<%BANNER%>
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Abstract
 Table of Contents
 Significance and impact
 History, scope and duration
 Methodology and standards
 Work plan
 Staff
 Dissemination
 History of grants
 Appendices






Phase Four: Preservation and access for American and British children's literature, Undated
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF90000018/00005
 Material Information
Title: Phase Four: Preservation and access for American and British children's literature, Undated
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publication Date: 2009
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature
 Notes
Abstract: NEH grant proposal for cataloging and digitization of volumes from the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF90000018:00005

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

PDF ( 2 MBs ) ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Abstract
        Abstract
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents 1
        Table of Contents 2
    Significance and impact
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    History, scope and duration
        Page 6
    Methodology and standards
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Work plan
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Staff
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Dissemination
        Page 24
    History of grants
        Page 25
    Appendices
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
Full Text


Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida


Abstract of Proposal

The University of Florida seeks support from the National Endowment for the
Humanities for a two-year project titled, Phase IV Cataloguing and Creating Access to
American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated), to catalog and digitize
volumes from the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature which were
ineligible for earlier NEH grant projects. Three previous grant awards provided
cataloging and microfilming or digitization of American and British children's literature
dated 1850-1869, 1870-1889, and 1890-1910, which excluded thousands of undated
books held by the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature.

The Baldwin Library, housed in the University of Florida's Department of Special and
Area Studies Collections, is one of the largest collections of English-language children's
literature in the world. It contains approximately 103,000 titles published in the United
States and Great Britain from 1656 through 2009. The Library is of international
significance for growing numbers of researchers from a variety of humanities disciplines
who study the historical, cultural, social and literary aspects of children's literature. It
supports research in areas such as education and upbringing; family and gender roles;
civic values; racial, religious, and moral attitudes; literary style and format; textual
criticism; and the arts of illustration and book design.

The cataloging portion of the project will provide detailed bibliographic records for
approximately 4,900 undated titles through either original or enhanced copy cataloging.
From the previous three cataloguing and microfilming/digitization projects, the project
team discerned that approximately half of the cataloging records produced will be
original records, indicating that the Baldwin Library holds the only known copy. The
items to be digitized, approximately 2,400, will be selected from these unique titles.

All cataloging records will be contributed to the national database, OCLC/Worldcat.
These records will include access points for authors, illustrators, printers, and publishers,
as well as enhanced subject access through both topical and genre terms. The
bibliographic record for titles already in the national database will be enhanced with these
access points as well, and will also be available through the national database and in the
on-line catalog of the University of Florida, which is freely available to anyone with
internet access. The digitized titles will be uploaded to the Baldwin Library Digital
Collection (http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/UFDC.aspx?c=juv) providing access and full-
text searching of the titles for anyone with internet access.






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida


Table of Contents

S ign ifican ce an d Im p act............................................ .......................................... 1

H history, Scope and D uration........................................... ............................. 6

M ethodology & Standards.............. ............................ 7

W ork P lan................... ............... ................. ........ ......... ...... 16

S ta ff ...................................... ......................................... ............... 1 9

Dissem ination................... .................................... ...... 24





Appendices

Appendix 1: Sample Listing of Recent Books, Articles, Theses and Dissertations Based
on Baldwin Library Research

Appendix 2: UF Libraries Letter of Commitment

Appendix 3: Samples of Enhanced Copy and Original Catalog Records (from previous
NEH-funded projects) and List of Genre Terms (to be applied in MARC21 655 field)

Appendix 4: Descriptions of International Children's Digital Library and Open Content
Alliance

Appendix 5: Imaging Equipment

Appendix 6: Greenstone Digital Library System Functionalities

Appendix 7: Greenstone XML Metadata

Key Personnel Resumes

Letters of Support
Peter Bolt Moore College
Kenneth Kidd University of Florida
Donelle Ruwe Northern Arizona University
Lynne Vallone Rutgers University
John Cech University of Florida
Megan Norcia, SUNY, Brockport







Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

Significance and Impact

The Baldwin Library

The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature is part of the Department of Special and
Area Studies Collections at the University of Florida (UF) and contains approximately 103,000
books published for children in the United States and Great Britain from 1656 through 2009.
Ruth Baldwin spent 40 years building the collection, casting a wide net so as to include all kinds
of books read by children, not just the well known classics. Tony Watkins, in an essay entitled
"History, Culture and Children's Literature" notes: "The rise of newer forms of literary
historicism is connected, in part, with social change and the effort to recover histories
for...minority groups within society. In turn, these social aims are linked with the recuperation
of forgotten texts, including texts that have never been considered worthy of academic study."
(International Companion Encyclopedia of Children's Literature, 1996, p. 4) Although the
Baldwin contains all the classics of children's literature in many different editions, it also has
thousands of unknown books written by unknown authors, including Watkins' "forgotten texts"
which were widely read by children at the time of publication. It is this depth and breadth that
makes the Baldwin Library unique and such an important repository of social and cultural
information for the humanities scholar.

Scholars are delighted by the opportunity to delve into the unknown parts of the collection. Dr.
Kenneth Kidd, Associate Director of UF's Center for the Study of Children's Literature &
Culture, states "Ruth Baldwin collected materials that others deemed insignificant but that have
proven immensely instructive," and Megan Norcia, Assistant Professor at SUNY-Brockport,
writes "I have... spoken about the collection at national conferences like the British Women
Writers Conference, the 19th-Century Studies Association, and the Postcolonial Studies
Conference. At these venues, I am consistently asked where I located such fascinating primary
sources, far off the well-trodden path of "classic" literature; I always point interested colleagues
back to the Baldwin." These statements attest to the importance of the unique texts held by the
Baldwin Library and the necessity of detailed access points to facilitate discovery.

The vast scope of intellectual content within the collection accommodates and supports research
in a variety of humanities disciplines. David Greenspoon, a Ph.D. candidate in History at
Pennsylvania State University, used Baldwin materials to research his dissertation, entitled
Children 'sMite: Juvenile Philanthropy in America, 1815-1865. Mr. Greenspoon is researching
the role played by reformers who encouraged children to charity and participation in
philanthropic organizations. In a paper for a graduate English seminar at the University of
Florida, Lisa Dusenberry compared the first edition of the Nancy Drew series with later editions
and discovered that in the latter edition racial stereotypes had been expunged, but gender
stereotypes reinforced.






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

As awareness of and access to the collection expands and the potential for multi-disciplinary use
increases, more professors will follow the lead of their History of Science colleagues who have
already directed one master's degree candidate to use the collection in the area of natural history
and domesticity for a master's thesis entitled The Child and the Bee: Natural Theology and
Insect Science in Children's Literature, 1825-1855. Deeb Kitchen received his Masters degree
in Sociology at UF, using Baldwin materials to write a thesis entitled Little Golden Fathers
which analyzed the role of the father in the Little Golden Books series. Mr. Kitchen focused on
the differences in the engagement of fathers and mothers, what fathers and mothers were
depicted as doing with their children, and how the images changed over time. Dr. Elise Smith,
Professor of Art History at Millsaps College, is working on a book exploring the role of women
in the domestication of the English landscape from 1750-1850, using a wide range of texts by
women, including children's books. She has been particularly interested in garden scenes in the
illustrations of Baldwin Library material.

The Library holdings can also accommodate different research approaches of scholars. Some
scholars bring to the collection a broad area of interest and use the collection as a base for
exploration before narrowing a topic. Others bring a very specific research agenda to the
collection. With its extensive holdings, the Baldwin Library is capable of serving both needs.

For example, Dr. Maude Hines, Professor of English at Portland State University, visited the
Baldwin Library to research boys' adventure novels of the late 19th-century published in
America, and became interested, while browsing through the novels, in scenes of economic
exchange including missionary capitalism and savagery being equated with not understanding
the European/American market economy. Most useful to her was the subject access assigned to
the bibliographic records which included such terms as "national characteristics" and
"missionaries." During the course of the week she narrowed her topic to "Missionary Capitalism
in Nineteenth Century U.S. Boys' Adventure Novels." Nearly half of the books she discovered
and used were not available at other collections.

On the other hand, Dr. Phil Nel of Kansas State University, came to the Library with very
specific intentions. He wanted to see R. F. Outcault's story "Buster Brown Plays David and
Goliath" to determine its appropriateness for his book, Tales for Little Rebels: A Collection of
Radical Children's Literature, published by New York University Press in 2008. Dr. Nel used
little-known stories such as Outcault's as examples of leftist political/social content in children's
books. What all these research efforts elucidate is the variety of topics available for inquiry and
the interdisciplinary approaches supported by the extensive material in the Baldwin Library. (See
Appendix 1 for recent publications based on research in the Baldwin Library).

Significance of the Targeted Texts

The selected texts for this project will draw primarily from two basic groups of undated literature
published for children: tracts and other publications issued by religious societies and






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

organizations and 19th century British imprints. Although some of this material, notably the
religious publications, was the most widely distributed and read children's literature thanks to its
low cost and to its placement in free Sunday School libraries, it is also among the most
ephemeral material published for children.

Lucy Rollin, children's literature critic, author and Professor Emerita of Children's Literature at
Clemson University, wrote in her letter of support for an earlier proposal to the National
Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), of the importance of such ephemeral literature: "[o]ur
culture creates, uses, and responds to literature, even what might be considered ephemeral, for it
is in the ephemera, really, that a culture truly reveals itself; such artifacts are its unguarded
moments." This project will open a path into this rich repository of literature which comprises
the chorus of other voices that surround and provide a larger cultural background for classic titles
and well-known authors.

The Baldwin Library contains thousands of religious tracts and publications issued for children
throughout the late 18th and 19th centuries. Although these small books, which rarely exceeded 3
x 5 inches and 16 pages of text, were never intended for posterity, they none-the-less provide a
fascinating glimpse into the religious values and behavior adults wanted to teach children and
what kinds of knowledge they thought it important for children to absorb. These selected texts
will include material from The Religious Tract Society and The Society for Promoting Christina
Knowledge, British publishers, and the American Tract Society and The American Sunday
School Union, American publishers.

These obscure texts can hold exactly what a scholar is seeking. While researching the
publications of Reverend William Cowper (1778-1858), Dr. Peter Bolt, Head of New Testament
at Moore College, New South Wales, discovered that one of the religious tracts he sought was
not available in Australia, Great Britain, or the Library of Congress, but, by searching WorldCat,
he discovered it was held by the Baldwin Library. A digitized copy was made for him which he
then accessed via the Baldwin Library Digital Collection. Dr. Bolt writes, "in short, it [this tract]
has not only been helpful to me in my narrow interests for Cowper's biography, but it will also
proved to be a useful primary source for Australian Colonial History, hitherto unavailable."

A second group of texts to be selected for this project is 19th century British publications. British
publishing houses generally did not include the publication date on children's books, therefore,
the books have not been catalogued during previous grant projects. About half the books from
prolific publishing houses, such as Raphael Tuck & Sons, George Routledge & Sons, Frederick
Warne, T.C. and E.C. Jack, Blackie & Sons, Frederick A. Stokes, and Ernest Nister will require
original records and the remaining records will be upgraded with subject headings and other
access points. One of the strengths of the Baldwin Library is the presence of parallel editions of
a title published in both Great Britain and the Unites States and creating the detailed
bibliographic records for the British imprints increase their visibility opportunity for comparison
with American editions.






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

Besides these two major groups, the project will also include some interesting miscellaneous
ephemeral material like Care of the Teeth, published by the Metropolitan Life Insurance
Company and What Two Little Girls Did, published by the National Temperance Society.

Much of the research highlighted in the first section of the narrative was accomplished thanks to
the subject headings and genre terms added to bibliographic records for 19th century children's
books during the previous three project phases. A current PhD student at the University of
Florida is interested in social justice issues in children's literature and one of her chapters
focuses on how the law, justice, prisons, and court proceedings were portrayed in Victorian
children's literature. She searched for books using such terms as "prisons," "trials," "justice,"
"criminals," "thieves," etc., and gathered a number of the fully catalogued books, both fiction
and non-fiction, which proved useful to her topic. This is exactly the kind of access the Phase IV
proposed project will provide for undated books, drawing on a largely hidden collection that
maps an unexplored cultural and social landscape for the adventurous researcher.

Baldwin Library materials are cataloged individually, so that each book and each tract, no matter
how small, will be given complete title, date, publisher, printer, illustrator and subject access. Of
the approximately 50% of titles for which some level of cataloging exists on OCLC/Worldcat,
less than 5% include subject or genre access, and the majority of records do not include
sufficient data for scholarly use. Inclusion of genre terms is appropriate in this context because
researchers in children's literature seek access not only through traditional author, title, and
subject approaches, but through a term descriptive of the over 50 types into which it falls, e.g.
Toy and movable books, Imaginary voyages, Alphabet books, Captivity narratives, and
Chapbooks.

Currently, access is provided through a printed guide to the collection produced in 1981, a local
card catalog, the University of Florida on-line catalog (http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/) and the
University of Florida Digital Collections (UFDC)
(http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/UFDC/UFDC.aspx?c=iuv). All Baldwin Library books have a record
in the University of Florida on-line catalog. Approximately 40,000 of those books are
represented with full bibliographic records and 60,000 with brief provisional records accessible
by title and date only. Digital versions of over 5,299 Baldwin Library books are currently
available on-line through UFDC.

The Baldwin Library's aggregation of well-known and little-known titles has formed a unique
collection with a depth and breadth that other collections of similar material do not duplicate.
Although several collections of historical children's literature have received grant funds to
support preservation and improve access to their collections in the past, the portion of the
Baldwin collection that is the focus of this project will not significantly overlap with these other
major holdings. The American Antiquarian Society, which has a valuable collection of historical
children's books, holds only titles published in American before 1876. The children's literature
collections at the deGrummond Collection at the University of Southern Mississippi and the






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

Kerlan Collection at the University of Mississippi, both focus on author manuscripts and
illustrators' original art and the bulk of their collections are 20th-century. The Arne Nixon Center
for Children's Literature at California State University Fresno, holds primarily 20th-century
publications and California authors. Most digitization projects of children's literature collections
focus on books recognized as classics, as representatives of a particular theme, or as the work of
a well known author or artist, and while the mass digitization of academic library collections has
received attention and support in recent years, few of those collections include historical
children's books to any great extent. Many of Phase IV targeted books were considered truly
ephemeral by authors and publishers. Once properly cataloged, these ephemeral works will
support scholars who often seek the story behind the story.

The University of Florida understands the importance of children's literature and demonstrates its
commitment by supporting faculty and programs dedicated to children's literature. An NEH
reviewer for one of the previous proposals commented, "More than 200 U.S. universities now
offer courses in this [children's] field in their literature departments, and the University of Florida
is a leading center for this kind of study." There are 20 MA and PhD students in UF's English
Department with an area of concentration in children's literature; and more than 150 other
graduate students take children's literature classes annually. This is a reflection of the national
trend of increased scholarly interest in children's literature. In the fall of 2008, 12 UF students
participated in a graduate seminar, "Into the Archive: Readings in the Baldwin Library." This
seminar provided students the opportunity to explore in depth the Baldwin Library and utilize its
materials in their seminar papers. Most of these papers were accepted for presentation at the
2009 annual conference of the Children's Literature Association, the national association for
scholars of children's literature. The enhanced bibliographic records of the Baldwin Library
greatly facilitate this kind of research and inquiry and the cataloging of the undated material will
encourage other such graduate level seminars.

