• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Cover sheet
 Table of Contents
 Summary
 Budget
 Narrative
 Appendices














Title: U. S. Newspaper Program : Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF90000019/00002
 Material Information
Title: U. S. Newspaper Program : Florida
Physical Description: Book
Publication Date: 1997
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF90000019
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Table of Contents
    Cover sheet
        Page i
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
    Summary
        Page vi
    Budget
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
        Page xii
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
        Page xv
        Page xvi
        Page xvii
        Page xviii
    Narrative
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Appendices
        A-1
        A-2
        A-3
        B-1
        C-1
        C-2
        C-3
        C-4
        C-5
        D-1
        D-2
        D-3
        D-4
        D-5
        D-6
        D-7
        D-8
        D-9
        D-10
        D-11
        F-1
        F-2
        F-3
        F-4
        F-5
        F-6
        F-7
        F-8
        F-9
        G-1
        G-2
        H-1
        H-2
        I-1
        J-1
        J-2
        J-3
        J-4
        J-5
        J-6
        J-7
        J-8
        J-9
        J-10
        J-11
        J-12
        J-13
        J-14
        J-15
        J-16
        J-17
        J-18
        J-19
        K-1
        K-2
        K-3
        K-4
        K-5
        K-6
        K-7
        K-8
        K-9
        K-10
        K-11
        K-12
        K-13
        K-14
        K-15
        K-16
        K-17
        K-18
        K-19
        K-20
        K-21
        K-22
        K-23
        K-24
        K-25
        K-26
        K-27
        K-28
        K-29
        K-30
        K-31
        K-32
        K-33
Full Text



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
SPONSORED PROJECTS
APPROVAL FORM


University Project # _____(
(LEAVE BLANK)


Title of Proposal:


United States Newspaper Program: Florida


Submitted to Agency/Program: National Endowment for the Humanities/Preservation Office
(NOTE TO THE P.I.: Please provide mailing instructions on page 2)
UNIVERSITY ENDORSEMENTS: The attached proposal has been examined by the officials whose signatures appear below. The principal academic review
of the proposal is the responsibility of the Department/Center and College. If additional space is needed for signatures, please provide them on a separate
sheet of paper.


Principal Investigator: (Project Director)

^k^T^ Y. "LC_


Approval by Dean or Director: (If more than one)

41 e6^2r^A z/9


..... -r--'-*---------------- -------------------------
NAME: Martha K. Hruska Date NAME:
TITLE: Associate Director for Technical ServicesTTLE:
CAMPUSADDRESS: 204 Library West
TELEPHONE: (352) 392-0342
SOC. SEC. NO.


Date


Co-Principal Investigator: (If Applicable)


NAME: Date
TITLE:
TELEPHONE:
SOC. SEC. NO.

Department Head:



NAME: Date
TITLE:



Department Head: (If more than one)



NAME: Date
TITLE:


Aproal by Dean or Director:

^w/g.^ 6/a49


NAME: Dale B. Canelas
TITLE: Director of Libraries


/ Dat


DSR-I (6/88)


Other Endorsement (If Needed):


Date


NAME:
TITLE:


Approval by Vice-President for Agricultural Affairs
(For all projects involving IFAS Personnel)


NAME: Date
TITLE:



Approval by Vice-President for Health Affairs:
(For all projects involving JHMHC Personnel)


NAME: Date
TITLE:

Official Authorized to Sign for the University:
(Leave Blank)


NAME: Date
TITLE:
Division of Sponsored Research
University of Florida


SEND NOTICE OF AWARD TO:
The University of Florida
Division of Sponsored Research
219 Grinter Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611
(904) 392-1582


AGENCY APPLICATION DEADLINE
(DO NOT LEAVE BLANK)


Date:

0 postmark O receipt


I






TO BE COMPLETED BY I
(Do Not Compl
PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR (Do Not Comp
Hruska
Last Name (Print or Type)

Department or Unit to Administer Account
CO-PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR
None
Last Name (Print or Type)
D 11i


Department
Title of Project:.


PRINCIPALL INVESTIGATOR
ete Shaded Boxes)


Initials Social Security


College


Initials


Number


Social Security Number
Social Security Number


College
United States Newspaper Program: Florida


INDIRECT COST (IDC):
FOR ALL APPLICABLE IDC ACCRUED, RETURN IDC TO: (CHECK ONE)
X (A) PI and Home Department Only.
(B) PI, CO-PI and their Home Departments (equal split).
EIES AND IFAS (C) PI, Center and Home Department.
FACULTY OMIT __ (D) PI and Center Only (No Department IDC return).
THIS SECTION. (E) OTHER (provide explanation)

NAME OF DEPARTMENTS) TO ACCRUE IDC, IF APPLICABLE __
NAME OF CENTER TO ACCRUE IDC, IF APPLICABLE
IF SPONSOR DOES NOT ALLOW IDC, PLEASE CHECK HERE: .
CERTIFICATIONS AND ASSURANCES
Exp Date Number
Human Subjects El L LJl 1 1 1 1 1 1I Proprietary Data El
Animal Subjects El []I1 [ 1 Z ] Copyright D
Recombinant DNA/RNA O Invention D
FDA Good Lab Practices D Clearinghouse Review D
Biohazards O (If none, please check here): El Classified Research El


TYPE:
New
Renewal
Continuation
Supplemental
Revised


CATEGORY:
El Research
E Training
l[ Other
M
M]


ELLEW11


MAILING INSTRUCTIONS:
Mail Original and 10 copies to: (
Division of Preservation&AccessLI First
National Endowment for HumanitiB Feder
1100 Pennsvlvania Av.- N W_. SamanAeF'


Room n80
Washingtnr, n.r 9fnsn
Send 1. copies to P.I.


Check One)
Class
al Express
t. #


O Other


uDG 1IND PROEG'E


,. ItA, I I:l TTT
OFFCAMPUS-
%STSHAOST SHARING %:""
-'RECEIVED:` ~ : k ..E,-X" .05
BUDGET CHECK: IstCLS:. FEDEX: DIRECT:
UFFL: YES. NO DATE CONTACTED: NR: INTERNAL: COPIES DED:
DSR-I (6/88)




NEH APPLICATION COVER SHEET


OMB No. 3136-0111
Expires: 3/31/96


1. Individual applicant or project director
a. Name and mailing address


Name


Hruska


Martha


(initial)


Address P.O. Box 117001
204 Library West

Gainesville FL 32611-7001
(city) (state) (zip code)


b. Form of address:


c. Telephone number
Office: j 5 /J.39-n3-? Home: 35?7 73-3818
(area code) (area code)


d. Major field of applicant
or project director


a. Citizenship:


Library Science


H3
(code)


X U.S.
Other


2. Type of applicant
a. __ by an individual b. through an org./institution
If a, indicate an institutional affiliation, if applicable, on line 1 la.
If b, complete block 11 below and indicate here:
c. Type University Library
d. Satus Unit of Florida State Government

3. Type of application
a. ^ new b. supplement

4. Program to which application Is being made

Division of Preservation and Access
Endowment Initiatives:
(code)

5. Requested grant period
From: .Tin 97 To: May 99


6. Project Funding
a. Outright funds
b. Federal match
c. Total from NEH
d. Cost sharing


$341.956.87
$
$341.956.87
$184,320.55


(specify) Ie. I t proje Ccosts $ J ~ LI / L 4
7. Field of project H3 8. Descriptive title of project
(coe) U.S. Newspaper Program: Florida

9. Description of project (do not exceed space provided)

This proposal builds upon two previous funded NEH projects. It seeks to complete
the cataloging of unique newspaper titles in the state of Florida, to create a union
list of Florida newspaper holdings, and to extend the preservation microfilming
beyond only those in critical need, to some of the unique titles in the University
of Miami's Cuban Exile collection, and to unique titles in West and Central Florida.
Based on the 1993-94 survey database of Florida newspaper holdings, it is projected
that 1,489 titles throughout the state remain to be cataloged. These, as well as
the 1,811 titles cataloged in the first phase of the project, as well as any newspapers
cataloged at the University of Florida in the coming year, will be union listed with
local data records in OCLC.
10. Will this proposal be submitted to another government agency or private entity for funding? (if yes, indicate
where and when): No


11. Institutional data
a. Institution or organization:
University of Florida
(name)
Gainesville
(city)
596001874
b. Employer identification number: 596001874

c. Name of authorizing official:

(last) (first) (initial)

(title)


d. Name and mailing address of institutional grant administrator:

Division of Sponsored Research
(last) inrst) (initial)
219 Grinter Hall

University of Florida

Gainesville FL 32611
(city) (state) (zip code)
Telephone: 352 /392-1582 Form of address
(eacode)


12. Certification
By signing and submitting this application, the applicant or the authorizing official of the applicant institution (block 1 1c) is providing the applicable
certifications regarding the nondiscrimination statutes and implementing regulations, federal debt status, debarment and suspension, a drug-free
workplace, and lobbying activities, as set forth in the appendix to these guidelines.


(printed name) (signature) (date)
NOTE: Federa law provide oiminal penalties o up to $10.000 or inprsonmnent o up to li year, oa both for knowingly proving false inblomalin to an agency of th U.S. government 18 U.S.C. Section 1001.
For NEH use only
Date received
Application #
Initials







Field of Project Categories and Codes


The following categories and codes should be used to complete blocks
ld and 7 of the NEH Application Cover Sheet. If no exactly appropriate
category is provided, please select the larger category that would
include the more precise one. (This listing is strictly for use by the NEH
staff to help retrieve information about applications and grants by
subject matter field. The listing is not comprehensive and is not meant
to define the disciplines of the humanities. For that definition and advice
about eligibility for Endowment awards, please consult elsewhere in
these application materials. The hierarchical arrangement is for
convenience.)


Anthropology LI
Archaeology U6

Archival Management/Conser-
vation II

Arts/History and Criticism MA
Architecture: History & Criticism
U3
Art: History and Criticism M1
Dance: History & Criticism M3
Film: History & Criticism M4
Music: History & Criticism M5
Theater: History & Criticism M2

Communications P2
Composition & Rhetoric P1
Journalism P4
Media P3

Education HI

Ethnic Studies KI
Asian American K5
Black/Afro-American K4
Hispanic American K3
Jewish K6
Native American K2

History Al
African A2
American A3
Ancient AC
British A4
Classical A5
European A6
Far Eastern A7
Latin American A8
Near Eastern A9
Russian AA
South Asian AB


Humanities U8

Interdisciplinary UI
African Studies GI
American Studies G3
Area Studies. GH
Asian Stu s G5
Classics G7
Folklore/Folklife R1
History/Philosophy of Science,
Technology of Medicine GA
International Studies GG
Labor Studies G4
Latin American Studies GJ
Medieval Studies G8
Regional Studies GF
Renaissance Studies G9
Rural Studies GC
Urban Studies G2
Western Civilization GB
Women's Studies G1

Languages Cl
Ancient CC
Asian CA
Classical C2
Comparative C9
English CE
French C3
German C4
Italian C5
Latin American C6
Near Eastern CB
Slavic C7
Spanish C8


LawlJurisprudence

Library Science H3

Linguistics Jl


Literature Dl
African DK
American DE
Ancient DC
Asian DA
British DD
Classical D2
Comparative D9
French D3
German D4
Italian D5
Latin American D6
Literary Criticism DI
Near Eastern DB
Slavic D7
Spanish D8

Museum Studies/Historic
Preservation 12

Philosophy BI
Aesthetics B2
Epistemology B3
Ethics B4
History of Philosophy B5
Logic B6
Metaphysics B7
Non-Western Philosophy B

Religion El
Comparative Religion E5
History of Religion E2
Non-Western Religion E4
Philosophy of Religion E3

Social Science U2
American Government F2
Economics N1
Geography U7
International Relations F3
Political Science Fl
Psychology U5
Public Administration F4
Sociology S1





UNITED STATES NEWSPAPER PROGRAM : FLORIDA.
Proposal for Continued Cataloging and Preservation Microfilming.



CONTENTS.

A. Cover Sheet
B. Table of contents
C. Summary
D. Budget
E. Narrative
F. Appendices
A. Florida newspapers currently filmed by University of Florida
B. Microfilm Consent forms
C. Newspaper selection criteria
D. Distribution of unique newspaper titles in Florida
E. Florida Map of locations with unique newspaper titles
F. Cuban Exile Community Newspapers
G. Florida Newspapers: Titles Selected for Preservation Microfilming
H. Preservation Microfilming Statistical Summary
I. Past Preservation Microfilming Projects
J. Resumes
K. Letters of Support





UNITED STATES NEWSPAPER PROGRAM : FLORIDA.
Proposal for Continued Cataloging and Preservation Microfilming.



Project Summary.


This proposal builds upon two previous NEH supported projects. It seeks to
complete the cataloging of unique newspaper titles in the state of Florida, to create a
union list of Florida newspaper holdings, and to extend the preservation microfilming
beyond only those in critical need, to some of the unique titles in the University of
Miami's Cuban Exile collection, and to unique titles in West and Central Florida. Based
on the 1993-94 survey database of Florida newspaper holdings, it is projected that
1,489 titles throughout the state remain to be cataloged. These, as well as the 1,811
titles cataloged in the first phase of the project, as well as any newspapers cataloged at
the University of Florida in the coming year, will be union listed with local data records
in OCLC. A total of 53 newspaper titles which are reasonably complete will be
microfilmed. Another 205 titles from the Cuban Exile collection will also be
microfilmed, although these runs are not necessarily complete.










National Endowment for the Humanities
Budget Form
University of Florida. George A. Smathers Libraries.

SECTION A budget detail for the period from 6/97 to 5/99.

1. Salaries and wages.
Provide the names and titles of principal project personnel. For support staff, include the title of each position and
indicate in brackets the number of persons who will be employed in that capacity. For persons employed on an
academic year basis, list separately any salary charge for work done outside the academic year.


Name/Title of position Number Method of cost computation


Cecilia Botero (1)
Erich Kesse (1)
(preservation librarian)
Robert Harrell (1)
(reprograhics supervisor)
Robert Dowd (1)
(newspaper cataloger)
LaVerne Jenkins (1)
(newspaper archivist)
Dolores Jenkins (1)
John Ingram (1)
Nelda Schwartz (1)
(brittle materials coordinator)
Asst. Microfilm Tech. (0.5)
Student Assistants (0.7)


0.5 FTE
0.1 FTE

0.15 FTE

1.0 FTE

1.0 FTE

0.1 FTE
0.05 FTE
0.15 FTE


NEH Funds Cost Sharing Total
(a) (b) (c)
$ 0.00 $ 34,414.87 $ 34,414.87
$0.00 $8,134.42 $8,134.42

$ 0.00 $ 9,589.38 $ 9,589.38


$ 56,385.42

$41,795.42


$ 0.00
$0.00
$0.00


0.5 FTE
$ 5.50 x 1456 hrs +
$ 5.90 x 1456 hrs =
Subtotal


$ 0.00 $ 56,385.42

$0.00 $41,795.42


$ 8,885.26
$ 5,798.39
$ 8,680.52


$ 8,885.26
$ 5,798.39
$ 8,680.52


$ 0.00 $ 17,740.63 $ $ 17,740.63

$ 16.598.40 $ 0.00 $ 16.598.40
$ 114,779.24 $ 93,243.47 $ 208,022.71


2. Fringe Benefits.
If more than one rate is used, list each rate and salary base.


Rate Salary Base (a) (b) (c)
0.1% of $ 16,598.40 (student staff) $ 16.60 $0.00 $ 16.60
27% of $ 68,216.57 (para-professional staff) $13,357.14 $7,133.71 $20,490.85
32% of $ 123,207.74 (professional staff) $18.043.33 $21.383.14 $ 39.426.47
Subtotal $31,417.07 $28,516.85 $59,933.92

3. Consultant Fees.
Include payments for professional and technical consultants and honoria.

Name or type of consultant no. of days daily rate of NEH Funds Cost Sharing Total
on project compensation (a) (b) (c)
N/A $0.00 $0.00 $0.00
Subtotal $0.00 $0.00 $0.00









4. Travel.
For each trip, indicate the number of persons traveling, the total days they will be in travel status, and the total
subsistence and transportation costs for that trip. When a project will involve the travel of a number of people to a
conference, institute, etc., these costs may be summarized on one line by indicating the point of origin as "various".
All foreign travel must be listed separately.


from/to


no. total Subsistence
persons travel days Costs


Gainesville/
Central Florida
Gainesville/
South Florida
Gainesville/
Washington, DC
Gainesville/
ALA annual '97
Undertermined/
Gainesville intendn
Washington, DC/
Gainesville (R. Ha
Gainesville/
West Florida
Gainesville/
North Florida
Gainesville/
Washington, DC
Gainesville/
ALA annual '98
Washington, DC/
Gainesville (R. Ha


Transportation
Costs


(1) (60) $5,340.00 $3,142.74

(1) (70) $7,070.00 $5,162.64

(1) (4) $484.00 $400.00

(1) (3) $ 363.00 $1,000.00

(2) (6) $600.00 $900.00
views)
(1) (2) $150.00 $400.00
arriman '97)
(1) (35) $2,695.00 $ 2,413.80

(1) (55) $4,235.00 $2,826.76

(1) (4) $484.00 $400.00

(1) (3) $363.00 $500.00

(1) (2) $150.00 $400.00
rriman '98)
Subtotal


>n NEH Funds Cost Sharing Total
(a) (b) (c)
$ 8,482.74 $0.00 $ 8,482.74

$ 12,232.64 $0.00 $ 12,232.64

$ 884.00 $0.00 $ 884.00

$ 1,363.00 $0.00 $ 1,363.00

$ 1,500.00 $0.00 $ 1,500.00

$ 550.00 $0.00 $ 550.00

$ 5,108.80 $0.00 $ 5,108.80

$7,061.76 $0.00 $7,061.76

$ 884.00 $0.00 $ 884.00

$ 863.00 $0.00 $ 863.00

$ 550.00 $0.00 $ 550.00

$ 39,479.94 $ 0.00 $ 39,479.94


5. Supplies and Materials.
Include consumable supplies, materials to be used in the project, and items of expendable equipment; i.e.,
equipment costing less than $500 of with an estimated useful life of less than two years.

Item Method of cost computation NEH Funds Cost Sharing Total
(a) (b) (c)
Raw microfilm 336 @ $9.00 reel $ 3,024.00 $ 0.00 $ 3,024.00
Shipping boxes (for newspaper 100 @ $ 1.25 each $0.00 $124.50 $124.50
transport)
Cotton Gloves (for film inspection) 8 @ $ 0.60 $ 0.00 $ 4.80 $4.80
Camera bulbs 4 @ $ 7 each $ 0.00 $ 28.00 $ 28.00
Subtotal $ 3,024.00 $157.30 $3,181.30









6. Services.
Include the cost of duplication and printing, long distance telephone, requirement rental, postage, and other services
related to project objectives that are not included under other budget categories or in the indirect cost pool. For
subcontracts over $10,000, provide an itemization of subcontract costs on this form or on an attachment.


Item Basis/Method of cost computation
Postage 350 items @ $ .32
Network access OCLC access/service fees $
Network access OCLC profiling fee $
Network access OCLC Idr storage @ $ .05/year/item
Telephone long distance 100 calls @ $ 2.00/call/year
Shipping (newspapers 150 boxes @ $ 60 $
for filming, includes insurance)
Microfilm processing 336 @ 7.50/reel $
(with IPI SilverLock polysulfiding treatment)
Microfilm duplication 1008 @ $18.50/reel $ 1
(with IPI SilverLock polysulfiding treatment)
(includes: print master and 2 positive copies per camera master)
Carmera maintenance @1,100/year
Subtotal


$112.00
6,802.08
8,750.00
$ 400.00
$ 400.00
6,000.00

2,520.00

8,648.00


$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$ 3,000.00


(c)
$112.00
$ $ 6,802.08
$ 8,750.00
$400.00
$ 400.00
$ 9,000.00


$ 0.00 $ 2,520.00

$ 0.00 $18,648.00


$ 0.00 $ 2200.00
$43,632.08 $ 5,200.00


$0.00
$ 48,832.08


7. Other Costs.
Include participant stipends and room and board, equipment purchases, and other items not previously listed. Please
note that "miscellaneous" and "contingency" are not acceptable budget categories. Refer to the budget instructions
for the restriction on the purchase of permanent equipment.


