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Need-Based Feedback

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0021236/00001

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Title: Need-Based Feedback An Optimization Approach
Physical Description: 1 online resource (75 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Chakraborty, Debraj
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: bangbang, control, differential, game, loop, minmax, open, optimal, robust
Electrical and Computer Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Electrical and Computer Engineering thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Feedback is often used to overcome the adverse effects of perturbations and uncertainties on the performance of engineering systems. However, failures of the feedback channel cannot be completely avoided. This dissertation addresses the questions of how and for how long can desirable performance of a perturbed system be maintained after a failure of the feedback channel. Let Sigma_e be a system that is subject to a perturbation e in its parameters. The exact value of the perturbation e is not known; it is only known that e is bounded by a given constant d. Now, let u(t) be an input function of Sigma, and let Sigma_e(u) be the response of the perturbed system to the signal u(t). The nominal system is Sigma_0, and the nominal response to the signal u is Sigma_0(u). Therefore, the deviation in the response caused by the perturbation is ||Sigma_e(u)-Sigma_0(u)||. To reduce the perturbation, add a 'correction signal' v(t) to the input signal, so that the perturbed response becomes Sigma_e(u+v). Then, the new deviation between the perturbed and nominal cases becomes ||Sigma_e(u+v)-Sigma_0(u)||. The correction signal v(t) must be independent of perturbation value e, as the latter is not known. Let M be the maximal deviation allowed for the response, and let t_f be the time for which ||Sigma_e(u+v)-Sigma_0(u)|| < =M. Then, the objective is to find a correction signal v(t) that maximizes t_f, given only that the perturbation e is bounded by d. Euler-Lagrange type first-order conditions for calculating the optimal correction signal v(t) is presented. It is shown that, under rather broad conditions, the optimal correction signal v(t) is either a bang-bang signal or can be arbitrarily closely approximated by a bang-bang signal.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Debraj Chakraborty.
Thesis: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2007.
Local: Adviser: Hammer, Jacob.

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Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2007
System ID: UFE0021236:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0021236/00001

Material Information

Title: Need-Based Feedback An Optimization Approach
Physical Description: 1 online resource (75 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Chakraborty, Debraj
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: bangbang, control, differential, game, loop, minmax, open, optimal, robust
Electrical and Computer Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Electrical and Computer Engineering thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Feedback is often used to overcome the adverse effects of perturbations and uncertainties on the performance of engineering systems. However, failures of the feedback channel cannot be completely avoided. This dissertation addresses the questions of how and for how long can desirable performance of a perturbed system be maintained after a failure of the feedback channel. Let Sigma_e be a system that is subject to a perturbation e in its parameters. The exact value of the perturbation e is not known; it is only known that e is bounded by a given constant d. Now, let u(t) be an input function of Sigma, and let Sigma_e(u) be the response of the perturbed system to the signal u(t). The nominal system is Sigma_0, and the nominal response to the signal u is Sigma_0(u). Therefore, the deviation in the response caused by the perturbation is ||Sigma_e(u)-Sigma_0(u)||. To reduce the perturbation, add a 'correction signal' v(t) to the input signal, so that the perturbed response becomes Sigma_e(u+v). Then, the new deviation between the perturbed and nominal cases becomes ||Sigma_e(u+v)-Sigma_0(u)||. The correction signal v(t) must be independent of perturbation value e, as the latter is not known. Let M be the maximal deviation allowed for the response, and let t_f be the time for which ||Sigma_e(u+v)-Sigma_0(u)|| < =M. Then, the objective is to find a correction signal v(t) that maximizes t_f, given only that the perturbation e is bounded by d. Euler-Lagrange type first-order conditions for calculating the optimal correction signal v(t) is presented. It is shown that, under rather broad conditions, the optimal correction signal v(t) is either a bang-bang signal or can be arbitrarily closely approximated by a bang-bang signal.
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Debraj Chakraborty.
Thesis: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2007.
Local: Adviser: Hammer, Jacob.

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2007
System ID: UFE0021236:00001


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NEED-BASED FEEDBACK: AN OPTIMIZATION APPROACH


By

DEBRAJ CHAKRABORTY













A DISSERTATION PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT
OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

2007
































O 2007 Debraj Chakraborty


































To my family.









ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I would like to thank my advisor, Dr. Jacob Hammer for his kind and patient guidance

during my stay at University of Florida. Our long discussions, whether technical or not were

intellectually stimulating and extremely enj oyable. I thank all the faculty members of my

department who helped me learn the basics of Electrical Engineering. Especially I would like to

thank Dr. Pramod Khargonekar, Dr. Haniph Latchman and Dr. John Schueller for serving on my

PhD committee and for improving my thesis through some insightful suggestions and

corrections. Lastly I would like to thank my friends Yoav Levinbook, Saravanan Vij ayakumaran,

Niranj an Venkatraman and Jun Peng for comments, suggestions and especially for listening to

my half-baked ideas and theories at various stages of their development.












TABLE OF CONTENTS


page

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS .............. ...............4.....


LIST OF FIGURES .............. ...............7.....


AB S TRAC T ......_ ................. ............_........8


CHAPTER


1 INTRODUCTION .............. ...............10....


2 LITERATURE REVIEW .............. ...............15....


Related Work in Min-Max Optimal Control Problems .............. ...............15....
Other Approaches for Reducing Feedback Requirements. ..........._..._ ................. .......17
Residence Time Control .............. ...............17....


3 MATHEMATICAL PRELIMINARIES ................. ...............19........... ....


Normed Linear Spaces............... ...............19.
W eak Convergence............... ..............1
Alaoglu' s theorem .............. ...............20....
Weak upper semicontinuity ................. ........... ...............20......
Definition ofBorel, Lebesgue and Radon Measures................ ...............2
Riesz Representation Theorem ............_ ..... ..__ ...............22...
Fubini's Theorem .............. ...............22....

Separation of Convex Sets............... ...............23..
Directional (Gateaux) Derivative .............. .... .. ...............23.
Existence and Uniqueness of Solution to a LTI System ................. ................. ..........24
Jordan Canonical Representation .............. ...............24....

4 NOTATION AND PROBLEM FORMULATION ................ ............. ......... .......26


Notation ..................... ...............26.
Statement of the Problem ................. ...............28................


5 EXISTENCE OF A SOLUTION................ ...............3


Weak Compactness of U .............. ...............30....
Alternative Problem ............... ... ............... ...............31.......
Weak Upper Semicontinuity of T(u,D) .............. ...............37....
Existence of u* ................ ...............39........... ....


6 GENERALIZED FIRST ORDER CONDITIONS ................. ...............41........... ...


Simplified Theorem from Warga (1970) ................. ...............41........... ..













The Scaled System ................. ...............45........... ....
Necessary Conditions .............. ...............47...

Bang-Bang Approximation to v* ............. ...............53.....


7 CONDITIONS FOR A PURELY BANG-BANG SOLUTION ................. ............. .......57


8 CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK .............. ...............67....


Conclusion ............ _. ..... ...............67...
Future Work............... ...............68..

Applications............... ..............6
Theoretical Research............... ...............69


LIST OF REFERENCES ............_...... ...............71...


BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH .............. ...............75....










LIST OF FIGURES


Figure page

1-1 Schematic of intermittent feedback control ................. ...............12...............

1-2 Loss of feedback due to communication channel disruption ................. ......................13

6-1 Optimal input has one switch: M= 1.96, tf= 3.7............... ...............5...1

6-2 Trajectories for ten different uncertainty values of 'a'; M = 1.96, tf = 3.7 .................. .......52

6-3 Approximate bang-bang input: 16 switches .............. ...............56....

6-4 Trajectories for ten different uncertainty values of 'a'; M = 1.96, tf = 3.69 .................. .....56

7-1 Optimal input has one switch: M = 25, t, = 5.08 .............. ...............66....

7-2 Trajectories for ten different uncertainty values of 'a'; M = 25, tf = 5.08 ................... .......66









Abstract of Dissertation Presented to the Graduate School
of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the
Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy

NEED BASED FEEDBACK: AN OPTIMIZATION APPROACH

By

Debraj Chakraborty

August 2007

Chair: Jacob Hammer
Major: Electrical and Computer Engineering

Feedback is often used to overcome the adverse effects of perturbations and uncertainties

on the performance of engineering systems. However, failures of the feedback channel cannot be

completely avoided. This dissertation addresses the questions of how and for how long can

desirable performance of a perturbed system be maintained after a failure of the feedback

channel .

Let Es be a system that is subject to a perturbation E in its parameters. The exact value

of the perturbation E is not known; it is only known that s is bounded by a given constant 6.

Now, let u(t) be an input function of C, and let Esu be the response of the perturbed system to

the signal u(t). The nominal system is Co, and the nominal response to the signal u is Cou.

Therefore, the deviation in the response caused by the perturbation is ||L~u Cou||. To reduce the

perturbation, add a "correction signal" v(t) to the input signal, so that the perturbed response

becomes Es(u+v). Then, the new deviation between the perturbed and nominal cases becomes

||Es(u+v) Cou||. The correction signal v(t) must be independent of perturbation value s, as the

latter is not known.

Let M be the maximal deviation allowed for the response, and let tf be the time for

which ||Es(u+v) Cou|| < M. Then, the objective is to find a correction signal v(t) that









maximizes tf, given only that the perturbation E is bounded by 6. Euler-Lagrange type first-

order conditions for calculating the optimal correction signal v(t) is presented. It is shown that,

under rather broad conditions, the optimal correction signal v(t) is either a bang-bang signal or

can be arbitrarily closely approximated by a bang-bang signal.









CHAPTER 1
INTTRODUCTION

In this work we reduce the need to communicate between the controller and the sensor

measuring the system output by maximizing the time during which the feedback loop can remain

open. This is motivated from the fact that in certain applications, feedback is not continually

available or cannot be continually measured. Sometimes it is advantageous to temporarily stop

the transmission of the feedback signal from the sensors at the system output to the controller. In

other situations an unpredictable failure of the feedback channel can occur.

For example, in controlling space vehicles, obstacles may accidentally disrupt the line of

vision between the spacecraft and earth for varying time periods. In telemetry, the need to

conserve battery life may motivate a planned reduction of the time of transmission of feedback

signal. Moreover stealth applications, that hide systems from detection, prefer to minimize

transmission between the controlled obj ect and the remote controller. In agriculture,

measurements about soil parameters like moisture, etc., must be done manually and are

consequently expensive. Usually such measurements are carried out intermittently after long

intervals. In medicine, mathematical modeling and control of certain diseases have become quite

common (see Panetta 2003 and references therein). However the feedback available is inherently

of an intermittent nature, since measurements on the patients can only be made after long

intervals. Lastly network based control systems use a common unreliable network on time-

shared basis with other users and hence the feedback signal may be available to the controller

only intermittently. In such applications, it is relevant to ask:

* Research Question 1: How long can the feedback loop be kept open, while maintaining
desirable performance specifications?

* Research Question 2: What is the best way to control the system when we do not have the
feedback signal?









Feedback is necessary due to the uncertainty inherent in any system. The main reason for

this need for feedback is the lack of perfect knowledge about the system. This includes modeling

inaccuracies, unmodeled nonlinearities, parametric uncertainties, spurious disturbances, input

noise and measurement noise. Robustness and immunity to all this features are usually achieved

through feedback strategies. Hence, it is evident that no uncertain system can be controlled

indefinitely if the feedback signal is not available.

However, assuming some amount of tolerance for error, there will be an interval of time in

which the system will perform acceptably even without any feedback. Let us assume that the

system is allowed to operate within some specified level of error and the loss of feedback occurs

when the error is within this specified limit. Then the system traj ectory will usually require at

least a Einite amount of time to exceed the specified error level. This is true for most real systems

and in particular, for linear time invariant systems. As we illustrated in the above applications, it

is interesting to know, how and for how long this period of acceptable operation without

feedback may be extended. The question we ask is: what is the maximal time until which the

feedback loop can be kept open so that the error remains within the specified limit. We will show

that under suitable assumptions, this period is always Einite. Hence the disruption in the feedback

signal, whether intended or accidental, will have to end or must be ended after this period of

time. Otherwise, effective control is not possible, and the system traj ectory may exceed the

tolerated error.

If the disruption was accidental, this maximal time describes the upper bound of

guaranteed safe operation. If the disruption carries on beyond this point the system can

potentially fail. The a priori knowledge of this critical maximal time interval can help in

decision-making. If the suspension of feedback was intentional, at that point of time the feedback










is reconnected and the knowledge of the current outputs/states are utilized to bring down the

system error. Once the error is reduced to near zero, the feedback may be disconnected again and

the previous cycle may resume.



Controller I 1 Plant





Switch

Figure 1-1: Schematic of intermittent feedback control

In this study we consider linear time invariant systems with bounded inputs and the states

are assumed to be available as outputs. As in most common situations, we assume that the

system parameters are uncertain but are known to lie within some bounds. The Euclidean norm

of the state is taken as a measure of the system error at any time instant, which is required to be

always less than a pre-specified upper bound. The norm of the initial condition is assumed to

satisfy this bound. Under these assumptions the obj ectives for the open loop operation may be

outlined briefly as follows. Find, for any permissible uncertainty, the maximal time interval for

which the system error does not exceed the allowed limit. The system error is not monitored

during open loop operation. Hence, such a worst-case optimization is considered to guarantee

acceptable performance. A special input function is calculated to achieve maximal duration of

the open loop period. Note that this is legitimate even when the loop is open, as long as no

knowledge of the feedback signal is used for its computation. Existence of the time optimal

controller is proved and Euler-Lagrange type conditions are derived for calculating the time

optimal open loop input. It is shown that this time optimal input signal is either purely bang-bang

or can be uniformly approximated by a bang-bang signal.









Finally, it should be noted that, corresponding to the optimal open loop input, an infinite

number of system traj ectories might be realized depending on the particular value the uncertainty

takes within the allowed set The main emphasis of this formulation is to guarantee that none of

the trajectories, from the infinite number possible, can exceed the allowed error bound for the

maximal time interval of operation.





Loss of Feedback -
Signal-


,/ Acceptable Flight
// Envelope \





~ Earth
\\ Launch
arget Site


Figure 1-2: Loss of feedback due to communication channel disruption

We conclude this introductory chapter with a hypothetical example to illustrate our

problem formulation: Consider the simulated firing of a ground-to-ground missile as illustrated

in the figure. The flight path of the missile is predetermined and the missile is regulated carefully

so that it follows the prescribed flight path. The feedback about the current coordinates, velocity,

angles, etc., of the missile is transmitted to the ground controller via a satellite. The controller

uses this information to determine the angle and amount of thrust needed to keep the missile on

track. Under this scenario even a temporary loss of signal from the satellite may lead to the

catastrophic failure of the control and a subsequent loss of the missile. We are proposing a









solution to the problem by defining the best way to design the control of the missile for the

duration of no feedback. Our method also guarantees that the missile can stay within the

acceptable flight envelope for a maximal time after loss of signal from the satellite occurs. We

prove that the best control under these circumstances is either bang-bang or can be approximated

by a bang-bang signal.









CHAPTER 2
LITERATURE REVIEW

Related Work in Min-Max Optimal Control Problems

The obj ective of time optimality, for every possible uncertainty, in open or closed loop

operation embeds our problem within the framework of min-max optimal control. This area of

differential game theory has been extensively researched and encompasses a wide variety of

interesting results. We review a few papers directly related to our work.

Isaacs (1954) was the first investigation to formulate a control problem in which two

players with conflicting interests interact with each other in a game theoretical setup. These

results were later published as a book in Isaacs (1965). The so-called "main" equation was

derived, which can be viewed as a game theoretical extension of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman

equation and the dynamic programming approach (Bellman 1957). Independently,

Kelendzheridze (1961) solved a pursuit-evasion problem, which in turn spawned a body of

research of which Pontryagin et al. (1962), Pontryagin (1966, 1967a and b), Mishchenko and

Pontryagin (1967) and Mischenko (1971) were early contributors. These papers generally

derived Euler-Lagrange type necessary conditions for the equilibrium solutions to the pursuit-

evasion problem. Berkovitz (1964 and 1967) formalized Isaacs' results in a classical calculus of

variations setting and also derived necessary conditions for general systems under weak

assumptions. Other early contributors were Fleming (1961 and 1964), Ho et al. (1965), Friedman

(1971), Elliott and Kalton (1972) and Elliott et al. (1973).

Numerous authors developed different definitions of the equilibrium solution and various

payoff functions of which Linear Quadratic Games have been extensively developed. A

complete set of references can be found in Basar (1982). However the maj ority of interesting

results have been concentrated for differential games with a saddle point solution. The problem









of worst-case optimization without the saddle point assumption was posed by Feldbaum (1961

and 1965). This problem was addressed by, among others, Koivuniemi (1966), Howard and

Rekasius (1964) and Bellanger (1964). Witsenhausen (1968) solved the same problem with a

convex cost functional for sampled data systems. As discussed next, the problem was

mathematically solved by Warga (1965a).

The concept of relaxed solutions in optimal control theory was introduced by Young

(1937) and later in the book Young (1969). In a series of papers Warga (1965a and b, 1970 and

1971a and b) solved the min-max control problem using relaxed solutions with quite general

assumptions. The existence of relaxed solutions (in the sense of Young 1937) to the min-max

problems were guaranteed and the solutions were found to satisfy variants of Euler-Lagrange

type necessary conditions. The techniques used were similar to those of Neustadt (1966 and

1967) and Gamkrelidze (1965). These results were reworked and accumulated into a book

(Warga 1972), from which we use a result on conflicting controls (Theorem IX. 1.2) to derive

necessary conditions for our problem. We quote a simplified version of the actual theorem in

Chapter 4.

It should be noted that with the exception of papers related to the Isaacs "main" equation,

almost all the work reviewed above looked for open loop solutions. Apparently little has been

done in search of closed loop necessary conditions characterizing solutions to the min-max

problem. Conditions for existence of a stable solution were formalized with the help of concepts

like stable bridges in Krasovskii and Subbotin (1974). This book contains a detailed exposition

of "positional", i.e., feedback solution to differential games. In a series of papers, Ledyaev and

Mishchenko (1986, 1987 and 1988) and Ledyaev (1989 and 1994) derived necessary conditions

for min-max control problems of a fixed duration. This has been an area of intensive research









since but most of the advances have been related to the dynamic programming approach. See

Vinter (2000) and the references therein. However efforts to derive Euler-Lagrange type

necessary conditions have been limited.

Throughout this study, results and ideas from standard optimal control and mathematics

references have been used. Some of them are Kolmogorov and Fomin (1957 and 1961),

Liusternik and Soboley (1961), Rudin (1966), Bryson and Ho (1969), Luenberger (1969),

Balakrishnan (1971), Hirsch and Smale (1974), Halmos (1982) and Zeidler (1985).

Other Approaches for Reducing Feedback Requirements

As outlined in the introduction, the main obj ective of this work is to reduce the duration

during which the feedback loop has to be closed for controlling an uncertain plant. As far as we

are aware of, such a robust time optimal formulation for reducing feedback requirements has not

been dealt with in literature. However, in the context of Network Control Systems (see Nair et al.

2007), model based approaches have been developed for controlling systems with intermittent

feedback. Design methodologies, in which ideal models of the system were used to guess the

output of the system during the open loop, were proposed by Zhivogyladov and Middleton

(2003) and Montestruque and Antsaklis (2004). Estimates of the maximum time the feedback

signal may be delayed were calculated in Walsh et al. (1999). However in these works, the

problem of finding the best open loop input was not dealt with and consequently, the maximum

time for acceptable open loop operation has not been calculated. In conclusion, our work may

have some implications for the problem of bandwidth reduction or control under communication

constraints usually addressed in Network Control Systems (see Nair et al. 2007).

Residence Time Control

The problems of pointing and the related concept of residence time control are similar to

our formulation of the problem. (See Meerkov and Runolfsson 1988 and the references therein).










The pointing problem was investigated among others by Skelton (1973), Eng (1979), Cannon

and Schmitz (1984) and Halyo (1983). In Meerkov and Runolfsson (1988), the residence time

control problem was formulated as that of choosing a feedback control law, so as to force the

system states to remain, at least on the average, within pre-specified limits during some minimal

period of time in spite of the disturbances that are acting on the system. The objective is very

similar to that treated in this work, but the use of feedback creates a fundamental difference.

Recall that in our hypothesis the feedback signal is completely absent over the period of interest.

Moreover the maximum residence time was also not calculated in these papers.









CHAPTER 3
MATHEMATICAL PRELIMINARIES

In this chapter we will cover some of the well-known results from functional analysis,

measure theory and linear algebra that have been used repeatedly in this dissertation. This

chapter is meant as an easy reference for the results derived in the later chapters, and is an

attempt to make this thesis tolerably self-contained. We start by a selection of relevant results

from the theory of normed linear spaces. Most of these standard results are taken from Liusternik

and Soboley (1961), Halmos (1982) and Zeidler (1984).

Normed Linear Spaces

Weak Convergence

First we recall the definition of weak convergence in a normed linear space.
Definition 3.1: Let E be a normed linear space, {xn} a seque~nce of elementsofEl andT


xoEE. If for all functionals feE* (where E* is the space conjugate to E), the sequence f(xn) 4

f(xo) as namo, then we say that {xn} converges weakly to xo and we write xn -4i xo. Here xo is

the weak limit of the sequence {xn).

Since Hilbert spaces are self-conjugate, the above definition may be specialized to the

following form for Hilbert spaces:

Definition 3.2: A sequence {xn i;n a Hilbert space H converges weakly to xoEH if


4 as n a a for all yeH. Then we write xn -4j xo, where xo is the weak limit

of the sequence {xn).

A continuous functional on a compact set in a normed linear space is bounded and

achieves is maximum and minimum. However, in this dissertation, most of the sets we would be

interested in are not compact in the sense of strong convergence. Weak convergence and weak










compactness are much less severe requirements and will shown to hold for the sets of interest in

this work. Weak compactness is defined next.

Definition 3.3: A set XCE is weakly compact (i.e., sequentially weakly compact) if


ever in~ite equece {n} E has a subsequence {xnk} such that xnk Xo and xoEX.

The existence of solutions to optimal control problems is very much dependent on the

following very important theorem.

Alaoglu's theorem

Theorem 3.4: Every bounded sequence of elements in a Hilbert space contains a weakly

convergent subsequence.

This theorem guarantees the weak compactness of bounded sets in the Hilbert space.

However for compactness in itself, the set of interest must be closed in the weak topology. The

following result is useful for checking the sequential weak closure of convex sets:

Theorem 3.5: A bounded strongly closed convex set in a Hilbert space is also weakly

closed.

In the analysis of existence of optimal solutions to dynamic optimization problems, we

are actually interested in the functionals defined on compact or weakly compact sets. We define

the concepts of weakly continuous and weakly upper-semicontinuous functionals.

Weak upper semicontinuity

Definition 3.6: A functional f (possibly nonlinear) on a Hilbert space H is defined to be

weakly continuous at xoeH, if for any sequence xnEH and xn 42 xo, we have f(xn) 4 f(xo).

