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The Anclote and Pithlachascotee Rivers as water-supply sources ( FGS: Map series 61 )
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF90000314/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Anclote and Pithlachascotee Rivers as water-supply sources ( FGS: Map series 61 )
Series Title: ( FGS: Map series 61 )
Physical Description: 2 maps : col. ; 25 x 24 cm. and 17 x 25 cm. on sheet 61 x 94 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Coble, Ronald W ( Ronald Wimmer )
Geological Survey (U.S.)
Southwest Florida Water Management District (Fla.)
Florida -- Bureau of Geology
Publisher: The Bureau
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1973
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Water-supply -- Maps -- Florida -- Anclote River watershed   ( lcsh )
Water-supply -- Maps -- Florida -- Pithlachascotee River watershed   ( lcsh )
Groundwater -- Maps -- Florida -- Anclote River watershed   ( lcsh )
Groundwater -- Maps -- Florida -- Pithlachascotee River watershed   ( lcsh )
Saltwater encroachment -- Maps -- Florida -- Anclote River   ( lcsh )
Saltwater encroachment -- Maps -- Florida -- Pithlachascotee River   ( lcsh )
Rivers -- Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Water-supply -- 1:160,000 -- Florida -- Anclote River watershed -- 1973   ( local )
Water-supply -- 1:160,000 -- Florida -- Pithlachascotee River watershed -- 1973   ( local )
Groundwater -- 1:160,000 -- Florida -- Anclote River watershed -- 1973   ( local )
Groundwater -- 1:160,000 -- Florida -- Pithlachascotee River watershed -- 1973   ( local )
Saltwater encroachment -- 1:160,000 -- Florida -- Anclote River watershed -- 1973   ( local )
Saltwater encroachment -- 1:160,000 -- Florida -- Pithlachascotee River watershed -- 1973   ( local )
Rivers -- 1:160,000 -- Florida -- 1973   ( local )
Water-supply -- 1:160,000 -- Florida -- Anclote River watershed -- 1973   ( local )
Water-supply -- 1:160,000 -- Anclote River watershed (Fla.) -- 1973   ( local )
Water-supply -- 1:160,000 -- Florida -- Pithlachascotee River watershed -- 1973   ( local )
Water-supply -- 1:160,000 -- Pithlachascotee River watershed (Fla.) -- 1973   ( local )
Groundwater -- 1:160,000 -- Florida -- Anclote River watershed -- 1973   ( local )
Groundwater -- 1:160,000 -- Anclote River watershed (Fla.) -- 1973   ( local )
Groundwater -- 1:160,000 -- Florida -- Pithlachascotee River watershed -- 1973   ( local )
Groundwater -- 1:160,000 -- Pithlachascotee River watershed (Fla.) -- 1973   ( local )
Saltwater encroachment -- 1:160,000 -- Florida -- Anclote River watershed -- 1973   ( local )
Saltwater encroachment -- 1:160,000 -- Anclote River watershed (Fla.) -- 1973   ( local )
Saltwater encroachment -- 1:160,000 -- Florida -- Pithlachascotee River watershed -- 1973   ( local )
Saltwater encroachment -- 1:160,000 -- Pithlachascotee River watershed (Fla.) -- 1973   ( local )
Rivers -- 1:160,000 -- Florida -- 1973   ( local )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
single map   ( marcgt )
Maps   ( lcsh )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by R. W. Coble ; prepared by United States Geological Survey in cooperation with Southwest Florida Water Management District and Bureau of Geology, Florida Department of Natural Resources.
Bibliography: Bibliography.
General Note: Includes text, 6 statistical tables, and 5 graphs.
Funding: Map series (Florida. Bureau of Geology) ;
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001820168
oclc - 07691721
notis - AJP4155
lccn - 80695119 /MAPS
System ID: UF90000314:00001

Full Text



MAP SERIES NO. 61


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
published by BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


