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Group Title: Bulletin - University of Florida. Division of Agricultual Extension ; no. 19
Title: Farm and home makers' clubs
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF90000447/00001
 Material Information
Title: Farm and home makers' clubs
Series Title: Bulletin
Alternate Title: Farm and homemakers' clubs
Physical Description: 8 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turner, A. A
Publisher: University of Florida, Division of Agricultural Extension
Place of Publication: <Gainesville Fla.>
Publication Date: 1919
 Subjects
Subject: Home demonstration work -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural extension work -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Home economics extension work -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African American home economics extension workers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by A.A. Turner.
General Note: "March, 1919".
Funding: Bulletin (University of Florida. Agricultural Extension Division) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF90000447
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002569493
oclc - 47285149
notis - AMT5796

Table of Contents
    Historic note
        Historic note
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Objects
            Page 2
        Farm makers' clubs
            Page 2
            Page 3
            Page 4
        Adult clubs
            Page 4
        Club meetings
            Page 4
        Joint club meetings
            Page 5
            Page 4
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida






Bulletin No. 19


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL
EXTENSION AND UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT
OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATING
P. H. ROLFS, Director



FARM AND HOME MAKERS' CLUBS
By A. A. TURNER
Manager Club Agent
The farm and home makers' clubs in Florida provide es-
pecially for the training of negro boys and girls of the farms,
thru practical demonstrations. Pioneer work of this kind was
begun in October 1915 under the supervision of the United


Fig. 1.-Jenkins Carter, Jr. of Gadsden county, first prize winner in Farm
Makers' clubs. Record: 711/ bushels of corn on one acre


March, 1919







Florida Cooperative Extension


States Department of Agriculture and University of Florida
cooperating. Headquarters for the work are at the Florida
A. & M. College, Tallahassee.
Farm and home makers' clubs were organized in four coun-
ties in 1915. The organization has had a steady development,
and in 1919 there are 18 counties well organized. The manager
club agent conducted the work alone the first year, but at
present there are 12 men and 17 women assistant agents working
in the counties where clubs are organized. The number of boys
and girls enrolled the first year was necessarily small, but each
year has marked an increase until there were 2122 active mem-
bers in 1918.
Farm and home makers' clubs furnish a direct medium thru
which instruction may be given to a great number of people who
need it. The teaching of better methods of agriculture and home
making is carried to the homes.
Hearty cooperation from various sources has made the
organization a permanent one. It offers a definite field of in-
struction and unlimited opportunities for the farm boy and girl.

OBJECTS
The principal objects of farm and home makers' clubs are:
1. To train the boys and girls in the activities of rural life.
2. To encourage boys and girls to form the habit of reading by
furnishing them interesting literature on club work.
3. To bring the school life of the boy and girl into closer relationship
with the home life.
4. To enlist the cooperation of the progressive rural school teacher
in improving farm life.
5. To encourage farm boys and girls to prepare themselves to enter
the regular or short courses at the Florida A. & M. College.
FARM MAKERS' CLUBS
Boys between ten and eighteen years of age may join the
farm makers' club. A boy may be a member of the farm makers'
club by cultivating a half acre of corn, or a fourth acre of pea-
nuts, or a fourth acre of sweet potatoes, or by keeping a pig and
growing the necessary feeds. This, however, does not qualify
him to compete in county and state prize contests.
To be entitled to compete for prizes, a first year boy must
agree to grow all of the crops mentioned. In addition to his
demonstration plot he may keep one or more pigs, if he chooses,
to consume the crops. This also teaches him how to market his
crops by feeding them to livestock.







Florida Cooperative Extension


States Department of Agriculture and University of Florida
cooperating. Headquarters for the work are at the Florida
A. & M. College, Tallahassee.
Farm and home makers' clubs were organized in four coun-
ties in 1915. The organization has had a steady development,
and in 1919 there are 18 counties well organized. The manager
club agent conducted the work alone the first year, but at
present there are 12 men and 17 women assistant agents working
in the counties where clubs are organized. The number of boys
and girls enrolled the first year was necessarily small, but each
year has marked an increase until there were 2122 active mem-
bers in 1918.
Farm and home makers' clubs furnish a direct medium thru
which instruction may be given to a great number of people who
need it. The teaching of better methods of agriculture and home
making is carried to the homes.
Hearty cooperation from various sources has made the
organization a permanent one. It offers a definite field of in-
struction and unlimited opportunities for the farm boy and girl.