The Center for the Study of Children's Literature and Culture (http://www.clas.ufl.edu/cclc/) at
the University of Florida has collaborated with the Baldwin Library to create Conversations in
Children's Literature, a series of presentations and discussions about various aspects of
children's literature and culture. The series is aimed at teachers, librarians, academics, writers,
and all adults who value the books and cultural materials produced for children. Both the Center
and the Baldwin Library personnel plan an inclusive, multidisciplinary look at children's
literature; therefore, the series approaches the creation, distribution, and uses of children's books
from a multitude of perspectives. A talk, followed by discussion, takes place monthly. In June,
Linda Martin, the 2009 Bechtel Fellow, discussed "Storytelling in the Content Areas," specific
ways in which stories can be used as a framework for teaching a variety of subjects in science,
math and the language arts in the modern classroom.

Linda Martin's research at the Baldwin shows the breadth of scholarship possible with Baldwin
materials. Since 1993, the American Library Association's Association for Library Service to
Children (ALSC) has awarded from one to three Bechtel Fellowships to its members for a month






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

of study and research at the Baldwin Library. The Fellows have studied 19th-century series
books, pop-up books, folk tales, family stories from the 1930s and 1940s, 19th- and 20th-century
editions of Cinderella, and 19th-century alphabet books. This research has resulted in articles and
a book, as well as programs which are shared through public library programs and other
community presentations. Requests for information and anecdotal evidence indicate the digitized
books have been accessed by children, scholars, and home-schoolers.

Intellectual access to the Baldwin Library for such varied research activities will be expanded
through cataloging the material and adding the detailed bibliographic records to the national
database, OCLC/Worldcat, and through the creation of harvestable metadata to access the
project's digital component. The digital component will make all aspects of the uniquely-held
books, including text, design, illustrations, bindings, and typography, freely available to anyone
with Internet access via the University of Florida Digital Collections initiative
(http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/UFDC/UFDC.aspx?c=iuv). The three earlier NEH funded projects
(2000-2002, 2004-2006, and 2007-2009) covering from 1850 to 1869, 1870 to 1889, and 1890 to
1910 respectively, were very successful. Although use statistics for the source material fluctuate
between 700 and 1,200 items per 12 months depending largely on the number of children's
literature classes taught at the UF in any given year, the use of the digitized material has steadily
increased. The Baldwin Library Digital Collection registered 27,000 user sessions between 2006
and 2009. Already, in the first four months of 2009, there have been more than 6,000 sessions.
This grant project will fill in some of the gaps left by undated volumes that were not included in
the earlier grant projects, and will build upon that legacy of success to catalog and digitize a set
of materials that will further enhance this collection's value to all Internet users.

The physical collection does not circulate. It is currently housed in closed stacks in a humidity-,
temperature-, and light-controlled environment. The materials are used in the secure reading
room of the Department of Special and Area Studies Collections. Some of the books are quite
brittle and special care will be taken during the digitization process to handle the books in ways
that produce the least amount of damage. The digitization portion of the project will place 2,400
of children's books from the late 18th- and 19th-centuries on the Internet at no cost to the user and
with minimum damage to the physical item. Digital access will benefit the academic community
who will be able to read the books from their home base as well as people of all ages who enjoy
children's literature and would never encounter the language and art of these older books, except
through digitized versions. A Spanish publishing company has used Baldwin texts available on
the Internet to create Spanish language editions that are reaching an audience that the original
authors and publishers would never have imagined.

History, Scope and Duration

This grant application for a two-year project is a continuation of three earlier Baldwin Library
proposals that were funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities in 2000, 2004 and
2007. These three projects have been quite successful, producing 21,000 original and enhanced






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

bibliographic records which were contributed to OCLC/WorldCat, microfilming 5,898 titles
(2000 grant project) and digitizing and uploading over 5,200 titles, thereby providing free access
to a very large unique collection of 19th century books. Authority records for series were
contributed to the Name Authority Cooperative Program (NACO). The detailed bibliographic
MARC records have provided increased access to these resources for scholars and researchers
working in the field of historical children's literature; additionally, the availability of selected
titles on the Internet has made a substantial collection of 19th century books available to a world-
wide audience. The proposed project will make equally accessible an additional 2,400 undated
books and ephemeral publications.

The University of Florida Library stands firm in its commitment to provide increased access to
the Baldwin Library. While the support of the NEH has expedited the cataloging and digitization
of large numbers of items, and contributed greatly to the accessibility of this collection of
historical children's literature, additional Library staff members continue to catalog other
material held by the Baldwin Library as part of their job regular assignments. The Library's
financial commitment is supported by the decision to set up and manage its own digital library,
by purchasing equipment best suited to the efficient and careful handling of material, and by
providing staff skilled in the management and maintenance of digital collections and in the
operation of the sophisticated equipment. (See Appendix 2 for an institutional statement of
commitment). The Baldwin Library Digital Collection is only one of a number of such
collections (www.uflib.ufl.edu/UFDC/UFDC.aspx?) supported and managed by the University
of Florida Libraries and the Libraries anticipate adding other important collections as well as
increasing its web presence for many years to come. (For specific information on maintenance
of digital collections, see "Storage, Maintenance and Protection" section in the "Digitizing the
Source Document," below)

Methodology and Standards

This project consists of two major components that will be discussed in this section. First, 4,900
titles are to be cataloged either in original or enhanced copy cataloging, and second, 2,400 of the
cataloged volumes that are uniquely held by the Baldwin Library will be digitized and made
available freely over the Web.

Cataloging Printed Works

Approximately 100 titles a week will be removed from the Special Collections stacks and
transported on book carts to the Cataloging Unit of the Cataloging and Metadata Department,
which is located in the same building. The Library Assistant II assigned to the project will check
the books into the department electronically, using the bar code assigned to each title. This
information will be on the catalog record and alert the public that the book is in the process of
being cataloged. If a patron requests use of a book while it is in cataloging, the book will be
retrieved for the patron to use in the Special Collections Reading Room. During the cataloging






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

process, the books will be stored in a locked metal bookcase near the catalogers' desks. After
cataloging, the books that are going to be digitized will be checked out of cataloging and into the
Conservation Unit; books that are not going to be digitized will be checked out of the cataloging
department and sent back to the Baldwin Library stacks. The books will never be removed from
the building since all departments involved in the cataloging and digitization processes are
located in the same building as the stacks where the books are permanently housed.

Cataloging will conform to the requirements of full-level Anglo-American Cataloging Rules, 2nd
edition (2002 revision) (AACR2R) and to the guidelines already established at the University of
Florida libraries for the enhanced access cataloging of the Baldwin materials
(http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/alephpro/NEH Baldwin Project Monograph Cataloging_Procedure.h
tm). All cataloging will include Library of Congress Subject Headings, subject access through
genre terms (MARC21 655 field), using a list of subject and genre terms
(http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/alephpro/BaldwinSubiects.htm) and access by publisher, printer and
illustrator, (700 or 710 field). Of the approximately 50% of titles for which some level of
cataloging already exists, less than 5% include genre access. The majority of records include
only author, title and publisher information. The records created for the digital version will have
an active MARC21 856 field, and follow established standards for cataloging electronic
resources. All access points for names and subjects will be verified in local and national
databases for consistency in form and heading.

All cataloging will be completed with the original item in hand and subsequently a record will be
derived for the digital versions. (See Appendix 3 for samples of enhanced copy and original
catalog records from previous NEH-funded projects and for a list of the genre terms to be applied
in MARC21 655 field).

Digitization of Uniquely Held Volumes

In this fourth phase, digitization will be employed as both an access and as a preservation
strategy. All volumes selected for digitization are in the public domain. The digitization plan
offers both Internet availability and ensures fitness-for-purpose in secondary uses, such as
facsimile reproduction and classroom uses. To increase discovery of and access to the Baldwin
volumes, UF will continue to contribute to the freely available International Children's Digital
Library (http://www.icdlbooks.org/), and to the Open Content Alliance
(http://www.opencontentalliance.org/). (See Appendix 4 for a description of these entities)

Preparation and processing for digitization

The Conservation Unit Head, John Freund, will work with the Digital Library Center (DLC) and
the Curator of the Baldwin Library to monitor and mitigate the effects of handling during
cataloging and digitization. After cataloging, the books to be digitized will be transported to the
Conservation Unit where Freund will review the physical volumes, noting the condition of the
books previous to digitization. After digitization, he will again review the condition, making






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

repairs and recommending adjustments in the digitization processes if necessary. Protective
enclosures will be purchased to house volumes with structural damage that, as a result of their
brittle nature, cannot be repaired.

After conservation assessment, books will be transported to the DLC from the Conservation Unit
after they are cataloged and after the conservator has reviewed them. Each book will be checked
into the DLC electronically, using the bar code assigned to each title. This information will be
on the catalogue record and alert the public that the book is in the process of being digitized. If a
patron requests use of a book while it is in the DLC, the book will be retrieved for the patron to
use in the Special Collections Reading Room.

Once received into the DLC, Nelda Schwartz, Coordinator of Bibliographic Control, will capture
the MARC record for each volume. This record will run through a batch importer program that
creates both the XML bibliographic data files and adds similar bibliographic data to DLC's
internal tracking database. Tracking slips will be inserted into each book and then the books will
be transferred to the imaging unit. At the end of the digitization process which includes
searchable text creation, Schwartz will return the books to the conservator.

The schematic below shows the basic workflow for bringing these digitized volumes to a global
audience: quality-controlled digital page images are passed to a text-processing unit for text
conversion and mark-up and from there into the web served collections.


h. k


111


UM


6:0


Image
.C.^^^^


Scanning Plan: The digitization plan assures highest quality capture with the lowest risk of
damage to nineteenth- and early twentieth-century bindings with brittle animal glues.

All images will be captured at bit depths and resolutions appropriate to textual and binding
characteristics. Tightness of binding, fragility of paper and/or binding, type face characteristics,
and physical size of the item necessitate use of various capture devices. Past experience
indicates that only 50% of the volumes are likely to be suitable for capture by the fastest method:
the Copibook scanner. Other volumes will need to be scanned by slower but less rigorous
methods using the Microtek 9800 XL flatbed scanner, an Epson 1640 XL flatbed scanner, or a
13.7-MP (mega-pixel) Kodak DCS 14n planetary digital camera. When appropriately calibrated,
this equipment achieves highly accurate capture in grey scale and color. Capture will be


r,


Ik


- S






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

sufficient to meet Quality Index requirements as calculated by Cornell University and widely
used within the library digitization community as a standard for determining requisite digital
resolution, i.e., dpi. (See Benchmarking for Digital Capture
(http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/conversion/conversion-04.html) and
Establishing a Central Depository for Preserving Digital Image Collections
(http://www.library.cornell.edu/imls/image%20deposit%20guidelines.pdf) Specifications for
the capture equipment and the book cradle used with the Kodak camera are given in Appendix 5.

Scanning methods chosen will depend on the document characteristics, but will follow the
principals and recommendations set forth in Moving Theory into Practice: Digital Imaging for
Libraries and Archives (Anne R. Kenney and Oya Y. Rieger [Mountain View, Ca : Research
Libraries group, 2000]) and Cornell University's Digital Imaging Tutorial
(http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/contents.html.

Digital Images: The Guidelines for Master TIFF Image Files
(http://palmm.fcla.edu/strucmeta/tiff.html ) employed by this project are those established by the
University of Florida for the PALMM cooperative. The master files are uncompressed TIFF
(ITU T.6) images. Scans are scaled to 100% of the source document dimensions. Bit-depth is 24-
bit color or 8-bit gray scale; dpi is 300 at a minimum. Color space is sRGB with scanning
software calibrated to a standard RGB palate. Derivative jpg2000 zoomable images and jpg files
will be created for use in OCRing and for web serving.

Images are captured onto 8 TB (terabyte) storage area network (SAN) connected via network
cabling to computer workstations running Microsoft Windows XP or higher and Adobe
Photoshop CS 4 or higher. Image processing routines are conservative and are intended to
maintain original image quality. Image de-skew, cropping, and color correction are the common
corrections needed.

Because color management of images is important in this project, calibration of equipment will
be monitored continuously. Digital camera color fidelity is achieved by color balancing the
digital camera with ANSI IT8.7/2-1993 (Graphic Technology _Color Reflection Target for Input
Scanner Calibration. Washington, D.C.: American National Standards Institute, last revised
1993) compliant specifications through the use of targets such as Kodak Q-60 and Q-13. Flatbed
scanner color fidelity is achieved through bundled Q-60 based calibration programs, and the
CopiBook is calibrated through its integrated calibration utility. Monitor gamma and color
calibration is achieved through Monaco Optix 2.0. The supervising technicians have academic
training in both photographic and digital imaging techniques and will determine the correct tonal
values for the 24-bit image according to Q-60 and Q-13 calibrations and adjust each image to
optimize tone and contrast, assuring color fidelity.

Quality Control Review: Quality control plays a prominent role in all UF Digital Library Center
imaging operations. Visual inspection, together with a query of the file header, will be






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

completed by spot check. Spot check requires inspection of every image in thumbnail view and
of no less than 10% of the images in full-image view. S pot check against file header is an
automated process that alerts Quality Control Technicians to deficiencies of image files. The
Quality Control Unit performs the visual inspection. This work team uses specially designed
software programs (Pre-QC and Quality Control Applications) to derive jpg images used in the
text conversion, to verify completeness of image capture, and to create the basic structural
metadata.

Text Conversion: Accepted page image files for each volume are saved to a portable hard drive
that is connected to a text-conversion workstation. This station is an Intel Xeon 3 GHz with
Windows XP.

The page images are processed by Prime Recognition optical character recognition (OCR)
(http://www.primerecognition.com/) software. Prime Recognition software is also used by the
digital programs at the University of Michigan and the University of Kentucky and processes
images against a battery of six optical character recognition engines. It chooses the best engine
for the fonts and font sizes on the page. Depending on printed text characteristics, conversion,
together with some automated and dictionary aided correction, can achieve up to a 99.99%
accuracy, depending on printed text characteristics.

Pages are processed out of Prime Recognition as plain text (TXT) and PRO files that contain the
coordinates for the text location on the page images. For this project, no text tagging is
proposed. UF utilizes locally programmed routines to create METS (Metadata Encoding and
Transmission Standard, http://www.loc.gov/standards/mets/) files that identify and tag structural
metadata (e.g., covers, preliminaries, title pages, chapters, etc.) and will also add bibliographic
and administrative metadata including responsibility statements.