THE ANCLOTE AND PITHLACHASCOTEE RIVERS

AS WATER-SUPPLY SOURCES


INTRODUCTION

PURPOSE AND SCOPE

Water for municipal, industrial, domestic, and agricultural use in the
Anclote and Pithlachascotee River basins in west-central Florida (fig. 1)
is withdrawn from the limestone Floridan aquifer, which underlies the
entire region. Demands for water have increased in the last few years,
and alternate sources must be considered to meet the demands of the
future. One alternate source is surface water from the two rivers.
The purposes of this study ame to define the quantity and quality of
water flowing in the Anclote and Pithlachascotee Rivers and to
determine whether the water is suitable and adequate for such uses as:
(1) water supply by direct withdrawal; (2) water supply during dry
periods by diversion into flood-detention areas; and (3) inducing
recharge to the Floridan aquifer.
Both rivers are short and discharge into the Gulf of Mexico. Flow in
their downstream reaches reverses during tidal cycles, and salt water is
mixed with fresh water for several miles upstream from their mouths.
Data on mean discharge, flow duration, and magnitude and
frequency of annual high and low flows are presented for three sites on
each river. Water-quality data are presented also; these include the
delineation of the upstream extent of salt water in each river, chemical
analyses, results of sampling for pesticides, heavy metals, biochemical
oxygen demand and bacteria. The relation between specific
conductance and dissolved solids, hardness, and flow duration is
presented graphically.

DESCRIPTION OF DRAINAGE BASINS

The drainage area of the Anclote River is about 100 square miles.
The basin's easternmost boundary is near U.S. Highway 41 in Pasco
County between Denham and Drexel, and the river's mouth is at
Tarpon Springs in northwestern Pinellas County (fig. 2). The
topographic basin of the Pithlachascotee River encompasses about 200
square miles and extends from Brooksville, in Hernando County,
southwestward to include Crew's Lake, then westward through New
Port Richey and to the Gulf at Port Richey.
Land-surface altitudes in the Anclote River basin range from sea level
at the Gulf to near 80 feet at the basin's easternmost boundary. Highest
altitudes in the Pithlachascotee Basin exceed 250 feet at the east edge
of the basin southeast of Brooksville and east of Masaryktown. A series
of sand hills as high as 60 feet above sea level parallels the Gulf coast
about 2 miles east of the coast line. The topographic relief is 100 to
150 feet in a faulted and eroded ridge area southeast of Brooksville.
The remaining part of the area (about 85 percent) is characterized by
sand-covered flatlands dotted with depressions containing cypress
swamps. Most of these depressions are sinks, which are the surface
expression of solution collapse in the underlying limestone. Small sinks
prevail over the entire surface of both river basins. The largest sinks and
sink complexes are in the upper reaches of the Pithlachascotee
Basin-generally north and northeast of Crew's Lake. Much of the
rainfall here collects in the sink holes and drains into the underlying
Floridan aquifer. Within the aquifer it moves west and northwest to the
coastal areas of northern Pasco and southern Hernando Counties.

STREAMFLOW

Streamflow data presented in this report were collected at sites A-1,
A-3 and A-4 on the Anclote and at sites P-1, P-2, and P-4 on the
Pithlachascotee (fig. 3). As of 1972, records were being collected only
at sites A-4, P-1 and P-4. Sites A-4 on the Anclote is the major (or
reference) site used in this study. Its record was used in developing
graphical streamflow regressions with the other five sites by means
described by Searcy (1960). The degree of correlation between the
reference site and the other five is good, ranging from 0.85 to 0.97.
Streamflow and rainfall generally follow the same pattern. Each year.
on the average, nearly half the 52.55 inches of rain at Tarpon Springs
falls in June, August, and September; 4.26 inches in March, 4.91 inches
in June, and 2.88 inches or less in each of the other months. On the
average, almost 45 percent of the annual discharge of the Anclote River
at site A-4 occurs in August and September, and more than 34 percent
in November through June. Discharge is lowest in May, June,
November, and December. Runoff accounts for about 30 percent of the
rainfall.
The average discharge of the Anclote River at site A-4 near Elfers
from 1947 to 1969 was 83.2 cfs (cubic feet per second) or 1.15 cfsm
(cubic feet per second per square mile). That of the Pithiachascotee
River at site P-4 near New Port Richey was 36.7 cfs (0.202 cfsm) from
1963 to 1969; and is estimated to be 49 cfs (0.270 cfsm) for 1947-69.
Therefore, the 182- square-mile drainage area above site P-4 on the
Pithlachascotee River yields a little more than one-half the discharge
and less than one-fourth as much runoff per square mile as the
72.5-square-mile area above site A-4 on the Anclote River.
The difference in runoff per square mile from the two basins is
related to recharge and discharge of the Floridan aquifer and the
direction of flow in the aquifer. The aquifer is recharged over most of
this region through the permeable material overlying the aquifer and
through sinkholes (Cherry and others, 1970, p. 56). Discharge is mainly
through springs and seeps along the coast and in the lower reaches of
the rivers.
Figure 2 shows the altitude of the potentiometric surface of the
Floridan aquifer in May 1969, and the arrows indicate the direction of
movement of ground water after it infiltrates into the aquifer through
permeable material overlying the aquifer. Water in the aquifer moves
parallel to the axis of the Anclote Basin, nearly parallel to the axis of
the lower part of the Pithlachascotee Basin and discharges to the rivers
in their lower reaches. The direction of ground-water movement is
nearly perpendicular to the axis of the upper part of the
Pithlachascotee Basin, and water moving from the east toward the
upper Pithlachascotee Basin underflows this area and moves on toward
the coast. The water that infiltrates to the Floridan aquifer in the upper
Pithlachascotee Basin also moves westward and discharges near the
coast several miles north of the Pithlachascotee River estuary. Closed
depressions and sinkholes in the upper part of that basin capture a large
part of the storm runoff. This water often evaporates or infiltrates to
the Floridan aquifer and does not reach the lower part of the basin as
streamflow. By this process streamflow in the Pithlachascotee River is
less than what a basin of this size should yield. In mid 1972, wells in
three major well fields-Eldridge-Wilde, Cosme, and Section 21 well
fields-produced on the average 65 mgd (million gallons per day) from
the Floridan aquifer. (See fig. 2 for locations of these well fields.) At
that time. the Tampa, Pasco County, and Starkey well fields were in
various stages of planning and construction and were not taking water
from the aquifer.
As of 1972, some water that had been entering the Anclote River
from the aquifer during low flow was being diverted to wells in the
Eldridge-Wilde field, and the effect of the wells in this and other fields
on the low-flow regimen of the Anclote River has been noted by Cherry
and others (1970, p. 81-86). The base flow of the Anclote River will be
reduced still more when wells in the Pasco County field begin
production, and withdrawals from the Starkey well field will reduce
flow in the lower reaches of both rivers. Production from the Tampa
well field will not affect low flow in either the Anclote or
Pithlachascotee Rivers.