Item Basis/Method of cost computation (a) (b)


One Lap-top computer
Database software


$ 3,000.00
$ 500.00


$ 3,000.00
$ 500.00
Subtotal $ 3,500.00


8. Total Direct Costs.
(Add subtotals of items 1 through 7).


$0.00
$0.00
$ 0.00


(c)
$ 3,000.00
$ 500.00
$ 3,500.00


$ 235,832.33 $ 127,117.62 $ 362,949.95


9. Indirect Costs.
(This budget item applies only to institutional applicants.)

_X Current indirect cost rates) has/have been negotiated with a federal agency.


A. Name of Federal Agency. Date of agreement.
DHHS

B. Rate(s) of Base(s) NEH Funds Cost Sharing Total
(a) (b) (c)
45% $ 362,949.95 $106.124.54 $ 57.202.93 $ 163.327.47
TOTAL INDIRECT COSTS $106,124.54 $ 57,202.93 $163,327.47
NOTE: In accord with the University of Florida's Indirect Cost calculations, the salary of the principal
investigator, Martha Hruska, is accounted for as administrative overhead, an indirect cost.
NOTE: Shipping and storage of master microforms is accounted for as facilities related overhead, an indirect
cost.

10. Total Project Costs (direct and indirect) for Budget Period $ 341,956.87 $ 184,320.55 $ 526,277.42


~


r 4









National Endowment for the Humanities
Budget Form
University of Florida. George A. Smathers Libraries.

SECTION A -- budget detail for Fiscal Year 1996/1997 (i.e., 6/97).

1. Salaries and wages.
Provide the names and titles of principal project personnel. For support staff, include the title of each position and
indicate in brackets the number of persons who will be employed in that capacity. For persons employed on an
academic year basis, list separately any salary charge for work done outside the academic year.


Name/Title of position Number


Method of cost computation
(see example)


Cecilia Botero (1) ($ 32,970.30 @ 50%) 1/12
Erich Kesse (1) ($ 38,964.90 @ 10%) 1/12
(preservation librarian)
Robert Harrell (1) ($ 30,622.90 @ 15%) 1/12


(reprograhics supervisor)
Robert Dowd (1)
(newspaper cataloger)


($ 27,810 @ 100%) 1/12


LaVerne Jenkins (1) ($ 20,614 @ 100%) 1/12
(newspaper archivist)
Dolores Jenkins (1) ($ 42,561.66 @ 10%) 1/12
John Ingram (1) ($ 55,549.96 @ 5%) 1/12
Nelda Schwartz (1) ($ 27,720.66 @ 15%) 1/12
(brittle materials coordinator)
Asst. Microfilm Tech. (0.5) ($ 17,500 @ 50%) 1/12
Subtotal

2. Fringe Benefits.
If more than one rate is used, list each rate and salary base.


NEH Funds Cost Sharing
(a) (b)
$0.00 $ 1,373.76 $
$0.00 $324.71


Total
(c)
1,373.76
$ 324.71


$ 0.00 $ 382.79 $ 382.79


$2,317.50

$1717.84

$0.00
$0.00
$0.00


$0.00 $2,317.50

$0.00 $1717.84


$ 354.68
$231.46
$ 346.51


$0.00 $729.17
$ 4,035.34 $ 3,743.08


$ 354.68
$231.46
$346.51

$729.17
$ 7,778.42


Rate Salary Base (a) (b) (c)
27% of $ 2,793.52 (para-professional staff) $ 463.82 $ 290.43 $ 754.25
32% of $ 4,984.90 (professional staff) $741.60 $853.57 $1.595.17
Subtotal $1,205.42 $1,144.00 $2,349.42

3. Consultant Fees.
Include payments for professional and technical consultants and honoria.

Name or type of consultant no. of days daily rate of (a) (b) (c)
on project compensation
N/A $0.00 $0.00 $0.00


Subtotal $ 0.00


$ 0.00 $ 0.00









4. Travel.
For each trip, indicate the number of persons traveling, the total days they will be in travel status, and the total
subsistence and transportation costs for that trip. When a project will involve the travel of a number of people to a
conference, institute, etc., these costs may be summarized on one line by indicating the point of origin as "various".
All foreign travel must be listed separately.


no. total Subsistence Transportation (a)
persons travel days Costs Costs


N/A $ 0.00 $0.00 $ 0.00
Subtotal $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

5. Supplies and Materials.
Include consumable supplies, materials to be used in the project, and items of expendable equipment; i.e.,
equipment costing less than $500 of with an estimated useful life of less than two years.

Item Method of cost computation NEH Funds Cost Sharing Total
(a) (b) (c)
Raw microfilm 168 @ $9.00 reel $ 1.512.00 $ 0.00 $ 1.512.00
Subtotal $1,512.00 $0.00 $1,512.00

6. Services.
Include the cost of duplication and printing, long distance telephone, requirement rental, postage, and other services
related to project objectives that are not included under other budget categories or in the indirect cost pool. For
subcontracts over $10,000, provide an itemization of subcontract costs on this form or on an attachment.


Item


Network access


Basis/Method of cost computation
OCLC access/service fees (1 month)
Subtotal


(a)
$272.08
$ 272.08


(b)
$0.00
$ 0.00


(c)
$272.08
$ 272.08


Item


from/to









7. Other Costs.
Include participant stipends and room and board, equipment purchases, and other items not previously listed. Please
note that "miscellaneous" and "contingency" are not acceptable budget categories. Refer to the budget instructions
for the restriction on the purchase of permanent equipment.

Item Basis/Method of cost computation (a) (b) (c)
One Lap-top computer $ 3,000.00 $ 3,000.00 $0.00 $ 3,000.00
Database software $ 500.00 $ 500.00 $0.00 $ 500.00
Subtotal $ 3,500.00 $ 0.00 $ 3,500.00

8. Total Direct Costs. $10,524.84 $4,887.08 $ 15,411.92
(Add subtotals of items 1 through 7).

9. Indirect Costs.
(This budget item applies only to institutional applicants.)

-X _Current indirect cost rates) has/have been negotiated with a federal agency.

A. Name of Federal Agency. Date of agreement.
DHHS

B. Rate(s) of Base(s) NEH Funds Cost Sharing Total
(a) (b) (c)
45% $ 15,411.92 $4.736.17 $2.199.19 $6,935.36
TOTAL INDIRECT COSTS $4.736.17 $2.199.19 $6,935.36
NOTE: In accord with the University of Florida's Indirect Cost calculations, the salary of the principal
investigator, Martha Hruska, is accounted for as administrative overhead, an indirect cost.
NOTE: Shipping and storage of master microforms is accounted for as facilities related overhead, an indirect
cost.

10. Total Project Costs (direct and indirect) for Budget Period $ 15,261.01 $ 7,086.27 $ 22,347.28










National Endowment for the Humanities
Budget Form
University of Florida. George A. Smathers Libraries.

SECTION A -- budget detail for Fiscal Year 1997/1998 (i.e., 7/97 to 6/98).

1. Salaries and wages.
Provide the names and titles of principal project personnel. For support staff, include the title of each position and
indicate in brackets the number of persons who will be employed in that capacity. For persons employed on an
academic year basis, list separately any salary charge for work done outside the academic year.


Name/Title of position Number


Method of cost computation
(see example)


Cecilia Botero (1) $ 33,990 @ 50%
Erich Kesse (1) $ 40,170 @ 10%
(preservation librarian)
Robert Harrell (1) $ 31,570 @ 15%
(reprograhics supervisor)
Robert Dowd (1) $ 27,810 @ 100%
(newspaper cataloger)
LaVerne Jenkins (1) $ 20,614 @ 100%
(newspaper archivist)
Dolores Jenkins (1) $ 43,878 @ 10%
John Ingram (1) $ 57,268 @ 5%
Nelda Schwartz (1) $ 28,578 @ 15%
(brittle materials coordinator)
Asst. Microfilm Tech. (0.5) $ 17,500 @ 50%
Student Assistants (0.7) $ 5.50/hour x 1456


NEH Funds Cost Sharing
(a) (b)
$0.00 $16,995.00 $
$0.00 $4,017.00 $


Total
(c)
16,995.00
4,017.00


$ 0.00 $ 4,735.50 $ 4,735.50


hours
Subtotal


$27,810.00

$ 20,614.00

$0.00
$ 0.00
$0.00

$0.00
$ 8,008.00
$ 56,432.00


$0.00 $27,810.00

$0.00 $20,614.00

$ 4,387.80 $ 4,387.80
$ 2,863.40 $ 2,863.40
$ 4,286.70 $ 4,286.70

$ 8,750.00 $ 8,750.00
$0.00 $ 8008.00
$ 46,035.40 $ 102,467.40


2. Fringe Benefits.
If more than one rate is used, list each rate and salary base.


Rate Salary Base (a) (b) (c)
0.1% of $ 8,008.00 (student staff) $ 8.01 $0.00 $ 8.01
27% of $ 33,650.70 (para-professional staff) $8,899.20 $3,519.91 $11,158.06
32% of $ 60,808.70 (professional staff) $7.638.15 $10.559.58 $19.458.78
Subtotal $ 16,545.36 $14,079.49 $ 30,624.85

3. Consultant Fees.
Include payments for professional and technical consultants and honoria.

Name or type of consultant no. of days daily rate of (a) (b) (c)
on project compensation
N/A $ 0.00 $0.00 $ 0.00


Subtotal $ 0.00


$ 0.00 $ 0.00









4. Travel.
For each trip, indicate the number of persons traveling, the total days they will be in travel status, and the total
subsistence and transportation costs for that trip. When a project will involve the travel of a number of people to a
conference, institute, etc., these costs may be summarized on one line by indicating the point of origin as "various".
All foreign travel must be listed separately.


no. total Subsistence Transportation (a)
persons travel days Costs Costs


Gainesville/
Central Florida
Gainesville/
South Florida
Gainesville/
Washington, DC
Gainesville/
ALA annual '97
Undertermined/
Gainesville (inter
Washington, DC/
Gainesville (R. H.


(1) (60) $5,340.00 $3,142.74 $8,482.74

(1) (70) $7,070.00 $5,162.64 $ 12,232.64

(1) (4) $484.00 $400.00 $884.00

(1) (3) $363.00 $1,000.00 $ 1,363.00

(2) (6) $600.00 $900.00 $1,500.00
views)
(1) (2) $150.00 $400.00 $550.00
arriman)
Subtotal $25,012.38


$0.00 $ 8,482.74

$0.00 $ 12,232.64

$0.00 $ 884.00

$0.00 $ 1,363.00

$0.00 $ 1,500.00

$0.00 $ 550.00


$0.00 $25,012.38


5. Supplies and Materials.
Include consumable supplies, materials to be used in the project, and items of expendable equipment; i.e.,
equipment costing less than $500 of with an estimated useful life of less than two years.


Method of cost computation NEH Funds Cost Sharing
(a) (b)


Shipping boxes (for newspaper 50 @ $ 1.25 each
transport)
Cotton Gloves (for film inspection) 4 @ $ 0.60 pair
Camera bulbs 4 @ $ 7 each


$ 0.00

$0.00
$0.00
Subtotal $ 0.00


Total
(c)


$ 62.25 $ 62.25


$2.40
$28.00
$ 92.65


$2.40
$28.00
$ 92.65


6. Services.
Include the cost of duplication and printing, long distance telephone, requirement rental, postage, and other services
related to project objectives that are not included under other budget categories or in the indirect cost pool. For
subcontracts over $10,000, provide an itemization of subcontract costs on this form or on an attachment.


350 items @ $ .32
OCLC access/service fees
OCLC profiling fee


$112.00
$ 3,265.00
$ 8,750.00


Network access OCLC Idr storage @ $ .05/year/item $ 200.00
Telephone long distance 100 calls @ $ 2.00/call $ 200.00
Shipping (newspapers 75 boxes @ $ 60 $ 3,000.00
for filming includes insurance; assumes 25% return after filming)
Microfilm processing 168 @ 7.50/reel $1,260.00
(with IPI SilverLock polysulfiding treatment)
Microfilm duplication 504 @ $18.50/reel $ 9,324.00
(with IPI SilverLock polysulfiding treatment)
(includes: print master and 2 positive copies per camera master)
Camera maintenance @1,100/year $0.00
Subtotal $26,111.


(b)
$ 0.00
$ 0.00
$ 0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$ 1,500.00


(c)
$112.00
$ 3,265.00
$ 8,750.00
$ 200.00
$ 200.00
$4,500.00


$0.00 $1,260.00

$ 0.00 $ 9,324.00


$1.100.00 $1.100.00
00 $2,600.00 $28,111.00


Postage
Network access
Network access


Item Basis/Method of cost computation (a)


from/to









7. Other Costs.
Include participant stipends and room and board, equipment purchases, and other items not previously listed. Please
note that "miscellaneous" and "contingency" are not acceptable budget categories. Refer to the budget instructions
for the restriction on the purchase of permanent equipment.

Item Basis/Method of cost computation (a) (b) (c)
N/A $ 0.00 $0.00 $ 0.00
Subtotal $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

8. Total Direct Costs. $ 124,100.74 $ 62,807.54 $ 186,908.28
(Add subtotals of items 1 through 7).

9. Indirect Costs.
(This budget item applies only to institutional applicants.)

X Current indirect cost rates) has/have been negotiated with a federal agency.

A. Name of Federal Agency. Date of agreement.
DHHS

B. Rate(s) of Base(s) NEH Funds Cost Sharing Total
(a) (b) (c)
45% $ 186,908.28 $ 55.845.33 $ 28.263.39 $84.108.72
TOTAL INDIRECT COSTS $ 55,845.33 $ 28,263.39 $ 84,108.72
NOTE: In accord with the University of Florida's Indirect Cost calculations, the salary of the principal
investigator, Martha Hruska, is accounted for as administrative overhead, an indirect cost.
NOTE: Shipping and storage of master microforms is accounted for as facilities related overhead, an indirect
cost.

10. Total Project Costs (direct and indirect) for Budget Period $ 179,946.07 $ 91,070.93 $ 271,017.00










National Endowment for the Humanities
Budget Form
University of Florida. George A. Smathers Libraries.

SECTION A -- budget detail for Fiscal Year 1998/1994 (i.e., 7/98 to 5/99).

1. Salaries and wages.
Provide the names and titles of principal project personnel. For support staff, include the title of each position and
indicate in brackets the number of persons who will be employed in that capacity. For persons employed on an
academic year basis, list separately any salary charge for work done outside the academic year.


Name/Title of position Number


Cecilia Botero
Erich Kesse


Method of cost computation
(see example)
($ 35,009 @ 50%) 11/12
($ 41,375 @ 10%) 11/12


(preservation librarian)
Robert Harrell (1) ($ 32,517 @ 15%) 11/12
(reprograhics supervisor)


Robert Dowd
(newspaper cataloger)
LaVerne Jenkins
(newspaper archivist)
Dolores Jenkins
John Ingram
Nelda Schwartz
(brittle materials coor
Asst. Microfilm Tech.
Student Assistants


NEH Funds Cost Sharii


(a)
$ 0.00
$0.00

$ 0.00


(1) ($ 28,645 @ 100%) 11/12 $ 26,257.92

(1) ($ 21,233 @ 100%) 11/12 $19,463.58

(1) ($ 45,194 @ 10%) 11/12 $0.00
(1) ($ 58,986 @ 5%) 11/12 $0.00
(1) ($ 29,435 @ 15%) 11/12 $ 0.00
dinator)
(0.5) ($ 18,025 @ 50%) 11/12 $ 0.00
(0.7) $ 5.90/hour x 1456hours $ 8.590.40
Subtotal $54,311.90


(b)
$16,046.11
$ 3,792.71


ng Total
(c)
$16,046.11
$ 3,792.71


$4,471.09 $4,471.09

$ 0.00 $ 26,257.92

$ 0.00 $ 19,463.58


$4,142.78
$ 2,703.53
$4,047.31

$8,261.46
$0.00
$ 43,464.99


$4,142.78
$ 2,703.53
$4,047.31

$8,261.46
$ 8.590.40
$ 97,776.89


2. Fringe Benefits.
If more than one rate is used, list each rate and salary base.


Rate Salary Base (a) (b) (c)
0.1% of $ 8,590.40 (student staff) $ 8.59 $0.00 $ 8.59
27% of $ 31,772.35 (para-professional staff) $5,255.17 $3,323.37 $8,578.54
32% of $ 57,414.14 (professional staff) $ 8.402.53 $ 9.969.99 $ 18.372.52
Subtotal $13,666.29 $13,293.36 $26,959.65

3. Consultant Fees.
Include payments for professional and technical consultants and honoria.

Name or type of consultant no. of days daily rate of (a) (b) (c)
on project compensation
N/A $0.00 $0.00 $0.00


Subtotal $ 0.00


$ 0.00 $ 0.00









4. Travel.
For each trip, indicate the number of persons traveling, the total days they will be in travel status, and the total
subsistence and transportation costs for that trip. When a project will involve the travel of a number of people to a
conference, institute, etc., these costs may be summarized on one line by indicating the point of origin as "various".
All foreign travel must be listed separately.


from/to


no. total Subsistence Transportation (a)


persons travel days Costs


Gainesville/ (1) (35)
West Florida
Gainesville/ (1) (55)
North Florida
Gainesville/ (1) (4)
Washington, DC
Gainesville/ (1) (3)
ALA annual '98
Washington, DC/ (1) (2)
Gainesville (R. Harriman)


) $ 2,695.00


Costs
$2,413.80 $ 5,108.80


$4,235.00 $2,826.76 $7,061.76

$ 484.00 $ 400.00 $ 884.00

$ 363.00 $500.00 $ 863.00

$150.00 $400.00 $550.00


$0.00 $ 5,108.80

$0.00 $7,061.76

$0.00 $ 884.00

$0.00 $ 863.00

$0.00 $ 550.00


Subtotal $ 14,467.56 $ 0.00 $14,467.56


5. Supplies and Materials.
Include consumable supplies, materials to be used in the project, and items of expendable equipment; i.e.,
equipment costing less than $500 of with an estimated useful life of less than two years.

Item Method of cost computation NEH Funds Cost Sharing Total
(a) (b) (c)
Raw microfilm 168 @ $9.00 reel $ 1,512.00 $0.00 $1,512.00
Shipping boxes (for newspaper 50 @ $ 1.25 each $ 0.00 $ 62.25 $ 62.25


transport)
Cotton Gloves (for film inspection) 4 @ $ 0.60 pair


$0.00
Subtotal $ 1,512.00


$2.40 $2.40
$64.65 $1,576.65


6. Services.
Include the cost of duplication and printing, long distance telephone, requirement rental, postage, and other services
related to project objectives that are not included under other budget categories or in the indirect cost pool. For
subcontracts over $10,000, provide an itemization of subcontract costs on this form or on an attachment.


Basis/Method of cost computation


Network access OCLC access/service fees $
Network access OCLC ldr storage @ $ .05/year/item
Telephone long distance 100 calls @ $ 2.00/call
Shipping (newspapers 75 boxes @ $ 60 $
for filming includes insurance)
Microfilm processing 168 @ 7.50/reel $
(with IPI SilverLock polysulfiding treatment)
Microfilm duplication 504 @ $18.50/reel $
(with IPI SilverLock polysulfiding treatment)
(includes: print master and 2 positive copies per camera master)
Camera maintenance @1,100/year


Subtotal $ 17,2


(a)
3,265.00
$ 200.00
$200.00
3,000.00

1,260.00

9,324.00


(b)
$ 0.00
$ 0.00
$0.00
$1,500.00


(c)
$ 3,265.00
$ 200.00
$200.00
$ 4,500.00


$ 0.00 $ 1,260.00

$ 0.00 $ 9,324.00


$0.00 $1.100.00 $1.100.00
49.00 $ 2,600.00 $ 19,849.00


--







-" V


7. Other Costs.
Include participant stipends and room and board, equipment purchases, and other items not previously listed. Please
note that "miscellaneous" and "contingency" are not acceptable budget categories. Refer to the budget instructions
for the restriction on the purchase of permanent equipment.

Item Basis/Method of cost computation (a) (b) (c)
N/A $0.00 $0.00 $0.00
Subtotal $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

8. Total Direct Costs. $101,206.75 $ 59,423.00 $160,629.75
(Add subtotals of items 1 through 7).

9. Indirect Costs.
(This budget item applies only to institutional applicants.)

X Current indirect cost rates) has/have been negotiated with a federal agency.

A. Name of Federal Agency. Date of agreement.
DHHS ~15 IO5

B. Rate(s) of Base(s) NEH Funds Cost Sharing Total
(a) (b) (c)
45% $ 160,629.75 $ 45.543.04 $ 26.740.35 $ 72.283.39
TOTAL INDIRECT COSTS $ 45,543.04 $ 26,740.35 $ 72,283.39
NOTE: In accord with the University of Florida's Indirect Cost calculations, the salary of the principal
investigator, Martha Hruska, is accounted for as administrative overhead, an indirect cost.
NOTE: Shipping and storage of master microforms is accounted for as facilities related overhead, an indirect
cost.