Text Verification and Mark-Up: The text output is manually reviewed and corrected as
necessary. Prime Recognition was chosen by UF primarily because it features six OCR engines
governed by a voting algorithm. This software is recognized as an industry leader in producing
accurate text conversion. Structural mark-up information, e.g., title, bibliographic information,
table-of-contents, chapter headings, etc. will be corrected to 100% accuracy. Other texts will not
be corrected outside Prime's normal dictionary aided correction routines until a later date and
only as needs dictate.

Once the digital packages are successfully created, they will be deployed to Web servers for
public access: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature, International Children's
Digital Library, and the Open Content Alliance. Digital packages containing TIFFs are archived
permanently the Florida Digital Archive and the metadata becomes available for harvesting by
service providers. The details of access and preservation are more fully described in the sections
below.

Organization of and access to material






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

Discovery of digitized texts can occur in several ways: 1) MARC records with linked 856 fields
will be in the online catalogs of the University of Florida, the Florida state university union
catalog, WorldCat, etc.; 2) OAI compliant metadata is served for harvesting by repositories; 3)
open search engine access to the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature are enabled
by sitemaps and static pages (built simultaneously by the UF Digital Collection system); and 4)
complete electronic packages will continue to be contributed to other online collections such as
the International Children's Digital Library, Literature for Children, and the Open Content
Alliance. The primary access into the digital collection is through the Baldwin Library
homepage (http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/UFDC.aspx?c=iuv). This interface has been
developed by the University of Florida as part of its broader digital collection architecture and is
based on the Greenstone Digital Library System. This system and its associated resources are
discussed below. An overview of the search and display functionalities of this system is found in
Appendix 6.

Greenstone Architecture: Greenstone's Digital Library System (http://www.greenstone.org/cgi-
bin/library ) was chosen as the full text indexing, metadata storage, retrieval, and search engine
for all University of Florida Digital Collections (UFDC) including the Baldwin Library of
Historical Children's Literature Digital Collection. Greenstone is an open-source digital library
system produced and maintained by the New Zealand Library Project at the University of
Waikato. It is promoted by the United Nations to many of our partners in Africa, the Caribbean,
and Latin America. Greenstone has two main components, the metadata portion and the display
portion. While the metadata portion is strong, the display portion did not provide all
functionalities we required. As a result, only the metadata portion of Greenstone is currently
used. All the bibliographic data ultimately resides in Greenstone 2.81 running under Linux.
Greenstone's indexing is robust for collections of under a million pages and/or with minimal
language requirements. However, as the University of Florida (UFDC) grew to many millions of
pages and over a dozen languages, a more powerful indexing solution became necessary and all
UFDC, including the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature, now uses Apache
Lucene (http://lucene.apache.org/iava/docs/) for indexing. Apache Lucene is an open-source,
indexing and text search engine natively supported in Greenstone 2.81.

The UF Digital Library Center chose to build a multi-tier architecture with a custom presentation
layer. Greenstone forms the foundation of UFDC. A presentation layer created in C#, utilizing
ASP.net provides access to the web user. The presentation layer will read all bibliographic data
from Greenstone and interact with Greenstone in real-time to perform searches. The Greenstone
server will continue to serve both the data and the image. However, the user will interact with
the presentation layer outside of Greenstone.

There are several advantages to this architecture beyond its total control over look and feel. This
provides for platform independence. Greenstone could be removed from the data layer and a
variety of other digital library management systems could be used. We can build a hierarchical
collection structure with collection groups, collections, and sub-collections. This architecture






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

also allows us to store session state and develop user portfolios. These are currently in
development in the form of user bookbags or bookshelves for saving and sharing results and
favorites. This architecture can read data from a variety of sources besides Greenstone, and it
allows the data and images to appear under the same interface. This provides users with a
continuity in look and feel regardless of the source of the images and data. Technical
specifications and documentation for UFDC development may be found at
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/technical/.

Database: Data needed to drive the presentation layer is placed in a Microsoft SQL Server
database. This database mainly stores display information. The appearance of collections
depends partly on data stored in the database. This data tells the presentation layer where to look
for the style sheets and banners. It also contains the information about the hierarchy of
collections. The bridge between the presentation layer and the Greenstone collections) is stored
in this database.

The database also stores basic information to assist with the display of items from Greenstone.
This includes the watermarks (or icons) on the left navigation bar, downloads, and the table of
contents. The tables and relationships supporting the presentation layer are given in a diagram at
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/technical/.

Metadata (MARC): As noted above in the methodology for cataloging, MARC records will be
created for all volumes. These records will be added to the UF online catalog
(http://uf.aleph.fcla.edu/F ), and within scheduled load periods in the OCLC WorldCat. As part
of this project, the Table of Contents for the volumes digitized will be sent to RichCAT which is
part of the Library of Congress's Bibliographic Enrichment initiative
(http://www.loc.gov/catdir/beat/). This initiative is designed to "enhance the content of Library
of Congress bibliographic records and improve access to the information which the records
contain." The UFDC system will continue to automatically generate MARCXMO records that
are openly available for use and download into other catalog systems.

Metadata (METS and Greenstone): For volumes that are uniquely-held and are digitized,
national Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS) metadata will be created. The
METS files will continue to include structural data about each image file related to a
bibliographic resource, as well as descriptive and administrative information. The bibliographic,
or descriptive, data for these METS files will be imported from the catalog records that will be
created during the cataloging phase. METS files will be created by an in-house Quality Control
Application (see Quality Control Review above) and the output will be reviewed and enhanced,
as needed, by our text technicians. METS files will be viewed by selecting METS Metadata
under the Technical Data menu on the navigation bar to the left of an item being viewed. Also
viewable will be the Greenstone derivative metadata format that will continue to be
automatically created for internal Greenstone use when items are loaded. METS records will be
OAI compliant and harvestable. Information on the metadata used in the UFDC may be found at






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/technical/index.htm#mets. Samples of the record displayed to the
public and of the Greenstone XML metadata are shown in Appendix 7.

Because the METS records will continue to be harvestable, it is expected that they will be
incorporated into the metadata repositories of multiple service providers. OAlster
(http://oaister.umdl.umich.edu/o/oaister/) at the University of Michigan and UIUC Digital
Gateway to Cultural Heritage Materials (http://nergal.grainger.uiuc.edu/cgi/b/bib/bib-idx/) have
harvested the Baldwin metadata from Phase I-III projects.

Because UFDC represents the largest set of digital collections supported by Greenstone, a great
deal of supporting programming has been done and will continue to be done to create needed
functionalities in terms of search and display. As presently configured, the full text searching
capabilities of Greenstone are not as robust as desired. Ideally, the result sets will highlight the
search term in the text or metadata wherever found. Additionally, page images are more useful if
displayed in the jpg2000 format which allows zooming in and out, and volumes can be browsed
more easily with thumbnail images for all page images. Programming to support the jpg2000
zoomable viewing is now in place, as is support for a volume thumbnail view that allows users to
"flip" through the volume quickly. Baldwin Library volumes currently online without zoomable
views are being reprocessed and loaded to take advantage of the enhanced functionality. These
desired enhancements are queued for future implementation by DLC staff and will occur
concurrently with the grant period; however, grant funds are not being requested to implement
these processes.

Storage, maintenance, and protection of data

Preservation of original paper-based materials: As outlined more fully in both the Work Plan
and other portions of the Methodology & Standards section, the physical volumes themselves
will be monitored at all stages in the project. The volumes will never leave the Smathers Library
building and are stored in secure areas during all parts of the project, limiting opportunities for
theft or misplacement. The book cradle as described in Appendix 5: Imaging Equipment will
only open the volume to a 120 degree angle, 40 to 50 degrees less than a microfilm camera and
up to 60 degrees less than a flat bed scanner, minimizing the damage caused to the spine of the
volume during imaging. The amount of UV light the volume will be exposed to during the
scanning process is equivalent to that of normal reading or photocopying. Storage conditions in
the Special Collections stacks are cool and dry. Finally, all volumes will be returned to the
Special Collections stacks after the project is completed and will be available for future
researchers. No titles will be withdrawn.






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

Archiving of the electronic output of the digitization project

In practice consistent for all UF digital projects, redundant digital archives are maintained. An
in-house DLC archive is created by burning TIFF masters, derivatives, and METS files to gold-
based DVDs, which are retained in environmentally controlled storage (cf. Guidelines at
http://palmm.fcla.edu/strucmeta/tiff.html ). Disks and their contents are logged in the DLC
Tracking Database, which queues disks and files for inspection every 3 years and migration
every 10 years or upon format obsolescence. The primary archive is maintained by the Florida
Center for Library Automation (FCLA). Completed by the FCLA in 2005, the Florida Digital
Archive (FDA) (http://www.fcla.edu/digitalArchive/Index.htm) is available at no cost to
Florida's public university libraries. Should future storage costs become necessary, the UF
Libraries will cover all costs associated with UFDC collections including UFDC collections
including the Baldwin texts.

The software programmed to support the FDA is modeled on the widely accepted Open Archival
Information System. The Florida Digital Archive software, DAITSS
(http://www.fcla.edu/digitalArchive/pdfs/DAITSS.pdf ) [Dark Archive In The Sunshine State],
is designed to implement the functional OAIS model and performs traditional repository
functions such as ingest, data management, including all associated metadata, and dissemination
of digital content. It is a dark archive and no public access functions are provided. It supports
the preservation functions of format normalization, mass format migration and migration on
request. An action plan that details how forward migration will occur has been written for TIFF
6.0 files (http://www.fcla.edu/digitalArchive/pdfs/action plans/tiff 6.pdf). Preservation of
Baldwin TIFF files in the FDA will assure future access. Checksum data are tracked for each
file by DAITSS and used to confirm the accuracy of the ingest process. Formal contracts signed
between the Florida Center for Library Automation and the University of Florida Libraries
specify the tasks and reporting that are associated with the curation and retention of all UFDC
collections. Laurie Taylor, Interim Director and Mark Sullivan, Digital Library Programmer of
the UF Digital Library Center are the FDA authorized users from the University of Florida.

As Baldwin Library objects for Phase IV will be loaded into UFDC for public access, a
command in the METS header will direct a copy of the files to the Florida Digital Archive
(FDA). The process of forwarding original uncompressed TIFF images to the FDA will continue
to be the key component in the University of Florida's plan to store, maintain and protect
electronic data for the long term. The Phase IV project also will ensure the continued
preservation of these collections. The originals will remain open to researchers, but requests for
reproductions received from off-site researchers will be reduced, and there may be a reduction in
requests from researchers on campus as well. A reduction in requests for physical access will
result in less handling and a reduced possibility of risk.

University of Florida's plan to store, maintain and protect electronic data including the Baldwin
texts for the long term.






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

Work Plan

Selection of the Target Collection

Rita Smith, Curator of the Baldwin Library, will select all titles of the target collection from the
Baldwin Library (i.e. children's literature published in the English language lacking publication
dates). Items for selection will be identified through the on-line catalog. Student assistants,
trained and supervised by the Curator, will pull from 80 to 100 books a week from the shelves
and add location codes and bar codes to acid free strips which will be inserted in each book. A
database will be established to indicate that a book has been pulled from the stacks, pre-
processed by the student and sent to cataloging.

Cataloging Workflow and Procedures

When the books arrive in cataloging, they will be checked into cataloging using the bar code
associated with each book. The selected titles will be searched initially in ALEPH, the state
university libraries' on-line catalog. Titles already in ALEPH will have Baldwin Library
holdings added. Titles not found in ALEPH will be searched on OCLC. If copy for the book is
found, a Library Associate I-level technical support person will assure quality control by
verifying authority work. This staff member will bring the record up to full AACR2R cataloging
standards and enhance it with access points for publisher, printer, illustrator (MARC21 700,
710), and subject genre terms (MARC21 655) as required by the Baldwin Cataloging guidelines
and added to the national databases. This work will be carried out under the supervision of the
grant-funded Project Cataloger. After enhancement, UF holdings will be added and the record
exported into ALEPH. This portion of the project will be assigned to a Library Assistant III (.33
FTE). For titles lacking copy in OCLC, a full AACR2R record will be created and added to the
national databases by the Project Cataloger. Both the Project Cataloger and the Library
Associate I also will be responsible for contributing series, personal and corporate name
authority records to the National Authority Cooperative (NACO) where necessary and deemed
feasible. All cataloging will conform to AACR2R rules and MARC21 Bibliographic Format
Standards.

Based on 65 months of experience cataloging Baldwin Library texts during previous phases, the
complete copy cataloging sequence for a record, from searching for copy through the creation of
a full AACR2R enhanced catalog MARC record, with associated NACO participation, requires
approximately 75 minutes per title. Using that figure, it will take approximately 3,120 hours to
complete the copy cataloging of 2,500 titles. The complete original cataloging sequence for a
record, with associated NACO participation, due to the complexity of working with undated
publications, requires approximately 104 minutes per title. Using that figure, it will take
approximately 4,160 hours to complete the original cataloging of 2,400 titles. The project will
therefore provide cataloging for 4,900 titles.






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

Following cataloging of the source document, items that are not going to be digitized will be
returned to the Baldwin Library, checked in and re-shelved by students under the supervision of
the Curator of the Baldwin Library.

Conservation Review

Following cataloging of the source document, the uniquely held items will be checked out of the
Cataloging Department and into the Conservation Unit. Each week a book cart of approximately
50 cataloged books will be sent from the Cataloging Department to the Conservation Unit. John
Freund, Head of the Conservation Unit, will review the books, noting problems or physical
conditions affecting digitization. While the books are in the Conservation Unit, they will be
locked in a secure room. After his review, he will deliver the books to the DLC. After the books
have been digitized, they will be returned to Freund for further review. The books will then be
returned to the Baldwin Library/Special Collections stacks and will be available to future
researchers.

Digitization Workflow and Procedures

When items enter the digitization workflow from the Conservation Unit, they are checked out of
the Conservation Unit and into the DLC, using the bar code that is attached to each book. The
doors to the DLC are always locked and the workspace is considered a secure area.

Nelda Schwartz, Coordinator of Bibliographic Control receives the books and captures the
MARC record for each volume. This record is run through a batch importer program that creates
both the XML bibliographic data files and adds similar bibliographic data to DLC's internal
tracking database. Items entered receive bibliographic identification numbers that are used
throughout the digitization process and are retained in the administrative metadata of the final
digital package. Tracking slips are inserted into each book and then the books are transferred to
the imaging unit.

Imaging the item (detailed above in Methodology and Standards, Digitizing of uniquely held
volumes) includes scanning the physical object to create the digital images, and post image
processing, e.g., cropping, de-skewing, and color correction. This work is carried out by a
number of scanning technicians who are trained and supervised by Randall Renner, Image
Capture Coordinator; Lourdes Santamaria, Imagining Tech Supervisor; and Traveler Wendell,
Image Processor.

