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Phase Two, Revised: Preservation Microfilming and Cataloging of American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF90000018/00007
 Material Information
Title: Phase Two, Revised: Preservation Microfilming and Cataloging of American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Copyright Date: 2002
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature
 Notes
Abstract: NEH grant proposal for cataloging and digitization of volumes from the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF90000018:00007

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1. PROJECT DIRECTOR OR INDIVIDUAL APPLICANT o Mr. o Mrs. o Ms. o Dr. o Prof. Major Field of Study: ____________ Name (last, first, middle): _________________________________________________________________________________ Address: ______________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ City:__________________________________________________ State: ______ Zip Code: ________________________ Email: ________________________________________________________________________________________________ Telephone (work): _______________________ (home): ________________________ Fax: _________________________ 5. TYPE OF APPLICATION: o New o Supplement Current Grant Number(s): _____________________________ 9. REQUESTED GRANT PERIOD: From: __________________________ To: ____________________________ 2. INSTITUTION INFORMATION Name:_________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address: ______________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ City: __________________________________________________ State: ______ Zip Code: _______________________ Employer ID number: ______________________________ OMB no. 3136-0134 ~ Expires 6/30/06 8. PROJECT DESCRIPTION (use only space provided) : 7. PROJECT TITLE: ____________________________________________________________________________________ 3. TYPE OF APPLICANT (check one, as appropriate) o Institution Type: ___________________________ Status: o Private Nonprofit o Unit of State/Local Govt 4. GRANT PROGRAM : __________________________________________________________________________________ (Please refer to the application instructions for a list of program names.) A PPLICA TION C OVER S HEET FOR NEH G RANT P ROGRAMS Fellowships, Stipends, & Faculty Research Awards o University o College Teacher/ Teacher Indep. Scholar o Jr. Scholar o Sr. Scholar o Individual Citizenship: o US o Other Country:_________________________ Month/Year: ______________________ 6. PROJECT FIELD CODE: _____________________

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11. PROJECT FUNDING FOR INSTITUTIONS Programs other than Challenge Grants a. Outright Funds $_____________________ b. Federal Match $_____________________ c. Total from NEH $_____________________ d. Cost Sharing $_____________________ e. Total Project Costs $_____________________ Challenge Grants applicants only a. Fiscal Year #1 $_____________________ b. Fiscal Year #2 $_____________________ c. Fiscal Year #3 $_____________________ d. Total from NEH $_____________________ e. Non-Federal Match $_____________________ f. Total $_____________________ 12. ADDITIONAL FUNDING Will this proposal be submitted to another NEH division, government agency, or private entity for funding? o Yes o No If yes, indicate where and when: ___________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Applicant Name: _______________________________ Project Title: ____________________________________ 13. GRANT ADMINISTRATOR INFORMATION FOR INSTITUTIONS o Mr. o Mrs. o Ms. o Dr. o Prof. Title: __________________________________________________ Name (last, first, middle): _________________________________________________________________________________ Institution: _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Address: _______________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ City: __________________________________________ State:_________ Zip: ___________________________________ Telephone: _____________________________________ Fax: ___________________________________________________ Email: ________________________________________________________________________________________________ 14. FELLOWSHIPS AND SUMMER STIPENDS APPLICANTS List the name, department, and institutional affiliation of your referees. a. ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ b._____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Summer Stipends applicants only: Provide the name, title, and signature of nominating official. Printed name: ___________________________________ Title: __________________________________________________ Signature: ______________________________________ 15. CERTIFICATION By signing and submitting this application, the individual applicant or authorizing official is providing the applicable certifications as set forth in these guidelines. Printed name of individual applicant / authorizing official: ________________________________________________________ Title of individual applicant / authorizing official: ________________________________________________________________ Signature: _________________________________________________ Date: _____________________________________ For NEH use only: date received: application #: initials: 10. WE THE PEOPLE GRANT INITIATIVE Check the box if your proposal responds to the initiative. o

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122 OMB No. 3136-0134 Expires 6/30/03 National Endowment for the HumanitiesBUDGET FORM_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ Project DirectorIf this is a revised budget, indicate the NEH application/grant number: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ Applicant OrganizationRequested Grant Period FROM ___________________ THROUGH ______ ______________ mo/yrmo/yr The three-column budget has been developed for the convenience of those applicants who wish to identify the project costs that will be charged to NEH funds and those that will be cost shared. FOR NEH PURPOSES, THE ONLY COLUMN THAT NEEDS TO BE COMPLETED IS COLUMN C. The method of cost computation should clearly indicate how the total charge for each budget item was determined. If more space is needed for any budget category, please follow the budget format on a separate sheet of paper. When the requested grant period is eighteen months or longer, separate budgets for each twelve-month period of the project must be developed on duplicated copies of the budget form. SECTION A budget detail for the period FROM ___ _________________ THROUGH ___________________ mo/yr mo/yr 1. Salaries and Wages. Provide the names and titles of principal project personnel. For support staff, include the title of eac h position and indicate in brackets the number of persons who will be employed in that capacity. For persons employed on an academic year basis, list sepa rately any salary charge for work done outside the academic year. method of cost computationNEH FundsCost SharingTotal name/title of positionno.(see sample)(a)(b)(c) _______________________________________________[ ] ___________________________________________$ _________________$ _________ ________$ ____________ _______________________________________________[ ] _______________________________________________________ ___________ _________ ________ ____________ ________ _______________________________________________[ ] _______________________________________________________ ___________ _________ ________ ____________ ________ _______________________________________________[ ] _______________________________________________________ ___________ _________ ________ ____________ ________ _______________________________________________[ ] _______________________________________________________ ___________ _________ ________ ____________ ________ _______________________________________________[ ] _______________________________________________________ ___________ _________ ________ ____________ ________ _______________________________________________[ ] _______________________________________________________ ___________ _________ ________ ____________ ________ SUBTOTAL$ ___ ______________$ _________________$ ____________ 2. Fringe Benefits. If more than one rate is used, list each rate and salary base. Ratesalary base(a)(b)(c) _____________% of $ _________________$ _________________$ _________________$_ ___________ _____________% of $ __________________________________________________________________________ _____________% of $ _________________$ _________________$ _________________$_ ___________ SUBTOTAL$ ___ ______________$ _________________$ ____________ 3. Consultant Fees. Include payments for professional and technical consultants and honoraria. name or type of consultantno. of daysdaily rate of on projectcompensationa)(b)(c) _________________________________________________________________ $ ________________$ _________________$ _______ __________$ ____________ _________________________________________________________________ $ ________________$ _________________$ _______ __________$ ____________ _________________________________________________________________ $ ________________$ _________________$ _______ __________$ ____________ _________________________________________________________________ $ ________________$ _________________$ _______ __________$ ____________ SUBTOTAL$ ___ ______________$ _________________$ ____________ 53072 115-128 Instruc. Sec. 9/9 11/14/00 8:59 AM Page 122

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123 NEH Budget Form Page 2 4. Travel. For each trip, indicate the number of persons traveling, the total days they will be in travel status, and the total subsistence and transportation costs for that trip. When a project will involve the travel of a number of people to a conference, institute, et c., these costs may be summarized on one line by indicating the point of origin as "various." All foreign travel must be listed separately. from/tono.totalsubsistencetransportationNEH FundsCost SharingTotal personstravel costs +costs =(a)(b)(c) days _________________________________________[ ][ ]$ _______________$ _______________$ _______________$ _______________$ ______ _________ _________________________________________[ ][ ] __________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________[ ][ ] __________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________[ ][ ] __________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________[ ][ ] __________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________[ ][ ] __________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________[ ][ ] __________________________________________________________________________________________ SUBTOTAL$ ______________$ _______________$ _______________ 5. Supplies and Materials. Include consumable supplies, materials to be used in the project and items of expendable equipment; i.e., equipment items costing less than $5,000 and with an estimated useful life of less than one year. itembasis/method of cost computation(a)(b)(c) _____________________________________________________________________________________________________$ _______________$ _______ ________$ _______________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ SUBTOTAL$ ______________$ _______________$ _______________ 6. Services. Include the cost of duplication and printing, long distance telephone, equipment rental, postage, and other servic es related to project objectives that are not included under other budget categories or in the indirect cost pool. For subcontracts provid e an itemization of subcontract costs on this form or on an attachment. itembasis/method of cost computation(a)(b)(c) _____________________________________________________________________________________________________$ _______________$ _______ ________$ _______________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ SUBTOTAL$ ______________$ _______________$ _______________ 53072 115-128 Instruc. Sec. 9/9 11/14/00 8:59 AM Page 123

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124 NEH Budget Form Page 3 7. Other Costs. Include participant stipends and room and board, equipment purchases, and other items not previously listed. Pl ease note that "miscellaneous" and "contingency" are not acceptable budget categories. Refer to the budget instructions for the restriction on the purchase of permanent equipment. NEH FundsCost SharingTotal itembasis/method of cost computation(a)(b)(c) _____________________________________________________________________________________________________$ _______________$ _______ ________$ _______________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ SUBTOTAL$ ______________$ _______________$ _______________ 8. Total Direct Costs (add subtotals of items 1 through 7)$ ______________$ _______________$ _______________ 9. Indirect Costs (This budget item applies only to institutional applicants.) If indirect costs are to be charged to this project, CHECK THE APPROPRIATE BOX BELOW and provide the information requested. Refer to the budget instructions for explanations of these options. [ ] Current indirect cost rate(s) has/have been negotiated with federal agency. (Complete items A and B.) [ ] Indirect cost proposal has been submitted to a federal agency but not yet negotiated. (Indicate the name of the agency in item A and show proposed rate(s) and base(s), and the amount(s) of indirect costs in item B.) [ ] Indirect cost proposal will be sent to NEH if application is funded. (Provide an estimate in item B of the rate that will be used and indicate the base against which it will be charged and the amount of indirect costs.) [ ] Applicant chooses to use a rate not to exceed 10% of direct costs, less distorting items, up to a maximum charge of $5,000 per year. (Under item B, enter the proposed rate, the base against which the rate will be charged, and the computation of indirect costs or $5,000, whichever sum is less.) A. ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________ name of federal agencydate of agreement NEH FundsCost SharingTotal B.rate(s)base(s(a)(b)(c) ________________% of$________________$$ _______________$ _______________$ _______________ ________________% of$________________$______________________________________________________ TOTAL INDIRECT COSTS$ ______________$ _______________$ _______________ 10. Total Project Costs (direct and indirect) for Budget Period$ ______________$ _______________$ _______________ 53072 115-128 Instruc. Sec. 9/9 11/14/00 8:59 AM Page 124

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Salaries and Wages October 2004 September 2005 ContinuationName/TitleMethod of Cost ComputationNEHUFTotalFringeHealth **J. Ingram/Co-Project Director12mo. X 10% FTE R. Smith/Co-Project Director12mo. X 20% FTE @ 441210882488241653701 Project Cataloger12mo. X 100% FTE @ 400004000004000074922986 Project Archivist12mo. X 100% FTE @ 300003000003000042182986 Senior Library Technical Assistant12mo. X 33% FTE @ 2543008477847711921493 **E. Kesse/Dir, Digital Library Center12 mo. x 5% FTE 00000 S. Haas/Asst Dir., Dig. Lib. Cntr12 mo. x 10% FTE @ 529260 5293 5293991297 M. Smith/Imaging Tech. Supervisor12 mo. x 30% @ 2548406371637110751527 Student Assts/Imaging tech staff (2.5 FTE)2000 hrs @ $8.hr.4000004000000 J. Freund/Head Conservation12 mo. x 10% @ 41533041534153 777 611 T. Barr/Head, Spec. Colls. Catalog Unit12 mo. x 10% @ 45311045314531 849 351 J. Pen/Lib Tech Asst, Dig Lib Cntr12 mo. x 50% @ 2123501061810618 1493 3058 A. Terman/Db coordinator/FCLA12 mo. x 50% @ 4704702399423994 4494 3053 R. Renner/Coordinator of Planetary Ops.12 mo. X 15% @ 35000052505250983448 Student Assts./Paging540 hrs. @ $6.50/hr 3510 0351000 Totals 113510775111910212521717511 ** In accord with the University of Florida's Indirect Cost Calculations, the salaries of John Ingram and Erich Kesse are accounted for as adminis-trative overhead, an indirect cost .Fringe Benefits The standard benefit of OPS (Other Personnel Services) is 8.3 percent. Permanent staff enjoy a fringe benefit rate of 14.06 percent for Florida Retirement System, and 18.73 percent for the Optional Retirement System. To each rate is added annual health coverage set at: $2986.00 for single staff person coverage. $3505.00 for spouse coverage. $6106.00 for family coverage. The amount is prorated according to percentage of time devoted to the grant.

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122 OMB No. 3136-0134 Expires 6/30/03 National Endowment for the HumanitiesBUDGET FORM_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ Project DirectorIf this is a revised budget, indicate the NEH application/grant number: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ Applicant OrganizationRequested Grant Period FROM ___________________ THROUGH ______ ______________ mo/yrmo/yr The three-column budget has been developed for the convenience of those applicants who wish to identify the project costs that will be charged to NEH funds and those that will be cost shared. FOR NEH PURPOSES, THE ONLY COLUMN THAT NEEDS TO BE COMPLETED IS COLUMN C. The method of cost computation should clearly indicate how the total charge for each budget item was determined. If more space is needed for any budget category, please follow the budget format on a separate sheet of paper. When the requested grant period is eighteen months or longer, separate budgets for each twelve-month period of the project must be developed on duplicated copies of the budget form. SECTION A budget detail for the period FROM ___ _________________ THROUGH ___________________ mo/yr mo/yr 1. Salaries and Wages. Provide the names and titles of principal project personnel. For support staff, include the title of eac h position and indicate in brackets the number of persons who will be employed in that capacity. For persons employed on an academic year basis, list sepa rately any salary charge for work done outside the academic year. method of cost computationNEH FundsCost SharingTotal name/title of positionno.(see sample)(a)(b)(c) _______________________________________________[ ] ___________________________________________$ _________________$ _________ ________$ ____________ _______________________________________________[ ] _______________________________________________________ ___________ _________ ________ ____________ ________ _______________________________________________[ ] _______________________________________________________ ___________ _________ ________ ____________ ________ _______________________________________________[ ] _______________________________________________________ ___________ _________ ________ ____________ ________ _______________________________________________[ ] _______________________________________________________ ___________ _________ ________ ____________ ________ _______________________________________________[ ] _______________________________________________________ ___________ _________ ________ ____________ ________ _______________________________________________[ ] _______________________________________________________ ___________ _________ ________ ____________ ________ SUBTOTAL$ ___ ______________$ _________________$ ____________ 2. Fringe Benefits. If more than one rate is used, list each rate and salary base. Ratesalary base(a)(b)(c) _____________% of $ _________________$ _________________$ _________________$_ ___________ _____________% of $ __________________________________________________________________________ _____________% of $ _________________$ _________________$ _________________$_ ___________ SUBTOTAL$ ___ ______________$ _________________$ ____________ 3. Consultant Fees. Include payments for professional and technical consultants and honoraria. name or type of consultantno. of daysdaily rate of on projectcompensationa)(b)(c) _________________________________________________________________ $ ________________$ _________________$ _______ __________$ ____________ _________________________________________________________________ $ ________________$ _________________$ _______ __________$ ____________ _________________________________________________________________ $ ________________$ _________________$ _______ __________$ ____________ _________________________________________________________________ $ ________________$ _________________$ _______ __________$ ____________ SUBTOTAL$ ___ ______________$ _________________$ ____________ 53072 115-128 Instruc. Sec. 9/9 11/14/00 8:59 AM Page 122

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123 NEH Budget Form Page 2 4. Travel. For each trip, indicate the number of persons traveling, the total days they will be in travel status, and the total subsistence and transportation costs for that trip. When a project will involve the travel of a number of people to a conference, institute, et c., these costs may be summarized on one line by indicating the point of origin as "various." All foreign travel must be listed separately. from/tono.totalsubsistencetransportationNEH FundsCost SharingTotal personstravel costs +costs =(a)(b)(c) days _________________________________________[ ][ ]$ _______________$ _______________$ _______________$ _______________$ ______ _________ _________________________________________[ ][ ] __________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________[ ][ ] __________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________[ ][ ] __________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________[ ][ ] __________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________[ ][ ] __________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________[ ][ ] __________________________________________________________________________________________ SUBTOTAL$ ______________$ _______________$ _______________ 5. Supplies and Materials. Include consumable supplies, materials to be used in the project and items of expendable equipment; i.e., equipment items costing less than $5,000 and with an estimated useful life of less than one year. itembasis/method of cost computation(a)(b)(c) _____________________________________________________________________________________________________$ _______________$ _______ ________$ _______________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ SUBTOTAL$ ______________$ _______________$ _______________ 6. Services. Include the cost of duplication and printing, long distance telephone, equipment rental, postage, and other servic es related to project objectives that are not included under other budget categories or in the indirect cost pool. For subcontracts provid e an itemization of subcontract costs on this form or on an attachment. itembasis/method of cost computation(a)(b)(c) _____________________________________________________________________________________________________$ _______________$ _______ ________$ _______________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ SUBTOTAL$ ______________$ _______________$ _______________ 53072 115-128 Instruc. Sec. 9/9 11/14/00 8:59 AM Page 123

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124 NEH Budget Form Page 3 7. Other Costs. Include participant stipends and room and board, equipment purchases, and other items not previously listed. Pl ease note that "miscellaneous" and "contingency" are not acceptable budget categories. Refer to the budget instructions for the restriction on the purchase of permanent equipment. NEH FundsCost SharingTotal itembasis/method of cost computation(a)(b)(c) _____________________________________________________________________________________________________$ _______________$ _______ ________$ _______________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ SUBTOTAL$ ______________$ _______________$ _______________ 8. Total Direct Costs (add subtotals of items 1 through 7)$ ______________$ _______________$ _______________ 9. Indirect Costs (This budget item applies only to institutional applicants.) If indirect costs are to be charged to this project, CHECK THE APPROPRIATE BOX BELOW and provide the information requested. Refer to the budget instructions for explanations of these options. [ ] Current indirect cost rate(s) has/have been negotiated with federal agency. (Complete items A and B.) [ ] Indirect cost proposal has been submitted to a federal agency but not yet negotiated. (Indicate the name of the agency in item A and show proposed rate(s) and base(s), and the amount(s) of indirect costs in item B.) [ ] Indirect cost proposal will be sent to NEH if application is funded. (Provide an estimate in item B of the rate that will be used and indicate the base against which it will be charged and the amount of indirect costs.) [ ] Applicant chooses to use a rate not to exceed 10% of direct costs, less distorting items, up to a maximum charge of $5,000 per year. (Under item B, enter the proposed rate, the base against which the rate will be charged, and the computation of indirect costs or $5,000, whichever sum is less.) A. ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________ name of federal agencydate of agreement NEH FundsCost SharingTotal B.rate(s)base(s(a)(b)(c) ________________% of$________________$$ _______________$ _______________$ _______________ ________________% of$________________$______________________________________________________ TOTAL INDIRECT COSTS$ ______________$ _______________$ _______________ 10. Total Project Costs (direct and indirect) for Budget Period$ ______________$ _______________$ _______________ 53072 115-128 Instruc. Sec. 9/9 11/14/00 8:59 AM Page 124

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Salaries and Wages October 2005 September 2006 ContinuationName/TitleMethod of Cost ComputationNEHUFTotalFringeHealth **J. Ingram/Co-Project Director12mo. X 10% FTE 00000 R. Smith/Co-Project Director12mo. X 20% FTE @ 454450908990891703701 Project Cataloger12mo. X 100% FTE @ 412004120004120077172986 Project Archivist12mo. X 100% FTE @ 309003090003090043452986 Senior Library Technical Assistant12 mo. X 33% FTE @ 2593908646864612161493 **E. Kesse/Dir, Digital Library Center12 mo. X 5% FTE 00000 S. Haas/Asst Dir.,Dig. Lib. Cntr12 mo. X 10% FTE @ 556050 5561 55611042297 M. Smith/Imaging Tech. Supervisor12 mo. X 30% @ 2624807874787411071527 Student Assts./Imaging tech staff (2.5 FTE)5 X 2000 hrs. @ $8/hr4000004000000 J. Freund/Head Conservation12 mo. X 10% @ 442779042784278 801 611 T. Barr/Head, Spec. Colls. Catalog Unit12 mo. X 10% @ 446670046674667 874 351 J. Pen/Lib Tech Asst, Dig Lib Cntr12 mo. X 50% @ 2187201093610936 1538 3058 A. Terman/Db Coordinator/FCLA12 mo. X 50% @ 4894802447424474 4584 3053 R. Renner/Coordinator of Planetary Ops.12 mo X 15% @ 360500540854081013448 Student Assts/Paging540 hrs @ $6.75/hr 3645 0364500 Totals 115745809331966782594017511 ** In accord with the University of Florida's Indirect Cost Calculations, the salaries of John Ingram and Erich Kesse are accounted for as administrative overhead, an indirect cost .Fringe Benefits (Projected) The standard benefit of OPS (Other Personnel Services) is 8.3 percent. Permanent staff enjoy a fringe benefit rate of 14.06 percent for Florida Retirement System, and 18.73 percent for the Optional Retirement System. To each rate is added annual health coverage set at: $2986.00 for single staff person coverage. $3505.00 for spouse coverage. $6106.00 for family coverage. The amount is prorated according to percentage of time devoted to the grant.