10. Total Project Costs (direct and indirect) for Budget Period $ 146,749.79 $ 86,163.35 $ 232,913.14





UNITED STATES NEWSPAPER PROGRAM : FLORIDA.
Proposal for Continued Cataloging and Preservation Microfilming.



Narrative.


History of Newspaper Publishing in Florida
Newspaper publishing in Florida began under British rule. In 1783, William and
John Wells published a Tory newspaper in St. Augustine and moved to the Bahamas
when Florida came again under Spanish rule in 1784.. Six surviving issues of the East
Florida Gazette are held at the Public Record Office, London. There is indirect
evidence for a single issue of a Spanish language newspaper, El Telegrafo de las
Floridas, published at Fernandina in December 1817 and described in the Charleston
Courier.
Spain ceded East and West Florida to the United States in July 1821, and the
Florida Gazette began publication in St. Augustine that same month. The Pensacola
Gazette and West Florida Herald began publication in 1824, and the Key West
Register and Commercial Advertiser was begun in 1829. By 1830, Florida's
population was 34,730, and the two counties established by Andrew Jackson when
provisional governor had become fifteen.
Territorial newspapers promoted immigration and statehood. The standard source
for information on early Florida newspapers is Florida Territorial Journalism by
James Owen Knauss (Florida State Historical Society, DeLand, 1926). Knauss
(1926:15) estimated that at least forty-four newspapers were published in Florida
before the end of the territorial period and that about half of the 6,800 issues produced
survived. The survey database created in the planning phase of the Florida Newspaper
Project largely corroborates this estimate: thirty-eight records list holdings for
newspapers published in Florida before 1845.
By 1845, Florida's population totaled 66,000, including slaves. By the time of the
Civil War, the state's newspapers had become sharply political. Titles such as
Jacksonville's Southern Rights and Southern Confederacy were countered by titles like
Tampa's True Southerner, a Republican paper. Jacksonville's Republican paper, the
Florida Union, continues today as the Florida Times-Union.
During the war, Confederate newspapers in Key West and St. Augustine were
taken over and published by Union forces. One Confederate newspaper became the
state's first African-American title. Josiah Walls came to Florida with the Third
Infantry Regiment, United States Colored Troops, in 1864, purchased The Cotton
States from a former Union general after the war and published The New Era from
Gainesville in 1873.
Newspapers and their publishers heavily influenced political and social
developments during Reconstruction. According to historian, Jerrell Shofner, a
member of the Florida Newspaper Project's statewide advisory committee and author
of Nor Is It Over Yet. Florida in the Era of Reconstruction (University Presses of
Florida, Gainesville, 1974), a publisher of The Floridian in Tallahassee masterminded


Page 1





UNITED STATES NEWSPAPER PROGRAM : FLORIDA.
Proposal for Continued Cataloging and Preservation Microfilming.



Democratic strategy during Reconstruction. The survey database has twenty-nine
records for Civil War-era newspapers, forty-two for Reconstruction-era papers, and
fifteen records for newspapers spanning both eras.
A line drawn across the Florida peninsula from the mouth of the Suwannee River
on the Gulf of Mexico to Daytona Beach creates a northern and southern division
more useful than the old east-west one. Two-thirds of the total population lived in the
northern section at the turn of the century; less than a fifth of total population is there
now. Newspapers in the northern section tend to have been published continuously in
stable communities for long periods; nineteen of the twenty-five agricultural titles in
the survey database are located there, and eighteen date from the nineteenth century.
Of 305 ethnic titles in the database, only seven are located in the northern section.
The diversity in Florida's newspapers is largely attributable to population
movements into the southern section of the peninsula. Retirees and refugees have
converged from numerous points, and there are newspapers serving a variety of
groups and interests. For example, Sidelines in West Palm Beach is an equestrian
newspaper specializing in news about the polo circuit, Enfoque Medico offers
"principally news of Cuban-American physicians who have graduated from foreign
schools," and TW is "South Florida's weekly gay alternative."
A million and a halfFloridians are of Hispanic origin, and 280 Spanish-language
newspapers are listed on the survey database, all published in the southern section of
the state and three dating from the last century. Fifty-two African-American titles
have been identified, seventy-six military titles are listed, and forty titles represent the
religious press. The state has several metropolitan dailies with national reputations,
and nearly 900 weeklies are listed in the survey database. About 375 newspapers are
currently published in Florida.


Major Newspaper Collections in Florida
The P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History, Department of Special Collections, at
the George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida, holds the largest collection of
newspapers in the state. A collection and preservation effort begun in 1944 called for
acquisition of at least one newspaper from each of Florida's 67 counties on an ongoing
basis. The library began to produce in-house microfilm copies of its Florida
newspapers in 1947 and today films 66 Florida newspapers on a regular basis (see,
Appendix A). Additional microfilm of current and back runs is purchased from
commercial microform publishers, and retrospective microfilming is undertaken in-
house whenever possible. However, almost no cataloging had been done prior to the
first implementation phase of the Florida Newspaper Project, 1995-1997.
Other major collections in the northern and western parts of the state are at the
State Library, the Robert Manning Strozier Library at Florida State University, and the
John C. Pace Library at the University of West Florida. These collections largely


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UNITED STATES NEWSPAPER PROGRAM : FLORIDA.
Proposal for Continued Cataloging and Preservation Microfilming.



overlap and complement holdings at the University of Florida. Of the 454 titles
reported by the State Library, 376 are also held by the University of Florida; of the
286 titles reported by Florida State University, 251 are also held by the University of
Florida; of the 293 titles reported by the University of West Florida, 190 are also held
by the University of Florida.
Major collections in the southern part of the state are at the University of Miami's
Otto G. Richter Library and the University of South Florida's Tampa Campus Library.
Of the 112 titles reported by the University of South Florida, 53 are also held by the
University of Florida. Of the 324 titles reported by the University of Miami, the
University of Florida holds only 22. Most of the unique titles at the University of
Miami constitute its Cuban Exile collection. The collection covers a broad range of
special interests within the Cuban community, but runs tend to be relatively recent,
short, and scattered.
Other newspaper collections of note in Florida are held by Miami-Dade Public
Libraries, 71 titles; the Fort Lauderdale Historical Society, 88 titles; the Florida
Historical Society, 58 titles; Hillsborough County Public Library, 59 titles; Orange
County Library, 62 titles; Orange County Museum, 46 titles; St. Augustine Historical
Society, 46 titles. Of the 1,735 titles listed on the survey database, 709 are held by the
University of Florida.


The Florida Newspaper Project: Life-to-Date.

Planning Phase, 1993-1994
A survey of all likely repositories of newspapers in the state was conducted over
1993-1994. A questionnaire was mailed to more than a thousand publishers, library
and museum directors, genealogical and historical societies. Follow-up mailings,
including news releases to publicize and explain the project, and telephone contact
have continued throughout the first and second grant periods. All information
obtained has been compiled into a survey database.
Diskette copies of the survey database have been given to interested institutions,
and the State Library reports daily use of its copy to answer patron queries regarding
availability of Florida newspapers. In the interim preceding full cataloging of all state
newspapers, the database has proved valuable as a finding aid, research tool, and
project resource. Its abstract field has been used for information unlikely to be found
on a catalog record. For example, abstracts in the database include information from
the notebooks of Dr. Kevin McCarthy which were a source of detailed analysis on
numerous nineteenth-century titles, confirmed and fugitive.
A professor of English at the University of Florida, Dr. McCarthy spent his free
time over several years reading every nineteenth-century Florida newspaper he could
find preserved on microfilm in repositories throughout the United States. As he read,


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UNITED STATES NEWSPAPER PROGRAM : FLORIDA.
Proposal for Continued Cataloging and Preservation Microfilming.



he made photocopies of information pertaining to publishers and editors, changes of
title and ownership, political alignment, and the like, saving and identifying these
clippings in four large notebooks. To have the results of this labor incorporated into
the survey database allows its wider usefulness.



Initial Implementation Phase, 1995-1997

Cataloging
Although Florida is currently the fourth most populous state, the number of
surviving newspaper titles is smaller than in states with a comparable population. For
one thing, the influx of people is relatively recent; for another, the climate that attracts
people is detrimental to newsprint. The lack of large numbers following the initial
survey led project staff to propose using only one team of catalogers in the first
implementation phase. Co-sponsoring institutions agreed that a reasonable plan was
to have a single cataloging team begin with the largest collection.
The two-year proposal to catalog titles at the University of Florida's Smathers
Libraries was approved in early 1995 and announced with a news release that was
translated into Spanish for the Hispanic newspapers. Special background information
on Hispanic and African-American newspapers was provided when appropriate as a
supplement to the general release. In addition, a packet containing background
information on the Florida Newspaper Project and the NEH brochure "Preserving the
Nation's Newspapers" was mailed to Florida's congressional representatives.
One cataloger with previous USNP experience and one archivist were hired full-
time in the spring of 1995, and entry of OCLC records began in June 1995. Robert
Dowd, formerly with the New York State Newspaper Program, elected to begin work
with the most difficult task, cataloging the miscellaneous rolls of microfilm in the
Florida History Collection. He and LaVerne Jenkins, archivist, implemented a team-
oriented workflow that produced these results: In the twelve-month period June 1995-
May 1996, project catalogers entered 677 new bibliographic records into the OCLC
database, modified and enhanced 954 bibliographic records in the OCLC database,
identified a total of 180 titles held by the University of Florida but needing little
significant bibliographic modification, downloaded these 1,811 CONSER-
authenticated bibliographic records into the University of Florida's online public access
catalog, and entered 2,319 local data records into the OCLC union list subsystem.
The geographic distribution of these newspapers is that 1,010 of them are Florida
titles, while 801 are from other states. We estimate that another 200 newspaper titles
will be identified at UF during the next twelve months.


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Proposal for Continued Cataloging and Preservation Microfilming.



All cataloging proposed in 1994 by the Florida Newspaper Program will be
completed ahead of schedule. This will allow time to test methods proposed for the
second implementation phase with advanced fieldwork. The state's geography is a
challenge, and firsthand experience with anticipated problems would be useful.

Preservation Microfilming
The first phase project also included an emergency microfilming proposal for nine
titles in the worst physical condition. Lending agreements and consent forms for
microform distribution were sent in March 1995 to all institutions and publishers
associated with these titles and any related titles and variations. (A blank copy of the
forms used can be found in Appendix B.) Most of these were collected by the UF
project staff. Some were mailed or delivered by the institution holding them.
Holdings that constituted a complete or as extensive a run as possible were collated,
and microfilming began in late May 1995.
By the end of December 1995, all but two of the nine titles had been microfilmed
to preservation standards by the Reprographics Unit of the Preservation Department,
University of Florida Smathers Libraries. The delay in microfilming the Colored
Citizen was a matter of waiting for two institutions in Pensacola to send their material
for collation with material from the Black Archives of Florida A & M University.
(Florida's Panhandle, including Pensacola had been hit by two hurricanes during the
1995/1996 storm season, contributing to the delay.) However, the Chronicle of Fort
Pierce may well have been lost.
The sole publisher of the Chronicle during its 35-year existence died in early 1995.
Relatives and former associates were contacted in hopes of locating back runs of the
paper that featured Zora Neale Hurston as a columnist, but no issues could be
obtained in spite of a trip to Fort Pierce in September 1995 and numerous telephone
calls before and after the visit.
Driving on to West Palm Beach from Fort Pierce, Jenkins and Mason represented
the Florida Newspaper Program at the annual meeting of the Florida Newspaper
Librarians' Association. Returning to Gainesville through Ocala, they obtained the
four sole surviving issues of the Florida Watchman from 1973. This African-
American title was published weekly from 1924 to 1973 but was never collected by
any institution.
By the end of March 1995, sixty-six reels of preservation microfilm had been
produced for eleven titles and variations, including the Colored Citizen. This is
39,542 exposures and is less than the amount estimated in the 1994 proposal, which
assumed that all material could be obtained. The calculation of 2,750 pages per hour
for collation was also inaccurate, as preservation staff found the condition of the
newsprint much worse than had been reported. Working with boxes of loose pages
broken in the middle and mismatched top and bottom was time-consuming. A further
miscalculation was omission of the cost of shipping the original newsprint back to


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Proposal for Continued Cataloging and Preservation Microfilming.



lenders, most of whom had last minute conversions, contingent to loan of the
newspapers, and wanted the paper copy returned even when microfilm copies were
provided.
Preservation staff benefited from the opportunity of limited microfilming in the
current phase and propose an expanded project of emergency and other limited
microfilming in the next phase prior to a subsequent proposal to microfilm all unfilmed
runs that meet criteria for preservation. (See Appendix C for the criteria adopted by
the Florida Newspaper Project's statewide committee.). During the summer of 1995,
the project coordinator assessed the holdings information on all database records to
make a preliminary recommendation on preservation in a special field; 286 records are
currently tagged for future microfilming.



Proposed Work for Implementation Phase I, 1997-1999

Plan for Cataloging
A single team of one cataloger, one archivist, and part-time student assistants
based at the University of Florida's Smathers Libraries is proposed for a second two-
year implementation phase. As noted in the report on the present phase, the number of
unique newspapers held in repositories throughout the state is relatively small. These
holdings tend to either duplicate or complement holdings at the University of Florida.
(See Appendix D for a report on the distribution of total unique holdings in the state
including currently published newspapers.)
While the "three-person" cataloging team appears adequate for the number of
newspapers to be cataloged, the state's geography remains a significant factor in
deployment. The distance from Pensacola in the Panhandle to Key West in the
extreme south is nearly 1000 miles. To accomplish USNP objectives at reasonable
cost and with maximum efficiency, the proposal for the second phase of the project
focuses on cataloging the unique newspaper titles not held by the University of Florida
and union listing all the Florida newspaper holdings at target sites.
Using the survey database, project staff have identified specific titles at specific
sites that require firsthand inspection for original cataloging. Other sites will not be
visited and other holdings at a visited site will not be inventoried. Rather, photocopies
of specific parts of newspaper issues can be supplied in some instances to defray travel
cost. In other cases, the courier service for state institutions will be used for
borrowing of material when necessary. In a few instances, institutions will be asked to
ship holdings to the University of Florida for cataloging and microfilming in tandem.
For example, those titles in the University of Miami's Cuban Exile collection that are
significant will be shipped to the University of Florida for cataloging and microfilming
once the queue of titles proposed for emergency microfilming is cleared.


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Proposal for Continued Cataloging and Preservation Microfilming.



The efficiencies of the approach proposed are reflected in the following numbers:
Of some 375 newspapers currently publishing in Florida, fewer than half need be
contacted; of 122 institutions reporting newspaper holdings, only 78 need be visited.
The distribution of the unique newspaper holdings is broken down by region and
county in (See Appendix D ) and a map showing the location of the on-site cataloging
needed is given as (See Appendix E).
Cataloging will conform to full-level CONSER standards. As has been the case
with the current grant, USNP staff at the University of Florida are creating and
contributing full level CONSER records to the OCLC database. Other USNP
cataloging sites have contributed their records as minimal level CONSER records.
The essential difference between these two levels is the authority control component.
Until very recently the University of Florida was the only NACO library in the state of
Florida. As such, we felt it an important contribution to establish full authority records
for all the place names encountered when cataloging Florida newspapers. Having
added this extra authority component, we are in the position of contributing all of our
Florida newspaper records as full level CONSER records. The added service to the
state and other USNP participants has not interfered with productivity as evidenced by
the fact that we were able to finish the University of Florida cataloging phase of the
project ahead of schedule. For this next phase of the grant we will continue to create
full-level CONSER records.
Local data records will be created on OCLC for all titles cataloged. Current
profiling costs are $25 for institutions with active OCLC symbols and $75 for
institutions that would require an OCLC symbol be established. Project staff have
identified 149 newspaper repositories which have currently active OCLC symbols. For
the sake of efficiency, and in an effort to reduce costs, we have decided to create one
symbol for each county in the state and "umbrella" holdings within these 67 counties
for all institutions which do not have an OCLC symbol. By doing this we only incur
the $75 charge for each county (67) rather than for all institutions, which is a
significantly higher number. In addition, we are spared the time consuming process of
trying to identify the pertinent details about every location ahead of time which would
need to have a symbol assigned.
A current trend in newspaper publishing has been the increased presence of
electronic versions of newspapers. These are not duplicates of the printed form, but
have their own "persona" due to the differences of the medium. (See the Editor and
Publisher Co. web site, http://www.mediainfo.com/ephone/npaper/nphtm/online.htm
for just one entree to a huge database of web versions of newspapers.) Noting the
trend towards electronic publishing, as well as users' interest in using the electronic
versions, the Florida Newspaper Program proposes to identify electronic versions of
Florida newspapers. This follows a CONSER proposal that allows for the adding of
an 856 field with URLs for the electronic alternative on the cataloging record for the
print copy.


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Proposal for Continued Cataloging and Preservation Microfilming.



Because the survey database is so central to the work of the cataloging team in the
second implementation phase, a laptop computer and software is requested for field
work. This will allow on-site searches when questions arise and for preliminary
cataloging. An additional benefit is the ability to store cataloging information directly
on the computer rather than on loose pages that are easily misplaced or lost. No other
equipment is requested.
Since timing is critical, we anticipate an increased reliance on telephone contact
over the US Postal Service during this phase. Budgeting for calls in order to arrange
for visits, explain the details of the project, and investigate details pertaining to
newspaper collections is necessary.

Travel for cataloging
In estimating the number of new bibliographic records to be contributed to OCLC
by the project's traveling cataloging team, we make the conservative estimate that for
every reported title, two (bibliographic) titles are actually held. National experience
has shown this to be a reasonable factor. For purposes of planning, we therefore
expect twice as many uncataloged titles to be discovered on site than were reported in
the 1993 survey. The total number of new newspaper titles we expect to catalog is
1,489. This number has been arrived at by doubling the number of titles reported in
the survey, excepting the University of Miami's Cuban Exile collection, the number of
titles for which we believe to be precise. Our reported new title figure is 642, while
additionally, the Cuban Exile collection is reported to be 205 individual titles.
USNP guidelines suggest that 80 titles per month can be cataloged and fully union-
listed by a cataloging team of two people. Allowing time for travel, we are using an
estimate of ten titles per day in planning for on-site inventory of collections. Over the
twenty-four month period, we expect to catalog an average of 62 new titles per
month. Union-listing of all holdings will take place in Gainesville. Entry of holdings
into the OCLC union list subsystem will include the unique titles inventoried in the
field and Florida newspapers held by other institutions as well as by the University of
Florida, and therefore cataloged during the 1995-1997 phase of the project.
Early in the planning phase of the Florida Newspaper Project, the state was divided
into four sections for organization of the paper files. This regional division will now
be used for sequential focus on geographic areas. Over a two-year period, there will
be six months to complete the cataloging of unique titles in each section: West Florida
(ten counties), North Florida (twenty-six counties), Central Florida (twenty-one
counties), and South Florida (ten counties). Because more cities will need to be visited
than are listed below, two extra trips to each region are included in the budget to
ensure staffs ability to visit all targeted collections and to investigate repositories
reporting incomplete survey information.


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Proposal for Continued Cataloging and Preservation Microfilming.



Regional summaries
In West Florida, the largest concentration of unique titles is in Pensacola, which is
330 miles from Gainesville. Other uncataloged collections are in Panama City (239
miles from Gainesville) and Crestview (291 miles from Gainesville). The reported
number of uncataloged titles is 87 in this region, therefore, the cataloger will need five
weeks of fieldwork to cover the area. Each week involves one day of round-trip
driving, four nights stay, and four full days of work with targeted collections.
In North Florida, the largest concentration of unique titles is in Tallahassee, which
is 144 miles from Gainesville. Other uncataloged collections are in Jacksonville, St.
Augustine, and Fernandina (71, 76, and 100 miles from Gainesville, respectively). The
reported number of uncataloged titles is 180 in this region, therefore, the cataloger will
need nine weeks of fieldwork in this section. Again, a four-day workweek at ten titles
per day and with one day of travel is the basis of the estimate.
In Central Florida, the largest concentration of unique titles is in Tampa, which is
128 miles from Gainesville. Other uncataloged collections are in Orlando (109 miles
from Gainesville) Bradenton (166 miles from Gainesville), and Sarasota (177 miles
from Gainesville). The reported number of uncataloged titles is 193 in this region,
therefore, the cataloger will need ten weeks of fieldwork in this section.
In South Florida, the largest concentration of unique titles is in Miami, 332 miles
from Gainesville. Other uncataloged collections are in Fort Myers (231 miles from
Gainesville) and Fort Lauderdale (290 miles from Gainesville). Key West, 478 miles
from Gainesville, will also be visited. In this region, a three-day workweek with two
days of travel is reasonable. Another alteration in this section pertains to the general
expectation of two titles for each one reported. The 205 titles reported by the
University of Miami for its Cuban Exile collection is expected to be accurate; further,
most of these will be cataloged when microfilmed at the University of Florida.
However, some unique titles at the University of Miami are non-Cuban. Expecting to
find approximately 182 other unique uncataloged titles in this region, the cataloger will
need twelve weeks of fieldwork in this section.

