) developed the sequential optimization and reliability analysis method

in which they show that evaluating the probabilistic constraint at the design point is equivalent to

evaluating the deterministic constraint at the most probable point of the inverse reliability. This

facilitates in converting the probabilistic constraint to an equivalent deterministic constraint. That

is, the deterministic optimization is performed using a constraint limit which is determined based

on the inverse MPP obtained in the previous iteration. Kiureghian et al. (1994) proposed an

extension of the Hasofer-Lind-Rackwitz-Fiessler algorithm that uses a merit function and search

direction to find the MPTP. In Figure 3-4, the value of the minimal limit state function or the

PPM is -0.2. This process can be expressed as:

Minimize :G(U)

Subject to :|| U|| = J = Freze (316
In reliability analysis the MPP is on the G (U) = 0 failure surface. In inverse reliability

analysis, the MPP search is on the Ptarse curve. One of the main advantages when inverse

measures are used in the FORM perspective is that, the formulation of the optimization problem

is as expressed in Eq. (3-16) where the constraint has a simple form (circle) compared to the cost

function. The cost function has in general a complicated expression due to the nonlinear









transformation between physical random variable X to the standard random variable U. It is well

known that it is easy to satisfy a simple constraint compared to a complicated constraint

irrespective of the cost function. On comparing the formulation in Eq.(2-5) with the formulation

in Eq.(3-16), it is evident that it is easier to solve the latter because of the simpler constraint.

Reliability Based Design Optimization with Inverse Measures

The probabilistic constraint in RBDO can be prescribed by several methods like the

Reliability Index Approach (RIA), the Performance Measure Approach (PMA), the Probability

Sufficiency Factor approach (PSF), see Table3-1.

Table 3-1. Different approaches to prescribe the probabilistic constraint
Method RIA PMA PSF
Probabilistic constraint 13 > twer g* > 0 s* > 1
Quantity to be computed Reliability index( P) PPM ( g*) PSF (s*)


In RIA, P can be computed as the product of reliability analysis as

discussed in the previous section. The PPM or PSF can be computed through inverse reliability

analysis or as a byproduct of reliability analysis using MCS.

To date, most researchers have used RIA to prescribe the probabilistic constraint.

However, the advantages of the inverse measures, illustrated in the next section, have led to its

growing popularity.

Beam Design Example

The cantilever beam shown in Figure. 3-5, taken from Wu et al. (2001), is a commonly

used demonstration example for RBDO methods. The length L of the beam is 100". The width

and thickness is represented by w and t. It is subj ected to end transverse loads X and Y in

orthogonal directions as shown in the Figure 3-5 1. The obj ective of the design is to minimize the


i For this example, the random variables are shown in bold face









weight or equivalently the cross sectional area: A =wt subj ect to two reliability constraints, which

require the safety indices for strength and deflection constraints to be larger than three. The first

two failure modes are expressed as two limit state functions:


Stress limit G = R -a=l( R +, (3-17)


4L 3 iY X (-8
Tip displacement limit: Gd = Do D = Do + 3-8
Ewt t' w-

where R is the yield strength, E is the elastic modulus, Do the displacement limit, and w and t are

the design parameters. R, X, Y and E are uncorrelated random variables and their means and

standard deviations are defined in Table 3-2.

Table 3-2. Random variables for beam problem
Random X Y R E
Variables (lb) (lb) (psi) (psi)
Di stributi on Normal Normal Normal Normal
(p, a)(500,100) (1000,100)1b (40000,2000) (29x 106,1.45x106)


Design for Stress Constraint

The design with strength reliability constraint is solved first, followed by the design with a

system reliability constraint. The results for the strength constraint are presented in Table 3-3.

For the strength constraint, the limit state is a linear combination of normally distributed random

variables, and FORM gives accurate results for this case. The MCS is performed with 100,000

samples. The standard deviation in the estimated failure probability is calculated by MCS as:

Pf (1 Pf )
Op (3-19)
In this case, the failure probability of 0.0013 calculated from 100,000 samples has a

standard deviation of 1.14x10-4. It is seen from Table 3-3 that the designs obtained from RIA,

PMA and PSF match well. Since the stress in Eq. (3-17)is a linear function of random variables,









the RIA and PMA are exact. The more conservative design from PSF is due to limited sampling

of MCS.

Table 3-3. Comparison of optimum designs for the stress constraint
Minimize obj ective function A =wt such that p 2 3
Method Reliability Inverse Reliability Analysis Exact
Analysis FORM M~CS (PSF) Optimnum
FORM (PMA) (Qu and Haftka,2003) (Wu et al.
(RIA) 2001)
Optima w 2.4460 2.4460 2.4526 2.4484
t 3.8922 3.8920 3.8884 3.8884
Obj ective Function 9.5202 9.5202 9.5367 9.5204
Reliability Index 3.00 3.00 3.0162 3.00
Failure Probability 0.00135 0.00135 0.00128 0.00135


Comparison of Inverse Measures

The relation between PSF and PPM in Eq. (3-13) is only approximate when PPM is calculated

by FORM and PSF by MCS. PSF suffers from sampling error and PPM from error due to

linearization. For the linear stress constraint, and with a large Monte Carlo sample, the difference

is small, as seen in Table 3-4. It may be expected that the MPTP (minimum performance target

point) should also be close to the point used to calculate PSF. This result may be useful, because

when a response surface is used for an approximation of the response, it is useful to center it near

the MPTP. In order to check the accuracy of the MPTP estimation, the MPP of PPM and the

point corresponding to the PSF are compared and the results are tabulated in Table 3-5. The

coordinates corresponding to the PSF, computed by a million-sample MCS, deviate considerably

from the MPTP. Since the accuracy of the points computed by MCS depends on the number of

samples used, an increased number of samples lead to more accurate results, albeit at increased

computational cost. Alternative approaches to obtain the points with better accuracy without

increasing the number of samples are to average the co-ordinates computed by repeated MCS

simulations with fewer numbers of samples. Alternatively, we can average a number of points









that are nearly as critical as the PSF point. That is, instead of using only the X1 corresponding to

the S, in Eq (3-15), we use also the points corresponding to S S,, S ,in computing the

PSF, where 2p is the total number of points that is averaged around the PSF. It can be observed

from Table 3-5 that averaging 11 points around the PSF matches well with the MPTP, reducing a

Euclidean distance of about 0.831 for the raw PSF to 0.277 with 11-point average. The values of

X, Y and R presented in Table 3- 5 are in the standard normal space

Table 3-4. Comparison of inverse measures for w=2.4526 and t-3.8884 (stress constraint)
Method FORM MC S (1 x107samples)
Pc 0.001238 0.001241
Inverse Measure PPM: 0.00258 PSF: 1.002619

Table 3-5. Comparison of MPP obtained from calculation of PSF for w=2.4526 and t-3.8884
(stress constraint)
Co-ordinates X Y R
MPTP 2.1147 1.3370 -1.6480
PSF
1)106 Samples 2.6641 1.2146 -1.0355
2)Average:10 runs of each 105samples 2.1888 1.8867 -1.1097
3)Average:11 points around PSF of 106 Samples 2.0666 1.5734 -1.5128


Use of PSF in Estimating the Required Change in Weight to Achieve a Safe Design

The relation between the stresses, displacement and weight for this problem is presented to

demonstrate the utility of PSF in estimating the required resources to achieve a safe design.

Consider a design with the dimensions of Ao= wo to with a PSF of so*" less than one. The

structure can be made safer by scaling both w and t by the same factor c. This will change the

stress and displacement expressed in Eq.(3-17) and Eq. (3-18) by a factor of c3 and c4,

respectively, and the area by a factor of c2. If Stress is most critical, it will scale as c3 and the PSF

will vary with the area, A as:









1.5
s* = so a (3-20)

Equation (3-20) indicates that a one percent increase in area will increase the PSF by 1.5

percent. Since non-uniform scaling of width and thickness may be more efficient than uniform

scaling, this is a conservative estimate. Thus, for example, considering a design with a PSF of

0.97, the safety factor deficiency is 3% and the structure can be made safer with a weight

increase of less than two percent, as shown by Qu and Haftka (2003). For a critical displacement

state, s* will be proportional to A2 and a 3% deficit in PSF can be corrected in under 1.5%

weight increase. While for more complex structures we do not have analytical expressions for

the dependence of the displacements or the stresses on the design variables, designers can

usually estimate the weight needed to reduce stresses or displacements by a given amount.

System Reliability Estimation Using PSF and MCS

System reliability arises when the failure of a system is defined by multiple failure modes.

Here, the discussion is limited to series systems. The estimation of system failure probability

involves estimating the failure due to individual modes and failure due to the interaction between

the modes. This is mathematically expressed for a system with n failure modes as:

Psv = P(F, ) +P(F, )+...+ P(F ,)
P(F, nF,) -P(F; nr,,) -... -P(F,_ z Fn ) (3 -21)
+P(; nr, nr, ,)+...+ P(F,_, Fng,_ Fn)-...Higher order terms
It is easy to employ MCS to estimate system failure, as the methodology is a direct extension of

failure estimation for single modes. In the context of employing analytical methods like FORM,

estimation of failure regions bounded by single modes are easy to estimate but estimating the

probability content of odd shaped domains created because of the intersection of two or more

modes is challenging. Techniques are available to estimate the probability content at the

intersection regions but require evaluating multiple integrals (Melchers, pp: 386-400). Since the









number of multiple integrals that has to be evaluated depends on the number of variables, the

task becomes arduous when more variables are involved. Instead, an alternate technique is to

develop upper and lower bounds on the failure probability of the structural system. Considering

the terms in the first and the third rows (positive contributions) in Eq. (3-21) permits us to

estimate the upper bound. When the terms in first and second rows (negative contributions) are

considered, the lower bounds can be estimated. Improved bounds for the system reliability are

available in the literature.

Owing to these challenges, MCS is mostly used when system reliability is to be estimated.

As discussed earlier, MCS is computationally prohibitive when the failure probability to be

estimated is low, because of the number of samples required. PSF can be used to estimate system

reliability. The method is an extension of the PSF estimation for single failure mode. When M\~

failure modes are considered, the most critical safety factor is calculated for each sample. Then

the sorting of the n*h minimum safety factor can proceed as in Eq.(3-15). This process is

explained in the flow chart in Figure 3-6. The estimation of PSF for a system reliability case is

demonstrated with an example in Appendix A

Design for System Reliability by MCS and PSF

Monte Carlo simulation is a good method to use for system reliability analysis with

multiple failure modes. For the cantilever beam discussed in the earlier section, the allowable

deflection was chosen to be 2.25" in order to have competing constraints (Wu et al., 2001). The

results are presented in Table 3-6. It can be observed that the contribution of the stress mode to

failure probability dominates the contribution due to displacement and the interaction between

the modes. The details of the design process are provided in Qu and Haftka (2004). They

demonstrated the advantages of using PSF as an inverse safety measure over probability of

failure or the safety index as a normal safety measure. They showed that the design response

44










surface (DRS) of the PSF was much more accurate than the DRS for the probability of failure.

For a set of test points the error in the probability of failure was 39. 11% from the DRS to the

PSF, 96.49% for the DRS to the safety index, and 334.78% for the DRS to the probability of

failure .

Table 3-6. Design for System Reliability by PSF, Qu and Haftka (2004)**
Optima Obj ective Pf Safety Ppl Pz Ppl n Pf PSF
Function Index s*
w = 2.6041 9.5691 0.001289 3.01379 0.001133 0.000208 0.000052 1.0006
t= 3.6746
**100,000 samples, qf~Pf, Pf, On Pfz Failure probabilities due to stress constraint, displacement constraint, and
intersection between the modes, respectively.











PDF of 3


Figure 3-1. Schematic probability density of the safety factor S. The PSF is the value of the
safety factor corresponding to the target probability of failure



PDF of G


p~gc~


g~ G (x) =G, (x) Gr i)-


Figure 3-2. Schematic probability density of the limit state function. The Probabilistic
Performance Measure is the value of the limit state function corresponding to the
target probability of failure.









G(X) <
Failure region


O O


Figure 3-3. Illustration of the calculation of PPM with Monte Carlo Simulation for the linear
performance function


Figure 3-4. Inverse reliability analysis and MPP for target failure probability 0.00135 (/7


Figure 3-5. Cantilever beam subj ected to horizontal and vertical loads


Y'




























Figure 3-6. Flowchart for estimating system PSF









CHAPTER 4
TAIL MODELLING AND RELIABILITY ANALYSIS

Low failure probability problems (extreme value) require one to have sufficient data in the

tails of the distribution which represent the extremes. But this is seldom possible and instead

researchers use tail modeling techniques based on extreme value theory to predict the probability

of extreme events. The theory comprises a principle for model extrapolation based on the

implementation of mathematical limits as finite level approximations. Since several advantages

are reported by working with inverse measures, it is logical to justify an attempt to perform tail

modeling in the performance space along with inverse measures to estimate quantities at

unobserved levels. This section discusses the tail modeling technique and how to apply it to find

inverse measures.

Tail Equivalence and Generalized Extreme Value Theory

Tail modeling is based on the concept of approximating the tail distribution of the variable

of interest by associating it with the tail of already known distribution and using the parameters

and characteristics therein for further analysis. This criterion is adequately defined by tail

equivalence. That is, two CDFs F(x) and Q(x) can be called tail equivalent (Maes and Breitung,

1993) at the right tails when:

.1- F(x)
him = 1 (4-1)
1-Q(x)
This reveals that the error in approximating the small probability of 1- F(x) by 1- Q(x) tends to

zero as x 4 00

The extremal theorem by Fisher and Tippet (1928) states that, if2I,, is the maximum of a

sequence of 'n' independent random variables having a common distribution function and if

there exists sequences of constants (a,, > 0) and {b,,) such that










Pr (M, ,, V/' a, U 4Hn)a (4-2)
for a non-degenerate distribution function H, then H belongs to one of the extreme value

distribution families namely, the Gumbel, Frechet and Weibull families. It is to be noted that

regardless of the distribution for the population, the three types of the extreme value distributions

are the only possible limits for the distribution of the normalized maxima. In this respect, this

theorem is to extreme value theory what central limit theorem is to central statistics. The central

limit theorem states that the approximating distribution of the sample mean is normal regardless

of the parent distribution.

The three families of distributions can be combined into a single family of models having

distribution function of the form


H(z) = exp 1+(r (4-3)

such that (zl :+ 5(z pu) / a > 0), where the parameters satisfy -co < pu < c, a > 0 and

-co < 5 < CO This is the generalized extreme value (GEV) family of distributions. Here, pu is the

location parameter, a is the scale parameter, 5 is the shape parameter. A more detailed

discussion of the generalized extreme value distributions is presented in Appendix B

Generalized Pareto Distribution

In engineering applications, rather than maxima, the interest is to address the excesses over

threshold. In these situations, the generalized pareto distribution (GPD) arises as the limiting

distribution. The concept of GPD is presented in Figure 4-1. Let y be a model output which is

random and u be a large threshold of y. The observations of y that exceed u are called

exceedance. The conditional distribution Fu(z) of the exceedance given that the data y is greater

than the threshold u, is modeled fairly well by the GPD. Here, z = y u Let approximation of









Fi (z-) using GPD be denoted by F,,(z). 5 and ry are the shape and scale parameters

respectively. For a large enough u, the distribution function of (y u) conditional on y > u, is

approximately written as (Coles, 2001):




1- 1+ if 5 +0
i-(z)= = (4-4)
1- exp --if 5=0


In Eql (4-4), (Aj+ = max(0, A) and z > 0.5 plays a key role in assessing the weight of the

tail. Eq (4-4) can be justified as a limiting distribution as u increases (Coles, 2001, pp:75-76).

Tails can be classified based on 5 as:

5 > 0, heavy tail (pareto type tail)
5 = 0, medium tail (exponential type tail)
5 <0, light tail (Beta-type tails)
There are several parameter estimation methods to estimate the parameters 5 and ry .It is to be

noted that conditional excess CDF F (z) is related to the CDF of interest Fly) through the

following expression:

Fly) Flu)
,(z) = (4-5)
1- Flu)
From Eq (4-5), the CDF of y can be expressed as:

Fly) = (1 -F(u))Fu(z) +Flu) (4-6)
When Eq (4-4) is substituted for F (z) in the above expression, Eq (4-6) becomes:



F(y)=1- O (1- F(u) ( -u (4-7)
For simplicity of presentation, only the case of5 + 0 is considered here. Once we obtain

estimates of the parameters as 5 and ry using some parameter estimation method like maximum









likelihood estimation method, least square regression that are discussed later in the chapter, it is

possible to estimate the pth quantile by inverting Eq.(4-7) :


yp = F (p)= u+ -1 (4-8)p
1 l- F(u)j 48
In order to extend the concept to structural applications, if the output y is replaced by the

limit state in Eq (3-5) then the interest is to model the lower tail rather than the upper tail.

However, modeling the upper tail of y is equivalent to modeling the lower tail of -y. Therefore,

an equivalent way of expressing Eq.(3-5) is:

G, (x)= 1- S,(x) (4-9)
where S, is the reciprocal of the safety factor. Failure occurs when G1 > 0. S, at any required

target reliability index can be estimated using Eq(4-8). If Pf target refers to the target failure

probability that we wish to design the structure, PSF can be obtained as:


S = F 1-P ,,)=* u+ Pf target -1(4-10)
r f taget ( 1- Flu)

Coles (2001) opines that it is easy to obj ect to the procedure of tail modeling on the

grounds that even with the support of asymptotic argument, there is an implicit assumption that

the underlying stochastic mechanism of the process being modeled is sufficiently smooth to

enable extrapolation. However no credible alternative has been proposed to date.

Threshold Selection

The theory of excess over threshold is referred to as peaks over threshold method also.

Performance of this approach is based on the choice of the threshold value u. The basic theory

identified by Pickands (1975) states that the pareto distribution will be a practical family for

statistical estimation of the tails, provided that the threshold is taken sufficiently high. The CDF

is composed of 3 portions, the lower tail, upper tail and the central portion. In theory, the









threshold should be selected where the actual upper tail starts. But there is no straightforward

globally accepted method to select threshold.

Selection of threshold is a tradeoff between bias and variance. If the threshold selected is

low, then some data points belong to the central part of the distribution and do not provide a

good approximation to the tails. On the other hand, if the threshold selected is too high, the

number of data available for the tail approximation is much less and this might lead to excessive

scatter in the Einal estimate. The proper selection of threshold is very important because it has

important repercussions on the estimated value of the shape factor (Caers and Maes, 1998,

McNeil and Saladin, 1997) and hence on the Einal estimates such as the quantile, extreme values

etc.

There are many exploratory techniques like the mean excess plot which help in selecting

the threshold. But in a simulation study, it is impractical to perform interactive data analysis

required by the exploratory techniques to choose the threshold. The mean excess plot is the

sample mean excess function defined as the sum of the excesses over the threshold divided by

the number of the data points which exceed the threshold plotted with respect to the threshold. A

reasonable choice of the optimal threshold is where this plot becomes linear. For further reading

the reader is referred to Coles (2001).

Boos (1984) suggests that the ratio of Nex (number of tail data) over N (total number

data) should be 0.02 (50
suggests using Nex = 1.5J Caers and Maes (1998) propose to use a Einite sample mean square

error (MSE) as a criterion for estimating the threshold. They use the threshold value that

minimizes the MSE. In a similar fashion Beirlant et al (1996) Eind an optimal threshold by

minimizing an approximate expression for asymptotic mean square error. The other methods









include plotting the quantile, shape or scale factor or any quantity of interest with respect to

different thresholds and look for a stability in the curve (Bassi et al, Coles pp:84-86)

Parameter Estimation

Generally one is interested to generate values (PDF) from a particular distribution given a

set of parameter values B which is expressed as:

f (x / ) (4-11)
where, x is a data vector [xl ... xm] of frequency. However, here we are faced with an inverse

problem. Given the set of observed data and a model of interest, one is required to find one PDF

that among all probability distribution that is possible for the model is most likely to have

produced the data. The parameters can be estimated by several methods. The methods used in the

literature include, maximum likelihood estimation (MLE), method of moments, probability

weighted moments, elemental percentile method, the least square regression method. Generally,

maximum likelihood estimation method is widely used and accepted by researchers though it has

limitations. That is as long as 5> -0.5 the asymptotic properties (Appendix B) of the maximum

likelihood estimators are preserved. When -1 < < -0.5 MLE are obtainable but do not have the

standard asymptotic properties. MLE is not obtainable when 5 <-1 (Coles, 2001, pp54-55). The

likelihood estimation approach for the GPD parameters is presented in the Appendix B.

However, accurate estimation of the parameters is a huge research area in itself. Beirlant et al

(2004), Castillo et al (2005) discuss these methods in detail. Hasking and Wallis (1987) report a

comparison between the maximum likelihood estimation method, method of moments and the

probability weighted moments. They conclude that method of moments and the probability

weighted moments are more reliable compared to the MLE method unless the sample size is

greater than 500. This section discusses the maximum likelihood method and least square

regression approach in detail









Maximum Likelihood Estimation

MLE is a popular statistical method that is used to make inferences about the parameters of

the underlying probability distribution of a given data set. There is nothing visual about the MLE

method but it is very powerful and is precise for large samples. The likelihood of a set of data is

the probability of obtaining that particular set of data, given the chosen probability distribution

model. ML estimation starts with writing the likelihood function which contains the unknown

distribution parameters. The values of these parameters that maximize the likelihood function are

called the maximum likelihood estimators.

In order to estimate the parameters, the likelihood function has to be constructed by

reversing the roles of the data and parameter in Eq (4-11i), i.e.,

L(6 / x) = f (xl / ) (4-12)
Thus L represent the likelihood of the parameter B given the observed data x and is a function

of 0 For a model with k parameters, the likelihood function takes the shape of k-dim geometrical

surface sitting above a k-dim hyperplane spanned by the parameter vector (Myung, 2003).

Both fand L are PDFs but the maj or difference lies in the fact that they are defined in two

different axes and are not directly comparable to each other. PDF fis a function of data given a

particular set of parameter values defined on the data scale. The likelihood function L is the

function of parameter given a particular set of observed data defined on the parameter scale.

ML approach is totally analytical in concept. MLE's generally have very desirable large

sample properties (Appendix C) However, MLE cannot be adopted in all situations. There are

some limitations when small numbers of failures (less than 5, and sometimes less than 10 is

small), MLE's can be heavily biased and the large sample asymptotic properties do not apply









Least Square Regression

The method of least squares assumes that the best-fit curve of a given type is the curve that

has the minimal sum of the deviations squared leastt square error) from a given set of data. The

parameters are obtained by solving the following minimization problem




The GPD CDF can be obtained by using Eq. (4-4). The empirical CDF are plotting positions

which are computed as:


F:= ,i1.N(4-14)
N+1
where N is the total number of samples, Nuis the index corresponding to the threshold u and P is

the plotting position. Since it is a minimum finding, it can be seen as an optimization technique

similar to maximum likelihood estimate method where we try to maximize the likelihood

function. Least square regression requires no or minimal distributional assumptions. Unlike

MLE, there is no basis for testing hypotheses or constructing confidence intervals.

Accuracy and Convergence Studies for the Quantile Estimation

In order to understand the capability of GPD to model the tails of the distribution, an error

analysis in terms of modeling and sampling error was performed on the probability content

estimation using tail modeling approach. A detailed discussion of this is presented in Appendix

D. Based on the results, it can be concluded that the sampling error is high compared to the

modeling error. If the sampling error is accounted for, tail modeling has a fairly good capacity to

estimate extreme probabilities with good accuracy. In structural reliability studies, one is

required to model the tails of the response which might follow some standard statistical

distributions. Normal and Lognormal distributions are widely used to model physical quantities

in structural reliability studies. Therefore, an investigation was done to study the accuracy and









convergence capabilities of tail modeling approach to model the tails of normal and lognormal

distribution which is discussed in detail in Appendix E. Then, the approach is demonstrated on a

cantilever beam example and a tuned mass damper example to estimate the failure probability.

The simulation studies (Appendix E) help us to conclude that based on the target quantile

value we wish to estimate, the threshold and number of exceedance data need to be chosen. In

the context of structural analysis, the interest is to address the response function. The failure

probability is based on the response. If we wish to design a system with a low failure probability

of the order of le-4 or higher, then we are required to estimate quantiles of 0.9999 or higher. So,

if the response follows a distribution close to normal, and we wish to estimate a quantile of

0.9999, a quantile of 0.95 and 100 exceedance data would enable us to estimate the quantile

under 3% error. On the other hand, if the response follows more of a lognormal distribution

(heavy tailed), then one is required to choose a higher threshold of the order of 0.99 or 0.995

with 100 or more exceedance data to be guaranteed to have a bias error of less than one percent

and a RMSE error of less than 5 percent. However, it is not possible to come up with a table that

explains the minimum exceedance data required for a level of quantile and required accuracy

level because, in practical situations the distribution of the response is not known. Moreover, the

challenge is to develop methodologies that can estimate the inverse measure corresponding to

high reliability, with limited samples.

Cantilever Beam Example

The beam example that was considered in Chapter 3 is treated here also. Though

simulating the beam example is not very expensive, we pretend that we have limited computer

resources and are restricted to use a maximum of 500 simulations. We are interested in

estimating the PSF for low failure probabilities with only 500 response data. Three different

cases are discussed. Case 1 discusses the estimation of PSF for the strength failure mode using









the tail modeling approach at different threshold values. Similarly the PSF estimation for the

deflection failure mode is investigated in Case 2 and the system failure case where both the

failure modes are considered simultaneously is discussed in Case 3. Case 1 and Case 2 are

presented in Appendix F. For all the cases, the convergence of PSF with respect to different

thresholds and accuracy of PSF at different number of samples are investigated. Two methods,

namely the maximum likelihood method and the least square regression methods are used to

estimate the parameters. The results from these methods are compared.

In the system failure mode, both the failure modes are considered simultaneously. The safety

factor for each failure mode is evaluated. For each realization, the critical of the two safety factor

is considered the system safety factor. Once, the system safety factor is obtained for 100

simulations, the tail modeling approach is carried out and the corresponding system PSF is

estimated. Here the design variables are w=2.6041; t-3.6746 and the allowable deflection

Do=2.145. This combination of the variables allows equal contribution of the modes to the total

failure. The contribution of the modes are: P, = 0.00099; Pf, = 0.00117 ; nf ~f = 0.00016 .