FLOW DURATION

The Anclote at site A-4 and the Pithlachascotee at site P-4 have never
gone dry during the period of record (table 1). The potentiometric
surface of the Floridan aquifer during the dry season (low flow)
intersects the rivers' channels a short distance above these sites, and the
aquifer sustains the flow by outflow from ground-water storage. The
aquifer does not sustain flow in the streams above any of the other
sites, and the streams at all other sites have zero flow at 95 percent
duration. The South Branch of the Anclote (site A-3) has more periods
of zero flow than any other stream studied; it has no flow at 70 percent
duration.


By
L. W. Coble
Prepared by
UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
in cooperation with
SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
and
BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES

TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
1973





FLOW MAGNITUDE AND FREQUENCY

The streams at all sites except A-4 and P-4 (table 2) will have no flow
for 30 days once every 2 years on the average and for 60 days once
every 10 years on the average. Flow in the South Branch of the Anclote
at Odessa site (A-3) will be zero for 60 consecutive days once every 2
years on the average.
The magnitude and frequency of the highest average flow for specific
recurrence intervals are shown in table 3. In contrast to the long periods
of zero flow, the South Branch of the Anclote at Odessa site (A-3)
shows more discharge for all the high flow listed than the other three
tributary streams (sites A-1, P-1, and P-2). Even though the drainage
area of the South Branch at site A-3 is only 25 square miles and the
drainage area above site P-1 is 150 square miles, high flow at A-3 is
almost always twice that at P-1. This illustrates the effect of the many
closed depressions in the upper Pithlachascotee River basin on
discharge.