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53072 115-128 Instruc. Sec. 9/9 Page 125 8:59 AM 11/14/00 NEH Budget F o r m P age 4 SECTION B Summar y Budget and Project F unding SUMMAR Y BUDGET T ransfer from section A the total costs (column c) for each categor y of project expense. When the proposed grant period is eigh teen months or longer project expenses for each twelve-month period are to be listed separately and totaled in the last column of the summar y budget. F or proj ects that will r un less than eighteen months, only the last column of the summar y budget should be completed. Budget Categories 1. Salaries and W ages 2. F ringe Benefits 3. Consultant F ees 4. T ravel 5. Supplies and Materials 6. Ser vices 7. Other Costs F irst Y ear/ from: 2004 thr u: 2005 $_ TOT AL COSTS FOR from: Third Y ear/ ENTIRE GRANT PERIOD Second Y ear/ from: 2005 thr u: 2006 $ thr u: $ = $ __________________________ _ ______________ ______________ = _ _ _ ______________ ______________ ______________ ______________ ______________ ______________ ______________ ______________ ______________ ______________ = _ = _ = _ = _ = _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ 8. T otal Direct Costs (items 1-7) _ ______________ ______________ ______________ ______________ = _________ 9 I n d i r e c t C o s t s ______________ _ = _________ 10. T otal Project Costs (Direct & Indirect) _ ______________ ______________ = _________ 2.Cost Sharing: Applicants Contributions Third-par ty Contributions Project Income F ederal Agencies TOT AL COST SHARING $ ____________________________ $ ____________________________ $ ____________________________ $ ____________________________ $ ____________________________ PROJECT FUNDING FOR ENTIRE GRANT PERIOD 1. Requested from NEH: Outright F ederal Matching ___________________________ $_ ___________________________ $_ TOT AL NEH FUNDING $_ ___________________________ 3. T otal Project F unding (NEH F unds + Cost Sharing) = $_ 1. Indicate the amount of outright and/or federal matching funds that is requested from the Endowment. 2. Indicate the amount of cash contributions that will be made by the applicant and cash and in-kind contributions made by thir d par ties to suppor t project expenses that appear in the budget. Cash gif ts that will be raised to release federal matching funds should be included under Third-par ty Contributions. (Consult the program guidelines for infor mation on cost sharing requirements.) When a project will generate income that will be used during the grant period to suppor t expenses listed in the budget, indicat e the amount of income that will be expended on budgeted project activities. Indicate funding received from other federal agencies. 3. T otal Project F unding should equal T otal Project Costs. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Institutional Grant Administrator/Individual Applicant. Provide the infor mation requested below when a revised budget is submit ted. The signature of this person indicates approval of the budget submission and the agreement of the organization/individual to co st share project expenses at the level indicated under Project F unding. T e l ephone (_ _________) Name and T itle (please type or print) ___________________________________________________________________________________________ _ Signature Date_ 125

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STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT The University of Florida seeks supp ort from the National Endowment for the Humanities for a two-year pr oject to catalogue and digiti ze titles from the Baldwin Library of Historical Childrens Literature published from1870 through 1889. The Baldwin Library, housed in the Universi ty of Floridas Department of Special and Area Studies Collections, is one of the largest collections of English-language literature for children in the world. It contains approximately 95,000 volumes published in Great Britain and the United States be tween 1686 and 2003 and is of international significance for researchers who st udy historical, cultu ral, social and literary aspects of childrens literature. It supports research in areas such as education and upbringing; family and gender roles; civic values; racial, religious, and mo ral attitudes; literary style and format; textual criticism; and the arts of illustration and book design. The digital component of the grant will bring early editions of both well-known and unknown titles to a new generation of readers via the Internet. Of the 7,500 cataloging records to be produ ced during this grant, about 40% will be original records contributed to the na tional databases, OCLC and RLIN. These records will include access points for authors, il lustrators, printers, and publishers, as well as enhanced subject access including genre terms such as dime novels and folk tales. The records of titles already in the national databases will be enhanced with these access points as well, and will be available in the onl ine catalogue of Floridas state universities, which is available to anyone with Internet access. During the targeted period of this grant proposal, 1870-1889, new technologies increased the use of color in childrens literature, signifi cantly altering the layout and visual aspects of the book, the publics reception of books for the young, and the experience of the reader and his/her encounter with the book. This aspect of childrens literature can substantively inform our current perceptions about ch anges in childrens literature and our understanding of American and British culture. The grant proposal includes digitizing a nd mounting on a web site all selected volumes that contain color illustrations. These digitized books, estimated to number 3,750, will be available, at no cost, on the Internet Digital Library Center staff will derive original records from the paper vers ions for the digitized items and the Florida Center for Library Automation will add URLs to the records when the images have been put up on the web. All original cataloging r ecords will be contributed to OCLC and RLIN and all original and enhanced copy cataloging record s will be made available through the online catalogue of Floridas state universities. Summary of Objectives for the Project To catalog 7,500 titles through either original or e nhanced copy cataloging To digitize and create electronic reso urce cataloging records for those titles (approx. 3,750) that contain color illustrations and make them permanently accessible at no cost through the Internet To contribute cataloging records to OC LC, RLIN and the online catalogue of Floridas state universities

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Statement of Significance and Impact Table of Contents Narrative Significance of the Project Significance of the Collection Significance of the Historical Period, 1870-1889 Significance of Color in Childrens Literature History, Scope and Duration of Project Methodology and Standards Cataloging the Source Document Conserving the Source Document Digitizing the Source Document Digitizing the Source Document: Preparation Digitizing the Source Document: Processing Digitizing the Source Document: Text Conversion and Mark-up Digitizing the Source Document: Transmission Digitizing the Source Document: Digital Archiving Plan of Work Selection of the Target Collection Cataloging Workflow and Procedures Conservation Review Digitization Workflow and Procedures Staffing Dissemination Budget Appendices History of Grants List of Suggested Evaluators Resumes/Position Descriptions 1 2 3 3 5 7 8 9 10 10 11 11 12 12 13 14 14 15 15 17 20 2

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NARRATIVE Significance of the Project Significance of the Collection The Baldwin Library of Historical Childrens Literature is part of the Department of Special and Area Studies Collections at the University of Florida. The collection includes approximately 95,000 books published for children in the United States and Great Britain from 1686 through 2003. Current access is provided through a printed (1981) guide to the collection, a local card catalog, and by means of title access in the local on-line catalog. Progress is being made in full cataloging of materials in the Baldwin Library. This access is a top priority for the Department of Special and Area Studies Collections and the University of Florida Libraries. A recently completed NEH grant covering holdings from the Baldwin Library dated between 1850 and 1869 approximately 7,500 titles provided original and enhanced records to the local and national databases and established an on-line digital collection of selected materials as well. The University of Florida seeks support from the National Endowment for the Humanities for a two-year project to catalog and digitize approximately 7,500 volumes from the Baldwin Library published in the United States and Great Britain from 1870 through 1889. All titles will be fully catalogued and those with color illustrations, approximately 3,750, will be digitized, assigned metadata, and mounted on a website. A recent internal survey indicates that more than 40% of the records created by this grant would be added to the national database as original records. Although several major collections of historical childrens literature have received grants to support preservation and improve access to their collections in the past, the portion of the Baldwin collection that is the focus of this project will not reflect a significant overlap with these other major holdings. The current proposal covers the years of continued expansion in childrens publishing. Technologies developed during the targeted period, 1870-1889, increased the use of color in childrens literature. Color illustration significantly altered the layout and visual aspects of the book, the publics reception of books for the young, as well as the experience of the reader and his/her encounter with the book. This aspect of childrens literature can substantively inform our current perceptions about changes in childrens literature and our understanding of American and British culture. Intellectual access will be improved through cataloging the material into the national bibliographic databases and through the creation of metadata to access the project's digital component. This digital component will make all aspects of the books with color illustration, including text, design, illustrations, bindings, and typography, freely available to anyone with Internet access via the Literature for Children website 3

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( http://palmm.fcla.edu/juv/ ). The earlier project, covering the years from1850 to1869, was very successful, as use of the collection has increased, both on-site and via the Internet. (See Appendix 1 for use statistics) This grant, to cover the 1870-1889 period, will build upon that legacy of success to catalog and digitize a set of materials that represent an important era not only in childrens literature, but in the history of the United States and Great Britain. The Baldwin Library is of international significance for researchers who study historical, cultural, social and literary aspects of children's literature published in English. The collection supports research in many areas including education and upbringing; family and gender roles; civic values; racial, religious, and moral attitudes; literary style and format; and the arts of illustration and book design. A number of childrens literature experts, such as Jack Zipes and Gillian Avery, have consulted the Baldwin Library to research their publications and a number of masters theses and doctoral dissertations have been completed using the Baldwin Library. (See Appendix 2 for research publication examples) Each year the American Library Associations Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) awards from one to three fellowships to its members for a month of study and research at the Baldwin Library. The Fellows have studied nineteenth-century series books, pop-up books, folk tales, family stories from the 1930s and 1940s, twentieth-century editions of Cinderella, poetry for children before Dr. Seuss, and choral reading and poetry for children. The Center for the Study of Childrens Literature and Culture ( http://www.recess.ufl.edu/center.shtml ) at the University of Florida has initiated a series of short essays for the Universitys Public Radio affiliate which is linked to a satellite and picked up and broadcast by nearly 500 public radio stations across the country. Rita Smith, Curator of the Baldwin Library, is a regular contributor of essays based on the Baldwins holdings. The University of Florida understands the importance of children's literature and the growing demand for courses in this subject. The English Department has five faculty members who teach 14 undergraduate and graduate courses in childrens literature each year. Currently there are 12 MA and PhD students in the Departments Childrens Literature Track, and more than 150 other graduate students who take the childrens literature classes. This is a reflection of the national trend of increased scholarly interest in childrens literature. As awareness of the collections potential for multi-disciplinary use increases, professors will follow the lead of the Universitys History of Science staff who have already directed one masters degree candidate to use the collection in the area of natural history and domesticity. The physical collection does not circulate and the material is not available through interlibrary loan. It is currently housed in closed stacks in a humidity, temperature, and light controlled environment. The materials are used in the secure reading room of the Department of Special and Area Studies Collections. Some of the books are quite brittle and special care will be taken during the digitization process to handle the books in ways that produce the least amount of damage. The digitization portion of the project will 4

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place thousands of childrens books from the late nineteenth century on the Internet at no cost to the user and with minimum damage to the physical item. Digital access will benefit the academic community interested in the history of childrens literature; cultural, social and literary scholars, who will be able to read the books from their home base; and people of all ages who enjoy childrens literature and would never encounter the language and art of these older books, except through digitized versions. Significance of the Historical Period, 1870 1889 The period 1870-1889 that follows the publication of Lewis Carrolls Alice in Wonderland (1865) experienced an explosive growth in the number of titles published for children and is generally considered the Golden Age of American and British childrens literature. Literature written for children, in both countries, moved beyond the memoir, moral tale, and instructional book. Authors and their publishers began to experiment with a broad range of new genres, including fairy tales, fantasy, adventure stories, family stories, and picture books. Peter Hunt, perhaps Englands most distinguished scholar and critic in the field, characterized this period in Childrens Literature, an Illustrated History (Oxford University Press, 1995) as follows: During the second half of the nineteenth century publishers competed to produce cheaper reading for an expanding market. The development of publishing for children reflected economic and demographic growth, as well as a society more sensitive and responsive to children's needs. . From religious and didactic beginnings, writers were responding to a redefined childhood, one that required a distinctive literature. . Many authors whose works are still in print and who had a large influence flourished. In a sense, childrens literature was growing-upaway from adults. Dr. Patricia Craddock, Professor of English at the University of Florida, notes that because of the intrinsic importance of these books, and because they had ceased to be governed by rigidly didactic conventions that prevented writers from presenting children and their lives realistically, the study of the childrens literature of the period has major contributions to make not only to the history and theory of books for children and of child life in general, but also to the cultural history of England and America. The collection constitutes the best available evidence concerning how English and American cultures inculcated values in children and expressed their own concept of what childhood should be. Tony Watkins, in an essay entitled History, Culture and Childrens Literature notes: The rise of newer forms of literary historicism is connected, in part, with social change and the effort to recover histories forminority groups within society. In turn, these social aims are linked with the recuperation of forgotten texts, including texts that have never been considered worthy of academic study. (International Companion Encyclopedia of Childrens Literature, 1996, p. 4) 5

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The books of the Baldwin Library are uniquely qualified to reveal this literary and cultural history. In an article about the Baldwin Library in the Times Literary Supplement, September 17, 1982, Gillian Avery, a British scholar and author of childrens books, noted that Ruth Baldwin, the original collector of these nineteenth-century books, concentrated on buying books which children had actually read. This collecting philosophy resulted in one of the most important attributes of the Baldwin Library: not only does it hold multiple editions of the agreed upon classics of childrens literature, it also supports these classics with thousands of less significant or less known works. There are many titles not collected by other libraries because they were not considered important. These fugitive titles, read and loved by many children, are now extremely scarce, but are important to scholars interested in American and British cultural history and literature. The authors of these unknown books comprise the chorus of other voices that surround and provide a larger cultural background for classic titles and well-known authors. For example, Henry Cadwallader Adams is a relatively well-known writer of nineteenth-century school stories, which became an important genre after the popularity of Tom Browns School Days, first published in 1857. The Baldwin Library has many of Adams titles, but also holds Edith Awsbys Three School Friends (1889), Paul Blakes Expelled, A Story of Eastcote School (1886), and Willis B. Allens Northern Cross (1887), among many other unknown examples of the genre. All these titles were published in the last half of the nineteenth century. The Baldwin Library contains extensive holdings of the novels of Louisa M. Alcott, Charlotte Maria Tucker, and Horatio Alger, as well as the novels of Emilia Marryat Norris, Robina F. Hardy, and Stella Austin. These last three authors published popular childrens books in the last half of the nineteenth century, as did Alcott, Tucker and Alger, but Norris, Hardy and Austin have now become the unheard voices. There are also non-fiction examples: Edward S. Ellis, Samuel Goodrich, and Edward E. Hale all wrote important and well-known histories of the United States for children in the nineteenth century. The Baldwin Library holds all these titles, but also has Salma Hales History of the United States (1836), Robert Adamss History of the United States in Rhyme (1884), and T. F. Donnellys Primary History of the United States (1885), as well as 26 other titles on this subject. These less known or unknown fiction and non-fiction titles are equally important to our understanding of this extremely formative, transformational time in the history of childrens literature. Lucy Rollin, childrens literature critic, author and English Professor at Clemson University, wrote in her letter of support for an earlier grant proposal to the National Endowment for the Humanities, that Our culture creates, uses, and responds to literature, even what might be considered ephemeral, for it is in the ephemera, really, that a culture truly reveals itself; such artifacts are its unguarded moments. 6

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One vital function of this grant would be to make available to researchers in a very immediate and accessible way the wide range of both classic and fugitive titles held in the Baldwin Library that date to this significant period of social change. Significance of Color in Childrens Literature As noted above, this was an era when the use of color in childrens books was increasing dramatically, thanks to the technological advances in color printing. The digital portion of this project will provide access to thousands of illustrations, many of them color. One of the ways to gauge the place of color in children's literature is to consider not only its denotative value but also, and perhaps more importantly, its connotative influence on readers. In author John Cech's letter of support for an earlier similar project, he noted that "aesthetically, color illustration offered the artist a new, wider vocabulary for representation, thus contributing dramatically to an expansion of the emotional meaning and other visual information in a given work." In Myth, Magic, and Mystery: One Hundred Years of American Children's Book Illustration (a 1996 catalog to accompany an exhibition of American children's book illustration), Michael Patrick Hearn quoted James Johnson Sweeney, former director of the Museum of Modern Art as follows: children's book illustration should never be seen as merely a vessel for the conveyance of information. Its real role is that played by a Gothic stained glass window in the Middle Ages, or a mosaic in the apse of a Romanesque church. Although not specifically stating the nature of the illustrations (i.e., color and/or black and white) it is very clear from the two examples that he gives, that he has color in mind: Gothic stained glass and Romanesque mosaics were seldom done in anything other than color. Through the early decades of the nineteenth century only a very small portion of book illustrations had color, and then only by hand. Such extra effort was expensive, and therefore available only to the privileged few who could afford to present their children with more realistic representations of the world about them. With the full-blown implementation and acceptance of mechanical color printing during the remaining decades of the nineteenth century, such "natural" representations of the real world and indeed of the fantastic world of the imagination moved from the privileged few to the mass market. Peter Hunt notes that if early childrens books contained any color, it was produced by laborious hand coloring, but the development of mechanical colour printing, especially by Edmund Evans, brought an immense improvement in coloured picture-books for children in the last quarter of the century. Understanding just how immense such an improvement in childrens books with color illustrations was in the later decades of the nineteenth century becomes easier by examining those years in which the process actually advanced. 7