Acceptable scanned images are transferred to the Quality Control Unit where they are processed
through two software packages especially designed for the DLC: Pre-QC and Quality Control
Applications. These programs derive jpg and thumbnail jpg images, jpg2000 images, verify
image capture settings are valid, and create basic structural metadata. The jpg and jpg2000
images are checked for missing pages through the spot checking procedure described in the






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

Quality Control Review above, and the basic structural metadata is verified and amended as
needed. All of these activities are under the supervision of Jane Pen, Image Quality Specialist.

This process is followed by text conversion and mark-up where metadata is enhanced, text
created, and both verified for accuracy (detailed above in Methodology and Standards, Text
Conversion and Text Verification and Mark-Up). Text conversion and mark-up are supervised
by Matt Mariner, Head of Text Markup.

Acceptable scanned images are transferred to the Quality Control Unit where they are processed
through two software packages especially designed for the DLC: Pre-QC and Quality Control
Applications. These programs derive jpg and thumbnail jpg images, jpg2000 images, verify
image capture settings are valid, and create basic structural metadata. The jpg and jpg2000
images are checked for missing pages through the spot checking procedure described in the
Quality Control Review above, and the basic structural metadata is verified and amended as
needed. All of these activities are under the supervision of Jane Pen, the Image Quality
Specialist.

This process is followed by text conversion and mark-up where metadata is enhanced, text
created, and both verified for accuracy (detailed above in Methodology and Standards, Text
Conversion and Text Verification and Mark-Up). Text conversion and mark-up are supervised
by Matt Mariner.

Numerical Project Objectives

The following table represents ideal rates of productivity for all project objectives. The rates
reflect lower production figures for quarters with major holidays and/or anticipated summer
vacation schedules.

Schedule of Objectives (Number of Titles) Year-One:
Document Document
Source: Source:
Cataloging Digitization
Months 1-3 480 300
Months 4-6 580 300
Months 7-9 690 300
Months 10-12 700 300

Year-One Totals 2,450 1,200






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida



Schedule of Objectives (Number of Titles) Year-Two
Document Document
Source: Source:
Cataloging Digitization
Months 1-3 600 300
Months 4-6 650 300
Months 7-9 650 300
Months 10-12 550 300

Year-Two Totals 2,450 1,200

Grand Totals 4,900 2,400

Staff

Department of Special and Area Studies Collections

The George A. Smathers Libraries' Department of Special and Area Studies Collections holds
the primary source research collections of the University of Florida. The named collections
include the P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History, the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's
Literature, and the Belknap Collection for the Performing Arts. The area studies collections are
comprised of African, Asian, Jewish, and Latin American materials. The general collections
consist of Manuscripts, Rare Books, and University Archives. Total holdings are 750,000
volumes, 60,000 microfilms, 10 million manuscripts and archival items. Staff include 24 FTE.
The Department maintains a separate reading room and security stacks for the rare books,
manuscripts, university archives, and the named collections, including the Baldwin Library.

Nancy M. Poehlmann, Co-Principal Investigator, will provide 0.2 FTE in cost share to this
project. Her responsibilities will be to assist in hiring and training personnel involved in
cataloging the materials, and to monitor financial aspects of the grant. Poehlmann holds a
Masters degree in Library Science from Indiana University, and a Masters degree in
Comparative Literature, also from Indiana. As Head, Humanities and Special Collections
Cataloging Unit from 2007 to the present, she was responsible for ongoing supervision of project
staff involved in cataloging the source documents, both original and copy records, and liaison
between the Project Director and the Cataloging Unit to insure consistency in record creation and
statistical reporting on one earlier (2007-2009) NEH-funded Baldwin Library Preservation and
Access project.






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

Rita J. Smith, Curator of the Baldwin Library, will provide 0.1 FTE in cost share. Her
responsibilities will be to select the titles to be cataloged, and to resolve questions of curatorial
complexity for the collection. Smith holds a Masters degree in Library Science from the
University of Michigan. She has worked in the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's
Literature since 1989, first as Coordinator of Academic Support Services, and, since 1995, as
Curator of the Baldwin Library and Associate University Librarian in the Department of Special
and Area Studies Collections. She served as Project Cataloger from 1990 through mid-1991 for
a U.S. Department of Education Title IIC grant to catalog 4,000 titles held by the Baldwin
Library. Smith served as co-principal investigator for two earlier (2000-2002 and 2004-2006)
and as principal investigator on one earlier (2007-2009) NEH-funded Baldwin Library
Preservation and Access projects.

Student Assistants (540 hours) will remove and replace titles selected for cataloging, digitization,
and conservation review. They will assign location codes and affix bar codes to acid-free strips
before the books are sent to be catalogued. They will work under the supervision of Rita Smith.

Cataloging and Metadata Department

Jane Anne Carey, Co-Principal Investigator, will provide 0.2 FTE in cost share. Her
responsibilities will be to hire and train personnel involved in cataloging the materials, and
ongoing supervision of project staff involved in cataloging the source documents, both original
and copy records. Carey has a Masters degree in Library Science from South Florida. She
served as Project Archivist on one earlier (2000-2002), and as Project Cataloger on two earlier
(2004-2006, 2007-2009) NEH-funded Baldwin Library Preservation and Access projects.

The Cataloging and Metadata Department staff is responsible for creating and maintaining an
ALEPH-based on-line catalog. They contribute original bibliographic and authority records and
holdings information to the OCLC national database and participate in the CONSER, BIBCO,
NACO, SACO and OCLC Enhance national cooperative programs. The Department has
previously participated in the National Endowment for the Humanities and U.S. Department of
Education Title IIC Project (RC-21593-88) for National Database Access to Library Resources
for Latin American Studies through Retrospective Conversion of Latin American Library
Materials (1988-1991), the U.S. Department of Education Title IIC Project for Access to Library
Resources in the Baldwin Library, University of Florida (1990-1991), the National Endowment
for the Humanities US Newspaper Program: Florida Newspaper Project, (1995- to date), and in
the Research Libraries Group's Great Collections Microfilming Project, Phase II and Phase IV,
as well as the Research Libraries Group's Archives Preservation Microfilming Project. The
Department also participated in the earlier (2000-2002, 2004-2006, 2007-2009) NEH-funded
Baldwin Library Preservation and Access projects.

The proposed NEH-funded Project Cataloger (1.0 FTE) will be primarily responsible for creating
original bibliographic description and access records for selected titles, contributing these






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

original records to the OCLC database, and assisting other staff in doing the same. S/he will
create original authority records for series and personal and corporate names when none exists in
the national authority file, contribute these authority records to the NACO database, and
supervise the project Library Associate I in doing the same. The Project Original Cataloger will
be responsible for the final quality of all bibliographic and authority records created for this
project.

The proposed NEH-funded Library Associate I (.80 FTE) will be responsible for 1) enhancing all
copy cataloging records on OCLC to conform to Baldwin Cataloging Guidelines, and importing
them into the ALEPH database, 2) assisting the Project Cataloger in creating original
bibliographic description and access records for selected titles, 3) collaborating with other grant
staff to create original series and personal and corporate name authority records when none exists
in the national authority file, and 5) contributing these authority records to the NACO database.

A Library Assistant III (LibAsst) (TBD) in the Resource Services Department of the Libraries
will provide 0.33 FTE to this project. The LibAsst will be responsible for: 1) all required
searching for existing records in the local database and searching in OCLC for member copy;
evaluating this member copy and selecting best matching record, 2) importing member copy into
the local database from OCLC and creating copy holdings records, 3) picking up materials to be
cataloged and distributing searched materials to Project Cataloger and to the Library Associate I
for original and enhanced copy cataloging.

Preservation Department, Conservation Unit

The Preservation Department has been recognized as a full-service preservation facility since
1987 and maintains the most advanced and comprehensive conservation labs in Florida. The
Department is staffed by a total of full-time staff. It is charged with preserving and making
accessible archival and library materials in all formats. The Conservation Unit of the
Preservation Department is responsible for the physical condition of the collections of the UF
Libraries. Services include repair and restoration, rebinding, de-acidification, encapsulation,
construction of protective enclosures, and environmental monitoring.

John Freund (0.10 FTE) will be responsible for completion of conservation assessments and, as
required, conservation treatments. Freund has served as the Preservation Department's Chief
Conservator since 1988. He holds a Certificate of Book Restoration and Binding from the
College of Art and Design at San Francisco State University.

UF Digital Library Center (DLC)

The Digital Library Center was established in 1999 as an off-shoot of several digitization
projects based in the Preservation Department and the Marston Science Library, including the
brittle books and microfilming programs. Today, it is responsible for the creation and
maintenance of Digital Collections from traditional library and museum materials for use in








Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida


teaching and research. DLC's program management structure invites faculty collaborations both

within and beyond the Libraries and University of Florida. Partners include the Florida Museum

of Natural History, the Matheson Historical Trust, Florida's State Library and Archives, other

state university libraries and university libraries across Florida, and university and special

libraries beyond Florida including the international project the Digital Library of the Caribbean.

DLC also maintains active liaison with the Florida Center for Library Automation's Digital

Library Services division and is a major contributor to the PALMM Collections. DLC also

develops innovative projects that make materials accessible and usable in new ways. The

Ephemeral Cities project allows users to browse through cities spatially, showing one new

method for accessing materials in relation to each other geographically and in relation to the

cities themselves. Allowing users to see and use materials in new ways creates new information,

new types of information, and new avenues for research.




UFDC
nrts i System.s Preservaton, etc. PROJECT PLANNING &
UrLs to FCLA Diital Arcrue, Havest ng AgenD., etc INSTITUTIONAL REPOSITORY PROGRAM
Urnts ID rantlig Agencies, et Unt to BuIness Serces. Acqslton, DSR. Granting Agenites
uLnks SpecI CMteaons, Conecon Management etc- Lik I 31ec Cnaecibs, Colleaeun Mancagemenl, ec.
Unks to Famuly. UF Urts, etc, LUn to Patlram. USe Groups. Slanlar Crn Lunames etc.
Unk to Ubrary Prons. PubIr Pu ic es, etc- Links th FaJculy, UF Un ts, etc.
flnls W Etbeial Partinrs









TEXT PROCESSING
u~nt to Specla corecmco, cotecln Maage ec.
Lns tao LL E Reserve Et.
Links Syteset- Digital
Library Center
BIBUOGRAPHIC CONTROL
i.n-s Io Special COalAdm.E,. PuWc Sertlces, etc.
Urms to Extema ProiuIers & Partners, etc
Links Io LL & E-Resefves, etc
LUnI to Cataoging. Conseratton. etc.
^ i nks ID Systems, ete l


QUALITY CONTROL
Links CanseNartm. ILL &4 E46Nerves, e6c.
UPAS ID S4W6 124aC.


-I- IMAGING
Lns to CWfnenvankiN ILL & E-ReseweEs, etm
Lifnks o Remlote Proviiers A Veldo
Links to AcquisIUmis. Buines6 Sefv~Ce. etc
Lk1ks to Systefis. Presevallron. ele.
Unks b3 Paniers






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

Laurie Taylor, Interim Director of the Digital Library Center, provides management oversight for
the digitization portion of this project and monitors the workflow between digitization units and
will provide cost share in the amount of 0.10 FTE in year one and 0.10 FTE in year two. She
tracks production schedules and facilitates communication and trouble-shooting between units.
Taylor is a co-principal investigator of the NHPRC funded America's Swamp project and works
extensively on humanities-related digital projects. Taylor holds a doctorate from the University
of Florida and has served on a review panel for the Digital Humanities Start-up grants for the
National Endowment for the Humanities. She will be responsible, in conjunction with Digital
Library Center staff, for the archiving of the TIFF masters with the Florida Center for Library
Automation.

Randall Renner, Coordinator of Image Capture Operations, will provide cost share in the amount
of 0.41 FTE in year one and 0.32 FTE in year two. He supervises all image capture units.
Renner will train student imaging staff on new equipment and will provide technical expertise on
functional operations. Renner holds a Master of Fine Arts (Photography) from the University of
Florida's College of Fine Arts.

Lourdes Santamaria, Imaging Technician Supervisor, will provide 0.30 FTE in cost share. She
will hire trains, and supervises all of the students who scan Baldwin volumes. She will assign
Baldwin Library image related tasks to Traveler Wendell and maintain workflow between
imaging and the Quality Control Unit.

Jane Pen, Image Quality Specialist, will contribute 0.50 FTE in cost share. She will supervise
the quality control assessment of the images and the creation of the preliminary XML used to
create the metadata. Pen holds the equivalent of the Master of Library Science degree from
Taipei (Taiwan/Republic of China).

Nelda Schwartz, Coordinator of Bibliographic Control, will contribute 0.20 FTE in cost share.
She will supervise the tracking of all items through the digitization chain. Schwartz will 1)
verify the creation of all cataloging records, 2) capture data for XML creation and for the
tracking database, and 3) verify completion of digital package before item is returned.

Matt Mariner, Head of Text Mark-Up, will contribute 0.20 FTE in cost share. He will 1)
supervise the text extraction (OCR) of all texts scanned, 2) verify or completes bibliographic and
structural metadata, 3) supervise the archiving of digital packages, and 4) coordinate their
delivery to FCLA and UFDC.

Traveler Wendell, Image Processor, will contribute 0.30 FTE in cost share. He will assist
Lourdes Santamaria with image creation, enhancement of scanned images, and in the supervision
and training of student assistants.






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida

Dissemination

The University of Florida Libraries will distribute MARC cataloging records of both the physical
book and the digitized version generated by this project through three bibliographic networks:
the University of Florida on-line catalogue (ALEPH) and the national database of
OCLC/Worldcat. In addition to this bibliographic access, the uniquely held volumes will be
available in their entirety in digital form at no cost to the user as part of the University of Florida
Digital Collections at http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/UFDC/?c=juv. As mentioned in previous
sections, they will also be made available to other web servers for public access: the International
Children's Digital Library and the Open Content Alliance. The physical book may be consulted
in the Special Collections Reading Room on the University of Florida campus.

The Libraries' staff associated with past Baldwin Library cataloguing and digitization projects
have had a history of presenting papers at the American Library Association's annual
conference. We propose to send one staff member to ALA in year-two to build awareness of the
project, and the resulting new cataloguing records and digitized volumes. Beyond this, articles
will be published in the Libraries' printed and online newsletters which have a wide distribution
beyond UF, to the general public, alumni and other academic institutions. The Curator of the
Baldwin Library normally attends the Children's Literature Association's annual conference, a
gathering of international professors and graduate students working in the field of children's
literature. Project staff anticipate that awareness will grow through these and other promotional
initiatives yet to be planned.






Phase IV: Cataloguing and Creating Access to American and British Children's Literature Collection (undated)
University of Florida



History of Grants

1989: US Dept. of Education $64,000 for retrospective cataloguing

2000: NEH $381,220 Phase I to catalog and microfilm Baldwin materials dated from
1850-1869

2000: Northeast Florida Library Information Network $9,240 retrospective cataloging

2001: Northeast Florida Library Information Network $10,710 retrospective
cataloging

2004: NEH $295,507 Phase II to catalog and digitize Baldwin materials dated from
1870-1889.