The convergence plots of PSF for the system failure case is presented in Figure 4-2. Figure 4-2

shows that the PSF estimated through parameters estimated by the regression method is unstable

in contrast to the PSF estimated through parameters from the ML method. This behavior was

observed in the other two cases too. The PSF estimate at a threshold of 0.9 is 0.99 with a

standard deviation of 0.003. The corresponding failure probability estimate is 0.0017 with a

standard deviation of 0.0002 which is about 10% of the estimate. The number of samples used in

the above studies is 500. The PSF is expected to converge to the actual value when the number

of samples is increased.









Tuned Mass-Damper Example

The tail modeling approach to estimate the failure probability is demonstrated here with

the help of a tuned mass-damper example. The tuned mass-damper problem in Figure 4-3 is

taken from Chen et al (1999). The problem involves the failure probability estimation of a

damped single degree of freedom system with dynamic vibration absorber. Figure 4-3 illustrates

the tuned damper system consisting of the single degree of freedom system and a dynamic

vibration absorber to reduce the vibrations. The original system is externally excited by a

harmonic force. The absorber serves to reduce the vibration. The amplitude of vibration depends

on


R = the mass ratio of the absorber to the original system


r, the damping ratio of the original system


S=" ratio of the natural frequency of the original system to the excitation frequency


r2= n2, ratio of the natural frequency of the absorber to the excitation frequency


The amplitude of the original system y is normalized by the amplitude of its quasi static

response and is a function of four variables expressed as:




y = (4-15)
1 1 1 1 -1 1
r, a r2 6 2 6 1 2


This example treats r, and r2 as random variables. They follow a normal distribution

N(1,0.025) andR = 0.01, r=0.01. The normalized amplitude of the original system is plotted in










Figure 4-4. There are two peaks where the normalized amplitude reached undesirable vibration

levels. The corresponding contour plot is presented in Figure 4-5. The failure region is denoted

by the red band. This failure region is an island. That is, the failure region has safe regions on

either side of it. This introduces additional challenges of not being able to use analytical

approaches like FORM because the failure region is not a half plane. The obj ective of the

problem is to reduce the risk of the normalized amplitude being larger than a certain value. The

limit state for this case is expressed as:

%(6,6= MG,)-70(4-16)
where yo can be considered as the allowable level of vibration. When the limit state in Eq.

(4-16) is greater than 0, failure is said to occur. Increasing or decreasing yo will help in

decreasing or increasing the failure probability respectively. yo =27 is considered for the

discussion. The corresponding failure probability with le7 sample MCS is estimated to be

0.01031. The tail modeling approach with 500 samples and 100 repetitions are used to study the

convergence and accuracy estimates of PSF. The plot for PSF at various thresholds is presented

in Figure 4-6. From the plots, it seems that regression behaves better compared to the ML

method. There is a discrepancy in the plot corresponding to the ML method. The PSF estimated

at 0.96 threshold is more accurate than the PSF estimate at a threshold of 0.98. In order to

understand the behavior of the tail of the tuned mass damper, a log plot of the CDF with le5

samples is examined. The plot is presented in Figure 4-7. It is evident from the plot that there are

two curvatures in the tail which are difficult to model. The GPD has to capture this shape with

less exceedance data. This is the reason for the discrepancy in the ML plot, the shape of the tail

at the area of interest (Sr=1) modeled by ML with a threshold of 0.96 was better than the tail

model with a threshold of 0.98.









In order to further explore the tail models from each method, the tail model from each

method is superimposed on each other and the comparative plots are presented in Figure 4-7. It is

clearly observed that the tail modeled based on ML approach denoted by the dashed line

attempts to capture the second curvature and in the process introduces error in the PSF value

corresponding to a failure probability level of 0.01. On the other hand, the model obtained based

on regression parameters represented by the solid line, approximates the tail in a linear fashion

and is accurate compared to the tail based on ML method for a failure probability of 0.01.

However, the ML method is expected to perform better when the failure probability to be

estimated is low. When the failure probability is low, it becomes necessary to model the second

curvature adequately to estimate the PSF with reasonable accuracy. The ML method can perform

better than the regression approach in modeling the second curvature. Such types of CDF with

double curvature might not be encountered in structural applications often and solving this

problem with less number of samples is very challenging. With more insight on the problem, it is

possible to select the suitable parameter estimation method depending on the requirements. Here,

if one needs to estimate PSF corresponding to failure probabilities lesser than le-3, then the

second curvature has to be modeled well and hence ML method is a good choice. Else, for higher

failure probabilities, regression can perform better.

Alternate Tail Extrapolation Schemes

In this section, simple tail extrapolation techniques are developed to estimate the PSF for

low target failure probability using MCS that is sufficient only to estimate the PSF for

substantially higher failure probability (lower target reliability index). Failure probability can be

transformed to reliability index by using Eq. (2-3). The same transformation is applied here to

the CDF of the reciprocal of inverse measure. Since we are modeling the upper tail, reciprocal of

the inverse measure is of interest here. The tail portion of the resulting transformed CDF









(relationship between inverse measure and reliability index) is approximated by a linear

polynomial in order to take advantage of fact that normally distributed inverse measure is

linearly related to the reliability index. Since this approximation will not suffice if the inverse

measure follows distributions other than normal, a logarithmic transformation is then applied to

the reliability index which tends to linearize the tail of the transformed CDF. This tail is

approximated using a quadratic polynomial. Since both these techniques use only data from the

tail, another technique that approximates the relationship between inverse measure and reliability

index from the mean to the maximum data using a quadratic polynomial is developed. The three

extrapolation techniques discussed are described with the help of a figure. A data set of size 500

with a mean of 10 and variance 9 following a lognormal distribution is used to illustrate the three

techniques.

Figure 4-8, A) shows the general relationship between PSF reciprocal and 1-Pf. Applying

the transformation modifies the CDF as in B). If the PSF reciprocal follows a normal

distribution, this curve will be linear. Therefore, the first technique approximates the tail of the

curve in B) by a linear polynomial. In order to take advantage of the remaining data, half of the

curve in B) is approximated by a quadratic polynomial. It is sufficient to consider only half of the

data because of the symmetry in reliability index. The third technique applies a logarithmic

transformation to the reliability index and approximates the tail of the curve shown in C) by a

quadratic polynomial. In all the above three techniques, once the coefficients of the polynomial

are obtained, the PSF reciprocal corresponding to any higher reliability index can be found. It is

to be noted that with 500 samples, it is possible to estimate only PSF reciprocal at reliability

levels less than 3. Classical tail models discussed in the previous chapter and the alternate









extrapolation techniques discussed in this chapter allow predicting PSF reciprocal at much higher

reliability indices without additional reliability analysis.

The alternative extrapolation techniques and classical tail modeling techniques are

conceptually the same. The maj or difference in perceiving the two classes is that the classical tail

modeling techniques model the CDF of PSF reciprocal, whereas the extrapolation schemes

approximates the trend of PSF reciprocal in terms of reliability index.
























Figure 4-1. Tail modeling of F(u) using the threshold u. The region of y>0 is failure


1 -


Tail part ~


Safe region


Failed region













































0.82 0.84 0.86 0.88 0.9 0.92 0.94 0.96 0.98
Fu


I.L.



1


1.(


0


0.!


Figure 4-2 Convergence of PSF at different thresholds. A) MLE B)Regression. Cantilever beam

system failure mode. 500 Samples. 100 repetitions


Nex

1 090 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10


I


.


32~~~~~ -- - LCI
+UCI
31C1 -- ---- -M ean
-M Median




98 --





97 -r


u..


0.i


0.i

0e


0'J.8













m, On2 Absorber


k2


Mn, mni Original
y I Isystem

F = cos(mt) clkl



Figure 4-3. Tuned vibration absorber


9095 1

1 05 1
71 1.1 0 9 r2



Figure 4-4. Normalized amplitude vs rl and r2














~i~f~f~i_~


I :

I i

I-1


0. '

0.9 0.95 1
B~eta


Figure 4-5. Contour of the normalized amplitude







































67





~_


Nex

1. O0 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10


-Actual PSF
SLCI
- - UC I
--BMean
-x-Median


1.4


1.2
L.


0.8 -~~ ~


0.7 --------' r- -;c~~ -


.8 0.82 0.84 0.86 0.88 0.9 0.92 0.94 0.96 0.98 1
Fu


00 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 (
-Actual PSF


LC I
tUCI
-Mean

- edian



-- -- ---






-t-=*~ C~


1.86


1.72


1.58


1.44




1.16




0.88


0.74


0.~8 0.82 0.84 0.86 0.88 0.9 0.92 0.94 0.96 0.98 1
Fu


Figure 4-6. Convergence of PSF at different thresholds. Tuned Mass Damper. A) MLE.

B)Regression. 500 samples. 100 repetitions. LCI Lower Confidence Interval. UCI-

Upper Confidence Interval











-185 Samples

i I ,, MLE
-I .. ---Reg
h: --500 Samples









.1 I


10 1



V 102
L.



103


0.5


1 1.5


2 2.5


3 3.5


Figure 4-7 Tuned Mass Damper. Comparison of tail models using regression and ML method














69






















10-2 2




-2


100 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 30 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1
S Sr
A 'B












-3





0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1
Sr
C


Figure 4-8. Transformation, V of the CDF of PSF reciroclV L (Sr).l A) CDF. of S. B) Inverse Standard
normal cumulative distribution function applied to the CDF. C ) Logarithmic
transformation applied to the reliability index.




















70









CHAPTER 5
MULTIPLE TAIL MODELS

Multiple Tail Model
A total of Hyve methods to model the tails of data were discussed in the previous two

sections. However, in practical applications where there is no information on the form of the

output distribution, there is no way to explore which technique performs better. A single

technique that performs well for a particular example might not perform the best for another

example. In fact, a single method that performs the best at a particular reliability index might not

perform the best at a different reliability index for the same example, as will be shown in the

numerical examples. In addition, there are no known straight forward ways to quantify the error

in the estimates.

In order to take advantage of all the techniques and still come up with the best prediction,

we propose to apply the Hyve techniques simultaneously and use the median of the Hyve estimates.

It is observed that the median is a robust estimate than the mean. This method is demonstrated

first on seven different statistical distributions followed by two engineering examples. In all

examples, it is observed that the median of the five estimates is at least the second best compared

to estimates from individual techniques. Moreover, the range of the Hyve estimates closely

approximates the error in the median. Thus using multiple tail models not only ensures to choose

a good estimate and buys insurance against bad predictions but also provides an error of the

estimate. Figures 5.1 to 5.5 show the various tail modeling techniques for a lognormal

distribution with a data mean of 10 and standard deviation of 3. In each case, the le5 sample

curve and 500 sample curve are superimposed to highlight the extrapolation. The Sr is computed

as discussed in the implementation in next section. Figure 5.4 shows the multiple tail model

approach (MTM). In order to understand to clearly see the range of the five methods, the region

beyond the threshold is zoomed and presented in Figure 5.5. The range of the five methods at









three different reliability indices is marked by double headed arrows. Mean of these ranges

computed over the entire extrapolation zone are capable of representing the error associated with

the median estimate from MTM.A representative actual error is presented in the plot. The QH is

the median and overlaps with the MTM curve.

Numerical Examples

Standard Statistical Distributions

The standard statistical distributions that are discussed in this section are presented in

Table 5-1. A data set with mean 10 and standard deviation 3 is considered. In order to compare

the performance of the proposed method on different distributions, a common target failure

probability is used to find the capacity which is in turn is used to normalize the parameters.

Implementation of this exercise is as follows:

Pf smse = 0.00135 ( smsget =3), X=10, COV = 0.3, 0-=COV x X
1. Use x and CO~to estimate parameters (ao and bo) for each distribution from Table 5-1.
These parameters can be used to generate random numbers.
2. Find capacity C as (1-4~,ef quantile. Inverse cumulative distribution functions (icdf)
can be used for this. In the case of single parameter distributions, add shift factor to the C.
3. Find normalized mean using x= We are interested in the safety factor reciprocal S,

following different statistical distributions. The normalized mean is the mean of the Sy
4. Use -x and CO~to find new parameters (a andb) for all the distributions.
5. Generate N = 500 Latin hypercube samples in [0, 1]
6. Find sy at each sample using (a, b) and inverse icdf
7. Use Eq (4-14) to estimate plotting positions
8. Plotting Sy and P provides the empirical CDF ofSy It is to be noted that the ordinate is
(1-Pf). That is, we are interested in the upper tail. As Pf decreases, 1 Pf increases,
reliability index increases, S decreases and sy increase.
9. A threshold of 0.9 is considered for classical tail modeling techniques and the parameters
of GPD that approximates the conditional CDF beyond the threshold are estimated using
Maximum Likelihood and least square regression approaches.
10. The transformations discussed in the previous section can be applied to the CDF of
S, and s, at higher reliability indices can be estimated directly from the approximated
relationships.










11. There are totally five estimates (steps 9 and 10) of sy denoted by Sind in the extrapolated
regions. Record the median and range of f md .as 5m and 5Ra respectively.
12. Exact values of Sy can be obtained using icdf functions.
13. Compute error in the estimate of individual methods eind as abs (sy Smd ).
14. Compute error in multiple tail model (MTM) estimate eMTM~n RS abs(si. 'm)
15. Compute the ratio of mean of eMTM to mean of 5Ra over the entire extrapolation zone and
denote it as rl
16. Repeat steps 5 to 15, 1000 times for each distribution.
17. Record the median, mean of eind and eMTM OVer 1000 repetition as '"ooomind > 1000pind and
oomMTM, >100MTM
18. Record the median and mean of the ratio in step 15 over 1000 repetition as 'ooom,


For each distribution, boxplots of eind and eMTM are preSented. 'ooomind and 'ooomMTM COmpared

at three reliability indices between 3 and 4.2. The results for the normal distribution are

presented in Figure 5-6. The obj ective of this plot is to see how well the 5m estimate compares to

the Sind For 1000 repetitions, only the median and the mean can be compared because the range

is volatile. It was observed that the median was a robust estimate compared to the mean. It is

evident that the median is less sensitive to the outliers compared to the mean. At P =3, the

regression (Rg) performs the best followed by the linear tail (LT). The MTM performs as good

as the second best. At p =3.6, the LT performs the best followed by the regression (Rg) and

MTM performs as well as LT. At P =4.2, the LT performs the best followed by the quadratic tail

(QT) and MTM's performance is as good as LT. It is to be noted that the individual techniques

that provided the best estimate differed at different reliability indices. However, the MTM

estimate was consistent and it performed at least as good as the second best estimate from the

individual techniques. This approach serves as an insurance against bad predictions, if we were

to use a single technique.









Box plots of rl ratio are presented to see how well the range of the methods compares to

the mean of the eMTM Over the entire extrapolation region. The results for the normal distribution

are presented in Figure 5-7. It is clearly observed that the ratio of the mean of the error to the

mean of the range in the entire extrapolation region is around 1. If the ratio is 1, then the range

captures the error in the median perfectly. Here, the range provides an estimate of eMTM that

might slight over or under estimate the actual error. The boxplots for the remaining distributions

are presented in the Appendix G. Table 5-2 provides a summary of the performance of the

individual methods and the MTM for all the distributions. Table 5-2 shows that not a particular

technique was the best for all the distributions and the technique that provided the best estimate

for a particular distribution varied as the reliability indices changed. However, the MTM

estimate was mostly close to the 2nd best available estimate. The summary of rl ratio is presented

in Table5-3. It is observed that other than uniform distribution, the ratio varies between 0.15 to

Table 5-1. 7 standard statistical distributions and their parameters

Distribution Parameters
a b
Normal ;nr 5('
LogNormal n( -05b


Gamma 2


Extreme Type _0.577 i
1 b o

Uniform 1 2
x--a x+-a
2 2
Single parameter distributions
Exponential Y x
Rayleigh a



74









0.35. This means that half of the range over estimates the error by a factor of 1.5 to 3. In order to

provide an insight what number should one expect for the r ratio, a simple exercise is performed.

Standard normal random numbers of size 5x7 (represents 5 estimates at 7 different reliability

indices) are generated and rl is computed over le5 repetition. The resultant number is 0.18.

Table 5-2. Summary of the performance of individual methods and MTM for different
di stributi ons
Rel Index 3 3.6 4.2
Performance 1st best 2nd best MTM 1st best 2nd best MTM 1st best 2nd best MTM
Distributions
Normal Rg LT 2nd LT QH 1st LT QT 1s
Lognormal Rg LT 1st QH Rg 3rd QH QT 3rd
Gamma Rg LT 2nd LT Rg 1st QT LT 2nd
Ev QH Rg 1st QH QT 1st QH QT 2nd
Uniform QT Rg 1st Rg ML 2nd Rg ML 2nd
Rayleigh Rg LT 2nd LT Rg 1st LT QT 1st
Exponential LT Rg 2nd Rg QT 1st Rg QH 3rd

Table 5-3. Summary of the Error to range ratio for different distributions
Distribution looom
Normal 0.279
Lognormal 0.349
Gamma 0.181
Ev 0.183
Uniform 0.003
Rayleigh 0.148
Exponential 0.241
Since the concept of regression is used to estimate the parameters in all methods other

than the ML approach, the residuals are monitored for each method to see whether they follow

the normal distribution as per classical statistical theory. It is expected that the type of

distribution of the residuals can provide a good idea about the quality of the fit. A similar study

was made for the normal distribution case and the normal QQ plots for the residuals are

presented in Figure 5-8. It is observed that the residuals of none of the methods follow a normal

distribution. Investigating the corresponding histograms reveal that they follow a log normal









distribution. In these situations, other regression schemes like weighted approaches can be

adopted depending on the knowledge of the histograms and QQ plots of the residual which is

scope for future work.

Engineering Examples

Application of multiple tail models for reliability estimation of a cantilever beam

The cantilevered beam example treated in Chapter 3 is considered here. The obj ective of

the original problem is to minimize the weight or, equivalently, the cross sectional area, A =w. t

subject to two reliability constraints, which require the reliability indices for strength and

deflection constraints to be larger than three. Eqs (3-17) and (3-18) are rewritten as

600 600
,Y+ X

sR R
4L Y (X
D Ew t t'w2
Gd = 1- 1- (5 -2)
Do Do
It is to be noted that the performance functions are expressed in a fashion such that failure

occurs when G, or Gd is greater than 1. Here, we consider a system failure case. That is, both the

failure modes are considered simultaneously. The optimal design variables w=2.6041, t-3.6746

is taken from Qu and Haftka (2003) for a system reliability case. The corresponding reliability

index is 3. The allowable deflection Do is taken to be 2. 145. For each sample the critical safety

ratio reciprocal (maximum of the two) is computed. Since we are dealing with S,, it is to be

noted that n=1-Perazer. The conditional CDF of Sy can be approximated by classical techniques

and the relationship between Sy and reliability index be approximated by three different alternate

techniques. Finally, using the MTM approach will give a better prediction compared to any

individual method. This procedure is repeated 1000 times and the results are presented in Figure









5-9 It is observed that the LT performs the best at all three reliability indices followed by the QH

as the second best. MTM consistently performed close to the second best estimate.

Figure 5-10 presents the plot of rl ratio. The ratio is 0.23 and thus strengthens our

conclusion that the half of the range approximates the error in the median by a factor between 1.5

and 3, which is close to 2 here. The main advantages of the techniques discussed are that no

statistical information is required and huge reduction in computational power. In order to

understand the sacrifice in accuracy for the reduction in computational power a MCS study is

performed.

100 repetitions of Sy estimates with 5E5 samples and the corresponding standard

deviation are computed and presented in Table 5-4. At a reliability index of 4.2, the standard

deviation in Sy estimate is 0.04 which is the same error from MTM using 500 samples.

Therefore, for a same level of accuracy, the reduction in computational power is about 3 orders

of magnitude (5E5 to 5E2).

Table 5-4. PSF reciprocal estimates and standard deviation at different reliability indices
Rel Index 3 3.2 3.4 3.6 3.8 4 4.2
S, 1.012 1.032 1.05 1.07 1.09 1.12 1.13
SD 0.003 0.004 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.02 0.04


Application of multiple tail models for reliability estimation of a composite panel

The design of the wall of a hydrogen tank which is a composite laminate operating in

cryogenic temperatures addressed by Qu et al., (2003) is considered as a second engineering

example. In order to reduce matrix cracking and hence hydrogen leakage in cryogenic

environments, the laminates need to have smaller angle between the plies. However, these types

of laminates do not carry the biaxial hoop and axial stresses due to pressure. Qu et al., (2003)

investigated options for minimizing the increase in thickness required to carry both mechanical

77









and thermal residual strains. The geometry and loading conditions of the problem is presented in

Figure 5-1 1. The laminate is subj ect to mechanical (Nx and N,) load and thermal loading due to

operating temperature -423oF where the stress free temperature is 300oF. The obj ective of the

actual problem was to optimize the weight of laminate with two ply angles [Oz,,102 The ply

angles and ply thickness (t, and t2 ) are the design variables. The material used is IM600/133

graphite epoxy of ply thickness 0.005 inch. Qu et al., (2003) performed the deterministic design

optimization using continuous design variables. In order to account for the uncertainties and

make the deterministic optimal design comparable to probabilistic optimal design, they used a

safety factor of 1.4. For further details, the reader is referred to Qu et al., (2003). The mechanical

properties are presented in Table 5-5.

The deterministic optimization problem is formulated as

Minimize h =4(tz + t2
Such that t,,, t2 >0.005 (5-3)
El < SFE 1" U, ef S;F 2 2U SFZ ~ 5;121 1 I:


All material properties are assumed to be random, uncorrelated and follow normal

distributions. The coefficient of variation is presented in Table 5-6. Here, thickness is in inches

and h is the laminate thickness. Superscripts U and L represent upper and lower limits of the

associated quantities. El, E2, and 712 are the ply strains along fiber direction, transverse to fiber

direction, and shear strain, respectively. E2, G127 1 and a2 are functions of temperature. Qu et al

(2001) show that at 20.2K (-423 o F) the thickness of the optimum laminates obtained by using

temperature dependent material properties is 80% less than that using constant material

properties at 298 K (77o F ). Qu et al (2003) observed that e2U is the active constraint. For a

feasible design, 21 different temperatures uniformly distributed between 20oK and 300oK is

78









considered and the strain constraints are applied to these temperatures. The mean is computed at

a particular temperature and random numbers generated based on coefficient of variation. The

mean for other parameters are presented in Table 5-7. The deterministic optimal design obtained

by Qu et al (2003) is presented in Table 5-8.

The transverse strain on the first ply (direction 2) is the critical strain. The limit state is

defined as the difference between the critical strain and the upper bound of the allowable strain.

G; = Ez -- E"r (5-4)

Failure is said to occur if Eq. (5-4)> 0. In order to extend this example for demonstrating the

multiple tail models approach, the second optimal design in Table 5-8 is considered. The loads

are increased by a factor of 1.1 (Nx -5280 lb/inch and Ny -2640 lb/inch) so that the failure

probability is of the order of l e-3.

500 random critical strain values are generated. Similar to the previous examples, 5

different techniques are used to fit the tail of the response distribution. The results are presented

in Figures 5-12 and 5-13. As observed in other examples the MTM compared at least close to the

second best in estimates from individual methods. However, the ratio of mean error to mean

range is 0.22 which means that half of the range overestimates the error by a factor of around

2.which falls within the range of 1.5 and 3 that was observed earlier in section. The le7 sample

based PSF reciprocal estimation and the corresponding standard deviation is presented in Table

5-9. At reliability index of 4.2, it is seen that the standard deviation is 0.0063 and the multiple

tail model provides an estimate with an error of 0.05 which is off by a factor of 8. The number of

samples used for this estimation is 500, which is about 4 orders of magnitude less than le7 Due

to the prohibitive computational power required, an exercise similar to the previous example is




























Table 5-7: Mean of random variables


not performed here. Instead the estimate from 500 samples and le7 samples are compared


directly .

Table 5-5. Mechanical properties of the composite laminates
Elastic properties E,,E ,G,, and ,,
Coefficients of thermal a, and a,


expansion
Stress-free temperature
Failure strains
Safety factor


6 ,6 ,6f,ef nd7{
S,


Table 5-6: Coefficient of variation for random material properties

0.035 0.035 0.03 0.06 0.09


21.5x100 0.359


300 -0.0109 0.0103 -0.013 0.0154


0.0138


Table 5-8:
Or (deg)


Deterministic optima found by Qu et al (2003)
6~ (deg) tl (in) t2 (in) h (in)


0.00
27.04
25.16


28.16
27.04
27.31


0.005
0.01
0.005


0.02
0.015
0.020


Table 5-9: Composite laminate. S, reciprocal estimates and standard deviation at different
reliability indices
Rel Index 3 3.2 3.4 3.6 3.8 4 4.2
1E+07 1.0043 1.0304 1.0579 1.0862 1.1157 1.1480 1.1824
SD 0.0007 0.0009 0.0015 0.0021 0.0025 0.0046 0.0063













101


10~

1-3

104



10-4


0.5 1 1.5



Figure 5-1.Lognormal distribution. Classical tail modeling techniques MLE and Regression













3.5




2.5 -.

-Th reshold
c~z I-1015 Samples
1.5 -LT


1 ---500 Samples

0.5




0.4 0.6 0.8 11.2 1.4



Figure 5-2. Lognormal distribution. Linear fit to tail (LT) and Quadratic fit to half of the data
(QH)



















0.5






S-0.5 -






-1.5



0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 1.1 1


Figure 5-3. Lognormal distribution. Quadratic fit to the tail (QT)


-Th reshold
-10e5 Samples
-,-QT
---500 Samples


.2 1.3 1.4

























1.5 -- Reg
-eLT
1- J I-QH

0.5- T
---500 Sample



0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4


Figure 5-4.Lognormal distribution. Multiple tail models
























Adual Ermrr
r. -*-Threshold
-165% Samples
tRange
2- / I--ML

-LT
1.t ,P I-*-QH


1 -* MTMd
0.6 0 7 0.8 0.9 1 1.1 1 2 1.3 1 4 1.5 1.6


Figure 5-5 Lognormal distribution. Multiple tail models-extrapolation region


















+









ML Rg OT LT H


looom = 0.016
1000 Id=008
MTM




i-


1-





ML Rg OT LT H


looom = 0.022
1000 Id=005
MTM


+









ML Rg OT LT Q


looom = 0.028
100 n = 0.032
MTM









-


1 = 4.2
0.074 0.034 0.028
0.074 0.051 0.033


S= 3
0.006 0.023 0.016 0.017
0.006 0.029 0.018 0.020


p = 3.6
0.031 0.031
0.031 0.041


looom = 0.018
1001n=0.01B
ind


oom. = 0.047
1001n=0.045
ind


looom = 0.093
1000md007
FIind .8


0.041
0.048


0.022 0.028
0.026 0.033


0.2

0.15


0.3


S0.2


0.1


0









0.15


0.05


0.05

0








0.12

0.1

0.08

S0.06

0.04

0.02

O


0.06


S0.04


0.02


0


0.05


0


MTM MTM MTM
Med= Median. ML=Maximum Likelihood, Rg- Regression, QT Quadratic fit to the Tail data between Sy and In( P ), LT Linear fit to the Tail data between
S~ and a QH Quadratic fit to Half of the data between S~ and a Dashed line inside the box depicts the mean and the solid line, the median.

