University of Florida campus plan maps

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Material Information

Title:
University of Florida campus plan maps
Alternate title:
Campus plan 1905-1966
Physical Description:
25 maps. : ;
Language:
English
Creator:
University of Florida

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Campus planning -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
City planning -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University of Florida
Genre:

Notes

Summary:
The items in Subseries 144a of the University of Florida Archives Public Records Collection are planning documents made before the creation of the campus planning office. Most of the items are copies of plans, some are original drawings, and several were published in leaflet or brochure form.
Biographical:
The original campus plans for the University of Florida at Gainesville were developed by the firm of Edwards & Walter. Edwards & Walter were contracted to design and layout the campus buildings in 1905. Additional plans were developed by the firm's successor, Edward and Sayward. In 1925, Rudolph Weaver, Director of the University's School of Architecture, assumed the position of Architect for the Board of Control and was responsible for campus planning throughout the state.
Biographical:
In the period following World War II, a consulting architect was hired by the state. In the early 1970s, a campus planning office was created. Originally the Office of Planning and Analysis and, later, the Office of Facilities Planning, it is now known as the Division of Campus Planning and Construction Management
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Florida Heritage Project of the State University Libraries of Florida, the Institute for Museum and Library Services, and the U.S. Department of Education's TICFIA granting program.
General Note:
Campus master plan

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida Archives
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002338876
oclc - 39311204
notis - ALU2689
Classification:
System ID:
UF90000063:00001

Full Text





























































SCHEDULE OF
1' LAW IbLDtL0G
2- TEMKPCAYl D M- AOM.N4HMI
3- LANGUAGE HALL
4- LIbP.AI..Y
5- TE.MPO,AI.Y BkE:ADINKG PM
0- PEAbODY HALL
1- WENTON HALL 6- ,1OPS
6- EMGINEE.RI4G bLPG.
9- TEMPR .LAb &-CLASSPcoM
10- FOPOSED STUDEMIT CEHTEA
11- AUDITORIUM
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29- CAMPIfJ POST OPFFICL.
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31- AGPICULTUAAL bLDG.
32 CHEMISTYP-PHARMAC.y
33- SCIENCE. HALL
34- TEMP 1. CLAS4MPOOMS
35- FLETCHEP. HALL-
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37. PJUCHMAN mAL.L
36- LED.D -&ALL
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42- HEWE.L. HALL "1
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50-PHOTOGP,APMIC LAS.
51-HYONALIC LAIb.
A-HE.ATIMN PLANT
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54-MAINTE4ANCPe. tJILOlDNGS
55-GKAHAAM FIELD
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57-OPIESSIMG PooM
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THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA PRESENTS ITS CAMPUS PLAN FOR FUTUF


UNIVERSITY AVENUE

cmJILJ)ING LE GE( 2
EXI STING OR A L t

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2 AW dIBUGLDING
IISUADINmROA I-- f .












s __'---_ 4 LIBERAL ARTS 12 GRADUATE DORM'S S.
F5- P FINE ARTS 13 STADIUM '

7 SORORITIES 15 RECREATION AREA
8 AGRICULTURE 16 MEN'S DORM'S
J JThJ1LU ME '.E 9. MEMORIAL CENTER 17 ATHLETICS MILIT RY L ,
PSIDENT 10 PLAZA OF AMERICAS 18 PRESIDENT'S HOSE t- O
PRESIDENT 11 SCIENCES 19 FACULTY HOMES i1 R- "".. O
JJO~MDIm. S AULB 20 FRATERNITIES I J
VICE- PRESIDENT 21 CAMPUS GOLF C [. l LTING AR
Dfl AW C:A D .6D.1Y A D
COMMITTEE ,, PLANNING, A, POLICIES ( PLANNING CONS

J1 NIVERSI TY 0 F ;FI FID A


RE NEEDS




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P1 KY






1 MEDICAL
7 CENTER
A SITE
D OF CONTROL
CHITECT 'O UoF.
)ULTANT

31 -48







A GREAT


STATE


MUST HAVE


A GREAT


UNIVERSITY


The

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

SERVES THE STATE




By providing our youth with high quality edu-
cation in -

Arts and Sciences
Agriculture
Architecture and Allied Arts
Business Administration
Education
Engineering
Forestry
Law
Pharmacy
Physical Educational



By research in problems relating to agri-
culture, business, engineering, public ad-
ministration and all branches of science and
social science.