2007: NEH $284,288 Phase III to catalog and digitize Baldwin materials dated from
1890-1910.

Total awarded: $1,044,965





Appendix 1


Sample Listing of Recent Books, Articles, Theses and Dissertations
Based on Baldwin Library Research
Books:

Mickenberg, Julia L. and Philip Nel, eds. Tales for Little Rebels, A Collection ofRadical
Children's Literature, New York University Press, 2008

Humphrey, Mary. Living the Hero's Quest: Character Building Through Action
Research, Westport, Conn.: Libraries Unlimited, 2005

Darton, Lawrence. The Dartons: An Annotated Check-List of Children's Books Issued
by Two Publishing Houses, 1787-1876, New Castle, Delaware: Oak Knoll Press,
2002.

Books in Progress

Megan Norcia, XMarks the Spot: British Women Writers Map the Empire, 1790-1895,
(forthcoming) University of Ohio Press.

Articles/Chapters

Caponegro, Ramona, "The Accidental Sleuth: Investigating Mysteries and Class in
Three Series for Girls," in Clues: A Journal ofDetection, Vol. 27, No. 1, Spring
2009, p. 11-21

Charmette Kendrick, "The Goblins Will Get You! Horror in Children's Literature from
the 19th Century," in Children & Libraries, Vol. 7, No. 1, Spring 2009

Jacquelyn S. Rogers, "Picturing the Child in Nineteenth-Century Literature: The Artist,
the Child and a Changing Society, in Children & Libraries, Vol. 6, No. 3, Winter,
2008

Smith, Elise L. "Centering the Home-Garden: The Arbor, Wall, and Gate in Moral Tales
for Children." in Children's Literature 36 (2008): 24-48.

Barban, Leslie. "The Evolution of Children's Literature," in Children & Libraries,
Chicago: American Library Association, v.3, no. 1 Spring 2005

Sierra, Horatio. "La Leyenda Negra in British and American Children's Literature: 1583
to the Present" in Mester, Los Angeles: University of California, Los Angeles,
v. 34, 2005.

Hines, Maude. "Implanting Sympathy in Nineteenth-Century Anglo-American
Children's Literature," in Wild Things: Children's Culture andEcocriticism,









Sidney I. Dobrin and Kenneth B. Kidd, eds. Detroit: Wayne State University
Press, 2004.

Dissertations/Theses

Julie Sinn, Golden Mean: Commercial Culture, Middle-Class Ideals, and the Little
Golden Books, PhD 2008 University of Florida

Martin, Cathlena. Charlotte's Website: The Changing Nature of Children's Literature and
Culture, MA, 2008 University of Florida

Kitchen, Deeb. Little Golden Fathers, MA 2007 University of Florida

Caponegro, Ramona. Prisoners ofInnocence: American Justice, Children, and
Children's Books, 1865-1920. MA 2006 University of Florida

Norcia, Megan. "X" Marks the Spot: Victorian Women Writers Map the Empire, PhD
2004 University of Florida.

Lambert, Cornelia C. The Child and the Bee: Natural Theology and nsect Science in
Children's Literature, 1825-1885 MA 2001 University of Florida.

Dissertations/Theses in Progress

Aaron, Talbot, Peculiar Information, Partic'lar Friends: How American Literature and
Culture Know Horatio Alger, Jr., PhD (2009) University of Florida

Caponegro, Ramona, Weighed in the Balance: The Law and Criminal Justice Systems in
Children's and Young Adult Literature, PhD (2010) University of Florida

Mann, Jaimy, The Transracial Politics of Cute, PhD (2010) University of Florida

Keebaugh, Cari, Into the Woods: Intertextuality in Children's and Young Adult Fantasy
Literature, PhD (2011) University of Florida,

Linda Martin, The Professionalization of S.fi yelli,,g. PhD (2011) University of Georgia

Greenspoon, David, Children's Mite: Juvenile Philanthropy in America, 1815-1865, PhD
(2011) Pennsylvania State University

Dusenberry, Lisa, Interfacing Childhood: Texts Mediated for and through the "Child, "
PhD (2011) University of Florida





Appendix 2


UFT UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORDA

George A. Smathers Libraries 535 Library West
Office of the Associate Dean for Technology & Support Services PO Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611
352-273-2505
352-392-7251 Fax
www.uflib.ufl.edu
Nancy Poehlmann, Rare Books Librarian June 24, 2009
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
P.O. Box 117005
Gainesville, FL 32611-7005

Dear Nancy,

The George A. Smathers Libraries of the University of Florida have made great strides in the
phased digitization and cataloging of the Baldwin Collection of Children's Literature with the
generous and gracious support from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). This
assistance has made possible access to more than 25,000 items, with full color digitization of
much of the collection. The Baldwin is the largest collection to be digitized at the University of
Florida, with a total of 1,957 NACO (Name Authority Co-Operative) records added to the
Library of Congress. The NACO work has been a worthwhile and national outcome from the
cataloging of this important collection.

Concurrent with multiple grants, the Digital Library Center of the University of Florida
continues to build its other humanities-related digital collections--often making these collections
accessible for the first time--to the world. Our commitment to the preservation of historical
collections is well known, in part, through our Digital Library of the Caribbean, Florida Digital
Newspaper Library, Women in Development, Oral Histories, Florida Architecture, and the
Popular Culture Collection that draws from the Belknap Collection for the Performing Arts.

In August of 2005, the University of Florida Libraries signed an agreement with the Florida
Center for Library Automation (FCLA) to archive our digital collections in the Florida Digital
Archive. This long-term commitment to digital preservation will insure the Baldwin's future
accessibility. Since all eighteenth and most nineteenth century dated items held by the Baldwin
Library of Historical Children's Literature have been catalogued, this final phase of the project
proposes to catalogue all of the remaining undated items and to digitize those which have no
other copy of record in the national database (OCLC).

The collaboration between the NEH and the University of Florida Libraries has been a very
successful event providing access and digital preservation of the Baldwin Collection. It is with
great pleasure I write this letter of support for your efforts to continue this fine project.

Sincerely,


Dr. Rachel A. Schipper, Associate Dean
Technology & Support Services

The Foundation for The Galor Nation
An I qual Opportunity Institution





Appendix 3
OCLC Connexion
Page I of I

OCLC 7391153 No holdings in FUG 5 other holdings; 1 other IR

Rec stat c Entered 19810505 Replaced 20080521
Type a ELvI I Srce Audn j Ctrl Lang eng
BLvl m Form Conf 0 Biog MRec Ctry mau
Cont GPub LtF 1 Indx 0
Desc Ills f Fest 0 DtSt s Dates 1904

010 04024574
040 DLC tc NGU td OCLCG
029 1 AU@ tb 000028362248
050 0 PZ7.B59 *b Bo
090 +b
049 FUGG
100 1 Blanchard, Amy Ella, *d 1856-1926.
245 1 0 Bonny Lesley of the border, lc by Amy E. Blanchard; illustrated by William F. Stecher.
260 Boston, ta Chicago, +b W.A. Wilde *c [1904]
300 331 p. tb front., 4 pl. +c 20 cm.
490 0 Her The Pioneer series

Delete Holdings- Export- Label- Produce- Submit- Replace- Report Error- Update Holdings- Validate-
Workflow-ln Process




OCLC Connexion


OCLC 7391153 Held by FUG 5 other holdings; 1 other IR

Rec stat c Entered 19810505 Replaced 20090602
Type a ELvl I Srce Audn j Ctrl Lang eng
BLvl m Form Conf 0 Biog MRec Ctry mau
Cont GPub LitF f Indx 0
Desc a Ills af Fest 0 DtSt s Dates 1904 ,

010 04024574
040 DLC *c NGU *d OCLCG *d FUG
029 1 AU@ +b 000028362248
050 0 PZ7.B59 +b Bo
090 +b
049 FUGG
100 1 Blanchard, Amy Ella, d 1356-1926.
245 1 0 Bonn, Lesley of the border / ic by Amy E. Blanchard ; illustrated by WVlliam F. Stecher.
260 Boston; ta Chicago: *b W.A. Wilde Company, tc c1904.
300 331, [4] p., [5] leaves of plates : *b ill.; *c 20 cm.
490 1 Pioneer series
500 Publisher's advertisements precede and follow text.
650 0 Youth *x Conduct of life iv Juvenile fiction
650 0 Conduct of life *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Grandfathers tv Juvenile fiction
650 0 Cousins +v Juvenile fiction
650 0 Frontier and pioneer life tv Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Indians of North America +v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Courtship +v Juvenile fiction.
655 7 Publishers' advertisements ty 1904. *2 rbgenr
700 1 Stecher, William F. +q (William Frederick), *d b.1864. 4 ill
710 2 W.A. Wilde Compan-,. *4 pbl
752 United States *b Massachusetts *d Boston.
752 United States *b Illinois *d Chicago.
800 1 Blanchard, Amy Ella, +d 1856-1926. *t Pioneer series.

Delete Export- Label- Produce- Submit- Replace- Report Update
Validate-
Holdings- Error- Holdings-
Workflow-ln
Process


about:blank


Page I of I


6/22/2009


















OCI -' ( onnexion Page I of I



OCLC 972831 Held by FUG 16 other holdings

Rec stat c Entered 19740806 Replaced 20001204
Type a ELvy I Srce d Audn Ctr Lang eng
BLvl in Form Conf 0 Blog MRec Ctry mau
Cont GPub LitF 1 Indx 0
Desc Ills af Fest 0 DtSI s Dates 1872

040 OUN *c OUN td OCL +d FUG
090 PS1534.D3 +b F56x
049 FUGG
100 1 De Mille, James, +d 1833 1880.
245 1 0 Fire in the woods.
260 Boston. +b Lee and Shepard, 4c 1872.
300 323 p- tb illus. front.. plates. 4c 18 cm.
490 0 B.O.W.C. series, tv 4
599 002391402

Delete Holdings- Export-C Label- Produce Submit Replace- Report Error- Update Holdings-C Validate-
Workflow-in Proce-s


Baldwin Library Grant Proposal














Piue


Cataloging Record from another insLitution (see previous( record) cnhar, (ti for Unit -rsit
of Ploribla, N T Granlt 7004-:~nF,
OCLC 972831 Held by FUG 19 other t :1. .,,

Rec stat c Entered 19740806 Replaced 20050318
Type a ELvl I Srce d Audn j Ctrl Lang eng
BLvl m Form Conf 0 E. I MRec Ctry mau
Cont GPub LitF f Indx 0
Desc a Ills af Fest 0 DtSt I Dates 1872 1871

040 OUN #c OUN +d OCL #d FUG
043 n-cn-ns
090 PS1534.D3 tb F56x
090 tb
049 FUGG
100 1 De Mille, James, *d 1833-1880.
245 1 0 Fire in the woods.
260 Boston: tb Lee and Shepard ; ta New York b Lee, Shepard, and Dill igham, #c
1872. c1871 te ([Boston] #f Boston Stereotype Foundry)
300 323. [10] p., [3] leaves of plates : #b ill.; #c 18 cm.
490 1 B.O.W.C. series ; +v 4
500 Publisher's catalogue follow text and on endpapers.
520 Fourth volume in a series about a boy's club at the Grand Pre Academy in Randnd Pre. Nova
Scotia, called the Brethren of the Order of the White Cross. who embark on perilous
adventures.
650 0 Voyages and travels *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Adventure and adventurers #v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Boarding school students *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Survival skills tv Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Sailing #v Juvenile fiction.
651 0 Grand Pre (N.S.) #v Juvenile fiction.
655 7 School stories ty 1872. #2 local
655 7 Publishers' catalogues ty 1872. #2 rbgenr
710 2 Lee and Shepard. +4 pbl
710 2 Lee, Shepard, and Dillingham. #4 pbl
710 2 Boston Stereotype Foundry. #4 str
752 United States *b Massachusetts *d Boston.
752 United States tb New York td New York.
800 1 De Mille, James, #d 1833-1880. tt B.O.W.C. series; #v 4.

Delete Export- Label- Produce- Submit- Replace- Report Update ,ad
i alidate-
Holdings- Error- Holdings-
'Vorkflow-ln
process






about blank 5/3 1 2100;


Baldwin Library Grant Prop,- .l












IPau I of


Origii~al eonrd, Univer siy of lori id,, NFi; Grant 2004-2006

OCLC 58796201 Held by FUG 1 other holding

Rec stat c Entered 20050404 Replaced 20050621
Type a ELvl I Srce d Audn j Ctrl Lang eng
BLvl m Form Conf 0 Biog MRec Ctry enk
Cont GPub LitF f Indx 0
Desc a Ills af Fest 0 DtSt s Dates 1872

040 FUG -c FUG +d OCL
043 po----
090 +b
049 FUGG
100 1 Ballantyne, R. M. 4q (Robert .1i, r.,. I, rd 1825-1894.
245 1 4 The coral island : +b a tale of the Pacific Ocean / +c by Robert Michael i.,.- : with
illustrations by Dalzielt
260 London; +a Edinburgh; ta New York : 4b T. Nelson and Sons, 4c 1872.
300 438. [8] p., I leaves of plates : -b ill.; 4c 18 cm.
520 Three E, ,-ii. r, boys, shipwrecked on a deserted island, create an idyllic society despite
typhoons, sharks, wild hogs, and hostile visitors, and then pirates kidnap on of the boys
whose adventures continue among the South Sea Islands.
500 Added title page, engraved.
500 Publisher's catalogue follows text.
650 0 Adventure and adventurers +v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Islands tv Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Outdoor life iv Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Survival skills 4-v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Natural history tv Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc. +v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Pirates +v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Rescues 4v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Christian life 4v Juvenile fiction.
651 0 Oceania +v Juvenile fiction.
655 7 Robinsonades ty 1872. 42 rbgenr
655 7 Publishers' catalogues ty 1872. 42 rbgenr
710 2 Thomas Nelson & Sons. *4 pbl
710 2 Dalziel Brothers. 44 ill
752 England *d London.
752 Scotland td Edinburgh,
752 United States +b New York +d New York.