Figure 5-6. Normal distribution. 1000 repetitions. Boxplot comparison of eind and eMTM at different reliability indices














oom =0.279
1000=0.5

0.55 025

0.55

0.45

0.45


0.35

S0.3

0.25

0.2

0.15

0.1

0.05t

MTM



Figure 5-7: Normal distribution. Boxplot of I ratio.

















































MTM MTM MTM

Med= Median. ML=maximum likelihood, Rg- Regression, QT Quadratic fit to the Tail data between Sy and In( P ), LT Linear fit to the Tail data between
S~ and a QH Quadratic fit to Half of the data between S~ and a Dashed line inside the box depicts the mean and the solid line, the median.

Figure 5-8. Cantilever Beam. 1000 repetitions. Boxplot comparison of eind and eMTM at different reliability indices


ML Rg QT LT H



looom = 0.017
1000 Id=001
MTM 002






I


+ .





ML Rg OT LT H



looom = 0.028
100 n = 0.034
MTM


0.8+


0.6


0.4



0.0


ML Rg QlT LT O



looom = 0.040
100 n = 0.051
MTM

0.25

0.2

S0.15

e 0.1I

0.05


1 = 3
0.037 0.020 0.015 0.016
0.052 0.026 0.018 0.021


S= 4.2
0.135 0.051
0.435 0.060


13 = 3.6
10m.d= 0.040 0.078 0.034 0.022 0.027
100 In=0.054 0.144 0.041 0.025 0.032
ind


0.6


= 0.021
:0.024


1000m.
1000 n
FIind

0.3

0.25

0.2

e= 0.15

0 5


0


looom = 0.087
100 In=0.101
ind


0.028 0.039
0.033 0.048


0.5

0.4


0.3








0.15


0.1

0.08

E 0.06

e0.04


0.05


O


0.02

0














QQ Plot of Sample Data versus Standard Normal
Regression


-0 3 -7 -


m -0 4 .,.+ 4 + + -






'-0 7- +

m~ +'
-O +



-0 9 +


QQ Plot of Sample Data versus Standard Norrnal
QT
-0 2


-0 3-


m -0 4 -~,+ 4. 4.4





'-0 7-
m .+

E +


-0 9-


-25 -2 -1 5 -1 -0.5 0 0 5 1 1 5 2 2.5 -2 5 -2 -1 5 -1 -0 5 0 0.5 1 1 5 2 2 5
Standard Norrnal Quantiles Standard Normal Quantiles



QQ Plot of Sample Data versus Standard Norrnal QQ Plot of Sarnple Data versus Standard Norrnal
QH LT
-02 ,., -02


-0 3 -I -0 3-


-0~ 4 4.~,+ 4- +1 0 4 4. 4.+ + +-









-2 5 -1 -. O 5 1 15 2 2.-25 -15 -05 O.5 1 1 52 2
Stndr Nora Quanile Stndr Nom lQun

Figure 5-9. NomlQ lto hersdasfrteomldsrbto










looom = 0.231
1000 =0.7
3.5


2.5-








MTM

Figure 5-10. Cantilever beam. Boxplot of I ratio.


Ny


~J;,


Figure 5-11. Geometry and loading for the composite laminate. X-hoop direction, Y-axial
direction

















+ +



i-







ML Rg Q~T LTQH


loo = 0.026
MTM














MTM


$ +


j+







ML Rg QT LT QH


1000 m =008
0100 T = 0.0 61
MTM
+ 0













MTM


ML Rg QTLT QH


100m = 0.081
1000 MM .0
MTM





+







MTM


S= 3
0.034
0.044


S= 3.6
0.111 0.073 0.040 0.032
1.668 0.094 0.049 0.039


1000 1= 4.2
looom = 0.166 0.210 0.121
1001n=0.547 227.298 0.156


2


looom = 0.027
1001n=0.032
ind


0.25

0.2

0.15



0.05











0.3


oom. = 0.080
1000nd016
Cind 010


0.8


0.042
0.085


0.026 0.021
0.032 0.025


0.058 0.049
0.067 0.057


0.6


S0.4


0.2


0









0.6


'0.4


0.2


0


0.5









1.2

1

0.8



0.4

0.2

0


ML=Maximum Likelihood, Rg- Regression, QT Quadratic fit to the Tail data between SI and In( 4), LT Linear fit to the Tail data between S, and a QH
Quadratic fit to half of the data between S, and a .Dashed line inside the box depicts the mean and the solid line, the median

Figure 5-12. Composite laminate of cryogenic tank. 1000 repetitions. Boxplot comparison of eind and eMTM at different reliability
indices...














looom = 0.220
1000 =0.5




2.5


2


F 1.5





0.5



MTM



Figure 5-13. Composite laminate of cryogenic tank. Boxplot of rl ratio.









CHAPTER 6
CONCLUSIONS

High reliability estimations with expensive computer models pose a challenge because of

the high computational expense. Extrapolating into higher reliability indices with information

from lower reliability indices can be one solution to this problem. In order to do this, the tails of

the distribution are to be modeled well. Inverse reliability measures feature several advantages

and is widely used by researchers in structural reliability. This work explores the usefulness of

inverse measures in tail modeling. Two classical tail modeling techniques were discussed.Three

extrapolation techniques that can complement the classical tail modeling techniques were

developed. This work proposes to use a multiple tail model approach in which all the five

techniques are applied simultaneously to estimate the inverse measure, and the median is taken

to be the best estimate. It is shown that the range of the five methods can be utilized to

approximate the error associated with the estimate. The proposed method was demonstrated on

seven statistical distributions and engineering examples. It was shown that the sacrifice in

accuracy compared to the crude MCS is relatively small compared to the immense reduction in

computational power.









APPENDIX A
PSF ESTIMATION FOR A SYSTEM RELIABILITY

The estimation of PSF for a system reliability case is demonstrated with an example. This

example is artificial and is an illustration of a case with multiple limit state functions. The

example is presented in Figure Al.The limit state functions are:



G, =( y 3 X (A l)

(x + y-5)23 (x- y -12)21 (2
G2 =+ 0.8 (2


G3=y 20 (A3)

The limit states are functions of two random variables x and y. The distributions of the random

variables are presented in Table A-1. The example has been created in such a fashion that each

limit state and its intersection with other limit states contributes significantly to the total failure.

It should be noted that non linear functions are used to emphasize the advantage of using MCS

and a PSFbased approach to estimate failure probability. Using FORM in these circumstances

might introduce huge error due to linearizing the limit state function at the most probable point

of failure. The contributions of failure modes to the total failure are listed in Table A-2. The

system PSF can be estimated as described in the flowchart in Figure A-1. The limit states are

functions of two random variables x and y. The PSF estimated for different target failure

probabilities are listed in Table A-3. For a target failure probability of 0.5 57 which is the actual

failure probability as listed in Table A-3, the PSF is estimated as 1. When a lower target failure

probability of 0.5 is used, the PSF is estimated to be 0.844 indicating that the system is unsafe

and when a larger target failure probability of 0.6 is used, the PSF is found to be 1.12 showing

that the system is over safe. This shows that PSF based approach can adequately address system

reliability case accounting for the interactions between the modes.











Table A-1. Distribution of random variables. Multiple failure modes example
Random Variable x y

Distribution Normal (4,0.5) Normal (2,3)


Table
Limit
states


A-2. Contribution of failure modes to the system failure
Failure % Contribution
probability to total failure


1
2
3
1 & 2
1 & 3
2 & 3
1,2 & 3
Total


0.432
0.468
0.336
0.386
0.253
0.249
0.209
0.557


77.55
84.02
60.32
69.29
45.42
44.71
37.52
100


Table A-3.
Target Pf
0.557
0.5
0.6


PSF at different target failure probabilities
PSF
0.9996
0.8444
1.1191


n
Failure
i
*'
:' ,"':'"
\ :,"
i~ ~ ~
~r
;I~ .'
.'c:
'r.CI'
"r
i I
'
...
:~; I~
FlllrlP
x 'r.


2 3 4 5 6 '7


Figure A-1. Two variable system. Algebraic multiple limit state functions example









APPENDIX B
GENERALIZED EXTREME VALUE THEORY

Let X1, X2,...be a sequence of independent random variables with a common distribution
function F, and let

Mnn = maxt (X,..., Xn)
Pr(Mn < z} = Pr(X1 < z,...Xn <; z)
(B 1)
= PrfX,
= (F` Generally, the distribution function of Mn can be derived exactly for all values of n. But here F;

is not known, so it does not help. Here we look for approximate families of models for Fn which

can be estimated based on extreme data only. This is done as follows:


Mn n n(B2)

for sequences of constants (an > 0) and {bn) Appropriate choices of constants stabilize the

location and scale of Mn as n increases. Essentially we seek limit distributions for Mn with

appropriate choices of constants. The all possible range of limit distributions for Mn is given by

the following theorem, the extremal type theorem, a product of Fisher-Tippet (1928) work.

If there exists sequences of constants {an > 0) n b) uhta
Pr ((M~ b)l /~ a< z)~ H(z) as na a (B3)
for a non degenerate distribution function H, then H belong to one of the following families:

1. H(z) = exp exp ,JI -c < z < cO (B4)




2. H(z)= ex z b -a iz> b (B5)











3. H(z) = a- (B6) 2b~

Here, a and b are the scale and location parameters. a is the shape parameter. These three classes

of distributions are called the extreme value distributions with types I, II and III, widely known

as Gumbel, Frechet and Weibull families respectively. The above theorem implies that the

normalized maxima have a limiting distribution that must be one of the three types of extreme

value distribution. The three families of distributions can be combined into a single family of

models having distribution function of the form


H(z)= exp -[ 1+( z -~ug (B7)

such that (zl :+ 5(z u) / a > 0), where the parameters satisfy -co < pu < co, a > 0 and

-co < 5 < CO This is the generalized extreme value (GEV) family of distributions. Here, pu is the

location parameter, a is the scale parameter, 5is the shape parameter. Type II and III families

correspond to 5 > 0 and 5 < 0 cases in (9). 5 = 0 can be interpreted as the Gumbel family with

distribution function:


H~z)=exp -xp -(B8)









APPENDIX C
MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD ESTIMATION

The PDF of the Pareto Distribution is given by:

1 r~l~rz 1+-i o

f (x) = O (C1)

-e O 5= 0

Here, the z represents the exceedances. 5 and a are the shape and scale parameters respectively.

The likelihood function for a sample of zl...zn of iid GP random variables is given by:


n~= -ls i 1+-~)5~
L (zi,5 o ) = ::i i=1 5= (C2)


The log likelihood function is expressed as:


-nlogE-( 51+1 log= 1+ zi 1+ 5zi >0o
log L(f ) = (C3)
-n logs a zi 5 = 0
Oi=1
The maximization of (C3) is best made by reparametrization:


(,, r>() (, 5) with r =

yielding


h = log L (r, 5) = -n log f1+ jlog (1 zi)Si (C4)

= -n log5+ n log r- l1+ lg1ri (CS)

The max of (CS) is found as the minimum of the negative of(C5). The MLE are given by

differentiating (CS) and equating to zero.










dhn+ 2 Ilog( + rzi) =0 (C6)

-+-+1z Ci 0= (C7)


(C6) yields i = 1 log(1+ fzi) and (C7)can be solved for Z Numerical techniques are used for
i=1

the maximization of h in (CS) using algorithms that are available in standard software packages.

In most situations estimation is done using iid samples. In such cases, the interest is to

determine the behavior of the estimator as a sample size 3 0 This is referred to as asymptotic

behavior. Under certain regularity conditions like: the first and second derivatives of the log

likelihood function must be defined., the fisher information matrix must not be equal to zero,

MLEs exhibit following properties

Asymptotically unbiased (i.e.,) its bias tends to zero as the number of samples increases
to infinity.
MLE is asymptotically guassian. That is, as sample increases the distribution of MLE
tends to normal distribution. Here, the covariance matrix can be obtained as the inverse of
the fisher information matrix.









APPENDIX D
ERROR ANALYSIS FOR GPD

This appendix describes the error analysis for the probability content estimated using tail

modeling. When the distribution of exceedance is approximated using GPD, there are two

sources of error:

1. Modelling error

2. Sampling component of the total error

The modelling error refers to the capacity of the GPD model to accurately represent the

distribution of exceedance data or the tail of the CDF. If the exact CDF is available, the CDF

estimated through GPD can be compared and the resulting error is the modeling error.

Depending on the empirical CDF, the GP fit will vary. This introduces sampling error. The

sampling error comes from the fact that the GPD parameters vary depending on the exceedance.

The input variables generally come from sampling distributions like the LHS or any other

suitable DOE. Depending on these sampling points, the threshold differs. Hence, the exceedance

is affected and therefore the estimated parameters and eventually the fitted GPD.

If we have the privilege to generate large number of samples and use a fraction of it as

exceedance data to fit a GPD, the estimated parameters in the process can be considered as

'optimal' parameters since they are based on a large sample size. These parameters can be used

to estimate probability contents at certain levels and can be compared with the probability

content estimated by a GPD with small sample size. This difference will dictate the sampling

error contribution to the total error.

In an attempt to study the modeling and sampling error, an example problem is treated

here. The example under investigation is Y =exp(x) and x~N(0, 1). The modeling error is studied

comparing the estimated probability content using a GPD with a large sample size and the exact









probability content generated by analytical expression of the lognormal distribution. The

parameters for the GPD are obtained by MLE method.

Let the conditional CDF P (Y > ut +: / Y > ur) be represented by F4, (z) In this example, it

is possible to estimate this quantity exactly. Using extreme value theory for exceedances,

F (z-) can be approximated by a GP distribution denoted by F ,(z) Let the estimated CDF be

denoted by F ,(z)$ Let the GPD which is based on the optimal parameters be denoted


by F ~(z)* .

le6 samples based on LHS design are generated. The Y's are sorted

as: Y(, < Y(2) .. (le6) This is called the order statistics of Y. Choosing the appropriate 'u',

the threshold value is very critical. u defines the beginning of the upper tail. The F, is chosen to

be 0.90 and the corresponding value of Y is chosen as u. Once u is chosen, the exceedance data

is formed and the ML estimates are obtained for the parameters. These estimates are used to

estimate the probability content at different levels of Y. The results are presented in Table D-1.

Five repetitions of le6 samples are used for each level. The mean and standard deviation of the

CDF estimates based on GPD are presented. The error refers to the total error in percentage. The

sampling error component of the total error is extracted using estimated optimal parameters. The

optimal parameters were obtained based on a million samples. Here, 3 percent of the data was

considered as exceedance. The results are presented in Table D- 2. From Tables D-1 and D-2, it

can be clearly seen that the sampling error is high compared to the modeling error. So, if we can

account for the sampling errors, tail modeling has a fairly good capacity to model the tails of the

distribution to estimate probability contents.










TableD-1. Modelling error (F,(z-) ,,(z) ). The standard deviation is very low that it is not
presented.


Exact F, (z)
0.08283
0.05376
0.03659
0.02583
0.01879
0.01400
0.01065
0.00824
0.00648


GPD F,,(z)*A
0.07988
0.05299
0.03647
0.02587
0.01884
0.01403
0.01065
0.00822
0.00645


Error%
3.56
1.43
0.33
-0.16
-0.28
-0.19
0.00
0.24
0.49


TableD-2: Sampling error( (F,,(z)* ,;,(z) )


Error

-9.04
-9.39
-9.61
-9.15
-8.20
-7.17
-6.53
-6.69
-7.95


Y GPD- le6 samples ,,(z)*A

4 0.07988
5 0.05299
6 0.03647
7 0.02587
8 0.01884
9 0.01403
10 0.01065
11 0.00822
12 0.00645


GPD- le2 samples ~(z)S
0.08710
0.05797
0.03997
0.02824
0.02039
0.01503
0.01135
0.00877
0.00696









APPENDIX E
ACCURACY AND CONVERGENCE STUDIES FOR NORMAL AND LOGNORMAL
DISTRIBUTIONS

The quantile of a probability distribution can be estimated using Eq.(4-8). The quantile2

can be related to the inverse measure in the structural reliability context where the probability

content is expressed as the target failure probability. Due to the various advantages of using

inverse measures in RBDO, we are interested in estimating them using tail modeling approach.

Here, we study the accuracy of the tail model to capture the quantile in the tails of the normal

distribution. In the following simulation study a y=x example where x ~N (0, 1) is treated. The

error metrics that are monitored are:

a) Bias error:
Bias(x )=Ex x] (El)
1Ns
x~ xP (E2)
Nsim =
where,
x : Estimated quantile
x, : Actual quantile
Nsim : Number of simulations
b) RMSE error:

d~ -x)2_NS 2 (E3)


Here, we set out to study the effects of the threshold value, the number of exceedance data

on the accuracy of the quantile estimate. For each threshold value, four different exceedances are

tested. Since the exceedances vary, the number of samples used in each case varies. The results

are presented in Table E-1.The overall capacity of the tail modeling approach to capture the

quantiles in the tails of the normal distribution seems to be pretty good. For all the four threshold



2 A p quantile of a random variable X is any value x such that Pr(XI x,) = p










values, the % Bias error for the 25 exceedance data seem to be very less compared to higher

exceedance data. But, it is to be noted that the corresponding %RMSE errors are high

emphasizing the fact that the estimates from low number of exceedance data could be highly

unreliable. 25 exceedance data is considered low to estimate quantiles. 50 to 100 data is

considered realistic and 200 ideal. It can be clearly observed that the accuracy of the % Bias

increases as the threshold increases for the

Table E-1. Accuracy of the tail modeling approach to estimate quantiles. Normal distribution
y = x. x~N(0, 1). 500 simulations. ML estimated parameters
Fu Nex NS % Bias % RMSE
0.999 0.9999 0.99999 0.999 0.9999 0.99999
0.8 25 125 -8 -9 -5 48 98 216
50 250 -6 -10 -14 22 34 46
100 500 -3 -7 -11 11 16 22
200 1000 -2.5 -7.3 -12.5 5.1 8.5 12.0
0.85 25 166 -6 -7 -2 37 81 211
50 333 -4 -8 -11 17 28 44
100 666 -2 -6 -10 8 13 18
200 1333 -2.1 -6.1 -10.6 4.1 6.9 9.8
0.9 25 250 -3 -2 3 25 51 107
50 500 -4 -7 -10 11 18 25
100 1000 -2.2 -5.7 -9.4 5.4 9.3 13.1
200 2000 -0.8 -3.5 -6.8 2.6 4.8 7.1
0.95 25 500 -3 -3 0 12 26 57
50 1000 -2 -4 -5 6 11 17
100 2000 -0.8 -2.5 -4.5 2.8 5.5 8.5
200 4000 -0.4 -2.4 -5.2 1.3 2.6 4.0
Fu Threshold in the CDF. Nex Number of exceedance data. NS- Number of total samples used. 0.999, 0.9999,
0.99999 -> Quantiles required to be estimated.
For a threshold of 0.85 and Nex=100, the -2,-6,-10 % Bias error in quantile translates to -27.6, -139.9 and -524.12%
error in probability content
same number of exceedance data. The threshold values, number of exceedance data is dependent

on the level of target quantile we wish to estimate. It can be observed that for a quantile of 0.999,

reasonably low quantiles such as 0.8 perform well enough with 50 to 100 exceedance data, if 5%

bias error is allowable. For a 0.9999 quantile, a threshold of 0.9 with 100 exceedance data


104










performs fairly well. A 0.95 threshold is capable of estimating a 0.99999 quantile well with

about 100 data. But it can be observed that there is oscillation in the error values as the 100

exceedance data seem to perform better than the 200 exceedance data in % bias error.

A higher threshold value is expected to rectify this oscillation. Since normal distribution is

the most encountered distribution in structural analysis, it is good news that the tail modeling

approach can capture the quantiles in the tail of the normal distribution fairly well. The next

distribution that is treated here is a log normal distribution which has a heavy tail and is

generally used to model loads in structural analysis. The simulation procedure is same as above.

The results are provided in Table E-2. Comparison of Tables E-1 and E-2 allows us to conclude

Table E-2. Accuracy of the tail modeling approach to estimate quantiles. LogNormal distribution
y = x. x-logN(0,1). 500 simulations. ML estimated parameters
Fu Nex NS % Bias % RMSE
0.999 0.9999 0.99999 0.999 0.9999 0.99999
0.8 25 125 18 110 527 228 1214 8065
50 250 8 42 126 77 199 517
100 500 7 29 79 37 91 229
200 1000 3.8 17.4 44.0 16.6 36.4 75.1
0.85 25 166 18 170 1517 256 2848 40477
50 333 4 37 152 67 270 1410
100 666 6 26 70 28 68 159
200 1333 1.8 12.0 32.9 12.3 26.1 51.1
0.9 25 250 5 71 439 101 632 5683
50 500 6 38 136 44 152 590
100 1000 1.1 14.2 43.7 16.8 40.3 92.4
200 2000 1.5 10.5 29.4 8.6 18.6 36.4
0.95 25 500 2 38 211 41 196 1363
50 1000 1 20 82 19 71 358
100 2000 1.4 12.4 39.0 9.3 24.2 56.2
200 4000 -0.1 5.6 19.6 4.2 10.2 20.8
Fu Threshold in the CDF. Nex Number of exceedance data. NS- Number of total samples used.0.999, 0.9999,
0.99999 -> Quantiles required to be estimated.
For a 0.95 threshold and Nex=100, the 1.4, 12.4 and 39% Bias error in quantile translates to 4.5, 37.5 and 78.3%
error in probability content










that estimating quantiles in lognormal distribution is more challenging than normal distribution.

For a 0.999 quantile, 0.8 and 0.85 thresholds perform fairly well with 200 samples. Above a 0.9

threshold, 100 samples seem to render very good results. There is considerable difficulty in

estimating 0.9999 quantile with even a 100 exceedance data and a 0.95 threshold value. Needless

to mention, trying to estimate 0.99999 quantile deteriorates the accuracy of the estimation only.

In order to test whether higher threshold values enable us to estimate the extreme quantiles

accurately, simulation is conducted for threshold values ranging from 0.96 to 0.99 and results are

presented in Table E-3.

Table E-3. Accuracy of the tail modeling approach to estimate quantiles. Higher thresholds.
LogNormal distribution
y = x. x-logN(0,1). 500 simulations. ML estimated parameters
Fu Nex NS % Bias % RMSE
0.9999 0.99999 0.9999 0.99999
0.96 25 625 50 254 171 958
50 1250 16 61 46 160
100 2500 9 30 18 42
200 5000 4 16 8 16
0.97 25 834 20 135 102 693
50 1667 12 49 35 98
100 3334 7 29 16 43
200 6667 3 13 6 12
0.98 25 1250 17 126 74 563
50 2500 6 29 19 49
100 5000 4 20 10 22
200 10000 1 8 4 8
0.99 25 2500 5 65 30 225
50 5000 2 19 10 25
100 10000 0.9 10 5 12
200 20000 0.2 6 2 5
Fu Threshold in the CDF. Nex Number of exceedance data. NS- Number of total samples used. 0.9999, 0.99999
-> Quantiles required to be estimated


Results from Table 4-3 clearly show that as the threshold is increased, the extreme quantiles are

also captured fairly well. With a 0.99 threshold and 100 exceedance data, we can achieve less


106









than one percent error in bias for estimating 0.9999 quantile. This requires 10000 samples.

Similarly the accuracy in estimating 0.99999 quantile is also better with 0.99 threshold and 200

exceedance data. A more accurate estimate can be expected if we raise the threshold to 0.999 or

higher.









APPENDIX F
ACCURACY AND CONVERGENCE STUDIES FOR THE CANTILEVER BEAM

Stress Failure Mode

The stress failure mode for the cantilever beam discussed in Chapter 3 is considered here.

The optimal design variables w=2.4526; t-3.8884 for a target failure probability of 0.00125 (le7

Samples) are adopted from (Qu and Haftka, 2004). The corresponding value of PSF for this

design is 1. For the optimal combination of the design variables, 500 samples based on the

distribution of the random variables are generated and the PSF is estimated for different

thresholds as discussed in Chapter 3. This procedure is repeated 100 times and the mean, 5%,

95% confidence intervals are estimated. The results are presented in Figure E-1. It can be

observed from the figure that the PSF estimated by regression approach is very unstable whereas

the median of PSF estimated by the ML approach is relatively stable. There is instability towards

higher threshold like 0.98 but the corresponding exceedance data are very less, which explains

the instability. The estimated mean of the PSF in the ML approach is close to 0.99 which is about

1% bias error in estimating the actual value of the PSF. The standard deviation of the PSF

estimate at a threshold of 0.9 with ML approach is about 0.003 which is 0.3% of the estimate.

The corresponding estimate of failure probability is 0.001 1 with a standard deviation of 0.0001

which is about 10% of the estimate.

Deflection Failure Mode

The allowable deflection is chosen to be Do=2.25. Similar to the stress failure case, the

PSF is estimated at different thresholds for the optimal combination of the design variables. The

results are presented in Figure E-2. At a threshold of 0.9 and ML approach, the PSF is estimated

to be 0.99 with a standard deviation of 0.004. The corresponding failure probability estimate is

0.0013 with a standard deviation of 0.0001 which is about 8% of the estimate itself.
























;F~ C


0.82 0.84 0.86 0.88 0.9 0.92 0.94 0.96 0.98 1
Fu


Nex
50 40 30


,400 90 80 70 60


20 10 0


MM~an
-x-Median
- i ii


1.0

1.06

1.024

1.012


0.976




0.9
0.8


Nex


Figure F-1. Convergence of PSF at different thresholds. A) MLE B) Regression. Cantilever beam
stress failure mode. 500 Samples. 100 repetitions


109















1.0 0 90


80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10


- - - - - - M e a n

-1edian

-~--~-i-







-.