Definition 3.7: A functional f (possibly nonlinear) defined on a Hilbert space H is

defined to be weakly upper semicontinuous at xoeH, if for any sequence xnEH and xn 42 xo,

implies lim sup f(xn) < f(xo).










A generalization of the classical theorem of Weierstrass to semicontinuous functionals is

often used to prove existence of solutions in optimization problems. A simplified statement is

listed next:

Theorem 3.8: Let f be a weakly upper semicontinuous real valued functional on a weakly

compact subset S of a Hilbert space H. The functional f is bounded above on S and achieves

its maximum on S.

In differential game theory it is often not enough to study a single upper/lower

semicontinuous functional but a family of such functionals. Next we state a very useful property

of a family of upper semicontinuous functionals:

Theorem 3.9: (Willard 1970) Let X and A be two topological spaces. If f, is a upper

semi-continuous real valued function on X for each oceA, and if inf f,(x) exists at each xeX,


then the function f(x) = inf f,(x) is upper semi-continuous on X.


Definition of Borel, Lebesgue and Radon Measures

The interplay between measure theory and functional analysis is extremely common in

dynamic optimization and especially differential game theory. We briefly define a few standard

and well-known concepts for easy reference. For detailed exposition on these concepts see

Kolmogorov and Fomin (1957) and Rudin (1966).

If S be a topological space, then the smallest 0-field containing every open set in S is

called the Borel field of sets, and denoted C(S), and the elements of C(S) are called Borel sets.

A measure defined on C(S) is called a Borel measure. Let C1 be a Borel measure. A Borel set

EE C(S) is regular if both of the following properties hold:

* C1(E) = inf {p1(V): EcV, V open}
p(E)= sup {T(K): KcE, K( cmompact whe~never E is open or p(E)









If every Borel set in S is regular then C1 is called regular. A Einite regular Borel measure

is called a Radon measure. Radon measures are important from the point of this work, because of

their appearance in the Riesz representation theorem for characterizing linear functionals.

Finally, the Lebesgue measure on the real line R can be defined simply as follows: Let C(R) be

the Borel Hield defined on the real line and consisting of intervals. Then the set function that

assigns the interval [a,b], the measure (b-a) is called the Borel measure on C(R). The

completion of C(R) relative to the Borel measure is called the class of Lebesgue measurable

sets. The extension of the Borel measure to the completion of C(R) is called the Lebesgue

measure .

Riesz Representation Theorem

We present here a special form of the well-known Riesz Representation theorem, which

will be used in the later chapters. This specific form is a slight simplification of that presented in

Evans and Gariepy (1992).

Theorem 3.10: Let P be a compact subset of Rm. Denote the space of continuous

functions mapping P to R by C(P,R) and each element in this space by f.Let L be a

bounded linear functional on the space C(P,R). Specifically L: C(P,R)4R. Then there exists a

positive Radon measure C1 on P and a C1-measurable function h: PaR such that:

* |1(x)| =1 for C1-a.e. xeP.
* L~f = Sh f dC for all fe C(P,R).


Fubini's Theorem

Theorem 3.11: Let (X,Cx,C1) and (Y,Cy,h) be o-finite measure spaces, and let f be an

(Exx~y)-measurable function on XxY. If 0 < fl <0, and if










$(x)= Sfxdh and V(y) = .ffy dy (xeX, y eY)

then m is EX-measurable, 'F is Ey measurable, and Sm d,= cfd(lxh) = SI d1.
X XxY Y

Separation of Convex Sets

Let H be a topological vector space. A set A cH is convex if {ua + (1-u)b)| 0 < a <

1) cA whenever a,b eA. We say that a linear functional QEH* (where H* denotes the space

conjugate to H), separates subset A and B of H if 40 and either f(x) <; a < Q(y) or f(x) >

a 2 f(y) (xeA, yeB) for some aeR.

Theorem 3.12: Let K and M be non-empty disjoint convex subsets of a topological

vector space H and the interior of K is non-empty. Then there exists QEH* that separates K

and M.

Directional (Gateaux) Derivative

Definition 3.13: Let X be a vector space, Y a normed space, and T a (possibly

nonlinear) transformation defined on a domain DcX and having range RcY. Let xoeDcX

and let h be arbitrary in X. If the limit:

T(xo+ah) T(xo)
'DT(x;h) = lim

exists, it is called the Gateaux differential of T at xo with increment h.

If the above limit exists for each heX, the transformation T is said to be Gateaux

differentiable at xo. We note that this definition makes sense only when xo+ah E D for all a

sufficiently small and that the limit is taken in the usual sense of norm convergence in Y. If Y

is the real line and the transformation T is a real valued functional on X, then the following

definition may be used for the Gateaux differential:










'DT(x;h) duc T(xo + ath)|a=o for each fixed xoeX.

Existence and Uniqueness of Solution to a LTI System

In this section we quote a widely known theorem about the existence and uniqueness of the

solution to a differential equation with measurable right hand sides. In this dissertation, we


consider linear systems of the form k(t) = Ax(t) + Bu(t) where u(t) is Lebesgue measurable.

This theorem is used throughout to guarantee existence and uniqueness of solution for the

systems under consideration. This particular version of the theorem is taken from Young (1969).

Theorem 3.14: Let f(t,x) be a vector valued function with values in x-space, and suppose

that in some neighborhood of (to,xo), f(t,x) is continuous in x for each t, measurable in t for

each x, and uniformly bounded in (t,x). Then there exists an absolutely continuous function

x(t), defined in some neighborhood of to, such that x(to) = xo and that, almost everywhere in

that neighborhood: k(t) = f(t,x(t))

Suppose in addition that for some constant L, the function f(t,x) satisfies, whenever (t,xl)

and (t,x2) lie in Some neighborhood N of (to,xo), the Lipschitz condition

|f(t,x1)-f(t,x2)| < L~x1-x2|, then in some neighborhood of to there exists one and only one

absolutely continuous function x(t) such that:


x(t) =xoi + /f(T,x(r)) dr.


Jordan Canonical Representation

Theorem 3.15 (Hirsch and Smale 1974): Let A be a nxn matrix with real elements.

Then there exists a nxn real matrix P such that Ad= PAP- is composed of diagonal blocks

of the following two forms:











h 1 F I,
St=or S2 ~
1 1 I




The diagonal elements denoted by h is a real eigenvalue of A and appears as many times

as the multiplicity of the minimal polynomial. In the expression for S2,

F=-a b _1 r 10
F =-b andu I2 o 11

where (a + ib) are the complex eigenvalues of A. Each block F is repeated as many times as

the multiplicity of the eigenvalue a + ib in the minimal polynomial. Ad is called the Jordan real

canonical form of the matrix A.









CHAPTER 4
NOTATION AND PROBLEM FORMULATION

Notation

The systems we consider are linear time invariant continuous-time systems given by a

realization of the form


(4.1) x(t) = A'x(t) + B'u(t) x(0) = xo.

Where A' and B' are constant real matrices of dimensions nxn and nxm respectively. We

assume that the state x of the system is available as output. The initial condition of the system is

denoted by xo, and is given. In addition, we assume that there is an uncertainty about the values

of the entries of the matrix A' and B'. To represent these uncertainties, we introduce two

matrices DA and DB. We denote

(4.2) A' = A + DA and B' = B + DB,

where A, B, DA and DB are giVen COnstant matrices of appropriate dimensions. While A and

B are known, the matrices DA and DB can take any values within the sets AA and AB

respectively. We define AA and AB to be bounded subsets of the spaces of real (nxn) and

(nxm) matrices such that AA= {DA: ||DA|| < d} and AB= {DB: ||DB|| < d}. Here the norm

||D|| = s~up |Dg|l where D, denotes the ij"th element of the matrix D and d is a fixed positive real


number. Note that the sets AA and AB are ClOsed, bounded and hence compact. The particular

values DA and DB takes in the sets AA and AB are HOt known a priori and hence represents

the uncertainty in the system matrices A' and B'. Such an assumption is realistic because

though the exact values of the system parameters are never known, usually the sets in which they

belong are known a priori. For compactness of expression we group the uncertainties together

and define D = (DA,DB) belonging to the set A = AAX B. It is further assumed that at least one









eigenvalue of the nominal system matrix A has a non-negative real part and that the pair

(A',B') is stabilizable for every value of the uncertainty set A. We will show in Chapter 5 that

the assumption that the nominal system is unstable guarantees the existence of a finite solution to

the open loop problem.

We assume that the system is performing acceptably if the Euclidean norm of the states,

representing the system error, stays below a pre-specified positive bound (say M). In other

words, the inequality xT(t)x(t) < M, must hold as long as the system is operating. However once

the state norm exceeds the bound, the system must either be stopped or some action must be

taken to prevent this from happening. Here we assume that at the point in time when the

feedback signal stops, the system norm denoted as the initial condition in our problem, is less

than M.

(4.3) x0TXO < M

Then the open loop is allowed to run as long as xT(t)x(t) <; M, and the loop must be closed when

this inequality can be no longer made to hold.

As outlined in the introduction, we assume that there is a special input during the time

when the feedback signal is absent. This input is used to keep the system error within the

tolerated level for a maximal amount of time. We denote this input by u(t). For u(t) we will use

weighted norm and inner product as described below. Here u(t) is a vector valued function

(ul(t), ..., um(t))T, where each component is real valued and Lebesgue measurable. Each u(t) is

assumed to lie in the Hilbert space L~r with the following inner product: let x(t) and y(t) be


two elements of L Then the inner product = fp0) x0t)Ty(t)dt, where p(t) = em for


some Eixed constant oc > 0. The norm and the metric are defined correspondingly. Let U be a










set of bounded functions in L~ defined as Us { u E L~ : maxi |ui(t)| < K, t E [0,00]} where

K is a fixed positive number. This set U of bounded measurable functions define the

prospective inputs we shall consider for system (4.1). As will be shown in Chapter 4, the optimal

solution is bang-bang with possibly an infinite number of switches. Hence a smaller set, e.g., the

set of piecewise continuous bounded functions, would not suffice. The set U thus defined will

be shown to be compact in the weak topology and thus will facilitate the proof of existence of the

optimal solution. For engineering purposes, any element in U can be approximated to any

arbitrary accuracy by a piecewise continuous implementable function.

Statement of the Problem

We next state the mathematical problem formulation. During the open loop period the

obj ective is to maximize the time during which the system error is guaranteed to stay below

certain bound in the face of uncertainty. This obj ective is achieved with the help of the special

input u(t) used to correct the system during the time the feedback is absent. In the introduction

we described that how in various applications it is important to know both the correcting open-

loop input u(t), and the maximal amount of time for which the system can be left running in

open loop safely. Keeping this motivation in mind we pose the following problem:

Problem Statement: Using the notation of the last section the open loop problem may be

formulated as follows.

Problem 4.4: Find max tr subject to the following constraints:
ueU


x(t) = A'x(t) + B'u(t) 0 < t < tr
x(0)= xo x0TXO < M
xT(t~x(t) < M for 0 < t <; tr and for all (A',B') E (A+AA)x(B+AA)

where (A+AA)- t A+ DA : DAE A} a~ndl (B+AB) = {B+DB: DBEr B









Among the main obj ectives of this work is to show that such a maximum tr exists, is finite

and that it can be achieved by an input u(t)EU. Assuming they exist, the interval [0,tf] and the

optimal input solution u(t) to the above problem has the following feature. If u(t) is applied

over the interval [0,tf], irrespective of the value the system matrices (A',B') takes in the sets

(A+AA) and (B+AB), the system trajectory stays within the allowed error level, i.e., xTOt)x(t) <

M for the entire interval [0,tf]. The second objective is to find the nature of the optimal input

u(t) that achieves the maximum tf. This will be achieved through the derivation of first order

necessary conditions characterizing the optimal solution.









CHAPTER 5
EXISTENCE OF A SOLUTION

In this chapter we prove the existence of a solution to Problem 4.4. This will be achieved

through the application of the generalized Weierstrass theorem stated in Chapter 3 (Theorem

3.8). Before going into the mathematical details we describe a brief outline of this chapter. The

main idea is to repose Problem 4.4 in turns of a suitably defined upper semicontinuous

functional. This functional is nothing but the minimum possible time (corresponding to the worst

uncertainty) of open loop operation for any given ueU. We prove that the set U defined in

chapter 4 is compact in the weak topology and then we show that the functional mentioned

above is weakly upper semicontinuous. Thus we are ready to use a generalized Weierstrass

theorem to prove that a maximal time for the open loop operation exists, is finite, and can be

achieved with an input u from the set U we defined in Chapter 4.

Weak Compactness of U

We start with a few properties of the input set U defined in Chapter 4. Most of the

standard results of this section are taken from Liusternik and Soboley (1961), Halmos (1982) and

Zeidler (1984) and has been listed for reference in Chapter 3.

We prove the weak compactness property of the set U of inputs, in the form of a lemma .

This property, which is a consequence of the Alaoglu' s theorem (Theorem 3.4)), along with a

few well-known properties of semi-continuous functions on compact sets, is essential for proving

the existence of a solution to Problem 4.4.

Lemma 5.1: The set U is weakly compact in the Hilbert space L ~.

Proof: The set U is obviously bounded and hence by Theorem 3.4 every infinite sequence

in U has a weakly convergent subsequence. However we need to show that the set U is weakly

closed. Since U is convex by definition, by Theorem 3.5 we just need to show that U is









strongly closed. Consider a sequence of functions un(t)4uo(t) where uo(t)0U. Hence for some

set St'c-[0,c) of nonzero measure, uoi(t)>K, where te6t' and uoi denotes the i.th element of

uo(t). Hence the following inequality must hold:


fe-at|un(t)-uot)||2dt = Se-at||un(t) -uo(t)||2dt + Cn where Cn, is positive real.
O 6t'
> fe-'* (K -uoi(t))2 dt + Cn,


As namo, while Cn can tend to zero, the first term remains constant and finite. So un(t) does

not converge to uo(t).

Alternative Problem

We now define an alternative formulation for Problem 4.4 using the functional defined

next. It is easier to show the existence of the optimal solution in terms of this functional.

Definition 5.2: Let J(t) = x(t)Tx(t) where to [0,co). Define

Sinf t:J(t) > M if J(t) > M for some t T~,D= u otherwise

Here x(t) is related to u(t) and D through Equation 4. 1.

This functional may be interpreted as the time when the system error exits the allowed

envelope of operation for the first time. This functional is identical to the quantity tr defined in

Problem 4.4, for trajectories obeying the constraints. In other words, for a fixed (u,D) pair, the

relation x(t)Tx(t) < M is satisfied for the interval [0,T(u,D)]. Moreover for a fixed u(t), the

relation x(t)Tx(t) < M is satisfied for every value of the uncertainty DEA within the interval


[0, inf T(u,D) Hence it can be easily seen that Problem 4.4 is equivalent to finding sup inf

T(u,D), if it is finite. In addition we need to show that the supremum over U can be achieved.

We summarize in the following restatement of Problem 4.4:










Problem 5.3: Show that sup inf T(u,D) < co. Find u EU such that inf T(u*,D) = sup
ueU DeA DeA ueU

inf T(u,D).
DeA

Well posed: For this problem to be well posed, the first step is to show that inf T(u,D) <
DeA

co. This observation is crucial to us since we are interested in running the system on open loop as

long as possible. We realize that no matter what input we create for the system, nature can

choose a value for DE A that will make the system traj ectory leave the set of acceptable

operation in finite time.

First we prove a preliminary lemma:

Lemma 5.4: Let A and D be a real nxn matrices such that A has repeated eigenvalues

and DEA. Also let xo be a fixed non-zero vector in Rn. Then for any d > 0, there exists a D

such that ||D|| < d and (A+D) has distinct eigenvalues. Moreover let T be a nxn real matrix

such that Q= T(A+D)T" results in a Q which has the following block diagonal form:




(5.5) Q=whr Qi= ; -biai i for i=1,....,r and Qr+1=irllr+ .



Here (ai + ibi), i=1,...,r represents the complex eigenvalues and ai (i=2r+1,....,n)

represents the real eigenvalues of A. Then D can be chosen such that


E Tlj xoj >

where Tij is the ij"th element of T and xoj is the jth element of xo.

Proof: Let Ad = PAP- where Ad is the real Jordan canonical form of A.

Recall the Ad is COmposed of diagonal blocks of the following two forms:


















(possibly repeated) of A. In the expression for S2, F = -_b a wee(ti)ar h ope

roots of A (possibly repeated). (Theorem 3.15)

Let E be a diagonal matrix that we add onto Ad such that blocks S1 and S2 are changed as

follows:


h+s1 1

S1' =
h+8q-1 h+E


Where let q be the multiplicity of the


Ft = r I t~ FI2 ,I


eigenvalue h.


Where let s be the multiplicity of the eigenvalue (af ib) and Fi= ba + yayip~ i=1,2,...s


Now the eigenvalues corresponding to block S1' and S2' are distinct and of the form (h + si)

and (a + yj f ib) where i=1,2,...q and j=1,2,...s.

(Note: det(hI S2') = det(hI Fl) det(hI Fz)..... det(hI Fs) )

Thus (Ad + E) has distinct eigenvalues. From the construction above it can be seen that it is

possible to choose such an E such that ||E|| < r for any r > 0.

Now consider the reverse transformation:

P (~Ad + E)P = A + P 1EP


h 1


z
F F~twhere h is a real eigenvalue









|| P1EP|| < k|| P 1EP||2 < k ||P ||12 ||E||2 ||P||2 = k||E||2 -

The first inequality follows from the equivalence of norms where k is a finite constant and ||-||2 is


the spectral norm of the matrix. Clearly by making ||E||2 k~ we get that || P EP|| < d. Hence by

defining D = P 1EP we achieve our objective.


Now let C Tlj xoj = 0 with a certain choice of A with distinct eigenvalues and with a T


that transforms A according to Equation 5.5. Clearly, the vector T1 [T11 T12 .... Tin] is an

eigenvector of the matrix A and hence must satisfy

hlT1 = AT1 where hi is the eigenvalue corresponding to T1.

Now from the continuity of the eigenvalues of A w.r.t. the entries of A, we can change A to

(A+D) arbitrarily keeping the eigenvalues distinct. Then the following equation must hold:

hi' T1' = (A+D)T1'.

Since D is arbitrary, T1' can be made non-collinear to T1 keeping ||T1 T1'|| arbitrarily

small. It follows that T1' and T1 cannot be both orthogonal to xo.

Theorem 5.6: Consider the system (4.1) with a fixed initial condition xo in the set {xo: 0

< xoxo <; M}. Then for any fixed u(t)EU and M < co there exists a DEA such that T(u,D) <



Proof: Assume that for some fixed u(t)EU, T(u,D) = co for all De A. This implies that

x(t)Tx(t) < M VDEA and Vte[0,co]

-> || eA't [XO + -A'rB'u(T)dZ] || < M.


Now fix A' at some arbitrary value in (A + AA) Such that A' has distinct eigenvalues. By

Lemma 5.4 this can be done without loss of generality. Then we do a similarity transform on A'









such that Q = T 1A'T is in the block diagonal form shown in Equation 5.5. Note that in this

form Q and QT are commutative.

Now we consider the system transformed by T and name the new state vector z(t). It is related

to x(t) by the following relation: z(t) = Tx(t).

We further assume that T is such that zol = E To xoy r 0. By Lemma 5.4 this also can be

done without loss of generality. We seek to prove that ||x(t)|| can be made divergent with a

proper choice of DEA. We claim that it is enough to prove ||z(t)|| diverges.

||z(t)|| = ||Tx(t)||i < |T||||x(t)|| .

Hence lim ||z(t)|| = O -> lim ||x(t)|| = CO

In terms of z(t) our hypothesis implies:

z(t)Tz(t) < ||T|| M = M' VD'EA and Vt [0,co]

-> || eat [zo + Se- Bsru(Z)dr] || M'


where M'= ||T|| M and B" = TB'


Let F(t) =[zo + fe B"u(r)dr].


Therefore,

[ eat F(t) ]T[ Qt F(t) ] < M'
->F(t)T ,(QQT F(t) <; M'
-> F(t)T Lt F(t) <; M'

Where E = QT Q is a diagonal matrix with at least one of the elements positive, by hypothesis.

For simplicity assume that the 1st diagonal element denoted by al is positive. Let us denote











fi(t)

each entry of F(t) by fi(t), i.e., F(t)= ... nt~ Thus for the last equation to hold at least the




following must be true.

(5.7) lim fi(t)= 0


Now fi(t) may be written in a general form in the following way:


m m

fit=, zoI + -at[cos(blz) E BIjuj(z) + sin(blz) BzjUj(T)] dz


where (al + ibl) is the first eigenvalue of Q and Bij is the ij"th element of the matrix B".

Then Equation 5.7 implies that


m m
lim zol + e-a"[cos(blz) E Bijuj(Z) + sin(blz) E BzjUj(T)]dz =
tom j=1 j=1



-> zot + e -ae cobi) Bljuj(z) + sin(blz) C BzjUj(T)]dz = 0
j=1 j=1


But this is a linear equation in Bij and hence cannot hold over all values of B" in the set T(B +

AB) { T(B + DB) : DB E BE ) UnlCSS Uj(t) 0 for every j=1,...,m and for all to [0,00]. However

if this is true then zol = 0. Hence we have a contradiction.

In the above theorem we showed that, under the assumptions made in Chapter 4, the

system norm ||x(t)|| can diverge for any given input u(t) for a proper choice of the uncertainty

D. This is true for arbitrarily small uncertainty sets. Now define T'(u) a inf T(u,D), i.e., T'(u)
DeA

is the minimum time corresponding to u(t) in which the system norm ||x(t)|| can be made to










escape the set [0,M]. According to Theorem 5.6 for any Eixed u(t)EU the quantity T'(u) is

Einite .

Corollary 5.8: If the conditions of Theorem 5.6 are satisfied then for any fixed u(t)EU,

the inequality inf T(u,D) < co holds.
DeA

Weak Upper Semicontinuity of T(u,D)

Recall that according to Problem 5.3 our obj ective is to show that sup in~f T(u,D) < x.


Define T'(u) inf T(u,D). Thus it would be enough to show that T'(u) is weakly upper semi-
DeA

continuous in u(t). Along with the fact that the set U is weakly compact (Lemma 5.1)), this

would effectively prove that the functional T'(u) is bounded over the set U and that the

supremum is achieved. (Theorem 3.8). The upper semi-continuity of the functional T(u,D) in

u(t), for each fixed DEA is demonstrated next. Denote the set of solutions for Equation 4.1 for

all ueU and DEA by X(U,A). By Theorem 3.14, each element of X(U,A) is an absolutely

continuous function in t and unique corresponding to each (u,D) pair.

Lemma 5.9: For a fixed DEA, T(u,D) is weakly upper semi-continuous in u(t), i.e., as a

sequence of functions un(t) -4j uo(t), the functional T(u,D) obeys the following relation: for any

E > 0, and T(uo,D) < co we can choose an integer N such that T(un,D) T(uo,D) < s for n >




Proof: For a fixed DEA and t
is the solution to Equation 4.1. As un a uo (i.e., weakly converges), then for each to [0,co),

x(t;un) 4 x(t;uo), i.e., x(un) converges pointwise to x(uo). This is because for each to [0,co),

x(t;u) is a functional linear in u.