By assisting Florida citizens in studying
local problems of school or public adminis-
tration; by assisting in adult education and
other extension programs.


ENROLLMENT


Prior to the war 3,000 students
21 permanent buildings

1948 1949 10,200 students
25 permanent buildings



Estimates based on figures released by the
United States Office of Education indicate
the University of Florida will have more than
10,000 students, all non-veterans, after 1955.


The permanent population of Florida is grow-
ing faster than in any other state east of the
Rocky Mountains.



The University of Florida is now co-educa-
tional and has 1,125 women students. Even-
tually women may constitute about 30 per
cent of the student body.



The enrollment of the University of Florida
now consists of 10,200 men and women, vet-
erans and non-veterans, but after 1955 it
will exceed 10,000 and have only non-veteran
students.


SPACE




The University of Florida has floor space
compared to 50 other state universities as
follows:
Average of 50 state universities -
142 sq. ft. per student

University of Florida -
65 sq. ft. per student
(including temporary buildings)

To equal the average of our leading com-
petitors we must replace our temporary
buildings with permanent buildings and add
other permanent structures totaling about
1,000,000 sq. ft.

A long-range building program has been de-
veloped -
to replace temporary buildings
to house expanding departments
to provide space for new services
to build more dormitories for men and
women

This building program is integrated with a
plan for the campus designed to locate future
buildings in their proper relation to each other.

When funds become available, each building
can be so placed as to serve its greatest use-
fulness. The outline of the campus plan is
presented in the drawing on the opposite side
of this sheet.


.




I II


UNIVERSITY


AVENUE


V] W (CDAII lJEI UI
COMMITTEE o.N PLANNING AND POLICIES


col AL NI p li s


AM 1UR I1 DDlB


AP1L AN


PLANNING


EF FUTURE ,_
- EXISTING OR A. tltorAJ 5
S"' 7 A f




fl T:C r ROA ______














o soo .soo son ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
0j 300i 0 9001 \ ( j !
S/ 1 -, LAW __ BUILDING .



~3 PARKING lLD IN


6 WOMEN DORM'S 1 ENGINEERING
SADMINISTRASORORITIONES 15 RECREABUILDITION AREA
AGRICULTURE 16 MEN'S DORM'S L
J 1ILLIIS ME[Jll 9 MEMORIAL CENTER 17 ATHLETICS MILITARY ( Fi'"Y t[ ,TIUMW)R1
1 PRESIDENT 10 PLAZA OF AMERICAS 18 PRESIDENT'S HOUSE ARCH. TO BOARD OF
PRESIDENT 11 SCIENCES 19 FACULTY HOMES
JOUl S AUIL4 20 FRATERNITIES JE DllisoH IM IL
CIV ,- BB ,IDENT 21 CAMPUS GOLF COURSE 'n,.iim TINA o,ur,


CONTROL


&MRILTONI
ECTO 1-0: !!'-F.


CONSULTANT


U N IV ER SI TY


A OF


-FL OR IDA


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LONG


RANGE CAMPUS


PLAN


FOR


THE UNIVERSITY


OF


FLORIDA


The University of Florida has 10,000
students now and expects more than
10,000 by 1958. A campus plan
has been developed for the guid-
ance of the administration in meet-
ing immediate needs and in plan-
ning for long range needs. These
needs have been presented in a se-
ries of brochures entitled "The Uni-
versity of Florida Looks to the Fu-
ture." The immediate needs are
identified in blue and explained on
the other side of this sheet. The
long range needs are not numbered
and are indicated in a lighter shade
of blue.