Additional travel
The United States Newspaper Program is a nationally coordinated effort. This
coordination is enhanced by an annual USNP meeting in Washington, DC each spring.
Additionally, an ALA discussion group meets each summer at the annual conference.
We are including a request for travel to these four library conferences, and a yearly
visit by the USNP coordinator from the Library of Congress. The annual USNP
meetings are attended by all participating members in the program, as well as USNP
"alumni." These meetings help ensure coordination and focus at a national level.
Robert Harriman, CONSER USNP Coordinator, makes regular trips in order to
review the progress of state projects. We are requesting funds for one visit per year.


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Proposal for Continued Cataloging and Preservation Microfilming.



We are currently fully staffed with one professional cataloger and an archivist.
This team has been very efficient and effective. We hope to keep the team we
currently have; however, should we lose one of our team members, particularly the
professional cataloger, we have budgeted for interviews for a professional position.
The trend with other state projects has been that these temporary-status positions are
frequently vacated when a librarian finds more permanent employment. Travel funds
sufficient to bring two potential candidates to the University of Florida campus for
interviews are included in this proposal.

Cataloging Unit and Staff
All OCLC records will be input and reviewed at the University of Florida under the
supervision of Cecilia Botero, CONSER- trained cataloger and head of the Resource
Services Department's Serials Unit. Ms. Botero will continue to contribute .5 FTE to
the project.
The University of Florida became a full CONSER member in 1977. In 1981, it
was awarded a Title IIC grant to undertake a retrospective serials conversion project
along with seven other academic research libraries in the Southeast. This work led to
the development of the MARC holdings format. The University of Florida and the
Florida Center for Library Automation were instrumental in the development of the
MARC format for the NOTIS integrated system software (NOTIS is the overall name
for the library computer system of state universities in Florida).
The University of Florida became an associate of the Name Authority Cooperative
(NACO) program in 1987 after Ms. Botero received formal training at the Library of
Congress. The Serials Unit of the Cataloging Department currently does NACO work
for all its serial titles and for Latin American and Florida headings that appear on any
monograph.
Cataloging staff at the University of Florida have been notably active in national
cooperative programs. Martha Hruska, Director for Technical Services at the
University of Florida, served as chair of the CONSER Policy Committee from 1992 to
1994 and continues to be an active member of the committee. Recognizing that
technical services will be the focus of project work in future implementation phases,
the present principal investigator for the project proposes to have Ms. Hruska serve in
this capacity beginning in 1997.
Staff resumes may be found in Appendix J.


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Proposal for Continued Cataloging and Preservation Microfilming.



Plan for Preservation Microfilming
A plan of emergency microfilming is proposed in combination with a routine
newspaper filming project concentrated on papers published in the state's population
centers. As in the previous proposal funded by NEH, the University and state of
Florida recognize a continuing need to preserve, in microfilm, titles in immediate
danger of destruction or loss. The population centers were selected to begin the
routine preservation microfilming segment of this project because of their importance
in the state and because the repositories of the state's unfilmed newspapers are
concentrated in them. (See Appendix C for the criteria adopted by the Florida
Newspaper Project's statewide committee.)
Titles selected for emergency microfilming have been documented in previous state
and USNP surveys to be the sole remaining copies. All are extremely embrittled,
unable to pass one double fold using the double fold test utilized by libraries to
describe embrittlement. Papers held by libraries are subject to use and many, because
of their importance in their region of the state, are literally being used to destruction.
Papers held by their publishers, those less frequently used, are stored in less than ideal
conditions. And, in the past two years we have been made painfully aware of their
jeopardy with the destruction by fire of two newspaper offices housing complete runs
of their publications.
Titles selected for emergency microfilming have also been reviewed and
recommended by the Florida Newspaper Project committee, among them newspaper
publishers, historians of newspaper publishing in Florida, and Florida historians.
Emergency microfilming for preservation is restricted to runs of two titles: The Datil
Pepper (St. Augustine, FL) and The Florida Advocate (Wauchula, FL), as well as the
Cuban-American newspaper collection maintained by the University of Miami. Both
The Datil Pepper and The Florida Advocate are important titles, representing their
respective regions of the state. Each paper documents vibrant periods in the social and
economic life of northeast and central Florida, of "old" Florida.
The Datil Pepper records life in and around St. Augustine, the nation's oldest city.
As the title suggest, the paper deals with the agricultural economy upon which modem
St. Augustine was built. Prior to its contemporary history and embarkation upon a
tourist economy overshadowed by the growing importance of Jacksonville, St.
Augustine was the center of Florida's northeastern economy. It was a major railway
hub at the intersection of north-south and east-west rail lines. Crops, cotton, lumber,
and tung seed among them, flowed toward St. Augustine for sea passage to the
northern states and Europe. The Florida Advocate records life in rural central Florida
and, again, the agricultural economy which was to lay the foundations of modem
Florida. Unlike agricultural commodities of northeast Florida which required export
for processing, those of central Florida, vegetables and citrus among them, allowed
immediate consumption as well as export, feeding both the economy and people of
Florida.


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Proposal for Continued Cataloging and Preservation Microfilming.



The Cuban Exile newspaper collection contains the sole remaining issues of 205
titles published between 1960 and 1980 by south Florida's new and growing Cuban
community, much of it documenting life in the Little Havana section of Miami and
expatriate issues which continue to affect Florida's and America's politics. Surveys
indicate that the several titles which comprise this collection will not be augmented as
a result of additional survey and cataloging. Indeed, the University of Miami, which
compiled and holds this collection, reports that it is the result of several years' effort
and intensive searches with contacts throughout Miami and Florida's Cuban expatriate
community. (See Appendix F.)
The population centers' newspapers represent several constituent populations
including native Floridians; the political establishment; the African-American
community; and other minority communities; the agriculture/aquaculture industries and
others. They document several important eras of Florida's history and the state's
geographic regionalism. In a state without much of a documented past, before 1920,
they mark the true color of old Florida as well as its entry into the modem era of
industrialization and commerce.
Selected for what these papers represent as much as for the history and society
they document, the newspapers record the history and regional color of Pensacola
(Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties) in West Florida; Tallahassee (Leon County), the
state capital, in North Florida, Tampa/St. Petersburg (Hillsborough, Pasco and Pinellas
Counties) on Central Florida's Gulf coast; and Orlando (Orange and Osceola Counties)
in the heart of Central Florida. (See Appendix G.) These papers are relatively easy to
get to and have been largely ignored in the various preservation microfilming projects
to date. In total, 51 newspapers, reasonably complete for purposes of filming and not
previously filmed, have been selected from these population centers. Titles from other
population centers are excluded from this phase, pending additional cataloging effort.
Appendix G is a statistical summary used to budget for microfilming.
Preservation microfilming effort will begin with the titles selected for emergency
filming and subsequently work through the selected population centers following
cataloging. Newspapers will be retrieved by traveling catalogers and return-shipped
after filming. All filming will take place in the preservation microfilming facilities of
the University of Florida's George A. Smathers Libraries. The University of Florida
will also continue its program of Florida newspaper preservation microfilming outside
of the United States Newspaper Program. Appendix A contains a list of titles in the
continuing program; a complete list, including international titles, can be found at the
URL http://karamelik. eastlib. ufl. edu/repro/micrographics/nq. html.


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UNITED STATES NEWSPAPER PROGRAM : FLORIDA.
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Preservation Microfilming and Newspapers at the University of Florida.
Newspapers cataloged in the preceding phase were those held primarily by the
University of Florida. With few exceptions, each of these titles had been filmed in the
course of the University's on-going newspaper preservation microfilming program
prior to the USNP. Active since the 1930's, shortly after the first commercial
application of microfilm, and experiencing tremendous growth after World War II, the
University's microfilming program has grown into one of the largest in the nation. The
program annually films more than 90 Florida, Caribbean and Latin American, African,
and Russian newspapers, as well as several thousand monographs, in more than
600,000 exposures, nearly 400,000 of which are created in-house. More than half, 59,
of the titles in this continuing program are Florida newspapers.
The program has filmed to preservation standard since 1987 when the University's
Preservation Department was established. Filming practice adheres to guidelines put
forth in the RLG Preservation Microfilming Handbook (Nancy Elkington, editor.
Mountain View, CA : RLG, 1992) and all pertinent AIIM, ANSI and ISO standards
for media, imaging and processing, and enclosures.
The Libraries run a hybrid newspaper microfilming program. Every step in this
program is completed, whether by the Libraries' or vendor's staff, to standard and
under sanitary conditions. Filming is completed in-house using two Kodak MRD-2
cameras and raw 35 mm polyester film as specified by the RLG Handbook. The full-
time use of one camera is proposed for microfilming newspapers selected by this
program. Imaged film is picked up and processed several times daily by the Libraries'
contracted vendor of processing and duplicating services, Micrographics, Inc.
(Gainesville, FL). Processing is completed using a deep tank processor and includes a
final bath in IPI-formulated polysulfide solution (i.e., SilverLock) for added protection
against oxidation.
After an initial inspection by the vendor, the camera master is returned to the
Libraries for frame by frame inspection, editing, reshoots and splicing. The Libraries'
inspection is completed using a light board outfitted for inspection of microfilm reels;
microscope; densitometer calibrated with every use; skew meter; and ultrasonic welder
for "archival splices." Inspected and edited film, then, is returned to the vendor for
generation of the print master and positive patron-use copy using a high-speed
duplicator and deep tank processor. The print master, like the camera master, receives
SilverLock protection. All reels are inspected by the vendor and processed on reels
with reel ties and into clam shell boxes which meet or exceed the specifications of
ANSI and RLG Handbook guidelines. Regardless of generation, for every batch of
negatives processed, the vendor also runs methylene blue tests. Camera masters are
again inspected, this time on the light box with an eye-loop for evidence of scratching,


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UNITED STATES NEWSPAPER PROGRAM : FLORIDA.
Proposal for Continued Cataloging and Preservation Microfilming.



abrasion and fingerprints. The print-master and positive patron-use copy are likewise
inspected, with the addition of density and resolution readings as required by RLG
Handbook. Final editing, using the positive on a microfilm reader also is conducted
for approximately 10% of all films.
Final editing and generation of patron-use positives is followed by up-dating of the
Libraries' FILMLOG tracking system records. FILMLOG, an automated product of
the Preservation Department, tracks paper-based materials, microforms and electronic
media from selection for reproduction, through reel or disk programming and
reproduction and, after reproduction, is capable of recording and generating technical
information reports in NOTIS, OCLC and RLIN MARC styles. These reports are
forwarded to catalogers in the Resource Services Department which updates
bibliographic and holdings records. FILMLOG is also programmed to produce box
labels, packing lists and storage reports used to prepare, ship and maintain inventory
control of microforms and electronic media in storage.
Negotiation of microform distribution rights is the final act of preservation,
excluding on-going film maintenance and storage facility inspections. Negotiation of
distribution rights, using standardized forms, provides for the legal and authorized
distribution of film. Distribution and sale of film, a modest business, regulated by state
law, recoup the cost of duplicate production as well as the Libraries' film maintenance
and storage facility inspection program.
In addition to newspapers, the Libraries' Preservation program has successfully
completed several monograph and archives preservation microfilming projects under
the auspices of Research Libraries Group (RLG) and Southeastern Library Network
(SOLINET) cooperative preservation microfilming projects with NEH funding.
Appendix I is a list of prior projects. In addition to grant funding, the microfilming
program is supported by state funds, allocated annually. The program's average
annual state funded budget of $72,000 -- including raw materials, processing and
duplicating fees, and staff costs belies the production of, on average, 400,000
exposures annually. The University of Florida has learned to optimize costs without
jeopardizing image quality.

Preservation Microfilm Storage.
Optimal storage of preservation microfilm is taken seriously by the University.
The condition of the University's microfilm holdings created prior to 1987 is well
documented. A report, "Condition Survey of Master Microfilm Negatives, University
of Florida Libraries," (Abbey Newsletter, v.15 no.3 (May 1991), pp. 47-51) establishes
the condition of the University's Florida newspaper microfilms. Deteriorating as a
result of acetate-base film instability and volatilization, the collection has since been
"regenerated" on polyester-base film using techniques capable of optimizing and
preserving image quality and removed to an optimal storage environment.


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UNITED STATES NEWSPAPER PROGRAM : FLORIDA.
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The University's Master Microfilm Storage RFP and contract is regarded as one of
the most exacting currently in use. Contract for storage and duplication of print
masters is currently held by Preservation Resources (Bethlehem, PA). Contract for
storage of first-generation camera masters is currently held by National Underground
Storage (Boyers, PA).

Preservation Microfilming Staff.
Preservation Department staff have and continue to contribute to the
micrographics standards process. The Department's Chair, Erich Kesse, served on the
committee responsible for technical specifications in the RLG Handbook, as well as
the ALA Reproduction of Library Materials Section's Standards Committee and
several AIIM standards committees. Mr. Kesse will contribute 0.1 FTE as
preservation coordinator for this program. The Department's Reprographics Unit
Head, Robert Harrell, serves on the AIIM Standards Committee responsible for
revision ofANSI/AIIM standard MS23, the primary introduction to microfilming. Mr.
Harrell will contribute 0.15 FTE overseeing microfilm production and quality control.
The Brittle Materials Coordinator, Nelda Schwartz, has 6 years of experience
preparing materials for preservation microfilming. Ms. Schwartz will contribute 0.15
FTE and be assisted by 0.25 FTE student assistant previous employed in preparation,
tracking and records creation procedures. Preservation microfilming will be
completed by 0.5 FTE assistant microfilm technician.
All staff have participated in several NEH funded cooperative preservation
microfilming projects. Micrographics, Inc. has worked, under contract or other
agreement, with the University for more than 12 years. Its past preservation
microfilming experience includes processing and duplicating preservation microfilms
produced by the University of Florida for both state and grant funded projects and
preservation microfilming of the Swann Archive, as well as several civil and church
archives in the Caribbean, Latin America and Spain. James Craig, President and
General Manager of Micrographics, Inc., is a member of the Association for
Information and Image Management (AIIM) and has served on or chaired numerous
AIIM standards committees.


Plan for Program Building
Dolores Jenkins, the present principal investigator and Journalism Librarian at the
Smathers Libraries, will continue to contribute 0.1 FTE to the project as an active
member of the in-house committee. She will represent the Florida Newspaper
Program at meetings around the state, using her contacts to promote a broad base of
support and cooperation from publishers and librarians. As part of our publicity
campaign, we will be mailing 350 newspaper project brochures to a target audience.


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Proposal for Continued Cataloging and Preservation Microfilming.



John Ingram, head of Special Collections at the Smathers Libraries, will also
promote project goals and serve on the in-house committee at 0.05 FTE. Special
Collections and its P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History will monitor holdings and
collections maintenance for future preservation.


Page- 16







Statement of History of Grants


If the project has received previous support from any federal or nonfederal sources, including the Endow-
nent, please list below the individual sources of these funds as well as the date and total dollar amount of
each contribution to the project. If the project has had a long history of support, the sources and contributions
nay be grouped and summarized so that the list will not exceed one page.




















































_ _ __ .Ij









United States Newspaper Program: Florida
Interim Report, March 1997 October. 1998








NEH Grant Number: PS-20985-95










Submitted by Martha Hruska, PI
PO Box 117001
Library West
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
January 1999










The United States Newspaper Program: Florida has spent the last six months getting back on
track, following an eight month vacancy in the cataloger position. Susan Constantineau was hired
and started working as the new Project cataloger in May, 1998, replacing Robert Dowd. Susan
came to the project with cataloging experience from Dartmouth. She has learned quickly about
newspaper and CONSER cataloging, as well as OCLC union listing. She has already visited 17
sites in the North Florida area, verifying and identifying holdings and additional titles.

This interim report was delayed due to the turnover in the project cataloger position. Now that the
position has been successfully filled, we are better able to project how long it will take to complete
the project goals. With the cataloger position having been vacant for eight months, I am
requesting a 6 month no-cost extension, June 1999 through the end of November 1999. That will
enable us to complete the project cataloging and preservation microfilming goals.

Cataloging Report

Full level CONSER cataloging was completed for 110 records from June 1997 through May 1998.
From May 1998 through October 1998, another 61 full level CONSER catalog records have been
completed for Florida newspapers. Most all of these titles in this phase represent titles held in
libraries outside of the University of Florida. 30 of these titles were original catalog records, 18
records were modifications of existing OCLC records, and 13 were original records for the
microfilm versions of titles.

Susan Constantineau has started making field trips in the local area, completing cataloging and
verification of holdings for Citrus, Marion, and Nassau counties. She has nearly completed Duval,
Hernando, and Lake counties. In total, she has completed 17 site visits to date and finding a total
of 30 additional titles to add to the database. Her plans for future field trips will be to cover central
and south Florida, then to cover the University of West Florida and the Pensacola area, finally the
Florida State Library and the Tallahassee area.

The OCLC union listing of Florida holdings is well underway and should be completed by
January. Improvements to the inhouse database file are also underway and should also be
completed in January.

Preservation Report

Preservation microfilming has continued during the period on the publication, the Jewish
Floridian. This title was identified in the Miami area and, since the original survey was conducted
the family has agreed to filming. Its rarity, condition, and the extent of available holdings well
warranted preservation microfilming. This title represents 10 simultaneously running variant titles,
with differing content and layout, from regions and cities, across Florida. 13 volumes have been
completed to date. It is projected that the remainder of the title will be filmed in January.

It should be noted that delays in the Preservation microfilming occurred during this period
because our cameras were disabled by mechanical problems and that we were unable to send,
within Florida's procurement guidelines, additional papers to our vendor since we previously had
filled his queue with an extensive run of EL NACIONAL (Caracas, Venezuela).

Other microfilming projects in queue are incidental titles and issues from the St. Augustine area
and the Cuban exile papers at the University of Miami. Discussions are continuing to make
special arrangements to film and catalog those materials.

With the extension through November 1999, it is projected that we will be able to meet the
emergency preservation microfilming goals of the grant.









Program Building

Early in 1999, the Florida USNP team will revise and update the original brochure to circulate to
our State committee, and all participating libraries.

Planning is underway to put together the final phase of the Florida newspaper project, completing
priority microfilming, and possibly digitizing selective titles. We will be conducting a survey to
determine how many Florida newspapers have plans to digitize retrospectively.








United States Newspaper Program : Florida
Appendix A.
Florida Newspapers Currently Filmed by the University of Florida.


NEWSPAPER TITLE COUNTY OF PUBLICATION
APALACHICOLA TIMES ......................... Apalachicola, FL
APOPKA CHIEF ............. ... ............ .. Apopka, FL
ARCAD IAN ............................. ................ Arcadia, FL
BAKER COUNTY PRESS .........................MacClenny, FL
BELLE GLADE SUN ................................Belle Glade, FL
BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH ...... Starke, FL
CALHOUN LIBERTY JOURNAL ............Bristol, FL
CALOOSA BELLE ...................................Labelle, FL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE ............ Inverness, FL
CLAY COUNTY CRESCENT ................. Green Cove Springs, FL
CLEWISTON NEW S ................................ Clewiston, FL
COUNTY RECORD .................................Blountstown, FL
COURIER ..................................................Plant City, FL
DAILY OKEECHOBEE NEWS ................ Okeechobee, FL
DEFUNIAK HERALD ................................DeFuniak Springs, FL
DIXIE COUNTY ADVOCATE ..................Cross City, FL
FLAGLER/PALM COAST NEWS
TRIBUNE ............................................ Bunnell, FL
FLORIDA STAR ..................................... Jacksonville, FL
FROSTPROOF NEWS ...............................Frostproof, FL
GACETA ................................................. Tampa, FL
GADSDEN COUNTY TIMES ................... Quincy, FL
GILCHRIST COUNTY JOURNAL ............ Trenton, FL
GLADES COUNTY DEMOCRAT ...........Moore Haven, FL
GULF COUNTY BREEZE ....................Wewahitchka, FL
HERALD ADVOCATE ............................Wauchula, FL
HERITAGE: FLORIDA NEWS ................Fern Park, FL
HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER ........Bonifay, FL
INDEPENDENT ALLIGATOR ............... Gainesville, FL
JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN ............. Marianna, FL
JACKSONVILLE FREE PRESS ................ Jacksonville, FL
JASPER NEW S ....................................... Jasper, FL
JAX AIR NEW S ....................................... Jacksonville, FL
JACKSONVILLE JEWISH NEWS.............. Jacksonville, FL








United States Newspaper Program : Florida
Appendix A.
Florida Newspapers Currently Filmed by the University of Florida.