1I if i This can be seen by defining p(r)=l =~ l,,i l and noting that


xt) = eAt [XO+ j 1)Oe-A'B'u(T)dr].


Now define a functional T,: X(U,A) 4 [0,co] as follows:

Sinf t: xTx > M if xTx > M for some t < co
Tp(x(t))= =

Next consider a sequence of function xo(t) 4 xo(t) pointwise. We show that for any E > 0 there

exists an integer N such that for n > N T,(x,z) T,(xo) < E.

If T,(xx,) < T,(xo) then the claim is true. So we assume that T,(xx,) > T,(xo).

Let T,(x,z) = to and T,(xo) = to.

Now we assumed that x,z 4 xo pointwise. By the definition of to, the following is true for every

E > 0: there is a tl E (to, to+s) such that xTO(tl)xo(tl) > M. Consequently, there is N such that

xTn(tl>xTn(tl) M > [xTO(tl)xo(tl) M]/2 > 0 for all n > N. Therefore, to < to + s which implies

that ti,- to < s Thus we have shown that T,(xx,) T,(xo) < E.


Now, for a fixed DEA, consider the composition map T(u,D) :U 4 X 4 [0,co].

From the above arguments it is clear that as uzz uo, x,z 4 xo pointwise and for any E >0 there

exists N such that for n > N, T,(xx,) T,(xo) < E. Hence T(uzz) T(uo) < s. Thus for a fixed D,

T(u,D) is weakly upper semi continuous in u(t). Hence proved.

Now we need to prove that the functional T'(u) is also weakly upper semi-continuous.

This is true due to Lemma 5.9 and Theorem 3.9.

Corollary 5.10: The functional T'(u) inf T(u,D) is weakly upper semi-continuous in
DeA

u(t).










Proof: The proof amounts to checking the conditions of Theorem 3.9. By Lemma 5.9),

for each DEA, the functional T(u,D) is weakly upper semi-continuous in u(t). Also for each

ueU, the functional T'(u) = inf T(u,D) > 0. Hence the infimum exists always, and by the
DeA

property above T'(u) is weakly upper semi-continuous in u(t).

Existence of u"

The weak upper semicontinuity of T'(u) along with the weak compactness of the set of

inputs leave us posed for applying the general Weierstrass theorem (Theorem 3.8). Hence we can

now conclude the following:

Theorem 5.11: Let U and A be as defined above and T'(u) inf T(u,D) and let
DeA

6 = suR T'(u) suC inf T(u,D). Then 6 < 00. Moreover there exists some u (t)EU such that
us u DeA

T'(u ) = 6.

Proof: This follows directly by noting that the set U is weakly compact and the

functional T'(u) is weakly upper semi-continuous in u(t) over U. (Theorem 3.8). Hence T'(u)

is bounded above and it achieves it upper bound over U.

In conclusion, we showed in this chapter that a solution to Problem 4.4 exists within the

set of inputs U. The set U was shown to be compact in the weak topology. Then an alternative

formulation of the Problem 4.4 was stated using a functional T(u,D). A proof of the well-posed

ness of this new statement was presented next. In the process it was shown that under the

assumptions made in Chapter 4, the system traj ectory can leave the envelope of acceptable

operation in Einite time no matter what input we apply to the system. This inbuilt finiteness of the

functional T(u,D), along with particular features of the formulation was utilized to prove weak

upper semicontinuity of the functional T(u,D) for any Eixed De A. Another functional, namely









T'(u), denoting the worst possible time for the input u was introduced and it too was shown to

be weakly upper semicontinuous in u. Lastly Weierstrass theorem was applied to prove the

existence of the best input u* and the finiteness of 6 = supI T'(u). The application of u*

guarantees that the system error does not leave the allowed envelope for any value of the

uncertainty for a maximal duration of time. However, it should be noted that even for this

optimal input, the system error can leave the allowed envelope in finite time for certain values of

the uncertainty.









CHAPTER 6
GENERALIZED FIRST ORDER CONDITIONS

In Chapter 5 we proved that the optimal solution to Problem 4.4 existed among the set of

bounded and measurable input functions. Evidently it would be useful to know more about the

optimal solution, with a view to facilitate it's calculation for specific problems. The conventional

method for calculating solution to optimal control problems has been through characterizing first

order necessary conditions. Here however the situation is complicated by the game-theoretic

formulation, in that the maximization of open loop time has to be done over every possible value

of the uncertainty. We draw on the considerable amount of previous research in the area of

differential game theory and min-max optimal control. The relevant literature was reviewed in

Chapter 2. In particular, we note that Problem 4.4 is an example of min-max or conflicting

control problems studied previously among others, by Warga (1970). We use Theorem IX. 1.2

(Warga 1970), for finding the first order necessary conditions characterizing the optimal

solution. However we present a modified version of the theorem, which has been simplified to

suit the problem we are solving in this dissertation.

Simplified Theorem from Warga (1970)

In this section we state and prove the theorem along with some required modifications. We

require some new notation in this chapter:

Notation 6.1: Let S be a compact set on Rn and C be the Borel field of subsets of S.

Then by rpm(S) we denote the set of all Radon probability measures defined on E. Moreover

we denote the Banach space of continuous functions from SaR with the supremum (L1) norm


by the notation C(S,R). C denotes the closure of C and int(C) denotes the interior of C.









First we require the following lemma. Let H be a topological vector space and W be a

convex subset of RxH .We define Wo { woeR: (wo,wH)EW} and W'= {wH: 0w,wH)EW, wo

<0}). Let H* denote that space conjugate to H.


Lemma 6.2: Let C' be an open convex subset of H, Osint(Wo) and OEC'. Then either


there exists QH EH* such that QH f 0, QH H) > 0 > QH(C) for all wHEW' and ceC' or there

exists weW such that wo <0 and wHE -.

Proof: For every SEW let 5o <0O and SHEC' be outside W. Recall that W'= {wH:

(wo,wH) E W, wo <0}. Then W' is a nonempty convex subset of H and W'n, C' = $. Since

C' is an open convex set, by the separation property(Theorem 3.12), there exists QHEH* and

aeR such that QH > such that

QH (H) ~ H(c) where wHEW' and ceC'.


But OEC'n, W' and hence a=0. Thus we have

(6.3) QH H) > 0 >H(C (HE W' and ce C')

This is the first alternative of the lemma.

The remaining possibility is when there exists weW such that wo <0O and wHEC'. Hence we

have the second alternative of the lemma.

The above lemma will be used in the proof of the following theorem. Next we state and

prove the simplified version of Theorem IX. 1.2 from Warga (1970).

Theorem 6.4: Let Q be a convex set, F be a compact set in R and P be any compact

finite dimensional metric space. Consider two functions T1:QxF 4 R and T2:QxFxP 4 R.

Now assume the following:









1. Let N = ((q,f)E QxF : T2(q,f~p)E [-s,M] for every pEP ) where s,M>0. Let there be

(q*,f )EN such that Tl(q*,f ) = min Tl(q,f) .

2. The functions T1 and T2 have convex Gateaux derivatives.

3. For each pair (q,f)EQxF the function T2(q,f,p):Ps R bounded and continuous in p.

Then there exists a arpm(P) and an co-integrable o : P 4 R such that


i. |mo (p)|=1 for all peP and co(P) > 0
ii. S$(p) -DT2((q',f ),p;(ql~f)-(q*,f ))m,(dp)t >

iii. co(p)-T2(q',f'p) = max co(p)-a for co-a.a. peP
ae[-s,M]

where DTj((q*,f );(q,f) (q'~f )) denotes the directional derivative of T, at (q*,f*).

Proof: Define the set

?v~q,f) = ( D)T((q*,f*);(q,f) (q*,f*)), D)T2((q ,f ),p;(q~f) (q ,f )) :(q,f)EQxF )

This set is convex by hypothesis. Let C2 = ( c(p)E C(P,R) : E < c(p) < M ) where E > 0. Note

that C2 is a closed convex subset of C(P,R) and let C'= int(C2) T2 -,*>

Then we can apply Lemma 6.2 and the first alternative of the lemma yields the following: there

exists Q E CdC(P,R) such that -Q f 0, and for all (q,f)EQxF

(6.5) e(D)T2((q ,f ),p;(q~f) (q ,f )))~ >

(6.6) (c)l < (ce C')

In the above expressions note that fE C*(P,R) and hence by the Riesz representation theorem

(Theorem 3.10) we can specify an integral form of 8. In particular, there exists a positive Radon

measure ao on P and an co-integrable o : P 4 R such that


|mo (p)| = 1 for all peP and co(P) > 0










C(c)~ (p)c(p)co(dp) c E C(P,R)


Next we investigate the inequality (6.6). In view of the definition of C' this implies


(c T2(q,f ))<0 (ceC')
-> $(p) [c (p)-c(p)]m(dp)r > (ce C2)

We claim that this equation implies claim (iii) of the theorem. To see this assume that there

exists some coEC2 Such that co(p)c'(p) < c(p)co(p) for pe6P c- P where co(GP) > 0. Then we

can form c' EC2 Such that


c'= co when pe6Potevs

But, the integral inequality is not satisfied with c'(p) since:


S (p)-[c (p)-c'(p)]m,(dp)= ) Q(p)-[c (p)-'(p)p)] (dp) < 0.


Now note that C(P,R) is separable and hence C2 COntains a dense denumerable subset

(cic2....) Moreover the set (c/p)|ceC2) ;S depnse in [-sM]n for all peP) and hence it followsr

that the set (cl(p),c2(p),...) is dense in [-s,M] for all peP. So we can write the following:

$(p)c*(p) > sup mo(p)ci(p)
jeN
= sup co(p)a (peP)

= max mo(p)a (p EP) (Since c (p)E [-s,M])


Thus we have proved that the statement of the theorem is a result of the first alternative of the

lemma. We now prove that the other alternative of the lemma implies a contradiction with the

assumption in that (q*,f*) is found to be not minimizing. To prove this consider the set ?VV(q,f)









and C' as defined above. From the lemma there exists we TV(q,f) such that wl < 0 and

w2 E -

For each choice of qeQ and feF, define the function hl:[0,1]->R and h2: [0,1] -> C(P,R) as

follows:

(6.7) h1(6) = Tl(q* + 6(q-q*), f + 6(f-f ))
h2(6) = T2(q' + 6(q-q*), f*+ 6(f-f*),p) where 8E [0,1].

It can be easily verified that the derivatives h: and h2 at (0,0) can be expressed in terms of the

directional derivatives of T1 and T2 at (q ,f ).

(6.8) hi(0)86 = 'DTi((q ,f );(ql~f) (q ,f ))68 (i=1,2)

Now for sufficiently small SO > 0,

h1(68) = h1(0) + h (0)68 + o(||86||)
= h1(0) + wi SO + o(||68||) < hi(0) = Tl(q',f)

Also we know that

lim ||SO||- [h2(86) h2(0) + h2'(0)s6 ] = 0
->lim ||SO||-1 [h2(86) h2(0)] = w2 E C


Hence for sufficiently small ||SO|| we can conclude that

[h2(68) h2(0)]e||66|| C'c-C' (Since OEC')
h2(S6) T2(q',f ) E int(C2) T2 q -)

Hence (q ,f ) is not a minimizing solution as hypothesized in assumption (1) of the theorem.

The Scaled System

The theorem proved above is the main tool that we will use to derive first order conditions

for the solution of Problem 4.4. The functions T1 and T2 will be appropriately defined for our

problem and it will be shown that all the assumptions of Theorem 6.4 are satisfied. Hence a









solution to Problem 4.4 must satisfy the conclusions of Theorem 6.4. It will be shown that some

useful features of the optimal solution of Problem 4.4 may be derived from careful consideration

of conclusion (ii) of Theorem 6.4. With these objectives in mind we redefine Problem 4.4 for a

scaled system described next. We express system (4. 1) in terms of scaled variables y(s) and

w(s) as follows:

y(s) x(ps) sE [0,1]
v(s) au(ps) se [0,1] where 8 < 6 and 6 = sup inf T(u,D).

In terms of these variables Problem 4.4 can be written as:

Problem 6.9: Find min (-P) subject to the following constraints:


9(s) = P(A'y(s) + B'v(s)) 0 < s < 1
y(0)= xo x0TXO < M
yT(S~y(s) <; M for 0 < s < 1 and for all (A',B') E (A+AA)x(B+AB)

where (A+AA) a( A+DA:DA E A) and (B+AB) a (B+DB:DB EB -

It can be easily checked that Problem 4.4 and 6.9 are identical. Using standard methods, y(s) can

be expressed as:


y(s) = e"A' [XOi +-pA'T BB'v(T)dr]


Definition 6.10: Now we identify the relevant sets in Problem 6.9 with those defined in

Theorem 6.4 as follows:

Q Uo,,13 where Uto,l] {v(t)EU: v(t) = 0 for t > 1 )
F s[0,6+1]
P- ((A',B',s)E (A+AA)x (B+AB)x[0,1]}

And we define the functions T1 and T2 aS follows:

Tl(v(s),P) = -p
T2(V(S),P, (A',B',s)) = yTy









In the following Theorem P (A+AA)x (B+AB)x[0, 1]. Hence if moerpm(P) then

conditional probabilities co(A',B'|s) as well as the marginal probability co(s) can be defined in

the usual way so that for any (A',B',s)eE, the joint probability co(A',B',s) = co(A',B'|s) co(s).

Let us denote the Lebesgue measure on [0, 1] by C1. Also note that in the following theorem and

thereafter the variables z and s are both used to denote the scaled time and lies in [0,1]. They

are used interchangeably as appropriate.

Necessary Conditions

We are now ready to apply Theorem 6.4 to Problem 6.9 and thus derive necessary

conditions for the optimal solution (v*,P*). From this theorem we expect to gain some insight

about the characteristics of the optimal input v*. Indeed, from the theorem stated below it will

become apparent that the optimal input v* may have a bang-bang control feature. The result

introduces the quantity z(s) over the scaled interval time [0, 1], which is similar to the classical

switching function for the bang-bang control input v*.(Pontryagin et al. 1962). However the

exact characteristics of z(s) will have to be clarified through some further investigations. The

solution to Problem 6.9 and hence the solution to Problem 4.4 is summarized in the following

theorem :

Theorem 6.11: Let (v (s),P*) be the solution to Problem 6.9. Then there exists

ao Erpm((A+AA)x (B+AB)x[0,1]) and a C1-measurable function z(s):[0,1] 4 Rm such that the

following are satisfied:





ii. z(s) v(s) 2 z(s) v (s) for p-a a. st [0,1] and for any veUto,11

Where the support of ao is given by the set: 0Z = ( (A',B'r,s~ (A+AAvx (B+ABvx[0,1]: yT'y = M )









Proof: We can apply Theorem 6.4 since all the assumptions are clearly met We first

calculate the directional derivatives of T1 and T2. It is more convenient to use the variable z as

the time variable and s as the running variable in the following expressions. The advantage will

be apparent from the subsequent derivation.

DT1((GB)(v ;(,) (v ,P )) = (P-P )




By Theorem 6.4 there exists me~rpm(P) and an co-integrable integrable o : P 4 R such that

|mo (p)| = 1 for co-a.a peP and co(P) > 0
Si5(p) -D~T2 0

If we set p = P* in the above inequality and refer to the expression for the directional derivatives

of T1 and T2 We Obtain

(6.12) Si(p) -DT2 0.

->~~~ 2(p.y A (-s) P*B'(v(s)-v (s))pL(ds) m`p)>

(p~yT(' pA (Ts *BYorjs(o)-'s(ds)2 mOp




(W~here Ylno, (s)=( = ~ ).

->S riyr(p)yT p" A'Ts) BYor(s)o(dp)' (v(s)-v (s))Cl(ds)2 > (By Fubini's Theorem


(3.11))

-> (s)(v(s)-v (s))r-(ds) > 0 where z(s) o(p)yT p A8*T'("-s B'Y~o~,r(s)om(dp)
0 P









Now by hypothesis, Ps ((+A- (B+AB\ /nx[0,c1]} and ao is a Radon probability measure on P.

Hence we can write co(dA',dB',dz) in terms of the appropriately defined conditional and marginal

probabilities.

The expression for z(s) can be rewritten in terms of the conditionals as follows:



z(s) j 2U(A',B',Z)yT Z~P A'(t-s) B'm)(dA',dB'/Z) 'lo~,](s) m3(dr)



= $(A',B',Z)yT Z~P A'(-s) B'm(dA',dB '/z) (dz)


We claim that:


Sz(s)(v(s)-v.(s))p(ds) >o 0- z(s)v(s) >z(sivi(s) for p-a~a. se [0,1].


To see this assume that there exists some voEU such that z(s)vo(s) < z(s)v*(s) for se6T C- [0,1]

where C1(6T) > 0. Then we can form v'EU such that

Ivo when se6T
vr~V otherwise

But, the integral inequality is then not satisfied with v'(s) since:


/ z(s)(v'(s)-.(s)s))(ds) = J z(s)(v'(s)-v.(s));(ds) < 0
O ST

Now the third conclusion of Theorem 6.4 directly determines the form of the support set of the

measure mo. From Theorem 6.4):

c(p)-yT~pv,*y(p )p;v ,P* )= max co(p)-a for co-a.a. peP.
as [-s,M]









Recall that co(p) = +1. Hence: yT~p;v ,P )y(p;v*,P*) = M when co = 1. If c


-1 the equality


above cannot be satisfied. Hence ao = 1 for co-a.a. peP and the measure ao has the support set

defined as follows:

0Z = (peP: yT~p;v*,P )y(p;v*,P*) = M).

The expression for z(s) simplifies to:



zs =fy j (fA'(t-s) B'mrdA',dB'/T) w(dl). +


The above theorem derives necessary conditions for the optimal solution (v*,P*) to

Problem 6.9. Now consider conclusion (ii) of the above theorem.

z(s) v(s) > z(s) v (s) for C1-a.a. s [0, 1] and for any veUtool]

It follows that when each component of z(s) + 0 the optimal input solution v*(s) is bang-bang

and alternates between the maximum allowed input bounds (namely +K). In other words when

zl(s) + 0 for some je ( 1,2,...m), this implies that for a.a. se [0,1]:

I.-K when z)(s)>0
YY~)'I K when zl(s)<0

This partially solves our questions about the characteristics of the optimal solution v'.

However we cannot conclude anything about the corresponding components of the solution over

intervals when some components of the function z(s) are zero. A completely bang-bang solution

would be extremely favorable from an engineering point of view, for its ease of implementation

and numerical computation. However as we show in the following example, this may not always

be true in this case. We will show that some components of the switching function z(s) can turn

out to be zero over non-zero intervals of time.



















































I I I I I

~_________L________~_________L________~_






---~---------L________~_________L_______


0.5 1 1 .5 2 2.5 3 3.5


We would like to know more about the function z(s), in particular, whether some


components of z(s) could be zero over contiguous subintervals of [0, 1]. Recall that for the

solution to be purely bang-bang each component of the switching function z(s) needs to be non-


zero almost everywhere on [0,1]. We note that our problem is linear time optimal and in most


such problems studied in literature the solution turned out to be bang-bang. (See Pontryagin et al.


1962). However it is interesting to note that in this case, it does not always hold. In general, it is

not true that the optimal solution is bang-bang and hence some components of z(s) are zero over


subintervals of non-zero measure in [0, 1]. We present the following example:


Example 6.13: Find max tr subject to the following constraints:
ueU


0

for 0 < t <; tr and for all ae-[1.2,1.4]

to the problem for M = 1.96.


2


1






1


2


Time

one switch: M = 1.96, tf = 3.7


Figure 6-1: Optimal input has


x(t) = ax(t) + u(t)
x(0) 1
xT(t~x(t) < M

We provide a solution










The solution is bang-bang only over the first part [0, 1.27] of the interval. Over the rest of

the interval until tf the optimal input though constant (=1.67) is not +2. For a clear

understanding of the behavior of the system for different values of the uncertainty we have

plotted the corresponding traj ectories for ten different uncertainty values of the pole 'a'. The

solution to this problem was calculated using brute force techniques, where both the time axis (0

to 4 seconds) and the amplitude of the input [-2,2] were discretized thereby forming a grid. Every

input was checked on this grid to find the best solution. The continuous time solution was found

by interpolation of the discrete optimal solution.






















O 0.5 1 1 .5 2 2.5 3 3.5
Time

Figure 6-2: Traj ectories for ten different uncertainty values of 'a'; M = 1.96, tf = 3.7

While this feature of the optimal solution v* is interesting because of its anomaly with

other known solutions to linear time optimal problems, studied in literature, it is inconvenient

from an engineering point of view. It is much easier to compute a bang-bang solution than

otherwise, since for a bang-bang solution, only the switching instants need to be computed to









effectively know the solution. Hence for a bang-bang solution the dynamic optimization with

high complexity reduces to a simple static optimization over the space of switching instants. In

the next section we show, that even over intervals where some components of z(s) are zero and

consequently the optimal solution v* is possibly not bang-bang, there exists a bang-bang input

v' which approximates v* in an appropriate sense.

Bang-Bang Approximation to v*

As we discussed in the last section, it would be interesting to know if the optimal solution,

which may not be bang-bang, could be approximated by a bang-bang input in any sense. Recall

that the objective of the optimal input is to maintain the inequality xTx < M for every trajectory

of the error, corresponding to any uncertainty value, during the maximal time interval tf. We

show that the optimal input u* can be approximated by a bang-bang input u', in the sense that

xT~u',D)x(u',D) < M + s for every value of the uncertainty DEA, for at least tr seconds. Here

a can be made arbitrarily small by increasing the number of switches in u'.

Lemma 6.14: There exists a bang-bang function u'EUto y] with a finite number of

switches, such that xT(u';D)x(u';D) <; M + s for every DEA and for at least tr seconds. Here, a

can be made arbitrarily small by increasing the number of switches in u'.

Proof: Let x*(t,D) and x'(t,D) denote the state vectors, corresponding to uncertainty

value D-(DA,DB)EA at instance t when the optimal control u* and u' are applied respectively

between [0,t]. Since they start from the same initial condition,


x*(t,D) -x'(t,D) = eAl'te-A'zB'[u'-u']dt


We claim that for small enough t it is possible to switch u' appropriately so that










eA't e-A'"B'[u'-u']dt = 0 V'(A',B')E((A+AA)x(B+AB))


Since eAt is invertible always, it is enough to prove that


e-A'TB'[u'-u']dr =0.


Let t be small enough so that e-At can be considered constant over [0,t]. We now propose to
switch each component of u'-tul',u2' ,....,Um': Once betweenn +~ duringr [0,t]. The i~ntrval


before the switch we denote by til and the interval after the switch by ti2 COrresponding to the

ith input ui. The switching times have to add up to the total time t, i.e., til + ti2 = t.