WATER QUALITY
EXTENT OF SALT WATER

The main water-quality problem in coastal streams is the presence of
salt water in the stream channels because salt water restricts the use of
these stream waters for most off-channel uses.
Chloride content isa a useful criterion for distinguishing the salt
water-fresh water interface, because chloride is the major ion in sea
water. In coastal areas, a rise in the chloride content of fresh water
nearly always indicates that it has become mixed with sea water. The
contrast between the chloride concentrations in the upper and lower
reaches of these coastal streams is great. Concentrations of chloride in
the upper reaches of the Anclote and Pithlachascotee Rivers are
typically less than 100 mg/1 (milligrams per liter), and at the rivers'
mouths, the chloride content ranges from 3,000 mg/1 to 15,000 mg/I. A
chloride content of 250 mg/l is used in this report to distinguish
between fresh and salt water. This value is the upper limit
recommended by the State of Florida for an acceptable public
water-supply source.
The dense salt water forms a wedge that tapers upstream below the
less dense fresh water. Water containing 250 mg/1 of chloride may occur
200 to 10.000 feet farther upstream at the bottom of the stream
channel than at the water surface. The salt-water interface moves
upstream and downstream in response to changes in tides and the
amount of fresh-water discharge. The interface moves upstream during
a flood tide and downstream during ebb tide. High fresh-water
discharge will push the salt water toward the Gulf and flush it from part
of the stream channel. During low flow, flushing does not take place
and the salt-water front moves upstream.
Figure 3 delineates three zones-salt-water zone, transition zone and
fresh-water zone-in the Anclote and Pithlachascotee Rivers. The zones
were defined by determining the position of water with a chloride
content of 250 mg/I at the bottom of the stream channels during high
tide.
Water with a chloride content less than 250 mg/l can be withdrawn
from the fresh-water zone of each river at any time. Water withdrawn
from the salt-water zone nearly always will have a chloride content
greater than 250 mg/L Water withdrawn from the transition zones,
which extend as far as 11 miles upstream from the mouth of the
Anclote River and 6 miles upstream from the mouth of the
Pithlacascotee River, may be fresh or salt depending upon tidal
conditions and the amount of fresh-water discharge. Upstream
withdrawals of fresh water would diminish fresh-water discharge at the
salt-water front; the front could move farther upstream and lengthen
the transition zone. Reversal of flow during tidal cycles occurs as far
upstream as half a mile upstream from A-5 and 1 mile upstream from
P-S. These would be the maximum upstream distances salt water could
occur if all fresh-water discharge were stopped.
If withdrawals of fresh water are desired from the salt-water or
transition zones, a barrier would be required to hold the salt water
downstream. Operation of a barrier would extend the fresh-water zone
downstream to the location of the barrier. Among the barriers that
might be used are a low dam with movable gates or a plastic or rubber
inflatable dam.

FRESH-WATER ZONES

Direct relations between specific conductance and dissolved solids
and hardness of water at sites A-4, P-4 and P-5 are well defined (fig. 4)
as is the inverse relation between stream discharge and specific
conductance at sites A-4 and P-4. The conductance is lower during
storm runoff and higher during base flow when the more mineralized
ground water is the major contribute tothe streamflow. The relation
between discharge and color of water is not well defined, but a direct
relation between them is evident. Colored water is the rule for both
rivers-the color being about that of tea. Color is highest during storm
runoff when organic acids are flushed from swamps and other areas
where decaying plant debris has accumulated. Maximum color
encountered during this study for these sites is in the 200 to 300 range
shown by Kaufman (1969).
On the Pithlachascotee River, the specific conductance of water
flowing past downstream site P-5 is higher than at upstream site P-4
(fig. 5). At site P-4 the specific conductance is generally intermediate
between those for P-4 and P-5. Because site P-5 is at the upstream end
of the transition zone (fig. 3), the specific conductance of water there is
high, more than 550 micromhos, at 98 percent duration.
The relation between specific conductance and dissolved solids and
hardness (fig. 4) can be used min conjunction with the specific
conductance duration curves (fig. 5) to estimate the percentage of time
water of a certain quality can be expected. For example, to determine
when water with a hardness of 100 mg/1 or less is available from the
Anclote River at site A-4, first consult figure 4 which shows that this
hardness corresponds to a specific conductance of about 215
micromhos. Then consult figure 5 which shows the specific
conductance of water at A-4 is equal to or less than 215 micromhos
nearly 60 percent of the time.
Fresh water from both rivers is generally of the calcium bicarbonate
type except during short periods of unusually high surface runoff when
calcium is in combination with sulfate, sulfate chloride, or chloride
(table 4).
Phosphorus and nitrogen are essential for plant growth; in fact,
amounts, especially of phosphorus, in excess of certain limits
encourages algal blooms. Blooms are undesirable in lakes and streams
because the high oxygen-consumption rate from the respiration of
billions of the microscopic plants often reduces the dissolved oxygen
content of the water to cause asphyxiation of other aquatic biota.
Blooms are also unsightly and not only cause undesirable odors but
create problems for persons using or treating such waters. Guidelines
for desirable limits for total phosphorus are 0.1 mg/I for rivers and 0.05
mg/I for streams entering lakes (U.S. Dept. Interior, p. 53). Table 4
shows that total phosphorus at all sites in the fresh-water zones in both
rivers is below the 0.1 mg/I level; but only those on the Pithlachascotee
River were consistently below 0.05 mg/L Therefore, Anclote River
water impounded for any length of time would have a slightly greater
chance of experiencing algal blooms than water impounded from the
Pithlachascotee River.
Phenolic compounds were not detected at either site A-5 or P-4
during high flow, but amounts in excess of the Florida Department of
Pollution Control's criterion for public-water supplies of 0.001 mg/I
were found at both sites during low flow (table 4).
Pesticides, including Aldrin, DDT, DDD, DDE, Dieldrin, Endrin,
Heptachlor, Lindane, 2,4-D, 2,4,5-T, and Silvex were not detected in
the water samples collected in 1971 at site A-5 on February 9 and April
l or at site P-5 on February 10 and March 31.