NEWSPAPER TITLE COUNTY OF PUBLICATION
JEWISH ADVOCATE OF SOUTH
BROW ARD......................................... Hollywood, FL
JEWISH FLORIDIAN .............................Miami, FL
JEWISH JOURNAL ..................................Ft. Lauderdale, FL
JEWISH NEWS OF PINELLAS
COUNTY .......................................... Clearwater, FL
LAKE CITY REPORTER ...........................Lake City, FL
LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL ......................Bronson, FL
MADISON ENTERPRISE RECORDER..... Madison, FL
MAYO FREE PRESS .................................Mayo, FL
MIAMI JEWISH TRIBUNE .......................Miami, FL
MIAMI TIMES ...................................... Miami, FL
MONTICELLO NEWS ...............................Monticello, FL
NEWS-LEADER ....................................Fernandina Beach, FL
NEW S SUN .......................................... Sebring, FL
OKALOOSA NEWS JOURNAL ................. Crestview, FL
OSCEOLA NEWS GAZETTE ...................Kissimmee, FL
PALM BEACH JEWISH WORLD ..............West Palm Beach, FL
PASCO NEW S .................. ....................Dade City, FL
PERRY NEWS-HERALD .......................Perry, FL
POLK COUNTY DEMOCRAT ................Bartow, FL
PRESS GAZETTE .............................. Milton, FL
SOUTHERN JEWISH WEEKLY ............... Jacksonville, FL
SOUTH LAKE PRESS ............................Clermont, FL
STAR .................................. .................... Port. St. Joe, FL
STUART NEW S .......................................... Stuart, FL
SUMTER COUNTY TIMES ......................Bushnell, FL
SUWANEE DEMOCRAT ..........................Live Oak, FL
SYRIAN-LEBANESE STAR ...................... Jacksonville, FL
TACO TIM ES .......................................... erry, FL
TARPON SPRINGS LEADER................. Tarpon Springs, FL
TIM ES ................. .......... ...................... Dunedin, FL
UNION COUNTY TIMES ....................Lake Butler, FL








United States Newspaper Program : Florida
Appendix A.
Florida Newspapers Currently Filmed by the University of Florida.


NEWSPAPER TITLE COUNTY OF PUBLICATION
VENICE GONDOLIER ...........................Venice, FL
WAUKULLA NEWS ................................ Crawfordville, FL
WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS ......... Chipley, FL
WEST ORANGE TIMES ...........................Winter Garden, FL





United States Newspaper Program : Florida.
APPENDIX B.




MICROFORM DISTRIBUTION CONSENT AGREEMENT



I, (please print) am authorized to represent
and bind hereinafter "NEWSPAPER",
as stated below.

NEWSPAPER hereby grants to the University of Florida, acting for and on behalf of
the Board of Regents of the State of Florida, hereinafter "UNIVERSITY",
nonexclusive rights to microfilm and distribute copies of NEWSPAPER to other
educational institutions and public libraries, for the period of three years beginning
on this date,

UNIVERSITY may impose a reasonable charge to cover the actual expenses of
copying and distribution. UNIVERSITY may designate a third party agent to act on
its behalf in accordance with this MICROFORM DISTRIBUTION CONSENT
AGREEMENT.

NEWSPAPER may cancel and terminate this agreement for any reason upon the
provision of notice to:
University of Florida Libraries
Preservation Department
P.O. Box 117007
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
U. S. A.
by Certified Mail, no less than thirty (30) days prior to the effective date of
cancellation or termination.

NEWSPAPER

(Title)


(Authorized Representative's Signature)


(Date)

Please retain copy of this agreement and return signed original to the address above.

















Appendix C:

Newspaper Selection Criteria








Selection Criteria


A goal of the Florida Newspaper Project is the development of a
statewide plan for collection management and preservation of newspapers.
Such a plan must include a clear set of criteria for the selection of newspapers
for cataloging and microfilming. Generally, titles will not be cataloged
without preservation intent, although titles for which there are no holdings
or only provisional holdings can be listed on the USNP/FL database. The
following criteria will guide decisions on which titles to include in the
Florida Newspaper Project.


Place of Publication

A title included in the Florida Newspaper Project must have been
published in Florida during at least part of its publication history. For
example, a title like the Florida-New Yorker would be included because,
among other reasons, it was published for a while in Eustis as well as in New
York.


Newspapers vs. Magazines and Other Types of Publications

A clear distinction between newspapers and newsletters, magazines,
and advertising sheets can sometimes be difficult, and a publication may
move from one format to another. To be included in the Florida Newspaper
Project, a title must have been deemed a newspaper by its readership for most
of its publication history and must conform to characteristics commonly
associated with newspapers, as outlined below.

Frequency of publication. Newspapers may be published with a wide
range of frequency, but they are usually published at least monthly.
Publications that are published less frequently (quarterly, etc.) will not be
considered newspapers unless a special case can be made based on other
criteria.

Advertising. Free newspapers whose costs are paid by advertising will
not be excluded, but shoppers and other publications that contain mostly
advertisements and are read primarily for the information in the
advertisements will not be included in the Florida Newspaper Project. As a
rule, at least 50 percent of a newspaper's information should fall outside the
advertising content, although exceptions may be made when a publication
includes public service announcements and no other newspaper exists for a
community.








Reliance on news services. Some publications, usually free, contain
articles of general interest, but these are provided by the various wire and
news services available regionally and nationally. For example, there are
entertainment publications that contain ads for local restaurants and other
businesses sandwiched between articles on national celebrities and the like
that have been produced more as publicity than news. Unless a publication
contains original reporting on and for a particular community, it will not be
included in the Florida Newspaper Project.

Physical appearance. Although newspapers vary in size, their general
appearance is distinctive from that of newsletters and magazines. The
distinguishing features are:

Use of newsprint rather than other kinds of paper

Presentation of text in columns

Presence of masthead and text on front page

Magazines and newsletters tend to use a heavier grade of paper, and
the paper for magazines may be slick or glossy as well. Magazines and
journals usually have a front cover, often illustrated, that lists a table of
contents rather than presenting actual copy. Although magazines and
newsletters may use columns, newspapers tend to use more columns that are
smaller in width; i.e., at least four columns for a regular tabloid-sized
publication.

Some publications whose physical format deviates from the traditional
appearance of a newspaper may be included when their function is dearly
that of a traditional newspaper in bringing news of timely interest to a
particular community. For example, Moon subtitled "Gainesville's Free
Newsmonthly," will be included because it contains original reporting on
news items of interest to the area's alternative community even though the
publication was formerly named Moon Magazine and continues to use a
front cover. It is printed on newsprint, is slightly larger than a regular tabloid,
and has sometimes two, sometimes three, and sometimes four columns of
copy per page. The National Enquirer, published in Florida, will not be
included because it is officially defined as a magazine by the American Bureau
of Circulation on the basis of its cover format. Its paper is of a slightly better
grade than newsprint. The line is often fine, and decisions must be made on
a case-by-case basis.


Research Value








The research value of a particular publication will be determined by a
variety of characteristics. At its meeting September 11, 1993, the statewide
committee of the Florida Newspaper Project agreed that the interests of local
history and genealogy should be considered as well as those of academic
research in determine research value. Accordingly, decisions on value will
consider the following.

Content. The degree to which original reporting predominates over a
reliance on news services and other prepackaged articles and over the space
allotted to advertising adds to the research value of any newspaper.

Viewpoint. The degree to which a newspaper's coverage or slant is
unique rather than comparable to that of other titles in terms of audience,
area, and time period adds to its research value.

Quality. The degree to which a newspaper is a good example of its type
adds to its value.

Period of publication. Other things being equal, value and risk of loss
increase with age. The Florida Newspaper Project will arbitrarily consider any
title from the nineteenth century of value and at risk. For twentieth-century
titles, whether the period of publication is deemed a newsworthy time will
depend on the place of publication to a large extent because social and
economic changes have not been uniform within the state. Newspapers that
reflect newsworthy times and events are of greater value than otherwise.


Geographic and Ethnic Balance

To achieve and maintain a balance of representation within the state,
the Florida Newspaper Project will make a special effort to include titles from
all areas of the state and for all ethnic and other special groups. When ethnic
groups and publications are scattered throughout the state, titles that are
representative of both group and area will be selected whenever the criteria
for research value are met.


Considerations for Microfilming

In choosing titles for microfilming, the Florida Newspaper Project will
consider additional criteria: length of run and completeness of holdings, the
physical condition of the paper itself, and the storage conditions for the loose
or bound issues. Permission to film and distribute copies of the microfilm
produced is also necessary.








Length of Run and Completeness of Holdings


In general, long runs will be preferred to short runs, and volumes that
are less than 90 percent complete will not be filmed unless research value is
overriding. Every effort will be made to ensure that runs to be filmed are as
complete as possible.


Physical Condition

When text is illegible or missing because of mutilations and
deterioration of newsprint, the value of microfilming is reduced. Runs that
contain illegible or missing text will be considered proportionately
incomplete, and research value must then be evident. When value is high
and physical condition is poor, emergency microfilming will be
recommended.


Permission

An agreement that permits the distribution and sale of microfilm at
cost after filming must be signed by those with authority to grant such rights
before filming begins. A copy of the agreement to be used by the Florida
Newspaper Project is included in the appendices.


Emergency Microfilming in the Initial Implementation Phase


Because cataloging is the focus of the initial implementation phase,
microfilming during the next three years will be limited to previously
unfilmed titles that are clearly at risk and that have evident research value.
A title will be considered at risk when:

the paper itself is in poor condition,

current storage conditions are unsuitable, or

other factors make permission to film and distribute use
copies less likely with delay.







Appendix .>
Distribution Of Unique Newspaper Titles In Florida


WEST FLORIDA (10 counties, 87 OCLC records)

Bay County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Northwest Regional Library System 10
Gulf Coast Community College 1


Escambia Country, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC
as follows:

University of West Florida 47
Pensacola Historical Society 5
West Florida Regional Libraries 1
Publisher held Escambia County newspapers 3

Gulf County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Port St. Joe 1


Holmes County. project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Publisher held Holmes County newspapers 2

Okaloosa County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC
as follows:

Valparaiso Historical Society 9
Publisher held Okaloosa County newspapers 4

Santa Rosa County. project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC
as follows:

Jay Library 1
Publisher held Santa Rosa County newspapers 3


Page 1








NORTH FLORIDA (26 counties, 179 OCLC records)


Alachua County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Alachua County Library 3
Publisher held Alachua County newspapers 5
(four in Gainesville, one in High Springs)

Baker County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Publisher held Baker County newspapers 1
(one in Macclenny)

Clay County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Publisher held Clay County newspapers 2
(one in Keystone Heights; Clay Today is actually published in Orange Park)

Duval County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Jacksonville Public 12
University of North Florida 2
Publisher held Duval County newspapers 9
(four in Jacksonville, one each at Jacksonville University, Jacksonville Beach,
Cecil Field, Mayport Naval Station, Ponte Vedra Beach)

Franklin County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Publisher held Carrabelle Times 1


Page 2









Gadsen County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Publisher held Havana Herald 1

Publisher held Twin City News 1

Hamilton County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC
as follows:

Publisher held Jasper News 1

Leon County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

State Library 78
Florida State University 35
Florida A&M University 3
Leon County Public 1
Tallahassee Community College 1
Publisher held Tallahassee newspapers 2

Levy County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Publisher held Levy County newspapers 4
(one each in Cedar Key and Chiefland, two in Williston)

Madison County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Town of Madison 1

Marion County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Central Florida Library system (Ocala) 2
Dunnellon Public Library 1
Uncollected Marion County newspapers 3
(one each in Ocala, Dunnellon, Belleview)

Nassau County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Amelia Island Museum of History 4


Page 3









Putnam County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Office of the Putnam County Courier-Journal 1

St. Tohns County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

St. Augustine Historical Society 4

Suwannee County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC
as follows:

Suwannee River Regional Library 1

Union County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Union County Library 1


Page 4









CENTRAL FLORIDA (21 counties, 191 OCLC records)

Brevard County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Central Brevard Library 3
Palm Bay Library 2
Florida Institute of Technology 1

Citrus County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Old Courthouse in Inverness 3


Desoto County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Sun-Herald office in Arcadia 1

Hardee County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Inventory office of the Herald-Advocate in Wauchula. 1
Publisher has holdings of several titles recommended
for microfilming.

Hemando County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC
as follows:

Hemando County Clerk's Office 2
Hemando County Museum Association 2
Hernando County Public Library 2

Highlands County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC
as follows:

Uncollected newspapers 2
(one with title variant in Avon Park, one in Lake Placid)

Hillsborough County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to
OCLC as follows:

University of South Florida, Tampa 33
Florida Historical Society 4


Page 5








Tampa-Hillsborough County Public Library 9
Brandon Regional Library 1
Publisher held Hillsborough County newspapers 7
(five in Tampa, one each in Brandon and Temple Terrace)


Indian River County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to
OCLC as follows:

North Indian River Library 1

Lake County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Lake County Historical Society (Tavares) 6
Leesburg Public Library 1

Manatee County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Manatee County Central Library 17
South Florida Museum (Bradenton) 2
Longboat Key Historical Society 2


Okeechobee County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to
OCLC as follows:

Publisher held Okeechobee County newspaper 1

Orange County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Orange County Museum 15
Rollins College 3
Orange county Library 2
University of Central Florida 1
Winter Park Public Library 1
Maitland Public Library 1

Osceola County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Kissimmee Public Library 1


Page 6


*







Pasco County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

New Port Richey Library 2


Polk County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Polk County Historical & Geneological Library 5
Uncollected newspapers in Polk County 2
(One in Polk City, one in Lakeland)


Pineallas County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Pinellas Historical Museum (Heritage Park) 10
Tarpon Springs Historical Society 1
St. Petersburg Public Library 1
St. Petersburg Historical Society 1
Gulfport Museum 1
Gulfport Library 1
Publisher held Pinellas County newspapers 8

Sarasota County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Sarasota Dept. of Historical Resources 16
Uncollected Sarasota County newspapers 4
(two in Sarasota, one in North Port)


Seminole County. project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC
as follows:

Office of the Sanford Herald 1

St. Lucie County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

St. Lucie County Library System 6
Publisher held St. Lucie County newspaper 1
(Fort Pierce)


Page 7









Volusia County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Stetson University 1
DeLand Bureau of Daytona Beach News-Journal 1
Volusia County Library System or
Ormod Beach Public Library 1
Southeast Volusia Historical Society or
office of (New Smyrna)Observer 1
Daytona office of Daytona Beach News-Journal 2


Page 8








SOUTH FLORIDA (10 counties, 387 OCLC records)


Broward County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Fort Lauderdale Historical Society 16
Broward County Libraries 1
Publisher held Broward County newspapers 21
(Fort Lauderdale, 6; Coral Springs, 1; Davie, 1; Pompano Beach, 2; Hallendale, 1;
Hollywood, 2; Deerfield Beach, 8 all published by the South Florida Newspaper
Network. Holdings at the office of the Dani Press will need to be inventoried)

Charlotte County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC
as follows:

Publisher held Charlotte County newspapers 1
(The Port Charlotte News is held only at the Punta Gorda Herald office)


Collier County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Collier County Library 8
Collier county Museum 2
Publisher held Collier County newspapers 2
(one in Everglades City, one in Naples)

Dade County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

University of Miami 269
Miami-Dade Public Library 7
Historical Association of Southern Florida 1
Publisher held Miami newspapers 10
Other publisher held Dade County newspapers 2

Hendry County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

LaBelle Heritage Museum 2


Page 9







Lee County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Lee County Libraries 3
Bonita Springs Public 1
Ft. Myers Beach Public Library 1
Sanibel Public Library 5
Pioneer Research Library 1
Cape Coral Museum 1

Martin County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC as
follows:

Martin County Board of Commissioners 4
Martin County Libraries 1
Publisher held Martin County newspapers 1
(one in Indiantown)

1 Monroe County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC
as follows:

Monroe Public Library (Key West) 7
Publisher held Monroe County newspapers 3
(one each in Tavernier, Islamorada, and Marathon)


Palm Beach County, project staff will contribute original catalog records to OCLC
as follows:

Historical Society of Delray 5
West Palm Beach Library 2
Boyton Beach City Library 1
Publisher held Palm Beach County newspapers 9
(Boca Raton, 1; Lantana, 1; Lake Worth, 2; Royal Palm Beach, 1; Palm Beach, 1;
West Palm Beach, 2; Jupiter, 1)


Page 10










TITLES TO BE CATALOGED BY COUNTY AND REGION

S.un. OALDoosA, HOLMES JACKSON "
SANTA. 3CS
4 13 2 0 0o1
SWALTON oGADSDEN L MILTON ASSAU.
0 120 0 1 1 DUVAL
MADISON BAKER 23
11 0
West Florida WAKULOR n CLAY
West Florida Wm 0 TL2 ST. JOHN'S O
GUL uM1uNKL 0 i 0b 4

DIXE | ALACHUA 0
--|th ., ,,-0 a O, f PUTNAM
SNorth Florida 1 FLAGLER
LEVY 0
4 MARION 0 \
| \VOLUSIA 0
4
H-
3 LAKE rt
CITRUs 0 7 f l\ 1-
ORANGE :3
23 r.
PAS CO
Central 2 OSCE OLA (D
Central / 2osa-o
Florida lS T P BEARD
23 6\
mtt. INDIAN RIVER '

MANATEE HARDEE UwcUS I '
J21 1 1 2 (OKLCmt ST. LUCIE
1 7
S20 DESOTO F-
SARASOTA 1 MARTIN rt

\"" 1 0o


N

W E

S


REGIONAL TOTALS
West Florida ................... 87
North Florida ................ 176
Central Florida .............. 191
South Florida ............. 387


South
Florida


* 00
4





United States Newspaper Program : Florida
APPENDIX F
CUBAN EXILE COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS SELECTED FOR MICROFILMING.



APPENDIX F

CUBAN EXILE COMMUNITY
NEWSPAPERS




A

1. ABC: Organo Oficial del Interamerican Bureau Anticomunist Labor
2. Accion: Organo Oficial del Movimiento Nacionalista Cristiano Joven
America
3. Accion Continental
4. Accion Cubana
5. ACE: Organo Oficial de la Agrupacion de Caimitenses Exiliados
6. Actualidad
7. Actualidades
8. Adelante: Organo Oficial del Movimiento Democratico de Liberacion
Cubana
9. Adelante Libre
10. Ahora: Cuba Primero
11. Ahora: La Voz del Pueblo
12. Ahora: Un Periodicopara Hoy
13. Ahorros
14. Alarma: Organo de Divulgacion de la Agrupacion Familiar Cubana de
Refugiados en Espana
15. Alerta
16. Alpha: Organo Oficial de Alpha 66
17. America Libre: Quincenario Independiente, Veraz y Moderno al Servicio
de la Democracia del Continente
18. Antorcha = Torch
19. Antorcha Martiana: Publicacion del Movimiento Insurreccional Martiano
20. Anunciador: Guia Semanalpara el Comprador
21. Astro: Organo Oficial de Divulagacion y Orientacion de la Seccion Obrera
del Movimiento Revolucionario 30 de Noviembre
22. Atenas News: Un Periodico para Toda la Comunidad Democrata
23. Avance Criollo





United States Newspaper Program : Florida
APPENDIX F
CUBAN EXILE COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS SELECTED FOR MICROFILMING.