Hence:

BUlltii + Aulztl2


e-A'B'[u'-u']dr=e-A'tB

umitmi + Aumztm2-

Where Auij = ui ui' (i = 1,2,...m) and j = 1 denoted the time interval before the switch and j=2

implies the time after the switch.

Clearly, we can choose the switching times so as to make

Auiltil + Auizti2 = 0 for every is {1,2,....m}.

This proves that at time instant t we can make

x*(t,D) x'(t,D) = 0

irrespective of the value of the uncertainty D-(DA,DB), by switching each input once. The total

number of switches required for all the inputs is exactly m. This does not guarantee that x (z,D)

= x'(z,D) for all ze [0,t] VDEA. However because of the absolute continuity of x(t,D), by

choosing t small enough we can guarantee that ||x*(t,D) x'(t,D)|| <: E for any given s.









Recall that the optimal open loop interval is always finite. Hence the optimal interval [0,tf] can

be split into arbitrarily small sub-intervals to form a partition P-{0,tl,t2, ....,t,,tf}. We can use the

above method for each subintervals [ti,ti+l], (i=1,...,p) so that x*(ti,D) = x'(ti,D) VD EA for each

tieP. Also by making the partition P fine enough, we can make ||x (z,D) x'(z,D)|| < s

(ze(ti,ti+l)) for any given s. It follows easily that ||x'(t,D)|| <; M + s for to[0,tf] and VDEA.

Over intervals where some components of z(s) are 0, the above lemma provides an

approximation of the optimal solution with a bang-bang input. The approximation holds

irrespective of the value of the uncertainty and hence guarantees that every state traj ectory

remains within the allowed error bound for the maximal period. Moreover, since the

approximation is being done by a bang-bang function, all the computational advantages

corresponding to a bang-bang solution are inherited by u'. In general, for an accurate

approximation, the number of switches required for u' may be high. However for practical

purposes, the required number of switches may be computed by repeatedly calculating the

maximal time for increasing number of switches. The iteration should stop when no appreciable

improvement occurs with the increase in the number of switches.

We consider Example 6.13 again to show that the non-bang-bang optimal input can be

effectively approximated by a bang-bang signal, as is predicted by Lemma 6.14. The

approximating bang-bang input has a total of sixteen switches. Corresponding to each

uncertainty value of the pole a, the state traj ectory with the actual optimal input is approximated

by the traj ectory resulting from the bang-bang input. To see this the reader need to compare the

following figures with Figures 6-1 and 6-2. A slight relaxation of the error bound beyond

M=1.96 allows for an identical maximal time of 3.7 seconds.




















---







--



---



--



--



---


1.5







0.5



O:



-0.5



-1



-1.5


O 0.5 1 1 5 2 2.5 3 3 5


Time




bang-bang input:


Figure 6-3: Approximate


16 switches


-0.5-










O 0.5 1 1 .5 2 2.5 3 3.5
Time




Figure 6-4: Trajectories for ten different uncertainty values of 'a'; M = 1.96, tf = 3.69









CHAPTER 7
CONDITIONS FOR A PURELY BANG-BANG SOLUTION

Though the necessary condition derived in Theorem 6. 11 hints that the optimal solution

may be bang-bang, we could not rule out the possibility that some components of the switching

function z(s) could be zero over sub-intervals of [0, 1]. In fact we discussed a case where this is

the case and the optimal solution is clearly not bang-bang. Furthermore, we proposed a method

in which a non-bang-bang optimal input may be approximated by a high frequency bang-bang

mnput.

However it would be interesting to know whether there are conditions under which the

optimal solution itself is purely bang-bang. For this we need to investigate two important

questions about the switching function z(s). Firstly, we need to find conditions under which each

component of the switching function z(s) is non-zero almost everywhere. Moreover we need to

estimate number of zero crossings of the components of the function z(s). The following

assumptions were found sufficient to guarantee a purely bang-bang solution to Problem 4.4.

Assumptions 7.1:

* The uncertainty bound d is small.

* The input bound K is sufficiently small with respect to the error bound M.

* The system is controllable from each input for some value of the uncertain pair (A',B').

We first prove that all the components of the function z(s) cannot be identically zero

over the entire interval [0, 1] for small uncertainties on the A and B matrices.

Lemma 7.2: If the maximum disturbance d is small, the function zi(s):[0,1]4R cannot

be zero C1-a.e. on [0,1] for all je {1,...,m}.

Proof: According to Theorem 6. 11, for P = P ,









S DT2 (V *), V -V))Q(dp) = J z(s)(v(s)-v (s))Cl(ds).


Assume that z(s) = 0 a.e. on [0,1]. Then S iDT2(V *), V V*))cm(dp) = 0 for any y-measurable


v(s). Now, for p = P* the expression for DT2 (V ;V V )) may be simplified as follows :

DT2 (V ),(V V ))

= yT(r,A',B';P ,v.~ ) felA'(-s) *B'(v(s)-v (s))dsl

= yT(T,A',B';P ,v ) IfeB.A'(-s) B*B'v(s)ds- je8A'(T-s) P*B'v (s)ds



= yT(T,A',B';P ,v ) { y(Z,A',B';P ,v)-- y(Z,A',B';P ,v )}

Now the support of ao was determined to be the set

0Z = {(z,A',B')EP: yT(T,A',B';v ,P )y(z,A',B';v ,P ) = M}.

Hence the integral expression simplifies to:

S DT2 (V *), V -V))Q (dp)

= SyT(T,A',B';P ,v*)y(t,A',B';P ,v)uadzdrd'B)- M Sfa(dt,dA',dB')

= SyT(T,A',B';P ,v*)y(z,A',B';P ,v)u,(dt,dA',dB') -M

According to our assumption:

(7.3) SyT(t,A',B';B* ,v )y(t,A',B';B* ,v)co(dz,dA',dB') = M for every CL-measurable v(t).

Hence for v(t) = 0 for to [0,1] we have:

(7.4) SyT(T,A',B';B ,v )eAt' XO m(d~r,dA',dB') = M.

Next we use some Dirac delta and Dirac delta derivatives for v(t) to try to bring every traj ectory

to near zero. While these functions are not strictly C1-measurable, they can be thought of as the









limits of very high amplitude measurable functions and the proof is considerably simplified as a

result. Moreover, note that under the assumption of xoxo < M, and by the definition of 02, z(s)

can be expressed as the following power series in s in a small enough neighborhood about s =




z(s) = SyT(T,A',B')eB A' B'm3(dA',dB',dz) + s SyT(T,A',B')eBp" A*A'B'm(dA',dB',dz) +


+ 4 yT(TA',B')eP A' A'2B'm(dA',dB',dr)+ + ....

It follows that z(s) is analytic in a small enough neighborhood about s = 0 and hence the

assumption that z(s) = 0 C1-a.e. implies that z(0) = 0.

Choose v(t) =- [6(0) 6'(0) .... Sn(0)] C- xo

Since z(0) = 0, (7.3) is valid for such a v(t). Then:

y(0+) = xo [ (B+DB) (A+DA)(B+DB) ..... (A+DA n(B+DB) C-1 XO
= [DB DB +DAB ......]Cxo

Hence with this input (7.3) yields:

(7.5) y (0 ",v )eA"t [DB AB +DAB .........]C 'xo a = M

Assuming that DA and DB are Small the left hand side of the above equation can be

approximated by:

y T(0 ,v)eA/t' o [D'B BD' +D'AB .....]C x where DA' and DB' are average

values with respect to the measure mo.

If we divide the above expression by the maximum allowed scalar disturbance, d (recall ||IDAl

d and ||DB|| EA), then

[D'B DB +D'AB ......]C'xo = d [hi Ah2 + h3B.....] Cl'xo









where each element of the matrices hi lies between [-1,1]. Hence for any measure ao and

independent of the maximum disturbance d, the following upper bound holds:

[ hi Ah2 + h3B .....] C-'xo < ki xo where kl is a large enough scalar.
-> y ((3 ,v")eA[/to~ [D'B B '+D'AB .........]C-' x

<: dkl SyT *l,V )eA/t XO m < dkl M (by Equation 7.4)

Now as da 0 Equation 7.5 cannot be satisfied. Hence we have a contradiction.

Lemma 7.2 shows that at least one component zl(s) of the function z(s) is non-zero over

some part of [0,1]. The optimal solution is bang-bang over those subintervals.

In the following lemma we prove that if the input bound K is small enough compared to

the allowed error bound M (by Assumption 7.1), then the optimal trajectories hit the boundary

only at the end of the optimal interval [0,tf]. We will show that this condition is not only enough

to make optimal solution always bang-bang, but also provides more information about the zeros

of the function z(s). ||.||2 denotes the Euclidean norm below.

Lemma 7.6: If for some constants k2, d2 and dr defined below,

(M)1/2 (||A||2 di) > k2 (||B||2 +d2) K

holds, then XT(t)x(t)< Mfor all DEA te[0,6) and xT(6)x(6)= M for some DEA.

Proof: Recall that J(t) = xT(t)x(t). When some input u(t) is applied to the system, the

open loop operation must stop when for some disturbance D=(AA, B), the inequality J(t) > M is

satisfied. Now J(t) is a continuous and differentiable function of t on any interval in [0,00). Let


J(to) = M for some to corresponding to some x(t) and D .If for every permissible u(to+), J(t)|to+


> 0, then for every E > 0, J(to + 8) > M and hence 6 = to. We derive conditions so that J (t)|to

> 0 for any permissible input and any trajectory satisfying J(to) = M.










J (t|o>,+ 0 x,.c > 0 a xT(A'x + B'u) > 0.


We assumed A' to be unstable and hence, by the Lyapunov theorem, XTA'x > 0. If xTB'u > 0,

then the inequality above is trivially satisfied. Hence we assume that xTB'u < 0 and the last

inequality becomes:

xT(A'x B'u) > 0
e || xTA'x ||2 > IIXTB'u ||2 -
e || xTA'x ||2 > IX 2.||IB '||2. IU 2

Now there exists 0 < kl < 1 such that || xTA'x ||2 = kl||x||1.||A'||2. Let k2 be the lower bound of

the values of kl for any value of x(to) such that xT(to)x(to) = M and A'. Since by assumption

||xTA'x||2 > 0, we claim that k2 > 0. This can be seen by noting that ||xTA'x||2 < M (||A||2 + d2).


Hence k2 = 18 M(|A|+d Since the right hand side is continuous in x and A', the


infimum is achieved and hence k2 > 0.

Hence the following implies the last inequality:

k2||x||1 ||A'||2 > IX 2 ||IB'||2 IU 2z


e > k3 K (where k3 is a constant resulting from the equivalence of norms:
||B'||2

recall that ||u||2 = kzk3 ||u|| < kzk3 K)

(M)1/2(||A||2 di)
I |B||2+ d2 3

The last implication follows from:

||A'||2 = || A + DA 12 > ||A||2 ||DA 2z > ||A||2 di
||B'||2 = || B + DB 12 < ||B||2 + ||DBll 2 < |B||2 + d2.

where dl,d2 are pOsitive constants resulting from the equivalence of norms and the bound d on

the uncertainties: ||DA||, ||DB|| < d.









The significance of the above lemma is that it provides us with a simple condition when

the optimal trajectories will hit the boundary only at one point in time and that time is necessarily

at the end of the optimal time interval [0,tf]. It is however evident that more than one traj ectory

corresponding to different values of the uncertainty (DA,DB), can hit the boundary at the same

time.

Lemma 7.7: Under Assumption 7. 1, each zi(s) + 0 almost everywhere on (0, 1) and the set

of zeros of z(s) do not have a limit point in (0, 1).

Proof: Consider the expression for z(s):


z(s) = SfyT(r,A',B')ep A'(7-s) B'm(dA', dB'/Z) CO(dZ).


Recall that the support for aO was defined as 0Z = ((A',B',z)E(A+AA)x (B+AB)x[0,1]: yTy = M).

If Lemma 7.6 holds then 0Z = ( (A',B',z)E(A+AA)x (B+AB)X I f Ty = M, ) and z(s) can be

simplified as follows:


z(s) = SyT(1 ,A',B')eB A'(1-s) B'm(dA',dB').

Hence for each se [0,1) the expression for z(s) is given by the following power series

expansion:

z(s) = SyT(1,A',B')eB'A' B'm,(dA',dB') + s fyT(1,A',B')eB'A' A'B'm3(dA',dB') +

2! f.yT(1,A',B')eB'A' A'2B'm(dA',dB')+ +.........


SyT(1,A',B')eP'A1' d'd' B' + s yT(1,A',B')eP'A1' mdA',dB') A'B' +

fyT(!1",A',')SY'i m. lr (ladA',dB' A'2B'









The above equality is true since the diameter of AA and A, are small compared to the variation

in eP'A' as A' varies over As.

Let us denote the coefficients by (Xo, X1, X2, - )-

Hence:


Xk FT~r(1~A,A',B)e'A co(dA',dB') A'kB'
= [ f f2.. --n]A'kB'

(Where we denote the row matrix created by the integral as [ fi f2 -- ] and n is the order of

the system.

We stack that coefficients together and expand each Xk.

(7.8) [Xo X1 ....Xk ....] 1 [f2 -- -n][B' A'B' ..... A'kB'.....]
or [Xol ....Xom | X11 ...| ...| Xkl....] 1 [f2 - n[B' A'B' ..... A'mB'. ....]

Now recall Lemma 7.2, which guaranteed that at least one component of zi(s) (j=1,2,...,m) is

non-zero over at least a subinterval of non-zero measure in [0, 1]. Without loss of generality that

this is the case with the z (s). Let us write z (s) in terms of the coefficients defined above.

z (s) = Xoi + Xiis + X21S2 .

Hence z (s) is analytic and in particular a power series in s over [0,1]. It is well known that a

power series is either identically zero or is non-zero almost everywhere in its domain of

definition [0,1] (Conway 1978). Since by Lemma 7.2, z (s) is non-zero at least over some

interval of non-zero measure in [0,1], it follows that it is non-zero almost everywhere over [0,1].

We now write the coefficients of z (s) in terms of Equation 7.8.

[Xol X11 ...... Xnt ......] = [fi f2 ----~[C n 1 ..

Where C1 is the controllability matrix for the first input. Since z (s) is non-zero, at least one of

the coefficients Xil (i=0,1,....) is non-zero. Hence [fi ...fn] + 0, i.e., at least one among fi

(i=1,...,n) is non-zero. Recall that by assumption (7. 1), the controllability matrices Ci









corresponding to each of the m inputs are full rank. Hence at least one among the first n

coefficients of each z(s) (j=1,2...,m) is non-zero. This in turn implies that each z(s) is non-

zero almost everywhere on (0,1).

This proves that z(s) is a non-zero power series on (0,1). It is well known that zeros of analytic

functions cannot include a limit point in its domain of definition. It follows that the only possible

limit points in the zeros of z(s) is at s=0,1. Hence proved.

From Theorem 7.2 and the above lemma, we conclude that z(s) satisfies the following:

z(s~v(s) 2 z(s)v (s) for a.a. s [0, 1].

Moreover each component of z(s)+0 a.e. on (0,1). Together this implies that for a.a. se [0, 1]:

I.-K when z(s)>0
yi,=+K when z(s)<0

Hence, the optimal solution is purely bang-bang almost everywhere on (0, 1). The value of

v (s) is not known over sets of measure zero. These sets are exactly the values of s where some

component of the function z(s) = 0. Recall that each zero crossing of any component of the

switching function zl(s) (j=1,2...m) can potentially imply a switch between the extreme allowed

values of the input (+K). The number of such points is not Einite in general and hence the

solution may contain an infinite number of "switches" or sign changes between the extreme

values. However, by Lemma 7.7, the zeroes of z(s), or in other words the switching instants of

the optimal input v', do not have a limit point in (0, 1). The only possible limit points are at s =

0 or 1. This implies that the optimal switching sequence may have become increasingly close

together at the very beginning or the end of the optimal open loop interval. However, the open

loop interval is always Einite. From an engineering viewpoint, the optimal input function may be

truncated near the two ends. This will result in a Einite number of switches in the optimal input









solution with an arbitrarily small reduction in the maximal open loop time. This will make the

computation of the switching times as well as the hardware implementation feasible.

Hence the optimal v* may be approximated for every practical purpose, by an

implementable function with a finite number of switches. The engineering importance of the

numerical simplification in the calculation of the optimal solution cannot be over emphasized.

The optimal solution, being bang-bang, is effectively known by the computation of the switching

instants. Moreover, a bang-bang solution may be implemented with the most basic in hardware

and simplest of algorithms.

By a simple example, we demonstrate some of the interesting features of the problem

solved above. We choose the same single dimensional system with a single input and with some

uncertainty on the pole as was used in Problem 6. 13. The state is the output of the system. Let us

transcribe Problem 4.4 in terms of this system:

Problem 7.9: Find max tr subject to the following constraints:
ueU


x(t) = ax(t) + u(t) 0 < t < tr and |u(t)| < 2
x(0)= 1
xT(t~x(t) < M for 0 < t <; tr and for all as [1.2,1.4]

We provide a solution to the problem for M = 25. The optimal input in this case has only

one switch with the optimal switching instant at 1.3467 seconds. The maximum tf was found to

be 5.08 seconds, and in the time interval [0, 5.08 sec], every state trajectory is guaranteed to be

within [-5,5]. For a clear understanding of the behavior of the system for different values of the

uncertainty we have plotted the corresponding state traj ectories for ten different uncertainty

values of the pole 'a'.













l i l i l l i l


l l


----l l~~L~


_l_ I_ l_ __ __ l l l l l l__~_


O 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 5
Time


Figure 7-1: Optimal input has one switch: M = 25, t, = 5.08





























0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 5
Time


Figure 7-2: Traj ectories for ten different uncertainty values of 'a'; M = 25, tf = 5.08









CHAPTER 8
CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK

Conclusion

The problem of maximizing the open loop period of operation of a linear time invariant

system with bounded inputs has been considered. The parameters of the controlled system are

subj ect to bounded uncertainties. An optimal controller has been derived that maximizes the time

during which the control loop can be left open, while keeping the system error within pre-

specified bounds. The existence of such a control signal is first proved among the set of

measurable functions. Euler-Lagrange type first order necessary conditions are then derived for

calculating the optimal open loop input. It is shown that the time interval, during which the

control loop can remain open, is maximized by an input, which may not be purely bang-bang

over the entire maximal open loop time.

We further showed that in cases where the optimal input was not bang-bang over certain

intervals, a purely bang-bang input existed which approximated the optimal input. This is of

engineering importance, since the bang-bang nature of the optimal solution makes the

computation of switching instants computationally feasible, as opposed to solving the entire

dynamic optimization problem numerically. In the general case, the possibility of a high number

of switches in the approximate input solution cannot be excluded. However, under the

assumption that the input bound is small compared with the allowed error bound on the system,

we have shown that the optimal input itself is purely bang-bang. Moreover, the sequence of

optimal switching instants does not have a limit point in the interior of the maximal open loop

interval. This facilitates the computation of the optimal open loop input. Because of the

finiteness of the open loop interval of operation, the optimal input can then be approximated by a

piecewise constant input with a Einite number of switches.









Future Work

The results we have obtained have potential impacts on a number of application areas,

including the following. Each of these applications is a potential candidate for future research

that is based on the theory developed in this dissertation.

Applications

Control of Space Vehicles: Space vehicles are frequently faced with intermittent loss of

signal due to obstacles in the line of vision, radiation interference, limitations in power, etc. In

such situations, it is critical to know how long the system can perform within its specifications

without communication with its supervisory center. This question can be directly addressed

within the framework of need-based feedback we have developed.

Telemetry: Applications in telemetry frequently face the problem of limited power. The

method we propose effectively minimizes the communication needed to control a system to a

minimum and hence maximizes the longevity of the associated power sources.

Stealth Systems: Stealth and spy systems, like unmanned aerial vehicles and similar

devices, prefer to reduce communications with their control center so as to reduce the chances of

detection. The need-based feedback framework can derive the necessary control feeds to achieve

this goal and reduce the probability of detection.

Agricultural Systems: Modern agricultural applications, such as soil moisture content

control and fertilization control, require complex and expensive feedback processes, as most

feedback data has to be collected by human experts testing in the Hield. Using need-based

feedback reduces the frequency and the duration of these Hield tests, thus reducing costs and

improving efficiency.

Biotechnology: Biological research often involves culture and preservation of cells and

other organic substances under very carefully controlled environments. Regular human









surveillance is necessary and extremely expensive. Our method of reducing feedback can

effectively minimize requirements of human surveillance and thus reduce involved costs.

Networked Control Systems: It is increasingly common to use shared networks to control

geographically separated devices. The inherent unreliability of networks may cause frequent loss

of feedback signals for uncertain periods. To guarantee control obj ectives, it is crucial to have an

estimate of how long the system can perform in open loop. Again, this can be answered in the

framework of need-ba~sed feedback control.

Medicine: Applications are also possible in medicine and optimization of drug dosage.

Typically patients are treated with drugs at regular intervals while the feedback in terms of its

effectiveness is collected after large intervals. The method proposed can be potentially used to

guarantee the effectiveness of the drug when measurements are not being made. Moreover the

intervals after which the patient needs to be checked may be maximized.

Numerical Optimization: The actual computation of the optimal solution presents an

interesting problem in numerical optimization. We conj ecture that appropriate use of

combinatorics may lead to a highly efficient algorithm for calculating the solution.

Theoretical Research

This problem is closely related to the viscosity solutions of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman

equation. It seems that the so-called "exit time problem" studied widely in relation to min-max

dynamic programming is similar to the maximal open loop time studied above. But the inherent

non-smoothness of the current solution makes the use of non-standard solutions necessary and

hence may present an interesting future direction of research.

The theory proposed extends the results on optimal residence time of perturbed control

systems. While previous results have been derived in a feedback control setting, we have shown









that investigation in the framework of robust open-loop optimization framework is interesting

and relevant to physical situations. A complete theory requires further research in this direction.

Questions about reachability of uncertain dynamical systems are closely intertwined with

the problem investigated above. The concept of reachability of uncertain systems clearly depends

on whether the system is in open or closed loop. However the correct characterization still needs

to be investigated.

The problem of stabilizing an unstable system with pre-specified bounds on the inputs is

related. Though this is extremely common in most controller design, a satisfactory theory is not

yet available. It is thus of practical interest to calculate the minimum input bound required to

stabilize an unstable uncertain system.

Further theoretical applications of the proposed theory may be found in the areas of

stochastic dynamical systems, Lyapunov stability analysis of switched dynamical systems, and

convex and non-convex min-max dynamical optimization.










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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

Debraj Chakraborty was born in Calcutta, India. He earned his Bachelor of Engineering

degree from Jadavpur University, Calcutta, in 2001. After completing his master's degree in

electrical engineering from the Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of

Technology, Kanpur, in 2003, he j oined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

of the University of Florida, Gainesville, USA. He completed his Ph.D. in electrical and computer

engineering in 2007, under the guidance of Dr. Jacob Hammer at the University of Florida.

From 2003 to 2007, he was appointed an Alumni Fellow at the University of Florida.