Delete Export- Label- Produce- Submit- Replace- Report Update
\ alidate-
Holdings- Error- Holdings-
\Vorkflow-ln
P ocess



about blank 5/3 I1 2o00


Baldwin Library Grant Proposal

















)ri(jinal Rectrd, Urniversity of Florida, NEH Grant 2001-2002
OCLC 47224033 Held by FUG no other holdings

Rec stat n Entered 20010702 Replaced 20011027
Type a ELvl I Srce d Audn j Ctrl Lang eng
BLvl m Form Conf 0 Biog MRec Ctry enk
Cont GPub LitF f Indx 0
Desc a Ills of Fest 0 DtSt s Dates 1857

040 FUG *c FUG
090 +b
049 FUGG
100 1 Elwes, Alfred. "d 1819?-1888.
245 1 4 The adventures of a bear, and a great bear too / *c by Alfred Elwes ; with nine illustrations
by Harrison Weir.
260 London; *a New York : b George Routledge and Co., *c 1857 +e (Lo-don: Nf
Thomas Harrild)
300 60 p., (8] leaves of plates : #b ill. ; c 22 cm.
500 Illustrations engraved and signed by various artists, ,, rhi Wi W. Wight, J. Greenaway. A.J.
Mason, J. Cooper, and W. Measom drawn after Harrison Weir,
650 0 Bears *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Temper *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Quarreling *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Success *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Wit and humor, Juvenile.
650 0 Dogs *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Animal welfare *v Juvenile fiction.
655 7 Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) *y 1857. *2 rbbin
700 1 Weir, Harrison, #d 1824-1906. *4 ill
700 1 Greenaway, John, *d 1816-1890. +4 egr
700 1 Mason. Abraham John, *d 1794-1858. +4 egr
700 1 Wright, William, id 1830-1889. *4 egr
700 1 Measom, William. *4 egr
700 1 Cooper, James Davis, 4d 1823-1904. *4 egr
700 1 Harrild. Thomas. *4 prt
710 2 G. -.'-,i :.1,l- & Co. f4 pbl
752 England *d London.
752 United States +b New York *d New York.

Delete Export- Label- Produce- Submit- Replace- Report Update
Validate-
Holdings- Error- Holdings-
.Vorkflow-In
process s






ahout.blank /I I 20


Baldwin 1 ibiha. Grant Proposal





Appendix 4


International Digital Children's Library
http://www.icdlbooks.org/

The International Children's Digital Library (ICDL) provides free access to children's books from
around the world. By ensuring access to books from many cultures and in diverse languages, it
fosters a love of reading, a readiness to learn, and a response to the challenges of world illiteracy.

ICDL began as a partnership between the University of Maryland and the Internet Archive, collecting
largely contemporary and highly illustrated books for children. Funded originally by the Institute for
Museum and Library Services, the Library is now supported in part by a Foundation at the University
of Maryland. The University of Maryland continues to administer and grow the Library. The Library
continues to request assistance from granting agencies, and, is currently seeking project funding from
the National Endowment for the Humanities also in this round for development of historical
children's literature. Though the University of Florida will contribute to the ICDL, no funds for
the University of Florida contributions are requested by the ICDL grant in this round.

Legal: The University of Florida's relationship with the International Children's Digital Library is based
on a memorandum of understanding, recently revised, with the University of Maryland. (See p. XXX
for a copy of the memorandum)

Data Transfer: The University of Florida contributes new content to the International
Children's Digital Library via large-capacity external hard drives. Original transfers were
made via FTP and then via disk. Files transferred are in METS wrappers, containing check-
sums, metadata (MODS, UFDC, DAITTS, etc.), and image (digital master and derivatives
for Internet access) and text files. Drive transfers are on-going..

Why: The University of Florida contributes to the International Children's Digital Library to ensure the
most comprehensive collection of children's literature historic and contemporary and to doubly
insure the preservation of these resources.

Perhaps the most pertinent question is not "why contribute to ICDL?" but, rather, "why continue to
maintain a separate collection at the University of Florida?" Firstly, University of Florida collections
exist within a context; we are committed to maintaining that context for researchers. Our 18th and 19th
century holdings co-exist with other special collections in the social sciences, humanities and the arts.
Children's literature, together with other holdings, informs research in various fields: for example, civil
and moral education; abolition, slavery and race relations, etc. Secondly, maintenance of a local
collection ensures our ability to support intermediate uses: to tag and mine textual data for
specialized uses, e.g., extraction of geographic data, concept mapping, and even integration with
map interfaces uses and methods not supported by ICDL or any of the other digital libraries to
which we contribute.














Open Content Alliance
http://www.opencontentalliance.org/

The Open Content Alliance (OCA) reflects the collaborative efforts of a group of cultural, technology,
nonprofit, and governmental organizations from around the world that will help build a permanent
archive of multilingual digitized text and multimedia content.
OCA, in a sense, is a successor of the Internet Archive. OCA is administered from offices in the
Internet Archive and thrives on technologies supported by the Internet Archive.

Legal: While the University of Florida is not yet listed as a contributor to OCA, it is our intent to
become a contributor. Our content is already available in the Internet Archive and our permission has
been granted to migrate the data forward into OCA holdings. We anticipate that this relationship will
be formalized with an exchange of letters of understanding before Baldwin NEH Phase 3 funding has
been granted.

Data Transfer: The University of Florida contributes new content to Internet Archive via disk transfer.
Original transfers were made via FTP. Disk transfers allow us to send content first to the International
Children's Digital Library, now solely maintained by the University of Maryland, and on to the Internet
Archive/Open Content Alliance. Investigation of alternate transfer methods including FTP or large-
capacity drive transfer, is on-going as we anticipate additional contributions to the Open Content
Alliance. Files transferred are in METS wrappers, containing check-sums, metadata (MODS, UFDC,
DAITTS, etc.), and image (digital master and derivatives for Internet access) and text files.
The International Children's Digital Library (ICDL) now accepts historic children's literature. DVD data
disk transfers are on-going.

Why: The University of Florida contributes to the Internet Archive in appreciation of its free
access/open content model. We get absolutely nothing from participation other than knowing that the
partnership is able to extend the useful life and educational purpose of the content.

Why: The University of Florida participates in the BEAT program as one of several institutions
working to enhance records for improved access to bibliographic information and, where URLs exist,
to freely available openly accessible content for our patrons and the patrons of our partners in the
Caribbean, Africa and Florida.





Appendix 5


Imaging Equipment


Four different types of imaging equipment are used to capture volumes depending on the
physical characteristics of volume and its condition. They are the Kodak DCS 14n megapixel
DSLR camera mounted on a copystand with a book cradle, the CopiBook stand-alone scanning
station, Microtek 9800XL flatbed scanners, and an EPSON 1640SU flatbed scanner.

DSLR Cameras:
The Kodak DCS 14n digital cameras are mounted on planetary copystands with a specially
constructed book cradle horizontally positioned under the camera.

Specifications for Kodak DCS 14n:
http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/products/cameras/dcsPro 4n/specs.jhtml?id=0.1.2
2.28.3.14.18.14&lc=en

Independent Product Review:
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/kodakdcs 4n/

Capture:
The lossless DCS camera Raw file format will be converted to TIFFs.
Bit-depth:
24-bit color for color images
8-bit grayscale for tonal black and white images

Pixel Resolution:
4500 x 3000 or 3000 x 4500 pixels, depending upon orientation.
Effective Resolution:
Size of Page............ Effective Resolution
5" x 7" page 600 x 642 dpi
6" x 8" page 500 x 562 dpi
7" x 9" page 428 x 500 dpi
8" x 10" page 375 x 450 dpi
9" x 11" page 333 x 409 dpi
10" x 12" page 300 x 375 dpi

Both the minimum digital resolution threshold for the defacto commercial printing standard and
the optimal resolution setting for Optical Character Recognition systems is 300 dpi.

Lens:
Nikon Nikor 60mm f/2.8D AF Micro-Nikkor lenses are used.
Specifications: (http://nikonusa.com/template.php?cat=l&grp=5&productNr=1987)











Mounting:
Bogen / Manfrotto Super-Repro Copystand 48"
(http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=5094
&is=REG&addedTroughType=categoryNavigation)

Lighting:
Cool Touch (Two Twin 130 wattFluorescent Work Light Stand)
(http://www.naturallighting.com/order/store.php?crn=568&m=2329&action=show_detail ).
Daylight bulbs balanced to 6500K are used.

Connections:
Cameras operate tethered via a Firewire (IEEE-1394) connection to the computer, with alternate
storage to 2 GB Compact Flash card on the camera.

The DSLR cameras are used in conjunction with book cradles that have been especially designed
for this project and are similar to "preservation book cradles" in use at the E-texts Center at the
University of Virginia, the national Library of Scotland, and elsewhere. The University of
Florida design, however, is simplified.

The University of Florida's book cradle resembles that used by the University of Virginia's E-
Text center [http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/eaf/cradle.html], but the design is altered to better seat
the book spine and to accommodate variable spine sizes. In this regard, the University of Florida
design resembles the Conservation by Design Ltd. "Preservation Book Cradle"[
httD://www.conservation-bv-desian.co.uk/sundries/sundries38.htmll.











University of Florida's Simplified Book Cradle


The University of Florida book cradle utilizes a stationary base, parallel to the film plane. To
expedite imaging, all odd pages are imaged followed by all even pages. This is fairly typical of
European cradle design. At the University of Florida, a bulk file renaming software utility is used
to achieve correct pagination. The Virginia design, while it allows the volume to be imaged in
one pass, requires that the cradle rock on its base and continually be moved beneath the camera,
thereby necessitating continual adjustment of the cameras height and focus.

Like the University of Virginia cradle, the University of Florida cradle, seen above, places the
book into a position open to less than 120 degrees, the extent of openness common for reading.
Then Florida cradle design, however, has a moveable raised arm that slides in and out to
accommodate the width of the spine and a hammock between the base and moveable arm to seat
and support the spine. The Florida cradle shares this characteristic but is less mechanical. The
Florida design requires fewer initial adjustments and has a more ergonomic form.


Copibook:

Oversized volumes and volumes not requiring special handling are captured using the newly
available CopiBook.


C(q''iBook RGB shown











Specifications for the CopiBook:
http://www.iiri.com/copibook/copibook iiri.pdf
Capture:
TIFF will be used
sRGB color-space will be used
Images are captured directly to USB 2.0 Western Digital 80 GB removable hard drives.
(http://westerndigital.com/en/products/products.asp? driveid= 109&language=en )
Pixel Resolution:
300 dpi
Bit-depth
24-bit color for color images
8-bit grayscale for tonal black and white images
Bitonal for text images

Lighting:
Cool Touch (Two 65 watt Fluorescent Work Light Stand)
(http://www.naturallighting.com/order/store.php?crn=568&rn=2329&action=show detail).
Daylight bulbs balanced to 6500K are used.

Microtek and Epson Scanners:

A very few selected volumes, those bound in pamphlet style (similar to today's Time or
Newsweek magazines) may be imaged on flatbed scanners. The Digital Library Center operates
Microtek 9800XL (http://www.microtekusa.com/sm9800xl.html ) and Epson Expression
1640XL (http://files.support.epson.com/pdf/perl6u/perl6usl.pdf) scanners. Each is color
calibrated weekly utilizing Kodak Q-60 color targets.






Appendix 6


BALDWIN LIBRARY OF CHILDREN'S LITERATURE
Digital Collection


Search Collection: kittens .,


O] Include full text?




The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections
at the University of Florida's George A. Smathers Libraries contains more than 100,000 volumes
published in Great Britain and the United States from the early 1700s through the current year.
Its holdings of more than 800 early American imprints is the second largest such collection in
the United States.
The product of Ruth Baldwin's 40-year collection development efforts, this vast assemblage of
literature printed primarily for children offers an equally vast territory of topics for the researcher
to explore: education and upbringing, family and gender roles, civic values, racial, religious, and
moral attitudes, literary style and format, and the arts of illustration and book design.
A great strength of the collection is the many English and American editions of the same work.
Other strengths of the collection include 300 editions of Robinson Crusoe, 100 editions of
Pilgrim's Progress, fables, juvenile biography, 19th century science and natural history, 19th
century alphabet books, moral tales, fairy tales, 19th century juvenile periodicals, 19th century
boys' adventure stories, 20th century boys' and girls' series, Little Golden Books, and juvenile
publications of the American Sunday School Union and other tract societies. Scholars,
students, and researchers from the University of Florida and worldwide continue to request


____________________[QC~tIl~~ Lf.?b* ~fh~t~~


Keyword
search on
kittens


L SHO SUBCLLECIjaNigJ












Results: L .
Brief view

displays
SBALDWIN LIBRARY F CHILDREN 'S LITERA
Thumbnail, Digital Collection

Title, Year, dli MEM l
Publisher, Your search of Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature for 'kittens' in Sort By: [ arL
metadata only resulted in 98 items in 95 titles.
Format


1 20 of 95 matching titles
WiILr Wis~llm ms


Title 3 little kittens
Date: 1890
Publisher: McLoughlin Bros. (New York)
Format: 11 p.: ill. (some col.) ; 20 cm







T ile Denslow's Three little kittens


Results:
Table view

displays title
dateBALDWIN LIBRARY OF CHILD
date Digital Collectio


Your search of Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature for 'kittens' in
metadata only resulted in 98 items in 95 titles.


1 95 of 95 matching titles
*glillil BiW illMmIh *


No. Title
1 3 little kittens
2 Denslow's Three little kittens
3 3 little kittens
4 story of the three little kittens
5 3 little kittens
6 Wonderful history of three little kittens who lost their mittens
7 More about the three little kittens
8 three little kittens
9 Three little kittens
10 Cats and kittens ABC
11 Three little kittens


MEN'S LITERATU
n


Sort By: FPor





Date
1890
1904
1890
1892
1890
1858
circa 1900
1891
1896
1890's
circa 1900


19










Results:
Thumbnail
View
displays a
JPG image of
the cover or
title page
and lists the
title


i. I B N i.. i Ie-
BALDWIN LIBRARY OF CHILDREN S LITERA
Digital Collection
IMili siwwkWMili MIMW^i
Your search of Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature for 'kittens' in Sort By: riar
metadata only resulted in 98 items in 95 titles.

1 30 of 95 matching titles C
vsssyssszvasssS~vsEg


Sli i
Denslovds Three little kittens


3 little kittens


Results: Full
View
displays a
Larger JPG
image of the
cover or title
page along
with the
title. Full
view is
optimized
for easy
browsing of
covers and
for a larger
view on
mobile
devices.


Your search of Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature for 'kittens' in
metadata only resulted in 98 items in 95 titles.


Sort By: Rank


1 of 95 matching titles
Msiisllsivvssly "mEIoSAmMIEvm


Group Title: Pleasewell series
Title: The 3 little kittens
Full Item: Click for full item
dlilMINmllB


i "- 01
Y OF CHILDREN'S LITERATE
Digital Collection


i


rMFUTMl












Main Item

View


Left side:

Text Search

clickable

Table of

Contents

(which can

be

expanded or

collapsed)


Top tabs for viewing: Citation, Thumbnails, Page Image, Zoomable page images,

selecting pages and paging through.


SEARCH Group Title: Pleasewell series
Search This Document Title: The 3 little kittens


TABLE OF CONTENTS Go To -g I v

Front Cover
Frontispiece
The story ofthree little...
Back Cover






UNIVERSITYof
FLORIDA
Baldwin Library
of istoicatl uil&re
Literature


SEARCH
Search This Document


Group Title: Pleasewell series
Title: The 3 little kittens


GoTo .,el


o wf PgYLA


UNIVERSITYof
FLORIDA
Baldwin Library
of lfltmcal Chilaen
Literature


tI'?,
.2%j?