Criteria for concentrations of arsenic and several heavy metals in
water have been established by the State of Florida. All metals in water
samples listed in table 5 meet those criteria. The upper limit for arsenic
is 50 micrograms per liter, and this amount was reached or approached
in water from both rivers during the high-discharge period of February
1971.
BOD (biochemical oxygen demand) in several water samples taken
during ebb tide from the lower reaches of both rivers, was less than 3
mg/I (table 6). A BOD of this magnitude is expected to result from
natural conditions in a biologically active area such as west-central
Florida. That it is no greater indicates that no large quantity of
decomposable oxygen-demanding material was in the rivers, at least
when the BOD samples were collected.
Total coliform, fecal coliform, and fecal streptococcus bacteria
determinations were made using membrane filter techniques. The total
coliform group, long used as an indicator of pollution from
warm-blooded animals, includes bacteria from non-fecal sources, mainly
types that thrive in the soil. Fecal coliform and fecal streptococcus
bacteria indicate recent pollution from warm-blooded animals. The
ratio of fecal coliform to fecal streptococcus is used to identify the
type of warm-blooded anmmal causing the pollution. Ratios of about 4
indicate a human waste source, and ratios of I or less suggest domestic
animal-waste source.
Because standard tests for coliform and fecal coliform bacteria are
based on several samples collected over a period of time, the few
samples analyzed during this study are not conclusive for judging the
suitability of these streams for water supply. Some single-sample
criteria do exist, and the Florida Department of Pollution Control's
total coliform limit of 2,400/100 ml (individuals per 100 milliliters of
sample) for public-supply sources was approached one time in water
from site A-4. The fecal coliform count of 360/100 ml is near that of
the Federal Water Pollution Control Administration's limit of the
400/100 ml that should not be exceeded in 10 percent of the samples
from a public-supply source (U.S. Dept. of Interior, 1968, p. 12).
Fecal coliform/fecal streptococcus ratios are generally less than 1 and
well below 4. Some minor influence of fecal pollution from humans
may be indicated by ratios of 1.40 and 1.10 at sites A-10 and P-7,
respectively.

SUMMARY

The Anclote and Pithlachascotee Rivers are suitable sources for only
supplemental water supplies, which could be used in conjunction with
ground- water supplies, and as sources of recharge water to the Floridan
aquifer. At times, zero flow is experienced at most places along these
streams and their tributaries upstream from sites A4 and P-4. The
streams at sites A-4 and P-4 are sustained by outflow from
ground-water storage and at no time during the period of record has the
flow been zero. At 90 percent duration the combined discharge at sites
A-4 and P-4 is only 5.7 cfs (3.7 million gallons per day). The lowest
combined discharges at these two sites that can be expected for a 7-day
period once every 20 years is only 1.5 cfs (1 million gallons per day).
Major well fields in the southern part of the Anclote River basin are
depleting that river during low flow. The Pasco County well field will
deplete the Anclote, and the Starkey well field will deplete both the
Anclote and the Pithlachascotee.
Overland runoff is sometimes considerable, even from some of the
smaller tributary areas such as at sites A-1, A-3, and P-2. This runoff
could be diverted to temporary detention sites such as swamps or
sinkhole areas to induce more infiltration into the Floridan aquifer, or
it could be diverted to some of the larger lakes for storage.
During low flow, salt water extends about I11 miles upstream from
the coast m the Anclote River and 6 miles in the Pithlachascotee River.
in order to withdraw fresh river water from points closer to the coast
during low flow, salt-water barriers must be placed in the transition or
salt- water zones. Upstream withdrawals of fresh water could result in
the salt water moving farther upstream during low flow.
The river water in the fresh-water zones usually meets quality
standards for public water-supply sources; only occasionally have
phenolic compounds, arsemc, and bacteria in objectional
concentrations been detected. Further studies would confirm or
disprove their repeated occurrence. Proper water- and land-management
practices would, of course, circumvent any problems such constituents
might cause.