1.0461


1.032


1.018


1.004
L.



0.976


0.962

0.948


0.9341


0'~.8 0.82 0.84 0.86 0.88 0.9 0.92 0.94 0.96 0.98
Fu


1.1 0 90


80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10
-4-LCI


UUCI
-Mean
-x--Median





-L



-+




-i :


LI.
S1.15




.5
1 .O



0.95


0. 0.2 084 .86 0.8 0.9 0.92 0.94 0.96 0.98
Fu

B


Figure F-2. Convergence of PSF at different thresholds. A) MLE B) Regression. Cantilever beam

deflection failure mode. 500 Samples. 100 repetition


110









APPENDIX G
STATISTICAL DISTRIBUTIONS ERROR PLOTS

Boxplot comparison of eind and eMTM at different reliability indices. ML=Maximum

Likelihood, Rg- Regression, QT Quadratic fit to the Tail data between S, and In(P ), LT -

Linear fit to the Tail data between S, and P QH Quadratic fit to half of the data between S,

and ; .Dashed line inside the box depicts the mean and the solid line, the median. 1000

repetition












100 p= 3
looom = 0.029 0.006 0.034 0.012 0.021
1001n= 0.030 0.008 0.047 0.015 0.028


1000 1= 3.6
looom = 0.083 0 .025 0.034 0.056 0.019
10001nd= 0.082 0.027 0.058 0.052 0.032


1000 1= 4.2
looom = 0.177 0.081 0.079 0.145 0.027
100Pin=0.175 0 .080 0.000 0.135 0.041


+ +




ML Rg OT LT H


oom. = 0.008
100pIn = 0.016
MTM








I~ I




MTM


ML Rg OT LT OH


oom. = 0.032
100Pin = 0.039
MTM













MTM


ML Rg Q1T LT Q1H



100 m = 0.090
MTM



+




I



MTM


0.5

0.4

o 0.3
0.2

0.1

0








0.25

0.2

S0.15

0.1

0.05

0


0.3


0.2


0.1


0









0.15


S0.1


0.05


0


Figure G-1 Lognormal distribution


1.2
1

0.B

ei 0.5
0.4

0.2

0







0.4



0.2

e 0.

0.1


0






























ML RgI QT LT 1H


lom. = 0.009
100PIn = 0.015
MTM











I

MTM


ML RgI QT LT H



1000 nd=006

m.~~ =.1





MTM


ML RgI QT LT QH


oom. = 0.047





In

MTM


100 p= 3
looom = 0.025 0.005 0.030 0.008 0.024
100Pn= 0.026 0.006 0.040 0.013 0.029


1000 1 = 3.5
oom. = 0.068 0.027 0.029 0.016 0.037
1001n=0.06B 0.028 0.052 0.01B 0.046
ind


1000 = 4.2
oom. = 0.137 0.078 0.040 0.042 0.053
1000n=0.134 0.076 0.066 0.039 0.066


0.8


0.6


i' 0.4

0.2


0









0.3


E 0.2


0.1


0.4

0.3

dC0.2

0.1

0







0.25

0.2

0.15
e 01


0.05

0


0.2 1


m 0.15

S0.1

0.05





0.5





0.15


Figure G-2: Gamma Distribution


I I~I























i~ i


I i


ML RgI QT LT 1H


looom = 0.076
100 n = 0.132
MTM












MTM


+




II

ML RgI Q;T LT H


monom = 0.291
1000 Id=032
MTM












MTM


+









ML RgI QT LT Q~H


looom = 0.720
100 n = 0.692
MTM












MTM


lomi = 0.249 0.163 0.356 0.510 0.076
1000 = 0.255 0.159 0.435 0.544 0.106
ind


p = 3.6 13 = 4.2
oom. = 0.652 0.615 0.602 1.020 0.270 lomi = 1.203 1.245 0.B69 1.654 0.679
looo = 0.611 0.606 0.737 1.068 0.256 1000 = 1.10B 1.232 1.063 1.717 0.619
ind ind


4


3

r2

e1










2.5

2

S1.5

S1


2

1.5



o0.5

0









1.5


I 1
o
0.5


0


0.5


0







1

0.8

S0.6



0.2


Figure G-3. Extreme Value type 1 Distribution




























ML Rg QT LT QH

looom = 0.000
100 Ind = 0.000
x 10 MT












MTM


ML Rg Q~T LTQH

looom = 0.001
-4 100 n = 0.001
x 10 MTM












MTM


ML Rg Q~T LT Q~H

looo = 0.001
-4 100 n = 0.001
x 10 T







0 -




MTM


1000 1= 3 1001 = 3.6
looom = 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.029 0.037 oomind = 0.001 0.000 0.005 0.058 0.118
loo = 0.001 0.000 0.000 0.029 0.037 100in= 0.001 0.000 0.005 0.058 0.118
x 10' ,x10 3


8


1000 p = 4.2
oom. = 0.001 0.000 0.014 0.087 0.245
100 d=0.001s 0.000 0.014 0.087 0.245
xn X10.


2











10



5



0


1l


e4

2

0


1-
o


Figure G-4. Uniform Distribution.





























ML RgI QT LT lH


oom. = 0.015





In


MTM


i~ 1





B~ B


ML RgI QT LTQH


oom. = 0.016
100 n = 0.024
MTM


ML RgI QT LT Q~H


looom = 0.018
1000 n=0.3
MTM=.3


loom = 0.022 0 .005 0.028 0.015 0.027
ind
looo = 0.023 0.006 0.036 0.018 0.031


I


. ,


1000 = 3.6
loom = 0.059 0.027 0.036 0.016 0.049
ind
looop= 0.057 0.027 0.051 0.021 0.055


1000 1= 4.2
looom = 0.117 0.072 0.037 0.015 0.078
Ind0
looop, = 0.110 0.072 0.062 0.022 0.088


i i-


0.3

0.25


ei 0 1


0.05

0









0.15





0.05


0


0.5

0.4





0.1


0.15


0.05


0.1

0.08

E 0.05
o
0.04

0.02

0


0.25


0.2

~0.15
e)


0.05


MTM


MTM


Figure G-5. Rayleigh Distribution.

























B j

ML RgI Q;T LTQH


oom. = 0.025
1000 Id=003
MTM 003









I .


MTM


ML RgI Q;T LTQH


looom = 0.040
1000 Id=002
MTM












MTM


+i

t +3



ML Rg Q LT Q


oom. = 0.109
100 n = 0.120
MTM





+






MTM


1000 1= 4.2
looom. d = 0.209 0 .072 0.107 0.229 0.081
1000 =0.241 0 .087 0.132 0.214 0.106


100p = 3
looom = 0.040 0.025 0.056 0.023 0 .042
100 d=0.044 0.026 0.076 0.025 0 .052


1000 1 = 3.6
looom.n = 0.104 0.043 0.054 0 .098 0.061
1000 =0.115 0.049 0.093 0 .090 0.07B


2.5

2

S1.5

1

0.5









0.8

0.6

S0.4

0.2

0


0.6
0.5
0.4

d'0.2

0.0








0.3

0.25

0.2

S0.15
o


0.05

0


= 0.6

0.4


0.0









0.5

0.4

S0.3

0.2

0.1

0


Figure G-6. Exponential Distribution.













Boxplot of r ratio. Different distributions
oom =0.349
1000 = 0.340

0.8


0.7


0.6


0.5


0.4


0.3


0.2


0.1


MTM





Figure G-7. Lognormal Distribution.


1000m .8

looop = 0.220


0.6

0.5

0.4


0.3

0.2

0.1

MTM




Figure G-8. Gamma Distribution.













oom =0.183
looo = 0.185

0.55

0.5

0.45~

0.4

0.35

S0.3

0.25





0.1

0.05
MTM




Figure G-9. Extreme Value-Type 1 Distribution


oom =0.003

x 10 3 looo 0.003



6-


5-


4-


3-


2-





0-
MTM




Figure G-10. Uniform Distribution.


119













oom =0.146

10004= 0.185


0.4


0.2 -




MTM




Figure G-11. Rayleigh Distribution.



1000m .4
1000 0.276

0.7


0.6


0.5


0.4


0.3


0.2


0.1



MTM




Figure G-12. Exponential Distribution.


120









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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

Palani Ramu was born in Chennai, India in 1978. He earned his BEng in Mechanical from

Madurai Kamaraj University, India in 1999. He worked at the Indian Institute of Technology,

Bombay and InfoTech Pratt & Whitney Center of Excellence as Research Assistant and Design

Engineer respectively till 2002. In 2003, he started his graduate studies at the University of

Florida, Gainesville and worked towards a Ph.D in Aerospace Engineering. During his graduate

studies, he was a visiting researcher at the Leonardo Da Vinci University, Paris, France and was

awarded a summer fellowship at the Center for Space Nuclear Research Idaho National Labs,

Idaho. His areas of interest include application of probability and statistical methods to design

aerospace structures, specifically highly reliable designs.


126





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1 MULTIPLE TAIL MODELS INCLUDING IN VERSE MEASURES FOR STRUCTURAL DESIGN UNDER UNCERTAINTIES By PALANIAPPAN RAMU A DISSERTATION PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLOR IDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2007

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2 2007 Palaniappan Ramu

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3 Dedicated to my parents Meenakshi and Ramu

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4 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This dissertation would not have been possibl e if not for the help, support and motivation by my teachers, family and friends. I am extrem ely thankful to my advisors Dr. Nam Ho Kim and Dr. Raphael T. Haftka for, providing me th is wonderful opportunity to pursue a Ph.D, their constant encouragement, patience and excellent guidance. I learnt a lot both in academics and personal life from them. They have been more than mere advisors friends, philosophers and mentors. I have always admired their in-depth understanding and knowledge and feel that I am fortunate to have worked under their guidance. I would like to thank Dr. Pe ter Ifju, Dr. Tony Schmitz and Dr. Stanislav Uryasev for agreeing to serve on my committee, reviewing my dissertation and for providing constructive criticism that helped to enhance the quality of this work. I would like to thank Dr.Choi, Dr.Missoum, Dr.Qu, and Dr.Youn, fo r collaborating with me. I al so thank the staff of the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering departme nt for their help with administrative support Thanks are due to my former and present coll eagues in the Structural and Multidisciplinary Optimization group. I thank all my friends, espe cially Gators for Asha group members, for making my life outside work wonderful and enjo yable. I greatly appreciate the financial support that I received from the Instit ute for Future Space Transport Last, but not the least, I would not have comp leted this work if not for the unconditional love, emotional understanding and support of my family. To you, I dedicate this work!

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5 TABLE OF CONTENTS page ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...............................................................................................................4 LIST OF TABLES................................................................................................................. ..........7 LIST OF FIGURES................................................................................................................ .........9 NOMENCLATURE................................................................................................................... ...11 ABSTRACT....................................................................................................................... ............13 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION..................................................................................................................14 2 RELIABILITY BASED DESIGN OPTIMIZATION............................................................18 Introduction................................................................................................................... ..........18 Standard Formulations.......................................................................................................... ..18 Moment-Based Methods.................................................................................................21 Monte Carlo Simulation..................................................................................................22 3 INVERSE RELIABILITY MEASURES...............................................................................26 Literature Review.............................................................................................................. .....26 Birger Safety Factor........................................................................................................... .....31 Probabilistic Sufficiency Factor.............................................................................................31 Probabilistic Performance Measure........................................................................................33 Inverse Measure Calculation..................................................................................................35 Simulation ApproachMonte Carlo Simulation..............................................................35 Analytical ApproachMoment-based Methods..............................................................37 Reliability based Design Optimization with Inverse Measures...........................................39 Beam Design Example...........................................................................................................39 Design for Stress Constraint............................................................................................40 Comparison of Inverse Measures....................................................................................41 Use of PSF in Estimating the Required Change in Weight to Achieve a Safe Design..........42 System Reliability Estimation Using PSF and MCS..............................................................43 Design for System Reliability by MCS and PSF....................................................................44 4 TAIL MODELLING AND RELIABILITY ANALYSIS......................................................49 Tail Equivalence and Generalized Extreme Value Theory....................................................49 Generalized Pareto Distribution.............................................................................................50 Threshold Selection............................................................................................................ ....52 Parameter Es timation........................................................................................................... ...54

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6 Maximum Likelihood Estimation....................................................................................55 Least Square Regression..................................................................................................56 Accuracy and Convergence Studies for the Quantile Estimation...........................................56 Cantilever Beam Example......................................................................................................57 Tuned Mass-Damper Example...............................................................................................59 Alternate Tail Extrapolation Schemes....................................................................................61 5 MULTIPLE TAIL MODELS.................................................................................................71 Multiple Tail Model............................................................................................................ ....71 Numerical Examples............................................................................................................. ..72 Standard Statistical Distributions....................................................................................72 Engineering Examples.....................................................................................................76 Application of multiple tail models for reli ability estimation of a cantilever beam........76 Application of multiple tail models for reli ability estimation of a composite panel.......77 CONCLUSIONS.................................................................................................................... ........93 APPENDIX A PSF ESTIMATION FOR A SYSTEM RELIABILITY.........................................................94 B GENERALIZED EXTREME VALUE THEORY.................................................................96 C MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD ESTIMATION.........................................................................98 D ERROR ANALYSIS FOR GPD..........................................................................................100 E ACCURACY AND CONVERGENCE STUDIES FOR NORMAL AND LOGNORMAL DISTRIBUTIONS......................................................................................103 F ACCURACY AND CONVERGENCE STUD IES FOR THE CANTILEVER BEAM......108 Stress Failure Mode............................................................................................................ ..108 Deflection Failure Mode.......................................................................................................108 G STATISTICAL DISTRIBU TIONS ERROR PLOTS..........................................................111 REFERENCES..................................................................................................................... .......121 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH.......................................................................................................126

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7 LIST OF TABLES Table page 3-1 Different approaches to pres cribe the probabilis tic constraint..........................................39 3-2 Random variables for beam problem.................................................................................40 3-3 Comparison of optimum desi gns for the stress constraint.................................................41 3-4 Comparison of inverse measures for w =2.4526 and t =3.8884 (stress constraint).............42 3-5 Comparison of MPP obtaine d from calculation of PSF.....................................................42 3-6 Design for System Reliability by PSF, Qu and Haftka (2004)**......................................45 5-2 Summary of the performance of i ndividual methods and MTM for different distributions.................................................................................................................. ......75 5-3 Summary of the error to range ratio for different distributions.........................................75 5-4 PSF reciprocal estimates and standard de viation at different reliability indices...............77 5-5 Mechanical properties of the composite laminates............................................................80 5-6 Coefficient of variation fo r random material properties....................................................80 5-7 Mean of random variables.................................................................................................80 5-8 Deterministic optima found by Qu et al (2003).................................................................80 5-9 Composite laminate. rS reciprocal estimates and sta ndard deviation at different reliability indices............................................................................................................ ....80 A-1 Distribution of random variables. Multiple failure modes example..................................95 A-2 Contribution of failure modes to the system failure..........................................................95 A-3 PSF at different target failure probabilities........................................................................95 D-1 Modelling error (()gFz -* () Fz)..................................................................................102 D-2 Sampling error (* () Fz-$ () Fz)................................................................................102 E-1 Accuracy of the tail modeling approach to estimate quantiles. Normal distribution.......104

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8 E-2 Accuracy of the tail modeling appr oach to estimate quantiles. LogNormal distribution................................................................................................................... ....105 E-3 Accuracy of the tail modeling approach to estimate quantiles. Higher thresholds. LogNormal distribution...................................................................................................106

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9 LIST OF FIGURES Figure page 2-1 Reliability analysis and MPP. S ubscript refers to iteration number..................................25 3-1 Schematic probability density of the safety factor S.........................................................46 3-2 Schematic probability density of the limit state function..................................................46 3-3 Illustration of the calculation of PPM with Monte Carlo Simulation for the linear performance function.........................................................................................................47 3-4 Inverse reliability analysis and M PP for target failure probability 0.00135 ( = 3)........47 3-5 Cantilever beam subjected to horizontal and vertical loads...............................................47 4-1 Tail modeling of F (u) using the threshold u. The region of y >0 is failure........................64 4-2 Convergence of PSF at different threshol ds. A) MLE B)Regressi on. Cantilever beam system failure mode. 500 Samples. 100 repetitions...........................................................65 4-3 Tuned vibration absorber...................................................................................................66 4-4 Normalized amplitude vs r1 and r2.....................................................................................66 4-5 Contour of the normalized amplitude................................................................................67 4-6 Convergence of PSF at different thresholds. Tuned Mass Damper...................................68 4-7 Tuned Mass Damper. Comparison of tail models using regression and ML method........69 4-8 Transformation of the CDF of PSF reciprocal ( Sr). A) CDF of Sr. B) Inverse Standard normal cumulative distributi on function applied to the CDF. C ) Logarithmic transformation applied to the reliability index..............................................70 5-1 Lognormal distribution. Classical tail modeling techniques MLE and Regression........81 5-2 Lognormal distribution. Linear fit to tail (LT) and Quadra tic fit to half of the data (QH)........................................................................................................................... ........82 5-3 Lognormal distribution. Quad ratic fit to the tail (QT).......................................................83 5-4 Lognormal distribution. Multiple tail models....................................................................84 5-5 Lognormal distribution. Multiple tail models-extrapolation region..................................85 5-6 Normal distribution. 1000 repe titions. Boxplot comparison of eind and eMTM at different reliability indices.................................................................................................86

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10 5-7 Normal distribution. Boxplot of ratio.............................................................................87 5-8 Cantilever Beam. 1000 repetitions. Boxplot comparison of eind and eMTM at different reliability indices............................................................................................................ ....88 5-9 Normal QQ plot of the residua ls for the normal distribution.............................................89 5-10 Cantilever beam. Boxplot of ratio...................................................................................90 5-11 Geometry and loading for the compos ite laminate. X-hoop direction, Y-axial direction...................................................................................................................... .......90 5-12 Composite laminate of cryogenic tank 1000 repetitions. Boxplot comparison of eind and eMTM at different reliability indices............................................................................91 5-13 Composite laminate of cryogenic tank. Boxplot of ratio................................................92 A-1 Two variable system. Algebraic mu ltiple limit state functions example...........................95 F-1 Convergence of PSF at different thres holds. A) MLE B) Regression. Cantilever beam stress failure mode. 500 Samples. 100 repetitions.................................................109 F-2 Convergence of PSF at different thres holds. A) MLE B) Regression. Cantilever beam deflection failure mode. 500 Samples. 100 repetition............................................110 G-1 Lognormal distribution....................................................................................................112 G-2 Gamma Distribution.........................................................................................................113 G-3 Extreme Value type 1 Distribution..................................................................................114 G-4 Uniform Distribution.......................................................................................................115 G-5 Rayleigh Distribution...................................................................................................... .116 G-6 Exponential Distribution..................................................................................................117 G-7 Lognormal Distribution...................................................................................................118 G-8 Gamma Distribution.........................................................................................................118 G-9 Extreme Value-Type 1 Distribution.................................................................................119 G-10 Uniform Distribution...................................................................................................... .119 G-11 Rayleigh Distribution..................................................................................................... ..120 G-12 Exponential Distribution..................................................................................................120

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11 NOMENCLATURE A Cross sectional area C Capacity C Scaling factor CDF Cumulative Density Function DUU Design Under Uncertainties FORM First Order Reliability Method G Limit state function GPD Generalized pareto distribution M Number of failure modes MCS Monte Carlo Simulation MPP Most Probable Point MPPIR MPP Inverse Reliability MPTP Minimum Performance Target Point MSE Mean square error PMA Performance Measure Approach PPM Probabilistic Performance Measure PSF Probabilistic Sufficiency Factor R Response RBDO Reliability based Design Optimization RIA Reliability Index Approach RSA Response Surface Approximation U Variables in standard normal space u Threshold value t Thickness

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12 w Width X Load in x direction Y Load in Y direction Reliability Index Standard Normal Cumulative Density Function Scale parameter Shape parameter z Exceedance data Fu(z) Conditional CDF Fz Conditional CDF approximated by GPD target fP Target probability of failure

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13 Abstract of Dissertation Pres ented to the Graduate School of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy MULTIPLE TAIL MODELS INCLUDING IN VERSE MEASURES FOR STRUCTURAL DESIGN UNDER UNCERTAINTIES By Palaniappan Ramu December 2007 Chair: Nam Ho Kim Cochair: Raphael T. Haftka Major: Aerospace Engineering Sampling-based reliability estimation with expensive computer models may be computationally prohibitive due to a large numbe r of required simulations. One way to alleviate the computational expense is to extrapolate re liability estimates from observed levels to unobserved levels. Classical tail modeling techniques provide a cla ss of models to enable this extrapolation using asymptotic theory by approximating the tail region of the cumulative distribution function (CDF). This work proposes three alternate tail ex trapolation techniques including inverse measures that can complement classical tail modeling. The proposed approach, multiple tail models, applies the two classical and three alternate extrapolation techniques simultaneously to estimate inverse measures at th e extrapolation regions and use the median as the best estimate. It is observed that the rang e of the five estimates can be used as a good approximation of the error associated with the median estimate. Accuracy and computational efficiency are competing factors in selecting samp le size. Yet, as our num erical studies reveal, the accuracy lost to the reduction of computationa l power is very small in the proposed method. The method is demonstrated on standard statis tical distributions a nd complex engineering examples.

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14 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION Uncertainty is an acknowledged phenomenon in the process of structural design. In an optimization framework design under uncertainties re fers to a safe design that not only needs to be optimal but should also warrant survivability against uncertainties. Traditionally safety factors were used to account for the uncertainties. Howeve r, use of safety factors does not usually lead to minimum cost designs for a given level of sa fety because different structural members or different failure modes require different safety factors. Alternately, probabilistic approaches offer techniques to characterize the unc ertainties using a statistical me thod and have the potential to provide safer designs at a given cost. However, the probabilis tic approaches require solving an expensive, complex optimization problem that needs robust formulations and efficient computational techniques for stab le and accelerated convergence. In addition, they also require statistical information which may be expensive to obtain. Structural reliability analysis requires the assessment of the performance function which dictates the behavior of the stru cture. The performance function is called the limit state function which is typically expressed as the difference betw een the capacity (e.g, yield strength, allowable vibration level) and the response of the system (e.g, stress, actual vibration). Approaches available for reliability assessment and analysis can be widely classified as analytical and simulation approaches. Analytical approaches are simple to impl ement but are mostly limited to single failure modes, whereas simulation me thods like Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) are computationally intensive but can handle multiple failure modes. Moreover, they can handle any type of limit state functions unlik e analytical approaches which ar e mostly appropriate for linear limit state functions. Most real life applications exhibit multiple failure modes and the limit state function is not available explicit ly in closed form. Since there is no information on nonlinearity

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15 of the limit state function, MCS is the obvious ch oice in such situations In reliability-based design optimization, a widely used probabilistic optimization approach (Rackwitz, 2000) in structural engineering, reliability analysis is an iterative process and using crude MCS is computationally prohibitive. Researchers develo p variants of MCS or other approximation methods like response surface that replaces the re liability analysis and obviate the need to repeatedly access the expensive computer models In reliability based design context, high re liability, typical of aerospace applications translates to small probability in the tails of the statistical distributions. Reliability analysis when dealing with high reliability (or low failure proba bility) designs is mostly dependent on how the tails of the random variables behave. In few cases the safety levels can vary by an order of magnitude with slight modifications in the ta ils of the response va riables (Caers and Maes, 1998). Therefore, the tails need to be modeled accurately. Limitations in computational power prevent us in employing direct simulation methods to model the tails. On e way to alleviate the computational expense is to extrapolate into high reliability levels with limited data at lower reliability levels. Statistical techniques from ex treme value theory referred to as classical tail modeling techniques here are avai lable to perform this extrapolation. They are based on the concept of approximating the tail portion of the cumulative dist ribution function (CDF) with a generalized pareto distribution (GPD). In structural engineering, reliability is measur ed by quantities like probability of failure or reliability index. Recently, alte rnate safety measures like the inverse measures in performance space have cornered enough interest because of their multifaceted advantages (Ramu et al, 2006). The inverse measures in performance space tie s the concepts of safety factor and target failure probability. The inverse measures transl ate the deficiency in failure probability to

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16 deficiency in performance measure and hence provide a more quantitative measure of the resources needed to satisfy safety requiremen ts. Among the several advantages they exhibit, inverse measures like probabilistic sufficiency factor (PSF) help in stable and accelerated convergence in optimization, better response surfa ce approximations compared to surfaces fit to other reliability measures. Since inverse measure e xhibit several advantages, its usefulness in tail modeling is explored in this work. Here we develop 3 alternate tail extrapolation schemes including inverse measures that can complement the classical tail modeling techniques. The alternate extrapolation schemes are based on va riable transformations and approximating the relationship between the inverse m easure and transformed variable. The primary motivation of this work is to develop an efficient reliability estimation procedure employing tail modeling techniques in cluding inverse measures that can estimate reliability measures corresponding to high reliabili ty with samples that are only sufficient to assess reliability measure corresponding to low re liability levels. This is a tradeoff between accuracy and computational power. Yet, as the st udies reveal, the accuracy lost to the reduction of computational power is very reasonable. Th e reduction in computational cost is about a minimum of 3 orders of magnitude for the same level of accuracy. Goel et al., (2006) developed a method to extend the utility of an ensemble of surrogates. When faced with multiple surrogates, they explored the possibility of using the best surrogate or a weighted average surrogate model instead of in dividual surrogate models. In a similar fashion, in order to take advantage of both the cl assical tail modeling t echniques and alternate extrapolation schemes and still come up with the best prediction, we pr opose to apply all the techniques simultaneously and use th e median of the five estimates as the best estimate. Here, we call using all the techniques simultaneously as multiple tail models (MTM). In addition to

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17 arriving at the estimate, the range of the five techniques can be used to approximate the error associated with the median estimate. Moreover, the MTM approach can be used to replace the reliability analysis in reliab ility based design framework.