Left-side

with Table

of Contents

collapsed


I I











Results of
Text Search:
Mittens is
foundon BALDWIN LIBRARY OF CHILDREN S LITERATE
the five Digital Collection
pages listed.







The 3 little kittens
Main Publisher: McLoughlin Bros.
Format: Book, [11] p. : ill. (some col.) ; 20 cm.








Your search within the full text of this volume for pages with 'mittens' resulted in 5 matching pages..
Page 2
Page 3
Page 5
Page 6
Page 8












Group Title: Pleasewell series
Title: The 3 little kittens

mUmliMB Bl 3HIMlB a SMl


Related Images


THE 8TORY
TREE LITTLE KITTES














W.-
e,. 3. _




Page 3

p-y^--- --


Zoomable:


Allows

detailed

viewing for

every page

using the

controls

(below the

main tabs

and above

the page

image). The

location of

the zooming

is shown in

the left-side

thumbnail.


SEARCH
Search This Document


Group Title: Pleasewell series
Title: The 3 little kittens


GoTo:Page

I 9 1111 00 m*--0
I V


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Front Cover
Frontispiece
The storyof three little..
Back Cover


Thumbnail

View:


Displays all

images for

an easy

overview.


Page 1


Page 2


S"~' i~'m" n
A*~r IrlU


TuIIllr D A I






Appendix 7


Citation
Standard
view:
public
record for a
digitized
volume in
the
Baldwin
Library of
Historical
Children's
Literature


Group Title: Pleasewell series
Title: The 3 little kittens


Full Citation


Permanent Link:

Material Information
Title:
Series Title:
Uniform Title:
Format:

Physical Description:
Language:
Creator:
Publisher:
Place of Publication:
Publication Date:


http:/Aww.uflib.ufl.edulufdcd?b=UF00080125&v=00001


The 3 little kittens
Pleasewell series
Three little kittens
Book

11 p.: ill. (some col.); 20 cm.
English
McLoughlin Bros., inc (Publisher)
McLoughlin Bros.
New York
c1890


Subjects
Subject:


Kittens -- Juvenile fiction (Icsh)
Cats-- Juvenile fiction (Icsh)
Children's poetry-- 1890


I I


I I


~lli~Si~A~P~B











Citation
MARC
view:
public
record for a
digitized
volume in
the
Baldwin
Library of
Historical
Children's
Literature


Group Title: Pleasewell series
Title: The 3 little kittens


Full Citation


LDR 01391 nam'22003971aA4500
001 (UFDC)UF00080125_00001
005 20090304121915.0
006 m AX^wwwwwA
007 cr'W" maAmp
008 080208s1 890AAnyuaAAsA"AA000AAengAd
035 9 la 001589969 lb UF
035 9 laAHL3946 b UF
040 la FUG Ic FUG
130 0 a Three little kittens.
245 04 ja The 3 little kittens lh [electronic resource].
260 la New York: Ib McLoughlin Bros.lc cl 890.
300 la [11] p.: lb ill. (some col.); Ic 20 cm.
490 la Pleasewell series.
500 laCovertitle.
500 la Caption title: Three little kittens.
500 a In verse.
500 la Printed paper cover.
530 la Electronic reproduction of copy from George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida also
available.
530 la Also available in print.
533 Ja Electronic reproduction. Ib Gainesville, Fla.: Ic University of Florida, George A. Smathers
Libraries, Id 2008. If (University of Florida Digital Collections) If (Children's Literature)In Mode of
access: World Wide Web. In System requirements: Internet connectivity; Web browser software.
599 la UIU Ic UIU Id FUG
650 0 la Kittens Iv Juvenile fiction.


LSANliBiDAROIEW



















i J uo i I The data about this digital resource is available in a variety of metadata formats. For
a digitized more information about these formats, see the Metadata Section of the Technical
volume in Aspects information.
volume in
the View Complete METS
Baldwin
This metadata file is the source metadata file submitted along with all the digital
Library of resource files. This contains all of the citation and processing information used to build
Historical this resource. This file and the next both follow the established Metadata Encoding and
Transmission Standard.
Children's
Literature View UFDC Service METS

When this item was added to the digital library, this additional METS file is written for
active use by the UFDC software. This METS file includes all of the citation information
from the file above, but archive information is removed to decrease file size. In addition,
technical metadata is added for each of the service copy files used during resource
display. This METS file was just read when this item was loaded into memory and used
to display all the information in the standard view and marc view within the citation.

View Greenstone XML File
Most searches within this library are done in the background against an instance of the
Greenstone library. When an item is loaded into this library, the original METS is used to
create this Greenstone XML file to allow the item to be searched.


Sample: Metadata for the same Baldwin volume consisting of METS header ,
Descriptive metadata , Administrative metadata , filesection ,
and Structure map . A complete discussion of metadata may be found at
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc2/technical/Metadata/metadata.htm
Sample:


xmlns:METS="http://www.loc.gov/METS/"
xmlns:mods="http://www.loc.gov/mods/v3"
xmlns:ufdc="http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/"
xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink"
xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.loc.gov/METS/
http://www.loc.gov/standards/mets/mets.xsd
http://www.loc.gov/mods/v3
http://www.loc.gov/mods/v3/mods-3-3.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd">
LASTMODDATE="2009-03-04T21:02:18Z" RECORDSTATUS="METADATA UPDATE">

UF




Group Title: Pleasewell series
Title: The 3 little kittens


Full Citation


Citation
METS
view:
Standard
view:
public
rnnrrA fC-


L STANDARDVIW











UFDC Metadata Template


SMATHERSLIB\matmari






Nursery
rhymes

Children's
poetry

poetry
type="ALEPH">002250935
type="NOTIS">ALK2695
type="OCLC">07762422

type="text">English
authority="iso639-2b">eng


type="code">UF


McLoughlin Bros.,
inc


authority="marcrelator">pbl
type="text">Publisher


Electronic
reproduction of copy from George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
also available.

Cover title.
Caption title: Three little
kittens.

In verse.

McLoughlin
Bros.


authority="marccountry">nyu












encoding="marc">cl890
point="start">1890


source="ufdc">UF00078891 00001
encoding="marc">810916
Imported from
(ALEPH)002250935

University of
Florida

authority="marcorg">UIU
authority="marcorg">UIU
authority="marcorg">OCLCQ
authority="marcorg">FUG

type="text">English
authority="iso639-2b">eng




[12] p. : col. ill. ; 20
cm.





Pleasewell
series





United
States

New York
New York



Cats
Juvenile poetry


Kittens
Juvenile poetry













Parent and child
Juvenile poetry


Weddings
Juvenile poetry


Nursery rhymes


Children's poetry


1890
Nursery rhymes


1890
Children's poetry


Bldn
1890

authority="marctarget">juvenile

The
3 little kittens


Three little kittens

text





LABEL="University of Florida Digital Collections Metadata">



JUV
OO000thm.jpg
BLDN
UFSPEC
ICDL
NEH
CCLC
I













UF00078891
00001

McLoughlin Bros.
New
York



University of
Florida


Book






MIMETYPE="text/xml" LABEL="University of Florida Digital Collections
Metadata">


/>
/>
/>
/>
/>
height="1000" />


/>


height="890" />
height="913" />
height="897" />







CHECKSUM="16147ce86aacad6305022aa709a3f3bf" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="150970">











xlink:href="00001.jpg" />

CHECKSUM="9ba4bbf9d5c35f2bbadbal72e6858fl8" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="154515">
xlink:href="00002.jpg" />

CHECKSUM="da21b1274a92c06702c65d0c7533cbee" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="223728">
xlink:href="00003.jpg" />

CHECKSUM="43ff4ed5ac2f028d27dae0768dfec6f9" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="217879">
xlink:href="00004.jpg" />

CHECKSUM="c6fc3905814db67fee82b40e75efc609" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="149106">
xlink:href="00005.jpg" />

CHECKSUM="5ca3e7609c9d57d4db4da52179fdedbc" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="161306">
xlink:href="00006.jpg" />

CHECKSUM="7ad0bec5b760f21ae3f14ffd2dlf3222" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="233016">
xlink:href="00007.jpg" />

CHECKSUM="0041a087b3c4fdf359ae373cdcf366b9" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="244096">
xlink:href="00008.jpg" />

CHECKSUM="be8e89aa55260455491f7332524c9fcd" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="157471">
xlink:href="00009.jpg" />

CHECKSUM="13660c8752e0blf9fe630815850beb84" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="158691">
xlink:href="00010.jpg" />

CHECKSUM="95a321df957e3d2ce7df7e2191aa414d" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="235630">
xlink:href="00011.jpg" />

CHECKSUM="3e778d58c94c003f57f9f220524bdcfa" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="232315">
xlink:href="00000.jpg" />














CHECKSUM="b2cfd68e2fel6bc482c3023284eed203" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00001.jp2" />

CHECKSUM="37903f8e5fdbf8be7acefcd8e63fcl9f" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00002.jp2" />

CHECKSUM="6a842e110ed2b4397099409ell711a8d" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00003.jp2" />

CHECKSUM="68ef4157311c33ca35d94c90b10fc75b" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00004.jp2" />

CHECKSUM="fcb10171c945f6379246b55ac7e53e33" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00005.jp2" />

CHECKSUM="16c61395776cbdf0667c426bf900d346" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00006.jp2" />

CHECKSUM="5105e814370ef118d854507425ad62f8" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00007.jp2" />

CHECKSUM="dcad372c5527f30a72799f22fc7d05d2" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00008.jp2" />

CHECKSUM="bd0606493d3becOb0fb2681364b211de" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00009.jp2" />

CHECKSUM="lc9edd599d94355a88bff5a666871780" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00010.jp2" />

CHECKSUM="9b9c6d87bb972bbb4a477c322a56ba6c" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00011.jp2" />












CHECKSUM="a0a82c2f2c957666080e2fd44a9d43f7" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00000.jp2" />



CHECKSUM="92el2bb5314e6a9365c5e298ce0db749" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00001.tif" />

CHECKSUM="26451bb3f2b30a945blc2c4284b29741" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00002.tif" />

CHECKSUM="628c89dccd26e82e4ed3eab9f21c54fb" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00003.tif" />

CHECKSUM="6795f67a09155135bce7ec286b6edb5e" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00004.tif" />

CHECKSUM="fcl38ffe8ed5d9be6de596al83faea93" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00005.tif" />

CHECKSUM="519al8a7f968b32fcd9eabe062e7db5a" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00006.tif" />

CHECKSUM="13a5a4338fe43dea14841ed97b7931a0" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00007.tif" />

CHECKSUM="23696d594ea8ed02ffc62c9dc33c66e4" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00008.tif" />

CHECKSUM="cbb3818343dffe27fb84c93a471a900c" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00009.tif" />

CHECKSUM="b8fd8f7ae956e34d4al09b2874475e7c" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00010.tif" />












CHECKSUM="lef286f4223482bf4f74e9a924a570ad" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00011.tif" />

CHECKSUM="913f0176d2e04078fe4327f7f378d802" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5">
xlink:href="00000.tif" />



CHECKSUM="b0elde95fee0837a95cadfbb2d572421" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="15056">
xlink:href="00001.pro" />

CHECKSUM="d09b30bd8880f040dca7fe396390e752" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="14635">
xlink:href="00002.pro" />

CHECKSUM="0e7b213a92509266914b47d58dbfff3d" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="4083">
xlink:href="00003.pro" />

CHECKSUM="37129efb8df8dd111182c9647a59435c" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="2491">
xlink:href="00004.pro" />

CHECKSUM="9cc72683650ab04674460928a8713317" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="15284">
xlink:href="00005.pro" />

CHECKSUM="12ca4c02b73d8308c844893cce29d57d" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="16327">
xlink:href="00006.pro" />

CHECKSUM="537d891f8f2d9e651ecfc999ed4f2dca" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="1960">
xlink:href="00007.pro" />

CHECKSUM="Ob9df9f2fd8d48e4809f8cccdf941b5e" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="2478">
xlink:href="00008.pro" />

CHECKSUM="5f51cec56a2befbd34c5935bl46c3da2" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="16710">
xlink:href="00009.pro" />












CHECKSUM="74e4bl91b94868761aa6cdebdcf46cO2" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="17419">
xlink:href="00010.pro" />

CHECKSUM="cc88f6fblfcd9a2b8886dfce3b391e8d" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="3010">
xlink:href="00000.pro" />



CHECKSUM="4cfb73a498532b09fae49545da5721cl" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="829">
xlink:href="00001.txt" />

CHECKSUM="a7b8ed3737a20f91d0e32eba85d7d78f" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="673">
xlink:href="00002.txt" />

CHECKSUM="709e81b2e7984a617deac2b936efc547" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="272">
xlink:href="00003.txt" />

CHECKSUM="lf6ca3766ce204091d0916ell526a81f" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="218">
xlink:href="00004.txt" />

CHECKSUM="507c4e7e3f02629c2db49d375ae31962" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="700">
xlink:href="00005.txt" />

CHECKSUM="e45ab764b6928dcc29822c9d58657f89" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="739">
xlink:href="00006.txt" />

CHECKSUM="53bfee018d493d5d570e694878255955" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="122">
xlink:href="00007.txt" />

CHECKSUM="5e511205958a6be005ca0f9e785a380c" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="131">
xlink:href="00008.txt" />

CHECKSUM="64e9d0652bb2f9b5acee85525blaf650" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="755">
xlink:href="00009.txt" />












CHECKSUM="a9f270b7885f91bcdc90a542b8bffd85" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="782">
xlink:href="00010.txt" />

CHECKSUM="5a63e29dcaa0d276bfdc98bl511ebclf" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="223">
xlink:href="00000.txt" />



CHECKSUM="8al9283088be87b33efbfdb10bdce707" CHECKSUMTYPE="MD5" SIZE="37930">
xlink:href="00000thm.jpg" />




TYPE="main">

TYPE="Page">



























































































TYPE="Page">



















LABEL="Default View">
OTHERLOCTYPE="UFDC Procedure" xlink:type="simple" xlink:title="JPEG Viewer()"
/>

LABEL="Alternate View">
LOCTYPE="OTHER" OTHERLOCTYPE="UFDC Procedure" xlink:type="simple"
xlink:title="JP2 Viewer()" />

LABEL="Alternate View">
xlink:title="Related Image Viewer()" />



LABEL="Default Interface">
OTHERLOCTYPE="UFDC Procedure" xlink:type="simple"
xlink:title="UFDC Interface Loader" />













Vita of
Jane Pen

Education

2002-present: Santa Fe College, Gainesville, FL
Program Continuing education in computer science

1998-2001: Santa Fe Community College, Gainesville, FL
Graduation AAS Spring 2002
Major Software Applications Technologies

1979-1983: Tamkang University, Taipei, Taiwan
Degree Bachelor of Arts
Major Educational Media and Library Science

Work Experience

2001-present: Coordinator for Quality Control. Digital Library Center, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL
Oversee the Quality Control Unit to ensure the quality, consistency, and completeness
of digital products, including textual, visual, and metadata contents; supervise student
assistants; expanded and continue to enrich the digital collection's holdings for Asian
Studies.