B

24. Baragua: Organo de Orientacion Democratica y Revolucionaria
25. Boletin del Termino Municipal Independiente de Marianao
26. Broward Latino





27. Calle
28. Camara de Comercio Latino de Hialeah
29. Camimo
30. Caras y Caretas: La Hipocresia de la Careta del Hombre
31. Cartavoz
32. Casino: Disco Boletin
33. Casino Espanol de la Habana
34. Centinela de la Libertad
35. Chispa: Publicacion Quincenal Humoristica
36. Clarin: Un Nuevo Amanecer de Combate y Libertad
37. Clarin Latino: El Periodico de las Oportunidades
38. Condado News
39. Correo
40. Crisol de Libertad: Organo Mensual de Orientacion Patriotica al Pueblo
Cubano del Exilio
41. Cronica Cubana: Organo Oficial de la Cuban Brotherhood Association
42. Cronica de Aqui y de Alla
43. Cruzada Ideologica
44. CTC en Marcha: Organo Oficial de la Confederacion de Trabajadores de
Cuba en el Exilio
45. Cuba Catolica: En el Exilio
46. Cuba Democratica: Organo Central de Publicidadde la Unidad Nacional
Revolucionaria (UNARE)
47. Cuba Deportiva: Exilio
48. Cuba Espera: Sin Unidad No Hay Regreso
49. Cuba Libre: En el Exilio
50. Cuba Libre: Organo Oficial de la Insurreccion Cubana: Por una Cuba Sin
Comunismo
51. Cubamor: Una Patria Viva en el Recuerdo
52. Cubano Libre: Organo del Consejo Revolucionario de Cuba





United States Newspaper Program : Florida
APPENDIX F
CUBAN EXILE COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS SELECTED FOR MICROFILMING.


53. Cubano Libre: Organo del Gobierno Revolucionario Cubano en el Exilio
54. Cubano Libre Nacionalista



D

55. Debate
56. Debate: Informa y Forma Opinion
57. Debate: Organo Oficial del Hispanic Political Acton Committee
58. Democrata
59. Denuncia
60. Desfile
61. Dia: El Periodico de Hoy con las Ultimas Noticias
62. Diablo Cojuelo
63. Diario Las Americas
64. Discusion: Publicacion Semanal Independiente: Cuba Primero
65. Dignidad
66. Dios Es Luz: El Periodico de la Unidad Religiosa
67. Directorio



E

68. Economic Intelligence Report: Cuba
69. Ecos de Miami
70. Ecos del Continente
71. Enfoque Medico =Medical Focus
72. Espectaculos de la Semana
73. Exito Ilimitado
74. Exodo : Al Combate
75. Expreso de Miami: Tribuna Libre a Toda Opinion Responsable



F

76. Faro
77. Faro Martiano
78. Faro de Luz





United States Newspaper Program : Florida
APPENDIX F
CUBAN EXILE COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS SELECTED FOR MICROFILMING.


79. Fe : Trinchera de Ideas de la Patria Combatiente
80. FIN : Organo del Frente Integracion Nacional
81. Florida Latin News
82. Forum Cristiano : Una Publicacion Cristiana Mensual



G

83. Giron: Organo Oficial de la Brigada 2506
84. Gran Miami: The Great Miami
85. Guerra: Organo Oficial de las Juventudes del MI.R.R.: Movimiento
Insurreccional de Recuperacion Revolucionaria


H

86. Heraldo
87. Heraldo Cubano: Con Amor a Dios y Fe en los Hombres que Aman la
Libertad
88. Heraldo de Broward: Primer Periodico Latino del Condado
89. Heraldo del Exilio
90. Heraldo Pinareno
91. Hispano
92. Hoja
93. Hora de Sanidad
94. Hora 27





95. Impacto
96. Impacto News
97. Imparcial
98. Impulse
99. Independentista
100. Independiente: Organo Oficial de la Escuela de Periodismo y Literatura
"Jose Maria de Meredia"





United States Newspaper Program : Florida
APPENDIX F
CUBAN EXILE COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS SELECTED FOR MICROFILMING.


101. Independiente: Un Periodico al Servicio Unica y Exclusivamente de la
Republica
102. Indice: Quincenario en Pro de la Libertad de Cuba
103. Information Confidencial: El Periodico de Todos
104. Informese: Un Periodico con Articulos de Interes Vital
105. Intransigente: Organo de la Corporacion Presidio Politico Historico
Cubano
106. Invasion: Tribuna de Acciony Combate del Exilio
107. Isla News: Por Los Caminos del Regreso





108. Jaruqueno en Miami: Periodico Cubano para Defender a Cuba
109. Juventud: Ni con las Derechas ni con las Izquierdas, con Cuba, Armericay
la Democracia




II
110. Kendall Hispano



L

111. Latino en el Sur
112. Lea: La ActualidadArtistica
113. Letras
114. Liberacion: Organo de los Comandos, las Guerillas y el Clandestinaje
Cubano
115. Libertad: Un Semanario Libre, Justo, Bravo y Breve
116. Libertad Humana: Organo Oficial de Defensa Libre Empresista
117. Liborio: Un Periodico de Cuba, sin Cuba, pero por Cuba
118. Liborio/Editado por el Comite de Elecciones Honorables
119. Linterna
120. Llamada
121. Lucha
122. Luz Verde News





United States Newspaper Program : Florida
APPENDIX F
CUBAN EXILE COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS SELECTED FOR MICROFILMING.




M

123. Machete
124. Magisterio Cubano Libre: Organo del Directorio Magisterial
Revolucionario: Seccion en Miami
125. Manana: Sirviendo al Pueblo de Hialeah
126. Matancero Libre: Organo Oficial del Municipio de Matanzas en el Exilio
127. Mensajero
128. Mercado Hispano: Publicacion Mensual al Servicio de los Comerciantes
en el Estado de la Florida
129. Mi Casa (cf. record for Mi Casa Semanal)
130. Miami Aerospace Academy: Cadet Journal
131. Miami Beach News
132. Miami Deportivo: Organo Oficial de la Federacion Atletica Invernal de
Baseball en Miami
133. Miami Extra
134. Miami Heraldo
135. Miami Social
136. Mirador de Miami: Un Mensaje Vertical para una Hora Crucial
137. Moments
138. Mundo: Editado en el Exilio Edicion Aerea
139. Mundo: Un Diario Cubano al Servicio de los Cubanos y de Todo los
Hispanos
140. Mundo Deportivo






141. N J. C.: Una Informacion Mensual de la Federacion Nacional de Juristas
Cubanos
142. Nacion
143. Nacion: Organo Oficial de los Municipios de Cuba en el Exilio
144. Nacional Republicano
145. Noticia: Diario de la Tarde
146. Noticias de Arte: Gaceta Quincenal de las Artes Visuales, Escenicas
Musicales y Literarias
147. Noticiero : El Periodico Hispano de la Florida Central
148. Nuestra America: Para el Bienestar de Todos
149. Nuevo Patria





United States Newspaper Program : Florida
APPENDIX F
CUBAN EXILE COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS SELECTED FOR MICROFILMING.




0

150. Organo Oficial de Cuba Independiete y Democratica
151. Opinion
152. Opinion Publica
153. Orientador



P

154. Pagina: El Periodico de los Batistianos
155. Palestra Criolla: El Vocero de Todos
156. Palm Beach Latino
157. Panorama Comunitario
158. Papel Periodico Epoca del Exilio
159. Pasquin: En la Brevedad Reside el Interes
160. Periodico: Primer Periodico Bilingue del Condado Dade
161. Periodico El Mambi
162. Periodico Informacion
163. Periodico Pueblo: Un Diario del Pueblo, por el Pueblo, y para el Pueblo
164. Pitirre en Bromay en Serio
165. Playa: El Primer Periodico Latino de Miami Beach
166. Political Comica: El Periodico de Relajo, con Relajo, pero sin Relajo
167. Popular
168. Prensa Comunitaria
169. Prensa de Miami
170. Prensa del Sur: Primer Periodico Latino del Sur del Condado de Dade
171. Prensa Dinamica: Organo Oficial del Movimiento Dinamico Internacional
172. Prensa Grafica
173. Prensa Libre; see Note
174. Prensa Medica: Al Servicio de la Clase Medica y Profesiones Afines
175. Presencia: Organo Oficial de la Junta Patriotica Cubana
176. Pro-Cuba: Organo Oficial de la Asociacion Pro-Cuba
177. Pueblo Cubano en el Exilio
178. Pulguero News
179. Pulso de Miami = Miami Pulse





United States Newspaper Program : Florida
APPENDIX F
CUBAN EXILE COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS SELECTED FOR MICROFILMING.


180. Quincenal


181. Razon: Hacia la Libertadpor la Razon
182. RECE: Representacion Cubana del Exilio
183. Regreso: Organo Oficial de la Federacion de Propietarios Industriales y
Comerciantes Cubanos de la Florida
184. Replica: El Periodico de la Verdad Cubana
185. Republica
186. Resumen: El Primero en su Clase
187. Resumen Semanal


188.
189.
190.
191.
192.
193.
194.
195.
196.


197.
198.
199.
200.


Semana
Siete Dias del Diario de la Marina en el Exilio
Social Security News y Medicare News, El
Sol de Hialeah = The Hialeah Sun: El Primer Periodico Latino de Hialeah
Sol de la Florida = Florida Sun News
Sol de la Florida, El Sol de Tampa
Spotlight: Cine, Radio, TV, Cabarets, Teatro
Sucesos de Actualidad
Sweetwater Tribune


Tiempo Nuevo: En Todo el Sur de la Florida
Tiempos de Sweetwater: Periodico Bilingue al Servicio de la Comunidad
Trabajo: Organo Oficial de Comando Electrico Nacional 9 de Diciembre
Tridente: Organo Oficial del Movimiento de Recuperacion Revolucionaria






United States Newspaper Program : Florida
APPENDIX F
CUBAN EXILE COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS SELECTED FOR MICROFILMING.


201. Trinchera en el exilio: Organo Oficial del Directorio Revolucionario
Estudiantil de Cuba
202. Trinchera Proletaria: Organo Oficial de Accion Sindical Independiente
203. Trinchera Sindicalista: Organo Oficial de la Federacion de Trabajadores
del Transporte de Cuba






204. Ultima Hora: Diario de la Tarde
205. Unico





United States Newspaper Program : Florida
APPENDIX G.
FLORIDA NEWSPAPERS SELECTED FOR PRESERVATION MICROFILMING.



APPENDIX G

FLORIDA NEWSPAPERS
TITLES SELECTED FOR PRESERVATION MICROFILMING


1. Beach views (Clearwater, FL)
2. Belle Glade news (Belle Glade, FL) [
3. Bowling Green exponent (Bowling Green, FL) [
4. Bowling Green news (Bowling Green, FL) [
5. Boyton Beach news (Boynton Beach, FL) [
6. Brooksville argus (Brooksville, FL)
Includes the title variation: Southern argus
7. Brooksville herald (Brooksville, FL)
8. Brooksville sun (Brooksville, FL)
9. Capital outlook (Tallahassee, FL)
10. Citrus County star (Inverness, FL)
11. College arms (Tallahassee, FL)
12. Corner cupboard (Orlando, FL)
13. County journal (Crestview, FL)
14. Crystal River news (Crystal River, FL)
15. Current (Tallahassee, FL)
16. Current (Tallahassee, FL)
17. Diario de Tampa (Tampa, FL)
18. Dunnellon sun (Dunnellon, FL)
19. Everglades observer (Pahokee, FL)
20. Famcean (Tallahassee, FL)
21. FAMUan (Tallahassee, FL)
22. Farm and live stock record (Jacksonville, FL)
23. Farmer and stockman (Jacksonville, FL)
24. Fellsmere tribune (Fellsmere, FL)
25. Flagler tribune (Bunnell, FL)
26. Flaming sword (Estero, FL)
27. Florida beacon (Jacksonville, FL)
28. Florida commercial (Jacksonville, FL)
29. Florida cracker (Orlando, FL)
30. Floridafacts (St. Francis, FL)
31. Florida farmer (Jacksonville, FL)
32. Florida post (Winter Park, FL)
33. Florida State journal (Tallahassee, FL)
34. Florida sun (Orlando, FL)





United States Newspaper Program : Florida
APPENDIX G.
FLORIDA NEWSPAPERS SELECTED FOR PRESERVATION MICROFILMING.


35. Florida trade unionist (Orlando, FL)
36. Hooker's Point log (Tampa, FL)
37. Maitland news (Maitland, FL)
38. Mount Dora topic (Mount Dora, FL)
39. Orange County reporter (Orlando, FL)
40. Orlando daily reporter (Orlando, FL)
41. Orlando post (Orlando, FL)
42. Sarasota times (Sarasota, FL)
43. Seald-Sweet chronicle (Tampa, FL)
44. Spray (Camp Walton, FL)
45. Tallahasse dispatch (Tallahassee, FL)
46. Union County times (Lake Butler, FL)
47. Weekly news (Tallahassee, FL)
48. Whiting tower (Milton, FL)
49. Winter Park herald (Winter Park, FL)
50. Winter Park topics (Winter Park, FL)
51. Zolfo Springs truth (Zolfo Springs, FL)









United States Newspaper Program : Florida
Appendix H.
Preservation Microfilming Statistical Summary.

Emergency Newspaper Titles Eligible for Filming.
Datil Pepper (St. Augustine, FL)
3 years (from 1897 through 1900) of this weekly publication have been
located at the St. Augustine Historical Society. The average holdings
per publication year are 36 weekly issues. The average issue is 8 pages.
Newsprint is in extremely brittle condition.
3 years x 36 weeks = 108 weeks x 8 pages = 864 pages
864 pages + 2 pages per exposure = 432 exposures
432 exposures + 650 exposures per reel = 1 reel
Budget allows for generation of 2 positive copies; one copy each for the
St. Augustine Historical Society and for the University of Florida.
Florida Advocate (Wauchula, FL)
19 years, (from 1932 through 1955 -- some years of publication have
been lost) of this weekly publication have been located and compiled
from Wauchula area institutions (primarily from the Wauchula Public
Library) and citizens by the University of Florida. Survey and
telephone contacts indicate that the missing years will be located.) The
average publication year was 46 weekly issues of which, on average, 28
weekly issues per year have been compiled. The average issue was 10
pages. All issues are folded and extremely brittle; condition will slow
filming.
19 years x 28 weeks = 532 weeks x 10 pages = 5,320 pages
5,320 pages + 2 pages per exposure = 2,660 exposures
2,660 exposures + 650 exposures per reel = 4 reels
Budget allows for generation of 2 positive copies; one copy each for the
Wauchula Public Library and for the University of Florida.
Cuban Exile Newspapers
Cuban exile newspapers include 205 titles in partial runs. Survey and
several collecting ventures, including Spanish language efforts in the
Cuban communities of South Florida, by the University of Miami
indicate that missing issues no longer exist or cannot be found.
The average title includes 3 issues of, an average, 12 pages.
205 titles x 3 issues each = 615 issues x 12 pages = 7,380 pages
7,380 pages + 2 pages per exposure = 3,690 exposures
3,690 exposures + 650 exposures per reel = 6 reels
Budget allows for generation of 2 positive copies; one copy each for the
University of Miami and for the University of Florida.









United States Newspaper Program : Florida
Appendix H.
Preservation Microfilming Statistical Summary.

The Population Centers
Newspapers Eligible for Filming.
Approximately 80% of the 51 eligible titles were published weekly. The
remaining 20% were published daily.
Weeklies.
The average weekly (including its variant titles and title changes)
published for 12 years. Weeklies were published in one issue per week,
46 weeks per year, in an average of 14 pages per issue. Many of the
weeklies are extant only in incomplete runs. On average, a given year
is compiled in 32 weekly issues.
(41 titles x 12 years) x 32 weeks/issues = 15,744 issues
15,744 issues x 14 pages = 220,416 pages
220,416 pages + 2 pages per exposure = 110,208 exposures
110,208 exposures + 650 exposures per reel = 170 reels
Dailies.
The average daily (including its variant titles and title changes)
published for 10 years. Dailies were published on an average of 5
issues per week, 42 weeks per year, in an average of 12 pages per issue.
Many of the dailies are extant only in incomplete runs. Of the 210
issues in an average publication year, only 168 issues on average
survive.
10 titles x 10 years= 100 years
100 years x 168 issues = 16,800 issues
16,800 issues x 12 pages = 201,600 pages
201,600 pages + 2 pages per exposure = 100,800 exposures
100,800 exposures + 650 exposures per reel = 155 reels
Budget allows for generation of 2 positive copies; one copy each for the
University of Florida and for the holding institution (e.g., generally,
Florida A&M University, the Florida State Library, and Florida State
University)









United States Newspaper Program : Florida
Appendix I.
Past Preservation Microfilming Projects.


Continuing State-Funded Projects
African Newspapers Current (1994-Present)
A continuing program of preservation microfilming for current issue of Florida
newspapers. Averages more than 10,000 exposures annually.
Caribbean & Latin American Newspapers Current (1987-Present)
A continuing program of preservation microfilming for current issue of Caribbean and
Latin American newspapers. Averages more than 75,000 exposures annually.
Florida Newspapers Current (1987-Present)
A continuing program of preservation microfilming for current issue of Florida
newspapers. Jewish community newspapers primarily published in Florida are also
included. Averages more than 150,000 exposures annually.
Russian Economic and Literary Gazettes Current (1989-Present)
A continuing program of preservation microfilming for current issue of Russian
newspapers. Averages more than 10,000 exposures annually.

Grant-Funded Projects
Caribbean Basin Collection. (RLG GCMP I, 1989-1993)
Cataloging and preservation microfilming of 7,510 volumes from the Latin American
Collection.
Samuel Ashe Swann Archive. (RLG APMP I, 1990-1993)
Archives cataloging and preservation microfilming of 28 linear ft. archives dating from
1832 through 1909 from the University Archives and P.K. Yonge Library, Department
of Special Collections.
Brazilian Collection. (SOLINET CPMP I, 1990-1992)
Off-site cataloging and preservation microfilming of 2,500 volumes from the Latin
American Collection.
African Language & Linguistics. (SOLINET CPMP 11, 1992-1994)
Off-site cataloging and preservation microfilming of 2,500 volumes from the George
Fortune Collection, African Studies Program.
Daniel Defoe and the Robinsonades. (RLG GCMP IV, 1993-1995)
Rare book cataloging and preservation microfilming of 241 titles/250 volumes from the
Baldwin Library, Department of Special Collections.
French Post-Revolutionary Drama. (RLG GCMP IV, 1993-1995)
Cataloging and preservation microfilming of 880 titles/volumes from the Rare Book
Collection, Department of Special Collections.
U.S. Newspaper Program Florida. Emergency Microfilming (1994-1996)
Preservation microfilming and cataloging of 10 embrittled or endangered Florida
newspapers; a small part of the U.S. Newspaper Program's second phase in Florida.
Florida History & W.P.A. Florida. (SOLINET CPMP III, 1994-1997)
Off-site cataloging and preservation microfilming of 1,000 titles/volumes from the P.K.
Yonge Collection, Department of Special Collections.
















Appendix J:

Resumes of Principal Personnel






Resource Services University of Florida
200. George A. Smathers Library
Gainesville, FL 32611


CE52 5 cI fax (352)B0 3

352) 392-0355 fax (352) 392-47S8


4215 N.W. 17th Avenue
Gainesville, FL 32605
Home: (352) 377-2783


May, 1986


1978-1980

1976-1978

1975-1976


Master's in Library and Information Science.
The University of Texas at Austin, Graduate School of Library and Information
Science.
University of Texas at Austin, Institute of Latin American Studies. Thirty-six
hours (all but thesis) completed toward M.A. degree.
Bachelor of Arts, cum laude, University of Miami, Florida. Major areas of
study: Latin American Studies, with a concentration in history and literature.
University of Northern Michigan, Marquette, Michigan.


WORK EXPERIENCE


10/95- Head, Serials Unit
George A. Smathers Library University of Florida
Resource Services Serials Unit

Responsibilities include: supervising and overseeing the day to day activities of the Serials
Unit including: receiving, paying, ordering, claiming, cataloging and resolving serials
problems; reviewing serial policies and procedures for the library through the Serials Policy
Committee; coordinating University of Florida's participation in CONSER and in NACO
with the Library of Congress; representing library at CONSER operational meetings.


11/89 -10/95


Head, Serials Cataloging Unit
George A. Smathers Library University of Florida
Catalog Department Serials Unit


Responsibilities include: supervising and overseeing the day to day activities of the Serials
Unit; coordinating University of Florida's participation in CONSER and in NACO with the
Library of Congress; training all Cataloging Department personnel in all aspects of serials
cataloging and name authority work for contribution to NACO; representing library at
CONSER operational meetings; reviewing serial policies and procedures for the library
through the Serials Policy Committee; cataloging original titles and upgrading shared
bibliographic records of serials titles following CONSER standards and NACO guidelines.