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NEED-BASED FEEDBACK: AN OPTIMIZATION APPROACH By DEBRAJ CHAKRABORTY A DISSERTATION PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2007 1

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2007 Debraj Chakraborty 2

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To my family. 3

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank my advisor, Dr. Jacob Hammer for his kind and patient guidance during my stay at University of Florida. Our long discussions, whether technical or not were intellectually stimulating and extremely enjoyable. I thank all the faculty members of my department who helped me learn the basics of Electrical Engineering. Especially I would like to thank Dr. Pramod Khargonekar, Dr. Haniph Latchman and Dr. John Schueller for serving on my PhD committee and for improving my thesis through some insightful suggestions and corrections. Lastly I would like to thank my friends Yoav Levinbook, Saravanan Vijayakumaran, Niranjan Venkatraman and Jun Peng for comments, suggestions and especially for listening to my half-baked ideas and theories at various stages of their development. 4

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TABLE OF CONTENTS page ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...............................................................................................................4 LIST OF FIGURES.........................................................................................................................7 ABSTRACT.....................................................................................................................................8 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION..................................................................................................................10 2 LITERATURE REVIEW.......................................................................................................15 Related Work in Min-Max Optimal Control Problems..........................................................15 Other Approaches for Reducing Feedback Requirements......................................................17 Residence Time Control.........................................................................................................17 3 MATHEMATICAL PRELIMINARIES.................................................................................19 Normed Linear Spaces............................................................................................................19 Weak Convergence..........................................................................................................19 Alaoglus theorem....................................................................................................20 Weak upper semicontinuity......................................................................................20 Definition of Borel, Lebesgue and Radon Measures.......................................................21 Riesz Representation Theorem........................................................................................22 Fubinis Theorem............................................................................................................22 Separation of Convex Sets...............................................................................................23 Directional (Gateaux) Derivative....................................................................................23 Existence and Uniqueness of Solution to a LTI System.........................................................24 Jordan Canonical Representation...........................................................................................24 4 NOTATION AND PROBLEM FORMULATION................................................................26 Notation..................................................................................................................................26 Statement of the Problem........................................................................................................28 5 EXISTENCE OF A SOLUTION............................................................................................30 Weak Compactness of U.......................................................................................................30 Alternative Problem................................................................................................................31 Weak Upper Semicontinuity of T(u,D).................................................................................37 Existence of u*.......................................................................................................................39 6 GENERALIZED FIRST ORDER CONDITIONS.................................................................41 Simplified Theorem from Warga (1970)................................................................................41 5

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The Scaled System..................................................................................................................45 Necessary Conditions.............................................................................................................47 Bang-Bang Approximation to v*...........................................................................................53 7 CONDITIONS FOR A PURELY BANG-BANG SOLUTION.............................................57 8 CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK...............................................................................67 Conclusion..............................................................................................................................67 Future Work............................................................................................................................68 Applications.....................................................................................................................68 Theoretical Research........................................................................................................69 LIST OF REFERENCES...............................................................................................................71 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH.........................................................................................................75 6

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LIST OF FIGURES Figure page 1-1 Schematic of intermittent feedback control.........................................................................12 1-2 Loss of feedback due to communication channel disruption..............................................13 6-1 Optimal input has one switch: M = 1.96, t f = 3.7.................................................................51 6-2 Trajectories for ten different uncertainty values of a; M = 1.96, t f = 3.7.........................52 6-3 Approximate bang-bang input: 16 switches........................................................................56 6-4 Trajectories for ten different uncertainty values of a; M = 1.96, t f = 3.69.......................56 7-1 Optimal input has one switch: M = 25, tf = 5.08.................................................................66 7-2 Trajectories for ten different uncertainty values of a; M = 25, t f = 5.08..........................66 7

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Abstract of Dissertation Presented to the Graduate School of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy NEED BASED FEEDBACK: AN OPTIMIZATION APPROACH By Debraj Chakraborty August 2007 Chair: Jacob Hammer Major: Electrical and Computer Engineering Feedback is often used to overcome the adverse effects of perturbations and uncertainties on the performance of engineering systems. However, failures of the feedback channel cannot be completely avoided. This dissertation addresses the questions of how and for how long can desirable performance of a perturbed system be maintained after a failure of the feedback channel. Let be a system that is subject to a perturbation in its parameters. The exact value of the perturbation is not known; it is only known that is bounded by a given constant Now, let u(t) be an input function of and let u be the response of the perturbed system to the signal u(t). The nominal system is 0 and the nominal response to the signal u is 0 u. Therefore, the deviation in the response caused by the perturbation is || u 0 u||. To reduce the perturbation, add a "correction signal" v(t) to the input signal, so that the perturbed response becomes (u+v). Then, the new deviation between the perturbed and nominal cases becomes || (u+v) 0 u||. The correction signal v(t) must be independent of perturbation value as the latter is not known. Let M be the maximal deviation allowed for the response, and let tf be the time for which || (u+v) 0 u|| M. Then, the objective is to find a correction signal v(t) that 8

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maximizes tf, given only that the perturbation is bounded by Euler-Lagrange type first-order conditions for calculating the optimal correction signal v(t) is presented. It is shown that, under rather broad conditions, the optimal correction signal v(t) is either a bang-bang signal or can be arbitrarily closely approximated by a bang-bang signal. 9

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CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION In this work we reduce the need to communicate between the controller and the sensor measuring the system output by maximizing the time during which the feedback loop can remain open. This is motivated from the fact that in certain applications, feedback is not continually available or cannot be continually measured. Sometimes it is advantageous to temporarily stop the transmission of the feedback signal from the sensors at the system output to the controller. In other situations an unpredictable failure of the feedback channel can occur. For example, in controlling space vehicles, obstacles may accidentally disrupt the line of vision between the spacecraft and earth for varying time periods. In telemetry, the need to conserve battery life may motivate a planned reduction of the time of transmission of feedback signal. Moreover stealth applications, that hide systems from detection, prefer to minimize transmission between the controlled object and the remote controller. In agriculture, measurements about soil parameters like moisture, etc., must be done manually and are consequently expensive. Usually such measurements are carried out intermittently after long intervals. In medicine, mathematical modeling and control of certain diseases have become quite common (see Panetta 2003 and references therein). However the feedback available is inherently of an intermittent nature, since measurements on the patients can only be made after long intervals. Lastly network based control systems use a common unreliable network on time-shared basis with other users and hence the feedback signal may be available to the controller only intermittently. In such applications, it is relevant to ask: Research Question 1: How long can the feedback loop be kept open, while maintaining desirable performance specifications? Research Question 2: What is the best way to control the system when we do not have the feedback signal? 10

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Feedback is necessary due to the uncertainty inherent in any system. The main reason for this need for feedback is the lack of perfect knowledge about the system. This includes modeling inaccuracies, unmodeled nonlinearities, parametric uncertainties, spurious disturbances, input noise and measurement noise. Robustness and immunity to all this features are usually achieved through feedback strategies. Hence, it is evident that no uncertain system can be controlled indefinitely if the feedback signal is not available. However, assuming some amount of tolerance for error, there will be an interval of time in which the system will perform acceptably even without any feedback. Let us assume that the system is allowed to operate within some specified level of error and the loss of feedback occurs when the error is within this specified limit. Then the system trajectory will usually require at least a finite amount of time to exceed the specified error level. This is true for most real systems and in particular, for linear time invariant systems. As we illustrated in the above applications, it is interesting to know, how and for how long this period of acceptable operation without feedback may be extended. The question we ask is: what is the maximal time until which the feedback loop can be kept open so that the error remains within the specified limit. We will show that under suitable assumptions, this period is always finite. Hence the disruption in the feedback signal, whether intended or accidental, will have to end or must be ended after this period of time. Otherwise, effective control is not possible, and the system trajectory may exceed the tolerated error. If the disruption was accidental, this maximal time describes the upper bound of guaranteed safe operation. If the disruption carries on beyond this point the system can potentially fail. The a priori knowledge of this critical maximal time interval can help in decision-making. If the suspension of feedback was intentional, at that point of time the feedback 11

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is reconnected and the knowledge of the current outputs/states are utilized to bring down the system error. Once the error is reduced to near zero, the feedback may be disconnected again and the previous cycle may resume. Switch Controller Plant Figure 1-1: Schematic of intermittent feedback control In this study we consider linear time invariant systems with bounded inputs and the states are assumed to be available as outputs. As in most common situations, we assume that the system parameters are uncertain but are known to lie within some bounds. The Euclidean norm of the state is taken as a measure of the system error at any time instant, which is required to be always less than a pre-specified upper bound. The norm of the initial condition is assumed to satisfy this bound. Under these assumptions the objectives for the open loop operation may be outlined briefly as follows. Find, for any permissible uncertainty, the maximal time interval for which the system error does not exceed the allowed limit. The system error is not monitored during open loop operation. Hence, such a worst-case optimization is considered to guarantee acceptable performance. A special input function is calculated to achieve maximal duration of the open loop period. Note that this is legitimate even when the loop is open, as long as no knowledge of the feedback signal is used for its computation. Existence of the time optimal controller is proved and Euler-Lagrange type conditions are derived for calculating the time optimal open loop input. It is shown that this time optimal input signal is either purely bang-bang or can be uniformly approximated by a bang-bang signal. 12

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Finally, it should be noted that, corresponding to the optimal open loop input, an infinite number of system trajectories might be realized depending on the particular value the uncertainty takes within the allowed set The main emphasis of this formulation is to guarantee that none of the trajectories, from the infinite number possible, can exceed the allowed error bound for the maximal time interval of operation. Earth Target Loss of Feedback Signal Obstacle Launch Site Acceptable Flight Envelope Figure 1-2: Loss of feedback due to communication channel disruption We conclude this introductory chapter with a hypothetical example to illustrate our problem formulation: Consider the simulated firing of a ground-to-ground missile as illustrated in the figure. The flight path of the missile is predetermined and the missile is regulated carefully so that it follows the prescribed flight path. The feedback about the current coordinates, velocity, angles, etc., of the missile is transmitted to the ground controller via a satellite. The controller uses this information to determine the angle and amount of thrust needed to keep the missile on track. Under this scenario even a temporary loss of signal from the satellite may lead to the catastrophic failure of the control and a subsequent loss of the missile. We are proposing a 13

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solution to the problem by defining the best way to design the control of the missile for the duration of no feedback. Our method also guarantees that the missile can stay within the acceptable flight envelope for a maximal time after loss of signal from the satellite occurs. We prove that the best control under these circumstances is either bang-bang or can be approximated by a bang-bang signal. 14

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CHAPTER 2 LITERATURE REVIEW Related Work in Min-Max Optimal Control Problems The objective of time optimality, for every possible uncertainty, in open or closed loop operation embeds our problem within the framework of min-max optimal control. This area of differential game theory has been extensively researched and encompasses a wide variety of interesting results. We review a few papers directly related to our work. Isaacs (1954) was the first investigation to formulate a control problem in which two players with conflicting interests interact with each other in a game theoretical setup. These results were later published as a book in Isaacs (1965). The so-called main equation was derived, which can be viewed as a game theoretical extension of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation and the dynamic programming approach (Bellman 1957). Independently, Kelendzheridze (1961) solved a pursuit-evasion problem, which in turn spawned a body of research of which Pontryagin et al. (1962), Pontryagin (1966, 1967a and b), Mishchenko and Pontryagin (1967) and Mischenko (1971) were early contributors. These papers generally derived Euler-Lagrange type necessary conditions for the equilibrium solutions to the pursuit-evasion problem. Berkovitz (1964 and 1967) formalized Isaacs results in a classical calculus of variations setting and also derived necessary conditions for general systems under weak assumptions. Other early contributors were Fleming (1961 and 1964), Ho et al. (1965), Friedman (1971), Elliott and Kalton (1972) and Elliott et al. (1973). Numerous authors developed different definitions of the equilibrium solution and various payoff functions of which Linear Quadratic Games have been extensively developed. A complete set of references can be found in Basar (1982). However the majority of interesting results have been concentrated for differential games with a saddle point solution. The problem 15

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of worst-case optimization without the saddle point assumption was posed by Feldbaum (1961 and 1965). This problem was addressed by, among others, Koivuniemi (1966), Howard and Rekasius (1964) and Bellanger (1964). Witsenhausen (1968) solved the same problem with a convex cost functional for sampled data systems. As discussed next, the problem was mathematically solved by Warga (1965a). The concept of relaxed solutions in optimal control theory was introduced by Young (1937) and later in the book Young (1969). In a series of papers Warga (1965a and b, 1970 and 1971a and b) solved the min-max control problem using relaxed solutions with quite general assumptions. The existence of relaxed solutions (in the sense of Young 1937) to the min-max problems were guaranteed and the solutions were found to satisfy variants of Euler-Lagrange type necessary conditions. The techniques used were similar to those of Neustadt (1966 and 1967) and Gamkrelidze (1965). These results were reworked and accumulated into a book (Warga 1972), from which we use a result on conflicting controls (Theorem IX.1.2) to derive necessary conditions for our problem. We quote a simplified version of the actual theorem in Chapter 4. It should be noted that with the exception of papers related to the Isaacs main equation, almost all the work reviewed above looked for open loop solutions. Apparently little has been done in search of closed loop necessary conditions characterizing solutions to the min-max problem. Conditions for existence of a stable solution were formalized with the help of concepts like stable bridges in Krasovskii and Subbotin (1974). This book contains a detailed exposition of positional, i.e., feedback solution to differential games. In a series of papers, Ledyaev and Mishchenko (1986, 1987 and 1988) and Ledyaev (1989 and 1994) derived necessary conditions for min-max control problems of a fixed duration. This has been an area of intensive research 16

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since but most of the advances have been related to the dynamic programming approach. See Vinter (2000) and the references therein. However efforts to derive Euler-Lagrange type necessary conditions have been limited. Throughout this study, results and ideas from standard optimal control and mathematics references have been used. Some of them are Kolmogorov and Fomin (1957 and 1961), Liusternik and Sobolev (1961), Rudin (1966), Bryson and Ho (1969), Luenberger (1969), Balakrishnan (1971), Hirsch and Smale (1974), Halmos (1982) and Zeidler (1985). Other Approaches for Reducing Feedback Requirements As outlined in the introduction, the main objective of this work is to reduce the duration during which the feedback loop has to be closed for controlling an uncertain plant. As far as we are aware of, such a robust time optimal formulation for reducing feedback requirements has not been dealt with in literature. However, in the context of Network Control Systems (see Nair et al. 2007), model based approaches have been developed for controlling systems with intermittent feedback. Design methodologies, in which ideal models of the system were used to guess the output of the system during the open loop, were proposed by Zhivogyladov and Middleton (2003) and Montestruque and Antsaklis (2004). Estimates of the maximum time the feedback signal may be delayed were calculated in Walsh et al. (1999). However in these works, the problem of finding the best open loop input was not dealt with and consequently, the maximum time for acceptable open loop operation has not been calculated. In conclusion, our work may have some implications for the problem of bandwidth reduction or control under communication constraints usually addressed in Network Control Systems (see Nair et al. 2007). Residence Time Control The problems of pointing and the related concept of residence time control are similar to our formulation of the problem. (See Meerkov and Runolfsson 1988 and the references therein). 17

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The pointing problem was investigated among others by Skelton (1973), Eng (1979), Cannon and Schmitz (1984) and Halyo (1983). In Meerkov and Runolfsson (1988), the residence time control problem was formulated as that of choosing a feedback control law, so as to force the system states to remain, at least on the average, within pre-specified limits during some minimal period of time in spite of the disturbances that are acting on the system. The objective is very similar to that treated in this work, but the use of feedback creates a fundamental difference. Recall that in our hypothesis the feedback signal is completely absent over the period of interest. Moreover the maximum residence time was also not calculated in these papers. 18

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CHAPTER 3 MATHEMATICAL PRELIMINARIES In this chapter we will cover some of the well-known results from functional analysis, measure theory and linear algebra that have been used repeatedly in this dissertation. This chapter is meant as an easy reference for the results derived in the later chapters, and is an attempt to make this thesis tolerably self-contained. We start by a selection of relevant results from the theory of normed linear spaces. Most of these standard results are taken from Liusternik and Sobolev (1961), Halmos (1982) and Zeidler (1984). Normed Linear Spaces Weak Convergence First we recall the definition of weak convergence in a normed linear space. Definition 3.1: Let E be a normed linear space, {x n } a sequence of elements of E and x o E. If for all functionals fE (where E is the space conjugate to E), the sequence f(x n ) f(x o ) as n, then we say that {x n } converges weakly to x o and we write x n w x o Here x o is the weak limit of the sequence {x n }. Since Hilbert spaces are self-conjugate, the above definition may be specialized to the following form for Hilbert spaces: Definition 3.2: A sequence {x n } in a Hilbert space H converges weakly to x o H if x n ,y x o ,y as n for all yH. Then we write x n w x o where x o is the weak limit of the sequence {x n }. A continuous functional on a compact set in a normed linear space is bounded and achieves is maximum and minimum. However, in this dissertation, most of the sets we would be interested in are not compact in the sense of strong convergence. Weak convergence and weak 19

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compactness are much less severe requirements and will shown to hold for the sets of interest in this work. Weak compactness is defined next. Definition 3.3: A set XE is weakly compact (i.e., sequentially weakly compact) if every infinite sequence {x n }X has a subsequence {x nk } such that x nk w x o and x o X. The existence of solutions to optimal control problems is very much dependent on the following very important theorem. Alaoglus theorem Theorem 3.4: Every bounded sequence of elements in a Hilbert space contains a weakly convergent subsequence. This theorem guarantees the weak compactness of bounded sets in the Hilbert space. However for compactness in itself, the set of interest must be closed in the weak topology. The following result is useful for checking the sequential weak closure of convex sets: Theorem 3.5: A bounded strongly closed convex set in a Hilbert space is also weakly closed. In the analysis of existence of optimal solutions to dynamic optimization problems, we are actually interested in the functionals defined on compact or weakly compact sets. We define the concepts of weakly continuous and weakly upper-semicontinuous functionals. Weak upper semicontinuity Definition 3.6: A functional f (possibly nonlinear) on a Hilbert space H is defined to be weakly continuous at x0H, if for any sequence xnH and x n w x o we have f(x n ) f(x o ). Definition 3.7: A functional f (possibly nonlinear) defined on a Hilbert space H is defined to be weakly upper semicontinuous at x0H, if for any sequence xnH and x n w x o implies nlim sup f(x n ) f(x o ). 20

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A generalization of the classical theorem of Weierstrass to semicontinuous functionals is often used to prove existence of solutions in optimization problems. A simplified statement is listed next: Theorem 3.8: Let f be a weakly upper semicontinuous real valued functional on a weakly compact subset S of a Hilbert space H. The functional f is bounded above on S and achieves its maximum on S. In differential game theory it is often not enough to study a single upper/lower semicontinuous functional but a family of such functionals. Next we state a very useful property of a family of upper semicontinuous functionals: Theorem 3.9: (Willard 1970) Let X and A be two topological spaces. If f is a upper semi-continuous real valued function on X for each A, and if inf f (x) exists at each xX, then the function f(x) = inf f (x) is upper semi-continuous on X. Definition of Borel, Lebesgue and Radon Measures The interplay between measure theory and functional analysis is extremely common in dynamic optimization and especially differential game theory. We briefly define a few standard and well-known concepts for easy reference. For detailed exposition on these concepts see Kolmogorov and Fomin (1957) and Rudin (1966). If S be a topological space, then the smallest -field containing every open set in S is called the Borel field of sets, and denoted (S), and the elements of (S) are called Borel sets. A measure defined on (S) is called a Borel measure. Let be a Borel measure. A Borel set E(S) is regular if both of the following properties hold: (E) = inf {(V): EV, V open} (E) = sup{(K): KE, K compact} whenever E is open or (E). 21

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If every Borel set in S is regular then is called regular. A finite regular Borel measure is called a Radon measure. Radon measures are important from the point of this work, because of their appearance in the Riesz representation theorem for characterizing linear functionals. Finally, the Lebesgue measure on the real line R can be defined simply as follows: Let (R) be the Borel field defined on the real line and consisting of intervals. Then the set function that assigns the interval a,b], the measure (ba) is called the Borel measure on (R). The completion of (R) relative to the Borel measure is called the class of Lebesgue measurable sets. The extension of the Borel measure to the completion of (R) is called the Lebesgue measure. Riesz Representation Theorem We present here a special form of the well-known Riesz Representation theorem, which will be used in the later chapters. This specific form is a slight simplification of that presented in Evans and Gariepy (1992). Theorem 3.10: Let P be a compact subset of Rm. Denote the space of continuous functions mapping P to R by C(P,R) and each element in this space by f. Let L be a bounded linear functional on the space C(P,R). Specifically L: C(P,R)R. Then there exists a positive Radon measure on P and a -measurable function : PR such that: |(x)| = 1 for -a.e. xP. L(f) = P f d for all fC(P,R). Fubinis Theorem Theorem 3.11: Let (X,X,) and (Y,Y,) be -finite measure spaces, and let f be an (XY)-measurable function on XY. If 0 f and if 22

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(x) = Yfx d and (y) = Xfy d (xX, yY) then is X-measurable, is Y measurable, and X d = XYf d() = Y d Separation of Convex Sets Let H be a topological vector space. A set A H is convex if {a + (1)b}| 0 1}A whenever a,bA. We say that a linear functional H* (where H* denotes the space conjugate to H), separates subset A and B of H if 0 and either (x) (y) or (x) (y) (xA, yB) for some R. Theorem 3.12: Let K and M be non-empty disjoint convex subsets of a topological vector space H and the interior of K is non-empty. Then there exists H* that separates K and M. Directional (Gateaux) Derivative Definition 3.13: Let X be a vector space, Y a normed space, and T a (possibly nonlinear) transformation defined on a domain DX and having range RY. Let x0DX and let h be arbitrary in X. If the limit: DT()x;h = 0lim T(x0+h) T(x0) exists, it is called the Gateaux differential of T at x0 with increment h. If the above limit exists for each hX, the transformation T is said to be Gateaux differentiable at x0. We note that this definition makes sense only when x0+h D for all sufficiently small and that the limit is taken in the usual sense of norm convergence in Y. If Y is the real line and the transformation T is a real valued functional on X, then the following definition may be used for the Gateaux differential: 23

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DT()x;h = d d T(x0 + h)|=0 for each fixed x0X. Existence and Uniqueness of Solution to a LTI System In this section we quote a widely known theorem about the existence and uniqueness of the solution to a differential equation with measurable right hand sides. In this dissertation, we consider linear systems of the form .x(t) = Ax(t) + Bu(t) where u(t) is Lebesgue measurable. This theorem is used throughout to guarantee existence and uniqueness of solution for the systems under consideration. This particular version of the theorem is taken from Young (1969). Theorem 3.14: Let f(t,x) be a vector valued function with values in x-space, and suppose that in some neighborhood of (t 0 ,x 0 ), f(t,x) is continuous in x for each t, measurable in t for each x, and uniformly bounded in (t,x). Then there exists an absolutely continuous function x(t), defined in some neighborhood of t 0 such that x(t 0 ) = x 0 and that, almost everywhere in that neighborhood: .x(t) = f(t,x(t)) Suppose in addition that for some constant L, the function f(t,x) satisfies, whenever (t,x 1 ) and (t,x 2 ) lie in some neighborhood N of (t 0 ,x 0 ), the Lipschitz condition | f(t,x1)-f(t,x2)| L| x1-x2|, then in some neighborhood of t 0 there exists one and only one absolutely continuous function x(t) such that: x(t) = x0 + t0t f(,x()) d Jordan Canonical Representation Theorem 3.15 (Hirsch and Smale 1974): Let A be a nn matrix with real elements. Then there exists a nn real matrix P such that A d = PAP 1 is composed of diagonal blocks of the following two forms: 24