REFERENCES

Cherry, R.N., Stewart, J.W., and Mann, J.A.
1970 General hydrology of the middle Gulf area:Bur. Geol.
Florida Dept. Nat. Resources, Rept. Inv. No. 56.
Hem. J.D.
1970 Study and interpretation of chemical characteristics of
natural water.:U.S. GeoL Survey Water-Supply Paper 1473.
Kaufman, MJ.
1969 Color of water in Florida streams and canals: Bur. GeoL
Florida Dept. Nat. Resources, Map Series No. 35.
Reichenbaugh, R.C.
1972 The location of the salt water-fresh water interface in the
upper part of the Floridan aquifer in coastal Pasco County,
Florida.Bur. GeoL Florida Dept. Nat. Resources, Map
Series No. 47.
Searcy, JLK.
1970 Graphical correlation of gaging station records:U.S. Geol.
Survey Water-Supply Paper 1541-C.
State of Florida
Rules of the Florida Air and Water Pollution Control
Commission:Chap. 17-3-Pollution of waters.
Stewart, J.W., Mills, L.R., Knochenmus, D.D., and Faulkner, G.L.
1971 Potentiometric surface and area of artesian flow, May
1969. and change of potentiometric surface 1964 to 1969,
Floridan aquifer, Southwest Florida Water Management
District, Florida: U.S. GeoL Survey HydroL Inv. Atlas
HA-440.
U.S. Department of the Interior, Federal Water Pollution Control
Administration
1968 Water quality criteria:Rept. of the Nat. Tech. Advisory
Comm. to the Secretary of the Interior.
U.S. Public Health Service
1962 Public Health Service drinking water standards-1962:
Public Health Service Pub. 956.


Anclote ond
Pithloachascotee
Basins



Figure I. Location of the basins.


Figure 2. Potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer and areas of ground-water contributions to major well fields and streamflow during low-flow periods.


28' 20'

















15'

















10'










2807'


Figure 3. Data-collection sites and upstream extent of salt water.


DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
BUREAU OP GEOLOGY

This public document wa prgomolgted at a total
cost of $690.00 or a p r copy cot of $.46 for the
purpose of dineetiatlng geologic date.


1400 '- --- --" .

1o00
S 0 Curve for P-4 constructed

SN 1000 graphically by relating values
I F- from periodic osmples with
000 simun ta.neous values from site P-5



4 600



iv 200

0 ...

55- 5 ~ o 7, -

PERCENTAGE OF TIME SPECIFIC CONDUCTANCE
WAS EQUAL TO OR LESS THAN THAT SHOWN

Figure 5. Specific conductance-duration curves for Anclote River near Elfers (A-4)
and Pithlachascotee River near New Port Richey (P-4) and near Richey Lakes
(P-5).


Table 1. Duration of daily flow

Station Drainage Period Number Average Flow, in cubic feet per second, which was equaled or exceeded for indicated percent of time
number area of of discharge- - - --
(sq. mi.) record measure 99.5 99 98 95 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 5 2 1 0.50
used ments cfsl
A-1 9.0 1964-67, 19 a16 0 0 0 0 0.03 0.43 1.2 2.4 4.4 7.5 12 19 34 49 70 87 104
1971
A-3 25.3 1964-66. 20 a16 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .41 .86 3.6 9.9 23 53 91 145 203 285
1971
A-4 72.5 1947-69, Ib) a83.2 1.6 2.0 2.5 3.1 3.7 4.8 6.5 10 19 32 56 104 230 370 600 800 1,140
1971

P-1 150 1964-69. 56 017 0 0 0 0 .20 .62 1.4 2.6 5.1 8.4 13 21 38 54 77 95 118
1971
P-2 7.0 1964-67, 19 32.9 0 0 0 0 0 .03 .10 .23 .50 1.0 1.9 3.7 8.7 15 26 36 49
1971
P-4 182 1964-69, Ib) a49 .23 .32 .56 1.1 2.0 4.2 6.5 9.8 16 25 40 65 120 185 270 360 460

estimated for 1947 to 1969.
b continuous records
To convert cubic feet per second to million gallons per day, multiply the cfs value by 0.646.


'o ,.a i-1u. i
DISCHARGE, CUBC FET R SEC DISCHARGE, CUBIC FrET PER -SECtO

Figure 4. Water-quality relations for Anclote River near Elfers (A-4), Pithlachascotee River near New Port Richey
(P-4), and Pithlachascotee River near Richey Lakes (P-5).