OBJECTS
The principal objects of farm and home makers' clubs are:
1. To train the boys and girls in the activities of rural life.
2. To encourage boys and girls to form the habit of reading by
furnishing them interesting literature on club work.
3. To bring the school life of the boy and girl into closer relationship
with the home life.
4. To enlist the cooperation of the progressive rural school teacher
in improving farm life.
5. To encourage farm boys and girls to prepare themselves to enter
the regular or short courses at the Florida A. & M. College.
FARM MAKERS' CLUBS
Boys between ten and eighteen years of age may join the
farm makers' club. A boy may be a member of the farm makers'
club by cultivating a half acre of corn, or a fourth acre of pea-
nuts, or a fourth acre of sweet potatoes, or by keeping a pig and
growing the necessary feeds. This, however, does not qualify
him to compete in county and state prize contests.
To be entitled to compete for prizes, a first year boy must
agree to grow all of the crops mentioned. In addition to his
demonstration plot he may keep one or more pigs, if he chooses,
to consume the crops. This also teaches him how to market his
crops by feeding them to livestock.







Florida Cooperative Extension


States Department of Agriculture and University of Florida
cooperating. Headquarters for the work are at the Florida
A. & M. College, Tallahassee.
Farm and home makers' clubs were organized in four coun-
ties in 1915. The organization has had a steady development,
and in 1919 there are 18 counties well organized. The manager
club agent conducted the work alone the first year, but at
present there are 12 men and 17 women assistant agents working
in the counties where clubs are organized. The number of boys
and girls enrolled the first year was necessarily small, but each
year has marked an increase until there were 2122 active mem-
bers in 1918.
Farm and home makers' clubs furnish a direct medium thru
which instruction may be given to a great number of people who
need it. The teaching of better methods of agriculture and home
making is carried to the homes.
Hearty cooperation from various sources has made the
organization a permanent one. It offers a definite field of in-
struction and unlimited opportunities for the farm boy and girl.

OBJECTS
The principal objects of farm and home makers' clubs are:
1. To train the boys and girls in the activities of rural life.
2. To encourage boys and girls to form the habit of reading by
furnishing them interesting literature on club work.
3. To bring the school life of the boy and girl into closer relationship
with the home life.
4. To enlist the cooperation of the progressive rural school teacher
in improving farm life.
5. To encourage farm boys and girls to prepare themselves to enter
the regular or short courses at the Florida A. & M. College.
FARM MAKERS' CLUBS
Boys between ten and eighteen years of age may join the
farm makers' club. A boy may be a member of the farm makers'
club by cultivating a half acre of corn, or a fourth acre of pea-
nuts, or a fourth acre of sweet potatoes, or by keeping a pig and
growing the necessary feeds. This, however, does not qualify
him to compete in county and state prize contests.
To be entitled to compete for prizes, a first year boy must
agree to grow all of the crops mentioned. In addition to his
demonstration plot he may keep one or more pigs, if he chooses,
to consume the crops. This also teaches him how to market his
crops by feeding them to livestock.







Farm and Home Makers' Clubs


In addition to planting all of these crops, second year boys
who wish to compete for prizes are required to keep one or more
pigs.
Each boy may grow the three crops on a single acre, or
if the soil is not suitable for all crops, he may grow them sep-
arately in different fields. Care is taken to have the exact
amount of ground required in the plot selected.
Each club member is required to have two disinterested
persons verify the measurement of the ground as well as the
crops, also sign the reports.
HOME MAKERS' CLUBS
Girls between ten and eighteen years of age may join the
hame makers' clubs. A member is required to cultivate one
tenth of an acre of land, one half of this land to be planted in
tomatoes, one fourth in okra and one fourth in beans. After
harvesting these crops, the plot is to be planted to such vegetables
as will be found most profitable for a fall garden.
All vegetables raised are to be used upon the home table,
canned, or preserved. An accurate record must be kept of all
produce raised and of the year's work.
















Fig. 2.-Home Makers' club, Washington county
A first year girl may have poultry if she desires, but the
keeping of poultry is required of a second year girl who wishes
to compete for the state prize. The minimum requirement shall
be the incubation of at least one setting of purebred eggs and
the rearing of the resulting brood to maturity.