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S 1 = 1 1 .. 1 or S 2 = F I2 F I2 .. F I2 F The diagonal elements denoted by is a real eigenvalue of A and appears as many times as the multiplicity of the minimal polynomial. In the expression for S 2 F = a bb a and I2 = 1 00 1 where (a ib) are the complex eigenvalues of A. Each block F is repeated as many times as the multiplicity of the eigenvalue a + ib in the minimal polynomial. Ad is called the Jordan real canonical form of the matrix A. 25

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CHAPTER 4 NOTATION AND PROBLEM FORMULATION Notation The systems we consider are linear time invariant continuous-time systems given by a realization of the form (4.1) .x(t) = Ax(t) + Bu(t) x(0) = x 0 Where A and B are constant real matrices of dimensions nn and nm respectively. We assume that the state x of the system is available as output. The initial condition of the system is denoted by x 0 and is given. In addition, we assume that there is an uncertainty about the values of the entries of the matrix A and B. To represent these uncertainties, we introduce two matrices D A and D B We denote (4.2) A = A + D A and B = B + D B where A, B, D A and D B are given constant matrices of appropriate dimensions. While A and B are known, the matrices D A and D B can take any values within the sets A and B respectively. We define A and B to be bounded subsets of the spaces of real (nn) and (nm) matrices such that A = {D A : ||D A || d} and B = {D B : ||D B || d}. Here the norm ||D|| = Dijsup |Dij| where Dij denotes the ij th element of the matrix D and d is a fixed positive real number. Note that the sets A and B are closed, bounded and hence compact. The particular values D A and D B takes in the sets A and B are not known a priori and hence represents the uncertainty in the system matrices A and B. Such an assumption is realistic because though the exact values of the system parameters are never known, usually the sets in which they belong are known a priori. For compactness of expression we group the uncertainties together and define D = (D A ,D B ) belonging to the set = A B It is further assumed that at least one 26

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eigenvalue of the nominal system matrix A has a non-negative real part and that the pair (A,B) is stabilizable for every value of the uncertainty set We will show in Chapter 5 that the assumption that the nominal system is unstable guarantees the existence of a finite solution to the open loop problem. We assume that the system is performing acceptably if the Euclidean norm of the states, representing the system error, stays below a pre-specified positive bound (say M). In other words, the inequality xT(t)x(t) M, must hold as long as the system is operating. However once the state norm exceeds the bound, the system must either be stopped or some action must be taken to prevent this from happening. Here we assume that at the point in time when the feedback signal stops, the system norm denoted as the initial condition in our problem, is less than M. (4.3) x 0 T x 0 M Then the open loop is allowed to run as long as xT(t)x(t) M, and the loop must be closed when this inequality can be no longer made to hold. As outlined in the introduction, we assume that there is a special input during the time when the feedback signal is absent. This input is used to keep the system error within the tolerated level for a maximal amount of time. We denote this input by u(t). For u(t) we will use weighted norm and inner product as described below. Here u(t) is a vector valued function (u 1 (t), ..., u m (t)) T where each component is real valued and Lebesgue measurable. Each u(t) is assumed to lie in the Hilbert space L(t)2m with the following inner product: let x(t) and y(t) be two elements of L(t)2m. Then the inner product x,y = 0(t) x(t)Ty(t)dt, where (t) = e t for some fixed constant 0. The norm and the metric are defined correspondingly. Let U be a 27

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set of bounded functions in L(t)2m defined as U {u L(t)2m : maxi |ui(t)| K, t [0,]} where K is a fixed positive number. This set U of bounded measurable functions define the prospective inputs we shall consider for system (4.1). As will be shown in Chapter 4, the optimal solution is bang-bang with possibly an infinite number of switches. Hence a smaller set, e.g., the set of piecewise continuous bounded functions, would not suffice. The set U thus defined will be shown to be compact in the weak topology and thus will facilitate the proof of existence of the optimal solution. For engineering purposes, any element in U can be approximated to any arbitrary accuracy by a piecewise continuous implementable function. Statement of the Problem We next state the mathematical problem formulation. During the open loop period the objective is to maximize the time during which the system error is guaranteed to stay below certain bound in the face of uncertainty. This objective is achieved with the help of the special input u(t) used to correct the system during the time the feedback is absent. In the introduction we described that how in various applications it is important to know both the correcting open-loop input u(t), and the maximal amount of time for which the system can be left running in open loop safely. Keeping this motivation in mind we pose the following problem: Problem Statement: Using the notation of the last section the open loop problem may be formulated as follows. Problem 4.4: Find uUmax t f subject to the following constraints: .x(t) = Ax(t) + Bu(t) 0 t tf x(0) = x0 x0Tx0 M xT(t)x(t) M for 0 t tf and for all (A,B) (A+A)(B+A) where (A+ A ) {A+ D A : D A A } and (B+ B ) {B+D B : D B B }. 28

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Among the main objectives of this work is to show that such a maximum t f exists, is finite and that it can be achieved by an input u(t)U. Assuming they exist, the interval [0,t f ] and the optimal input solution u(t) to the above problem has the following feature. If u(t) is applied over the interval [0,t f ], irrespective of the value the system matrices (A,B) takes in the sets (A+ A ) and (B+ B ), the system trajectory stays within the allowed error level, i.e., x T (t)x(t) M for the entire interval [0,t f ]. The second objective is to find the nature of the optimal input u(t) that achieves the maximum tf. This will be achieved through the derivation of first order necessary conditions characterizing the optimal solution. 29

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CHAPTER 5 EXISTENCE OF A SOLUTION In this chapter we prove the existence of a solution to Problem 4.4. This will be achieved through the application of the generalized Weierstrass theorem stated in Chapter 3 (Theorem 3.8). Before going into the mathematical details we describe a brief outline of this chapter. The main idea is to repose Problem 4.4 in turns of a suitably defined upper semicontinuous functional. This functional is nothing but the minimum possible time (corresponding to the worst uncertainty) of open loop operation for any given uU. We prove that the set U defined in chapter 4 is compact in the weak topology and then we show that the functional mentioned above is weakly upper semicontinuous. Thus we are ready to use a generalized Weierstrass theorem to prove that a maximal time for the open loop operation exists, is finite, and can be achieved with an input u from the set U we defined in Chapter 4. Weak Compactness of U We start with a few properties of the input set U defined in Chapter 4. Most of the standard results of this section are taken from Liusternik and Sobolev (1961), Halmos (1982) and Zeidler (1984) and has been listed for reference in Chapter 3. We prove the weak compactness property of the set U of inputs, in the form of a lemma This property, which is a consequence of the Alaoglus theorem (Theorem 3.4)), along with a few well-known properties of semi-continuous functions on compact sets, is essential for proving the existence of a solution to Problem 4.4. Lemma 5.1: The set U is weakly compact in the Hilbert space L(t)2m. Proof: The set U is obviously bounded and hence by Theorem 3.4 every infinite sequence in U has a weakly convergent subsequence. However we need to show that the set U is weakly closed. Since U is convex by definition, by Theorem 3.5 we just need to show that U is 30

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strongly closed. Consider a sequence of functions u n (t)u o (t) where u o (t)U. Hence for some set t[0,) of nonzero measure, u oi (t)K, where tt and u oi denotes the i th element of u o (t). Hence the following inequality must hold: 0et||un(t)uo(t)||2dt = tet||un(t) uo(t)||2dt + C n where C n is positive real. tet(K uoi(t))2 dt + C n As n, while C n can tend to zero, the first term remains constant and finite. So u n (t) does not converge to u o (t). Alternative Problem We now define an alternative formulation for Problem 4.4 using the functional defined next. It is easier to show the existence of the optimal solution in terms of this functional. Definition 5.2: Let J(t) = x(t) T x(t) where t[0,). Define T(u,D) = inf t:J(t) > M if J(t) > M for some t< otherwise Here x(t) is related to u(t) and D through Equation 4.1. This functional may be interpreted as the time when the system error exits the allowed envelope of operation for the first time. This functional is identical to the quantity t f defined in Problem 4.4, for trajectories obeying the constraints. In other words, for a fixed (u,D) pair, the relation x(t) T x(t) M is satisfied for the interval [0,T(u,D)]. Moreover for a fixed u(t), the relation x(t) T x(t) M is satisfied for every value of the uncertainty D within the interval []0 Dinf T(uD). Hence it can be easily seen that Problem 4.4 is equivalent to finding uUsup Dinf T(u,D), if it is finite. In addition we need to show that the supremum over U can be achieved. We summarize in the following restatement of Problem 4.4: 31

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Problem 5.3: Show that uUsup Dinf T(u,D) Find u U such that Dinf T(u ,D) = uUsup Dinf T(u,D). Well posed: For this problem to be well posed, the first step is to show that Dinf T(u,D) This observation is crucial to us since we are interested in running the system on open loop as long as possible. We realize that no matter what input we create for the system, nature can choose a value for D that will make the system trajectory leave the set of acceptable operation in finite time. First we prove a preliminary lemma: Lemma 5.4: Let A and D be a real nn matrices such that A has repeated eigenvalues and D. Also let x 0 be a fixed non-zero vector in R n Then for any d > 0, there exists a D such that ||D|| < d and (A+D) has distinct eigenvalues. Moreover let T be a nn real matrix such that Q=T(A+D)T 1 results in a Q which has the following block diagonal form: (5.5) Q = Q1 Q2 Qr Qr+1 where Q i = ai bibi ai for i=1,.,r and Q r+1 = a2r+1 a2r+2 .. an. Here (a i ib i ), i=1,,r represents the complex eigenvalues and a i (i=2r+1,.,n) represents the real eigenvalues of A. Then D can be chosen such that j=1n T 1j x 0j 0 where T ij is the ij th element of T and x 0j is the j th element of x 0 Proof: Let A d = PAP 1 where A d is the real Jordan canonical form of A. Recall the A d is composed of diagonal blocks of the following two forms: 32

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S 1 = 1 1 .. 1 or S 2 = F I2 F I2 .. F I2 F where is a real eigenvalue (possibly repeated) of A. In the expression for S 2 F = a bb a where (a ib) are the complex roots of A (possibly repeated). (Theorem 3.15) Let E be a diagonal matrix that we add onto A d such that blocks S 1 and S 2 are changed as follows: S 1 = 1 1 2 1 .. q1 1 q Where let q be the multiplicity of the eigenvalue S 2 = F1 I2 F2 I2 .. Fs1 I2 Fs Where let s be the multiplicity of the eigenvalue (a ib) and F i = a + i bb a + i i=1,2,s. Now the eigenvalues corresponding to block S 1 and S 2 are distinct and of the form ( + i ) and (a + j ib) where i=1,2,q and j=1,2,s. (Note: det(I S2) = det(I F 1 ) det(I F 2 ).. det(I F s ) ) Thus (A d + E) has distinct eigenvalues. From the construction above it can be seen that it is possible to choose such an E such that ||E|| < r for any r > 0. Now consider the reverse transformation: P 1 (A d + E)P = A + P 1 EP 33

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|| P 1 EP|| k|| P 1 EP|| 2 k ||P 1 || 2 ||E|| 2 ||P|| 2 = k||E|| 2 The first inequality follows from the equivalence of norms where k is a finite constant and |||| 2 is the spectral norm of the matrix. Clearly by making ||E|| 2 < dk we get that || P 1 EP|| d. Hence by defining D = P 1 EP we achieve our objective. Now let j=1n T 1j x 0j = 0 with a certain choice of A with distinct eigenvalues and with a T that transforms A according to Equation 5.5. Clearly, the vector T 1 [T 11 T 12 T 1n ] is an eigenvector of the matrix A and hence must satisfy 1 T 1 = AT 1 where 1 is the eigenvalue corresponding to T 1 Now from the continuity of the eigenvalues of A w.r.t. the entries of A, we can change A to (A+D) arbitrarily keeping the eigenvalues distinct. Then the following equation must hold: 1 T 1 = (A+D)T 1 Since D is arbitrary, T 1 can be made non-collinear to T 1 keeping ||T 1 T 1 || arbitrarily small. It follows that T 1 and T 1 cannot be both orthogonal to x 0 Theorem 5.6: Consider the system (4.1) with a fixed initial condition x 0 in the set {x 0 : 0 < xT0x 0 M}. Then for any fixed u(t)U and M < there exists a D such that T(u,D) < Proof: Assume that for some fixed u(t)U, T(u,D) = for all D. This implies that x(t) T x(t) M D and t[0,] || e At [x 0 + 0te-ABu()d] || M. Now fix A at some arbitrary value in (A + A ) such that A has distinct eigenvalues. By Lemma 5.4 this can be done without loss of generality. Then we do a similarity transform on A 34

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such that Q = T 1 AT is in the block diagonal form shown in Equation 5.5. Note that in this form Q and Q T are commutative. Now we consider the system transformed by T and name the new state vector z(t). It is related to x(t) by the following relation: z(t) = Tx(t). We further assume that T is such that z 01 = j=1n T 1j x 0j 0. By Lemma 5.4 this also can be done without loss of generality. We seek to prove that ||x(t)|| can be made divergent with a proper choice of D. We claim that it is enough to prove ||z(t)|| diverges. ||z(t)|| = ||Tx(t)|| ||T||||x(t)|| Hence tlim ||z(t)|| = tlim ||x(t)|| = In terms of z(t) our hypothesis implies: z(t) T z(t) ||T|| M = M D and t[0,] || e Qt [z 0 + 0te-QBu()d] || M where M= ||T|| M and B = TB Let F(t) = [z 0 +0te-QBu()d]. Therefore, [ e Qt F(t) ] T [ e Qt F(t) ] M F(t) T e(QT+Q)t F(t) M F(t) T et F(t) M Where = Q T + Q is a diagonal matrix with at least one of the elements positive, by hypothesis. For simplicity assume that the 1 st diagonal element denoted by a 1 is positive. Let us denote 35

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each entry of F(t) by f i (t), i.e., F(t)= f1(t)f2(t)fn(t). Thus for the last equation to hold at least the following must be true. (5.7) tlim f 1 (t) = 0 Now f 1 (t) may be written in a general form in the following way: f 1 (t) = z 01 + 0te-a1t[cos(b1) j=1mB1juj() + sin(b1) j=1mB2juj()]d where (a 1 + ib 1 ) is the first eigenvalue of Q and B ij is the ij th element of the matrix B. Then Equation 5.7 implies that tlim z 01 + 0te-a1[cos(b1) j=1mB1juj() + sin(b1) j=1mB2juj()]d = 0 z 01 + 0e-a1 [cos(b1) j=1mB1juj() + sin(b1) j=1mB2juj()]d = 0 But this is a linear equation in B ij and hence cannot hold over all values of B in the set T(B + B ) { T(B + D B ) : D B B } unless u j (t) 0 for every j=1,,m and for all t[0,]. However if this is true then z 01 = 0. Hence we have a contradiction. In the above theorem we showed that, under the assumptions made in Chapter 4, the system norm ||x(t)|| can diverge for any given input u(t) for a proper choice of the uncertainty D. This is true for arbitrarily small uncertainty sets. Now define T(u) Dinf T(u,D), i.e., T(u) is the minimum time corresponding to u(t) in which the system norm ||x(t)|| can be made to 36

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escape the set [0,M]. According to Theorem 5.6 for any fixed u(t)U the quantity T(u) is finite. Corollary 5.8: If the conditions of Theorem 5.6 are satisfied then for any fixed u(t)U, the inequality Dinf T(u,D) holds. Weak Upper Semicontinuity of T(u,D) Recall that according to Problem 5.3 our objective is to show that uUsup Dinf T(u,D) Define T(u) Dinf T(u,D). Thus it would be enough to show that T(u) is weakly upper semi-continuous in u(t). Along with the fact that the set U is weakly compact (Lemma 5.1)), this would effectively prove that the functional T(u) is bounded over the set U and that the supremum is achieved. (Theorem 3.8). The upper semi-continuity of the functional T(u,D) in u(t), for each fixed D is demonstrated next. Denote the set of solutions for Equation 4.1 for all uU and D by X(U,). By Theorem 3.14, each element of X(U,) is an absolutely continuous function in t and unique corresponding to each (u,D) pair. Lemma 5.9: For a fixed D, T(u,D) is weakly upper semi-continuous in u(t), i.e., as a sequence of functions u n (t) w u o (t), the functional T(u,D) obeys the following relation: for any > 0, and T(u o ,D) we can choose an integer N such that T(u n ,D) T(u o ,D) for n N. Proof: For a fixed D and t consider the function x(u):UX(U,), where x(t;u) is the solution to Equation 4.1. As u n w u o (i.e., weakly converges), then for each t[0,), x(t;u n ) x(t;u o ), i.e., x(u n ) converges pointwise to x(u o ). This is because for each t[0,), x(t;u) is a functional linear in u. 37

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This can be seen by defining () = 1 if t 0 otherwise and noting that x(t) = e At [x 0 + 0()e-ABu()d]. Now define a functional T p : X(U,) [0,] as follows: T p (x(t)) = inf t: xTx > M if xTx > M for some t otherwise Next consider a sequence of function x n (t) x o (t) pointwise. We show that for any 0 there exists an integer N such that for n N T p (x n ) T p (x o ) If T p (x n ) T p (x o ) then the claim is true. So we assume that T p (x n ) T p (x o ). Let T p (x n ) = t n and T p (x o ) = t o Now we assumed that x n x o pointwise. By the definition of t 0 the following is true for every > 0: there is a t 1 (t 0 t 0 +) such that x T 0 (t 1 )x 0 (t 1 ) > M. Consequently, there is N such that x T n (t 1 )x T n (t 1 ) M [x T 0 (t 1 )x 0 (t 1 ) M]/2 0 for all n N. Therefore, t n t 0 + which implies that t n t o Thus we have shown that T p (x n ) T p (x o ) Now, for a fixed D, consider the composition map T(u,D) : U X Tp [0,]. From the above arguments it is clear that as u n w u o x n x o pointwise and for any 0 there exists N such that for n N, T p (x n ) T p (x o ) Hence T(u n ) T(u o ) Thus for a fixed D, T(u,D) is weakly upper semi continuous in u(t). Hence proved. Now we need to prove that the functional T(u) is also weakly upper semi-continuous. This is true due to Lemma 5.9 and Theorem 3.9. Corollary 5.10: The functional T(u) Dinf T(u,D) is weakly upper semi-continuous in u(t). 38

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Proof: The proof amounts to checking the conditions of Theorem 3.9. By Lemma 5.9), for each D, the functional T(u,D) is weakly upper semi-continuous in u(t). Also for each uU, the functional T(u) = Dinf T(u,D) 0. Hence the infimum exists always, and by the property above T(u) is weakly upper semi-continuous in u(t). Existence of u* The weak upper semicontinuity of T(u) along with the weak compactness of the set of inputs leave us posed for applying the general Weierstrass theorem (Theorem 3.8). Hence we can now conclude the following: Theorem 5.11: Let U and be as defined above and T(u) Dinf T(u,D) and let uUsup T(u) = uUsup Dinf T(u,D). Then Moreover there exists some u (t)U such that T(u ) = Proof: This follows directly by noting that the set U is weakly compact and the functional T(u) is weakly upper semi-continuous in u(t) over U. (Theorem 3.8). Hence T(u) is bounded above and it achieves it upper bound over U. In conclusion, we showed in this chapter that a solution to Problem 4.4 exists within the set of inputs U. The set U was shown to be compact in the weak topology. Then an alternative formulation of the Problem 4.4 was stated using a functional T(u,D). A proof of the well-posed ness of this new statement was presented next. In the process it was shown that under the assumptions made in Chapter 4, the system trajectory can leave the envelope of acceptable operation in finite time no matter what input we apply to the system. This inbuilt finiteness of the functional T(u,D), along with particular features of the formulation was utilized to prove weak upper semicontinuity of the functional T(u,D) for any fixed D. Another functional, namely 39

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T(u), denoting the worst possible time for the input u was introduced and it too was shown to be weakly upper semicontinuous in u. Lastly Weierstrass theorem was applied to prove the existence of the best input u* and the finiteness of uUsup T(u). The application of u guarantees that the system error does not leave the allowed envelope for any value of the uncertainty for a maximal duration of time. However, it should be noted that even for this optimal input, the system error can leave the allowed envelope in finite time for certain values of the uncertainty. 40

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CHAPTER 6 GENERALIZED FIRST ORDER CONDITIONS In Chapter 5 we proved that the optimal solution to Problem 4.4 existed among the set of bounded and measurable input functions. Evidently it would be useful to know more about the optimal solution, with a view to facilitate its calculation for specific problems. The conventional method for calculating solution to optimal control problems has been through characterizing first order necessary conditions. Here however the situation is complicated by the game-theoretic formulation, in that the maximization of open loop time has to be done over every possible value of the uncertainty. We draw on the considerable amount of previous research in the area of differential game theory and min-max optimal control. The relevant literature was reviewed in Chapter 2. In particular, we note that Problem 4.4 is an example of min-max or conflicting control problems studied previously among others, by Warga (1970). We use Theorem IX.1.2 (Warga 1970), for finding the first order necessary conditions characterizing the optimal solution. However we present a modified version of the theorem, which has been simplified to suit the problem we are solving in this dissertation. Simplified Theorem from Warga (1970) In this section we state and prove the theorem along with some required modifications. We require some new notation in this chapter: Notation 6.1: Let S be a compact set on Rn and be the Borel field of subsets of S. Then by rpm(S) we denote the set of all Radon probability measures defined on Moreover we denote the Banach space of continuous functions from SR with the supremum (L1) norm by the notation C (S,R). C denotes the closure of C and int(C) denotes the interior of C. 41

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First we require the following lemma. Let H be a topological vector space and W be a convex subset of RH We define W 0 { w 0 R: (w 0 ,w H )W} and W={w H : (w 0 ,w H )W, w 0 0}. Let H denote that space conjugate to H. Lemma 6.2: Let C be an open convex subset of H, 0int(W 0 ) and 0C. Then either there exists H H such that H 0, H (w H ) 0 H (c) for all w H W and cC or there exists wW such that w 0 0 and w H C. Proof: For every W let 0 0 and H C be outside W. Recall that W={w H : (w 0 ,w H ) W, w 0 0}. Then W is a nonempty convex subset of H and W C = Since C is an open convex set, by the separation property(Theorem 3.12), there exists H H and R such that H 0 such that H (w H ) H (c) where w H W and cC. But 0C W and hence =0. Thus we have (6.3) H (w H ) 0 H (c) (w H W and cC) This is the first alternative of the lemma. The remaining possibility is when there exists wW such that w 0 0 and w H C. Hence we have the second alternative of the lemma. The above lemma will be used in the proof of the following theorem. Next we state and prove the simplified version of Theorem IX.1.2 from Warga (1970). Theorem 6.4: Let Q be a convex set, F be a compact set in R and P be any compact finite dimensional metric space. Consider two functions T 1 :QF R and T 2 :QFP R. Now assume the following: 42