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In support of the need for preservation of color, Michael Patrick Hearn indirectly provided an additional rational for such work. He noted that "the purpose of an illustration is to be reproduced, not displayed, and artists have employed certain short cuts that have not always added to the life of the art. They often scrimped on material. Papers discolor or disintegrate, colors fade, glues dry out." It is likely that very few examples of the original artwork for the color illustration of children's books during the second half of the nineteenth century survive beyond their published versions. This project proposes to digitally preserve the color illustrations (along with the respective texts) contained in this collection, and to make them more widely and easily accessible. The University of Florida has an institutional commitment to providing long-term maintenance and permanent availability of the digital images. Additionally, the original artifacts the books will continue to be maintained in environmental conditions that will slow the process of their deterioration. History, Scope and Duration This grant application for a two-year project follows up a similar two-year project that was awarded funding by the National Endowment for the Humanities in 2000. That project, to catalogue and microfilm approximately 7,500 English language childrens books published from 1850 through 1869 and to digitize those with color illustrations, was very successful. 7,418 titles were fully catalogued during the two years of the grant. The original records, 46% of the total, were contributed to OCLC and the RLG on-line catalogue (RLIN). Records for titles already in the national databases were enhanced with access points for illustrators, printers and publishers (as well as subject and genre terms), and were added to the electronic catalogue of Floridas state university libraries. Authority records for series were contributed to the Name Authority Cooperative Program (NACO). Original cataloging records were also created for the microfilm (7,400) version and the electronic version (1,800) and contributed to the national databases. When microfilming and digitization are completed, over 12,000 original cataloging records produced for this grant will have been contributed to OCLC and RLIN. Microfilming of these catalogued volumes continues at this writing. Currently, a total of 5,706 titles have been microfilmed, with 1196 in the backlog. Throughout the period of the grant there were multiple mechanical problems with the camera (a Zeutschel purchased new for the project) and the microfilming staff experienced some turnover, which meant there were short periods when no work was being done, followed by training periods. NEH granted a no-cost extension to the project, allowing the microfilming to proceed. The University of Florida is committed to completing the microfilming of all books catalogued on the previous grant. The problems with the microfilming camera and staff affected the pace of digitization, since books were digitized after they were microfilmed. Digitization and application of metadata continues. Samples of the digitized books are available at 8

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http://palmm.fcla.edu/juv/ Titles digitized during the current project will be added to this website, which already contains the largest archive of childrens books available for free on the Internet. We have learned much from the experiences of the first project. Tightly bound volumes with brittle animal glues did not hold up well under the rigors of the 180 0 angle necessary for microfilming. This damage to the books and the persistent mechanical problems of the camera have led us to drop the microfilming component from the grant application and go with cataloging and digitization only. We acknowledge the value of the physical object as an artifact of book history, not just as a source of textual information. Books will be handled with care throughout the cataloging and digitization process. A special 120 0 book cradle will be built for the scanning process. Mounting the electronic versions of these titles on the website will make the collection available to a world-wide audience. Methodology and Standards Cataloging the Source Document Approximately 100 titles a week will be removed from the Special Collections stacks and transported on book carts to the Cataloging Unit of the Resource Services Department, which is located in the same building. The Senior Library Technical Assistant assigned to the project will check the books into the department electronically, using the bar code assigned to each title. This information will be on the catalogue record and alert the public that the book is in the process of being catalogued. If a patron requests use of a book while it is in cataloging, the book will be retrieved for the patron to use in the Special Collections Reading Room. During the cataloging process, the books will be stored in a locked metal bookcase near the catalogers desks. After cataloging, the books that are going to be digitized will be checked out of cataloging and into the Conservation Unit; books that are not going to be digitized will be checked out of the cataloging department and sent back to the Baldwin Library stacks. The books will never be removed from the building since all departments involved in the cataloging and digitization processes are located in the same building as the stacks where the books are permanently housed. Cataloging will conform to the requirements of full-level Anglo-American Cataloging Rules, 2 nd edition (2002 revision) (AACR2R) and to the guidelines already established at the University of Florida libraries for the enhanced access cataloging of the Baldwin materials (see Appendix 3; also on-line at http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/rs/catpro/NEHbaldwin.html ). All cataloging will include Library of Congress Subject Headings, subject access through genre terms (MARC21 655 field), and access by publisher, printer and illustrator, (700 or 710 field). Of the approximately 60% of titles for which some level of cataloging already exists, less than 5% include genre access, and the majority of records do not include other than "K" level data. The records created for the digital version will have an active MARC21 856 field, and follow established standards for cataloging electronic resources. All access points for names and 9

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subjects will be verified in local and national databases for consistency in form and heading. The inclusion of genre terms is appropriate in this context because researchers in children's literature will seek access to material not only through traditional author, title, and subject approaches, but also through a term descriptive of the category into which it falls, e.g., alphabet books, courtesy books, fables, and chapbooks. All cataloging will be done with the original item in hand and subsequently a record will be derived for the digital versions. [Note: Since much of the catalog of the Baldwin Library is currently not automated, catalogers will consult the Baldwin card catalog and the Index to the Baldwin Library of Books in English Before 1900, Primarily for Children (G. K. Hall, 1981) for comparative data on editions.] See Appendix 4 for samples of enhanced copy and original catalog records from the previous NEH-funded project and for a list of the genre terms to be applied in MARC21 655 field. Conserving the Source Document The Conservation Unit Head, John Freund, will work with the Digital Library Center and the Curator of the Baldwin Library to monitor and mitigate the effects of handling during cataloging and digitization. After cataloging, the books to be digitized will be transported to the Conservation Unit where Freund will review the physical volumes, noting the condition of the books previous to digitization. After digitization, he will again review the condition, making repairs and adjustments in the digitization processes if necessary. Protective enclosures will be purchased to house volumes with structural damage that, as a result of their brittle nature, cannot be repaired. Digitizing the Source Document Digitization is to be employed as an access rather than a preservation strategy. All volumes selected for this project are in the public domain. The digitization plan offers both Internet availability and ensures fitness-for-purpose in secondary uses, such as facsimile reproduction and classroom uses. Internet access to over 550 volumes of the Baldwin Library is currently available for free via the Internet, as a result of the earlier NEH grant and as part of the state university libraries of Floridas electronic collection: Literature for Children ( http://palmm.fcla.edu/juv// ). The Internet Archive, ( http://www.archive.org/index.php ) a website offering permanent access for researchers, historians, and scholars to historical collections that exist in digital format, has confirmed that Literature for Children, is the largest collection of childrens literature available at no charge on the Internet. To increase access to the on-line collection, the University of Florida contributes all titles from Literature for Children to both the freely available International Childrens Digital Library ( http://www.icdlbooks.org/ ) and to the Research Libraries Groups subscription-based Cultural Materials Initiative ( http://culturalmaterials.rlg.org/cmiprod/workspace.jsp ). Digitized titles produced with funding through this grant request will be added to the Literature for Children web site. 10

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Digitizing the Source Document: Preparation Books will be transported to the Digital Library Center from the Conservation Unit after they are catalogued and after the conservator has reviewed them. Each book will be checked into the Digital Library Center electronically, using the bar code assigned to each title. This information will be on the catalogue record and alert the public that the book is in the process of being digitized. If a patron requests use of a book while it is in the Digital Library Center, the book will be retrieved for the patron to use in the Special Collections Reading Room. Digitizing the Source Document: Processing The digitization plan assures highest quality capture (See Appendix 5: Imaging Equipment & Image Quality) with the lowest risk of damage to eighteenthand nineteenth-century bindings with brittle animal glues. All images will be captured as 24-bit sRGB color images, using 13.7-MP (mega-pixel) Kodak DCS 14n planetary digital cameras ( http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/specs/Kodak/kodak_dcs14n.asp ). As appropriate to particular need, cameras will be equipped with Nikon 150 mm 5.6f enlarging lens or Nikon 210 mm 5.6f enlarging lens. Capture will be sufficient to meet Quality Index requirements as calculated by Cornell University and widely used within the library digitization community as a standard for determining requisite digital resolution (i.e., dpi); cf. http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/conversion/conversion04.html ; cf. also, http://www.library.cornell.edu/imls/image%20deposit%20guidelines.pdf To minimize damage, volumes will be mounted on book-cradles (See Appendix 6: Book Cradle), specifically designed for and manufactured by the University of Florida Libraries for rare book imaging. It is anticipated that scanning will break some animal glues and loosen some bindings, but the cradles 120 0 angle is roughly comparable to the opening of a volume for normal reading. The cradles angle is 40 0 less than that forced by standard microfilming book cradles and 60 0 less than that required for flat-bed scanning. A lighting system employing daylight-balanced (5500 K) florescent lights will be used to ensure true-color capture. While commonly referred to as hot bulbs in reference to the warm or magenta-spiked spectrum they emit, this type of lighting emits very little heat, far less than other sources of illumination and far less than that of microfilming camera floodlights. And, while florescent bulbs emit ultra-violet (UV) light, the duration of exposure per page is not longer than exposure during photocopying or normal reading and is less than the exposure time of flatbed scanning. Images captured by the digital camera will be transferred immediately to networked computer workstations running Microsoft Windows 2000 or higher and Adobe Photoshop, v. 7.01 or higher. Image processing routines are conservative, to maintain the 11

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image quality of the original as much as possible. Image de-skew and crop are most frequent. Processed images are sequentially named, usually consistent with original pagination for use in text conversion and mark-up (cf. File Naming Conventions at http://palmm.fcla.edu/strucmeta/filenaming.html ). Images will be saved as uncompressed TIFF (ITU TIFF v.6) files, scaled to 100% of source document dimensions (cf. Guidelines at http://palmm.fcla.edu/strucmeta/tiff.html ). Files will be burnt to an intermediary archive on CD-ROM using Stomp RecordNOW Max, v.4.5 or higher. RecordNOW Max software verifies an accurate burn to ensure the integrity of the archive. This intermediary archive will not be the final product; it is created to mitigate loss while images are forwarded to text conversion and mark-up. (See also Digital Archiving, below.) Digitizing the Source Document: Text Conversion & Mark-Up Processed files are forwarded for text conversion and mark-up. Heretofore expensive and time-consuming vended or in-house tasks, the generation of searchable text and a variety of metadata are now optimized through automation. The University of Florida employs the Prime Recognition optical character recognition (OCR) software ( http://www.primerecognition.com/ ), with a battery of six voting engines to increase accuracy of resulting texts. The software outputs text with HTML mark-up as well as PDF page-image bundles. The University of Florida utilizes locally programmed routines to subsequently convert HTML to SGML files, marked-up with a localized subset of the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) DTD. These automated routines identify and tag structural metadata (e.g., covers, preliminaries, title pages, chapters, etc.) and will also add administrative metadata and responsibility statements. (See also Appendix 7: Text Processing & Quality.) Subsequent to transmission to the PALMM Digital Library ( http://palmm.fcla.edu/collection.html ) TEI encoded titles will be loaded into and supported by the XPAT engine ( http://www.dlxs.org/products/xpat.html ) as implemented by the Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA). FCLA provides centralized administration of the PALMM Digital Library (See Appendix 8: Digital Collections & Funding Sources). XPAT and the University of Michigan Digital Library eXtension Service (DLXS) middleware, operated locally by FCLA, are widely used among university-affiliated digital library programs. XPAT and DLXS middleware act as an SGML/XML-aware search engine for both simple and complex searching (See Appendix 9: Searching). Digitizing the Source Document: Transmission Upon completion of text conversion, mark-up, and a final quality control review, files are encapsulated in METS (Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard, http://www.loc.gov/standards/mets/) compliant tags for transfer to the PALMM Digital 12

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Library. Files are sent via secure FTP to FCLA and loaded upon receipt into the PALMM Digital Library Literature for Children section. Encapsulation utilizes an FCLA programmed, METS-compliant client: Metadata eXchange Format (MXF), supporting both direct load to the PALMM Digital Library and metadata and image file archiving (See Digital Archiving, below). Record of transmission and verification of load is made in the University of Floridas Digital Library Center (DLC) Tracking Database. Upon load, persistent URLs (PURL) are assigned individual titles 1 and recorded in catalog records. Addition of the PURL to the cataloging records of both the physical book and the digitized version provides a link from that record to the digitized electronic version. Copy of these enhanced records is submitted to both OCLC and RLGs RLIN bibliographic databases. Subsequent contribution of the digitized titles is made to both the International Childrens Digital Library and to RLGs Cultural Materials. Digitizing the Source Document: Digital Archiving In practice consistent for all University of Florida digital projects, redundant digital archives are maintained. An intermediary archive, recorded to gold-based (Mitsui) CD-ROM, is created during the imaging phase to ensure the integrity of files during subsequent processing. Accuracy is verified by software during creation. CD-ROMs are retained in environmentally controlled storage. Disks and their contents are logged in the DLC Tracking Database, with MD5 checksum numbers and file format & version information, in association with administrative and bibliographic metadata. The Database queues disks and files for inspection every three years and migration every ten years or upon format obsolescence. In some cases, during migration, a copy of the migrated digital master may replace the intermediary. The primary archive is that maintained by the Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA), a division of the University of Florida and the Libraries partner for digital library collections. The FCLA Digital Archive ( http://www.fcla.edu/digitalArchive/index.htm ) is funded in part by a grant from the Institute for Museum and Library Services and by storage fees. The Digital Archive is one of a handful of trusted repositories and the only such effort in the United States or United Kingdom given special mention in the recent JISC/University of Leeds report on digital preservation. 2 Physically, all digital information is stored in off-line systems under FCLA administration at the University of Floridas NorthEast Regional Data Center (NERDC) on IBM Magstar 3590 extended length cartridges (i.e., magnetic tape). Cartridges are inspected routinely, refreshed as necessary, and periodically migrated to 1 PURLS are maintained by FCLA in its PURL Server ( http://purl.fcla.edu/ ) 2 As reported in: University of Leeds. Representation and Rendering Project. Survey and assessment of sources of information on file formats and software documentation: final report (2003) http://www.jisc.ac.uk/uploaded_documents/FileFormatsreport.pdf 13

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replacement media. All electronic data is stored with MD5 checksum for verification of data integrity. Metadata is maintained in METS-compliant data structures. Bibliographic metadata, including cataloging, is also retained in FCLA maintained and archived bibliographic systems. Plan of Work Selection of the Target Collection Rita Smith, Curator of the Baldwin Library, will select all titles of the target collection from the Baldwin Library (i.e., childrens literature published in the English language between 1870 and 1889). Items for selection will be identified through a card catalog that provides chronological access to the collection, including items with approximate dates of publication. Student assistants, trained and supervised by the Curator, will pull from 80 to 100 books a week from the shelves and add location codes and bar codes to acid free strips which will be inserted in each book. A database will be established to indicate that a book has been pulled from the stacks, pre-processed by the student and sent to cataloging. Cataloging Workflow and Procedures When the books arrive in cataloging, they will be checked into cataloging using the bar code attached to each book. The selected titles will be searched initially in LUIS, the state university libraries on-line catalog. Titles already in LUIS will have Baldwin Library holdings added. Titles not found in LUIS will be searched on OCLC. If copy for the book is found, UF holdings will be added and the record exported into LUIS. This portion of the project is assigned to a Senior Library Technical Assistant (.33 FTE). After the record has been exported into LUIS, an Archivist-level technical support person will assure quality control by verifying authority work. This staff member will bring the record up to full AACR2R cataloging standards and enhance it with access points for publisher, printer, illustrator (MARC21 700, 710), and subject genre terms (MARC21 655) as required by the Baldwin Cataloging guidelines. This work will be carried out under the supervision of the grant Project Original Cataloger. For titles lacking copy in OCLC, a full AACR2R record will be created and added to the national databases by the Project Original Cataloger. The Project Original Cataloger will also be responsible for contributing series authority records to NACO where necessary and deemed feasible. All cataloging will conform to AACR2R rules and MARC21 Bibliographic Format Standards. Based on the results from 24 months of cataloging activity during a previous similar NEH grant, the complete cataloging sequence for an original record from searching for copy through full AACR2R enhanced catalog record requires approximately 45 minutes per title. To create an enhanced copy cataloging record requires approximately 20 minutes per title. The percentage of titles in this project that will require original cataloging is projected to be about 40 percent, or approximately 3,000 items. At the above rate of items per hour, it will take approximately 2,250 hours 14

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to complete the original cataloging. At the rate of three titles per hour for enhanced copy cataloging, the time required for the estimated 4,500 titles is approximately 1,500 hours. The time required for NACO participation will complete the projected FTE requirements for the cataloging staff. Following cataloging of the source document, items without color illustration that are not going to be digitized will be returned to the Baldwin Library, checked in and re-shelved by the students under the supervision of the Curator of the Baldwin Library. Conservation Review Following cataloging of the source document, the items with color illustration will be checked out of the Cataloging Department and into the Conservation Unit. Each week a book cart of approximately 50 cataloged books will be sent from the Cataloging Department to the Conservation Unit. John Freund, Head of the Conservation Unit, will review each book, noting its condition. While the books are in the Conservation Unit, they will be locked in a secure room. After his review, he will deliver the books on a book cart to the Digital Library Center. Digitization Workflow and Procedures When items enter the digitization workflow from the Conservation Unit, they are checked out of the Conservation Unit and into the Digital Library Center, using the bar code that is attached to each book. The doors to the Digital Library Center are always locked and the workspace is considered a secure area. The books are entered into the workflow management system (DLC Tracking Database) and are routed to the digitization technician (a student) accompanied with a work order, created by the Imaging Technician Supervisor, specifying particulars of imaging. Imaging the item (detailed in Methodology and Standards, Digitizing the Source Document: Processing, above) includes scanning the physical object to create the digital images, maintaining quality control during this process, post image processing (e.g., cropping & de-skewing), creating an initial image archive and logging the image into the DLC Tracking Database. Imaging is the work of trained digitization technicians supervised by a Coordinator of Planetary Operations. Quality control and image logging is the work of trained quality control technicians supervised by a skilled Image Quality Specialist. Initial image archiving is an automated routine organized and maintained by a computer programmer analyst. This process is followed by text conversion and mark-up, including quality control of these processes (detailed in Methodology and Standards, Digitizing the Source Document: Text Conversion & Mark-Up, above). Text conversion and mark-up is the work of text conversion technicians supervised by the Imaging Technician Supervisor. After conversion and mark-up is completed, the image is transmitted to the Digital 15