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18 CHAPTER 2 RELIABILITY BASED DE SIGN OPTIMIZATION Introduction Optimization is the process of minimizing a co st which is a functi on of design variables (and other variables) subject to constraints that prescribe the design requirement. Often times, the variables involved are uncertain and probabilistic approaches are called for to account for the uncertainty as an alternate to the traditional sa fety factor approach, to obtain better designs. Several probabilistic approaches has been pr oposed in the last d ecade like Robust Design Optimization (Phadke, 1989, Gu, 2000), Reliability -based Design Optimization(Frangopal, 1985, Tu, 1999), Fuzzy optimization (Sakawa 1993, Maglar as et al, 1997), Reliability design using evidence theory (Soundappan et al., 2004). Reliab ility-based Design Optimization (RBDO) is widely used because it allows the designer to pr escribe the level of reliability required. This section presents a review of the standard reliability-based design formulations and reliability estimation methods. Standard Formulations Primarily, reliability-based design consists of minimizing a cost function while satisfying reliability constraints. The reliability cons traints are based on the failure probability corresponding to each failure mode or a single failure mode describing the system failure. The estimation of failure probability is usually performed by reliability analysis. In structural engineering, the system performance criterion is described by the limit state function which is typically expressed as the di fference between the capacity of the system and the response of the system which is expressed as: ()()()crGGG xxx (2-1) where, G is the limit state function and GC, Gr are the capacity and the response respectively. All the three quantities are functions of a vector x which consists of design (and random) variables

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19 and other parameters. The syst em is considered failed if G < 0 and safe if G > 0. If x is random, the design is considered a failure if the pr obability of failure is unacceptably high. Often times, RBDO is formulated as a double loop (nested loop) problem. The outer loop performs the optimization with respect to design variables, wh ile the inner loop performs the reliability analysis estimating the failure proba bility. This is mathematically expressed as: argmin cost(x) subject to (0) 1,2...jjj fftetPPGPjnm (2-2) where the cost is a func tion of design variables, nm is the number of failure modes, G is the limit state function. f targetP is the prescribed failure probability levels to which the designer intends to design the structure. Here, estimation of probabilis tic constraint requires reliability analysis. Often times the magnitude of failure probabil ity is low and hence engineers prefer to work with reliability index as the alternate measur e of reliability. The reli ability index and failure probability are related as: ()fP (2-3) where, is the standard normal cumulative density function (CDF). Sin ce the inverse of the standard normal CDF is required to estimate the reliability index, it is an inverse measure. Probabilistic constraints in Eq.(2-2) can be written as: j j target (2-4) Employing Eq. (2-4) for prescribing the probabilistic cons traint is called the Reliability Index Approach (RIA). In RIA, the failure reliability measure is usually calculated via FORM which is an iterative process and so computationally expensive and sometimes features convergence problems (Tu et al., 1999) In order to reduce the computational cost of double loop, various techniques has been proposed which can be classi fied into two categories as: (i) techniques that improve the efficiency of uncertainty analysis like fast probability integration (Wu 1994) and two-point adaptive non linear approximations (Grandhi and Wang 1998) (ii) techniques that

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20 modify the formulation of the probabilistic constr aints, for instance, using inverse reliability measures in the probabilistic constraint. Someti mes, researchers formulate a single loop RBDO that avoids nested loops. The id ea of single loop formulations re sts on the basis of formulating the probabilistic constraint as deterministic co nstraints by either approximating the KarushKuhn-Tucker conditions at the MPP or approxi mating the relationship between probabilistic design and deterministic design safety factors. A detailed survey of both single and double loop methods in RBDO is presented in the literature survey of Chapter 3. Kharmanda et al (2002, 2004, a nd 2007) developed RBDO solution procedures relative to two views points: reliability and op timization. From an optimization view point, Kharmanda et al (2002) developed a hybrid method based on simultane ous application of the reliability and the optimization problem that reduced the computational time. The hybrid method, compared to classical RBDO, minimizes a new form of the objective function which is expressed as the product of the original objective function and the reliability index in the hybrid space. Since the minimization of the objective function is carried out in both the deterministic variables and random variable space, it is referred to as hybrid design space. The reliability index in the hybrid space is the distance between the optimum point and the design point in the hybrid space However, the hybrid RBDO problem was more comple x than that of the deterministic design and may not lead to local optima In order to addr ess both the challenges, Kharmanda et al (2004) propose an optimum safety factor approach that computes safety factors satisfying a reliability level without demanding additional computing cost for the reliability evaluation. Kharmanda et al (2007) developed the hybrid design spaces an d optimal safety factor equations for three distributions namely, the normal, lognormal a nd uniform. The optimal safety factors are computed by sensitivity analysis of the limit stat e function with respect to the random variables.

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21 They report that the optimal safety factor appr oach has several advantages like smaller number of optimization variables, good c onvergence stability, lower compu ting time and satisfaction of required reliability levels. In order to estimate th e reliability measure for reliability analysis, one need to use analytical or simulation approaches which are described below. Moment-Based Methods In standard reliability technique s, an arbitrary random vector x is mapped to an independent standard normal vector U (variables with normal distri bution of zero mean and unit variance). This transformation is known as Ro senblatt transformation (Rosenblatt, 1952, Melchers, 1999, pp.118-120). The limit state func tion in the standard normal space can be obtained as G (U) = G (T(X)) where T is the transformation. If the limit state function in the standard normal space is affine, i.e., if (U)UTG then failure probability can be exactly calculated as fP This is the basis fo r moment based methods. Moment-based methods provide for less expensiv e calculation of the pr obability of failure compared to simulation methods, although they ar e limited to a single failure mode. The First Order Reliability Method (FORM) is the most wi dely used moment-based technique. FORM is based on the idea of the linear approximation of the limit state function and is accurate as long as the curvature of the limit state function is not to o high. In the standard normal space the point on the first order limit state function at which the di stance from the origin is minimum is the MPP. When the limit state has a significant curvat ure, second order methods can be used. The Second Order Reliability Method (SORM) appr oximates the measure of reliability more accurately by considering the eff ect of the curvature of the lim it state function (Melchers, 1999, pp 127-130).

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22 Figure 2-1 illustrates the concep t of the reliability index and MPP search for a two variable case in the standard normal space. In reliability analysis, concerns are first focused on the ()0 G U curve. Next, the minimum distance to the origin is sought. The corresponding point is the MPP because it contributes most to failure. Th is process can be mathematically expressed as: To find *U Minimize Subject to ()TUU GU (2-5) Where U is the MPP. The calculation of the failure probability is based on linearizing the limit function at the MPP. It is to be noted that re liability index is the distance to the limit state function from the origin in the standard normal space. That is, it is an inverse measure in the input space (standard normal). Monte Carlo Simulation Variants of Monte Carlo methods were originally practiced u nder more generic names such as statistical sampling. The na me and the method were made famous by early pioneers such as Stainslaw Ulam and John von Neumann and is a re ference to the famous casino in Monaco. The methods use of randomness and repetitive nature is similar to the casi nos activities. It is discussed in Metropolis (1987) that the method earns its name from the fact that Stainslaw Ulam had an uncle who would borrow money from relative just to go to Monte Carlo. Monte Carlo integration is e ssentially numerical quadrature using random numbers. Monte Carlo integration methods are algorithms for the approximate evaluation of definite integrals, usually multidimensional ones. The usual algorithms evaluate the integrand at a regular grid. Monte Carlo methods, however, randomly choose the points at which the integrand is evaluated. Monte Carlo Methods are based on the analogy be tween volume and probability. Monte Carlo calculates the volume of a set by interpreting th e volume as probability. Simply put, it means,

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23 sampling from all the possible outcomes and cons idering the fraction of random draws that in a given set as an estimate of the sets volume. Th e law of large numbers ensures that this estimate converges to the correct value as the number of draws incr eases. The central limit theorem provides information about the likely magnitude of the error in the estimate after finite number of draws. For example, consider estimating the integral of a function f over a unit interval. The () f xdx (2-6) integral can be expres sed as an expectation () E fU, with U uniformly distributed between 0 and 1. The Monte Carlo estimate for the integral can be obtained as: ()n i i f U n (2-7) If f is continuous and integrable over [0, 1], th en, by the strong law of large numbers, the estimate in Eq. (2-7) converges to the actual va lue with probability 1 as n In fact, if f is square integrable and we set (())f f xdx (2-8) then the error in the Monte Carlo estimate is approxi mately normally distributed with zero mean and standard deviation of /fn, the quality of this approximation improving as n increases. The parameter f in Eq.(2-8) will not be known in a real setting but can be approximated by the sample standard deviation. Thus, we not only obtain the estimate but also the error contained in the estimate. The form of the standard error is th e main feature of the MCS. Reducing this error to half require about increasing the num ber of points by four; increasing the precision by one decimal point requires 100 times as many points. Yet, the advantage of MCS lies in the fact that its /() On convergence rate is not restricted to integrals

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24 over the unit interval and can be extended to any dimension. The standard error will still have the same form irrespective of dimension. This a dvantage is unlike other numerical methods. Thus, Monte Carlo simulation is attractive to solve integrals in higher dimension. In structural reliability estimation, MCS i nvolves sampling each random variable to give a sample value. Then, the limit state function is com puted at every realization. If the limit state is violated, the structure has failed. The experiment is repeated many times with a randomly chosen vector. If N trials are conducted, the estimate f Pof the probability of failure is given approximately as: (())i fnGx P N (2-9) Where (()) nGx denotes the number of trials n for whic h the structure failed. The number of trails N is related to the desired accuracy of failure probability. MCS need at least 100*N samples when the failure probabi lity is of the order of 1over N. One can find the standard deviation of failure probability in Eq. (2-9) using the following expression: () f fPP N (2-10) There are many variants to the abovementi oned crude MCS. Researchers use several variance reduction techniques li ke importance sampling (Glasserman, 2004) to make better use of MCS and extract more information from the same level of simulation. Importance sampling requires one to find a sampling PDF which uses the information of greatest probability density in the failure zone. This is conceptually similar to MPP which is essentially a point that contributes most to failure. An alternate formulation of the MCS is used by Smarslok et al (2006) to exploit the advantage of separable Monte Carlo simulatio ns. This integration method takes advantage of a special form of the limit state function in wh ich the limit state is composed of difference between capacity and response.

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25 Figure 2-1. Reliability anal ysis and MPP. Subscript re fers to iteration number

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26 .CHAPTER 3 INVERSE RELIABILITY MEASURES In probabilistic approaches the difference be tween the computed probability of failure or reliability index and their target values does not provide the designer with easy estimates of the change in the design cost needed to achieve these target values. Alternately, inverse reliability measures are capable of providing this informati on. Several inverse reliability measures (e.g., probabilistic performance measure and probabilistic sufficiency factor) that are essentially equivalent have been introduced in recent years. The different names for essentially the same measure reflect the fact that different research ers focused on different advantages of inverse measures. This chapter reviews the various inve rse measures and describes their advantages compared to the direct measures of safety such as probability of failure and reliability index. Methods to compute the inverse measures ar e also described. Reliability-based design optimization with inverse measure is dem onstrated with a beam design example. Literature Review In deterministic approaches, a safety factor is defined as the ratio of the capacity to resistance of a system, typically calculated at the mean values. However, in probabilistic approaches, as both capacity and response are random the safety factor is also a random number. One safety measure that combines the advantages of the safety factor and probability of failure was proposed by Birger (1970, as reported by Elisha koff, 2001). Birger relate s the safety factor and the fractile of the safety f actor distribution corres ponding to a target proba bility of failure. It belongs to a class of inverse reli ability measures, which carry that name because they require use of the inverse of the cumulative distribution f unction. Several researcher s developed equivalent inverse reliability methods (Lee and Kwak 1987; Kiureghian et al 1994; Li and Foschi 1998; Tu et al. 1999; Lee et al. 2002; Qu and Haftka 2003; Du et al. 2003) that are closely related to the

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27 Birger measure. These measures quantify the level of safety in terms of the change in structural response needed to meet the ta rget probability of failure. Lee and Kwak (1987) used the inverse formulation in RBDO and showed that it is preferable for design when the probability of failure is very lo w in some region of the design space so that the safety index approaches infinity. Kiureghian et al. (1994) addressed the inverse reliability problem of seeking to determine one unknown para meter in the limit state function such that a prescribed first order reliability index is attained To solve the inverse reliability problem, they proposed an iterative algorithm based on the Haso fer-Lind-Rackwitz-Fiessler algorithm. Li and Foschi (1998) employed the inverse reliability st rategy in earthquake and offshore applications to solve for multiple design parameters. They show that it is an efficient method to estimate design parameters corresponding to targ et reliabilities. Kirj ner-Neto et al. (1998) reformulated the standard RBDO formulation similar to Lee and Kwa k (1987) except that they use an inequality constraint. They developed a semi-infinite op timization algorithm to solve the reformulated problem. This formulation does not require seco nd order derivatives of the limit state functions and obviates the need for repeated reliability i ndices computation. However, they found that the approach can result in conserva tive design. Royset et al. (2 001) extended the reformulation technique discussed in Kirjner-Net o et al. (1998) for reliability-ba sed design of series structural systems. The required reliability and optimization calculations are completely decoupled in this approach. Tu et al. (1999) dubbed the invers e measure approach the Performance Measure Approach (PMA) and called the inverse measure probability performance measure (PPM). Lee et al. (2002) adopted the same procedure as Tu et al. (1999) and named it target performance based approach, calling the inverse measure th e target performance. They compared the reliability index approach and inverse measure based approach and found that the latter was

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28 superior in both computational efficiency and num erical stability. Youn et al. (2003) showed that PMA allows faster and more stable RBDO co mpared to the traditional Reliability Index Approach (RIA). When accurate statistical information is not avai lable for input data, it is not appropriate to use probabilistic method for stochastic stru ctural analysis and design optimization and researchers resort to possibility based design optimization (PBDO) methods in such situations. Mourelatos and Zhou, 2005, discus s a PMA based PBDO. They formulate the inverse possibility analysis problem for the possibilistic constrai nt. Unlike FORM based RBDO which is based on linear approximation, the PBDO is exact. To perform the inverse possibility analysis, Du et al (2006b) proposes a maximal possibility search (MPS) method with interpolation to address the challenges of accuracy and computational expe nse exhibited by traditional methods like the multilevel cut and alpha level optimization method respectively. They report that the MPS evaluates possibility constraint efficiently and accurately for nonlinear st ructural applications. Often times industry design problems deal with uncertainties with sufficient data and uncertainties with insufficient data simultaneously To address such situations Du et al., (2006a) extend the possibility-based design optimizati on (PBDO) method. They propose a two step approach to generate membership function from the available data. Initially, they develop a temporary PDF using the available data and th en generate a membership function from the temporary PDF. They report that PMA based PB DO combined with MPS method can adequately address design problems with mixed input variables and demonstrates that it evaluates possibility constraint efficiently, stably and accurately for nonlinear structural applications. Qu and Haftka (2003, 2004) called the invers e measure probability sufficiency factor (PSF) and explored its use for RBDO with multiple failure modes through Monte Carlo

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29 Simulation (MCS) and response surface approximation (RSA). They showed that PSF leads to more accurate RSA compared to RSA fitted to failure probability, provides more effective RBDO, and that it permits estimation of the necessary change in the design cost needed to meet the target reliability. Moreover, PSF enables performing RBDO in variable-fidelity fashion and sequential deterministic optimization fashion to reduce the computational cost (Qu and Haftka, 2004a and 2004b). An initial study of using PSF to convert RBDO to sequential deterministic optimization was performed to solve problems with reliability constraint s on individual failure modes (Qu and Haftka, 2003). An improved vers ion for system reliab ility problems with multiple failure modes was developed for reliab ility-based global optimization of stiffened panels (Qu and Haftka, 2004b). Du et al. (2003, 2004) employed PMA to formul ate RBDO, but used pe rcentile levels of reliability (1 minus failure proba bility) in the probabilistic co nstraint and called the inverse measure as percentile performance. Traditiona lly, design for robustness involves minimizing the mean and standard deviation of the performance. Here, Du et al. (2003) proposed to replace the standard deviation by percentile performance di fference, which is the difference between the percentile performance corresponding to the left tail of a CDF a nd the right tail of that CDF. They demonstrated increased computational e fficiency and more accurate evaluation of the variation of the objective performa nce. In an effort to address reliability-based designs when both random and interval variable s are present, Du and Sudijian to (2003) proposed the use of percentile performance with worst-case combination of the interval variables for efficient RBDO solutions. Du and Chen (2004) developed the sequentia l optimization and reliability assessment (SORA) to improve the efficiency of the probabili stic optimization. The me thod is a serial single

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30 loop strategy, which employs percentile performa nce and the key is to establish equivalent deterministic constraints from probabilistic cons traints. This method is based on evaluating the constraint at the most probable point of the i nverse measure in Section IV below) based on the reliability information from the previous cycl e. This is referred to as design shift (Chiralaksanakul and Mahadeva n 2004; Youn et al. 2004). They show that the design quickly improves in each cycle and is computationall y efficient. The sequential optimization and reliability assessment, however, is not guaranteed to lead to an optimal design. Single-level (or unilevel) techniques that are equivalent to the standard RBDO formulation are based on replacing the RIA or PMA inner loop by the corresponding Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions. Here again, Agarwal et al. (2004) showed that the PMA approach is more efficient than the unilevel RIA approach due to Kuschel and Rackw itz (2000). Since most commercial optimizers are numerically unreliable when applied to pr oblems accompanied by many equality constraints, Agarwal et al (2007) use homot opy methods for constraint rela xation and to obtain a relaxed feasible design. They solve a series of optimi zation problem as the relaxed optimization problem is transformed via a homotopy to the original problem. They show that it is easier to solve the relaxed problem and make a gradual progress to wards the solution than solve the original problem directly. The several inverse measures discussed above are all based on the common idea of using the inverse of the cumulative distribution f unction. The numerous names for the inverse measures contemplate that they were devel oped by different researchers for different applications. Since these inverse measures come under various names, it is easy to fail to notice the commonality among them.

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31 Birger Safety Factor The safety factor, S is defined as the ratio of the capacity of the system cG (e.g., allowable strength) to the responserGwith a safe design satisfyingrcGG To account for uncertainties, the design safety factor is greater th an one. For example, a load safety factor of 1.5 is mandated by FAA in aircraft applications. To address the probabilistic interpretation of the safety factor, Birger (1970) proposed to cons ider its cumulative dist ribution function (CDF)SF: ()Prob()c S rG Fss G (3-1) Note that unlike the deterministic safety factor, which is normally calculated for the mean value of the random variables, crGG in Eq.(3-1) is a random function. Given a target probability, f targetP Birger suggested a safety factor s*(which we call here the Birger safety factor) defined in the following equation Prob()Prob()c Sftarget rG F(s*)s*Ss*P G (3-2) That is, the Birger safety f actor is found by setting the valu e of cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the safety factor equal to the target probability That is, we seek to find the value of the safety factor that makes the CDF of the safety factor equal to the target failure probability. This requires the inverse transformation of the CDF, hence the terminology of inverse measure. Probabilistic Sufficiency Factor Qu and Haftka (2003, 2004) developed a sim ilar measure to the Birger safety factor, calling it first the probabilistic sa fety factor and then the probab ilistic sufficiency factor (PSF). They obtained the PSF by Monte Carlo simulatio n and found that the re sponse surface for PSF was more accurate than the re sponse surface fitted to failure probability. Later, they found the

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32 reference to Birgers work in E lishakoffs review (2001) of safety factors and their relations to probabilities. It is desirable to avoid the term safety factor fo r this entity because the common use of the term is mostly deterministic and independent of the target safety level. Therefore, while noting the identity of the Birger safety f actor and the probabilistic sufficiency factor, we will use the latter term in the following. Failure happens when the actual safety factorS is less than one. The basic design condition that the probability of failure should be smaller than the target probability for a safe design may then be written as: Prob(1)(1) f SftargetPSFP (3-3) Using inverse transformation, Eq.(3-3) can be expressed as: 11()SftargetFPs* (3-4) The concept of PSF is illustrated in Figure. 3-1. The design requirement f targetP is known and the corresponding area under the probability density function of the safety factor is the shaded region in Figure.3-1.The upper bound of the abscissa s* is the value of the PSF. The region to the left of the vertical line 1 S represents failure. To sa tisfy the basic design condition s* should be greater than or equal to one. In order to achieve this, it is possible to either increase cG or decreaserG The PSF s*, represents the factor that has to multiply the response rG or divide the capacitycG so that the safety factor be raised to 1. For example, a PSF of 0.8 means that rG has to be multiplied by 0.8 or cG be divided by 0.8 so that the safety factor ratio increases to one. In other words, this means that rG has to be decreased by 20 % (1-0.8) or cG has to be increased by 25% ((1/0 .8)-1) in order to achieve the target failure probability. It can be observed that PSF is a safety f actor with respec t to the target failure probability and is automatically norma lized in the course of its formulation.

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33 PSF is useful in estimating the resources needed to achieve the required target probability of failure. For example, in a stress-dominated linear problem, if the target probability of failure is 10-5 and a current design yields a probability of failure of 10-3, one cannot easily estimate the change in the weight required to achieve the ta rget failure probability. Instead, if the failure probability corresponds to a PSF of 0.8, this indica tes that maximum stresses must be lowered by 20% to meet the target. This permits the designers to readily estimate the weight required to reduce stresses to a given level. Probabilistic Performance Measure In probabilistic approaches, instead of th e safety factor it is customary to use a performance function or a limit stat e function to define the failure (or success) of a system. For example, the limit state function is expressed as in Eq(2-1). In terms of safety factor S another form of the limit state function is: ()110c rG GS G X X X (3-5) Here,() G X and () GXare the ordinary and normalized limit state functions, respectively. Failure happens when() G X or () GX is less than zero, so the probability of failure f P is: Prob(()0)fPG X (3-6) Prob(()0)fPG X (3-7) Using Eq. (3-6), Eq. (3-7) can be rewritten as: Prob(()0)(0) f GftargetPGFPX (3-8) Prob(()0)(0) f ftarget GPGFPX (3-9) where GF and GF are the CDF of () GX and () GX, respectively. Inverse transformation allows us to write Eqs. (3-8) and (3-9) as:

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34 10()GftargetFPg* (3-10) 10()ftarget GFPg* (3-11) Here, g* and g* are the ordinary and normalized Probabilistic Performance Measure (PPM, Tu et al, 1999), respectively. PPM can be defined as the solution to Eqs. (3-8) and (3-9). That is, the value in () (instead of zero) wh ich makes the inequality an equality. Hence PPM is the value of the limit state function that makes its CDF equa ls the target failure probability. Figure 3-2 illustrates the concept of PPM. The shaded area co rresponds to the target failure probability. The area to the left of the line 0 G indicates failure. g* is the factor that has to be subtracted from Eq. (3-6) in order to make the vertical line g* move further to the right of the 0 G line and hence facilitate a safe design. For example, a PPM of -0.8 means that the de sign is not safe enough, and -0.8 has to be subtracted from () GXin order to achieve the target probability of failure. A PPM value of 0.3 means that we have a safety margin of 0.3 to reduce while improving the cost function to meet the target failure probability. Considering g* as the solution for Eq.(3-11), it can be rewritten in terms of the safety factor as: Prob(()1) f targetGSg*PX (3-12) Comparing Eqs. (15), (23) and (24), we can observe a relationship between s* and g* PSF (s*) is related to the normalized PPM ( g* ) as: 1 s*=g* (3-13) This simple relationship between PPM and PSF s hows that they are closely related, and the difference is only in the way the limit state func tion is written. If the limit state function is expressed as the difference between capacity and response as in Eq.(3-6), failure probability

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35 formulation allows us to define PPM. Alternativ ely, if the limit state function is expressed in terms of the safety factor as in Eq. (3-7), the corresponding failure pr obability formulation allows us to define PSF. PSF can be viewed as PPM derived from the normalized form of Eq. (3-6). The performance-measure approach (PMA) notation may appeal because of its generality, while the PSF notation has the advantage of being automatica lly scaled and being e xpressed in terms that are familiar to designers who use safety factors. The PPM can be viewed as the distance from the G = 0 to target failure probability line, in the performance function space. This is analogi cal to reliability index being a measure of distance in the input variable space. The major difference is the measurement of distance in different spaces, the performance functi on (or output) space a nd the input space. Inverse Measure Calculation Simulation ApproachMo nte Carlo Simulation Conceptually, the simplest approach to eval uate PSF or PPM is by Monte Carlo simulation (MCS), which involves the generation of rando m sample points according to the statistical distribution of the variables. The sample poi nts that violate the safety criteria in Eq. (3-6) are considered failed. Figure.3-3 illustrates the co ncept of MCS. A two-variable problem with a linear limit state function is considered. The straig ht lines are the contour lines of the limit state function and sample points generated by MCS are represented by small circles, with the numbered circles representing failed samples. Th e zero value of the limit state function divides the distribution space into a safe region and a fa ilure region. The dashed lines represent failed conditions and the continuous lin es represent safe conditions. The failure probability can be estimated using Eq.(2-9) In Figure. 3-3, the number of sample points that lie in the failure region above the 0 G curve is 12. If the total number of

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36 samples is 100,000, the failure probability is estimated at 1.2x10-4. For a fixed number of samples, the accuracy of MCS deteriorates wi th the decrease in failure probability. For example, with only 12 failure points out of the 100,000 samples, the standard deviation of the probability estimate is 3.5x10-5, more than a quarter of the estimate. When the probability of failure is significantly smaller than one over th e number of sample points, its calculated value by MCS is likely to be zero. PPM is estimated by MCS as the thn smallest limit state function among the N sampled functions, where f targetnNP. For example, considering the example illustrated in Figure. 3-3, if the target failure probability is 10-4, to satisfy the target probability of failure, no more than 10 samples out of the 100,000 should fail. So, the focu s is on the two extra samples that failed. PPM is equal to the value of the highest limit state function among the n (in this case, n = 10) lowest limit state functions. The numbered small circles are the sample points that failed. Of these, the three highest limit states are shown by the dashed lines. The tenth smallest limit state corresponds to the sample numbered 8 and has a lim it state value of -0.4, which is the value of PPM. Mathematically this is expressed as: i i = 1(())N thg*nminG X (3-14) where, thn min is the thn smallest limit state function. So, the calculation of PPM in MCS requires only sorting the lowest limit state func tion in the MCS sample. Similarly, PSF can be computed as the nth smallest factor among the N sampled safety factors and is mathematically expressed as **: i i = 1(())N ths*nminS X (3-15) ** A more accurate estimate of PPM or PSF will be obtained from the average of the nth and (n+1)th smallest values. So in the case of Figure. 4, PPM is more accurately estimated as 0.35.

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37 Finally, probabilities calculated through M onte Carlo Simulation (MCS) using a small sample size are computed as zero in the region wher e the probability of failure is lower than one over the number of samples used in MCS. In that region, no useful gradient information is available to the optimization routin e. On the other hand, PSF value va ries in this region and thus provides guidance to optimization. MCS generates numerical noise due to limited sample size. Noise in failure probability may cause RBDO to converge to a spurious minimu m. In order to filter out the noise, response surface approximations are fitted to failure prob ability to create a so-called design response surface. It is difficult to constr uct a highly accurate design res ponse surface because of the huge variation and uneven accuracy of failure probability. To overcome these difficulties, Qu and Haftka (2003, 2004) discuss the usage of PSF to improve the accuracy of the design response surface. They showed that design response surfac e based on PSF is more accurate compared to design response surface based on failure probabi lity and this accelerates the convergence of RBDO. For complex problems, response surface a pproximations (RSA) can also be used to approximate the structural response in order to reduce the computationa l cost. Qu and Haftka (2004b) employ PSF with MCS based on RSA to desi gn stiffened panels unde r system reliability constraint. Analytical ApproachMoment-based Methods Inverse reliability measures can be estimated using moment based methods like FORM. The FORM estimate is good if the limit state is linear but when the limit state has a significant curvature, second order methods can be used. The Second Order Reliability Method (SORM) approximates the measure of reliability more accurately by considering the effect of the curvature of the limit state function (Melchers, 1999, pp 127-130).