Table 5. Arsenic and heavy metals in water at sites A-5 and P-5
(Results in micrograms per liter)





Soc


2- 9-71 40 0 30 0 0.5 150 10 0 30
A-5 4- 1-71 10 20 0 0 90 10 0 30

2-10-71 50 0 20 0 .5 170 0 0 50
P-5 3-31-71 10 20 0 .5 150 10 0 40

Criteria" 50 50 500 300 50 1,000

aRules of the Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Commission, State of Florida


EXPLANATION

Data Collection


A Streamflow measure

V Water sampling i


Anclote Basin

A-1 Anclole River nenr FvOy Junction
A-2 Anclote River at Odesso
A-3 South Branch AIlote Rver at Od.ess
A-4 Anclole River near Ellers
A-5 Anclote River below Seven Spring
neor Elfers
A-6 AnCiute River ot Per-rn Rinch ved
,a-r Elf-r$
A-7 Duock Slough ner Elfer
A- Anclote Rver t Seaboard Air, Line
bridge near Elfers
A-9 Forest Hlls West Channel near Elfers
A-10 Anclote ROver at US Highway 19
near Tarpon Sprmgs
A-l Anclole River at U S Alternate
Highway 19 ot Tarpon Springs


Table 2. Magnitude and frequency of annual low flows
Lowest average flow, in cfs, for indicated recurrence intervals
Station 3-day 7day 30-day 60-day 183-day
number
2 10 20 2 10 20 2 10 20 2 10 20 2 10 20
year year year year year year year year year year year year year year year
A-1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0.30 0 0 8 2.41.4
A-3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5.7 .4 .05
A- 2.8 1.4 1.1 2.9 16 1.3 3.2 2.2 2.1 4.3 2.5 2.3 40 11
P-1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .50 0 0 10 21 1.5
P-2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .02 0 0 1.3 .24 .11
P-4 .83 .20 la) .90 .23 .18 1.2 .40 .33 3.3 .57 .44 30 10 7.2

a data not available for accurate estimate; value less than 0.2 cfs



Table 3. Magnitude and frequency of annual high flows

Highest average flow. in cfs. for indicated recurrence intervals
Station
number 3-day -day 30-day 60-day 33-day
2 10 20 2 10 20 2 10 20 2 10 20 2 10 20
year year year year year year year year year year year year year year year
A-1 87 (a) la) 74 la) (a) 44 71 80 35 58 65 19 34 40
A-3 208 515 (b) 165 385 495 79 157 187 55 116 138 22 53 65
A-4 841 2,080 2,700 663 1.360 2.000 329 639 755 233 475 565 105 225 270
P-1 96 183 218 82 148 178 49 78 89 36 62 70 21 37 43
P-2 37 (c) Ic) 28 Ic) Ic) 13 2 32 9.1 20 24 3.S 9.0 11
P-4 355 740 920 295 580 720 165 280 325 125 225 255 66 120 140

' I a data not available for accurate estimate; all values greater than 100 cfs
b data not available for accurate estimate; value greater than 600 cfs
c data not available for accurate estimate; all values greater than 50 cfs


Table 4. Chemical analyses of river water for selected high and low discharges


Hardness
as CaC03

.0 o
c cu
a. o cc





.2-9-71 120 2.9 0.07 16 20 9.5 0.3 0.6 0.71 0.06 15 24 11 87 107 6.7 50 15.0
S 4- 1-71 1.0 2.4 .07 30 0.8 14 .2 0 .78 .03 15 68 110 7.4 80 17.0

A-3 2- 9-71 a50 4.0 .05 5 35 11 .3 5.0 1.6 .03 22 60 56 123 140 5.7 13.0
4- 1-71 0 1.6 1.3 26 23 21 .2 0 2.3 .07 47 146 180 7.1 24 20.0
S 2- 9-71 a200 2.7 .08 13 21 11 .3 1.3 86B .07 14 42 50a 79 114 69 14.0
4- 1-71 4.0 8.4 .04 176 16 11 .2 0 .22 .03 5 218 350 82 30 19.5
A-5 2- 9-71 ab250 2.9 .15 16 23 12 .3 1.9 .96 .06 16 0 42 29 98 123 6.7 560 13.0
4- 1-71 b-4.16 6.8 .09 160 12 11 .1 0 .27 .03 5 0.005 140 10 185 313 8.1 30 17.0
A-3 2-9-71 a50 3.5 .10 20 33 29 .3 2.0 .95 .02 29 68 52 162 210 7.1 100 15.0
4- 1-71 0 4.0 .10 926 10 680 .2 0 .45 .04 11 1,500 2,600 8.2 20 17.5
A-11 2- 9-71 (b)200 2.7 .08 112 7100 -.86 .07 19 2500 2400 14700 21400 7.5 16.5
4- 1-71 (b) 8.4 .04 156 16 13,000 .2 0 .22 .03 5 25700 37,500 8.0 17.0
P1 2-10-71 *37 2.9 .13 8 13 10 .3 01.9 .96 .01 36 30 2 77 8123 6.6 40 10.0