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Library (detailed in Methodology and Standards, Digitizing the Source Document: Transmission, above). This step includes METS encapsulation, data loading and Internet availability, load verification, and distribution to International Childrens Digital Library & RLG Cultural Materials. (See Appendices 10 and 11) These automated procedures are run and maintained by FCLAs Database Coordinator. When this work is completed, the books are checked out of the DLC and returned to the Conservation Unit for damage assessment and condition review, and the digital images are archived and sent on their way (detailed in Methods and Standards, Digitizing the Source Document: Digital Archiving, above) The following table represents ideal rates of productivity for all project objectives. The rates reflect lower production figures for quarters with major holidays and/or anticipated summer vacation schedules. SCHEDULE OF OBJECTIVES (NUMBER OF TITLES FIRST YEAROct-DecJan-MarchApril-JuneJuly-SeptTotalTotalProject Total20042005200520051st year2nd yearDocument800100010009503750SourceCatalogingPreparation10001000100010004000Digitization2505005005001750SCHEDULE OF OBJECTIVES (NUMBER OF TITLES SECOND YEAROct-DecJan-MarchApril-JuneJuly-SeptTotalProject Total20052006200620062nd yearDocument8001100110075037507500SourceCatalogingPreparation10001000100050035007500Digitization40060060040020003750 16

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Staffing Library Administration John E. Ingram, co-principal investigator, will devote 0.1 FTE of his time to the administration of the grant. Ingram currently serves as Director for Collections for the University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries. From November 1994 through August 2000, he chaired the Department of Special and Area Studies Collections. From 1979 to 1994, Ingram served as research archivist and curator of special collections at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. He currently serves on the SOLINET (Southeast Library Information Network) advisory committee to establish an electronic resource base for southern history and culture (AmericanSouth.org). Ingram also directed phase one of UF's participation in the NEH-funded United States Agricultural Information Network (USAIN). He has served on review panels for both NEH and DOE Title IIC grants. He served as co-principal investigator for the earlier (2000-2002) NEH funded Baldwin Library Preservation and Access Grant. Department of Special and Area Studies Collections The George A. Smathers Libraries' Department of Special and Area Studies Collections holds the primary source research collections of the University of Florida. The named collections include the P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History, the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature, and the Belknap Collection for the Performing Arts. The area studies collections are comprised of African, Asian, Jewish, and Latin American materials. The general collections consist of Manuscripts, Rare Books, and University Archives. Total holdings: 750,000 volumes, 60,000 microfilms, 10 million manuscripts and archival items. Staff: 22 FTE. The department maintains a separate reading room and security stacks for the rare books, manuscripts, university archives, and the named collections, including the Baldwin Library. Rita J. Smith, co-principal investigator, will give 0.2 FTE of her time to this grant. Her responsibilities will be to select the titles to be cataloged, to assist in training personnel involved in cataloging the materials, and to resolve questions of curatorial complexity for the collection. Ms. Smith has a Masters degree in Library Science from the University of Michigan. She has worked in the Baldwin Library of Historical Childrens Literature since 1989, first as Coordinator of Academic Support Services, and, since 1995, as Curator of the Baldwin Library and Associate University Librarian in the Department of Special and Area Studies Collections. She served as Project Cataloger from 1990 through mid-1991 for a U.S. Department of Education Title IIC grant to catalog 4,000 titles held by the Baldwin Library. She served as co-principal investigator for the earlier (2000-2002) NEH funded Baldwin Library Preservation and Access Grant. Student Assistants (540 hours) will remove and replace titles selected for cataloging, digitization, and conservation review. They will assign location codes and affix bar codes to acid free strips before the books are sent to be catalogued. They will work under the supervision of Rita Smith. 17

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Resource Services Department, Cataloging Unit The Resource Services Department staff is responsible for creating and maintaining a NOTIS-based online catalog. They contribute original bibliographic and authority records and holdings information to the OCLC national database and participate in the CONSER, BIBCO, NACO, SACO and OCLC Enhance national cooperative programs. As a member of the Research Libraries Group, through the Florida Center for Library Automation, the Department tape-loads records to RLIN. The Department has previously participated in the National Endowment for the Humanities and U.S. Department of Education Title IIC Project (RC-21593-88) for National Database Access to Library Resources for Latin American Studies through Retrospective Conversion of Latin American Library Materials (1988-1991), the U.S. Department of Education Title IIC Project for Access to Library Resources in the Baldwin Library, University of Florida (1990-1991), the National Endowment for the Humanities US Newspaper Program: Florida Newspaper Project, (1995to date), and in the Research Libraries Groups Great Collections Microfilming Project, Phase II and Phase IV, as well as the Research Libraries Groups Archives Preservation Microfilming Project. The Department participated also in the earlier (2000-2002) NEH funded Baldwin Library Preservation and Access Grant. Tatiana Barr, Head, Humanities and Special Collections Cataloging Unit, will be assigned 0.1 FTE to this grant. Assignment in this proposal will include responsibility for ongoing supervision of project staff involved in cataloging the source documents, both original and copy records, and liaison between the Project Directors (Ingram and Smith) and the Cataloging Unit to insure consistency in record creation and statistical reporting. Ms. Barr fulfilled the same responsibilities in the previous NEH funded project. The grant funded Project Original Cataloger (1.0 FTE), will be primarily responsible for creating original bibliographic description and access records for selected titles, contributing these original records to the OCLC database, and assisting other staff in doing the same. S/he will create original authority records for names when none exists in the national authority file, contribute these authority records to the NACO database, and supervise the project Archivist in doing the same. The project cataloger will be responsible for the final quality of all bibliographic and authority records created for this project. The grant funded Archivist (1.0 FTE)* will be responsible for 1) enhancing all copy cataloging records imported into the database from OCLC and already existing records to conform to Baldwin Cataloging Guidelines, 2) assisting the Project Original Cataloger in creating original bibliographic description and access records for selected titles, 3) contributing these original bibliographic records to the OCLC database, 4) collaborating with other grant staff to create original authority records when none exists in the national authority file, and 5) contributing these authority records to the NACO database. 18

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*Archivist is a state-level term for a high-level paraprofessional who works cooperatively with a professional librarian. A Senior Library Technical Assistant (SrLTA) in the Resource Services Department of the George A. Smathers Libraries will be assigned for 0.33 FTE to this grant. The SrLTA will be responsible for 1) all required searching for existing records in the local database and searching in OCLC and RLIN for member copy; evaluating this member copy and selecting best matching record, 2) for importing member copy into the local database from OCLC and RLIN and creating copy holdings records, 3) for picking up materials to be cataloged and distributing searched materials to Project Original Cataloger and to the Archivist for original and enhanced copy cataloging. Preservation Department, Conservation Unit The Preservation Department has been recognized as a full-service preservation facility since 1987. The Department is staffed by a total of 9 full-time staff. It is charged with preserving and making accessible archival and library materials in all formats. The Conservation Unit of the Preservation Department is responsible for the physical condition of the collections of the University libraries. Services include repair and restoration, rebinding, de-acidification, encapsulation, construction of protective enclosures, and environmental monitoring. John Freund (0.1 FTE) will be responsible for completion of conservation assessments and, as required, conservation treatments. Mr. Freund has served as the Preservation Departments chief conservator since 1988. He holds a Certificate of Book Restoration and Binding from the College of Art and Design at San Francisco State University. Digital Library Center The mission of the Digital Library Center at the University of Florida is to facilitate and focus the Libraries' development of digital programs and services. Its areas of responsibility include multimedia databases, digital collections, electronic text applications, online exhibits and finding aids. A primary goal of the Digital Library Center is to enhance the Libraries' role in electronic scholarly communications through effective and responsive digitization, dissemination, and long-term storage of university research and resource materials from the Libraries' collections. The Center provides library and university researchers with equipment and technical expertise for digital imaging and text markup. The Digital Library Center develops digital resources from collections at the University of Florida. In coordination with the Florida Center for Library Automation, the Center integrates effective user interfaces to these resources. The Digital Library Center staff brings several years of work experience in the Preservation Department, together with work experience from projects funded by the State of Florida (Florida Heritage Project at: http://palmm.fcla.edu/fh/ ), the Institute for Museum and Library Services (Linking Floridas Natural Heritage Project at: 19

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http://palmm.fcla.edu/lfnh/ ), and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation (Caribbean Newspaper Imaging Project: in process). Erich Kesse, Director of the Digital Library Center, provides management oversight for the digitization portion of this project (0.05 FTE). He served as Chair of the Preservation Department in the Libraries from 1987 through July 1999. Kesse has completed several preservation and access projects funded by the Research Libraries Group (RLG), the National Endowment for the Humanities, and by the Mellon Foundation. He serves as a consultant to the Southeastern Library Network (SOLINET) and to the University of the Virgin Islands on its IMLS funded Leadership Award. Kesse holds professional memberships in the American Library Association and the Association for Information and Image Management. Kesse holds a Certificate of Preservation Administration from Columbia University in addition to a Master of Library Science degree from the University of Kentucky. Stephanie Haas, Assistant Director, Digital Library Center, (0.1 FTE) insures workflow and entry into scanning queues for both microfilm to digital equivalents and source document scanning. Haas is a principal investigator of the selection and education components of the IMLS funded Linking Floridas Natural Heritage project. Randall Renner, Coordinator of Planetary Operations, Digital Library Center, (0.15 FTE) supervises planetary (digital camera) imaging. Renner trains imaging technicians and supervises the daily work of student assistants. Renner holds a Master of Fine Arts (Photography) from the University of Floridas College of Fine Arts. Melody Smith, Imaging Technician Supervisor, Digital Library Center, (0.30 FTE) manages the compilation of administrative metadata, derives titles into the Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA) Digital Library partition. Jane Pen, Image Quality Specialist, Digital Library Center (0.5 FTE) provides quality control assessment of both structural metadata and images. Pen coordinates the archiving of images and their delivery to FCLA. Phase I of this project was her principle assignment. Pen holds the equivalent of the Master of Library Science degree from Taipei (Taiwan/Republic of China). Florida Center for Library Automation Astrid Terman, Database Coordinator for the Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA) will serve (0.5FTE) as liaison between the imaging and metadata work to be completed in the project and the migration of images and metadata to the main frame at FCLA. Dissemination The University of Florida Libraries will distribute cataloging records of both the physical book and the digitized version generated by this project through three bibliographic networks: the Florida Center for Library Automations (FCLA) on-line 20

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21 catalogue (WebLUIS), OCLC and the Research Library Group (RLG ) RLIN, the latter via tape-load from OCLC. In addition to this bibliographic access, the volumes containing color illustrations will be available in their entirety in digital form at no cost to the user on the web at http://palmm.fcla.edu/juv/

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Brief Curriculum Vita Tatiana Barr Head, Special Collections/Architecture & Fine Arts/Humanities Cataloging Unit Resource Services Department, Room 300 George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida Gainesville, Fla. 32611 Telephone: (353) 392-0251 ext. 292 FAX: (352) 392-7365 George A. Smathers Libraries, Gainesville, Fla. Sept. 1999-present Head, Special Collections/Architecture and Fine Arts Humanities Cataloging Unit (SCAFAH). Oversees, coordinates, and expedites all cataloging activities. Supervises 6FTE. Responsible for original and complex cataloging of Special Collections and Humanities materials in all formats. Establishes priorities in consultation with other team members, and librarians in the Special and Area Studies Collections Department, and affiliated libraries. Liaison with Library of Congress Subject Authority Cooperative Program. Oct. 2000-present. Assigned 10% to act as NEH project trainer and cataloging consultant for the 1 st phase of the NEH project for Preservation and Access for American and British Childrens Literature, 1850-1859. Oct. 2000-present. Assigned 5% to act as principle investigator and project cataloging trainer and consultant for two one-year-retrospective copy cataloging project awarded by the Northeast Florida Library Information Network to catalog 20 th century childrens literature in the Baldwin Library of Historical Childrens Literature. Columbia University Libraries, New York, N.Y. Nov. 1996-Aug. 1999. Microforms Catalog Librarian. Cataloged all monographic microforms, in all subject areas. Acted as cataloging consultant to NEH projects (Modern Economic and Social History). Sept. 1998-Aug. 1999. Acting Head, Collection Maintenance Dept. Stanford University Libraries, Stanford, Calif. June 1991-Oct. 19967 Slavic Serials Cataloger. Cataloged Slavic, East European, and Baltic language serials in all formats and cataloging levels, using standard cataloging tools and following national and CONSER standards. Worked with Slavic Curator to establish and manage cataloging priorities. Acts as resource person in Technical Services 1

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2 for Slavic cataloging. 1991-1993: part-time assignment cataloging Slavic monographs; trained new Slavic monographs cataloge r; 1993-1996, full-time serials cataloger. Organized and cataloged collection of Russi an serials and periodicals published in unofficial press after breakup of Soviet Union, 1991-. New-York Historical So ciety, New York, N.Y. Oct. 1987-May 1990. Original Monographs Cata loger. Member of a Mellon Foundation funded project team to catalog the Society s collection of Amer icana and European literature, following national rare book cataloging standards. Curated exhibition on Shaker literature; organized and cataloged Jenny Lind Collection. Columbia University Libraries, New York N.Y. Oct. 1986-Sept. 1987. Rare Book Cataloger. Memb er of a cataloging team for the Edwin R.A. Seligman collection of rare business a nd economic literature in the Rare Books and Manuscripts Library. Full-level original ca taloging of primarily French materials. Oct. 1985-Sept. 1986. Monograph Cataloger. Member of a cataloging team for the Soviet Nationalities Collection. Feb. 1985-Oct. 1985. Bibliographic Assistant. Collection Maintenan ce Dept. Identified and prepared Slavic materials for preservation/replacement decisions by Slavic Bibliographer. EDUCATION 1987 Columbia University School of Library Services 1975 M.Phil. Columbia University Dept. of Slavic Languages 1973 M.A. Columbia University Dept. of Slavic Languages 1971 A.B. Barnard College, Russian languag e and literature; art history minor 1978-1979 IREX Fulbright Fellow in Leni ngrad for dissertation research 1971 Council on International E ducational Exchange (CIEE) Russian language program at Leningrad State University AFFILIATIONS & PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES American Association for Sl avic Studies (AAASS) 1987-1996 ALA, American Colleges and Research Librar ies, Slavic and East European Section, 1994-present; member Newsletter Committee, 2001-2003 ALA, ALCTS Council of Regional Groups, Affiliate Relations Committee, 2002-2004 ALA, ALCTS, Cataloging Norms Discussion Group, Chair, 2002-2003 Program for Cooperative Cataloging, St anding Committee on Standards, 2002-2005 Friends of Dard Hunter Florida Library Association

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John Freund 4331 NW 28th Terrace Gainesville, Florida 32605 johfreu@mail.uflib.ufl.edu Telephone: -home/ 352-374-4032 -office/352-392-6962 EDUCATION University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. June 1975, BA, Journalism. San Francisco State, San Francisco, California. College of Art and Design September, 1984, Certificate, Book Re storation and Binding. WORK EXPERIENCE Head, Conservation Unit. University of Florida, Smathers Libraries. Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007 October 1988 to present. Responsibilities: Collaborates with Collecti on Managers to assess and treat collections within the ability of available resources. Supervises services including : pamphlet binding, basic and complex repair, re storation, protective enclosure and environmental/physical conditions monitoring. Tr ains staff and monitors the work of Unit staff, volunteers and OPS, evaluates work fl ow and progress and maintains standards of treatment.. Performs intermediate and co mplex repair and rest oration for special collections materials. This may include deacidification and encapsulation, repair and restoration of paper and bindings including period leather, cloth and paper. Keeps current with the latest information, literature and resear ch in the Conservation field and with the latest equipment and procedures. Circulation and Stack Manager/Reference. Jonsson Library of Government Documents, St anford University, Palo Alto California. June 1983 to September 1988. Responsible for: Supervisi on of the Circulation Unit: Supervised student assistants, created and sent monthly overdue notices, and billings. Maintenance of the stacks Provided reference assistance tw o three hours/ day.

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Food Service Manager SAGA Corporation Menlo Park, California September 1975 to January 1983. Responsible for: Management of all aspects of contract food services. INTERNSHIPS Sutro Library San Francisco State University San Francisco, CA. Refurbishment of the reference collection. September March 1982-83 San Anselmo Theological Seminary San Anselmo California October December 1983 Responsible for: Preservation and restoration of the Libraries special collections.