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1. Let H = {(q,f)QF : T 2 (q,f,p)[,M] for every pP } where ,M0. Let there be (q ,f )H such that T 1 (q ,f ) = (q,f)HminT 1 (q,f) 2. The functions T 1 and T 2 have convex Gateaux derivatives. 3. For each pair (q,f)QF the function T 2 (q,f,p):PR bounded and continuous in p. Then there exists rpm(P) and an -integrable ~ : P R such that i. |~ (p)|=1 for all pP and (P) 0 ii. ~(p) DT2((q*,f*),p;(q,f)(q*,f*))(dp) 0 iii. ~(p)T 2 (q ,f ,p) = a[M] max ~(p)a for -a.a. pP where DT j ()(q*,f*);(q,f) (q*,f*) denotes the directional derivative of T j at (q ,f ). Proof: Define the set W(q,f) = { DT 1 ()(q*,f*);(q,f) (q*,f*), DT 2 ()(q*,f*)p;(q,f) (q*,f*) :(q,f)QF } This set is convex by hypothesis. Let C 2 = { c(p)C(P,R) : c(p) M } where 0. Note that C 2 is a closed convex subset of C(P,R) and let C= int(C 2 ) T 2 (q ,f ). Then we can apply Lemma 6.2 and the first alternative of the lemma yields the following: there exists C (P,R) such that 0, and for all (q,f)QF (6.5)(DT 2 ()(q*,f*)p;(q,f) (q*,f*)) 0 (6.6)(c) 0 (cC) In the above expressions note that C (P,R) and hence by the Riesz representation theorem (Theorem 3.10) we can specify an integral form of In particular, there exists a positive Radon measure on P and an -integrable ~ : P R such that |~ (p)| = 1 for all pP and (P) 0 43

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(c) P ~(p)c(p)(dp) c C(P,R) Next we investigate the inequality (6.6). In view of the definition of C this implies ( c T 2 (q ,f ) ) 0 (cC) P ~(p) [c*(p)c(p)](dp) 0 (cC 2 ) We claim that this equation implies claim (iii) of the theorem. To see this assume that there exists some c o C 2 such that ~(p)c*(p) ~(p)co(p) for pP P where (P) 0. Then we can form cC 2 such that c co when pPc* otherwise But, the integral inequality is not satisfied with c(p) since: P ~(p)[c*(p)c(p)](dp) = P ~(p)[c*(p)c(p)](dp) 0. Now note that C(P,R) is separable and hence C 2 contains a dense denumerable subset {c 1 ,c 2 ,.}. Moreover the set {c(p)|cC 2 } is dense in [,M] for all pP and hence it follows that the set {c 1 (p),c 2 (p),} is dense in [,M] for all pP. So we can write the following: ~(p)c*(p) jNsup ~(p)cj(p) = a[,M] sup ~(p)a(pP) = a[,M] max ~(p)a(pP) (Since c (p)[,M]) Thus we have proved that the statement of the theorem is a result of the first alternative of the lemma. We now prove that the other alternative of the lemma implies a contradiction with the assumption in that (q ,f ) is found to be not minimizing. To prove this consider the set W(q,f) 44

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and C as defined above. From the lemma there exists wW(q,f) such that w 1 0 and w 2 C. For each choice of qQ and fF, define the function h 1 :R and h 2 : C(P,R) as follows: (6.7) h 1 () = T 1 (q + (qq ), f + (ff )) h 2 () = T 2 (q + (qq ), f + (ff ),p) where [0,1]. It can be easily verified that the derivatives h1 and h2 at (0,0) can be expressed in terms of the directional derivatives of T 1 and T 2 at (q ,f ). (6.8) hi(0) = DT i ()(q*,f*);(q,f) (q*,f*) (i=1,2) Now for sufficiently small h 1 () = h 1 (0) + h1(0)) = h 1 (0) + w 1 ) h 1 (0) = T 1 (q ,f ) Also we know that ||||0lim || 1 [h 2 () h 2 (0) + h 2 (0) ] = 0 ||||0lim || 1 [h 2 () h 2 (0)] = w 2 C Hence for sufficiently small |||| we can conclude that [h 2 () h 2 (0)]|||| CC (Since 0C) h 2 () T 2 (q ,f ) int(C 2 ) T 2 (q ,f ). Hence (q ,f ) is not a minimizing solution as hypothesized in assumption (1) of the theorem. The Scaled System The theorem proved above is the main tool that we will use to derive first order conditions for the solution of Problem 4.4. The functions T1 and T2 will be appropriately defined for our problem and it will be shown that all the assumptions of Theorem 6.4 are satisfied. Hence a 45

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solution to Problem 4.4 must satisfy the conclusions of Theorem 6.4. It will be shown that some useful features of the optimal solution of Problem 4.4 may be derived from careful consideration of conclusion (ii) of Theorem 6.4. With these objectives in mind we redefine Problem 4.4 for a scaled system described next. We express system (4.1) in terms of scaled variables y(s) and w(s) as follows: y(s) x(s) s[0,1] v(s) u(s) s[0,1] where and uUsup Dinf T(u,D). In terms of these variables Problem 4.4 can be written as: Problem 6.9: Find min () subject to the following constraints: .y(s) = (Ay(s) + Bv(s)) 0 s 1 y(0) = x0 x0Tx0 M yT(s)y(s) M for 0 s 1 and for all (A,B) (A+A)(B+B) where (A+ A ) {A+D A :D A A } and (B+ B ) {B+D B :D B B }. It can be easily checked that Problem 4.4 and 6.9 are identical. Using standard methods, y(s) can be expressed as: y(s) = e As [x 0 + 0se-A Bv()d] Definition 6.10: Now we identify the relevant sets in Problem 6.9 with those defined in Theorem 6.4 as follows: Q U [0,1] where U [0,1] {v(t)U: v(t) = 0 for t 1 } F [0,] P { (A,B,s) (A+ A ) (B+ B )[0,1]} And we define the functions T 1 and T 2 as follows: T 1 (v(s),) = T 2 (v(s),, (A,B,s)) = y T y 46

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In the following Theorem P (A+ A ) (B+ B )[0,1]. Hence if rpm(P) then conditional probabilities (A,B|s) as well as the marginal probability (s) can be defined in the usual way so that for any (A,B,s), the joint probability (A,B,s) = (A,B|s)(s). Let us denote the Lebesgue measure on [0,1] by Also note that in the following theorem and thereafter the variables and s are both used to denote the scaled time and lies in [0,1]. They are used interchangeably as appropriate. Necessary Conditions We are now ready to apply Theorem 6.4 to Problem 6.9 and thus derive necessary conditions for the optimal solution (v*,*). From this theorem we expect to gain some insight about the characteristics of the optimal input v*. Indeed, from the theorem stated below it will become apparent that the optimal input v* may have a bang-bang control feature. The result introduces the quantity z(s) over the scaled interval time [0,1], which is similar to the classical switching function for the bang-bang control input v*.(Pontryagin et al. 1962). However the exact characteristics of z(s) will have to be clarified through some further investigations. The solution to Problem 6.9 and hence the solution to Problem 4.4 is summarized in the following theorem: Theorem 6.11: Let (v (s), ) be the solution to Problem 6.9. Then there exists rpm((A+ A ) (B+ B )[0,1]) and a -measurable function z(s):[0,1] R m such that the following are satisfied: i. z(s) = s1 P yT()e*A(s)B(dAdB|)(d) ii. z(s) v(s) z(s) v (s) for -a.a.s[0,1] and for any vU [0,1] Where the support of is given by the set: = { (A,B,s)(A+ A ) (B+ B )[0,1]: y T y = M } 47

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Proof: We can apply Theorem 6.4 since all the assumptions are clearly met We first calculate the directional derivatives of T 1 and T 2 It is more convenient to use the variable as the time variable and s as the running variable in the following expressions. The advantage will be apparent from the subsequent derivation. DT 1 ()(v*,*);(v,) (v*,*) = ( ) DT 2 ()(v*,*);(v v*)=* = y T () 0e*A(s) *B(v(s)v*(s))ds By Theorem 6.4 there exists rpm(P) and an -integrable integrable ~ : P R such that |~ (p)| = 1 for -a.a pP and (P) 0 ~(p) DT2((v*,*);(v,) (v*,*))(dp) 0 If we set = in the above inequality and refer to the expression for the directional derivatives of T 1 and T 2 we obtain (6.12) ~(p) DT2((v*,*);(v v*))(dp) 0. P~(p)yT() 0e*A(s) *B(v(s)v*(s))(ds) (dp) 0 P~(p)yT() 0e*A(s) *B[0](s)()v(s)v*(s)(ds) (dp) 0 (Where [0,] (s) = 1 when 0 s 0 otherwise ). 0 P ~(p)yT()e*A(s) B[0](s)(dp) (v(s)v*(s))(ds) 0 (By Fubinis Theorem (3.11)) 0 z(s)(v(s)v*(s))(ds) 0 where z(s) P ~(p)yT()e*A(s) B[0](s)(dp) 48

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Now by hypothesis, P {(A+ A ) (B+ B )[0,1]} and is a Radon probability measure on P. Hence we can write (dA,dB,d) in terms of the appropriately defined conditional and marginal probabilities. The expression for z(s) can be rewritten in terms of the conditionals as follows: z(s) 01 ~(A,B,)yT()e*A(s) B(dA,dB/) [0](s) (d) =s1 ~(A,B,)yT()e*A(s) B(dA,dB/) (d) We claim that: 0 z(s)(v(s)v*(s))(ds) 0 z(s)v(s) z(s)v (s) for -a.a. s[0,1]. To see this assume that there exists some v o U such that z(s)v o (s) z(s)v (s) for sT [0,1] where (T) 0. Then we can form vU such that v vo when sTv* otherwise But, the integral inequality is then not satisfied with v(s) since: 0 z(s)(v(s)v*(s))(ds) = T z(s)(v(s)v*(s))(ds) 0. Now the third conclusion of Theorem 6.4 directly determines the form of the support set of the measure From Theorem 6.4): ~(p)y T (p;v )y(p;v ) = a[M] max ~(p)a for -a.a. pP. 49

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Recall that ~(p) = 1. Hence: y T (p;v )y(p;v ) = M when ~ = 1. If ~ = 1 the equality above cannot be satisfied. Hence ~ = 1 for -a.a. pP and the measure has the support set defined as follows: = {pP: y T (p;v )y(p;v ) = M}. The expression for z(s) simplifies to: z(s) = s1 yT()e*A(s) B(dA,dB/) (d). The above theorem derives necessary conditions for the optimal solution (v*,*) to Problem 6.9. Now consider conclusion (ii) of the above theorem. z(s) v(s) z(s) v (s) for -a.a.s[0,1] and for any vU [0,1] It follows that when each component of z(s) 0 the optimal input solution v (s) is bang-bang and alternates between the maximum allowed input bounds (namely K). In other words when zj(s) 0 for some j{1,2,m}, this implies that for a.a. s[0,1]: v *j (s) = K when zj(s)0 K when zj(s)0 This partially solves our questions about the characteristics of the optimal solution v*. However we cannot conclude anything about the corresponding components of the solution over intervals when some components of the function z(s) are zero. A completely bang-bang solution would be extremely favorable from an engineering point of view, for its ease of implementation and numerical computation. However as we show in the following example, this may not always be true in this case. We will show that some components of the switching function z(s) can turn out to be zero over non-zero intervals of time. 50

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We would like to know more about the function z(s), in particular, whether some components of z(s) could be zero over contiguous subintervals of [0,1]. Recall that for the solution to be purely bang-bang each component of the switching function z(s) needs to be non-zero almost everywhere on [0,1]. We note that our problem is linear time optimal and in most such problems studied in literature the solution turned out to be bang-bang. (See Pontryagin et al. 1962). However it is interesting to note that in this case, it does not always hold. In general, it is not true that the optimal solution is bang-bang and hence some components of z(s) are zero over subintervals of non-zero measure in [0,1]. We present the following example: Example 6.13: Find uUmax t f subject to the following constraints: .x(t) = ax(t) + u(t) 0 t tf and |u(t)| 2 x(0) = 1 xT(t)x(t) M for 0 t tf and for all a[1.21.4] We provide a solution to the problem for M = 1.96. Figure 6-1: Optimal input has one switch: M = 1.96, t f = 3.7 51

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The solution is bang-bang only over the first part [0,1.27] of the interval. Over the rest of the interval until tff the optimal input though constant (=1.67) is not 2. For a clear understanding of the behavior of the system for different values of the uncertainty we have plotted the corresponding trajectories for ten different uncertainty values of the pole a. The solution to this problem was calculated using brute force techniques, where both the time axis (0 to 4 seconds) and the amplitude of the input [-2,2] were discretized thereby forming a grid. Every input was checked on this grid to find the best solution. The continuous time solution was found by interpolation of the discrete optimal solution. Figure 6-2: Trajectories for ten different uncertainty values of a; M = 1.96, t f = 3.7 While this feature of the optimal solution v* is interesting because of its anomaly with other known solutions to linear time optimal problems, studied in literature, it is inconvenient from an engineering point of view. It is much easier to compute a bang-bang solution than otherwise, since for a bang-bang solution, only the switching instants need to be computed to 52

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effectively know the solution. Hence for a bang-bang solution the dynamic optimization with high complexity reduces to a simple static optimization over the space of switching instants. In the next section we show, that even over intervals where some components of z(s) are zero and consequently the optimal solution v* is possibly not bang-bang, there exists a bang-bang input v which approximates v* in an appropriate sense. Bang-Bang Approximation to v* As we discussed in the last section, it would be interesting to know if the optimal solution, which may not be bang-bang, could be approximated by a bang-bang input in any sense. Recall that the objective of the optimal input is to maintain the inequality x T x M for every trajectory of the error, corresponding to any uncertainty value, during the maximal time interval t f We show that the optimal input u can be approximated by a bang-bang input u, in the sense that x T (u,D)x(u,D) M + for every value of the uncertainty D, for at least t f seconds. Here can be made arbitrarily small by increasing the number of switches in u. Lemma 6.14: There exists a bang-bang function uU [0,] with a finite number of switches, such that x T (u;D)x(u;D) M + for every D and for at least t f seconds. Here, can be made arbitrarily small by increasing the number of switches in u. Proof: Let x (t,D) and x(t,D) denote the state vectors, corresponding to uncertainty value D(DA,DB) at instance t when the optimal control u and u are applied respectively between [0,t]. Since they start from the same initial condition, x (t,D) x(t,D) = eAt0teAB[u*u]d We claim that for small enough t it is possible to switch u appropriately so that 53

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eAt0teAB[u*u]d = 0 (A,B)((A+A)(B+B)) Since e At is invertible always, it is enough to prove that 0teAB[u*u]d = 0. Let t be small enough so that e At can be considered constant over [0,t]. We now propose to switch each component of u{u 1 ,u 2 ,.,u m } once between K during [0,t]. The interval before the switch we denote by t i1 and the interval after the switch by t i2 corresponding to the i th input u i The switching times have to add up to the total time t, i.e., t i1 + t i2 = t. Hence: 0teAB[u*u]d = e At Bu11t11 + u12t12 u21t21 + u22t22... um1tm1 + um2tm2 Where uij = ui ui (i = 1,2,m) and j = 1 denoted the time interval before the switch and j=2 implies the time after the switch. Clearly, we can choose the switching times so as to make u i1 t i1 + u i2 t i2 = 0 for every i{1,2,.m}. This proves that at time instant t we can make x (t,D) x(t,D) = 0 irrespective of the value of the uncertainty D(DA,DB), by switching each input once. The total number of switches required for all the inputs is exactly m. This does not guarantee that x (,D) = x(,D) for all [0,t] D. However because of the absolute continuity of x(t,D), by choosing t small enough we can guarantee that ||x (t,D) x(t,D)|| for any given 54

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Recall that the optimal open loop interval is always finite. Hence the optimal interval [0,t f ] can be split into arbitrarily small sub-intervals to form a partition P{0,t 1 ,t 2 ,.,t p ,t f }. We can use the above method for each subintervals [t i ,t i+1 ], (i=1,,p) so that x (t i ,D) = x(t i ,D) D for each t i P. Also by making the partition P fine enough, we can make ||x (,D) x(,D)|| ((t i ,t i+1 )) for any given It follows easily that ||x(t,D)|| M + for t[0,t f ] and D. Over intervals where some components of z(s) are 0, the above lemma provides an approximation of the optimal solution with a bang-bang input. The approximation holds irrespective of the value of the uncertainty and hence guarantees that every state trajectory remains within the allowed error bound for the maximal period. Moreover, since the approximation is being done by a bang-bang function, all the computational advantages corresponding to a bang-bang solution are inherited by u. In general, for an accurate approximation, the number of switches required for u may be high. However for practical purposes, the required number of switches may be computed by repeatedly calculating the maximal time for increasing number of switches. The iteration should stop when no appreciable improvement occurs with the increase in the number of switches. We consider Example 6.13 again to show that the non-bang-bang optimal input can be effectively approximated by a bang-bang signal, as is predicted by Lemma 6.14. The approximating bang-bang input has a total of sixteen switches. Corresponding to each uncertainty value of the pole a, the state trajectory with the actual optimal input is approximated by the trajectory resulting from the bang-bang input. To see this the reader need to compare the following figures with Figures 6-1 and 6-2. A slight relaxation of the error bound beyond M=1.96 allows for an identical maximal time of 3.7 seconds. 55

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Figure 6-3: Approximate bang-bang input: 16 switches Figure 6-4: Trajectories for ten different uncertainty values of a; M = 1.96, t f = 3.69 56

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CHAPTER 7 CONDITIONS FOR A PURELY BANG-BANG SOLUTION Though the necessary condition derived in Theorem 6.11 hints that the optimal solution may be bang-bang, we could not rule out the possibility that some components of the switching function z(s) could be zero over sub-intervals of [0,1]. In fact we discussed a case where this is the case and the optimal solution is clearly not bang-bang. Furthermore, we proposed a method in which a non-bang-bang optimal input may be approximated by a high frequency bang-bang input. However it would be interesting to know whether there are conditions under which the optimal solution itself is purely bang-bang. For this we need to investigate two important questions about the switching function z(s). Firstly, we need to find conditions under which each component of the switching function z(s) is non-zero almost everywhere. Moreover we need to estimate number of zero crossings of the components of the function z(s). The following assumptions were found sufficient to guarantee a purely bang-bang solution to Problem 4.4. Assumptions 7.1: The uncertainty bound d is small. The input bound K is sufficiently small with respect to the error bound M. The system is controllable from each input for some value of the uncertain pair (A,B). We first prove that all the components of the function z(s) cannot be identically zero over the entire interval [0,1] for small uncertainties on the A and B matrices. Lemma 7.2: If the maximum disturbance d is small, the function z j (s):[0,1]R cannot be zero -a.e. on [0,1] for all j{1,,m}. Proof: According to Theorem 6.11, for = 57

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DT2((v*,*);(v v*))(dp) = 0 z(s)(v(s)v*(s))(ds). Assume that z(s) = 0 a.e. on [0,1]. Then DT2((v*,*);(v v*))(dp) = 0 for any -measurable v(s). Now, for = the expression for DT 2 ((v );(v v )) may be simplified as follows : DT 2 ((v );(v v )) = yT(*,v*) 0e*A(s) *B(v(s)v*(s))ds = yT(*,v*) 0e*A(s) *Bv(s)ds 0e*A(s) *Bv*(s)ds = yT(*,v*)e*A x0 + 0e*A(s) *Bv(s)ds y(*,v*) = yT(*,v*) {} y(*,v) y(*,v*) Now the support of was determined to be the set = {(,A,B)P: y T (,A,B;v )y(,A,B;v ) = M}. Hence the integral expression simplifies to: DT2((v*,*);(v v*))(dp) = yT(*v*)y(*v)(ddAdB) M (ddAdB) = yT(*v*)y(*v)(ddAdB) M According to our assumption: (7.3) yT(*v*)y(*v)(ddAdB) = M for every -measurable v(t). Hence for v(t) = 0 for t[0,1] we have: (7.4) yT(*v*)eA*t x0 (ddAdB) = M. Next we use some Dirac delta and Dirac delta derivatives for v(t) to try to bring every trajectory to near zero. While these functions are not strictly -measurable, they can be thought of as the 58

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limits of very high amplitude measurable functions and the proof is considerably simplified as a result. Moreover, note that under the assumption of xT0x0 M, and by the definition of z(s) can be expressed as the following power series in s in a small enough neighborhood about s = 0. z(s) = yT(,A,B')e*A B(dA,dB,d) + s yT(,A,B')e*A *AB(dA,dB,d) + + s22! yT(,A,B')e*A A2B(dA,dB,d) + .. It follows that z(s) is analytic in a small enough neighborhood about s = 0 and hence the assumption that z(s) = 0 -a.e. implies that z(0) = 0. Choose v(t) = [(0) (0) n (0)] C 1 x 0 Since z(0) = 0, (7.3) is valid for such a v(t). Then: y(0+) = x 0 [ (B+D B ) (A+D A )(B+D B ) .. (A+D A )n(B+D B ) ] C 1 x 0 = [D B AD B +D A B ]C 1 x0 Hence with this input (7.3) yields: (7.5) yT(*v*)eA*t [DB ADB +DAB ]C1 x0 = M Assuming that D A and D B are small the left hand side of the above equation can be approximated by: yT(*v*)eA*t [DB ADB +DAB ]C1 x0 where D A and D B are average values with respect to the measure If we divide the above expression by the maximum allowed scalar disturbance, d (recall ||D A || d and ||D B || d (D A ,D B )), then [D B AD B +D A B ]C 1 x 0 = d [ h 1 Ah 2 + h 3 B ..] C 1 x 0 59