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38 Figure 3-4. illustrates the c oncept of inverse reliability analysis and MPP search. The circles represent the curves with the target curve represented by a dashed circle. Here, among the different values of limit state functions that pass through the target curve, the one with minimum value is sought. The value of th is minimal limit state function is the MPP as shown by Tu et al. 1999. The point on the target circle with the minima l limit state function is sought. This point is also an MPP and in orde r to avoid confusion be tween the usual MPP and MPP in inverse reliability analys is, Du et al. (2003) coined th e term most probable point of inverse reliability (MPPIR) and Lee et al. (2002) called it the mi nimum performance target point (MPTP). Du et al. (2003) devel oped the sequential optimization a nd reliability analysis method in which they show that evaluati ng the probabilistic constraint at the design point is equivalent to evaluating the deterministic constraint at the most probable point of the i nverse reliability. This facilitates in converting the probabi listic constraint to an equivale nt deterministic constraint. That is, the deterministic optimization is performed using a constraint limit which is determined based on the inverse MPP obtained in th e previous iteration. Kiureghi an et al. (1994) proposed an extension of the Hasofer-Lind-R ackwitz-Fiessler algorithm that us es a merit function and search direction to find the MPTP. In Fi gure 3-4, the value of the mini mal limit state function or the PPM is -0.2. This process can be expressed as: Minimize :() Subject to :UT targetGU UU (3-16) In reliability analysis the MPP is on the ()0 G Ufailure surface. In inverse reliability analysis, the MPP search is on the target curve. One of the main advantages when inverse measures are used in the FORM perspective is that, the formulation of the optimization problem is as expressed in Eq. (3-16) where the constraint has a simple form (circle) compared to the cost function. The cost function has in general a complicated expression due to the nonlinear

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39 transformation between physical random variable X to the standard random variable U. It is well known that it is easy to satisfy a simple cons traint compared to a complicated constraint irrespective of the cost function. On comparing the formulation in Eq.(2-5) with the formulation in Eq.(3-16), it is evident that it is easier to solv e the latter because of the simpler constraint. Reliability Based Design Optimi zation with Inverse Measures The probabilistic constraint in RBDO can be prescribed by several methods like the Reliability Index Approach (RIA ), the Performance Measure Approach (PMA), the Probability Sufficiency Factor appro ach (PSF), see Table3-1. Table 3-1. Different approaches to prescribe the probabilistic constraint Method RIA PMA PSF Probabilistic constraint target 0 g* 1s* Quantity to be computed Reliability index ( ) PPM (g*) PSF (s*) In RIA, can be computed as the pr oduct of reliability analysis as discussed in the previous secti on. The PPM or PSF can be computed through inverse reliability analysis or as a byproduct of re liability analysis using MCS. To date, most researchers have used RIA to prescribe the probabilistic constraint. However, the advantages of the inverse measures, illustrated in the next section, have led to its growing popularity. Beam Design Example The cantilever beam shown in Figure. 3-5, taken from Wu et al (2001), is a commonly used demonstration example for RBDO methods. The length L of the beam is 100". The width and thickness is represented by w and t. It is subjected to end transverse loads X and Y in orthogonal directions as shown in the Figure 3-51. The objective of the design is to minimize the 1 For this example, the random variables are shown in bold face

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40 weight or equivalently the cross sectional area: A=wt subject to two reliability constraints, which require the safety indices for stre ngth and deflection constraints to be larger than three. The first two failure modes are expresse d as two limit state functions: Stress limit: sGRRYX wtwt (3-17) Tip displacement limit: --dOOLYX GDDD Ewt tw (3-18) where R is the yield strength, E is the elastic modulus, D0 the displacement limit, and w and t are the design parameters. R, X, Y and E are uncorrelated random vari ables and their means and standard deviations are defined in Table 3-2. Table 3-2. Random variables for beam problem Random Variables X (lb) Y (lb) R (psi) E (psi) Distribution (, ) Normal (500,100) Normal (1000,100)lb Normal (40000,2000) Normal (296,1.456) Design for Stress Constraint The design with strength reliability constraint is solved first, followed by the design with a system reliability constraint. The results for the strength constraint are presented in Table 3-3. For the strength constraint, the limit state is a linear combination of normally distributed random variables, and FORM gives accurate results fo r this case. The MCS is performed with 100,000 samples. The standard deviation in the estima ted failure probability is calculated by MCS as: p1 f fP(P) N (3-19) In this case, the failure probability of 0.0013 calculated from 100,000 samples has a standard deviation of 1.14-4. It is seen from Table 3-3 that the designs obtai ned from RIA, PMA and PSF match well. Since the stress in Eq. (3-17)is a linear functi on of random variables,

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41 the RIA and PMA are exact. The more conservati ve design from PSF is due to limited sampling of MCS. Table 3-3. Comparison of optimum designs for the stress constraint Minimize objective function A=wt such that 3 Inverse Reliability Analysis Method Reliability Analysis FORM (RIA) FORM (PMA) MCS (PSF) (Qu and Haftka,2003) Exact Optimum (Wu et al. 2001) w 2.4460 2.4460 2.4526 2.4484 Optima t 3.8922 3.8920 3.8884 3.8884 Objective Function 9.5202 9.5202 9.5367 9.5204 Reliability Index 3.00 3.00 3.0162 3.00 Failure Probability 0.00135 0.00135 0.00128 0.00135 Comparison of Inverse Measures The relation between PSF and PPM in Eq. (3-13) is only approximate when PPM is calculated by FORM and PSF by MCS. PSF suffers from sa mpling error and PPM from error due to linearization. For the linear stress constraint, and with a large Monte Carlo sample, the difference is small, as seen in Table 3-4. It may be expe cted that the MPTP (minimum performance target point) should also be close to the point used to calculate PSF. This resu lt may be useful, because when a response surface is used fo r an approximation of the response, it is useful to center it near the MPTP. In order to check th e accuracy of the MPTP estimation, the MPP of PPM and the point corresponding to the PSF are compared and the results are tabulated in Table 3-5. The coordinates corresponding to the PSF, computed by a million-sample MCS, deviate considerably from the MPTP. Since the accuracy of the poi nts computed by MCS depends on the number of samples used, an increased number of samples lead to more accurate results albeit at increased computational cost. Alternative approaches to obtain the points with better accuracy without increasing the number of samples are to averag e the co-ordinates computed by repeated MCS simulations with fewer numbers of samples. A lternatively, we can average a number of points

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42 that are nearly as critical as the PSF point. That is, instead of using only the iX corresponding to the nS in Eq (3-15), we use also th e points corresponding to ...,npnpnpSSS in computing the PSF, where 2p is the total number of points that is averaged around the PSF. It can be observed from Table 3-5 that averaging 11 points around the PSF matches well with the MPTP, reducing a Euclidean distance of about 0.831 for the raw PSF to 0.277 with 11point average. The values of X, Y and R presented in Table 35 are in the standard normal space Table 3-4. Comparison of inverse measures for w =2.4526 and t =3.8884 (stress constraint) Method FORM MCS (17samples) Pf 0.001238 0.001241 Inverse Measure PPM: 0.00258 PSF: 1.002619 Table 3-5. Comparison of MPP obt ained from calculation of PSF for w =2.4526 and t =3.8884 (stress constraint) Use of PSF in Estimating the Required Chan ge in Weight to Achieve a Safe Design The relation between the stresses displacement and weight for this problem is presented to demonstrate the utility of PSF in estimating the required resources to ach ieve a safe design. Consider a design with the dimensions of A0= w0 t0 with a PSF of 0s* less than one. The structure can be made safer by scaling both w and t by the same factor c This will change the stress and displacement expressed in Eq.(3-17) and Eq. (3-18) by a factor of c3 and c4, respectively, and the area by a factor of c2. If stress is most critical, it will scale as c3 and the PSF will vary with the area, A as: Co-ordinates X Y R MPTP 2.1147 1.3370 -1.6480 PSF 1)106 samples 2.6641 1.2146 -1.0355 2)Average:10 runs of each 105samples 2.1888 1.8867 -1.1097 3)Average:11 point s around PSF of 106 Samples 2.0666 1.5734 -1.5128

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43 15 0 0A s*s A (3-20) Equation (3-20) indicates that a one percent in crease in area will in crease the PSF by 1.5 percent. Since non-uniform scaling of width and thickness may be more efficient than uniform scaling, this is a conservative estimate. Thus, for example, considering a design with a PSF of 0.97, the safety factor deficiency is 3% and the structure can be made safer with a weight increase of less than two percent, as shown by Qu and Haftka (2003). For a critical displacement state, s* will be proportional to 2 A and a 3% deficit in PSF can be corrected in under 1.5% weight increase. While for more complex structur es we do not have analytical expressions for the dependence of the displacements or the st resses on the design variables, designers can usually estimate the weight needed to redu ce stresses or displacements by a given amount. System Reliability Estimation Using PSF and MCS System reliability arises when the failure of a system is defined by multiple failure modes. Here, the discussion is limited to series systems. The estimation of system failure probability involves estimating the failure due to individual modes and failure due to th e interaction between the modes. This is mathematically expressed for a system with n failure modes as: 12 12131 12321()()...() ()()...() +()...()...Higher order termssysn nn nnnPPFPFPF PFFPFFPFF PFFFPFFF (3-21) It is easy to employ MCS to estimate system failu re, as the methodology is a direct extension of failure estimation for single modes. In the co ntext of employing analytical methods like FORM, estimation of failure regions bounded by single m odes are easy to estimate but estimating the probability content of odd shaped domains created because of the intersection of two or more modes is challenging. Technique s are available to estimate th e probability content at the intersection regions but require evaluating multip le integrals (Melchers, pp: 386-400). Since the

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44 number of multiple integrals that has to be ev aluated depends on the number of variables, the task becomes arduous when more variables are i nvolved. Instead, an alternate technique is to develop upper and lower bounds on the failure probabi lity of the structural system. Considering the terms in the first and the third rows (positive contributions) in Eq. (3-21) permits us to estimate the upper bound. When the terms in firs t and second rows (negative contributions) are considered, the lower bounds can be estimated. Improved bounds for the sy stem reliability are available in the literature. Owing to these challenges, MCS is mostly used when system reliability is to be estimated. As discussed earlier, MCS is co mputationally prohibitive when the failure probability to be estimated is low, because of the number of sample s required. PSF can be used to estimate system reliability. The method is an extension of th e PSF estimation for single failure mode. When M failure modes are considered, the most critical sa fety factor is calculated for each sample. Then the sorting of the thnminimum safety factor can proceed as in Eq.(3-15). This process is explained in the flow chart in Figure 3-6. The es timation of PSF for a system reliability case is demonstrated with an example in Appendix A Design for System Reliability by MCS and PSF Monte Carlo simulation is a good method to use for system reliability analysis with multiple failure modes. For the cantilever beam di scussed in the earlier section, the allowable deflection was chosen to be 2.25" in or der to have competing constraints (Wu et al ., 2001). The results are presented in Table 3-6. It can be obs erved that the contribution of the stress mode to failure probability dominates the contribution du e to displacement and the interaction between the modes. The details of the design proce ss are provided in Qu a nd Haftka (2004). They demonstrated the advantages of using PSF as an inverse safety measure over probability of failure or the safety index as a normal safety measure. They showed that the design response

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45 surface (DRS) of the PSF was much more accurate than the DRS fo r the probability of failure. For a set of test points the erro r in the probability of failure was 39.11% from the DRS to the PSF, 96.49% for the DRS to the safety index, and 334.78% for the DRS to the probability of failure. Table 3-6. Design for System Reliabi lity by PSF, Qu and Haftka (2004)** Optima Objective Function Pf Safety Index Pf1 Pf2 Pf1 Pf2 PSF s w= 2.6041 t = 3.6746 9.5691 0.001289 3.01379 0.0011330.000208 0.000052 1.0006 ** 100,000 samples, Pf1, Pf2, Pf1 Pf2 Failure probabilities due to stress constraint, displacement constraint, and intersection between the modes, respectively.

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46 Figure 3-1. Schematic probability density of the safety factor S. The PSF is the value of the safety factor corresponding to th e target probability of failure Figure 3-2. Schematic probability density of the limit state function. The Probabilistic Performance Measure is the value of the limit state f unction corresponding to the target probability of failure.

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47 Figure 3-3. Illustration of the calculation of PPM with Monte Carlo Simulation for the linear performance function Figure 3-4. Inverse reliability analysis a nd MPP for target failure probability 0.00135 ( = 3) Figure 3-5. Cantilever beam subjected to horizontal and vertical loads

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48 Figure 3-6. Flowchart fo r estimating system PSF 1...i x iN () 1...(#of modes)j iSxjM (min(()))j criSsortSx ftarget 1min() ; N th syscr iSnSnNP

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49 CHAPTER 4 TAIL MODELLING AND RELIABILITY ANALYSIS Low failure probability problems (extreme value) require one to have sufficient data in the tails of the distribution which represent the extr emes. But this is seldom possible and instead researchers use tail modeling techniques based on extreme value theory to predict the probability of extreme events. The theory comprises a pr inciple for model extrapolation based on the implementation of mathematical limits as finite level approximations. Since several advantages are reported by working with inverse measures, it is logical to justify an attempt to perform tail modeling in the performance space along with in verse measures to estimate quantities at unobserved levels. This section di scusses the tail mode ling technique and how to apply it to find inverse measures. Tail Equivalence and Generalized Extreme Value Theory Tail modeling is based on the concept of approxi mating the tail distribution of the variable of interest by associating it w ith the tail of already known dist ribution and using the parameters and characteristics therein for further analysis This criterion is ade quately defined by tail equivalence. That is, two CDFs () Fx and () Qxcan be called tail equiva lent (Maes and Breitung, 1993) at the right tails when: 1() lim1 1()xFx Qx (4-1) This reveals that the error in approximating the small probability of 1-() Fxby 1-() Qxtends to zero as x The extremal theorem by Fisher and Tippet (1928) states that, ifn M is the maximum of a sequence of n independent random variables having a common distri bution function and if there exists sequences of constants 0na and nbsuch that

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50 Pr()/() as nnnMbazHzn (4-2) for a non-degenerate distribution function H then H belongs to one of the extreme value distribution families namely, the Gumbel, Frechet a nd Weibull families. It is to be noted that regardless of the distribution for the population, the three types of the extreme value distributions are the only possible limits for th e distribution of the normalized maxima. In this respect, this theorem is to extreme value theory what central limit theorem is to central statistics. The central limit theorem states that the approximating distri bution of the sample mean is normal regardless of the parent distribution. The three families of distributions can be comb ined into a single family of models having distribution function of the form 1/()exp1 z Hz (4-3) such that :1()/0 zz, where the parameters satisfy 0 and This is the generalized extreme valu e (GEV) family of distributions. Here, is the location parameter, is the scale parameter, is the shape parameter. A more detailed discussion of the generalized extreme value distributions is pres ented in Appendix B Generalized Pareto Distribution In engineering applications, rather than maxima the interest is to address the excesses over threshold. In these situations, the generalized pareto distribution (GPD) arises as the limiting distribution. The concept of GPD is presented in Figure 4-1. Let y be a model output which is random and u be a large threshold of y The observations of y that exceed u are called exceedance. The conditional distribution ()uFz of the exceedance given that the data y is greater than the threshold u, is modeled fairly well by the GPD. Here,zyu Let approximation of

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51 ()uFz using GPD be denoted by ()Fz. and are the shape and scale parameters respectively. For a large enough u, the distributio n function of () y u conditional on y > u, is approximately written as (Coles, 2001): 1 ,11 if 0 1exp if =0z Fz z (4-4) In Eq (4-4), max(0,) AAand0 z plays a key role in a ssessing the weight of the tail. Eq (4-4) can be justified as a limiting distribution as u increases (Coles, 2001, pp:75-76). Tails can be classified based on as: 0, heavy tail (pareto type tail) 0, medium tail (exponential type tail) 0, light tail (Beta-type tails) There are several parameter estimation methods to estimate the parameters and .It is to be noted that conditional excess CDF ()uFzis related to the CDF of interest () Fy through the following expression: ()() () 1()uFyFu Fz Fu (4-5) From Eq (4-5), the CDF of y can be expressed as: ()(1())()()uFyFuFzFu (4-6) When Eq (4-4) is substituted for()uFzin the above expression, Eq (4-6) becomes: 1()11()1() FyFuyu (4-7) For simplicity of presentation, only the case of0 is considered here. Once we obtain estimates of the parameters as and using some parameter estimation method like maximum

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52 likelihood estimation method, least square regression th at are discussed later in the chapter, it is possible to estimate the pth quantile by inverting Eq.(4-7) : 11() ()1 1()pFp yFpu Fu (4-8) In order to extend the concept to st ructural applicati ons, if the output y is replaced by the limit state in Eq (3-5) then the interest is to model th e lower tail rather than the upper tail. However, modeling the upper tail of y is equivalent to modeling the lower tail of y Therefore, an equivalent way of expressing Eq.(3-5) is: 1()1()rGxSx (4-9) where rS is the reciprocal of the safety factor. Failure occurs when G1 > 0. rS at any required target reliability index can be estimated using Eq(4-8). If target fP refers to the target failure probability that we wish to design th e structure, PSF can be obtained as: target 1 target 11 1()f rfP SFPu Fu (4-10) Coles (2001) opines that it is easy to object to the pro cedure of tail modeling on the grounds that even with the support of asymptotic argument, there is an implicit assumption that the underlying stochastic mechanism of the pro cess being modeled is sufficiently smooth to enable extrapolation. However no credible alternative has been proposed to date. Threshold Selection The theory of excess over threshold is refe rred to as peaks over threshold method also. Performance of this approach is base d on the choice of the threshold value u. The basic theory identified by Pickands (1975) states that the pa reto distribution will be a practical family for statistical estimation of the tails, provided that the threshold is taken sufficiently high. The CDF is composed of 3 portions, the lower tail, uppe r tail and the ce ntral portion. In theory, the

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53 threshold should be selected where the actual up per tail starts. But there is no straightforward globally accepted method to select threshold. Selection of threshold is a tradeoff between bias and variance. If the threshold selected is low, then some data points belong to the central part of the distribution and do not provide a good approximation to the tails. On the other hand if the threshold selected is too high, the number of data available for the tail approximation is much less and this might lead to excessive scatter in the final estimate. The proper selecti on of threshold is very important because it has important repercussions on the estimated value of the shape factor (Caers and Maes, 1998, McNeil and Saladin, 1997) and henc e on the final estimates such as the quantile, extreme values etc. There are many exploratory techniques like the mean excess plot which help in selecting the threshold. But in a simulation study, it is im practical to perform interactive data analysis required by the exploratory techniques to choose the threshold. The mean excess plot is the sample mean excess function defined as the su m of the excesses over th e threshold divided by the number of the data points which exceed the thre shold plotted with respect to the threshold. A reasonable choice of the optimal threshold is wher e this plot becomes linear. For further reading the reader is referre d to Coles (2001). Boos (1984) suggests that the ratio of Nex (number of tail data) over N (total number data) should be 0.02 (50< N <500) and the ratio should be 0.1 for 500< N <1000. Hasofer (1996) suggests using 1.5 NexN Caers and Maes (1998) propose to use a finite sample mean square error (MSE) as a criterion for estimating the threshold. They use the threshold value that minimizes the MSE. In a similar fashion Beirla nt et al (1996) find an optimal threshold by minimizing an approximate expression for asympt otic mean square error. The other methods

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54 include plotting the quantile, shape or scale factor or any quantity of interest with respect to different thresholds and look for a stability in the curve (Bassi et al, Coles pp:84-86) Parameter Estimation Generally one is interested to generate values (PDF) from a particul ar distribution given a set of parameter values which is expressed as: (/) fx (4-11) where, x is a data vector [ x1xm] of frequency. However, here we are faced with an inverse problem. Given the set of observed data and a mode l of interest, one is re quired to find one PDF that among all probability distri bution that is possibl e for the model is most likely to have produced the data. The parameters can be estima ted by several methods. The methods used in the literature include, maximum likelihood estima tion (MLE), method of moments, probability weighted moments, elemental percentile method, the least square regression method. Generally, maximum likelihood estimation method is widely used and accepted by researchers though it has limitations. That is as long as0.5 the asymptotic properties (Appendix B) of the maximum likelihood estimators are preserved. When 10.5 MLE are obtainable but do not have the standard asymptotic properties MLE is not obtainable when 1 (Coles, 2001, pp54-55). The likelihood estimation approach for the GPD para meters is presented in the Appendix B. However, accurate estimation of the parameters is a huge research area in its elf. Beirlant et al (2004), Castillo et al (2005) discuss these methods in detail. Hasking and Wallis (1987) report a comparison between the maximum likelihood esti mation method, method of moments and the probability weighted moments. They conclude that method of moments and the probability weighted moments are more reliable compared to the MLE method unless the sample size is greater than 500. This secti on discusses the maximum like lihood method and least square regression approach in detail

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55 Maximum Likelihood Estimation MLE is a popular statistical method that is used to make inferences about the parameters of the underlying probability distributi on of a given data set. There is nothing visual about the MLE method but it is very powerful and is precise for large samples. The likelihood of a set of data is the probability of obtaining that particular set of data, given the chosen probability distribution model. ML estimation starts with writing th e likelihood function which contains the unknown distribution parameters. The values of these pa rameters that maximize the likelihood function are called the maximum likelihood estimators. In order to estimate the parameters, the lik elihood function has to be constructed by reversing the roles of the data and parameter in Eq (4-11), i.e., (/)(/) Lxfx (4-12) Thus L represent the likeli hood of the parameter given the observed data x and is a function of For a model with k parameters, the likelihood function takes the shape of k -dim geometrical surface sitting above a k -dim hyperplane spanned by the parameter vector (Myung, 2003). Both f and L are PDFs but the major difference lies in the fact that they are defined in two different axes and are not directly comparable to each other. PDF f is a function of data given a particular set of parameter values define d on the data scale. The likelihood function L is the function of parameter given a par ticular set of observed data de fined on the parameter scale. ML approach is totally analyt ical in concept. MLE's genera lly have very desirable large sample properties (Appendix C) However, MLE ca nnot be adopted in all situations. There are some limitations when small numbers of failure s (less than 5, and sometimes less than 10 is small), MLE's can be heavily biased and the la rge sample asymptotic properties do not apply

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56 Least Square Regression The method of least squares assumes that the best -fit curve of a given ty pe is the curve that has the minimal sum of the deviations squared ( least square error ) from a given set of data. The parameters are obtained by solving the following minimization problem 2 ()uN i iN M inFzP (4-13) The GPD CDF can be obtained by using Eq. (4-4). The empirical CDF are plotting positions which are computed as: ,i=1... 1ii PN N (4-14) where N is the total number of samples, Nu is the index corresponding to the threshold u and P is the plotting position. Since it is a minimum finding, it can be seen as an optimization technique similar to maximum likelihood estimate met hod where we try to maximize the likelihood function. Least square regression requires no or minimal distributional assumptions. Unlike MLE, there is no basis for testing hypothese s or constructing c onfidence intervals. Accuracy and Convergence Studies for the Quantile Estimation In order to understand the capabil ity of GPD to model the tails of the distribution, an error analysis in terms of modeling and sampling error was performed on the probability content estimation using tail modeling approach. A detailed discussion of this is presented in Appendix D. Based on the results, it can be concluded that the sampling error is high compared to the modeling error. If the sampling e rror is accounted for, tail modeli ng has a fairly good capacity to estimate extreme probabilities with good accuracy. In structural reliability studies, one is required to model the tails of the response which might follo w some standard statistical distributions. Normal and Lognorma l distributions are widely used to model physical quantities in structural reliability studies Therefore, an investigation wa s done to study the accuracy and

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57 convergence capabilities of tail modeling approach to model the tails of normal and lognormal distribution which is discussed in detail in Appendix E. Then, the approach is demonstrated on a cantilever beam example and a tuned mass damper example to estimate the failure probability. The simulation studies (Appendix E) help us to conclude that based on the ta rget quantile value we wish to estimate, the threshold and num ber of exceedance data need to be chosen. In the context of structural analys is, the interest is to address the response function. The failure probability is based on the response. If we wish to design a system with a low failure probability of the order of 1e-4 or higher, then we are required to estimate quantiles of 0.9999 or higher. So, if the response follows a distribution close to normal, and we wish to estimate a quantile of 0.9999, a quantile of 0.95 and 100 exceedance data would enable us to estimate the quantile under 3% error. On the other hand, if the res ponse follows more of a lognormal distribution (heavy tailed), then one is required to choose a higher threshold of the order of 0.99 or 0.995 with 100 or more exceedance data to be guaranteed to have a bias error of less than one percent and a RMSE error of less than 5 percent. However, it is not possible to come up with a table that explains the minimum exceedance data required for a level of quantile and required accuracy level because, in practical situations the distri bution of the response is not known. Moreover, the challenge is to develop methodol ogies that can estimate the inverse measure corresponding to high reliability, with limited samples. Cantilever Beam Example The beam example that was considered in Chapter 3 is treated here also. Though simulating the beam example is not very expensiv e, we pretend that we have limited computer resources and are restricted to use a maximu m of 500 simulations. We are interested in estimating the PSF for low failure probabilities with only 500 response data. Three different cases are discussed. Case 1 disc usses the estimation of PSF for th e strength failure mode using

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58 the tail modeling approach at different threshold values. Similarly the PSF estimation for the deflection failure mode is investigated in Case 2 and the system failure case where both the failure modes are considered simultaneously is discussed in Case 3. Case 1 and Case 2 are presented in Appendix F. For all the cases, th e convergence of PSF with respect to different thresholds and accuracy of PSF at different num ber of samples are investigated. Two methods, namely the maximum likelihood method and the l east square regression methods are used to estimate the parameters. The results from these methods are compared. In the system failure mode, both the failure modes are considered simultaneously. The safety factor for each failure mode is evaluated. For each realization, the critical of the two safety factor is considered the system safety factor. Once, the system safety factor is obtained for 100 simulations, the tail modeling approach is car ried out and the corresponding system PSF is estimated. Here the design variables are w =2.6041; t =3.6746 and the allowable deflection D0=2.145. This combination of the variables allows equal contribution of the modes to the total failure. The contribution of the modes are:10.00099fP ;20.00117fP ;120.00016ffPP The convergence plots of PSF for the system failure case is presented in Figure 4-2. Figure 4-2 shows that the PSF estimated through parameters estimated by the regre ssion method is unstable in contrast to the PSF estimated through paramete rs from the ML method. This behavior was observed in the other two cases too. The PSF es timate at a threshold of 0.9 is 0.99 with a standard deviation of 0.003. Th e corresponding failure probability estimate is 0.0017 with a standard deviation of 0.0002 which is about 10% of the estimate. The number of samples used in the above studies is 500. The PSF is expected to conve rge to the actual va lue when the number of samples is increased.