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Stephanie Cornell Haas Assistant Director, Digital Library Center University of Florida Libr aries, Gainesville, FL 32611-7007 Employment Assistant Director, Digital Library Center, University of Florida libraries, Gainesville, FL, April 2000Acting Chair/Marston Science Library, University of Flor ida, Gainesville, FL, June 1994-June 1995 Assistant Chair/Marston Science Li brary, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, June 1993-1998 Environmental Sciences Librarian/Associate Univ ersity Librarian, Marston Science Library, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 1988(Tenure granted July 1992) Science Librarian/Assistant Profes sor, Colorado State University Libraries, Ft. Collins, CO 1987-88 Information Specialist, Professional Information Center, Southeastern Metropolitan Board of Cooperat ive Services, Denver, CO 1985-87 Assistant Librarian, Denver Bot anic Gardens, Denver, CO 1984-85 Department Head, Denver Museum of Natura l History Library, Denver, CO 1975-1984 Selected Professional Activities International Association of Aquatic and Marine Science and Libraries and Information Centers (IAMSLIC): President, 1999-2000 25 th Annual Conference Planner and Convenor, 1999 President-Elect, 1997 Chair of Metadata Committee, 1996Treasurer, 1992-1996 Member of Web site planning committee, 1995Site selection Committee, 1994 Florida Biotic Information Consortium, 1994Chair of Steering Committee, 1994Planned meetings for 1994 at Archbold Biological St ation, 1995 at University of Florida. Coplanned 1996 meeting held at Tall Timbers Research Station, Tallahassee ; 1997 meeting held at NOAA in Miami; convened 2000 meeting of the FB IC Bibliographic Database Working Group, Mote Marine Laboratory, November 2000 State Biodiversity Database Survey Co mmittee, Fish and Wildlife Information Exchange 1996. Assisted with soliciting information on species data from state agencies Selected Grants From the Air: the photographic record of Floridas lands funded in 2002 by LSTA. A cooperative project of the Digital Library Center and the Map & Imagery Library, UF to digitize and make available over the Internet 40,600 aerial photographs and 600 photomosaic indexes of Fl orida captured by the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture between 1937 and 1951. Identifying the Invaders: creating an online digital herbarium of invasive species (http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/natsci/herba rium/cat/imagelistpoisonous.htm) funded by Florida Department of Environmental Protection. This was a collaborative grant with the University of Florida Herbarium to digitize and make available over the Web, University of Florida herbarium specimens of Category II invasive exotics. Linking Florida's Natural Heri tage: Science and Citizenry (h ttp://www.fcla.edu /linkfl) will create a virtual library of Florida ecological information from a set of disparate and heterogeneous databases located on comput ers throughout Florida. This is a model program of cooperation between the Flori da Museum of Natural History; the

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libraries of the University of Florida, Florida International University, and Florida Atlantic University; and the Florida Center for Library Automation. The networking technologies used will conform to the la test national and inte rnational standards applicable to information system design in cluding the Z39.50 protocol. (Funded by the Institute for Museum and Library Studies, October 1998) Selected Publications 2003 DARWIN and MARC: A Voyage of Metadata Discovery Co-authored with Elaine Henjum and Mary Ann ODaniel, FCLA and Joe Aufmuth, GIS Coordinator, UF. Library Collections, Acquisitions, and Technical Services (accepted for publication) 2000 Linking Floridas Natural Heritage: Science & Citizenry Co-authored with Priscilla Caplan. Published in FirstMon day: Peer-reviewed journal on the Internet. URL: http://firstmonday.org/issu es/issue5_6/haas/index.html#h1 1999 Ecology and Ecosystem Management: Core Journals and Indexes Coauthored with Catherine W. Lee and Anita L. Battiste. Science & Technology Libraries v.18, no.1, p.3-24 1998 Floridas Environmental Mosaic: Balancing the Everglades and Disneyworld Florida Libraries, v.41, no.4, p.88-89 1998 Metadata Mania: An Overview in Proceedings of the 23 rd Annual Conference of IAMSLIC, Charleston, South Carolina, October 1997 1997 Scientific Research on the Natural History of the Bahamas: An Overview of the Published Literature in Bahamas Biodiversity Data Management (BDM) Report-95, Final Report, October 1997. p.96-107 1997 Holes in the Dike: Is Cambridge Scientific Losing Water? in Proceedings of the 22 nd Annual Conference of IAMSLIC, Monterey Bay, California, October 13-18, 1996. Selected Presentations Of Deserts, Springs, and Plants: a Freshwater Mosaic presented at the 26 th Annual Conference of the International Associati on of Marine and Aquatic Science Libraries and Information Center by Stephanie Haas, Digi tal Library Center, Univ. of Florida, Karen Brown, Aquatic Plants Information Center, Univ. of Florida, and Paula Wolfe, Univ. of Arizona, Victoria, B.C. 2000 Linking Floridas Natural Heritage presented at the Institute for Museum and Library Services Web-Wise Conference Washington, March 2000 "Linking Floridas Natural Heritage: Science & Citizenry: A Case Study in Crossing Information Boundaries at the session Museum Collection and Natural History Data on the World Wide Web for Special Libraries Association Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, June 2000. Research Metadata on the Web presented at the 24 th Annual Conference of the International Association of Aquatic and Marine Science Libraries and Information Centers, 1998. Florida Ecosystem Management: The Met adata Factor poster presented at the Natural Resources Forum, 1998 Metamania: An Overview of Metadata presented at the 23 rd Annual Conference of the International Association of Aquatic and Marine Science Libraries and Information Centers, 1997. Holes in the Dike: Is Cambridge Scientific Losing Water? presented at 22 nd Annual Conference of the International Association of Aquatic and Marine Science Libraries and Information Centers, 1996 Florida Biotic Information Consortium, presented at the 6th Annual Meeting of the Natural Resources In formation Council, 5-8 August 1996. Florida Biotic Information Consortium, presented at the Organization of Fish and Wildlife Information Managers meeting, 15 July 1996. Serious Science on the Web, presented at t he Florida and Caribbean Chapter, Special Libraries Association meeting Ridi ng the Internet Waves, 2 F ebruary 1996, Gainesville, FL "The Agriculture/Environment Interface: Locating the Relevant Literature." Presented at the Second Environmentally Sound Agriculture C onference, Orlando, FL, March 20-22, 1994.

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Vita of: John E. Ingram Director for Collections University Librarian (tenured 2000) Work Experience: University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries. 2000 present Director for Collections An officer of the library sharing leader ship responsibilities with senior management. Administers and provides leadership for the collections program with a budget of $7,500,000 for 2001-2002; bears principle responsibility for ensuring effective and responsive collections in support of the University's teaching and research programs. Leads in integrating digital and print based collections into a cohesive university collecti on and plays major role in librarys fundraising program. This officer has line responsibility for the Collection Management Department and the Special and Area Studies Collections Department: 30 staff positions. 1994 2000 Chair, Department of Special and Area Studies Collections Responsible for the overall development and mana gement of the Smathers Libraries' special collections and area studies, including rare books, archives, manuscripts, maps, prints, photographs, and other special material and area studies in Florida history, Latin Americana, Judaica, and Africana. Holdings: 250,000 books and 10 million manuscript and archival items for special collections, and 500,000 volumes, 60,000 rolls of microfilm, and other materials for area studies programs. Responsible for the depa rtment's public and technical services, personnel management and supervision (22 FTEs), space management, and collection development (materials budget in excess of $600,000 and endowments of more than $1,000,000. The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Department of the Library. 1984 1994 Curator for Library Special Collections Administer the special collections of the Foundation Library: manuscripts, rare books, architectural collections (including architectural, archaeological, and landscape drawings), maps, graphic arts, and microforms. Responsible fo r Library preservation and conservation decisions and for the acquisition of rare and out-of-print materials. Chief contact between donors and the Foundation for rare library materials Education: BA in Russian Language and Literature, Fordham University, 1967 MA in Russian Language and Literature, Fordham University, 1968 Ph D. in Slavic Linguistics, Brown University, 1977 Continuing Education: ACRL/Harvard Leadership Institute, Harvard Gra duate School of Educati on, Cambridge, MA, August 2001

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Advanced Special Collections Administration, Rare Books School, The University of Virginia, July 1998. Languages: Russian, Latin, French, German, other Indo-European languages Publications: Designing 21 st -century Library Spaces: Another Skill for th e Information Specialist, with Carol A. Turner, in Hum@n Beings and Information Specialists proceedings of the 10 th International BOBCATSSS Symposium on Libra ry and Information Science Portoro, Slovenia, January 28 30, 2002. John Evelyn, Elysium Britannicum, or the Royal Gardens editor, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001. From Handels Acis and Galatea to American Harmony: Going to the Source for the Music of Eighteenth-century Williamsburg, in Colonial Williamsburg (Spring 2000), pp. 24-29. Papers, Speeches, Presentations: "Special Collections in the 21 st Century at the University of Florida: The Past Morphs Into the Future," American Civilization Seminar, University of Florida, October 2002. Building Special Collections in a Research Library, Rare Books Road show, speaker, International College, Naples, Florida, July, 2002, 2001. Going to the Source: The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation Research Programs, speaker, el V Taller de Antropologa Social y Cultural Afroamericana, Museo Casa de frica de la Oficina del Historiador de la Ciudad de La Habana, Havana, Cuba, January 2001 Grants: (funded only) 2000-2002 National Endowment for the Humanities, Preservation and Access Project: Preservation Microfilming and Cataloging of American and British Children's Literature, 1850-1869; co-P.I. University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries. Total award: $653,817. 1996-1997 National Endowment for the Humanities, Preservation and Access Project: United States Agricultural Information Network Preservation Project, coordinator for University of Florida's participation in this NEH funded grant, P.I. Total award: $13,236. 1992 American Philosophical Society Grant Project: to complete the transcription of John Evelyn's unpublished manuscript "Elysium Britannicum," Christ Church College, Oxford. $4,000.

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Vita of: Erich Kesse, Director, Digital Library Center Work Experience: DIRECTOR, DIGITAL LIBARY CENTER. Smathers Libraries. University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. July 1999 to present Responsible for creation and implementation of digitization programs. Supervision of 4 FTE full-time staff and 8 FTE part-time staff. Administration of vendor contracts and budgets. Digitization grant development and admin istration, as well as product mark eting. Management of operations exceeding 100,000 images/pages annually. Special interest in automation issues, development of imaging management information systems PRESERVATION OFFICER Smathers Libraries. Preservation Department. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL May 1987 to 30 June 1999 RARE BOOK CATALOGER Smathers Libraries. Catalog Department. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL April 1984 September 1986 VOLUNTEER WORK EXPERIENCE PRESERVATION CONSULTANT. YIVO Institute. New York, NY January May 1987 CATALOG LIBRARIAN. Cincinnati Historical Society, Cincinnati, OH October 1983 April 1984. Part-time assignment. LIBRARIAN/ARCHIVIST. Taft Museum, Library, Cincinnati, OH November 1983 April 1984. Part-time assignment. ASSISTANT IN SPECIAL COLLECTIONS. Transylvania University, Library, Lexington, KY April June 1983. Part-time assignment. Education: COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY. School of Library Service. New York, NY May 1987. Certificate of Preservation Administration UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY. School of Library and Informati on Science. Lexington, KY August 1983. Master of Science, Library Science XAVIER UNIVERSITYSciences. Cincinnati, OH College of Liberal Arts and May 1982. Bachelor of Arts Continuing Education: CORNELL UNIVERSITY. Digital Imaging for Library and Archives Workshop Ithaca, NY November 1998. UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA. College of Liberal Arts and Sc iences. Gainesville, FL Department of English. Creative Writing Program. Audited a series of courses in the Program between 1987 and 1990. National Organizations: AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. ACRL. Rare Books & Manuscripts Section. (1983) ALCTS. Organization and By-Laws Committee. (2001-2003) Cataloging & Classification Section. (1983) Preservation & Reproduction Section. (1983) Reproduction. Standards Committee. (1988-1990, 1991-1993, Chair 1991-1992) Preservation. Management Committee. (1989-1991) Intellectual Access Committee. (1994various appointments, Chair 1998-2000)

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USMARC 583 Task Force. (1996-1998, Chair 1997-1998) ASSOCIATION FOR INFORMATION AND IMAGE MANAGEMENT. (1991-1996; 1999) Various Standards Committees; Ac ts as University of Florida Librarie s liaison (on Librarie s' membership). CENTER FOR RESEARCH LIBRARIES. Collections & Services Advisory Committee. (1999-2002) NATIONAL INFORMATION STANDARDS ORGANIZATION. Committee Member (Metadata Dictionary for Still Digital Images). (2000/2002) OCLC. Digital and Preservation Cooperative. (2002-) Steering Committee (2002-) Historic Newspapers Group. (2002-) RESEARCH LIBRARIES GROUP. Preservation Committee/PRESERV. (1990-) University of Flori da Libraries representative. Preservation Committee. Advisory Committee. (1992-1993) PRESERV. Advisory Committee. (1999-2001) Grants: (funded only) From the Air: Florida Aerial Photography. Phase I. 2002-. Principal Investigator. (Grant written in collaboration with Stephanie Haas) Supported by the State of Florida, Dept. of State, Library Services & Tec hnology Assistance Program. Digitization and indexing of aerial photography covering Florida. Amount funded: $190,000 Baldwin Library of Historical Childrens Literature. Phase I. 2000-. Planning Team member and Di gitization coordinator. Supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Digitization component targets color in childrens lit erature; cf, http://palmm.fcla.edu/juv/color.html Digitization expenditures to date: $5,000 grant + $40,000 state match Caribbean Newspaper Imaging Project. Phase II. 1999-. Planning Team member and Digitization coor dinator; wrote Phase II work-plan. Supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Pilot to evaluate Optical Character Re cognition applications to imaged newspapers as a machine alternatives to human indexing. Amount funded: $12,000 Linking Florida's Natural Heritage Project. 1998Institute of Museum and Library Se rvices funded digitization project. Project planning team member. Principle In vestigator for reprographic sub-contract. Amount funded: $12,000 digitization only U.S. Agricultural Info rmation Network Project. Part 2 : Preservation Microfilming, 1998-1999. Principle Investigator at the University of Florida. Supported by the National Endowment for the Humani ties; a national project, coordinated from Cornell University. Amount funded: @ $50,000 U.S. Newspaper Project, Florida. Phases 1 & 2 : Cataloging & Preservation Microfilming, 1996-1999. Planning Team member and Preserva tion Microfilming coordinator. Supported by the National Endowment fo r the Humanities; a state project, c oordinated from the University of Florida. Amount funded: @ $50,000 funded + @ $20,000 state match Caribbean Newspaper Imaging Project. Phase I. 1996-1998. Planning Team member and Digitiza tion coordinator. Supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Pilot project to digitize Caribbean Newspapers: Diario de la Mariana (Havana, Cuba) and La Nouvelliste (Portau-Prince, Haiti). Amount funded: $23,000 Written Documentation: Study of Preservation Documentation. 1988. Principle Investigator. Funded by the University of Florida. Young Investigat ors Start-up funding program to assist junior faculty establish their research programs Amount funded: $25,000

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Vita of Jane Pen Education 2001present: Santa Fe Community Co llege, Gainesville, FL Program Continuing education in computer science 1998-2001: Santa Fe Community Co llege, Gainesville, FL Graduation AAS fall 2001 Major Computer Inform ation Systems Analysis 1979-1983: Tamkang University, Taipei, Taiwan Degree Bachelor of Arts Major Educational Media and Library Science Work Experience 2001-present: Library Technical Assistant (Quality Control Coordinator). Digital Library Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL Perform quality control on digital im ages; supervise student assistants; manage intermediary archive files 1990-2001: Library Assistant. Alachua County Library District, Gainesville, FL Assist patrons with information inquiry; resolve a ccount problems; issue library cards; and perform customer services including data entry using SIRSI and office equi pment maintenance. 1996-1997: Library Assistant. Schaumburg High School, Schaumburg, IL Assisted students with reference inquiry; helped media center director with material ordering, pr ocessing, and disp laying. Also assisted computer lab manager with equipm ent maintenance and inventory. 1988-1996: Senior Cataloger: Follett Library Resources Co., McHenry, IL Assisted department head with cataloging and bib liographies consulting, sales support, and custom er service. Reduced prod uction cost of over $5000 per budget year by rearranging workflow.

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Randall David Renner 1103 N.W. 4 th Street Apt. A Gainesville, Florida 32601 H. 352.336.5973 W. 352.846.0129 renner@ufl.edu Education 1994 1997 University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. Master of Fine Arts Degree in Creative Photography. 1987 1990 Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida. Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in Photography; cum laude Employment 10/2002-Present University of Florida, George A. Smat hers Libraries, Digital Library Center. Coordinator of Computer Applications (Planetary Operations). Production coordinator for the large format digital planetary camera. Manage digitization of oversized materials from UF libraries Special Collections and Map and Image Library. 8/2001-10/2002 University of Florida, Office of Academic Technology. Photography Department. Photographer Responsible for implementation and daily operation of digital imaging services for the campus wide photographic service bure au; including equipment specification, integration, quality control and pricing strategy. Additional responsibilities included photographing library special collections, artwork, 3-D models, and other subjects, both in a studio environ ment and on location. Other technical duties included black and white printing and processing, and E-6 processing and mounting. 1/2001/2001 University of Florida, Office of Academic Technology. Center for Instructional Technology and Training. Training Specialist Responsible for conducting training semi nars of graphic software programs to faculty and staff. Development and revision of new graphic software training programs, and development of the Instru ctional Computing Activites Training Program. Specific seminar content inclu ded: Introduction to Digital Media, Web Site Development, Introduction to Photosho p, Intermediate Photoshop, Graphics for the Web, Digital Video, Acrobat, Frontpage, Powerpoint, and The Effective Use of Laptops. 1999 2000 University of Florida, Department of Art and Art History. Adjunct Assistant Professor Responsible for instruction, evaluati on, and curriculum development of the introductory digital arts class, Computer Art: Montage. 1997 2000 University of Florida Brain Institute Teaching Lab Resources. Audio Visual Specialist Management of multimedia and classroom support activities within the Brain Institute, including multimedia auditorium, conference rooms, audio/video building distribution and surgical resear ch and training lab. Coordination of

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scheduling, setup and maintenance of all multimedia and teleconferencing equipment. Administrative and technical management of all teleconferencing and multimedia resources including computers, digital projectors, slide projectors, teleconferencing codecs scalers, mixers, and amx controlled systems. Performed preventive and corr ective maintenance. Provide operational instruction of resources to faculty and staff. 1994 1997 University of Florida, Biomedical Media Services, Photography/Graphics Departments. Photographer Responsibilities included the design and creation of photographic and graphic media including images, text, charts, and graphs. The processing, printing and digital transfer of biomedical, scientific, and public relations subjects in both film based and digitally generated formats for teaching, research, publication and display. 1994 1997 University of Florida, Department of Art Gainesville, Florida. Graduate Teaching Assistant / Instructor Fully responsible for instruction, ev aluation and curriculum development of beginning photography courses in the Ar t department. Courses taught included Black and White Photography, Fi gure/Ground, and Image/Order/Idea. 1991 1993 U Mac International Language Academy, Nishi-Koiwa, Tokyo, Japan. Program Coordinator / Instructor Developed specialized English language curriculum, and provided English language instruction to Japanese students of all age groups in classroom and individualized settings. Edited foreign correspondence. 1988 1991 Florida State University, Department of Art Tallahassee, Florida. Color Darkroom Manager Designed, supervised and maintained the art departments color darkroom facility consisting of a photographic studio, a 10 workstation color darkroom, and a Durst RCP-50 dry to dry processor.