I-)
w


toy


L


future
1. Business Administration
2. College of Education
3. Architecture and Allied Arts
4. Speech, Dramatics, and Music
5. Physics Building
6. Dormitories


Buildings
7. Agriculture and Forestry
8. Engineering
9. Rehabilitation of Science and
Benton Hall
10. Woman's Gymnasium
11. Extension of Utilities


*0, A A A M AA GEAT


IERSIT


Present

Buildings


A. Administration-Classroom
B. Law
C. Language
D. Library
E. Peabody
F. Benton
G. Engineering
H. Women's Dormitories
I. Auditorium
J. Science
K. Chemistry-Pharmacy
L. Agriculture
M. Horticulture
N. Dairy Products Laboratory
0. Student Service Center
P. Newell Hall
Q. Union and Cafeteria
R. Men's Dormitories
S. Old Gymnasium and Swimming
Pool
T. Infirmary
U. Florida Gymnasium
V. Cancer Laboratory
W. Hydraulics Laboratory
X. Warehouse, Shops and Power
Plant
Y. ROTC
Z. P. K. Yonge Laboratory School


;i


"41


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O

BUSINESS

ADMINISTRATION

Builder of Florida Business

This College was organized in
1926 and it does not yet have a
building of its own. Its staff and
activities are scattered among sev-
eral buildings, none of them de-
signed for its particular work in eco-
nomics, real estate, accounting,
executive secretaryship, marketing,
traffic management, business ma-
chines, statistics, etc.
The College of Business Admin-
istration in 1948-49 has 53 gradu-
ate students, 650 juniors and sen-
iors, and approximately 1200 pre-
business students in the University
College. It is preparing Florida
youth for future responsibilities in
business and industry.
For efficiency of operation and
effectiveness of its program, the
College should be housed in its own
building designed for its special
work. It requires 32 regular class-
rooms, 8 classrooms equipped espe-
cially for accounting and statistics,
a business equipment and machine
room, facilities for the research ac-
tivities of the Bureau of Economic
and Business Research, and offices
for the dean and 60 faculty mem-
bers. This calls for about 48,000
square feet, and the building with
equipment will cost about $1,000,--
000.









COLLEGE of

EDUCATION
When the University of Florida was
for men only, its undergraduate offer-
ings for prospective school teachers
were limited. The six members of the
staff of the College of Education were
accommodated in the P. K. Yonge Lab-
oratory School building, which was
designed for 350 elementary and sec-
ondary pupils. It now has more than
500 pupils being taught by 29 teachers.
Crowded into the same building are 57
faculty of the College of Education who
meet college classes at odd hours of the
day or night when classrooms are avail-
able. The College of Education also has
471 graduate students who are candi-
dates for masters, or doctors degrees.
During a year there are many confer-
ences of school teachers, principals, or
superintendents which are also held in
the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School build-
ing, All groups suffer from this crowd-
ing and mixing of elementary school
children and high school adolescents
with college students and mature post-
graduate students.
The College of Education should be
housed in its own quarters, near but
separate from the P. K. Yonge Labora-
tory School. The work in Industrial Arts
and Vocational Shop teacher training is'
noisy and dusty enough that it should be
in a small separate building of its own.
The two buildings-College of Educa-
tion Building and Industrial Arts Building
-will need 60,000 square feet of floor
space and will cost about $1,180,000.









ARCHITECTURE

and

ALLIED ARTS

In 1925 when thirty-four students
entered the newly-established
School of Architecture, they were as-
signed space in the unfinished attic
over the Teachers College. Twenty-
four years later in 1949 when nearly
600 students enrolled in the College
of Architecture and Allied Arts, all
were assigned space that is almost
as unsuited to its purposes, inade-
quate, ill-lighted, or unsafe as was
the original attic.
Students in Architecture and the
Allied Arts require relatively large
amounts of space, for every upper
division student must be assigned
drafting room or studio .space for
his exclusive use during the thirty or
more hours he works in class each
week. He also needs book room
facilities, space for such activities
as the study of building and decora-
tive materials, project test and
judgment.
The College of Architecture and
Allied Arts needs space designed
for teaching architecture, arts,
crafts, and for the exhibition of wotk
done here or of famous museum
collections on loan to us. A build-
ing with 88,000 square feet is re.
quired, and its cost has been esti-
mated at $1,700,000.