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59 Tuned Mass-Damper Example The tail modeling approach to estimate the fa ilure probability is demonstrated here with the help of a tuned mass-damper example. Th e tuned mass-damper problem in Figure 4-3 is taken from Chen et al (1999). The problem i nvolves the failure probab ility estimation of a damped single degree of freedom system with dynamic vibration absorber. Figure 4-3 illustrates the tuned damper system consisting of the single degree of freedom system and a dynamic vibration absorber to reduce the vibrations. Th e original system is externally excited by a harmonic force. The absorber serves to reduce th e vibration. The amplitude of vibration depends on m R M the mass ratio of the absorber to the original system the damping ratio of the original system 1 1 nr ratio of the natural frequency of the orig inal system to the excitation frequency 2 2 nr ratio of the natural frequency of th e absorber to the excitation frequency The amplitude of the original system y is normalized by the amplitude of its quasi static response and is a function of four variables expressed as: 2 2 2 2 222 2 222 112121121 1 111111 14 r y R rrrrrrrr (4-15) This example treats12 and rr as random variables. They follow a normal distribution N(1,0.025) and0.01, =0.01 R The normalized amplitude of the original system is plotted in

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60 Figure 4-4. There are two peaks where the norm alized amplitude reached undesirable vibration levels. The corresponding contour plot is presen ted in Figure 4-5. The failure region is denoted by the red band. This failure region is an island. That is, the failure region has safe regions on either side of it. This introduces additional ch allenges of not being able to use analytical approaches like FORM because the failure regi on is not a half plane. The objective of the problem is to reduce the risk of the normalized amplitude being larger than a certain value. The limit state for this case is expressed as: 12120(,)(,) grryrry (4-16) where 0 y can be considered as the allowable level of vibration. When the limit state in Eq. (4-16) is greater than 0, failure is said to occur. Increasing or decreasing 0 y will help in decreasing or increasing the fa ilure probability respectively. 0 y =27 is considered for the discussion. The corresponding failu re probability with 1e7 samp le MCS is estimated to be 0.01031. The tail modeling approach with 500 samp les and 100 repetitions are used to study the convergence and accuracy estimates of PSF. The plot for PSF at various thre sholds is presented in Figure 4-6. From the plots, it seems that regression behaves better compared to the ML method. There is a discrepancy in the plot co rresponding to the ML method. The PSF estimated at 0.96 threshold is more accurate than the PSF estimate at a threshold of 0.98. In order to understand the behavior of the tail of the tune d mass damper, a log plot of the CDF with 1e5 samples is examined. The plot is presented in Figure 4-7. It is evident from the plot that there are two curvatures in the tail which are difficult to model. The GPD has to capture this shape with less exceedance data. This is the reason for the disc repancy in the ML plot, the shape of the tail at the area of interest (Sr=1) modeled by ML with a threshold of 0.96 was better than the tail model with a threshold of 0.98.

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61 In order to further explore the tail models from each method, the tail model from each method is superimposed on each other and the compara tive plots are presented in Figure 4-7. It is clearly observed that the tail modeled based on ML approach denoted by the dashed line attempts to capture the second curvature and in the process introduces error in the PSF value corresponding to a failure probability level of 0. 01. On the other hand, the model obtained based on regression parameters represented by the solid line, approximates the tail in a linear fashion and is accurate compared to the tail based on ML method for a failure probability of 0.01. However, the ML method is expected to perform better when the failure probability to be estimated is low. When the failure probability is low, it becomes necessary to model the second curvature adequately to estimate the PSF with reasonable accuracy. The ML method can perform better than the regression approach in modeling the second curvature. Such types of CDF with double curvature might not be encountered in stru ctural applications often and solving this problem with less number of samples is very cha llenging. With more insight on the problem, it is possible to select the suitable parameter estimation method depe nding on the requirements. Here, if one needs to estimate PSF corresponding to fail ure probabilities lesser than 1e-3, then the second curvature has to be modeled well and he nce ML method is a good choice. Else, for higher failure probabilities, regr ession can perform better. Alternate Tail Extrapolation Schemes In this section, simple tail extrapolation t echniques are developed to estimate the PSF for low target failure probability using MCS that is sufficient only to estimate the PSF for substantially higher failure probability (lower targ et reliability index). Failure probability can be transformed to reliabili ty index by using Eq. (2-3). The same transformation is applied here to the CDF of the reciprocal of inverse measure. Si nce we are modeling the uppe r tail, reciprocal of the inverse measure is of interest here. The tail portion of the resulting transformed CDF

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62 (relationship between inverse measure and reliability index) is approximated by a linear polynomial in order to take adva ntage of fact that normally di stributed inverse measure is linearly related to the reliability index. Since this approximation will not suffice if the inverse measure follows distributions other than normal, a logarithmic transformation is then applied to the reliability index which tends to linearize th e tail of the transformed CDF. This tail is approximated using a quadratic polynomial. Since both these techniques use only data from the tail, another technique that appr oximates the relations hip between inverse measure and reliability index from the mean to the maximum data usin g a quadratic polynomial is developed. The three extrapolation techniques discusse d are described with the help of a figure. A data set of size 500 with a mean of 10 and variance 9 following a lognor mal distribution is used to illustrate the three techniques. Figure 4-8, A) shows the general re lationship between PSF reciprocal and 1Pf. Applying the transformation modifies the CDF as in B). If the PSF reciprocal follows a normal distribution, this curve will be linear. Therefore, the first technique approximates the tail of the curve in B) by a linear polynomial. In order to ta ke advantage of the rema ining data, half of the curve in B) is approximated by a quadratic polynomial. It is sufficient to consider only half of the data because of the symmetry in reliability in dex. The third technique applies a logarithmic transformation to the reliability index and approxi mates the tail of the curve shown in C) by a quadratic polynomial. In all the above three techniques, once the coefficients of the polynomial are obtained, the PSF reciprocal corresponding to any higher reliabil ity index can be found. It is to be noted that with 500 samples, it is possi ble to estimate only PSF reci procal at reliability levels less than 3. Classical tail models discussed in the previous chapter and the alternate

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63 extrapolation techniques discusse d in this chapter al low predicting PSF recipr ocal at much higher reliability indices without a dditional reliability analysis. The alternative extrapolation techniques and classical tail mo deling techniques are conceptually the same. The major difference in perc eiving the two classes is that the classical tail modeling techniques model the CDF of PSF reci procal, whereas the extrapolation schemes approximates the trend of PSF reciprocal in terms of reliability index.

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64 0 Tail part () Fy () FuuyzFailed region Safe region 1fP Figure 4-1. Tail modeling of F (u) using the threshold u. The region of y >0 is failure

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65 0.8 0.82 0.84 0.86 0.88 0.9 0.92 0.94 0.96 0.98 0.95 0.96 0.97 0.98 0.99 1 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 Fu1/PSF LCI UCI Mean Median 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 NexA 0.8 0.82 0.84 0.86 0.88 0.9 0.92 0.94 0.96 0.98 0.9 0.935 0.97 1.005 1.04 1.075 1.11 1.145 1.18 1.215 1.25 Fu1/PSF LCI UCI Mean Median 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 NexB Figure 4-2 Convergence of PSF at different thre sholds. A) MLE B)Regre ssion. Cantilever beam system failure mode. 500 Samples. 100 repetitions

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66 Figure 4-3. Tuned vibration absorber Figure 4-4. Normalized amplitude vs r1 and r2 r1 r2 n2, m n1, M Absorber Original system c1k1 y cos() F t k2

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67 Figure 4-5. Contour of the normalized amplitude

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68 0.8 0.82 0.84 0.86 0.88 0.9 0.92 0.94 0.96 0.98 1 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 Fu1/PSF Actual PSF LCI UCI Mean Median 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 NexA 0.8 0.82 0.84 0.86 0.88 0.9 0.92 0.94 0.96 0.98 1 0.6 0.74 0.88 1.02 1.16 1.3 1.44 1.58 1.72 1.86 2 Fu1/PSF Actual PSF LCI UCI Mean Median 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 NexB Figure 4-6. Convergence of PSF at differen t thresholds. Tuned Mass Damper. A) MLE. B)Regression. 500 samples. 100 repetitions. LCI Lower Confidence Interval. UCIUpper Confidence Interval

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69 Figure 4-7 Tuned Mass Damper. Comparison of ta il models using regression and ML method

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70 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 10 10 10 100 PfSrA 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 0 1 2 3 = (1 Pf )SrB 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 0 1 2 log( )SrC Figure 4-8. Transformation of the CDF of PSF reciprocal ( Sr). A) CDF of Sr. B) Inverse Standard normal cumulative distribution function applied to the CDF. C ) Logarithmic transformation applied to the reliability index.

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71 CHAPTER 5 MULTIPLE TAIL MODELS Multiple Tail Model A total of five methods to model the tails of data were discussed in the previous two sections. However, in practical applications wh ere there is no information on the form of the output distribution, there is no way to explor e which technique performs better. A single technique that performs well for a particular example might not perfor m the best for another example. In fact, a single method that performs the best at a part icular reliability index might not perform the best at a different reliability index for the same example, as will be shown in the numerical examples. In addition, there are no known straight forw ard ways to quantify the error in the estimates. In order to take advantage of all the techniqu es and still come up with the best prediction, we propose to apply the five techniques simultaneous ly and use the median of the five estimates. It is observed that the median is a robust esti mate than the mean. This method is demonstrated first on seven different statistic al distributions followed by tw o engineering examples. In all examples, it is observed that the median of the five estimates is at least the second best compared to estimates from individual techniques. More over, the range of the five estimates closely approximates the error in the median. Thus usi ng multiple tail models not only ensures to choose a good estimate and buys insurance against bad pr edictions but also provides an error of the estimate. Figures 5.1 to 5.5 show the vari ous tail modeling tec hniques for a lognormal distribution with a data mean of 10 and standard deviation of 3. In each case, the 1e5 sample curve and 500 sample curve are superimposed to highlight the extrapolation. The Sr is computed as discussed in the implementation in next section. Figure 5.4 shows the multiple tail model approach (MTM). In order to under stand to clearly see the range of the five methods, the region beyond the threshold is zoomed and presented in Figure 5.5. The range of the five methods at

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72 three different reliability indices is marked by double headed arrows. Mean of these ranges computed over the entire extrapolation zone are capable of representing the error associated with the median estimate from MTM.A representative act ual error is presented in the plot. The QH is the median and overlaps with the MTM curve. Numerical Examples Standard Statistical Distributions The standard statistical distri butions that are discussed in this section are presented in Table 5-1. A data set with mean 10 and standard deviation 3 is considered. In order to compare the performance of the proposed method on diff erent distributions, a common target failure probability is used to find the capacity which is in turn is used to normalize the parameters. Implementation of this exercise is as follows: targettarget0.00135 (=3), =10, 0.3, =fPxCOVCOVx 1. Use x and COV to estimate parameters (0aand 0b) for each distribution from Table 5-1 These parameters can be used to generate random numbers. 2. Find capacity C as target1th fP quantile. Inverse cumulative di stribution functions (icdf) can be used for this. In the case of single parame ter distributions, add shif t factor to the C. 3. Find normalized mean using x x C We are interested in the safety factor reciprocal rS following different statistical distributions. The normalized mean is the mean of the rS. 4. Use x and COV to find new parameters (a andb) for all the distributions. 5. Generate N = 500 Latin hype rcube samples in [0,1] 6. Find rSat each sample using (a b) and inverse icdf 7. Use Eq (4-14) to estimate plotting positions 8. Plotting rSand P provides the empirical CDF ofrS. It is to be noted that the ordinate is (1Pf). That is, we are intere sted in the upper tail. As Pf decreases, 1Pf increases, reliability index increases, S decreases and rS increase. 9. A threshold of 0.9 is considered for classical tail modeling technique s and the parameters of GPD that approximates the conditional CDF beyond the threshold are estimated using Maximum Likelihood and least s quare regression approaches. 10. The transformations discussed in the previous section can be applied to the CDF of rSand rSat higher reliability indices can be es timated directly from the approximated relationships.

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73 11. There are totally five estimates (steps 9 and 10) of rSdenoted by ind rSin the extrapolated regions. Record the median and range ofind rS.as 5m and 5Ra respectively. 12. Exact values of rScan be obtained using icdf functions. 13. Compute error in the estimate of individual methods eind as abs (rS -ind rS). 14. Compute error in multiple tail model (MTM) estimate eMTM as abs(rS 5m) 15. Compute the ratio of mean of eMTM to mean of 5Ra over the entire ex trapolation zone and denote it as 16. Repeat steps 5 to 15, 1000 times for each distribution. 17. Record the median, mean of eind and eMTM over 1000 repetition as 1000 indm, 1000 indand 1000 MTMm,1000 MTM 18. Record the median and mean of the ra tio in step 15 over 1000 repetition as 1000 m For each distribution, boxplots of eind and eMTM are presented. 1000 indmand 1000 MTMmcompared at three reliability indices between 3 and 4. 2. The results for the normal distribution are presented in Figure 5-6. The objective of this plot is to see how well the 5m estimate compares to the ind rS. For 1000 repetitions, only the median and the mean can be compared because the range is volatile. It was observed that the median was a robust estimate compared to the mean. It is evident that the median is less sensitive to the outliers compared to the mean. At =3, the regression (Rg) performs the best followed by the linear tail (LT). The MTM performs as good as the second best. At =3.6, the LT performs the best followed by the regression (Rg) and MTM performs as well as LT. At =4.2, the LT performs the best followed by the quadratic tail (QT) and MTMs performance is as good as LT. It is to be noted that the individual techniques that provided the best estimate differed at di fferent reliability indices. However, the MTM estimate was consistent and it pe rformed at least as good as the second best estimate from the individual techniques. This approach serves as an insurance against bad predictions, if we were to use a single technique.

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74 Box plots of ratio are presented to see how well the range of the methods compares to the mean of the eMTM over the entire extrapolation region. The results for the normal distribution are presented in Figure 5-7. It is clearly observed that the ratio of the mean of the error to the mean of the range in the entire extrapolation region is around 1. If the ratio is 1, then the range captures the error in the median perfectly. Here, the range provides an estimate of eMTM that might slight over or under estimate the actual er ror. The boxplots for the remaining distributions are presented in the Appendix G. Table 5-2 pr ovides a summary of the performance of the individual methods and the MTM fo r all the distributions. Table 52 shows that not a particular technique was the best for all the distributions and the technique that provided the best estimate for a particular distribution va ried as the reliability indices changed. However, the MTM estimate was mostly close to the 2nd best available estimate. The summary of ratio is presented in Table5-3. It is observed that other than unifo rm distribution, the ratio varies between 0.15 to Table 5-1. 7 standard statistical distributions and their parameters Distribution Parameters a b Normal x LogNormal 2ln0.5 x b 2ln1x Gamma 2 x a Extreme Type 1 0.577x b 6 Uniform 12 2x 12 2x Single parameter distributions Exponential x x Rayleigh 2 x b 2 2

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75 0.35. This means that half of the range over estimates the error by a factor of 1.5 to 3. In order to provide an insight what number should one expect for the ratio, a simple exercise is performed. Standard normal random numbers of size 5 (rep resents 5 estimates at 7 different reliability indices) are generated and is computed over 1e5 repetition. The resultant number is 0.18. Table 5-2. Summary of the performance of individual methods and MTM for different distributions Rel Index 3 3.6 4.2 Performance 1st best 2nd best MTM1st best2nd bestMTM1st best 2nd bestMTM Distributions Normal Rg LT 2nd LT QH 1st LT QT 1st Lognormal Rg LT 1st QH Rg 3rd QH QT 3rd Gamma Rg LT 2nd LT Rg 1st QT LT 2nd Ev QH Rg 1st QH QT 1st QH QT 2nd Uniform QT Rg 1st Rg ML 2nd Rg ML 2nd Rayleigh Rg LT 2nd LT Rg 1st LT QT 1st Exponential LT Rg 2nd Rg QT 1st Rg QH 3rd Table 5-3. Summary of the Error to ra nge ratio for different distributions Distribution 1000 m Normal 0.279 Lognormal 0.349 Gamma 0.181 Ev 0.183 Uniform 0.003 Rayleigh 0.148 Exponential 0.241 Since the concept of regression is used to es timate the parameters in all methods other than the ML approach, the residuals are monito red for each method to see whether they follow the normal distribution as per classical statistical theory. It is expected that the type of distribution of the residuals can provide a good idea about the quali ty of the fit. A similar study was made for the normal dist ribution case and the normal QQ plots for the residuals are presented in Figure 5-8. It is observed that the residuals of none of the methods follow a normal distribution. Investigating th e corresponding histograms reveal that they follow a log normal

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76 distribution. In these situati ons, other regression schemes like weighted approaches can be adopted depending on the knowledge of the histogra ms and QQ plots of the residual which is scope for future work. Engineering Examples Application of multiple tail models for re liability estimation of a cantilever beam The cantilevered beam example treated in Chap ter 3 is considered here. The objective of the original problem is to minimize the weight or, equivalently, the cross sectional area, A=w.t subject to two reliability constraints, which require the reliability indices for strength and deflection constraints to be larger than three. Eqs (3-17) and (3-18) are rewritten as sYX S wtwt G RR (5-1) d OOLYX Ewt tw D G DD (5-2) It is to be noted that the pe rformance functions are expressed in a fashion such that failure occurs when s Gor dGis greater than 1. Here, we consider a system failure case. That is, both the failure modes are considered simulta neously. The optimal design variables w=2.6041, t=3.6746 is taken from Qu and Haftka (2003) for a system reliability case. The corresponding reliability index is 3. The allowable deflection Do is taken to be 2.145. For each sample the critical safety ratio reciprocal (maximum of the two) is computed. Since we are dealing with rS, it is to be noted that n=1-Pftarget. The conditional CDF of rScan be approximated by classical techniques and the relationship between rSand reliability index be approxima ted by three different alternate techniques. Finally, using the MTM approach wi ll give a better prediction compared to any individual method. This procedur e is repeated 1000 times and the results are presented in Figure

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77 5-9 It is observed that the LT pe rforms the best at all three reliability indices followed by the QH as the second best. MTM consistently perf ormed close to the second best estimate. Figure 5-10 presents the plot of ratio. The ratio is 0.23 and thus strengthens our conclusion that the half of the range approximates the error in the median by a factor between 1.5 and 3, which is close to 2 here. The main advantages of the techniques discussed are that no statistical information is required and huge re duction in computational power. In order to understand the sacrifice in accuracy for the re duction in computational power a MCS study is performed. 100 repetitions of rSestimates with 5E5 samples a nd the corresponding standard deviation are computed and presented in Table 5-4. At a reliability index of 4.2, the standard deviation in rS estimate is 0.04 which is the same error from MTM using 500 samples. Therefore, for a same level of accuracy, the redu ction in computational pow er is about 3 orders of magnitude (5E5 to 5E2). Table 5-4. PSF reciprocal estimates and standa rd deviation at differe nt reliability indices Rel Index 3 3.2 3.4 3.6 3.8 4 4.2 rS 1.012 1.032 1.05 1.071.091.121.13 SD 0.003 0.004 0.01 0.010.010.020.04 Application of multiple tail models for re liability estimation of a composite panel The design of the wall of a hydrogen tank whic h is a composite laminate operating in cryogenic temperatures addressed by Qu et al., (2003) is consid ered as a second engineering example. In order to reduce matrix crack ing and hence hydrogen leakage in cryogenic environments, the laminates need to have smalle r angle between the plies. However, these types of laminates do not carry the bi axial hoop and axial stresses due to pressure. Qu et al., (2003) investigated options for minimizing the increase in thickness required to carry both mechanical

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78 and thermal residual strains. The geometry and lo ading conditions of the problem is presented in Figure 5-11. The laminate is subject to mechanical (Nx and Ny) load and thermal loading due to operating temperature -423oF where the stress free temperature is 300oF. The objective of the actual problem was to optimize the weight of laminate with two ply angles 12, The ply angles and ply thickness (12 and tt) are the design variables. The material used is IM600/133 graphite epoxy of ply thickness 0.005 inch. Qu et al., (2003) performed the deterministic design optimization using continuous design variables. In order to account fo r the uncertainties and make the deterministic optimal design comparable to probabilistic optimal design, they used a safety factor of 1.4. For further details, the reader is referred to Qu et al., (2003). The mechanical properties are presen ted in Table 5-5. The deterministic optimization problem is formulated as 12 12 1112221212Minimize 4() Such that ,0.005 L ULUU FFFhtt tt SSS (5-3) All material properties are assumed to be random, uncorrelated and follow normal distributions. The coefficient of va riation is presented in Table 5-6. Here, thickness is in inches and h is the laminate thickness. Superscripts U and L represent upper and lower limits of the associated quantities. 1212,, and are the ply strains along fiber di rection, transverse to fiber direction, and shear strain, respectively. 21212,, and EG are functions of temperature. Qu et al (2001) show that at 20.2K (-423 F) the thickness of the optim um laminates obtained by using temperature dependent material properties is 80% less than th at using constant material properties at 298 K (77 F ). Qu et al (2003) observed that 2 U is the active constraint. For a feasible design, 21 different temperat ures uniformly distributed between 20oK and 300oK is

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79 considered and the strain constrai nts are applied to these temperat ures. The mean is computed at a particular temperature and random numbers gene rated based on coefficient of variation. The mean for other parameters are presented in Tabl e 5-7. The deterministic optimal design obtained by Qu et al (2003) is presented in Table 5-8. The transverse strain on the first ply (direction 2) is the critical st rain. The limit state is defined as the difference between the critical strain and the uppe r bound of the allowable strain. 21 UG (5-4) Failure is said to occur if Eq. (5-4)> 0. In order to extend this example for demonstrating the multiple tail models approach, the second optimal design in Table 5-8 is considered. The loads are increased by a factor of 1.1 (Nx -5280 lb/inch and Ny -2640 lb/inch) so that the failure probability is of the order of 1e-3. 500 random critical strain values are genera ted. Similar to the previous examples, 5 different techniques are used to f it the tail of the response distri bution. The results are presented in Figures 5-12 and 5-13. As observed in other ex amples the MTM compared at least close to the second best in estimates from individual methods However, the ratio of mean error to mean range is 0.22 which means that half of the ra nge overestimates the error by a factor of around 2.which falls within the range of 1.5 and 3 that was observed earlier in section. The 1e7 sample based PSF reciprocal estimation and the correspo nding standard deviation is presented in Table 5-9. At reliability index of 4.2, it is seen that the standard deviation is 0.0063 and the multiple tail model provides an estimate with an error of 0.05 which is off by a factor of 8. The number of samples used for this estimation is 500, which is about 4 orders of magnitude less than 1e7 Due to the prohibitive computational power required, an exercise similar to the previous example is

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80 not performed here. Instead the estimate from 500 samples and 1e7 samples are compared directly. Table 5-5. Mechanical properties of the composite laminates Elastic properties 121212,, and EEG Coefficients of thermal expansion 12 and Stress-free temperature zeroT Failure strains 112212,,, and L ULUU Safety factor F S Table 5-6: Coefficient of varia tion for random material properties 121212,,,EEG 12, zeroT 11, L U 2212,, L UU 0.035 0.035 0.03 0.06 0.09 Table 5-7: Mean of random variables 1E 12 zeroT 1 L 1 U 2 L 2 U 12 U 21.5x106 0.359 300 -0.0109 0.0103 -0.013 0.0154 0.0138 Table 5-8: Deterministic optim a found by Qu et al (2003) 1 (deg) 2 (deg) t1 (in) t2 (in) h (in) 0.00 28.16 0.005 0.02 0.1 27.04 27.04 0.01 0.015 0.1 25.16 27.31 0.005 0.020 0.1 Table 5-9: Composite laminate. rSreciprocal estimates and stan dard deviation at different reliability indices Rel Index 3 3.2 3.43.63.844.2 1E+07 1.0043 1.0304 1.0579 1.0862 1.1157 1.1480 1.1824 SD 0.0007 0.0009 0.0015 0.0021 0.0025 0.0046 0.0063

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81 Figure 5-1.Lognormal distribution. Classical ta il modeling techniques MLE and Regression

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82 Figure 5-2. Lognormal distri bution. Linear fit to ta il (LT) and Quadratic fit to half of the data (QH)

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83 Figure 5-3. Lognormal dist ribution. Quadratic fi t to the tail (QT)

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84 Figure 5-4.Lognormal distribution. Multiple tail models

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85 Figure 5-5 Lognormal distribution. Multip le tail models-extrapolation region

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86 Med= Median. ML=Maximum Likelihood, RgRegression, QT Quadratic fit to the Tail data between rSand ln( ), LT Linear fit to the Tail data between rSand QH Quadratic fit to Ha lf of the data between rS and Dashed line inside the box depicts th e mean and the solid line, the median. Figure 5-6. Normal distribution. 1000 repetitions. Boxplot comparison of eind and eMTM at different reliability indices

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87 MTM 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 0.35 0.4 0.45 0.5 0.55 1000m = 0.279 1000= 0.254 Figure 5-7: Normal dist ribution. Boxplot of ratio.

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88 Med= Median. ML=maximum likelihood, RgRegression QT Quadratic fit to the Tail data between rSand ln( ), LT Linear fit to the Tail data between rSand QH Quadratic fit to Ha lf of the data between rS and Dashed line inside the box depicts th e mean and the solid line, the median. Figure 5-8. Cantilever Beam. 1000 repetitions. Boxplot comparison of eind and eMTM at different reliability indices

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89 Figure 5-9. Normal QQ plot of the residuals for the normal distribution

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90 MTM 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 1000m = 0.231 1000= 0.374 Figure 5-10. Cantilever beam. Boxplot of ratio. NX 2 X Y 1 2 1 NY NX 2 X Y 1 2 1 NY Figure 5-11. Geometry and loading for the co mposite laminate. X-hoop direction, Y-axial direction

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91 ML=Maximum Likelihood, RgRegression, QT Quadratic fit to the Tail data between rSand ln( ), LT Linear fit to the Tail data between rSand QH Quadratic fit to half of the data between rS and .Dashed line inside the bo x depicts the mean and th e solid line, the median Figure 5-12. Composite laminate of cryogenic tank. 1000 repetitions. Boxplot comparison of eind and eMTM at different reliability indices...