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where each element of the matrices h i lies between [-1,1]. Hence for any measure and independent of the maximum disturbance d, the following upper bound holds: [ h 1 Ah 2 + h 3 B ..] C 1 x 0 k 1 x 0 where k 1 is a large enough scalar. yT(*v*)eA*t [DB ADB +DAB ]C1 x0 dk 1 yT(*v*)eA*t x0 dk 1 M (by Equation 7.4) Now as d 0 Equation 7.5 cannot be satisfied. Hence we have a contradiction. Lemma 7.2 shows that at least one component zj(s) of the function z(s) is non-zero over some part of [0,1]. The optimal solution is bang-bang over those subintervals. In the following lemma we prove that if the input bound K is small enough compared to the allowed error bound M (by Assumption 7.1), then the optimal trajectories hit the boundary only at the end of the optimal interval [0,tf. We will show that this condition is not only enough to make optimal solution always bang-bang, but also provides more information about the zeros of the function z(s). ||.||2 denotes the Euclidean norm below. Lemma 7.6: If for some constants k 2 d 2 and d 1 defined below, (M) 1/2 (||A|| 2 d 1 ) > k 2 (||B|| 2 +d 2 ) K holds, then x T (t)x(t) < M for all D t[0,) and x T ()x() = M for some D. Proof: Recall that J(t) = x T (t)x(t). When some input u(t) is applied to the system, the open loop operation must stop when for some disturbance D=( A B ), the inequality J(t) M is satisfied. Now J(t) is a continuous and differentiable function of t on any interval in [0,). Let J(t 0 ) = M for some t 0 corresponding to some x(t) and D If for every permissible u(t 0 +), .J(t)| t0+ 0, then for every > 0, J(t 0 + ) M and hence = t 0 We derive conditions so that .J (t)| t0+ > 0 for any permissible input and any trajectory satisfying J(t 0 ) = M. 60

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.J (t)| t0+ > 0 x T .x > 0 x T (Ax + Bu) 0. We assumed A to be unstable and hence, by the Lyapunov theorem, x T Ax 0. If x T Bu > 0, then the inequality above is trivially satisfied. Hence we assume that x T Bu 0 and the last inequality becomes: x T (Ax Bu) 0 || xTAx || 2 || x T Bu || 2 || xTAx || 2 ||x|| 2 .||B|| 2 .||u||2 Now there exists 0 k 1 1 such that || xTAx || 2 = k 1 ||x||22.||A|| 2 Let k 2 be the lower bound of the values of k 1 for any value of x(t 0 ) such that x T (t 0 )x(t 0 ) = M and A. Since by assumption ||x T Ax|| 2 0, we claim that k 2 0. This can be seen by noting that ||x T Ax|| 2 M (||A|| 2 + d 2 ). Hence k 2 = xTx=MAinf ||xTAx||M (||A||2+d2) Since the right hand side is continuous in x and A, the infimum is achieved and hence k 2 0. Hence the following implies the last inequality: k 2 ||x||22 ||A|| 2 ||x|| 2 ||B|| 2 ||u|| 2 (M)1/2||A||2||B||2 k 3 K (where k 3 is a constant resulting from the equivalence of norms: recall that ||u|| 2 = k 2 k 3 ||u|| k 2 k 3 K) (M)1/2(||A||2 d1)||B||2 + d2 k 3 K The last implication follows from: ||A|| 2 = || A + D A || 2 ||A|| 2 ||D A || 2 ||A|| 2 d 1 ||B|| 2 = || B + D B || 2 ||B|| 2 + ||D B || 2 ||B|| 2 + d 2 where d 1 ,d 2 are positive constants resulting from the equivalence of norms and the bound d on the uncertainties: ||D A ||, ||D B || d. 61

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The significance of the above lemma is that it provides us with a simple condition when the optimal trajectories will hit the boundary only at one point in time and that time is necessarily at the end of the optimal time interval [0,tf]. It is however evident that more than one trajectory corresponding to different values of the uncertainty (D A ,D B ), can hit the boundary at the same time. Lemma 7.7: Under Assumption 7.1, each z j (s) 0 almost everywhere on (0,1) and the set of zeros of z(s) do not have a limit point in (0,1). Proof: Consider the expression for z(s): z(s) = s1 yT(,A,B')e*A(s) B(dA,dB/) (d). Recall that the support for was defined as = {(A,B,)(A+ A ) (B+ B )[0,1]: y T y = M}. If Lemma 7.6 holds then = { (A,B,)(A+ A ) (B+ B ){1}: y T y = M c } and z(s) can be simplified as follows: z(s) = yT(,A,B')e*A(s) B(dA,dB). Hence for each s the expression for z(s) is given by the following power series expansion: z(s) = yT(1,A,B')e*A B(dA,dB) + s yT(1,A,B')e*A AB(dA,dB) + s22! yT(1,A,B')e*A A2B(dA,dB) + yT(1,A,B')e*A (dA,dB) B + s yT(1,A,B')e*A (dA,dB) AB + s22! yT(1,A,B')e*A (dA,dB) A2B + 62

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The above equality is true since the diameter of A and B are small compared to the variation in e*A as A varies over A Let us denote the coefficients by (X 0 X 1 X 2 .). Hence: X k = yT(1,A,B')e*A (dA,dB) AkB = [ f 1 f 2 f n ]A k B (Where we denote the row matrix created by the integral as [ f 1 f 2 f n ] and n is the order of the system. We stack that coefficients together and expand each X k (7.8) [X 0 X 1 .X k .] = [f 1 f 2 .f n ][B AB .. A k B..] or [X 01 .X 0m | X 11 | | X k1 .] = [f 1 f 2 .f n ][B AB .. A m B..] Now recall Lemma 7.2, which guaranteed that at least one component of z j (s) (j=1,2,,m) is non-zero over at least a subinterval of non-zero measure in [0,1]. Without loss of generality that this is the case with the z 1 (s). Let us write z 1 (s) in terms of the coefficients defined above. z 1 (s) = X 01 + X 11 s + X 21 s 2 + Hence z 1 (s) is analytic and in particular a power series in s over [0,1]. It is well known that a power series is either identically zero or is non-zero almost everywhere in its domain of definition [0,1] (Conway 1978). Since by Lemma 7.2, z 1 (s) is non-zero at least over some interval of non-zero measure in [0,1], it follows that it is non-zero almost everywhere over [0,1]. We now write the coefficients of z 1 (s) in terms of Equation 7.8. [X 01 X 11 X n1 ] = [f 1 f 2 .f n ][C 1 ] Where C 1 is the controllability matrix for the first input. Since z 1 (s) is non-zero, at least one of the coefficients X i1 (i=0,1,.) is non-zero. Hence [f 1 f n ] 0, i.e., at least one among f i (i=1,,n) is non-zero. Recall that by assumption (7.1), the controllability matrices C j 63

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corresponding to each of the m inputs are full rank. Hence at least one among the first n coefficients of each z j (s) (j=1,2,m) is non-zero. This in turn implies that each z j (s) is non-zero almost everywhere on (0,1). This proves that z(s) is a non-zero power series on (0,1). It is well known that zeros of analytic functions cannot include a limit point in its domain of definition. It follows that the only possible limit points in the zeros of z(s) is at s=0,1. Hence proved. From Theorem 7.2 and the above lemma, we conclude that z(s) satisfies the following: z(s)v(s) z(s)v (s) for a.a. s[0,1]. Moreover each component of z(s)0 a.e. on (0,1). Together this implies that for a.a. s[0,1]: v *j (s) = K when zj(s)0 +K when zj(s)0 Hence, the optimal solution is purely bang-bang almost everywhere on (0,1). The value of v (s) is not known over sets of measure zero. These sets are exactly the values of s where some component of the function z(s) = 0. Recall that each zero crossing of any component of the switching function zj(s) (j=1,2m) can potentially imply a switch between the extreme allowed values of the input (K). The number of such points is not finite in general and hence the solution may contain an infinite number of switches or sign changes between the extreme values. However, by Lemma 7.7, the zeroes of z(s), or in other words the switching instants of the optimal input v do not have a limit point in (0,1). The only possible limit points are at s = 0 or 1. This implies that the optimal switching sequence may have become increasingly close together at the very beginning or the end of the optimal open loop interval. However, the open loop interval is always finite. From an engineering viewpoint, the optimal input function may be truncated near the two ends. This will result in a finite number of switches in the optimal input 64

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solution with an arbitrarily small reduction in the maximal open loop time. This will make the computation of the switching times as well as the hardware implementation feasible. Hence the optimal v* may be approximated for every practical purpose, by an implementable function with a finite number of switches. The engineering importance of the numerical simplification in the calculation of the optimal solution cannot be over emphasized. The optimal solution, being bang-bang, is effectively known by the computation of the switching instants. Moreover, a bang-bang solution may be implemented with the most basic in hardware and simplest of algorithms. By a simple example, we demonstrate some of the interesting features of the problem solved above. We choose the same single dimensional system with a single input and with some uncertainty on the pole as was used in Problem 6.13. The state is the output of the system. Let us transcribe Problem 4.4 in terms of this system: Problem 7.9: Find uUmax t f subject to the following constraints: .x(t) = ax(t) + u(t) 0 t tf and |u(t)| 2 x(0) = 1 xT(t)x(t) M for 0 t tf and for all a[1.21.4] We provide a solution to the problem for M = 25. The optimal input in this case has only one switch with the optimal switching instant at 1.3467 seconds. The maximum tf was found to be 5.08 seconds, and in the time interval [0, 5.08 sec], every state trajectory is guaranteed to be within [-5,5]. For a clear understanding of the behavior of the system for different values of the uncertainty we have plotted the corresponding state trajectories for ten different uncertainty values of the pole a. 65

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Figure 7-1: Optimal input has one switch: M = 25, tf = 5.08 Figure 7-2: Trajectories for ten different uncertainty values of a; M = 25, t f = 5.08 66

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CHAPTER 8 CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK Conclusion The problem of maximizing the open loop period of operation of a linear time invariant system with bounded inputs has been considered. The parameters of the controlled system are subject to bounded uncertainties. An optimal controller has been derived that maximizes the time during which the control loop can be left open, while keeping the system error within pre-specified bounds. The existence of such a control signal is first proved among the set of measurable functions. Euler-Lagrange type first order necessary conditions are then derived for calculating the optimal open loop input. It is shown that the time interval, during which the control loop can remain open, is maximized by an input, which may not be purely bang-bang over the entire maximal open loop time. We further showed that in cases where the optimal input was not bang-bang over certain intervals, a purely bang-bang input existed which approximated the optimal input. This is of engineering importance, since the bang-bang nature of the optimal solution makes the computation of switching instants computationally feasible, as opposed to solving the entire dynamic optimization problem numerically. In the general case, the possibility of a high number of switches in the approximate input solution cannot be excluded. However, under the assumption that the input bound is small compared with the allowed error bound on the system, we have shown that the optimal input itself is purely bang-bang. Moreover, the sequence of optimal switching instants does not have a limit point in the interior of the maximal open loop interval. This facilitates the computation of the optimal open loop input. Because of the finiteness of the open loop interval of operation, the optimal input can then be approximated by a piecewise constant input with a finite number of switches. 67

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Future Work The results we have obtained have potential impacts on a number of application areas, including the following. Each of these applications is a potential candidate for future research that is based on the theory developed in this dissertation. Applications Control of Space Vehicles: Space vehicles are frequently faced with intermittent loss of signal due to obstacles in the line of vision, radiation interference, limitations in power, etc. In such situations, it is critical to know how long the system can perform within its specifications without communication with its supervisory center. This question can be directly addressed within the framework of need-based feedback we have developed. Telemetry: Applications in telemetry frequently face the problem of limited power. The method we propose effectively minimizes the communication needed to control a system to a minimum and hence maximizes the longevity of the associated power sources. Stealth Systems: Stealth and spy systems, like unmanned aerial vehicles and similar devices, prefer to reduce communications with their control center so as to reduce the chances of detection. The need-based feedback framework can derive the necessary control feeds to achieve this goal and reduce the probability of detection. Agricultural Systems: Modern agricultural applications, such as soil moisture content control and fertilization control, require complex and expensive feedback processes, as most feedback data has to be collected by human experts testing in the field. Using need-based feedback reduces the frequency and the duration of these field tests, thus reducing costs and improving efficiency. Biotechnology: Biological research often involves culture and preservation of cells and other organic substances under very carefully controlled environments. Regular human 68

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surveillance is necessary and extremely expensive. Our method of reducing feedback can effectively minimize requirements of human surveillance and thus reduce involved costs. Networked Control Systems: It is increasingly common to use shared networks to control geographically separated devices. The inherent unreliability of networks may cause frequent loss of feedback signals for uncertain periods. To guarantee control objectives, it is crucial to have an estimate of how long the system can perform in open loop. Again, this can be answered in the framework of need-based feedback control. Medicine: Applications are also possible in medicine and optimization of drug dosage. Typically patients are treated with drugs at regular intervals while the feedback in terms of its effectiveness is collected after large intervals. The method proposed can be potentially used to guarantee the effectiveness of the drug when measurements are not being made. Moreover the intervals after which the patient needs to be checked may be maximized. Numerical Optimization: The actual computation of the optimal solution presents an interesting problem in numerical optimization. We conjecture that appropriate use of combinatorics may lead to a highly efficient algorithm for calculating the solution. Theoretical Research This problem is closely related to the viscosity solutions of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. It seems that the so-called exit time problem studied widely in relation to min-max dynamic programming is similar to the maximal open loop time studied above. But the inherent non-smoothness of the current solution makes the use of non-standard solutions necessary and hence may present an interesting future direction of research. The theory proposed extends the results on optimal residence time of perturbed control systems. While previous results have been derived in a feedback control setting, we have shown 69

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that investigation in the framework of robust open-loop optimization framework is interesting and relevant to physical situations. A complete theory requires further research in this direction. Questions about reachability of uncertain dynamical systems are closely intertwined with the problem investigated above. The concept of reachability of uncertain systems clearly depends on whether the system is in open or closed loop. However the correct characterization still needs to be investigated. The problem of stabilizing an unstable system with pre-specified bounds on the inputs is related. Though this is extremely common in most controller design, a satisfactory theory is not yet available. It is thus of practical interest to calculate the minimum input bound required to stabilize an unstable uncertain system. Further theoretical applications of the proposed theory may be found in the areas of stochastic dynamical systems, Lyapunov stability analysis of switched dynamical systems, and convex and non-convex min-max dynamical optimization. 70

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LIST OF REFERENCES A.V. Balakrishnan, Introduction to Optimization Theory in Hilbert Space, Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg, 1971. T. Basar and G.J. Olsder, Dynamic Noncooperative Game Theory, London/New York: Academic Press, 1982. P.R. Bellanger, On the sensitivity of solutions to some optimal control problems, Ph.D. dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, 1964. R. Bellman, Dynamic Programming, Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1957. L.D. Berkovitz, A differential game with no pure strategy solution, Advances in Game Theory, pp. 175-194, 1964, Princeton Univ. Press, Princeton, N.J. L.D. Berkovitz, Necessary conditions for optimal strategies in a class of differential games and control problems, SIAM J. Control, 5, 1967, pp. 1-24. L.D. Berkovitz, A variational approach to differential games, Advances in Game Theory, Annals of Math. Study 52, Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1964, pp. 127-174. A.E. Bryson, Jr. and Y.C. Ho, Applied Optimal Control, Blaisdell, 1969. R.M. Cannon, Jr. and E. Schmitz, Initial experiments on the endpoint control of a flexible one-link robot, Int. J. Robotics Res., Vol. 3, pp. 62-75, Fall 1984. J.B. Conway, Functions of One Complex Variable, Springer, 1978. R.J. Elliot and N. Kalton, The existence of value in differential games Mem. Amer. Math. Soc. 126, 1972. R.J. Elliot, N. Kalton and L. Markus, Saddle points for linear differential games SIAM J. Control Optimization, Vol. 11, pp. 100-112, 1973. B.P. Eng, Microprocessor based servo control for gun fire control, in Proc. IEEE IECI Annual Conf., Philadelphia, PA, Mar. 1979, pp. 329-333. A.A. Feldbaum, "Dual control theory, parts I and II", Automation and Remote Control, Vol. 21, No. 9, April 1961, pp. 874-880 and Vol. 21, No. 11, May 1961, pp. 1033-1039. (Russian originals dated September 1960, 1240-1249 and November 1960, pp. 1453-1464) A.A. Feldbaum, Optimal Control Systems, New York: Academic Press, 1965. A.F. Filippov, Differential equations with discontinuous right-hand side, Amer. Math. Soc. Transl., Ser 2, 42, pp. 199-231, Providence, R.I., 1964. W.H. Fleming, The convergence problem for differential games, Journal of Mathematical Analysis and Applications, 3, pp. 102-116, 1961. 71

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W.H. Fleming, The convergence problem for differential games, Advances in Game Theory, pp. 195-210, 1964, Princeton Univ. Press, Princeton, N.J. A. Friedman, Differential Games, John Wiley, 1971. R.V. Gamkrelidze, On some extremal problems in the theory of differential equations with applications to the theory of optimal control, J. SIAM, Ser. A Control 3, 1965, pp. 106-128. P.R. Halmos, A Hilbert Space Problem Book, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1982. N. Halyo, Terminal area automatic navigation, guidance, and control research using the microwave landing system. Part 5-Design and development of digital automated landing system for steep final approach using modern control techniques, NASA Contract Rep. 3681, Apr. 1983. M.W. Hirsch and S. Smale, Differential Equations, Dynamical Systems, and Linear Algebra, Academic Press, 1974. Y.C. Ho, A.E. Bryson, Jr., and S. Baron, Differential games and optimal pursuit-evasion strategies," IEEE Trans. Automatic Control, vol. AC-10, pp. 385-389, October 1965. D.R. Howard and Z.V. Rekasius, Error analysis with the maximum principle, IEEE Trans. Automatic Control, vol. AC-9, pp. 223-229, July 1964. R. Isaacs, Differential Games, New York: Wiley, 1965. R. Isaacs, Differential games III, Research Memorandum RM-1411, The RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, California, 1954. D.L. Kelendzheridze, On the theory of optimal pursuit, Soviet Math. Dokl., 2, 1961, pp. 654-656. A.J. Koivuniemi, Parameter optimization in systems subject to worst (bounded) disturbance, IEEE Trans. Automatic Control, vol. AC-11, pp. 427-433, July 1966. A.N. Kolmogorov and S.V. Fomin, Elements of the Theory of Functions and Functional Analysis, Vol 1 and 2, Graylock Press, Rochester, New York, 1957 and 1961. N.N. Krasovskii and A.I. Subbotin, Game Theoretic Control Problems, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1974. Y.S. Ledyaev and E.F. Mishchenko, Extrema1 problems in the theory of differential games, Proceedings Steklov Inst. Math., 185, pp. 165-191, 1990. Y.S. Ledyaev and E.F. Mishchenko, Optimization conditions for strategies in differential games of fixed duration, Differential Equations, 23, 1988, pp. 175-184 72

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Y.S. Ledyaev, Optimality conditions for feedback controls in problems of control under disturbance, Proceedings of the 33 rd Conference on Decision and Control, Lake Buena Vista, FL, December 1994. Y.S. Ledyaev, The maximum principle for optimal strategies in differential games, Soviet Math. Dokl., 40, pp. 545-549, 1990. Y.S. Ledyaev, On optimal strategies in differential games of fixed duration, Soviet Math. Dokl., 33, pp. 78-80, 1986. L.A. Liusternik and V.J. Sobolev, Elements of Functional Analysis, Frederick Ungar, New York, 1961. D.G. Luenberger, Optimization by Vector Space Methods, Wiley, New York, 1969. S.M. Meerkov and T. Runolfsson, Residence Time Control, IEEE Transactions On Automatic Control, Vol. 33, No. 4, April 1988. E.F. Mishchenko and L. S. Pontryagin, "Linear differential games," Soviet Math. Dokl., 174,. No. 1, 1967, pp. 654-656. E.F. Mishchenko, Pursuit and evasion problems in differential games, Eng. Cybernetics, 9 (1971), no. 5, 787--791 L.A. Montestruque and P.J. Antsaklis, Stability of model-based networked control systems with time-varying transmission times, IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, Special Issue on Networked Control Systems, Vol. 49, No. 9, pp.1562-1572, September 2004. G.N. Nair, F. Fagnani, S. Zampieri and R. J. Evans, Feedback Control under Data Rate Constraints: an Overview, to appear in Proceedings of the IEEE (special issue on The Emerging Technology of Networked Control Systems), 2007. L.W. Neustadt, An abstract variational theory with applications to a broad class of optimization problems I, general theory, SIAM. J. Control, 4, 1966, pp. 505-527. L.W. Neustadt, An abstract variational theory with applications to a broad class of optimization problems II, applications, SIAM. J. Control, 5, 1967, pp. 90-137. J.C. Panetta and K.R. Fister, Optimal control applied to competing chemotherapeutic cell-kill strategies, SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics, Vol. 63, No. 6, 2003. L.S. Pontryagin, V.G. Boltyansky, R.V. Gamkrelidze and E.F. Mishchenko, The Mathematical Theory of Optimal Processes, Interscience Publishers John Wiley & Sons Inc., New York-London, 1962 L.S. Pontryagin, "On the theory of differential games", Russ. Math. Surv., 1966, 21 (4),pp. 193-246. 73

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L. Pontryagin, Linear differential games. I, II, Soviet Math. Dokl., 175, 1967 pp. 764-766 W. Rudin, Real and Complex Analysis, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1966. R.E. Skelton, Precise pointing control of space vehicles with momentum exchange controllers, Sperry Rand Rep. SP-250-754, 1973. R.B. Vinter, Minimax optimal control, SIAM Journal of Control and Optimization, Vol. 44, No 3, pp 939-968, 2005. R.B. Vinter, Optimal Control, Birkhauser, Boston, 2000. G. Walsh, H. Ye, and L. Bushnell, Stability analysis of networked control systems, Proceedings of American Control Conference, June 1999. J. Warga, Minimax problems and unilateral curves in the calculus of variations, J. SIAM, Ser. A, Control 3, pp. 91-105, 1965. J. Warga, Optimal Control of Differential and Functional Equations, Academic Press, New York, 1972. J. Warga, On a class of minimax control problems in the calculus of variations, Michigan Math. Journal, 12, 1965, pp. 289-311. J. Warga, Unilateral and minimax control problems defined by integral equations, SIAM J. Control, 8, 1970, pp. 372-382. J. Warga, On a class of pursuit and evasion problems, J. Differential Equations, 9, 1971, pp. 155-167. J. Warga, Conflicting and minimax controls, J. Math. Anal. Appl., 33, 1971, pp. 655-673. S. Willard, General Topology, Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA, 1970. H.S. Witsenhausen, A minimax control linear problem for sampled systems, IEEE Transactions On Automatic Control, Vol. AC-13, No. 1, February 1968. L.C. Young, Generalized curves and the existence of an attained absolute minimum in the calculus of variations, C. R. Sci. Lettres Varsovie, C III 30 (1937), 212-234. L.C. Young, Lectures on the Calculus of Variations and Optimal Control Theory, W. B. Saunders, Philadelphia, 1969. E. Zeidler, Nonlinear Functional Analysis and its Applications III Springer-Verlag, New York, 1985. P.V. Zhivogyladov and R.H. Middleton, Networked control design for linear systems, Automatica, 39, pp. 743-750, 2003. 74

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH Debraj Chakraborty was born in Calcutta, India. He earned his Bachelor of Engineering degree from Jadavpur University, Calcutta, in 2001. After completing his master's degree in electrical e ngineering from the Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, in 2003, he joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Florida, Gainesville, USA. He completed his Ph.D. in electrical and computer engineering in 2007, under the guidance of Dr. Jacob Hamme r at the University of Florida. From 2003 to 2007, he was appointed an Alumni Fellow at the University of Florida. 75


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