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Melody-Ann Jones Smith 8008 NW 31st Ave + APT 202 Gainesville, FL. 32606 + USA Fax 1-352-335-8950 Home Phone 1-352-335-8146 + E-mail blackfeIl@earthlink.net WORK EXPERIENCE April 2000 Present PROGRAM ASSISTANT I PRODUCTION COORDINATOR DIGITAL LIBRARY CENTER. Smathers Libraries. University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. Responsible for coordination and supervision of digital image production and metadata creation, as well as addressing quality control issues and handling file transfer protocols. Responsible for creation and implementation of staff training programs regarding metadata creation, digital image creation, quality control procedures, as well as some archival and tracking procedures. Resolution of metadata and material handling issues as necessary. Supervision 1 FTE full-time staff member and up to 24 FTE part-time OPS staff. Scheduling of material arrival, processing, and return. General Office duties including but not limited to staff scheduling, staff assignments, timecard review, payroll liaison. 1998-1999 TAX PREPARER H & R BLOCK Complete tax interview with client to determine the most advantageous and accurate method to file their tax return, Careful explanation of the electronic filing process and any current H&R Block programs to give the client a thorough understanding of what is available to them and how it will benefit them, Complete all required Block administrative forms, Attend all mandatory training, Assist in proper office appearance, Handle electronic file processing, Resolve client service issues, Assemble returns, Obtain all required signatures, Complete bookkeeping procedures each night, complete opening and closing procedures as assigned. 1998 OFFICE MANAGER CAPPADONNA BUILDERS & CONTRACTORS Write Contracts, Place Bids for Contract Jobs, AVR, AVP, Schedule appointments, Monitor and periodically update ledgers, review and balance company accounts, update year-end ledgers, Floor plan design and reconstruction, Computer aided design, File maintenance, Finance referrals, Mortgage Company liaison, and oversee daily office duties. 1996-1998 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT WYNN CONSTRUCTION AVR, AVP, Data Entry, Occasional Payroll, Receptionist duties, and some experience in residential design and computer aided drafting. Duties include but not limited to typing, filing, basic bookkeeping responsibilities, and general office work 1995-1998 Dynamics Director I D.J. PARTY CENTRAL ENTERTAINMENT COMPLEX Completely trained to operate any and all of the sound and lighting equipment in any of the three clubs on the complex property. Dynamics Director coordinating performances, practices times and work schedules for staff of 28 +. Filled in periodically as comptroller. Assisted with liquor control, as well as handling beer and wine inventory. Helped designed spreadsheets to be used in inventory reports.

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1994-1995 ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE OC ALA FORD MOTORS, INC. Representative for approximately 500 AIR accounts, with duties including but not limited to payment collection, data entry, stat ement processing, account maintenance, weekly financial reports, as well as general typing and filing. Filled in for cashier and receptionist periodically due to high turn over rate in those positions. EDUCATION UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX. School of Business Administration. Phoenix, AZ Current Enrollment. GPA 3.89 TREVECCA NAZARENE UNIVERSITY. Nashville. TN Att ended two years. Average CPA 3.5

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Rita J. Smith 1417 NW 17 th Terrace, Gainesville, FL 32605 ritsmit@mail.uflib.ufl.edu home: 352.276.0511 office: 352.392.0369 EDUCATION University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI M.A. in Library Science, June 1973 Goshen College, Goshen, IN B.A. in English, June 1967 WORK EXPERIENCE George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida Curator and Associate Librarian, The Baldwin Library of Historical Childrens Literature, Department of Special Collections (1.0 FTE) July, 1995-Present Responsible for all aspects of a collection of 95,000 rare and historical childrens books dating from the 17 th through the 21 st centuries. Provides reference service to patrons on-site and via the mail, email and the telephone on a national and international level; creates guidelines for collection development, including gifts, transfers, and purchase of books for the collection, through the annual endowment accounts. Undertakes research involving the historical childrens literature collection, publishes results and serves as essayist for the locally produced Recess program which airs nationwide on over 30 NPR stations. Prepares workshops, classes, and seminars about historical childrens literature for faculty, students, and librarians, and presentations for the general public. Publicizes the holdings of the library as well as important acquisitions, exhibitions and events by attending meetings, giving presentations, and providing interviews. Continues to enhance preservation of the collection. Trains and collaborates with members of the Contributed Cataloging Section and the Special Collections, Architecture and Fine Arts and Humanities Section of the Resource Services Department to establish projects which enhance intellectual access to the collection; develops cataloging standards for Baldwin records. General Humanities Cataloger, Resource Services Department January, 1994-June, 1995 Education Created original catalog records for monographs in subject areas included in Library of Congress Classification Schedules B-BX (Religion, Philosophy and Psychology), P-PZ (Language and Literature) and Z (Bibliography and Library Science. Coordinator, Academic Support Services, The Baldwin Library of Historical Childrens Literature, Department of Special Collections July, 1991-December 1993 1

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2 In lieu of an appointed Curator for the collec tion, responsible for all aspects of the Baldwin Library, a collection of 90,000 rare and historical childrens books from the 17 th through the 20 th centuries. RECENT GRANTS AND FUNDED PROJECTS Co-Principle Investigator on a $653,817 preservation and access grant proposal to the National Endowment for the Humanities to catalog and microfilm 10,000 titles held in the Baldwin Library, submitted July, 1999, awarded Ap ril, 2000; October, 2000-April, 2003. Contributed to the narrative and formulation of a 1-year grant proposal to copy catalog 4,000 20 th century Baldwin Library items. Awarded by Northeast Florida Library Information Network (NEFLIN); Awarded July, 200 0; October, 2000-September, 2002. Contributed to the narrative written for the gran t to preserve and microfilm Kohler Victorian theology pamphlets and publications of American and British tract societies. The grant was awarded through SOLINET with fundi ng from the National Endowment for the Humanities, 1997. RECENT PUBLICATIONS AND CREATIVE WORK The Vassar Girls Abroad, essay broadcast over public radio stations nationwide as part of Recess, a locally produced program, March 2003 Toby Tyler and the Circu, essay broadcast over public radio stations nationwide as part of Recess, a locally produced program, July, 2002 Mother Goose, 1719, essay broadcast over public radio stations nationwide as part of Recess a locally produced program, December, 2001 (and over 120 other similar 3-minutes essays broadcast in the past four years) Life is Short, Art is Long: Randolph Caldecott, 1846-1886. In Newbery and Caldecott Awards: A Guide to the Medal and Honor Books Chicago: American Library Association, 2000, p. 11-17. Caught Up in the Whirlwind: Ruth Baldwin, The Lion and the Unicorn, a Critical Journal of Childrens Literature vol. 22, no. 3, September, 1998. P. 289-302 Just Who Are These Women: Louise Seaman Bechtel and Ruth Marie Baldwin, Journal of Youth Services In Libraries Winter, 1998. p. 161-170. Those Who Go Before: Ancestors of Eva St. Clare, New England Quarterly p. 314-319, June, 1997 PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS AND SERVICE (CURRENT) American Library Association Association of Library Service to Children, 1989-Present Chair: National Planning of Special Collections Committee, 1999-Present Childrens Literature As sociation, 1989-Present The Howe Society, 1995-Present Friends of the Books Arts Press, University of Virginia, 1997-Present

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ASTRID TERMAN 714 NE Boulevard Gainesville, FL 32601 aterman@ufl.edu (352) 271-3543 EXPERIENCE 6/01 Present FLORIDA CENTER FOR LIBRARY AUTOMATION, Gainesville, FL Systems Librarian for Digital Library Services !" Implement and maintain all image based digital collections !" Daily monitoring of productions applications !" Analyze and design processes related to changes to existing applications !" Recommend and implement enhancements to current applications to enhance digital capabilities !" Project management and oversight of technical projects coordinating the work of several staff !" Work with library and systems staff on planning and development issues 3/98 6/01 UNIVERSITY OF CONNE CTICUT LIBRARIES, Storrs, CT Circulation Systems Librarian a nd Liaison to Womens Studies !" Implement, upgrade and maintain ILS, Endeavor Voyager !" Create dynamic interactive Web applications using ColdFusion !" Develop specialized SQL queries to solve production problems !" Interface with library ITS depa rtment and Computer Center EASTERN CONNECTICUT STATE UNIVERSITY, Willimantic, CT 1/96 3/98 Library Technician Circulati on, ILL, Reserve Department !" Supervise student staff in all areas of Circulation department services. !" Participate in all aspects of ILL and document delivery service. !" Develop HTML pages for Access Services Web Site. !" Develop relational database application to simp lify transfer of patron charges to Bursar !" using MS-Access. !" Member of systems focus group charged with recommending computer systems for new library building. !" Create and maintain all circulation statistical monthly and annual reports. !" Coordinate the reconciling of patron charges with Bursar utilizing On-line Student Information System. 8/95 12/95 Reference Librarian 1/95 1/96 GATEWAY COMMUNITY TECHNICAL COLLEGE, N orth Haven, CT Reference Librarian UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF LAW LIBRARY, Hartford, CT 6/95 12/95 Reference Librarian Volunteer 1/94 6/95 Collection Management Supervisor 12/93 8/95 CORA J. BELDEN LIBRARY, Rocky Hill, CT Reference Librarian 1981 1992 AETNA LIFE AND CASUALTY Windsor, CT Systems Specialist

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Astrid Terman 2 EDUCATION 1975 Master of Library and Information Science Queens College, New York, NY. 1971 Bachelor of Arts History City College, New York, NY. PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS American Library Association (ALA) Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) ACRL New England Chapter, Information Technology Interest Group (ITIG) Library and Information Technology Association (LITA) PROFESSIONAL ACTIV ITIES AND SERVICE LITA, Program Planning Committee 2001 ACRL, New England Chapter, Information Technology Interest Group (ITIG) Annual Meeting Planning Committee 2000 LITA National Forum. Portland, Oregon, November 2000 Selected by Endeavor and VUGM board for membership on Circulation Task Force to develop changes for the 2001 version of Voyager. 1999 ALA Midwinter Conference, San Antonio, Texas, Jan. 2000 Annual Voyager User Group Meeting, Chicago, IL, 2000 Statistical Methodologies Team, University of Connecticut Libraries, 1999ALA Annual Conference, New Orleans, 1999 Annual Voyager User Group Meeting, Chicago, IL, 1999 Andover Public Library Board of Trustees, Chair, 1999ASIS Annual Meeting, Pittsburgh PA, November 1998 Circulation Reciprocal Loan Team, Chair, 1999 2000 University of Connecticut Libraries, 1998ILS Advisory Team, University of Connecticut, 1998Systems Focus Group, J. Eugene Smith Library, Eastern Connecticut State University, 1996-1998 Search Committee, University Assistant, Eastern Connecticut State University, 1997 Several conferences on legislative changes to Medicare processing, Health Care Finance Administration (HCFA) Baltimore, MD, 1983-1985

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Appendix 1 Use Statistics Book [paper] Collection Annual On-Site Use Statistics/The Baldwin Library/July 1 June 30 Items Pulled from the Stacks for Use in the Special Collections Reading Room 1997-1998: 352 1998-1999: 478 1999-2000: 366* 2000-2001: 603 2001-2002: 467 2002-2003: 592 *Does not include 800 items pulled in se veral weeks for two undergraduate class assignments in which each student was to peru se and discuss their response to four early (1775-1820) childrens books. Digital Collection: Literature for Children The following statistical information is automatically collected and reported by the FCLA Digital Library Usage Reports ( http://www.fcla.edu/FCLAinfo/stats/dlcnt/index.html ). More detailed use studies and focus-group assessments are not scheduled until 2004. Use Statistics The number of times that the Literature for Children collection home-page was accessed (Table 1) represents a base for cons ideration of other use statistics. Users searching the collection generally come to th e collection home page first. Statistics indicate increasing awareness of the collection both as the University of Florida increases publicity for the collection and as web search engines index the collections static web pages. Table 1: Collection Home-Page Access Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec TOTAL 2000 12 43 55 2001 26 26 12 34 48 46 275 100 121 170 103 102 1,063 2002 156 194 125 134 206 149 143 125 254 255 194 176 2,111 2003 223 210 247 180 860 to date N.B. Literature for Children was launched in November 2000. N.B. 2003 statistics after April had not been compiled at the time this Appendix was written.

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Appendix 1. 2 Access to title table-of-contents (Table 2) indicates user interest beyond the collection home-page and other documentation. Table 2: Table-of-Contents List Viewed Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec TOTAL 2002 616 278 518 1412 2003 387 1131 247 218 432 2415 N.B. This level of statistical detail was not compiled prior to October 2002. N.B. 2003 statistics after May had not been compiled at the time this Appendix was written. N.B. Full-text became available in the collection in October 2002. Assuming that any single instance of access to a table-of-contents represents access to one title, the average user of the collection viewed 2.75 titles during the period of comparable statistical coverage for Tables 1 and 2. Upon closer examination of statistical reports (not summarized here for brevity), we know that the average user tends to read 1 title per entry into the collection. We also know that users of the full-text versions conduct more searches in and make more use of the titles they read. It is not unusual that such users log tens of queries and some users, hundreds of queries. In general, though users of full-text versions are fewer (cf, Table 3), they make far greater use of the collection. This data was sufficiently convincing for the University of Florida to commit to process all title, both in the existing collection and those created in future, as full-text. Highly accurate Prime Recognition software ( http://www.primerecognition.com/ ), with six optical character recognition engines, will allow production of page-image versions together with searchable full-text versions at the low costs budgeted by this proposal. (Full-text produced by vended double-keying (i.e., retyping) had cost upwards $75 per title.) The amount of content viewed (Table 3) indicates the extent of use. Relative to format, 77% of uses are of the pageable JPG format. Table 3: Content Viewed Year Ver. Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec TTL Use JPG 1082 227 171 1480 77% PDF 150 80 56 286 15% Text 115 33 9 157 8% 2002 Total 1347 340 236 1923 100% JPG 681 586 972 374 297 2910 77% PDF 101 108 62 29 383 683 18% Text 19 65 47 16 34 181 5% 2003 Total 801 759 1081 419 714 3774 100% JPG 4390 77% PDF 969 17% Text 338 6% 2002 thru 2003 Total 5697 100% N.B. This level of statistical detail was not compiled prior to October 2002. N.B. 2003 statistics after May had not been compiled at the time this Appendix was written. N.B. Full-text became available in the collection in October 2002.

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Appendix 1. 3 When examined more closely against user origin information it appears that the majority of users of the PDF format are remote users. This data is consistent with that reported by the University of Virginia of its smaller childrens literature collections. Remote users, particularly those connecting under hourly rate schedules, frequently have an incentive to download and read off-line. That said, though the majority of PDF users are remote users, remote users seem to prefer JPEG versi ons none-the-less. It is difficult to tease meaning from fulltext statistics. Comparing full-text with page image formats, in a sense, is comparing ap ples and oranges. The full-text of title is complete in one file while page-image versions are complete in multiple files. On-line statistical data (not summarized here for br evity), showing instances of use of full-text versions, shows targeted use (i.e., one to a handful of queri es). But full-text users logging hundreds of queries suggest more advanced re search use is also being made of the collection. It is anticipated that both enhanced search capabilities and increasing the number of titles in full-text within the collec tion will more aptly characterize research use in future statistical reports. Users Users of Literature for Children (Table 4) are almost evenly divided between those within and outside of Florida. To increase access to collection content outside Florida, the University of Florid a has signed agreements with the International Childrens Digital Library and with the Research Libraries Groups Cultural Materials Initiative And, an agreement with the Internet Archive, to make the University of Floridas titles available th rough its Bookmobile, an inne r-city literacy project, is complete pending signatures. Table 4: Users Year Location Users % Total Florida Location Users % Total Florida 719 51% University of Florida 568 79% Remote 693 49% Other Florida Users 151 21% 2002 Total 1412 100% Total Florida Users 719 100% Florida 1374 53% University of Florida 1166 85% Remote 1221 47% Other Florida Users 208 15% 2003 Total 2595 100% Total Florida Users 1374 100% Florida 2093 52% University of Florida 1734 83% Remote 1914 48% Other Florida Users 359 17% 2002 thru 2003 Total 4007 100% Total Florida Users 2093 100% N.B. Data above represents whole years, January through December of each year. Within Florida, 79% of use in 2002 and 85% of use in 2003 originated at the University of Florida. The level of use here is no t surprising given the amount of additional publicity targeted to this projects home institution, nor is it surprising given the institutions emphasis on the st udy of the child and childhood.

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Appendix 2 Sample Listing of Books, Articles and Dissertations based on Baldwin Library Research Books Avery, Gillian. Behold the Child, American Children and their Books 1621-1922, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994. Darton, Lawrence. The Dartons: An Annotated Check-Li st of Childrens Books Issued by Two Publishing Houses, 1787-1876. New Castle, Delaware: Oak Knoll Press, 2002 Rollin, Lucy. Twentieth Century Teen Culture by the Decades 1900-1999 Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press,1999. Wunderlich, Richard, comp. The Pinocchio Catalogue : bein g a descriptive bibliography and printing history of English language translations and other renditions appearing in the United States, 1892-1987 New York: Greenwood Press, 1988. Zipes, Jack. Fairy Tales and the Art of Subversion: The Classical Genre for Children and the Process of Civilization, New York: Wildman Press, 1983. Zipes, Jack. Victorian Fairy Tales: the Revolt of the Faeries and Elves New York: Methuen, 1987. Articles/Chapters Giles, Geoffrey J. Temperance Before th e Temperance Movements: Some Examples from Eighteenth-Century Childrens Literature in England and Germany, in History of Education v. 20, no. 4, 1991. Hines, Maude. Implanting Sympathy in Nineteenth-Century Anglo-American Childrens Literature, in Kidd, Kenneth and Sidney Dobrin, eds., Wild Things: Ecocriticism and Childrens Literature, Detroit: Wayne State University Press, forthcoming Spring, 2004. Marino, Jane. Joyful Noise: A Study of Childrens Music, in Children & Libraries v. 1, no. 1, Spring 2003. Smith, Rita J. Life is Short, Art is Long: Randolph Caldecott, 1846-1886 in The Newbery and Caldecott Awards: A Guide to the Medal and Honor Books, Chicago: American Library Association, 2000.

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Appendix 2.2 Smith, Rita J. Those Who Go Before: Ancestors of Eva St. Clare, in The New England Quarterly v. 52, no. 2, June 1997. Dissertations and Theses Kosten, Robert. Authority-fashioning in L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1992) PhD, University of Florida. Kendall, Kevin G. Racial Education: Chesnutt, Twain, and Post-bellum Children's Literature (1994) MA, University of Florida. Lambert, Cornelia C. The Child and the Bee: Natural Theology and Insect Science in Childrens Literature, 1825-1885 (2001) MA, University of Florida. Yontz, Mary Elaine, Music in Our Young Folks 1865-1873 (1998) PhD, University of Florida. Dissertations in Progress: Norcia, Megan. X Marks the Spot: Victori an Women Writers Map the Empire (2004) PhD, University of Florida. Sinn, Julie. American Cultural Ideology in the Little Golden Books. (2004) PhD, University of Florida.