9/90- 9/92


9/96-11/89


Contract cataloging of Spanish and Portuguese serials
National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD

Latin American Serials Cataloger
George A. Smathers Library University of Florida
Catalog Department Serials Unit


Cataloged original ties and upgraded shared bibliographic records of serials titles
following CONSER standards and NACO guidelines. Cataloged original monographic
titles for the Latin American collection following NACO guidelines. Supervised student
assistants working in NACO and Latin American Serials Cataloging. Coordinated the
University of Florida's participation in the NACO program. Trained all cataloging
personnel in name authority work to be contributed to NACO.


EDUCATION







9/85- 9/86


Library Assistant
University of Texas at Austin
Benson Latin American Collection Serials Cataloging Department


Searched, collected and verified bibliographic information for the Latin American serials
cataloger. Confirmed authority work and made bindery decisions.


6/85 9/85


Library Clerk IV
Texas State Library Austin, Texas


Staffed reference desk, processed federal documents, and performed stack maintenance.


4/84 6/85


Library Clerk-Typist
University of Texas at Austin
General Libraries Automated Cataloging and Acquisitions Departments


Searched OCLC and library catalog for errors in cataloging and acquisitions records.
Proofread and corrected bibliographic and typographic errors on catalog cards.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT / SPECIAL EXPERIENCE

6/95 Attended Series Authority Workshop at the Library of Congress.
4/90 Received NACO Linked Systems Project training at the Library of
Congress.
5/88 Received one week of training in name authority work from the Library of Congress as part
of the University of Florida's participation in the NACO program.

PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES AND ACTIVITIES


American Library Association Member

PUBLICATIONS / PRESENTATION


ALCTS-CCS/SS Member


Offloading or Staff Development? Team Cataloging At the University of Florida.
Published in Cataloging and Classification Quarterly. v.15, no.l, 1992
Co-authored with Carol Walton.
Series in NOTIS: An Option Beyond the MARC Authority Record.
Published in Cataloging and Classification Quarterly. v.11, no.2, 1990.
Co-Authored with Colleen Thorbum and Nancy Williams.
Drugs in Latin America: a bibliography.
Monticello : Vance Bibliographies, 1990.
Cooperative cataloging at the University of Florida.
Co-presented with Carol Walton at ALA Midwinter.

LANGUAGES


Spanish: Fluent (written and spoken)


Portuguese: Good


Lived and studied in Argentina for two years, Brazil for two years, Colombia for nine
years, and Costa Rica for two years.


CECILIl 0=oR!0






Robert C. Dowd
2712 S.W. 34th Street #88
Gainesville, Fla. 32608
(352) 337-9530


EDUCATION

Master of Library Science, School of Information Science and Policy,
State University of New York at Albany, December 1987

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Finance Major,
University of Florida, June 1981


PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

May 1995 present: Cataloger, Florida Newspaper Project, Smathers Library,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla.

Catalog newspapers in various formats to full level CONSER standards.
Travel whenever necessary to catalog newspapers throughout Florida.
Establish place name authority records to NACO standards.
Develop work-flow procedures to maximize efficiency.
Supervise one cataloging assistant.

October 1994 May 1995: Inter-Library Loan / Reference Librarian,
Flower Memorial Library, Watertown, N.Y.

Received, verified, and processed requests for materials to be borrowed.
Maintained complete records of inter-library loans and returns.
Supervised one library assistant in the III department, and volunteers.
Designed and implemented procedures as library automation is established.
Provided reference service and patron assistance on a daily basis.
Evaluated library collections for currency and relevancy.

March 1989 October 1994: Cataloger, New York State Newspaper Project,
New York State Library, Albany, N.Y.

Conducted on-site inventory of newspaper collections statewide.
Delivered presentations in the local, state, and national arenas.
Cataloged newspapers in various formats at the New York State Library.
Developed database applications to store and print newspaper data.
Supervised two librarians as regional project coordinator.
Supervised one graduate student assistant in Albany.

March 1988 March 1989: Archival Project Assistant, Schaffer Library,
Union College, Schenectady, N.Y.

Worked directly for and with the College Archivist.
Inventoried hundreds of manuscript and archival collections.
Analyzed the content as well as condition of the collections.
Indexed these collections by subject using modified LCSH.
Developed a microcomputer database program to display data.
Maintained current directories and indexes to collections.

September 1987 March 1988: Acting Periodicals Librarian, Schaffer Library,
Union College, Schenectady, N.Y.

Supervised and trained one clerk and up to five student assistants.
Manually checked-in and claimed all periodicals subscriptions.
Inventoried holdings and manually updated the card catalogs.
Participated in automation activities as part of a committee.
Provided reference service on a regular basis in rotation.

July 1987 August 1987: Student Intern, Schaffer Library,
Union College, Schenectady, N.Y.


* Mentored by the Acquisitions Librarian in a private college library.






ADDITIONAL WORK EXPERIENCE

January 1986 August 1986: Fund raiser,
Capital District Chapter of the
National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Albany, N.Y.

Raised funds primarily by telephone solicitation.

May 1982 December 1985: Laborer,
Murray Masonry Corporation, Albany, N.Y.

Built residential and commercial structures.


MEMBERSHIPS

American Library Association

New York Library Association








Martha Hruska


Office Address Home Address
204 Library West 3836 NW 31 Place
George A. Smathers Libraries Gainesville, FL 32606
Gainesville, FL 32611 (352) 373-3818
Telephone: (352) 392-0342
Fax: (352) 392-7251
Email: marhrus@nervm.nerdc.ufl.edu



Employment History

Director for Technical Services & Assistant Director of Libraries, August 1990-Present
Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Served as Acting Director for Technical Services August 1990 February 1992.

Responsibilities: Direction and administration of the Technical Services Division
which includes a total staff of 75: 22 Library Faculty, 5 A & P, 48 USPS (support staff).
Technical Services includes three departments: Resource Services (formerly
Acquisitions and Cataloging), Preservation, Systems. Librarian Coordinators for
Networking and Electronic Access Services also report to the Director for Technical
Services. Serve as UF representative to CONSER Policy Committee and as the UF
Technical Services representative to the Florida Center for Library Automation.
Decisions in matters of personnel, budget, policy and resource allocations are
negotiated with the other library directors and division department chairs. Strategic
planning includes library assessments, grants development and fundraising, and
facilities management.

Chair. Catalog Department. July 1989-August 1990
Smathers Libraries, University of Florida

Responsibilities: Management of Catalog Department of 42 FTE staff, comprised of
Monograph Cataloging, Serials Cataloging, Bibliographic Control, Online Catalog
Database Maintenance, and Area Studies and Special Materials units.
Priorities included: increased contributions to national cataloging programs,
development and integration of workflows for preservation microfilms,
implementation of MARC Holdings Format for Holdings and Locations (MFHL) in
LUIS, continued workflow and productivity enhancements, and position upgrades for
LTA staff working beyond the top of the LTA range.

Acting Chair. Catalog Department. October 1987-August 1988
University of Florida Libraries

Responsibilities: Management of Catalog Department of 38 FTE staff, comprised of
Monograph Cataloging, Serials Cataloging, and Automated Cataloging units.
Priorities included: definition of subject book cataloging teams, review and
development of strategies to reduce the uncontrolled arrearage, correction of heading
conflicts and display of cross references in LUIS, formulation of strategies to phase in
bibliographic control for special materials and documents.






Martha Hruska
Resume
Page 2

Acquisitions Librarian. January 1987-September 1987

Responsibilities: Managed domestic, British, Polish, Irish and German approval
plans, acted as order librarian for Humanities materials.
Served as Acting Chair of the Acquisitions Department from May 1987-September
1987. The NOTIS Acquisitions module was implemented during this time.

Assistant Chair. Catalog Department. November 1981-December 1986
University of Florida Libraries

Responsibilities: Assisted in overall management of Catalog Department, with
immediate responsibility for the Clerical/Data Entry Unit. General cataloging
responsibilities. Tenured as Associate Librarian in 1984.

Technical Services Librarian positions, 1975-October 1981
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey

Responsibilities: Beginning with a student librarian ranking, assisted in
supervising, then later headed, the Copy Cataloging unit, the Bibliographic Control
unit, and the Catalog Maintenance unit. Promoted to Librarian IV (Assistant
Librarian equivalent).

Library Assistant. 1972-1975
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey

Recent University and Library Service
Library Service
Charged Books In, Books Out Working Group, 1996-
Charged Shelf Ready Working Group, 1995-
Charged Library System Needs Assessment Review 1991-1993.
Charged Serials Policy and Operational Committees, 1991-
Charged OCLC Cutback Proposal Task Force, 1991.
Jointly charged:
Approval Plan Review and Implementation Groups, 1993-1995.
Library Survey Task Force, 1994-
Electronic Ordering Implementation Group, 1993.
Electronic Journals Task Force, 1992-1993.
Collection Review Task Force, 1991-1993.
Task Force on NOTIS Testing, 1991-1992.

Member, Assistant Director for Technical Services Search Committee, 1989-1990
Member, Library Management Group.

Chair, Technical Services Management Group.
Chair, Technical Services Steering Committee, established 1993-

University Service
Chair, CWIS Policy Implementation Committee, 1994-
Member, Standing Committee on Network and Telecommunications of Council on
Information Technologies and Services, 1992-
Member, Northeast Regional Data Center (NERDC) Instruction & Research Users
Committee, 1992-





Martha Hruska
Resume
Page 3


Recent Professional Service Contributions & Activity

Co-Chair, NISO AL Committee, Holdings Statements for Bibliographic Items, Z39.71,
1994-
Chair, CONSER Membership Task Force, 1995-96.
Chair, CONSER Policy Committee, 1992-1994.
Member, CONSER Mul/Ver Task Force 1991-1992.
Chair, ALA/Library and Information Technology Section (LITA) Membership
Committee, 1992-1993. Member, 1990-1992.
LITA representative to ALA Chapter Relations Committee 1990-1991, 1991-1992.
Presentation to RLG Great Collections Preservation Grant project group on MARC
Bibliographic and Holdings formats, March 1991.
Member, ALA/Resources and Technical Services Division (RTSD)/Cataloging &
Classification Section Nominating Committee, 1987-88.
OCLC PRISM Field Test Coordinator, 1990.
Member of ALA, ALCTS, and LITA

Grant Work, Writings and Projects

US Newspaper Project: Florida, Phase 2. Application to NEH for continuation of
Florida newspaper cataloging and microfilming grant to be submitted, June 1996.
Hruska, Martha, "CONSER: A Member's Perspective of an Evolving Program",
Serials Librarian, v. 29, no. 3/4, accepted for publication summer/fall 1996.
Hruska, Martha, "Internet Serials in the OPAC?", Serials Review, v. 21, no. 4, 1995.
Report of the University of Florida Libraries Integrated System Needs Assessment,
edited by Carol Walton and Martha Hruska, January 1994.
Project for National Database Access to Library Resources for Latin American
Studies, Title IIC and NEH funding, joint project with Indiana; Hoover Institution,
Indiana; Texas; Wisconsin; Yale; and administered by Stanford, served as
Principal Investigator 1989-1991.
Strengthening Library Resources: Retrospective Conversion of the Baldwin Library
Collection, Title IIC funding. Served as Principal Investigator Oct. 1989-June 1991.
Book Review: "Beyond the Book: Extending the MARC Format", Information
Technology and Libraries, v.10, no. 4 (December 1991), p. 339-340.
Sabbatical leave August 1988-June 1989 to study effect of preservation microfilm
cataloging on Technical Services organizational arrangements and to visit Yale,
Harvard, and MIT Technical Services Departments.

Education

Douglass College A.B., 1972 Philosophy
New Brunswick, New Jersey

Graduate School of Library and M.L.S., 1976
Information Service
Rutgers University
New Brunswick, New Jersey

Graduate School of Library and Graduate coursework toward Ph.D.
Information Service Almost A.B.D. 1978-81
Rutgers University
New Brunswick, New Jersey







May 1996


VITA

JOHN E. INGRAM


Current Residence:


Professional Address:


2247 NW 1lth Avenue
Gainesville, Florida 32605
USA
352-338-7558


Department of Special Collections
208 Smathers Library
P.O. Box 117007
Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
Voice: 352-392-9075
Fax: 352-3924788
Email: jeingr@nervnmnerdc.ufl.edu


EDUCATION

National Archives and Records Service, 1978: Certificate in Archives Administration.
Brown University, Providence, RI, 1968-1977: Ph.D. (Slavic Linguistics).
Fordham University, New York, 1963-1968: B.A., M.A. (Russian Language and Literature).


Continuing Education

Seminar for American Librarians, Oxford University, May-June 1987.
Out-of-Print and Antiquarian Book Market Seminar, University of Denver, August 1985.
Conservation of Archival Materials, HRHRC, University of Texas, April 1985.
Rare Books School, Columbia University, Summer 1984.

Special Qualifications

Information Systems: OCLC; MARC AMC; DOS: WordPerfect; Macintosh: Word, PageMaker, HTML.
Languages: Russian, Latin, French, German, other Indo-European languages.


PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries.

1994 present Chair, Department of Special Collections

Responsible for the overall development and management of the Smathers Libraries' special collections,
including rare books, record copies, archives, manuscripts, maps, prints, photographs, and other special
material gathered to support the University's academic programs. Responsible for personnel management
and supervision (13 FTEs), space management, and collection development. Serves as secretary and
treasurer for the Howe Society, a friends' group for special collections, and editor of The Howe Society
Newsletter. Serves as key spokesperson and liaison to Library and university administrations, professional
and scholarly organizations, faculty, students, and the general public in advancing the status of the
collections.






The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Department of the Library.


1984 1994 Curator for Library Special Collections

Administer the special collections of the Foundation Library: manuscripts, rare books, architectural
collections (including architectural, archaeological, and landscape drawings), maps, graphic arts, and
microforms. Responsible for Library preservation and conservation decisions and for the acquisition of rare
and out-of-print materials. Chief contact between donors and the Foundation for rare library materials.
Reference librarian for library collections. Collection development for history faculty. Fiscal and
personnel responsibility for two professional FTEs, and student assistants, volunteers, and interns (20
people). Member of Foundation committees for preservation, museum programming, African-American
History, emergency response, and pest management.

1991 1994 Research Division Coordinator, Bruton Heights Education Center

Coordinate planning, research and development, space requirements for staff and collections, and transfer of
four administrative departments within the Research Division: Library, History, Architectural Research, and
Archaeological Research to a new education complex. Work with the consulting architects and Foundation
staff to insure a successful conclusion to the project within budgetary guidelines. The Division employs
approximately 50 FTEs and has an operating budget above $2 million. In this capacity, my supervisor is
the vice-president for Research.

1991 Acting Director, Foundation Library

Administered audiovisual, public and information services, special collections, and technical services of the
Foundation Library with an FTE staff of 15.5 and an annual budget of $700,000 as part of an interim series
of library directors. Responsible for budget and personnel. Chief accomplishments: the complete revision
of all position descriptions for library staff and the preparation of a "white paper" that discussed the present
and future directions of the Library.

1983-1984 Acting Director of the Research Library

Administered the Foundation's major collections of rare books, manuscripts, research archives, and general
library collections. Fiscal and personnel responsibility for a staff of five FTE's and apprentices, interns,
work-study students, and volunteers. Budget: $150,000.

1979-1984 Research Archivist

Administered the primary source research holdings of the Foundation, including manuscripts, microfilm,
reference map and graphic arts collections. Responsible for donor relations as well as acquisitions,
cataloging, and research access and reference to the collections. Supervised the assistant archivist, interns,
and volunteers.

Brown University, John Hay Library.

1976-1979 Manuscripts Processor

Responsible for all levels of processing manuscript collections from the sixteenth to the twentieth centuries:
accessioning, arrangement, descriptions. Also, chief reference archivist for manuscript collections.

Brown University, Department of Slavic Languages.

Fall 1976 Teaching Assistant, Second-Year Russian Language

United States Air Force. Bitburg, Germany.

1971-1974 Computer Operator/Systems Monitor (Burroughs B-3500).






AWARDS AND HONORS

1992 National Endowment for the Humanities, Summer Stipend Grant

Project: to complete the transcription and proofreading of John Evelyn's unpublished manuscript "Elysium
Britannicum," Christ Church College, Oxford.

1992 American Philosophical Society Grant

Project: to complete the transcription of John Evelyn's unpublished manuscript "Elysium Britannicum,"
Christ Church College, Oxford.

1991-1992 Institute for Museum Services

Preservation survey of architectural, landscape, and archaeological drawings collection.

1988, 1991 National Endowment for the Humanities, Travel Grants

Project: to prepare a transcription of John Evelyn's unpublished manuscript, "Elysium Britannicum,"
Christ Church Library, Oxford.

1984-1986 National Endowment for the Humanities, Planning Grant

Principal project director. Coordinate research efforts to study the art and craft of bookbinding in
eighteenth-century Virginia. Direct the preparation of a research report and its publication.


TEACHING EXPERIENCE AND CONSULTANCIES

"An Introduction to the Indo-European Language Group." Instructor, The College of William and Mary, Special
Programs, 1985-1986.

Paper and book preservation workshops for participants in the archives and manuscripts program at the College of
William and Mary and the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.

Foundation for Historic Christ Church, Irvington, Virginia. Consultant for the preservation and processing of
collections, April, 1988.


PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

Strengthening research library resources: Imaging and the performing arts, project director, USDOE, Title IIC, 1994-
1996.

"Children's reading in early America," speaker, The Fontaneda Society, Fort Lauderdale, November, 1995

"Preservation on the home front: preserving your family's heritage," speaker, Winter Discovery Series, The Colonial
Williamsburg Foundation, January, 1995.

"From Parsley Beds to the Tarantula's Dance: John Evelyn and his 'Elysium Britannicum'," speaker, Library
Lecture Series, The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, November 1993.

"From Handel's Acis & Galatea to Pills to Purge Melancholy: Going to the source for the music of 18th-century
Williamsburg," speaker, DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Gallery, The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, October
1993, 1994.

National Endowment for the Humanities, Review Panel, Fellowships, July, 1992, 1993.

3







"John Evelyn's 'Elysium Britannicum' and European Gardening," speaker, Dumbarton Oaks Studies in Landscape
Architecture Symposium, May 1993 (To be published in 1996).

"John Evelyn's Elysium Britannicum': New Light Brings New Life to Old Ground," speaker, Williamsburg Garden
History Society, May 1993.

Department of Education, Title II-C, Review Panel, February, 1992, 1993.

"Preservation on the Home Front: What to do until the Fund Ship Arrives," speaker, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Preconference, ACRL, University of California Santa Cruz, June 1992.

"Common People and Their Material World: Free Men and Women in the Chesapeake, 1700-1830," speaker,
Williamsburg, March 1992.

"Printing in Williamsburg, Virginia, 1730-1780," speaker, The Typocrafters, Williamsburg, 1991.

"John Evelyn's 'Elysium Britannicum'," round table participant, Dumbarton Oaks, March 1991.

"Children's Books in Early America," speaker, DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Gallery, The Colonial
Williamsburg Foundation, December 1990.

"New Directions in Virginia History," speaker, The Virginia Historical Society, October 1990.

"The Business of Bookbinding in Eighteenth-century Williamsburg," speaker, The History of Printing in the
South. 1680-1800, Williamsburg, Virginia, October 1988.

"Rare Books: A Boon or a Bother in Archives?" speaker, Mid-Atlantic Regional Archives Conference,
Williamsburg, Virginia, November 1988.

"Treasures and Oddities of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation Library," speaker, Williamsburg Bibliophiles,
December 1986.

"Conservation of Microforms," speaker, Mid-Atlantic Regional Archives Conference, October 1986.

"Preservation and Special Collections at Colonial Williamsburg," speaker, Special Libraries Association, Virginia
Chapter, May 1986.

"The Conservation of Meaning," symposium member, HRHRC, University of Texas at Austin, 1986.

"Authentication and Preservation of Historic Documents," speaker, Mid-Atlantic Association of Forensic Scientists,
Fall 1984.

"Preservation of Microfilm," speaker, Association of Records Managers and Administrators, Tidewater (Virginia)
chapter, April 1982.

"The Preservation of Microforms at Colonial Williamsburg," speaker, Special Libraries Association, Virginia
Chapter, November 1981.


EXHIBITIONS

"From Ape to Zebra: A Bestiary of Early Children's Books," Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Center,
Williamsburg, Virginia. April October 1992.

"Child's Play? Children's Books in Early America," DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Gallery, Williamsburg,
Virginia. September 1990 June 1991.







"Voyaging and Beyond: Cartography and the New Worlds," The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation Library,
Williamsburg, Virginia. October December 1990.

"Art in Architecture: The A. Lawrence Kocher Book Collection," The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation Library,
Williamsburg, Virginia. April June 1989.