Florida Cooperative Extension


All club members, boys and girls, must follow to the best
of their ability the instruction given by agents of the farm and
home makers' clubs, as well as thru letters, circulars and bul-
letins.
ADULT CLUBS
The agents have spent a portion of their time working
among the adults, demonstrating and advising various methods
of improving the farm and home.
The use of improved machinery, labor saving devices in
the home, the importance of using field selected seed, and the
advantages of keeping better breeds of livestock and poultry are
some of the things stressed.
As a result of farm and home makers' club work, negro
farmers have become interested in improvements in their homes,
and are making them more sanitary and attractive.

CLUB MEETINGS
Club meetings are held monthly, at the school house or some
other central point in the community. These meetings are in
charge of the assistant agent of each county. The members
receive such instruction as may be necessary, and study the bul-
letins and other literature relative to the club work. Special
lectures are provided whenever possible.
While in the community, the agents inspect the plots of
the club members, visiting the homes for the purpose of giving
personal assistance with crops, livestock, and in the home.

JOINT CLUB MEETINGS
The manager club agent holds a joint meeting in each
county once every three months, for the purpose of stimulating
general interest among club members, also to visit the county
assistant agents and give them definite instructions for handling
their county problems. The best results have been obtained by
dividing the county into two sections, giving one day to each
section. Equipment necessary for demonstrations is carried to
those who do not get to attend the annual short course at the
Florida A. & M. College.
The programs frequently include lecturers from the Col-
lege of Agriculture and the United States Department of Agri-
culture.







Florida Cooperative Extension


All club members, boys and girls, must follow to the best
of their ability the instruction given by agents of the farm and
home makers' clubs, as well as thru letters, circulars and bul-
letins.
ADULT CLUBS
The agents have spent a portion of their time working
among the adults, demonstrating and advising various methods
of improving the farm and home.
The use of improved machinery, labor saving devices in
the home, the importance of using field selected seed, and the
advantages of keeping better breeds of livestock and poultry are
some of the things stressed.
As a result of farm and home makers' club work, negro
farmers have become interested in improvements in their homes,
and are making them more sanitary and attractive.

CLUB MEETINGS
Club meetings are held monthly, at the school house or some
other central point in the community. These meetings are in
charge of the assistant agent of each county. The members
receive such instruction as may be necessary, and study the bul-
letins and other literature relative to the club work. Special
lectures are provided whenever possible.
While in the community, the agents inspect the plots of
the club members, visiting the homes for the purpose of giving
personal assistance with crops, livestock, and in the home.

JOINT CLUB MEETINGS
The manager club agent holds a joint meeting in each
county once every three months, for the purpose of stimulating
general interest among club members, also to visit the county
assistant agents and give them definite instructions for handling
their county problems. The best results have been obtained by
dividing the county into two sections, giving one day to each
section. Equipment necessary for demonstrations is carried to
those who do not get to attend the annual short course at the
Florida A. & M. College.
The programs frequently include lecturers from the Col-
lege of Agriculture and the United States Department of Agri-
culture.







Florida Cooperative Extension


All club members, boys and girls, must follow to the best
of their ability the instruction given by agents of the farm and
home makers' clubs, as well as thru letters, circulars and bul-
letins.
ADULT CLUBS
The agents have spent a portion of their time working
among the adults, demonstrating and advising various methods
of improving the farm and home.
The use of improved machinery, labor saving devices in
the home, the importance of using field selected seed, and the
advantages of keeping better breeds of livestock and poultry are
some of the things stressed.
As a result of farm and home makers' club work, negro
farmers have become interested in improvements in their homes,
and are making them more sanitary and attractive.

CLUB MEETINGS
Club meetings are held monthly, at the school house or some
other central point in the community. These meetings are in
charge of the assistant agent of each county. The members
receive such instruction as may be necessary, and study the bul-
letins and other literature relative to the club work. Special
lectures are provided whenever possible.
While in the community, the agents inspect the plots of
the club members, visiting the homes for the purpose of giving
personal assistance with crops, livestock, and in the home.