SPEECH,

DRAMATICS

and MUSIC
The Department of Speech is now
housed in Temporary E. It has two radio
studios and a drama classroom 16' by
46' with a stage 10' by 14'. It has no
other rehearsal rooms, no Little Theatre,
no workshop for scene design and con-
struction. Neither does the Department
have adequate facilities for its clinical
work on speech defects or for plays pro-
duced by the Florida Players. The De-
partment of Speech and Dramatics
needs a Little Theatre equipped with
stage, work rooms for scene and cos-
tume construction, rehearsal rooms, ra-
dio broadcasting studios, classrooms,
and offices. Such a building will cost
$500,000.
Before co-education came to the Uni-
versity of Florida there was a large de-
mand for music from the men students.
This demand has increased many fold
with the coming of women undergrad-
uates. The great majority do not wish
to specialize in music but want to con-
tinue their music education along with
their major work in college. Courses in
music are offered and the band, sym-
phony orchestra, glee clubs and chorus
are active musical organizations. To
provide the proper facilities for music,
calls for a building with soundproofed
rooms for teaching studios, practice
rooms, classrooms, music listening
rooms, rehearsal halls, and a small con-
cert auditorium to seat about 450. The
23,000 square feet of space required
will cost about $550,000.









PHYSICS

BUILDING

For twenty years it has been
known that the facilities of the Phy-
sics Department at the University of
Florida were the poorest of any
comparable institution in the South.
As many as fifteen laboratory sec-
tions have had to meet at night.
Nevertheless, the Department has
served ever increasing enrollments
and carried on its three-fold func-
tion of (1) training future physicists,
(2) giving physics information to
students majoring in related fields
and (3) advancing our knowledge
of physics.
A new Physics Building is urgent-
ly needed to:
1. Provide proper instructional
facilities for elementary and
advanced work in physics.
2. Relieve present congestion.
3. Provide research space for
present and expanded staff.
The present building with less
than 10,000 square'feet is inade-
quate and inappropriate for the pre-
cision work done in physics labora-
tories. A building with 35,000
square feet of floor space specifi-
cally designed for use as physics
laboratories, lecture rooms and
seminar rooms is needed. Plans for
such a specialized building have
been developed and it will cost at
least $1,000,000. It is one of the
most urgent needs of the University
of Florida.









DORMITORIES

The University of Florida has per-
manent dormitories built between
1905 and 1936 for 1100 men. (By
overcrowding they are now accom-
modating 1800 men.) Dormitories
are under construction which will
house 300 women and 700 men.
Temporary barracks type buildings
have been remodeled into dormi-
tories sheltering 1900 men by plac-
ing four in each room sized 12' x
12'.
The older dormitories supply
comfortable quarters to students at
room rentals averaging $10 a
month. The new permanent dormi-
tories are to cost $5,000,000 of
which $1,000,000 was contributed
by the State and the balance is to be
liquidated over a period of 30 years
by income received from room rents
of $17 to $20 a month. This is higher
rent than Florida youth should be
asked to pay.
We should have dormitories for
about 60 per cent of our students,
or for 4,000 men and 2,000 women.
They can be built on a partially self-
liquidating basis but the State's con-
tribution should be large enough
(80 per cent of the total cost) so
that the rent on all rooms on the
campus can be brought down to the
level of $10 a month. In this bien-
nium the University of Florida is re-
questing $8,000,000 from the State
as its share in a partially self-liqui-
dating dormitory project for 2,000
students.





0

AGRICULTURE
FLORIDA'S BASIC INDUSTRY

FORESTRY
Florida's Undeveloped Resource
In recent years the agricultural income
in Florida has exceeded $400,000,000
and the forestry income has exceeded
$150,000,000. One of the major re-
sponsibilities of the University of Florida
is to give scientific training in Agricul-
ture and Forestry to Florida youth, to
carry on fundamental research, and to
report the results to Florida farmers. This
threefold responsibility is discharged
through the:
College of Agriculture A teach-
ing unit.
Agricultural Experiment Stations -
A research unit.
Agricultural Extension Service -
Service to Florida farmers -
School of Forestry Teaching and
research.
These units are crowded into old
buildings, designed for a university one-
fourth of the present size. The work in
Agriculture and Forestry has expanded
so much that the University cannot hope
to accommodate its program without
new buildings.
Plans are developed-for a new group
of buildings at Gainesville and for build-
ings needed at the various branch ex-
periment stations. The entire cost will be
in excess of six; million dollars. Those
buildings requested in this biennium will
cost $4,700,000.