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation Library and the John Hay Library, Brown University, 1977-present
Miscellaneous exhibitions of rare books and manuscripts on subjects such as Christmas, history of science,
medicine, garden history, eighteenth-century printing and binding.

PUBLICATIONS

John Evelyn, Elysium Britannicum, or the Royal Gardens, editor and transcriber. (Forthcoming publication)

The Art, Craft, and Business of Bookbinding in Eighteenth-Century Williamsburg, Virginia. (Forthcoming
publication)

"John Evelyn's obsession with his Elysium Britannicum," Colonial Williamsburg, V. 18, No. 3 (Spring 1996).

"John Evelyn's Elysium Britannicum: Provenance, Condition, Transcription," in John Evelyn's "Elysium
Britannicum", ed. Joachim Wolschke-Bulmahn and Therese O'Malley (Washington: Dumbarton Oaks, c. 1996).

"John Evelyn's 17th-century Elysium Britannicum," Ab Bookman's Weekly, June 21, 1993.

The Colonial Williamsburg Research Collections in Microform, A Guide, editor, UPA Academic Editions, 1992.

"Shirley's Hoard of Rare Books," Colonial Williamsburg Journal. V. 13, No. 3 (Spring 1991).

Child's Play? Children's Books in Early America, exhibition catalog, published by the International Board on
Books for Young People, 1990.

"Early Children's Books in Colonial Williamsburg," CBC Features, V. 43, No. 1 (January-June 1990).

The William Blathwayt Papers at Colonial Williamsburg, 1631-1722. Guide to the Microfilm Collection, editor,
UPA Academic Editions, 1989.

"The English Atlas of John Custis," Colonial Williamsburg Journal, V. 10, No. 4 (Summer 1988).

"Preservation of Library and Archival Materials at Colonial Williamsburg," Conservation Administration News,
No. 33, April 1988.

"Gardens of Delight and Pleasure: Resources for Garden History at Colonial Williamsburg," Colonial
Williamsburg Journal, V. 8, No. 4 (Summer 1986).

"Collecting Colonial Music Material," AB Bookman's Weekly, December 9, 1985.

"Safeguarding the Sources: Gathering Information for the Archives," Colonial Williamsburg Today, V. 6, No. 2
(Winter 1984).

Procedural Manual for the Colonial Williamsburg Research Archives (unpublished) 1983.

"Notes on the Collections: The Harry Lyman Koopman Papers," Books at Brown, Vol. XXVII (1979).

"The Accentuation of Second Conjugation Verbs in Standard Literary Russian," Slavic and East European Journal
(Summer 1979).






Dynamics of Stress Shift in the Second Conjugation of Standard Literary Russian, Ph.D. dissertation
(unpublished) Brown University, 1977.




A


PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

Society of American Archivists, 1978-.
Williamsburg Bibliophiles (founding member), 1980-. Treasurer, 1980-1982, 1990-1995.
American Printing History Association, 1984-.
American Library Association (ACRL), 1985-.
Program Committee, 1991 Rare Books and Manuscripts Preconference.
Speaker, 1992 Rare Books and Manuscripts Preconference.
American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages, 1975-.
The Howe Society, 1994-.



REFERENCES

Ms. Susan S. Berg, Library Director, The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation Library, P.O. Box 1776,
Williamsburg, VA 23187-1776. Telephone: 804-220-7413.

Ms. Carolyn Henderson, Deputy Director, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
32611. Tel: 352-392-0342.

Mr. Pearce S. Grove, Director, James C. Breckenridge Library, United State Marine Corps University, Quantico, Va
22134. Telephone: 703 784-2248.









DORA LaVERNE JENKINS

2510 N.E. 9th Street, Apt. 307
Gainesville, FL 32609

EDUCATION
Bethune-Cookman College, Daytona Beach, Florida
Bachelor of Science: Business Administration/Management; June,1994
HONORS: National Dean's List; Presidential Scholar(B-CC);
Cum laude 3.0/4.0

WORK EXPERIENCE
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida, Gainesville.
ARCHIVIST
Catalog Department, April, 1995-Present.
SCatalog and edit Florida Newspapers into the International
Database On-line Computer Library Center (OCLC) and Library
Users Information System (LUIS), for the United States
Newspaper Project in Florida.

George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida, Gainesville.
SUPERVISOR, LIBRARY TECHNICAL ASSISTANT
Acquisitions Department, April, 1990-August, 1992
Supervised, planned and directed work load for staff.
Set unit goals and objectives; weekly and monthly
activities for staff.
Ensured material received were processed and invoices paid
within 3 day turn-around period as mandated.
Assured materials were shipped within Library system
accurately and within time frame.
Evaluated work performance, developed position descriptions.
Participated in hiring process; including interviewing and
selection process.
Wrote and maintained processing procedures.
Compiled monthly statistics for management.

LIBRARY TECHNICAL-ASSISTANT II
Acquisitions Department, November, 1988-April, 1990
Supervised operations of monograph receiving unit.
Ensured material received were processed within 3-day time
frame.
Maintained accuracy of computerized order/pay/receipt
records.
Analyzed and resolved questionable receipts and
invoices.








Jenkins-2


PRIDE of Florida
Department of Corrections, Raiford, FL
ACCOUNTS PAYABLE CLERK
Administration Department, January, 1988-November, 1988
Compiled and processed payable invoices and purchase orders
for 14 industries.
Maintained batch control log of cash receipts.
Prepared month-end reports for management.
Handled customer inquires and account discrepancies.
Supervised inmate clerks.

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE CLERK
Administration Department, August, 1987-January, 1988
Processed shipping orders for 14 industries.
Handled collections on over-due accounts, invoice
payments and customer inquiries.
Supervised inmate clerks.

American Bankers Insurance Group,Miami, FL
TAPE ACCOUNT COORDINATOR
Financial Operations Department,April, 1984-November, 1986
Processed insurance reports received on magnetic tape.
Calculated and balanced month-end production reports;
generated monthly activity reports for management.
Maintained inventory of reports backlogged.

NASA\State Technology Applications Center (STAC)
University of Florida, Gainesville
CLERK V
Library Center,July, 1980-January, 1984
Managed documents delivery service via on-line system.
Reviewed grants allocation documentation for grant related
projects.
Maintained funds and set-up deposit accounts for purchases
for resale.
Prepared travel reports, purchase requisitions, expense
refunds and change notice requests, I-D Invoices and I-D
Requisitions.

CAREER DEVELOPMENT
Serial Operational Committee, University of Florida, 1992
Personnel Evaluation Workshop, University of Florida, 1992.
Certified Employment Interviewer, February, 1989.
Evaluating Employee Performance, March, 1990.
Everything You Always Wanted To Know About Supervision,
October, 1989.
CareerTrack-"How To Deal With Difficult People," May, 1988.









Jenkins-3



COMPUTER EXPERIENCE
Microsoft Word/Excel
WordPerfect
Lotus 1-2-3
LUIS
OCLC
E-Mail (Electronic Mail System)

REFERENCES --- Available upon request


1 "










ERICH J KESSE


WORK EXPERIENCE.

Preservation Officer. University of Florida Libraries. Gainesville, FL.
May 1987 present.
Responsible for creation and implementation of Office policies and procedures
including conservation, reprography, commercial library binding preparations,
preservation education, etc. with 10.5 FTE.

Rare Book Cataloger. University of Florida Libraries. Gainesville, FL.
April 1984 September 1986.

Graduate Assistant. University of Kentucky. M.I. King Library. Lexington, KY.
August 1982 August 1983.

Assistant to the Librarian. Cincinnati Historical Society. Cincinnati, OH.
January 1982 August 1982.

Assistant to the Curator of Rare Books. Xavier University. Cincinnati, OH.
August 1979 January 1982.


VOLUNTEER POSITIONS AND INTERNSHIPS.

Preservation Consultant. YIVO Institute. New York, NY.
January May 1987.

Catalog Librarian. Cincinnati Historical Society. Cincinnati, OH.
October 1983 April 1984. Part-time (16 hours per week).

Librarian/Archivist. Taft Museum. Cincinnati, OH.
November 1983 April 1984. Part-time (24 hours per week).

Assistant in Special Collections. Transylvania University. Lexington, KY.
April 1983 June 1983.


EDUCATION.

Columbia University. School of Library Service. New York, NY.
May 1987. Certificate of Preservation Administration.

University of Kentucky. College of Library Science. Lexington, Ky.
August 1983. M.S.L.S. Specialization in Rare Book and Manuscript Cataloging.

Xavier University. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Cincinnati, OH.
May 1982. B.A., cum laude, University Scholars Program.
Philosophy and English Literature.














United States Newspaper Program: Florida
Interim Report, March 1997 October. 1998









NEH Grant Number: PS-20985-95













Submitted by Martha Hruska, PI
PO Box 117001
Library West
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
January 1999











The United States Newspaper Program: Florida has spent the last six months getting
back on track, following an eight month vacancy in the cataloger position. Susan
Constantineau was hired and started working as the new Project cataloger in May, 1998,
replacing Robert Dowd. Susan came to the project with cataloging experience from
Dartmouth. She has learned quickly about newspaper and CONSER cataloging, as well
as OCLC union listing. She has already visited 17 sites in the North Florida area,
verifying and identifying holdings and additional titles.

This interim report was delayed due to the turnover in the project cataloger position. Now
that the position has been successfully filled, we are better able to project how long it will
take to complete the project goals. With the cataloger position having been vacant for
eight months, I am requesting a 6 month no-cost extension, June 1999 through the end
of November 1999. That will enable us to complete the project cataloging and
preservation microfilming goals.

Cataloging Report

Full level CONSER cataloging was completed for 110 records from June 1997 through
May 1998. From May 1998 through October 1998, another 61 full level CONSER catalog
records have been completed for Florida newspapers. Most all of these titles in this
phase represent titles held in libraries outside of the University of Florida. 30 of these
titles were original catalog records, 18 records were modifications of existing OCLC
records, and 13 were original records for the microfilm versions of titles.

Susan Constantineau has started making field trips in the local area, completing
cataloging and verification of holdings for Citrus, Marion, and Nassau counties. She has
nearly completed Duval, Hernando, and Lake counties. In total, she has completed 17
site visits to date and finding a total of 30 additional titles to add to the database. Her
plans for future field trips will be to cover central and south Florida, then to cover the
University of West Florida and the Pensacola area, finally the Florida State Library and
the Tallahassee area.

The OCLC union listing of Florida holdings is well underway and should be completed by
January. Improvements to the inhouse database file are also underway and should also
be completed in January.

Preservation Report

Preservation microfilming has continued during the period on the publication, the Jewish
Floridian. This title was identified in the Miami area and, since the original survey was
conducted the family has agreed to filming. Its rarity, condition, and the extent of
available holdings well warranted preservation microfilming. This title represents 10
simultaneously running variant titles, with differing content and layout, from regions and
cities, across Florida. 13 volumes have been completed to date. It is projected that the
remainder of the title will be filmed in January.

It should be noted that delays in the Preservation microfilming occurred during this
period because our cameras were disabled by mechanical problems and that we were








unable to send, within Florida's procurement guidelines, additional papers to our vendor
since we previously had filled his queue with an extensive run of EL NACIONAL (Caracas,
Venezuela).

Other microfilming projects in queue are incidental titles and issues from the St.
Augustine area and the Cuban exile papers at the University of Miami. Discussions are
continuing to make special arrangements to film and catalog those materials.

With the extension through November 1999, it is projected that we will be able to meet
the emergency preservation microfilming goals of the grant.

Program Building

Early in 1999, the Florida USNP team will revise and update the original brochure to
circulate to our State committee, and all participating libraries.

Planning is underway to put together the final phase of the Florida newspaper project,
completing priority microfilming, and possibly digitizing selective titles. We will be
conducting a survey to determine how many Florida newspapers have plans to digitize
retrospectively.














United States Newspaper Program: Florida
Interim Report, March 1997 October. 1998









NEH Grant Number: PS-20985-95













Submitted by Martha Hruska, PI
PO Box 117001
Library West
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
January 1999











The United States Newspaper Program: Florida has spent the last six months getting
back on track, following an eight month vacancy in the cataloger position. Susan
Constantineau was hired and started working as the new Project cataloger in May, 1998,
replacing Robert Dowd. Susan came to the project with cataloging experience from
Dartmouth. She has learned quickly about newspaper and CONSER cataloging, as well
as OCLC union listing. She has already visited 17 sites in the North Florida area,
verifying and identifying holdings and additional titles.

This interim report was delayed due to the turnover in the project cataloger position. Now
that the position has been successfully filled, we are better able to project how long it will
take to complete the project goals. With the cataloger position having been vacant for
eight months, I am requesting a 6 month no-cost extension, June 1999 through the end
of November 1999. That will enable us to complete the project cataloging and
preservation microfilming goals.

Cataloging Report

Full level CONSER cataloging was completed for 110 records from June 1997 through
May 1998. From May 1998 through October 1998, another 61 full level CONSER catalog
records have been completed for Florida newspapers. Most all of these titles in this
phase represent titles held in libraries outside of the University of Florida. 30 of these
titles were original catalog records, 18 records were modifications of existing OCLC
records, and 13 were original records for the microfilm versions of titles.

Susan Constantineau has started making field trips in the local area, completing
cataloging and verification of holdings for Citrus, Marion, and Nassau counties. She has
nearly completed Duval, Hernando, and Lake counties. In total, she has completed 17
site visits to date and finding a total of 30 additional titles to add to the database. Her
plans for future field trips will be to cover central and south Florida, then to cover the
University of West Florida and the Pensacola area, finally the Florida State Library and
the Tallahassee area.

The OCLC union listing of Florida holdings is well underway and should be completed by
January. Improvements to the inhouse database file are also underway and should also
be completed in January.

Preservation Report

Preservation microfilming has continued during the period on the publication, the Jewish
Floridian. This title was identified in the Miami area and, since the original survey was
conducted the family has agreed to filming. Its rarity, condition, and the extent of
available holdings well warranted preservation microfilming. This title represents 10
simultaneously running variant titles, with differing content and layout, from regions and
cities, across Florida. 13 volumes have been completed to date. It is projected that the
remainder of the title will be filmed in January.

It should be noted that delays in the Preservation microfilming occurred during this
period because our cameras were disabled by mechanical problems and that we were








unable to send, within Florida's procurement guidelines, additional papers to our vendor
since we previously had filled his queue with an extensive run of EL NACIONAL (Caracas,
Venezuela).

Other microfilming projects in queue are incidental titles and issues from the St.
Augustine area and the Cuban exile papers at the University of Miami. Discussions are
continuing to make special arrangements to film and catalog those materials.

With the extension through November 1999, it is projected that we will be able to meet
the emergency preservation microfilming goals of the grant.

Program Building

Early in 1999, the Florida USNP team will revise and update the original brochure to
circulate to our State committee, and all participating libraries.

Planning is underway to put together the final phase of the Florida newspaper project,
completing priority microfilming, and possibly digitizing selective titles. We will be
conducting a survey to determine how many Florida newspapers have plans to digitize
retrospectively.














United States Newspaper Program: Florida
Final Performance Report, 1997 1999
March 23, 2000









NEH Grant Number: PS-20985-95













Submitted by Martha Hruska, PI
PO Box 117001
Library West
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611












The first phase of the United States Newspaper Program: Florida grant (1993-95) focused
on surveying and building a database of statewide newspaper holdings. In the second phase
from 1995 1997, cataloging and emergency microfilming began at the University of Florida
where our Florida History collection has maintained a long tradition of acquiring and microfilming
Florida papers. The recently completed 1997 1999 phase of the grant focused on cataloging
and microfilming important newspaper runs and collections all around the state. As noted in the
Interim report on this phase in January 1999, the cataloger position turned over after an 8 month
vacancy. Therefore a no-cost extension through December 1999 was sought and approved. With
the extension, we were able to complete the cataloging and emergency preservation goals of the
grant. Still, the project will be returning $22,011.54 in unspent funds. This is due to the staff
turnover midway through the project, and a change in the way we brought newspapers to
Gainesville for filming. The original grant plan had budgeted for shipping these materials. We
found that it worked better for all parties for USNP grant staff to transport these newspapers.
This ended up being much less costly, as well as a more controlled way to move the materials
around the state.

Cataloging Report

In total through both cataloging phases, the Florida United States Newspaper project cataloged
3000 newspaper titles at full level CONSER standards. The 741 titles cataloged during this final
phase of the grant phase represent titles held in libraries outside of the University of Florida.
Detailed cataloging statistics for the 1997 1999 phase are attached on p. 4

Susan Constantineau was hired and started working as the new Project cataloger in May, 1998,
replacing Robert Dowd. Susan came to the project with cataloging experience from Dartmouth.
She learned quickly about newspaper and CONSER cataloging, as well as OCLC union listing. She
made a total of 52 site visits, verifying and identifying holdings and additional titles. This included
17 sites in North Florida, 24 in Central Florida (Citrus, Marion, Duval, and Nassau counties), 9 in
West (Pensacola and Tallahassee) and 2 in South Florida. This picked up unique newspaper titles
from the University of Miami, the State Library, Florida State University, Florida A&M University,
and the University of West Florida in Pensacola.

Indeed, the grant ended in December 1999 with the cataloging and filming of the 'jewels' of
Florida's newspapers, the most unique collection of newspapers in the state, and probably one of
the most unique in the country, the University of Miami's Cuban Exile Newspaper collection. In
1996, Cecilia Botero, the UF cataloger, and Bill Brown from Special Collections at the University of
Miami, featured a presentation at the Washington, DC USNP annual meeting about the Cuban
newspaper collection that would be included in the Florida project. The USNP project microfilmed
and preserved 122 of the most significant and extensive titles in Miami's collection. These 122
newspapers (337 reels, and almost 125,000 exposures of microfilm) figure to be about 70% of all
the papers filmed in the grant. A total of 204 Cuban exile newspaper titles were cataloged from
the collection into the OCLC database, making these very special resources better known to
researchers worldwide.

The OCLC union listing of Florida holdings includes all the titles cataloged as part of the grant.
The database file of Florida newspaper holdings was made accessible via the Florida Newspaper
web page, http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/flnews/ March 22, 2000.










Preservation Report


Most of the titles cataloged had already been microfilmed, but the grant filmed an additional 171
newspaper titles (equal to 736 reels of film and about 325,000 exposures.) in need of
preservation. Complete preservation microfilming titles and statistics can be found on p. 5-7. In
general it was found that the runs in need of emergency filming were not as many, nor as
extensive as had been anticipated.

Preservation microfilming priorities during the period focused on the publication, including the
various city versions, of the Jewish Floridian and the Cuban exile newspapers. The Jewish
Floridian was not on the original list of newspaper titles surveyed in the database for filming.
Since the original survey was conducted, the family agreed to microfilming. Its rarity, condition,
and the extent of available holdings well warranted preservation microfilming. This title
represents a total of 10 simultaneously running variant titles, with differing content and layout,
from regions and cities, across Florida.

Delays in Preservation microfilming occurred in the early phase of the grant period due to
renovations that affected the camera work area. During the latter months of this grant period,
the camera area was restored to optimal working condition, and microfilming both in-house and
outsourcing, focused on Florida newspapers. Project staff temporarily housed, processed, and
outsourced the filming of 122 of the University of Miami's Cuban exile papers by Micrographics,
Inc.

Other microfilming projects are included in the attached list. Papers from Bunnell (Flagler
Tribune, 1918 1955), Bushnell (Sumter County Times, 1894 1954; Herald Express,
1962 1977; Wildwood Echo, 1954) and Orange County (Country Cupboard remain in
queue for microfilming as part of UF's ongoing Florida newspaper commitment.

A future preservation/access project to continue and complete long-term access to Florida
newspapers will be planned to include digitizing newspapers from the microfilm. The University of
Miami is very interested in jointly pursuing such a project to improve further the access to their
unique Cuban exile newspapers.

Program Building

A press release was issued in February 2000 regarding the microfilming and cataloging of the
Cuban exile papers as the final major activity of the grant. A celebratory reception was held to
mark the event with the Amigos of the Cuban Heritage Collection of the University of Miami, Feb.
16, 2000.

A press release is going out, along with other communications to key publications and libraries
around the State, including those on the original State committee, to alert them to the Florida US
Newspaper Project web site, http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/flnews/. The web site now includes web
access to the Florida newspaper holdings database. The web site is well visited as evidenced by
the frequent requests received for more information on one of our newspapers.

As noted above, we will be planning to propose complete the filming and digitizing of selective
unique titles, like those in the University of Miami's Cuban exile collection.




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