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Appendix 5 Imaging Equipment & Image Quality Imaging Equipment Digital cameras on plan etary (overhead) mounts are the wo rkhorses of this project. The primary digital camera is the 14 megapixel Kodak DCS 14n Specifications for Kodak DCS 14n: http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe ssional/products/cameras/dcsPro14n/ dcsPro14nIndex.jhtml Independent Product Review: http://www.dpreview.com/revi ews/specs/Kodak/kodak_dcs14n.asp Capture: TIFF will be used sRGB color-space Pixel Resolution: 4500 x 3000 pixels or 3000 x 4500 pixe ls, depending upon orientation. Effective Resolution: Size of Page....................Effective Resolution.............Recommended Resolution 5 x 7 page....................600 x 642 dpi..................................384 dpi 6 x 8 page....................500 x 562 dpi..................................384 dpi 7 x 9 page....................428 x 500 dpi..................................384 dpi 8 x 10 page....................375 x 450 dpi..................................384 dpi 9 x 11 page....................333 x 409 dpi..................................384 dpi 10 x 12 page....................300 x 375 dpi..................................384 dpi Recommended Resolution is calculated using the Image Quality Calculator ( http://images.library.uiuc.edu/pr ojects/calculator/image_calc.asp ) from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaigns Digital Imaging and Media Technology Initiative and derived usi ng formulas established by Cornell Universitys Digital Imaging for Libraries and Archives (Ithaca, NY : Cornell University Libraries, 1999). See also, Cornell Universitys Moving Theory into Practice: Digital Imaging Tutorial ( http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/contents.html ). 384 dpi assumes: 1 mm smallest e, Quality Index (i.e., medium), and the more demanding measurement of bitonal imagi ng even though images will be produced in 24-bit color. N.B. Measurement esta blished for 24-bit imaging suggest 193 dpi resolution. Both the minimum digital resolution threshold for the defacto commercial printing standard and the op timal resolution setting for Optical Character Recognition systems is 300 dpi. Lens(es): Nikon Nikor 150 mm 5.6 f enlarging lens or Nikon Nikor 210 mm 5.6 f enlarging lens as appropriate for size of volume. Mounting: Bogen 0860 Super Salon 320 Camera Stand (10') Lighting:

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Appendix 5. 2 Cool Touch (Two Twin 130 (dual-mount) Fluorescent Work Light Stand) http://www.naturallighting.com/fixtures_worklights/worklights.cfm Daylight balanced bulbs (6500 K) are used. Connections: Firewire (IEEE-1394), with alternate storage to 1 GB Compact Flash card Oversized volumes will be imaged using a high-resolution Phase One PowerPhase FX+ ( http://www.phaseone.com/en/PRODUCTS/scan/PDF/POWERPHASE%20FX%2B.pdf ) digital camera back with a 10,500 x 12,600 pixel CCD chip. The camera back is mounted on a planetary ZBE Satellite universal scanning system ( http://www.zbe.com/manuals/satellite/satellite_p01.html ), it includes a turreted three lens mount with bellows, and an automated control system for calibrated imaging. This scanning system (no longer commercially available) has the look and feel of a commercial microfilming camera, or a large copy stand. A Rodenstock Rodagon 135 mm professional enlarging lens (f/5.6) ( http://www.rodenstockoptics.de/rodenstockoptics/standard_products/photo_optics/prof_ enlarging_lenses/rodagon.htm ) is used in conjunction with an AR-1 high aspect ratio filter for filtering infrared. Images are captured via PhaseOne 3.1.1 capture software through a SCSI PCI interface to a Macintosh Apple G4 computer operating under OS 10 with OS 9.22 subroutines for optimal performance with the PhaseOne imaging software. The image capture area is evenly illuminated by two Videssence ( http://www.videssence.com/ ) sRGB fluorescent light banks each fitted with six Sylvania Daylight Deluxe T-12 40 watt bulbs (6500K). A very few selected volumes, those bound in pamphlet style (similar to todays Time or Newsweek magazines) will be imaged on flat-bed scanners. The Digital Library Center operates 13 Microteck 9800XL ( http://www.microtekusa.com/sm9800xltma.html ) and 3 Epson Expression 1640XL ( http://www.epson.com/cgibin/Store/consumer/consDetail.jsp?oid=17065 ) scanners. Each is color calibrated daily. Faithful Capture Color-fidelity is achieved by color-balancing the digital camera with ANSI IT8.7/2-1993 (Graphic Technology Color Reflection Target for Input Scanner Calibration. Washington, D.C. : American National Standards Institute, last revised 1993) compliant specifications through the use of targets such as Kodak Q-60. Exposure can be varied by adjusting the lens aperture or the capture time. The technicians employed by this project are well-trained, each with education in photography. Technicians determine the color values for the 24-bit image and the appropriate histogram distribution for each image. Balance between exposure-time and noise entailed manipulating the digital camera's capture sensitivity in order to obtain an efficient ISO-equivalent capture speed without sacrificing excessive noise in the image.

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Appendix 5. 3 Digital Master Specifications Guidelines for Master TIFF Image Files ( http://palmm.fcla.edu/strucmeta/tiff.html ) employed by this project are those establis hed by the University of Florida for the PALMM cooperative. File Format: ITU TIFF (Tagged Image File Format) Reference: http://home.earthlink.net/~ritter/tiff/ Encoding: 6.0 (ITU T.6) Specification: TIFF 6.0 Specification (PDF file version) Compression: Uncompressed Bit-depth: 24-bit color DPI: 384 minimum Image Scale: Image Dimensions: Scan scaled to 100% of source document dimensions Color Space: sRGB (Scanning software calibra ted to standard RGB palate) No single method of scanning is recommende d. Any method appropriate to the source document and the intended uses of the electronic image may be acceptable. Compliance with the principals and recommendations of Moving Theory into Practice: Digital Imaging for Libraries and Archives (Anne R. Kenney and Oy a Y. Rieger [Mountain View, CA : Research Libraries Group, 2000]) and Cornell University's Digital Imaging Tutorial ( http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/contents.html ) are required. For optimal image capture, daily calibrati on of scanning devices and monitors is performed. Both Moving Theory into Practice and Cornell University's Digital Imaging Tutorial: Quality Control provide additional information. (See, Faithful Capture above). Quality control plays a prominent role in im aging operations. Visual inspection together with a query of the file header should be completed by spot check. Spot check requires inspection of every image in thumbnail view and of no less than 10% of the images in full-image view. Spot check against file header is an automated process that alerts Quality Control Technicians to deficiencies of image files.

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Appendix 6 Book Cradle The Book Cradle currently being constructed for this project is similar to preservation book cradles in use at the E-Texts Center at the University of Virginia, the National Library of Scotland, and elsewhere. The University of Florida design, however, is simplified. The University of Florida book cradle most closely resembles that used by the University of Virginias E-Text Center. The design is altered to better seat the book spine and to accommodate variable spine sizes. In this regard, the University of Florida design is closer to the Conservation by Design, Ltd. Preservation Book Cradle. University of Virginias E-Text Center cradle The University of Florida book cradle utilizes as stationary base, perpendicular to the cameras focal point. To expedite imaging, all right-hand pages are imaged followed by all left-hand pages. This is fairly typical of European cradle design. At the University of Florida, software reorganizes the page image into correct order. The Virginia design, while it allows the volume to be imaged in one pass, requires that the cradle rock on its base and be moved beneath the camera, thereby necessitating continual adjustment of the cameras focal point and view range. Like the University of Virginia cradle, seen above, the University of Florida cradle, places the book into a position open to 120 degrees, the extent of openness common for reading. The Florida cradle design, however, has a moveable raised arm that slides in and out to accommodate the width of the spine and a hammock between the base and moveable arm to seat and support the spine. The Florida cradle shares this characteristic with but is less mechanical than the Conservation by Design, Ltd cradle. Because it is less mechanical, the Florida design require fewer initial adjustments and has a more ergonomic form.

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Appendix 6. 2 Illustration from Conservation By Design, Ltd. See some of the designs on which the University of Florida Book Cradle is based: Conservation by Design, Ltd. Preservation Book Cradle http://www.conservation-by-design.co.uk/sundries/sundries38.html Netherlands National & University Library. Gttinger Digitalisierungs-Zentrum http://gdz.sub.uni-goettingen.de/en-old/gdz_cradle_en.html University of Virginia. E-Text Center. http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/eaf/cradle.html

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Appendix 7 Text Processing & Quality In this projects workflow, quality-controlled digital page images are passed to a text-processing unit for text conversion and mark-up and from there into the Literature for Children digital collection. Imaging Text Conversion Mark-Up Web Text Q.C. Image Q.C. Text Conversion Title-level directory-encapsulated page-image files are deposited into a text-conversion server. The server has dual 2.8 GHz Intel Pentium (P4) hyper-threading processors running under the Window NT4 server operating system. Files placed onto the server are processed by the Prime Recognition ( http://www.primerecognition.com/ ) software. Prime Recognition software, utilized also by the digital programs at the University of Michigan and the University of Kentucky, processes page-images against a battery of six optical character recognition engines, choosing the best engine for the fonts and font sizes on the page. Conversion, together with some automated and dictionary aided correction, is highly accurate, ranging up to 99.99% accuracy, but varies from title to title with some accuracy considerably lower. Prime Recognition software processes pages out as Adobe Acrobat PDFs with page-image over text. Text is hidden but searchable behind the image. This allows us to reap the benefits of accurately converted text while leaving inaccuracies hidden until use indicates need for higher-level treatment. Quality Control and Mark-Up Quality control occurs after text conversion and before PDF out-put. At this stage text will be corrected as necessary. Prime Recognition was chosen by the University of Florida primarily for its ability to capture structural information and to mitigate the cost of recording that information as structural metadata by staff. Structural information, e.g., title, bibliographic information, table-of-contents, chapter headings, etc. will be corrected to 100% accuracy. Other texts will not be corrected outside Primes normal dictionary aided correction routines until a later date and only as use indicates need. Prime Recognition applies the simple mark-up of HTML. For ingest into our digital librarys XPAT ( http://dlxs.org/products/xpat.html ) system, mark-up is post-processed

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Appendix 7. 2 into the TEI-DTD (Text Encoding Initiative document type definition). Post-processing, an automated instruction, converts HTML to simple SGML encapsulated TEI. Enhancements are currently being made to thes e automated instructions to add tagging to facilitate searches on personal, corporate, and place names as well as temporal events. With the completion of correction and tag-c onversion, titles are marked for creation of the PDF. Deployment Simultaneous with the creation of the PDF, ot her University of Florida in-house systems generate a METS wrapper for the title. M ETS, the Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard ( http://www.loc.gov/standards/mets/ ), is the defacto standard for the transmission of metadata between digital libra ries. The University of Florida uses an enhanced (i.e., localized) version of METS to transmit digital objects to the Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA). FCLA us es this data to load the objects into the digital library and to create persistent URLs for the digitized titles. The completion of this task, usually within 24 hours, ma kes a title accessible as part of Literature for Children ( http://palmm.fcla.edu/juv/ ) and searchable through bibliographic catalogs. Digitized titles will be searchable through Literature for Children as both by bibliographic information and by converted text. Titles will be searchable in the University of Floridas Internet searchable library catalog, and with a delay not greater than four days through the OCLC World Ca t, and again with a delay resulting from tape load schedules, no t greater than one quarter year through the Research Libraries Group (RLG) RLIN. Patrons will access the PDF version of the title.* In addition, OAI-compliant catalogs of the collection are made available to RLG for load into the Cultural Materials Initiative collection. Copies, made under signed agreements, also license digitized titles to both the International Digital Childrens Library and to the Internet Archive for use in its Bookmobile print-on demand literary project for innercity children. Note that the adoption of Prime Recogni tion will end the production of the page-bypage viewable JPEG version. Titles in the Literature for Children collection will begin to share the look and feel of collections such as JS TOR (http://www.jstor.org/).

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Appendix 8 Digital Collections & Funding Sources The University of Florida makes its digitized resources available freely via the Internet under the PALMM banner, and the University actively promotes contributions from partner institutions. PALMM is the collaborati ve project of the Stat e of Floridas State University Libraries and their educational, cultural, and scie ntific institution partners throughout Florida and the Caribbean. (Except as noted, the following digital collections were produced entirely at the University of Florida.) Projects of the Digital Librar y Center include the following: Aerial Photography: Florida Public Release scheduled for Fall 2003 Funded by : the Library Services and Technology A ssistance program of the State of Florida for $109,000. Description : This phase one project provides acce ss through a geographic information service (GIS) map server to aerial view of Florida from 1930 through 1951. A phase two project is currently under review. Current Count ( Phase One) : 44,000 aerial tiles and indices. Caribbean Newspaper Im aging Project (CNIP) Funded by : the Andrew W. Foundation in two phases to investigate issues of newspaper microfilm-to-digital conversion and indexing. Phase I: Imaging and Indexing Model Funded by : Andrew W. Mellon Fou ndation (1998-1999) for $100,000. Description : Newspaper microfilm conversion project designed to build and test production systems using off-theshelf solutions. See the report at http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/ digital/collections/cni p/eng/CNIP1report.htm Phase II: Optimization for OCR Funded by : Andrew W. Mellon Fou ndation (1999-2000) for $12,500. Description : Prior to the development of c ontemporary newspaper digitization models, this project was designed to test imaging methods and OCR accuracy for consumer-market OCR software. See the report at: http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/ digital/collections/cni p/eng/CNIP2report.htm The University of Floridas Erich Kesse co-chairs the OCLC Digital & Preservation Cooperatives Historic Ne wspapers Group, which continues to investigate newspaper conversion and delivery. Mr. Kesse also has a proposal before NISO to subset the Newspaper Industry Text Format (NITF) for historic newspapers; the proposal aims to bring consistency to appl ications and standardize the market for conversion and indexing. The CNIP proj ect is not in public release pending repurposing under such a standard. Current Count : 3 titles, more than 265,000 page images.

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Appendix 8. 2 Eric Eustace Williams (EEW) http://palmm.fcla.edu/eew/ Funded through volunteer labor and the fiscal resources of the University of Florida since 2001 Description : This project began as the offshoot of a NEH-funded preservation microfilming project, part of the SOLINET Great Collections Microfilming project. The Project serves as a bibliography of the works of Eric Eustace Williams, the first Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago and a scholar of the slave trade in the West Indies. In 2003, the project began digitizing resources with the agreement of the Eric Williams Memorial Collection. The Project now has the official sponsorship of the University of the West Indies and Florida International University, both providing reference assistance for the Project. Current Count : 347 bibliographic records, 20 titles digitized. Florida Environments OnLine (FEOL) http://palmm.fcla.edu/feol/ Funded through the fiscal resources of the University of Florida and allied scientific institutions since 2002. Parts of the collection were separately funded. Description : This project began as the offshoot of the IMLS-funded Linking Floridas Natural Heritage project. FEOL is a library and grey literature for Florida environmental, earth systems, and agricultural sciences, the collection includes: Florida Agricultural and Rural Life (FLAG) http://palmm.fcla.edu/flag/ The University of Florida funds this on-going component, with the in-kind assistance of the Institute for Food and Agricultural Sciences (i.e., Floridas state-wide agricultural education service), as an offshoot of the NEH-funded U.S. Agricultural Information Network preservation microfilming project, to make available the most heavily requested titles via the Internet for in-field use. Current Count : 310 titles Florida Geological Survey Publications (FGS) http://palmm.fcla.edu/fgs/ Including all of the Surveys publications (monographs, periodicals, and maps), this component was completed with funding from the University of Florida with the in-kind assistance of the Florida Geological Survey. Current Count : 567 titles Aquatic, Wetland and Invasive Plant Information Retrieval System (APIRS) http://palmm.fcla.edu/feol/apirs/index.html This component, funded by the University of Floridas Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, serves as a growing bibliography (5,500 + records) of aquatic, wetland, and invasive plants. Plans call for granting to fund digitization of most heavily requested titles. Current Count : 5,500 bibliographic records

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Appendix 8. 3 LFNH Core Collection See: Linking Floridas Natural Heritage, below. This core titles component was completed with IMLS funding for $75,000. Current Count : 278 titles Florida Heritage Project (FHP) http://palmm.fcla.edu/fh/ Funded by : State of Florida. State University Libraries. (continuously funded since 1999, with approximately $7,500 to $15,000 per year, and preceded in 1998 by a planning project.) Description : The Florida Heritage Project is a coordinated state-wide effort of the State University Libraries and their partners in other educational and cultural institutions. Lead by the University of Florida, this Project is building a collection of state history and cultural heritage resources. Collection development continues outside state funding, with the fiscal resources of the University of Florida and its donors. Approximately 50% of this collection originates from the University of Florida. Current Count : 7599 [or 3,852 University of Florida titles] Florida Historical Legal Documents (LAW) http://palmm.fcla.edu/law/ Funded by : the University of Florida. Levin College of Law and the State of Floridas Florida State Archives (2001) Description : This collection brings together in a text searchable collection both the Florida Territorial Laws and Floridas early state constitutions. Collection development is on-going, with early modern court cases in queue for addition and planning for conversion of the legal documents associated with Spanish Florida. Approximately 85% of this collection originates from the University of Florida. Current Count : 28 titles Great Floridians: Bryant Papers (GrFL-b) Interface 1: http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/collections/Floridians/Bryant/ Interface 2: http://findaidt8.fcla.edu/cgi/f/findaid/findaididx?type=boolean;c=flfind;view=text;subview=outline;q1=%2A;op1=And;rgn= item;id=FUG_FH_0201 Funded by Governor C. Farris Bryant (2000-2002) through endowment. Description : A demonstration project for a larger Great Floridians Collection of archival and other primary resources about Florida politicians, artists, etc. Current Count : 25,687 items

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Appendix 8. 4 Linking Floridas Natural Heritage (LFNH) http://palmm.fcla.edu/lfnh/ Funded by the Institute for Museum and Library Services (1998-2000) for $250,000. Description : Linking Floridas Natural Heritage was the science counter-part of the Florida Heritage Project. Designed as a linking project predating OAI, it utilizes the Z39.50 communications protocol to support unified query of library and museum databases. Collection development continues outside IMLS funding, with the fiscal resources of the University of Florida and its donors and through supplemental grants. Literature for Children (JUV) http://palmm.fcla.edu/juv/ Funded by : the NEH Baldwin Library of Historical Childrens Literature, Phase One: 1850-1869 cataloging, preservation-microfilming and selective digitization project for $250,000 with additional funding from the University of Florida. Description : Literature for Children is the largest collection of childrens literature in any language(s) freely available on the Internet. The digitization component of the Phase One NEH project, digitized color source documents using a hybrid method, combining page images digitized from the preservation microfilm (i.e., of uncolored pages) and from the volumes in-hand (i.e., of colored pages and covers). An additional 949 titles are held pending full-text processing. Approximately 99% of this collection originates from the University of Florida. Current Count : 552 [+949] titles Psychological Study of the Arts (PSA) http://palmm.fcla.edu/psa/ Funded by : the University of Florida, with in-kind assistance from the Institute for Psychological Study of the Arts. Description : PSA is a collection of the works of leading researchers in its field. Additional works, representing the archives of the International Institute for Psychological Study of the Arts, are in queue. Current Count : 23 titles Ringling Collection: Images of 19 th Century Actors and Actresses http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/collections/theatre/ringling/index.htm Funded by : the University of Florida Description : The digitized Ringling Collection represents the entire public-domain photo-archive (more than 7,000 images) of the University of Floridas Belknap Collection for the Performing Arts. Current Count : 7473 images

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Appendix 8. 5 Samuel Proctor Oral History Collection (SPOHP) Public release scheduled for Spring 2004 Funded by : the University of Florida Description : Transcripts of oral history interviews with Floridians from virtually every walk of life and culture. Transcripts contain a record of life in Florida dating back to the Territorial era (i.e., the early 1830s). Current Count : 3,900 transcripts Sanborn Fire Insurance Company Maps of Florida Public release scheduled for Spring 2004 Funded by : the University of Florida and the State of Floridas State University Libraries Description : A fully indexed set of the public-domain Sanborn Fire Insurance Companys maps of Florida. A proposal, Ephemeral Cities, is currently out for review by the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS). The proposal will bring images into a geographic information service, linking them geographically to resources associated with places on the maps. Current Count : 3017 maps, 82% indexed; 300 maps undergoing geo-rectification. U.S. Virgin Islands Culture and Heritage Public release scheduled for Spring 2004 Funded by : the University of Florida (University of Florida component only) Description : The University of Florida collaborates with the University of the Virgin Islands to provide digital access to USVI materials in UF collections. The University of the Virgin Islands component is funded by the Institute for Museum and Library Services. The University of Florida serves as the UVI agent for technical training. Current Count : [+50] volumes to date University of Florida Photo-Archive Collections Funded by : the University of Florida Description : Selected photograph collections from the University Archives.. Wilbur L. Floyd Collection http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/collections/special/archives/mss37/index.htm Ralph Gower Collection http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/collections/special/archives/mss37/index.htm Jackson Henson McDonald Collection http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/collections/special/archives/mss81/ Edward Orville Powers Collection http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/collections/special/archives/mss73/index.html An additional 9,000 images from general unnamed photo-archive collections is scheduled for release in Spring 2004.