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92 MTM 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 1000m = 0.220 1000= 0.356 Figure 5-13. Composite laminate of cryogenic tank. Boxplot of ratio.

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93 CHAPTER 6 CONCLUSIONS High reliability estimations with expensive co mputer models pose a challenge because of the high computational expense. Extrapolating in to higher reliability indices with information from lower reliability indices can be one solution to this problem. In order to do this, the tails of the distribution are to be modele d well. Inverse reliability measur es feature several advantages and is widely used by researchers in structural reliability. This work explores the usefulness of inverse measures in tail modeling. Two classical tail modeling techniques were discussed.Three extrapolation techniques that can complement the classical tail modeling techniques were developed. This work proposes to use a multiple tail model approach in which all the five techniques are applied simultaneously to estimate the inverse measure, and the median is taken to be the best estimate. It is shown that the range of the five methods can be utilized to approximate the error associated with the es timate. The proposed method was demonstrated on seven statistical distributions and engineering examples. It was shown that the sacrifice in accuracy compared to the crude MCS is relative ly small compared to the immense reduction in computational power.

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94 APPENDIX A PSF ESTIMATION FOR A SYSTEM RELIABILITY The estimation of PSF for a system reliability case is demonstrated with an example. This example is artificial and is an illustration of a case with multiple limit state functions. The example is presented in Figure A1 .The limit state functions are: 32 115 40 xx Gy (A1) 22 2(5)(12) 0.8 30140 xyxy G (A2) 380 20Gy x (A3) The limit states are functions of two random variables x and y. The distributions of the random variables are presented in Table A-1. The exampl e has been created in such a fashion that each limit state and its intersection with other limit stat es contributes significantly to the total failure. It should be noted that non lin ear functions are used to empha size the advantage of using MCS and a PSFbased approach to estimate failure probability. Using FORM in these circumstances might introduce huge error due to linearizing the limit st ate function at the most probable point of failure. The contributions of failure modes to the total failure are listed in Table A-2. The system PSF can be estimated as described in th e flowchart in Figure A-1. The limit states are functions of two random variab les x and y. The PSF estimated for different target failure probabilities are listed in Table A3. For a target failure probabil ity of 0.557 which is the actual failure probability as listed in Table A-3, the PSF is estimated as 1. When a lower target failure probability of 0.5 is used, the PSF is estimated to be 0.844 indicating that the system is unsafe and when a larger target failure probability of 0.6 is used, the PSF is found to be 1.12 showing that the system is over safe. This shows that PS F based approach can adequately address system reliability case accounting for the interactions between the modes.

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95 Table A-1. Distribution of random vari ables. Multiple failure modes example Table A-2. Contribution of failure modes to the system failure Limit states Failure probability % Contribution to total failure 1 0.432 77.55 2 0.468 84.02 3 0.336 60.32 1 & 2 0.386 69.29 1 & 3 0.253 45.42 2 & 3 0.249 44.71 1,2 & 3 0.209 37.52 Total 0.557 100 Table A-3. PSF at different target failure probabilities Target Pf PSF 0.557 0.9996 0.5 0.8444 0.6 1.1191 Figure A-1. Two variable system. Algebr aic multiple limit state functions example Random Variable x y Distribution Normal (4,0.5) Normal (2,3)

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96 APPENDIX B GENERALIZED EXTREME VALUE THEORY Let X1, X2,be a sequence of independent random variables with a common distribution function F, and let 1 1 1max,..., PrPr,... = Pr...Pr = ()nn nn n nMXX MzXzXz X zXz Fz (B1) Generally, the distribution function of n M can be derived exactly for all values of n. But here F is not known, so it does not help. Here we look for approximate families of models for nFwhich can be estimated based on extreme data only. This is done as follows: nn n n M b M a (B2) for sequences of constants 0na and nb. Appropriate choices of constants stabilize the location and scale of *n M as n increases. Essentially we seek limit distributions for *n M with appropriate choices of constants. The all possible range of limit distributions for *n M is given by the following theorem, the extremal type theo rem, a product of Fisher-Tippet (1928) work. If there exists sequences of constants 0na and nbsuch that Pr()/() as nnnMbazHzn (B3) for a non degenerate distribution function H, then H belong to one of the following families: 1. ()expexp, zb Hzz a (B4) 2. 0 zb () exp, Hz zb zb a (B5)

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97 3. exp, () 1 zb, zb zb Hz a (B6) Here, a and b are the scale and location parameters. is the shape parameter. These three classes of distributions are called the extreme value di stributions with types I, II and III, widely known as Gumbel, Frechet and Weibull families respectively. The a bove theorem implies that the normalized maxima have a limiting distribution that must be one of the three types of extreme value distribution. The three families of distributions can be combined into a single family of models having distribution function of the form 1/()exp1 z Hz (B7) such that :1()/0 zz, where the parameters satisfy 0 and This is the generalized extreme valu e (GEV) family of distributions. Here, is the location parameter, is the scale parameter, is the shape parameter. Type II and III families correspond to 0 and 0 cases in (9). 0 can be interpreted as the Gumbel family with distribution function: ()expexp z Hz (B8)

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98 APPENDIX C MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD ESTIMATION The PDF of the Pareto Di stribution is given by: 1 11 1 0 () 1 = 0i zz fx e (C1) Here, the z represents the exceedances. and are the shape and scale parameters respectively. The likelihood functi on for a sample of z1 zn of iid GP random variables is given by: 1 1 1 1 11 1 0 ,, 1 = 0n i n i i n n iz Lz e (C2) The log likelihood function is expressed as: 1 11 log1log1 1+0 log(,) 1 log = 0n i i i n i iz nz L nz (C3) The maximization of (C3) is best made by reparametrization: ,, with yielding 11 log,log1log1n i ihLnz (C4) 11 loglog1log1n i innz (C5) The max of (C5) is found as the minimum of the negative of(C5). The MLE are given by differentiating (C5) and equating to zero.

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99 2 11 log(1)0 n i ihn z (C6) 111 10 1n i i ihn z z (C7) (C6) yields 11 log(1)n i iz n and (C7)can be solved for Numerical techniques are used for the maximization of h in (C5) using algorithms that are availa ble in standard software packages. In most situations estimation is done using iid samples. In such cases, the interst is to determine the behavior of the estimator as a sample size This is referred to as asymptotic behavior. Under certain regularit y conditions like: the first and second derivatives of the log likelihood function must be defined., the fisher information matrix must not be equal to zero, MLEs exhibit following properties Asymptotically unbiased (i.e.,) its bias tends to zero as the number of samples increases to infinity. MLE is asymptotically guassian. That is, as sample increases the distribution of MLE tends to normal distribution. Here, the covarian ce matrix can be obtai ned as the inverse of the fisher information matrix.

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100 APPENDIX D ERROR ANALYSIS FOR GPD This appendix describes the error analysis for the probability content estimated using tail modeling. When the distribution of exceedance is approximated using GPD, there are two sources of error: 1. Modelling error 2. Sampling component of the total error The modelling error refers to the capacity of the GPD model to accurately represent the distribution of exceedance data or the tail of th e CDF. If the exact CDF is available, the CDF estimated through GPD can be compared and th e resulting error is the modeling error. Depending on the empirical CDF, the GP fit will vary. This introduces sampling error. The sampling error comes from the fact that the GPD parameters vary depending on the exceedance. The input variables generally come from samp ling distributions like the LHS or any other suitable DOE. Depending on these sampling points, the threshold differs. Hence, the exceedance is affected and therefore the estimated para meters and eventually the fitted GPD. If we have the privilege to generate large number of samples and use a fraction of it as exceedance data to fit a GPD, the estimated para meters in the process can be considered as optimal parameters since they are based on a large sample size. These parameters can be used to estimate probability contents at certain leve ls and can be compared with the probability content estimated by a GPD with small sample si ze. This difference will dictate the sampling error contribution to the total error. In an attempt to study the modeling and samp ling error, an example problem is treated here. The example under investigation is Y =exp( x) and x~N(0,1). The modeling error is studied comparing the estimated probability content using a GPD with a large sample size and the exact

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101 probability content generated by analytical expression of the lognormal distribution. The parameters for the GPD are obtained by MLE method. Let the conditional CDF/ PYuzYu be represented by()uFz In this example, it is possible to estimate this quantity exactly. Using extreme value theory for exceedances, ()uFz can be approximated by a GP distribution denoted by, () Fz. Let the estimated CDF be denoted by$ () Fz. Let the GPD which is based on the optimal parameters be denoted by* () Fz. 1e6 samples based on LHS design are generated. The Ys are sorted as:(1)(2)(16)....eYYY This is called the order statistics of Y. Choosing the appropriate u, the threshold value is very critical. u defines the beginning of the upper tail. The uF is chosen to be 0.90 and the corresponding value of Y is chosen as u. Once u is chosen, the exceedance data is formed and the ML estimates are obtained for the parameters. These estimates are used to estimate the probability content at different levels of Y. The results are presented in Table D-1. Five repetitions of 1e6 samples are used for each level. The mean and standard deviation of the CDF estimates based on GPD are presented. The error refers to the total error in percentage. The sampling error component of the total error is ex tracted using estimated optimal parameters. The optimal parameters were obtained based on a million samples. Here, 3 percent of the data was considered as exceedance. The results are presen ted in Table D2. From Tables D-1 and D-2, it can be clearly seen that the sampling error is high compared to the modeling error. So, if we can account for the sampling errors, tail modeling has a fairly good capacity to model the tails of the distribution to estimate probability contents.

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102 TableD-1. Modelling error (()gFz -* () Fz). The standard deviation is very low that it is not presented. TableD-2: Sampling error (* () Fz-$ () Fz) Y Exact g F z GPD* () F z Error% 4 0.08283 0.07988 3.56 5 0.05376 0.05299 1.43 6 0.03659 0.03647 0.33 7 0.02583 0.02587 -0.16 8 0.01879 0.01884 -0.28 9 0.01400 0.01403 -0.19 10 0.01065 0.01065 0.00 11 0.00824 0.00822 0.24 12 0.00648 0.00645 0.49 Y GPD1e6 samples* () F z GPD1e2 samples$ () Fz Error % 4 0.07988 0.08710 -9.04 5 0.05299 0.05797 -9.39 6 0.03647 0.03997 -9.61 7 0.02587 0.02824 -9.15 8 0.01884 0.02039 -8.20 9 0.01403 0.01503 -7.17 10 0.01065 0.01135 -6.53 11 0.00822 0.00877 -6.69 12 0.00645 0.00696 -7.95

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103 APPENDIX E ACCURACY AND CONVERGENCE STUD IES FOR NORMAL AND LOGNORMAL DISTRIBUTIONS The quantile of a probability distribution can be estimated using Eq.(4-8). The quantile2 can be related to the inverse m easure in the structural reliability context where the probability content is expressed as the targ et failure probability. Due to th e various advantages of using inverse measures in RBDO, we are interested in estimating them using tail modeling approach. Here, we study the accuracy of the tail model to capture the quantile in the tails of the normal distribution. In the following simulation study a y=x example where x ~ N (0, 1) is treated. The error metrics that are monitored are: a) Bias error: Bias()=E p pp x xx (E1) 11Ns p p i x x Nsim (E2) where, : Estimated quantile : Actual quantile : Number of simulationsp px x Nsim b) RMSE error: 22 11 ()()Ns pppp ixxxx Ns (E3) Here, we set out to study the effects of the threshold value, the number of exceedance data on the accuracy of the quantile estimate. For each threshold value, four different exceedances are tested. Since the exceedances vary, the number of samples used in each case varies. The results are presented in Table E-1.The overall capacity of the tail modeling approach to capture the quantiles in the tails of the norma l distribution seems to be pretty good. For all the four threshold 2 A p quantile of a random variable X is any value x such that Pr(X xp) = p

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104 values, the % Bias error for the 25 exceedance data seem to be very less compared to higher exceedance data. But, it is to be noted that the corresponding %RMSE errors are high emphasizing the fact that the estimates from low number of exceedance data could be highly unreliable. 25 exceedance data is considered low to estimate quantiles. 50 to 100 data is considered realistic and 200 ideal It can be clearly observed th at the accuracy of the % Bias increases as the threshold increases for the Table E-1. Accuracy of the tail modeling approa ch to estimate quantiles. Normal distribution y = x. x~N(0,1). 500 simulations. ML estimated parameters % Bias % RMSE Fu Nex NS 0.999 0.9999 0.99999 0.999 0.9999 0.99999 25 125 -8 -9 -5 48 98 216 50 250 -6 -10 -14 22 34 46 100 500 -3 -7 -11 11 16 22 0.8 200 1000 -2.5 -7.3 -12.5 5.1 8.5 12.0 25 166 -6 -7 -2 37 81 211 50 333 -4 -8 -11 17 28 44 100 666 -2 -6 -10 8 13 18 0.85 200 1333 -2.1 -6.1 -10.6 4.1 6.9 9.8 25 250 -3 -2 3 25 51 107 50 500 -4 -7 -10 11 18 25 100 1000 -2.2 -5.7 -9.4 5.4 9.3 13.1 0.9 200 2000 -0.8 -3.5 -6.8 2.6 4.8 7.1 25 500 -3 -3 0 12 26 57 50 1000 -2 -4 -5 6 11 17 100 2000 -0.8 -2.5 -4.5 2.8 5.5 8.5 0.95 200 4000 -0.4 -2.4 -5.2 1.3 2.6 4.0 Fu Threshold in the CDF. Nex Nu mber of exceedance data. NSNumber of total samples used. 0.999, 0.9999, 0.99999 Quantiles required to be estimated. For a threshold of 0.85 and Nex=100, the -2,-6,-10 % Bias erro r in quantile translates to -27.6, -139.9 and -524.12% error in probability content same number of exceedance data. The threshold va lues, number of exceedance data is dependent on the level of target quantile we wish to estimate It can be observed that for a quantile of 0.999, reasonably low quantiles such as 0.8 perform we ll enough with 50 to 100 exceedance data, if 5% bias error is allowable. For a 0.9999 quantile, a threshold of 0.9 with 100 exceedance data

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105 performs fairly well. A 0.95 threshold is cap able of estimating a 0.99999 quantile well with about 100 data. But it can be observed that there is oscillation in the error values as the 100 exceedance data seem to perform better than the 200 exceedance data in % bias error. A higher threshold value is expected to rectify this oscillation. Since normal distribution is the most encountered distribution in structural analysis, it is good news that the tail modeling approach can capture the quantiles in the tail of the normal distribution fairly well. The next distribution that is treated he re is a log normal distribution which has a heavy tail and is generally used to model loads in structural anal ysis. The simulation procedure is same as above. The results are provided in Table E2. Comparison of Tables E-1 a nd E-2 allows us to conclude Table E-2. Accuracy of the tail modeling approa ch to estimate quantiles. LogNormal distribution y = x. x~logN(0,1). 500 simulations. ML estimated parameters % Bias % RMSE Fu Nex NS 0.999 0.9999 0.99999 0.999 0.9999 0.99999 25 125 18 110 527 228 1214 8065 50 250 8 42 126 77 199 517 100 500 7 29 79 37 91 229 0.8 200 1000 3.8 17.4 44.0 16.6 36.4 75.1 25 166 18 170 1517 256 2848 40477 50 333 4 37 152 67 270 1410 100 666 6 26 70 28 68 159 0.85 200 1333 1.8 12.0 32.9 12.3 26.1 51.1 25 250 5 71 439 101 632 5683 50 500 6 38 136 44 152 590 100 1000 1.1 14.2 43.7 16.8 40.3 92.4 0.9 200 2000 1.5 10.5 29.4 8.6 18.6 36.4 25 500 2 38 211 41 196 1363 50 1000 1 20 82 19 71 358 100 2000 1.4 12.4 39.0 9.3 24.2 56.2 0.95 200 4000 -0.1 5.6 19.6 4.2 10.2 20.8 Fu Threshold in the CDF. Nex Nu mber of exceedance data. NSNumber of total samples used.0.999, 0.9999, 0.99999 Quantiles required to be estimated. For a 0.95 threshold and Nex=10 0, the 1.4, 12.4 and 39% Bias error in qu antile translates to 4.5, 37.5 and 78.3% error in probability content

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106 that estimating quantiles in lognor mal distribution is more challe nging than normal distribution. For a 0.999 quantile, 0.8 and 0.85 thresholds perf orm fairly well with 200 samples. Above a 0.9 threshold, 100 samples seem to render very good results. There is considerable difficulty in estimating 0.9999 quantile with even a 100 exceedan ce data and a 0.95 threshold value. Needless to mention, trying to estimate 0.99999 quantile de teriorates the accuracy of the estimation only. In order to test whether higher threshold values enable us to estimate the extreme quantiles accurately, simulation is conducted for threshold va lues ranging from 0.96 to 0.99 and results are presented in Table E-3. Table E-3. Accuracy of the tail modeling appr oach to estimate quantiles. Higher thresholds. LogNormal distribution y = x. x~logN(0,1). 500 simulations. ML estimated parameters % Bias % RMSE Fu Nex NS 0.99990.999990.99990.99999 25 625 50 254 171 958 50 1250 16 61 46 160 100 2500 9 30 18 42 0.96 200 5000 4 16 8 16 25 834 20 135 102 693 50 1667 12 49 35 98 100 3334 7 29 16 43 0.97 200 6667 3 13 6 12 25 1250 17 126 74 563 50 2500 6 29 19 49 100 5000 4 20 10 22 0.98 200 10000 1 8 4 8 25 2500 5 65 30 225 50 5000 2 19 10 25 100 10000 0.9 10 5 12 0.99 200 20000 0.2 6 2 5 Fu Threshold in the CDF. Nex Nu mber of exceedance data. NSNumber of total samples used. 0.9999, 0.99999 Quantiles required to be estimated Results from Table 4-3 clearly show that as the threshold is increased, the extreme quantiles are also captured fairly well. With a 0.99 threshol d and 100 exceedance data, we can achieve less

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107 than one percent error in bias for estimating 0.9999 quantil e. This requires 10000 samples. Similarly the accuracy in estimating 0.99999 quantil e is also better with 0.99 threshold and 200 exceedance data. A more accurate estimate can be e xpected if we raise the threshold to 0.999 or higher.

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108 APPENDIX F ACCURACY AND CONVERGENCE STUDIES FOR THE CANTILEVER BEAM Stress Failure Mode The stress failure mode for the cantilever beam discussed in Chapter 3 is considered here. The optimal design variables w=2.4526; t=3.8884 for a target failure probability of 0.00125 (1e7 Samples) are adopted from (Qu and Haftka, 2004). The corresponding value of PSF for this design is 1. For the optimal combination of the design variables, 500 samples based on the distribution of the random vari ables are generated and the PSF is estimated for different thresholds as discussed in Chapter 3. This pr ocedure is repeated 100 times and the mean, 5%, 95% confidence intervals are estimated. The resu lts are presented in Figure E-1. It can be observed from the figure that the PSF estimated by regression approach is very unstable whereas the median of PSF estimated by the ML approach is relatively stable. There is instability towards higher threshold like 0.98 but the corresponding ex ceedance data are very less, which explains the instability. The estimated mean of the PSF in the ML approach is close to 0.99 which is about 1% bias error in estimating th e actual value of the PSF. The standard deviation of the PSF estimate at a threshold of 0.9 with ML approach is about 0.003 which is 0.3% of the estimate. The corresponding estimate of failure probability is 0.0011 with a standa rd deviation of 0.0001 which is about 10% of the estimate. Deflection Failure Mode The allowable deflection is chosen to be D0=2.25. Similar to the stress failure case, the PSF is estimated at different thresholds for the optimal combination of the design variables. The results are presented in Figure E2. At a threshold of 0.9 and ML approach, the PSF is estimated to be 0.99 with a standard deviation of 0.004. The corresponding failure probability estimate is 0.0013 with a standard deviation of 0.0001 wh ich is about 8% of the estimate itself.

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109 0.8 0.82 0.84 0.86 0.88 0.9 0.92 0.94 0.96 0.98 1 0.94 0.952 0.964 0.976 0.988 1 1.012 1.024 1.036 1.048 1.06 Fu1/PSF LCI UCI Mean Median 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 NexA 0.8 0.82 0.84 0.86 0.88 0.9 0.92 0.94 0.96 0.98 1 0.9 0.935 0.97 1.005 1.04 1.075 1.11 1.145 1.18 1.215 1.25 Fu1/PSF LCI UCI Mean Median 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 NexB Figure F-1. Convergence of PSF at different thresholds. A) MLE B) Regression. Cantilever beam stress failure mode. 500 Samples. 100 repetitions

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110 0.8 0.82 0.84 0.86 0.88 0.9 0.92 0.94 0.96 0.98 0.92 0.934 0.948 0.962 0.976 0.99 1.004 1.018 1.032 1.046 1.06 Fu1/PSF LCI UCI Mean Median 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 NexA 0.8 0.82 0.84 0.86 0.88 0.9 0.92 0.94 0.96 0.98 0.9 0.95 1 1.05 1.1 1.15 1.2 1.25 1.3 1.35 1.4 Fu1/PSF LCI UCI Mean Median 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 NexB Figure F-2. Convergence of PSF at different thresholds. A) MLE B) Regression. Cantilever beam deflection failure mode. 500 Samples. 100 repetition

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111 APPENDIX G STATISTICAL DISTRIBUTIONS ERROR PLOTS Boxplot comparison of eind and eMTM at different reliability indices. ML=Maximum Likelihood, RgRegression, QT Quadra tic fit to the Tail data between rSand ln( ), LT Linear fit to the Tail data between rSand QH Quadratic fit to half of the data between rS and .Dashed line inside the box depicts the m ean and the solid line, the median. 1000 repetition

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112 Figure G-1 Lognormal distribution

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113 Figure G-2: Gamm a Distribution

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114 Figure G-3. Extreme Value type 1 Distribution

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115 Figure G-4. Uniform Distribution.

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116 Figure G-5. Rayleigh Distribution.

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117 Figure G-6. Exponential Distribution.

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118 Boxplot of ratio. Different distributions Figure G-7. Lognorma l Distribution. MTM 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 1000m = 0.181 1000= 0.220 Figure G-8. Gamma Distribution. MTM 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 1000m = 0.349 1000= 0.340

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119 MTM 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 0.35 0.4 0.45 0.5 0.55 1000m = 0.183 1000= 0.185 Figure G-9. Extreme Valu e-Type 1 Distribution MTM 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 x 10 1000m = 0.003 1000= 0.003 Figure G-10. Uniform Distribution.

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120 MTM 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1000m = 0.146 1000= 0.185 Figure G-11. Rayleigh Distribution. MTM 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 1000m = 0.241 1000= 0.276 Figure G-12. Exponential Distribution.

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121 REFERENCES Agarwal, H.; Lee, J.C.; Watson, L.T.; Renaud, J.E. 2004: A unilevel met hod for reliability based design optimization, Proceedings of the 45th AIAA/ASME/ASC E/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Material Conference, Palm Springs, CA, April 19-22, AIAA Paper 2004-2029. Agarwal H., Shawn E.G., Renaud J.E., Perez V. M., Watson. L.T. 2007: Homotopy Methods for Constraint Relaxation in Unilevel Reliability-based Design Optimization, Submitted to the ASME Journal of Mechanical Design Bassi, F.; Embrechts, P.; Kafetzaki, M. 1998: Ri sk Management and Quantile Estimation In: A Practical Guide to Heavy Tails, Edited by Adler, R. J., et al., Boston, Birkhaeuser, pp. 111-130 Beirlant, J.; Goegebeur, Y.; Segers, J.; Teugels, J. 2004: Statistics of Extremes: Theory and Applications, John Wiley & Sons Beirlant, J.; Vynckier, P.; Teuge ls, J.L. 1996: Excess Functions and Estimation of Extreme Value Index. Bernoulli, 2, pp:293-318 Boos, D.D. 1984: Using Extreme Value Theory to Estimate Large Percentiles, Technometrics, 26, pp:33-39 Caers, J.; Maes, M.A. 1998: Identifying Tails, Bounds and End-points of Random Variables. Structural Safety, Vol 20, pp 1-23 Castillo, E.; Hadi, A.S.; Balakr ishnan, N.; Sarabia, J.M. 2005: Extreme Value and Related Models with Applications in Engineering and Science, Hoboken, New Jersey:Wiley Interscience Chen, S.; Nikolaidis, E.; Cudney, H. H. 1999: Comparison of Probabilistic and Fuzzy Set Methods for Designing under Uncertainty. Proceedings, AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural dynamics, and Materials Conference and Exhibit, 2860-2874. Chiralaksanakul, A.; Mahadevan, S. 2005: Mu ltidisciplinary Design Optimization Under Uncertainty, in press, Optimization and Engineering. Coles, S. 2001: An Introduction to Statistical Modeling of Extreme Values, London, England: Springer-Verlag Du, X.; Chen, W. 2004: Sequential Optimizatio n and Reliability Assessment Method for Efficient Probabilistic Design, Journal of Mechanical Design, Vol 126, No. 2, pp. 225 233. Du, X.; Sudjianto, A.; and Chen, W. 2004: An Integrated Framework for Optimization under Uncertainty Using Inverse Reliability Strategy, ASME Journal of Mechanical Design, Vol.126, No.4, pp. 561-764. Elishakoff, I. 2001: Interrelation between Saf ety Factors and Reliability, NASA report CR-2001211309

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126 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH Palani Ramu was born in Chennai, India in 1978. He earned his BEng in Mechanical from Madurai Kamaraj University, India in 1999. He wo rked at the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay and InfoTech Pratt & Whitney Center of Excellence as Research Assistant and Design Engineer respectively till 2002. In 2003, he starte d his graduate studies at the University of Florida, Gainesville and worked towards a Ph.D in Aerospace Engineering. During his graduate studies, he was a visiting researcher at the Leon ardo Da Vinci University, Paris, France and was awarded a summer fellowship at the Center fo r Space Nuclear Research Idaho National Labs, Idaho. His areas of interest include applicati on of probability and statistical methods to design aerospace structures, specifical ly highly reliable designs.