JOINT CLUB MEETINGS
The manager club agent holds a joint meeting in each
county once every three months, for the purpose of stimulating
general interest among club members, also to visit the county
assistant agents and give them definite instructions for handling
their county problems. The best results have been obtained by
dividing the county into two sections, giving one day to each
section. Equipment necessary for demonstrations is carried to
those who do not get to attend the annual short course at the
Florida A. & M. College.
The programs frequently include lecturers from the Col-
lege of Agriculture and the United States Department of Agri-
culture.








Farm and Home Makers' Clubs


SHORT COURSES
A short course for club members and men and women has
been held at the Florida A. & M. College during the first week
in December each year. Scholarships were given those boys and
girls making the best records in their respective counties.
A program covering such subjects as are of interest was car-
ried out by lecturers and agents in the Extension Service.
The College makes necessary provision for the care of these
club members at this time. Many of the boys and girls qualified
to enter college decide to return for the regular college course
later on.
PRIZE CONTESTS
To encourage efficiency among the club members, prizes
are given to those boys and girls who do the best work. During
1918, state and county fairs, boards of trade, banks, business
men and individuals donated $345.50, which was awarded in
prizes and scholarships.
The boy and girl making the best showing in each county
received a scholarship to the short course at the Florida A. & M.
College the first week in December. This included railroad fare
from the club member's home to Tallahassee and return, and
board and lodging.
For the boys, three state prizes are offered this year, as
follows: First, a registered Duroc Jersey pig about eight
months old; second, a registered pig three months old; third,
$15 in gold.
The three state prizes offered for girls are: First, a coop
of purebred chickens consisting of four pullets and a cock;
second, two pullets and cock; third, $15 in gold.
Boys and girls winning state prizes and competing for
county prizes also are awarded the state prize only. In such
cases the county first prize is awarded to the boy or girl making
the second best showing in that county.

METHODS OF AWARDING PRIZES
In awarding prizes the following basis is being used:
percent
(a) Greatest yield per acre...... ... ................. ......... 30
(b) Best exhibit ............ ........ ......... ...... ........ ..... ........... ...... ... 20
(c) Best written account, showing history of the crop and how
to select seed ............ ....~.... ................. ........ ..... .... .. 20
(d) Best showing of profit on investment based on the commer-
cial price of crop ....................... ................ .... ................. 30







Florida Cooperative Extension


All club members, boys and girls, must follow to the best
of their ability the instruction given by agents of the farm and
home makers' clubs, as well as thru letters, circulars and bul-
letins.
ADULT CLUBS
The agents have spent a portion of their time working
among the adults, demonstrating and advising various methods
of improving the farm and home.
The use of improved machinery, labor saving devices in
the home, the importance of using field selected seed, and the
advantages of keeping better breeds of livestock and poultry are
some of the things stressed.
As a result of farm and home makers' club work, negro
farmers have become interested in improvements in their homes,
and are making them more sanitary and attractive.

CLUB MEETINGS
Club meetings are held monthly, at the school house or some
other central point in the community. These meetings are in
charge of the assistant agent of each county. The members
receive such instruction as may be necessary, and study the bul-
letins and other literature relative to the club work. Special
lectures are provided whenever possible.
While in the community, the agents inspect the plots of
the club members, visiting the homes for the purpose of giving
personal assistance with crops, livestock, and in the home.

JOINT CLUB MEETINGS
The manager club agent holds a joint meeting in each
county once every three months, for the purpose of stimulating
general interest among club members, also to visit the county
assistant agents and give them definite instructions for handling
their county problems. The best results have been obtained by
dividing the county into two sections, giving one day to each
section. Equipment necessary for demonstrations is carried to
those who do not get to attend the annual short course at the
Florida A. & M. College.
The programs frequently include lecturers from the Col-
lege of Agriculture and the United States Department of Agri-
culture.







Florida Cooperative Extension


The exhibits must consist of well selected ears of corn, one
half peck of potatoes, one half peck of peanuts and three vines
with the nuts.