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Appendix 8. 6 University of Florida Campus Plan Maps http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/collections/special/archives/mss144a/index.htm Funded by : the University of Florida Description : A limited selection of University of Florida campus planning maps. Imaging of more than 10,000 maps was recently completed and their addition is scheduled for January 2004. Current Count : 29 [+10,000] maps University of Florida Herbarium Collections Catalog (HERB) http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/natsci/herbarium/cat/ Funded by : the University of Florida Description : This collection provides access to high-resolution images of plant specimens housed in the University of Florida Herbarium. The Catalog is linked to plant literature in the Florida Environments OnLine collection by way of the Linking Floridas Natural Heritage collections Z39.50 queries. All images were digitized by the Universitys Digital Library Center. The collection databases were provided by the University of Florida Herbarium. Current Count : 709 specimen images Type Specimens in the University of Florida Herbarium (HERB) http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/natsci/herbarium/types/ Type Specimens is one of several divisions within the Herbarium Collections and the only one with a separate interface. Other major component collections include the Aquatic Invasive Plant Specimens and the Kanapaha Gardens Plant Specimens. Work has just begun to build an Orchid Specimens image collection. World Map Collections (MAP) http://palmm.fcla.edu/map/ Funded by : the University of Florida and the State of Floridas State University Libraries. Description : Antique and public-domain maps of the world with emphasis on collections of strength at the University of Florida. Major sub-collections include: African Map Collection http://palmm.fcla.edu/map/mapaf.html Current Count : 41 maps Caribbean Basin Map Collection http://palmm.fcla.edu/map/mapc.html Current Count : 66 maps Florida Map Collection http://palmm.fcla.edu/map/mapfl.html Current Count : 304 maps See also: Sanborn Fire Insurance Company Maps of Florida University of Florida Campus Plan Maps

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Appendix 8. 7 Middle East ( the Holy Lands ) Map Collection http://palmm.fcla.edu/map/mapme.html Current Count : 49 maps North American Map Collection http://palmm.fcla.edu/map/mapna.html Current Count : 298 maps Approximately 99% of these collections orig inates from the University of Florida.

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Appendix 9 Searching the Digital Collection: Literature for Children Literature for Children is the digital compone nt of this project. Instructions for searching this collection reflect its current state (as of 27 June 2003). Formats Available At this time, the Literature for Children is predominantly a page-image collection of more than 550 titles. An additional 82 titles are concurrently available as searchable fulltext. Page-image formatted titles are searchable by author, title, and other bibliographic elements, including table of contents. Searches of the collection are similar to searches of almost any library book collection; users, how ever, connect directly to the electronic resource through a table of contents. In fact the search system is the library catalog system. Two page-image versions are availa ble: (1) a pageable JPEG version, optimized for online reading one page at a time a nd (2) a page-bundled Adobe Acrobat PDF version, optimized for downloading and o ff-line reading one chapter at a time. Full-text versions are searchable by text in addition to bibliographic elements. While searches of page-image versions takes place in a catalog of th e collection, full-text searches take place in the text analysis system, XPAT ( http://dlxs.org/products/xpat.html ). XPAT is used predominantly by digital libraries associated with academic programs. Among ch ildrens literature coll ections (a modified version of) XPAT is used by the University of Pittsburghs 19th Century Schoolbooks ( http://digital.library.pitt.edu/nietz/ ) and the University of Virginias Illustrated Classics ( http://etext.lib.vi rginia.edu/ebooks/subj ects-illclas.html ) XPAT affords the user basic and advanced searches. In addition to this traditional full-text collection, the University of Florida is preparing to launch full-text versions in e-book formats for handheld computers. By Way of Caution A recent review of Literature for Children by the Digital Library Center found that this duality of search systems was confusing for the collections users. As a result, in the near future, collection searches will take place entirely within the XPAT system. Further, particularly among older users of the collection, there was a general lack of understanding of system capab ilities and the state of optical character recognition systems. This set of users failed to differe ntiate among text in page-image formats and text in full-text format: if they could read either, why couldnt the search system read either? or, in the language they used to express their concern, why didnt the computer see [my search term] in this book? To mitigate the problem of what the computer sees all of the collections titles are scheduled to be repurposed, with searchable full-text and page images.

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Appendix 9. 2 Pending implementation of these changes between July and October 2003, the following search strategies describe the current dual systems. A more complete set of Search instructions can be found on-line at http://palmm.fcla.edu/juv/search.html Search Basics NOTIS-based Library Catalog Searching Literature for Children users most frequently enter the collection through its home-page (Illustration 1). The home-page supports three points of entry into the collection catalog: Search, Author List, and Title List. Illustration 1: Literature for Children Home-page ( http://palmm.fcla.edu/juv/ ) The Author and Title lists (Illustration 2) offer the user alphabetically arranged catalogs of the collection, both those items on-line and those queued for digitization. But, the lists support limited navigation and are recommended only for individuals browsing the collection. Author and Title lists are generated by the NOTIS-based WebLUIS bibliographic catalog.

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Appendix 9. 3 Illustration 2: Author and Title Lists Recommended for most users, the Main Search page (Illustration 3) in WebLUIS, allows the user to specify keywords, authors name, title, and subject. The user is also given the ability to specify if all items, only items available online, or portable eBooks are desired. The majority of the Literature for Childrens users search from this page. Almost anyone familiar with an online library catalog will understand the page. For users wishing to apply Boolean logic and addition data types, an Advances Search page (Illustration 4) is available. Illustration 3: Main Search Page in WebLUIS

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Appendix 9. 4 Illustration 4: Advanced Search Page in WebLUIS Search execution returns a list of titles meeting search criteria. Illustration 5 show part to the list returned for a search of the keyword water. Clicking the title presents a bibliographic record. And, clicking an electronic resource type returns the JPEG, PDF, Full-Text, or eBook formatted version of the title. Titles queued but not yet available will be indicated. Illustration 5: Search Return List In advance of contents display, the search system passes the user over to the XPAT system. Here it presents the titles Table of Contents (Illustration 6) and

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Appendix 9. 5 additional search opportunities. Clicking a Table of Contents entry opens the title for reading (Illustration 7). Illustration 6: Table of Contents Illustration 7: Page Display Searching in Textual Collections XPAT System Within PALMM Collections such as Literature for Children, collections supported by the XPAT system are known collectively as Textual Collections. The main Textual Collections search page (Illustration 8) ( http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/fulltext ) supports searching within Literature for Children and across other PALMM Collections.

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Appendix 9. 6 Illustration 8: Textual Collections Main Search Page ( http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/fulltext ) Because the Literature for Children holds materials dating from before 1850 through 1869, this XPAT feature facilitates studies, heretofore, difficult to undertake, for example, attitudes toward slavery comparing Florida law and culture with New England social and religious perspectives (i.e., a major component of Literature for Children). A simple search of slave returns 117 matches in Literature for Children, 596 in Florida Historical Legal Documents, and 3092 in the Florida Heritage Collection (Illustration 9). XPAT provides the researcher search terms clearly marked (bold red text) in the context in which theyre found. XPAT executes searches against bibliographic information, tables of contents, and other metadata, as well as against the searchable text. (Note: text in page-image format is a picture of text and is not searchable. The University of Florida is committed to providing searchable text for all titles in this collection and is currently installing Prime Recognition software ( http://www.primerecognition.com/ ) to reach this goal. This proposal assumes a workflow including use of Prime Recognition.)

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Appendix 9. 7 Illustration 9: Search Results XPAT/Textual Collections also supports advanced search with limited Boolean capabilities. Programming to extend these capabilities and search filters is underway. Extensions will more appropriately support directed searches of genre and place of publication to support the studies of the early childrens book publishing industry and of the book arts. A mocked-up genre page (Illustration 11) demonstrates the look-&-feel of the expected programming. Illustration 10: Advanced Search

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Appendix 9. 8 Illustration 11: Genre Mock-Up http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/collections/BaldwinInPROCESS/genre.htm

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Appendix 10 International Childrens Digital Library The International Children's Digital Library (ICDL) ( http://www.icdlbooks.org/ ) is a 5year research project to develop innovativ e software and a collection of books that specifically address the needs of children as readers. Interdisciplinary researchers from computer science, library studies, educati on, art, and psychology are working together with children to design this new library. With participants from around the world, the ICDL is building an internati onal collection that reflects both the diversity and quality of children's literature. Currentl y, the collection includes mate rials donated from 27 cultures in 15 languages. Project Overview The International Children's Digital Libr ary (ICDL) is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to create a digital library of internati onal children's books. This five-year research project, being conducted by the University of Maryland/Colleg e Park (UMCP) and the Internet Archive, has five primary goals: to create a collection of more than 1 0,000 books in at least 1 00 languages that is freely available to children, teachers, lib rarians, parents, and scholars throughout the world via the Internet; to collaborate with children as design partners in the development of computer interface technologies that support childre n in searching, browsing, reading, and sharing books in electronic form; to better understand the con cepts of rights management a nd "fair use" in a digital age; to evaluate the impact that access to digital materials may have on collection development and programming practices in school and public libraries; to develop a greater understanding of th e relationship between children's access to a digital collection of multicultural mate rials and children's attitudes toward books, libraries, reading, technology, and other countries and cultures. The materials included in the collection refl ect similarities and differences in cultures, societies, interests, lifestyles, and priorities of peoples around th e world. The collection's focus is on identifying materials that help children to understand the world around them and the global society in whic h they live. It is hoped that through a grea ter understanding of one another that tolerance and acceptance can be achieved. The collection has two primary audiences. The first audience is children ages 3-13, as well as librarians, teachers, parents, and car egivers, who work with children of these ages. The second audience is international scholars and re searchers in the area of children's literature. The University of Floridas collaboration with the ICDL is that of a content provider, as outlined in the following LETTER OF AGREEMENT. Pending formal signatures, the

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Appendix 10. 2 agreement is being extended to the Internet Archives (IA), one of ICDLs two lead institutions, specifically for the use of titles from the University of Florida collection in Internet Archives Bookmobile (literacy project ) [see below] OBSCRURED FOR SECURITY OBSCRURED FOR SECURITY

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Appendix 10. 3 Internet Archive Bookmobile The Internet Archive offers exciting possibilities for new uses of old childrens books in it mobile literacy project, the Internet Archive Bookmobile. The following text has been edited and recomposited for use here from Internet Archives web pages at: http://www.archive.org/texts/bookmobile.php and http://www.archive.org/texts/bookmobile-in_it.php The Bookmobile In a celebration of the Public Domain, the Internet Archive's Bookmobile will be coming to a town near you, bringing with it the ability to access, download, and print one of the almost 20,000 public domain books currently available online. The first tour of the Internet Bookmobile The Bookmobile began its first tour on September 30, 2002, has visited Menlo Park and Berkeley, CA, Salt Lake City, UT, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Baltimore, MD, and was in Washington, DC on Wednesday, October 9 for the historic Supreme Court case.

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Appendix 10. 4 Delaware, OH. (Matt Cox, photographer) Emily Brush is making a Wizard of Oz for herself. Additional photos at: http://www.archive.org/texts/bookmobile-photos.php Why a Bookmobile? Just like the bookmobiles of the past brought wonderful books to people in towns across America, this century's bookmobile will bring an entire digital library to their grandchildren. The Internet Archive's mission is to provide universal access to human knowledge, and given the advancement of digital storage and communications this goal is now achievable. Part of accomplishing that goal is to make sure that public domain books are available digitally. Another part is making sure people across the country have access to those works whether by reading on a screen, or more likely, to be printed back out again as a book. So what is the Bookmobile? It is a mobile digital library capable of downloading public domain books from the Internet via satellite and printing them anytime, anywhere, for anyone. It will be traveling across the country from San Francisco to Washington D.C., stopping at schools, libraries and retirement homes; places where people understand the value of a book. After the bookmobile leaves, each library will understand what it would take to make print and bind public domain books for their patrons. Why September 30, 2002? On October 9th the Supreme Court will hear arguments in Eldred v. Ashcroft, a landmark case that will decide how many books are part of the digital library the Bookmobile brings. The founding fathers decided that copyright protection should last for 14 years and then another 14 years if the author chose to renew. Over the last 200 years, this has been extended many times to where it is now life of the author plus 70 years. Each time this is extended, this decreases the number of books that enter the public domain. Without those books, there can be no digital bookmobile.

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Appendix 10. 5 Printing public domain books The one-time costs are here (without mobility): We believe you can set this up in an existing library or school for about $3k: B/W duplex laser $700 retail Binder: $1200 retail Cutter: $800 retail The color laser is $2500, nice but non-essential. Duplexing is almost essential; most people probably don't have this on hand. The computer is just a normal PC, so we assume people have this. It takes an inkjet to print the covers. We got a cheapo inkjet and suffered: we would get a $150-200 one next time, but again, we assume people have these. The book costs We say it is a "Buck a Book" or $1US per book as spelled out below. This means a library can give out books. The regular library circulation admin costs are higher than that to get a book back from borrowers and get it back on a shelf. People *loved* making and then getting a book. The book is a letter-sized sheet or a legal sized sheet cut in half. This is a good paperback book size. Therefore each sheet of letter paper has 2 pages on each side, or 4 book pages per sheet. A 240-page book, then would take 60 sheets of paper. The 240-page book would take 2 impressions with the laser printer (one for each side). Paper: about $0.05 to $0.01/sheet (for really nice paper) $0.30 to $0.60 for paper for 240 page book

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Appendix 10. 6 Toner: about $0.005 per impression $0.60 for toner for 240 page book Cover: cover stoc k is $0.65 retail the ink on the cover does not amount to much Therefore the book cost is $1.65-$2.00 fo r renewables for a 240 page book. We say it is a "Buck a Book" because many of our books are shorter ( Alice in Wonderland is 100 pages), and you can often get serious discounts or donations because of the mission. How long does it take to print a book? B/W duplex laser (20 pages/min, 10-20 min/book) Binder: (about 3 minutes/book) Cutter: (about 2 minutes/book) Cover: (1-5 minutes/book> Therefore we would make about 4-6 books/hr. You can build our own Bookmobile! Here ar e the details you need, the software and hardware we used and what it cost ( http://www.archive.org/ texts/bookmobile-in_it.php ).

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Appendix 11 Research Libraries Group. Cultural Materials Initiative. The University of Florida maintains signed agreements with the Research Libraries Group to contribute resources ge nerated by this and previous ite rations of this project. Resources are contributed by OAI to the Cultura l Materials Initiative with the assistance of the Florida Center for Li brary Automation. The digital component of this project, Literature for Children is currently being loaded a nd should be available by Winter 2003. The following text was been extracted from Research Libraries Group web pages (last updated on 24 April 2003). For text as published with recent edits and a full list of links, see: http://www.rlg.org/culturalres/ RLG Cultural Materials Initiative A major focus for RLG is to improve access to primary sources and cultural materials those rare and often unique works held largel y by institutions for education and research such as RLG's members. In the Cultural Materials Initiative ( http://www.rlg.org/ pr/pr2000-01cmi.html ), the organization has applied collective experience and capabilities to creating a Web-based, integrated collection of electronic representations of such materials: RLG Cultural Materials. Visit these pages to learn what's new ( http://www.rlg.org/cult uralres/progress.html ) in this work and for answers to questions ( http://www.rlg.org/cu lturalres/faq.html ). Where museums, libraries, and archives intersect RLG Cultural Materials is being developed and r ealized through an alliance ( http://www.rlg.org/culturalres/allies.html ) of RLG members collaborating to set the conditions for contributing and distributi ng their digital surro gates of valuable collections. These institutions are seeing to it that research/teaching institutions, students, and scholars will be well served. Advisory groups develop directions and consensus on a range of issues, from licensing agreements to content development, descriptive guidelines, and suggestions for creating and c ontributing digital surrogates. The goal is a growing, significant, online resource and service solution for members and others. Any RLG member can participate in this alliance. The materials that document civilization and define global culture The RLG Cultural Materials resource ( http://culturalmaterials.rlg.org/cmiprod/workspace.jsp ) is a dynamic, multimedia collection of digital versions of manuscripts, photos, art, historical documents and memorabilia, and much more, brought together from around the world. Some may reveal "hidden collections," previously in storage or otherwise inaccessible to museum or library visitors. Through a unique, flexible Web workspacedeveloped with the materials'

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Appendix 11. 2 special characteristics in mindusers can discover, compare, interpret, and make connections between materials in ways that enrich teaching, learning, and scholarship. Licensed for educational/research use in academic and research communities, RLG Cultural Materials is available by annual subscription (September 1 through August 31). Under terms to be developed by the contributors to RLG Cultural Materials, those with other needs for this resourcesuch as publishers, writers, software developers, and advertising agenciescan anticipate future access to the growing collection. (Screen Print)