ENGINEERING

Bringing Industry to Florida

In 1940 the College of Engineer-
ing had 40,000 square feet of space
in Benton and Engineering Halls,
and it had a professional staff of
24. In 1949 the College with its En-
gineering and Industrial Experiment
Station has 28,000 square feet of
permanent space augmented by
82,000 square feet in temporary
buildings scattered over a wide
area. It has a professional staff of
200 faculty, research scientists and
technicians. It has equipment val-
ued at $3,000,000. Much of this
valuable equipment is housed in
temporary wooden buildings and
would be a complete loss in case of
fire or other catastrophe.
The College of Engineering has
the staff; it has the equipment; it
has nationally accredited curricu-
lums in Aeronautical, Civil, Chemi-
cal, Electrical, Mechanical, Industrial
and Sanitary Engineering. It is car-
rying on teaching and research pro-
grams that are of the most vital im-
portance to the economy and the
development of Florida. It needs
appropriate space in permanent
buildings. The buildings requested
in this biennium will cost $4,200,-
000.







REHABILITATION
of

SCIENCE and

BENTON HALLS


These buildings were constructed
in 1909 and 1911 respectively with
wood timbers rather than steel
beams. They have been subjected
to the usual hard use given all class-
room and laboratory buildings.
During the war years they were not
adequately cared for and since the
war the great influx of veterans and
other students has added to the
wear and tear on the buildings.
To make these buildings fire-
proof, to strengthen and modernize
them they must be rehabilitated
with steel beams, modern interiors
and new equipment. This will cost
about $450,000 and will give us
two modern buildings in place of
old buildings which are unsafe and
not capable of efficient use in their
present condition.







PHYSICAL

EDUCATION,

HEALTH and

ATHLETICS
The new men's gymnasium was de-
signed when the University of Florida
anticipated its permanent enrollment
would be about 5,000. With 7,000 men
and 3,000 women expected after the
veterans have graduated, the men's
gymnasium will be taxed to more than
capacity to. accommodate the men.
Pending the construction of a Music
Building the Basketball Court is to be
used for music and then torn down. The
old gymnasium built in 1918 has
been temporarily rehabilitated for use
by women students. It is not adequate
and it is not located conveniently to the
women's residence halls. A new gym-
nasium should be provided which is
especially designed for the needs of
women students. It should be located
near the women's dormitories and so-
rority area, as indicated on the campus
plan. Its cost is estimated at $900,000.
Facilities for men's and women's phys-
ical education requires additional play-
ing fields and tennis courts since those
now in existence were planned when
the University anticipated an enrollment
of 5000. The most urgent needs can be
met with $150,000.








EXTENSION

of UTILITIES
Additional buildings will require re-
habilitation of the central heating plant
and extension of such campus utilities
as storm sewers, sanitary sewers, steam
lines, telephone lines, power lines,
streets, sidewalks, and landscaping. A
system well planned in advance is re-
quired for adequate service. The total
cost is estimated at $560,000.
PLANNING:
All of the buildings listed in the long
range Six-Year Plan will require archi-
tectural services for contract and con-
struction purposes. Preliminary architec-
tural studies should be made for each
of them now so that fundamental de-
cisions can be made about final size,
arrangement and location before the
working drawings must be produced.
$150,000 is needed for these prelimi-
nary architectural studies.
LIBRARY EQUIPMENT
and STACKS:
The library buildings now under con-
struction will serve the University's needs
for several years. There remains the
necessity of providing metal stacks for
books, and tables and chairs for students
to use while studying. The amount
needed is $70,000.






The
UNIVERSITY


of FLORIDA
LOOKS TO THE
FUTURE


Presntaation of its
Long-range campus plan to meet the
needs of the next two decades with
special emphasis on its immediate
needs. When funds become avail-
able, each building can be so
placed as to serve its greatest use-
fulness.