3-31-71 2.8 3.4 .05 22 .8 12 .2 0 84 .04 15 -- 70 85 7.0 100 15.0
S3-31-71 4.18 4.4 .09 48 10 1.8 13 .2 0 .271 .02 29 -0.005 140 10 18542 130 7.6 120 16.0
A-7 29-10-71 a275 2.2 .10 20 33 9.0 .2 0 .952 .01 95 308 52 162 210 7. 1 100 12.0




3-31-71 7.2 5.4 .11 82 2.4 12 .2 .3 .79 .02 13 136 185 8.0 70 16.0
P- 2-10-71 ab3790 2.6 .17 24 9.6 9.4 .4 0 .40 .01 20 0 33 14 81 93 7.2 80 12.0
3-31-771.8 6.6 .15 120 23 30 .1 .4 .62 .03 .0 .017 120 24 210 329 7.6 60 17.0

2-10-71 (b) 42 370 17 200 170 1250 1.40 85 7.2 11.5
P-9 3-31-71 (b) 164 7,300 6 14,200 22,000 8.1 16.0


a = estimated
b = affected by tide


Pithlachoscotee Basin
P- I Pthisshsscotse ever rer- F-oar Janctrr
P-2 F,,vemile Creek near Fivoy Jnctlion
P-3 Plhilochoscotee R-,ve at Crocketl Lake
Ranch near New Port Rchey
P-4 Pihiachoscotee River near New Port Richey
P-5 Pfthlochoscolee Rever near R,chey Lakes
P-6 Phhlicuhotee fcR W.. tal Trouble crahk
Road ner NNew Port Rlchey
P-7 Pthlachussoth Rver -t NI, Poht Rchey
P-0 P,thlochoscolee River t M M Streeat ol
New Port Richey
P-9 Pilhtochaicotee River ot Port Richey


Upstream Extent of Salt Water

Freeh rnd solt-water zones dleterned by the uptrerm
tent of water conta,nng 250 i g/I of chlode Samples
collected at bottom of stream channel during high tide



Fresh- water one
Chlori,,de content teIss than 250 mg/I






sli wahen movsI upstream during low fresh-waher discharge and
is pushed downstream during high fresh-water discharge



Sort- water zone
Chloride content greater than 250 mg/I

o- 24-69 Date salt water found at indcaled
0S its position and ,oinciding fresh-naer
discharged, in cubic feet per second,
at gaging $taotion A-4 o P-4


Dronage bosin boundary


Table 6. -Biochemical oxygen demand and bacteria


.
E !!E E

W 8^ o aQ a 1- 8 ua8 ux u.

12-18-70 2.6 0.4 1100 -
A-4 8-11-71 53 2.2 66 30 -
8-25-71 121 1.3 2200 46 190 0.24
12-18-70 .6 800 -
A-5 8-11-71 1.2 79 59 -
8-25-71 1.1 820 44 270 .16
12-18-70 1.3 b320
A-6 8-11-71 1.3 630 54 -
8-25-71 .9 1200 41 220 .19
12-18-70 2.6 b60 -
A-9 8-11-71 2.3 110 23 -
8-25-71 2.0 210 0 b2
A-10 8-11-71 1.8 66 -
8-25-71 1.4 820 60 43 1.4
12-18-70 1.9 160 -
A-11 8-11-71 2.1 160 51 -
8-25-71 1.3 520 47 -
P-4 8-12-71 12 1.5 250 S60 -
8-25-71 44 1.0 480 b30 120 0.25
P-5 8-12-71 .8 490 b60 -
8-25-71 .8 550 60 200 .30
P-6 8-12-71 1.7 200 '120
8-25-71 1.7 650 90 160 .56
P-7 8-12-71 1.7 1200 '120
8-25-71 1.2 1600 360 330 1.1
P-8 8-12-71 1.4 140 60
8-25-71 1.1 1200 '170 240 0.71
P-9 8-12-71 2.0 120 -
8-25-71 1.2 800 56 55 1.0

alndividuals/100 mI of sample
bLow colony count
cNon-ideal count


sS~

5, f10-.

~ NOV22 1974





~4 ~f~s
-,~,,,.,f


6 3931


.CS
aJ/ e.1 No.61, A


FLORIDA GEOLOGIC SURVEY MAP SERIES 1/


p .


VYIL