Fig. 3.-Joint meeting of Farm and Home Makers' clubs, Madison county

The girls' exhibits must consist of one dozen tin cans and
one dozen glass jars of vegetables and fruits, and samples of
their jellies, preserves, dried products and such other work as
was accomplished during the season.
All compositions written by the club members are forwarded
to the office of manager club agent by December 1. It is recom-
mended that the teacher correct the compositions before sending
them in.
REPORT FOR 1918
In 1918 work was carried on in eighteen counties and
supervised by twenty-nine assistant agents who worked an
average of five and one half months. There were enrolled 2,122
boys and girls, of which number 982 sent in their reports. These
reports showed that 17,280 bushels of corn, peanuts and potatoes
were raised by the boys at a net profit of $13,996.80; and 107,100
containers were filled by the girls at a net profit of $5,890.50.
The total value of the crops raised by club members was $34,452.
During the year the manager club agent and county assist-






Farm and Home Makers' Clubs


ant agents held 1,256 meetings and lectured to 44,125 persons;
1,966 plots were supervised; 3,250 visits made to club members
and 2,656 visits made to demonstrators. A distance of 55,404
miles was traveled by rail, auto and team in performing the
field work.
One hundred and five pigs were kept by the boys, who
realized good profits by feeding them the products from their
demonstration plots and then selling the animals for pork. Girls
in many instances kept poultry, with encouraging results. These
two branches of the farm and home makers' clubs will make
rapid development where club members produce an abundance
of feed. It should be the final aim of each club member to suc-
cessfully raise pigs or poultry as a part of their club work.
WINNERS OF STATE PRIZES
James West of Alachua county, who raised 41% bushels of
corn, 121/2 bushels of peanuts, and 491/2 bushels sweet potatoes
on one acre at a net profit of $114.50, was awarded a registered




















Fig. 4.-A Home Makers' club, Leon county
pig valued at $25. This pig was donated by the American Duroc
Jersey Association.
James Hamilton of Gadsden county raised 361/4 bushels
potatoes on one acre at a net profit of $112.98. He was awarded
the $10 in gold, donated by the W. M. Gory Co., Quincy.






Florida Cooperative Extension


Willie Ming of Jackson county raised 311/4 bushels of corn,
13 bushels peanuts and 451/ bushels potatoes on one acre at a
net profit of $98.65, and was awarded a spiked tooth harrow by
the Porter Carroll Hardware Company, Marianna.
Ida Smith of Putnam county filled 1,525 containers from
her tenth acre plot at a net profit of $78.50. She was awarded
a coop of purebred Plymouth Rock (barred) chickens, donated
by the Florida A. & M. College and Mrs. J. F. Neimeyer. This
coop of chickens was valued at $35.
Willie Mae Fields of Gadsden county filled 1,160 containers
from her tenth acre plot at a net profit of $58.75, and was
awarded the $10 in gold donated by the Sumatra Tobacco Com-
pany, Quincy.
Annie Glymp of Marion county filled 840 containers from
her tenth acre plot with a net profit of $42.45. She was awarded
$5.00 donated by the Metropolitan Bank of Ocala.

HOW TO SECURE BULLETINS
Bulletins published by the United States Department of
Agriculture, the University of Florida and the State College for
Women may be secured thru the assistant agents. Any one
may also apply directly to these institutions for such publica-
tions.
TABLE SHOWING COMPARATIVE RESULTS FOR THREE YEARS
S RESULTS ACCOMPLISHED 1916 1917 1918
-boys enrolled .. ......... ............. 132 567 849
Number reporting .......--....-.. 78 175 389
Biggest yield of corn on one acre .... 701/4 73 83/2
A Bushels corn ............ 2652 3366 5760
FARM CRoPs Bushels peanuts ........................ 2112 2688
RAISED Bushels potatoes ........................ 4200 8832
MAKERS' AVERAGE Bushels corn ............. 35 38 30
YIELD Bushels peanuts .............. ..... 38 28
CLUBS PER ACRE Bushels potatoes ......................... 90 92
SCorn .................... $2,386.80 $4,025.75 $ 7,200
VALUE Peanuts ......... .................... 1,855.00 3,360
OF CROPS Potatoes ............ .................. 2,887.50 11,040
S Total value .............. $2,386.801$8,768.25 $ 21,600
Girls enrolled ........... .......................... 687 1273
HOME Number reporting ............................ ........... 263 598
MAKERS' Containers filled ......... ...... ....................... 28276 107,100
CLUBS Value of canned goods-.................-..--.-- .. 3241.40 $ 12,852
Canning outfits purchased ...... .. ... ... ...... 71 355




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