1997-2001: Library Assistant. Alachua County Library District, Gainesville, FL
Assist patrons with information inquiry; resolve account problems; issue library cards;
and perform customer services including data entry using SIRSI and office equipment
maintenance.

1996-1997: Library Assistant. Schaumburg High School, Schaumburg, IL
Assisted students with reference inquiry; helped media center director with
material ordering, processing, and displaying. Also assisted computer lab
manager with equipment maintenance and inventory.

1988-1996: Senior Cataloger: Follett Library Resources Co., McHenry, IL
Assisted department head with cataloging and bibliographies consulting, sales support,
and customer service. Reduced production cost of over $5000 per budget year by
rearranging workflow.

Nuclear Engineering Departmental Library, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu,
Taiwan
Immediately upon my graduation from Tamkang University, I accepted a position as a
departmental library manager for 3 years before I moved to the United States.












Nancy Mitchell Poehlmann
P. O. Box 117005
Gainesville, FL 32611-7005
(352) 273-2728
npoehlmann@ufl.edu

EDUCATION
Doctor of Philosophy, in progress
Comparative Literature Department, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Minors:
English, French. Languages: French, German, Latin. Dissertation (in progress): The C. Hystogyes
of Troye: An Edition of Robert Wyer's Translation of Christine de PiZan's Epistre d'Othea.

Master of Library Science, 1985
School of Library and Information Science, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN

Certificate in Medieval Studies, 1982
Institute for Medieval Studies, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN

Master of Arts, 1982
Comparative Literature Department, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Thesis:
Signposts to the Celestial Jerusalem: Precious Gem Symbolism in Pearl and the Roman d'Eneas.

Bachelor of Arts, 1976
Agnes Scott College, Decatur, GA. Majors: English, French.

EXPERIENCE

Rare Books Librarian, Associate Librarian, 2009- ,George A. Smathers Libraries, University
of Florida, Gainesville, FL

Responsible for developing and managing the Rare Book Collection.
Develop and maintain contacts with dealers, donors, and other sources for acquisitions.
Set priorities for cataloging and preserving materials in the Rare Book Collection.
Prepare workshops and classes about rare books for faculty, students, librarians, and other
interested groups.

Head, Humanities and Special Collections Cataloging Unit, Associate Librarian, 2007-2009
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL

Coordinated cataloging workflow, assesses output, and evaluates the effectiveness of the
unit, consisting of 6 FTE
Participated in national cooperative cataloging programs such as BIBCO, CONSER,
NACO, and SACO












Established unit cataloging priorities in keeping with library and department goals and in
consultation with selectors and curators

Cataloging and Documents Librarian, Associate Librarian, 2004-2007; Assistant Librarian,
1999-2004. Notre Dame Law School, Notre Dame, IN

Created original cataloging for all materials in all formats and all Western European
languages acquired by the Law Library, including rare books. Upgraded complex copy for all
materials acquired in all formats and all Western European languages

Principal Cataloger, 1990-1994. University of Washington Libraries, Seattle, WA

Created training materials and taught over 30 professional and paraprofessional staff
involved in cataloging activities for the Libraries

NCCP Cataloger, 1987- 1990. Indiana University Libraries, Bloomington, IN

As the Libraries' NCCP cataloger, added original cataloging records into the Library of
Congress database for materials in Spanish and Portuguese.

Monographic Cataloger, 1986-1987. University of Chicago Libraries, Chicago, IL

As part of a pilot project with the Library of Congress and Harvard University, added
original cataloging records into the Library of Congress database for rare science materials in
the John Crerar Library, using the standards in The Descrition and Cataloging of Rare Books.
Created original cataloging for rare books acquired by the University of Chicago as well as
materials in all Western European languages.


PUBLICATIONS

Co-author, with Jimmie Lundgren and Carrie Newsom. "Genre Terms for Chemistry and
Engineering: Not Just for Literature Anymore." In Cataloging & Classification Quarterly 46:4
(2008), 412-424.

Co-author, with Joel Fishman, Adrienne Adan, Laura Bedard, Margaret Duczynski,
Christopher Knott, and Nancy McMurrer. "Bibliography of Legal History Articles in Law
Library Journal, Volumes 1-94 (1908-2002)." In Law Libray Journal 95:2 (2003), 217-278.

Translation of Klapisch-Zuber, Christiane. "Women Servants in Florence during the
Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries." In Hanawalt, Barbara, A., ed. Women and Work in
PreindustrialEurope. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1986, 56-80.


2 Poehlmann










Randall David Renner
Gainesville, Florida
renner()ufl.edu
Education

1994 1997 University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
Master of Fine Arts Degree in Creative Photography.

1987 1990 Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida.
Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in Photography; cum laude
Employment

2002-Present
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries, Digital Library Center.
Library Associate 3.
Supervision of daily operations of the Digital Library Center which includes Bibliographic
Control, Imaging, Quality Control, OCR, and Archiving.
8/2001-10/2002
University of Florida, Office of Academic Technology.
Photography Department.
Photographer
Responsible for implementation and daily operation of digital imaging services for the
campus wide photographic service bureau; including equipment specification, integration,
production, and quality control. Additional responsibilities included photographing
museum and library special collections, artwork, and other subjects, both in a studio
environment and on location. Other technical duties included traditional black and white
photographic printing and processing, E-6 processing and maintenance, and other
technical photographic processes.
1/2001-8/2001
University of Florida, Office of Academic Technology.
Center for Instructional Technology and Training.
Training Specialist
Responsible for conducting training seminars of graphic software programs to faculty and
staff. This included development and revision of new graphic software training programs,
and development of the Instructional Computing Activities Training Program. Specific
seminar content included: Introduction to Digital Media, Web Site Development,
Introduction to Photoshop, Intermediate Photoshop, Graphics for the Web, Digital Video,
Acrobat, FrontPage, PowerPoint, and The Effective Use of Laptops.
1999 -2000
University of Florida, Department of Art and Art History.
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Responsible for instruction, evaluation, and curriculum development of the introductory
digital arts class, Computer Art: Montage.

1998 -2000
University of Florida Brain Institute, Teaching Lab Resources.
Audio Visual Specialist
Management of multimedia and classroom support activities within the Brain Institute,
including multimedia auditorium, conference rooms, audio/video building distribution and
Surgical Research and Training Lab. Scheduling, setup and maintenance of all
multimedia and teleconferencing equipment. Performed preventive and corrective
maintenance, and operational instruction of multimedia resources to faculty and staff.










1994 1997
University of Florida, Biomedical Media Services, Photography/Graphics
Departments.
Photographer
Responsibilities included the design and creation of photographic and graphic media
including images, text, charts, and graphs. The processing, printing and digital transfer of
biomedical, scientific, and public relations subjects in both film based and digitally
generated formats for teaching, research, publication and display.
1994-1997
University of Florida, Department of Art, Gainesville, Florida.
Graduate Teaching Assistant / Instructor
Fully responsible for instruction, evaluation and curriculum development of beginning
photography courses in the Fine Arts department. Courses taught included Black and
White Photography, Figure/Ground, and Image/Order/Idea.
1991 -1993
U Mac International Language Academy, Nishi-Koiwa, Tokyo, Japan.
Program Coordinator/ Instructor
Developed specialized English language curriculum, and provided English language
instruction to Japanese students of all age groups in classroom and individualized
settings.
1988-1991
Florida State University, Department of Art, Tallahassee, Florida.
Color Darkroom Manager
Designed, supervised and maintained the art department's color darkroom facility
consisting of a photographic studio, a 10 workstation color darkroom, and a Durst RCP-
50 processor.






Lourdes Santamaria-Wheeler
lourdesswheeler(@,gmail.com


EDUCATION

2005 2009 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Masters of Arts in Museology
Project-in-lieu-of-thesis: "Digitizing Museum Collections: The Elmer Harvey Bone
Photographic Collection"

1999 2003 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Creative Photography, Minor in Art History
Cum Laude

EMPLOYMENT

2006 present Technical Trainer, Consultant, and Translator, Digital Library of the Caribbean
Train partner institutions in the digitization process, including metadata creation, specific equipment
use, current standards and image manipulation
Contribute and translate content for the multi-lingual technical manual, website, and software

2005 present Digital Production Supervisor, Digital Library Center, Gainesville, FL
Supervise imaging of books, documents, photographs, and other materials
Supervise imaging staff, including part-time and full-time employees
Train staff on digitization equipment, including flatbed, high speed/rotary, negative/slide, microfilm,
and CopiBook scanners as well as digital SLR cameras
Prepare archival and library materials for digital imaging

2003 2004 Digital Technician, Flair Pro Color Lab, Gainesville, FL
Prepared digital files for printing, including color correction, image sizing, and digital manipulations

EXHIBITIONS

2008 Between the Beads: Reading African Beadwork, Samuel P. Ham Museum of Art, Gainesville, FL
Photographed and uploaded exhibit objects for accompanying websites
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?s=artaf and http://www.harn.ufl.edu/beadwork
Coordinated imaging and metadata creation between library and museum staff

2008 Pop-up, Spin, Pull, Fold: Toy Books from the Baldwin Library, George A. Smathers Libraries,
Gainesville, FL
*Assisted exhibit preparation and layout

2007 Photographic Formalities: from Ansel Adams to Weegee, Samuel P. Har Museum of Art,
Gainesville, FL
Researched artworks/artists and created exhibit labels

2007 The Afterlife of Alice in Wonderland, George A. Smathers Libraries, Gainesville, FL
Assisted exhibit preparation and layout

PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITY

2009 Society of Florida Archivists Annual Meeting, Gainesville, FL
Co-Presenter "The Basics of Digitizing Collections"
2008 Florida Association of Museums Annual Conference, Miami, FL
Co-Presenter "Developing Collaborative Opportunities to Increase Accessibility to Exhibitions and
Collections Online"















EDUCATION


WORK
EXPERIENCE


Nelda M. Schwartz
2503 N.E. 11 Ter., Gainesville, FL 32609
neldas@.ufl.edu
home/352.378.3219 office/352.273.2900

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA. Gainesville, Florida
College of Education
Spring 1970. Bachelor of Science.
Major: Library Science.

INDIAN RIVER JUNIOR COLLEGE. Ft. Pierce, FL
April 1968. Associate of Arts.


Sr. Archivist/Library Associate II
Smathers Libraries. Digital Library Center
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
August 2004 to present
Responsible for maintaining tracking database for materials
entering and leaving the DLC, locating or creating brief
bibliographic records; implementing and analyzing
condition surveys; supervising, training and coordinating
student assistants;
Previously spent time developing and documenting
procedures for the web-based manual for brittle books and
sales/distribution of reformatted materials; coordinating
brittle books reformat preparations and materials routing;
initiating replacement orders for brittle materials and
cataloging preservation microforms.

Archivist, Sr. Archivist
Smathers Libraries. Preservation Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
1990 July 2004
Responsible for cataloging preservation microforms;
implementing and analyzing condition surveys;
supervising, training and coordinating student assistants;
developing and documenting procedures for the web-based
manual for microfilming, brittle books and scanning;
coordinating brittle books reformat preparations and
materials routing; initiating replacement orders for brittle
materials; occasional serials, theses and monograph
binding.


Library Technical Assistant II









Smathers Libraries. Catalog Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
1975-1989

Responsible for cataloging periodicals and other serials;
supervising and training student assistants; distribution and
bibliographic searching of serials; catalog maintenance;
developing and documenting procedures.

Library Assistant
Smathers Libraries. Catalog Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
1973-1975
Responsible for distribution of materials to be cataloged;
cataloging new monographic editions; bibliographic
searching of serials; adds; catalog maintenance.

Clerk-Typist II,III
Smathers Libraries. Catalog Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
September 1970-1973
Responsible for organization and distribution of unit work;
train and supervise other clerk-typists; preliminary
cataloging of theses; secretarial duties.


COMPUTER
EXPERIENCE Operating Systems (OS) experience
Windows 2000, XP

Programming Language experience
HTML mark-up, including forms, tables

PROFESSIONAL
ORGANIZATIONS Florida Library Association (1994)
Co-organized Paraprofessional Workshop

Library Paraprofessional Development Group (1991-1995)
Co-organized three Paraprofessional Conferences having
national attendance.
Developed a procedural manual for planning and hosting
workshops and conferences.


References Upon Request.









Rita J. Smith
Associate Librarian and Curator
The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature
Department of Special and Area Studies Collections
University of Florida Libraries, Gainesville, FL 32611

Date June 17, 2009

Recent Work Experience:

January 1994 Present:
Curator, Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature, University of Florida
Library
June 2006-June 2007 Chair, Department of Special and Area Studies Collections
June 1992-December 1993:
General Humanities Cataloger, University of Florida Library
October 1989-May 1992
Project Cataloger, University of Florida Library, on U.S. Department of Education
Title IIC grant to catalogue books from the Baldwin Library of Historical
Children's Literature
Education:

BA in English, Goshen College, May 1967
MA in Library Science, University of Michigan, June, 1972

Publications/Exhibits:

Exhibit: "Pop-up, Spin, Pull, Fold: Toy Books from the Baldwin Library," an exhibit of
50 items from the Baldwin Library, Smathers Library Exhibit Area, September 2-
October 31, 2008.
Exhibit: "Alice Ever After," Various editions of Alice 's Adventures in Wonderland,
Harn Museum of Art, August-November 2008
Exhibit: "The Afterlife of Alice In Wonderland," an exhibit on cultural reincarnations
and uses of Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures In Wonderland Library East Exhibit
Area, October 15, 2007 January 15, 2008.
"The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature," in Journal of Children's
Literature, vol. 31, no. 1, Spring, 2005. pp. 48-53.
"Life Is Short, Art Is Long: Randolph Caldecott, 1846-1886," The Newbery and
Caldecott Awards: A Guide to the Medal and Honor Books, p. 11-17. Chicago:
American Library Association, 2000.
"Recess!" Over 160 essays written for Recess!, a 3-minute program recorded at the
University of Florida and aired nationwide over National Public Radio, September
1999-August 2007
"Caught Up in the Whirlwind: Ruth Baldwin," The Lion and the Unicorn, p. 289-302,
Vol. 22, No. 3, September 1998.










Papers, Speeches, Presentations:


"Randolph Caldecott and the Caldecott Award," Presentation for the Conversations In
Children's Literature monthly meeting, February 17, 2009
"The First Alice," Presentation at the Harn Museum of Art, Gainesville, Florida, on first
editions of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, October 12, 2008
"Claiming New Territory: Louise Seaman Bechtel and the Establishment of Juvenile
Departments in American Publishing Houses," A Paper Presented at the Children's
Literature Association Annual Conference, Newport News, Virginia, June 15, 2007.
"The Quest for the Quotidian," a paper presented as part of a panel entitled Culture of
Comics: The Sol and Penny Davidson Special Collection at the University of Florida.
Popular Culture Association Annual Conference, April 13-15, 2006, Atlanta.
"The History of the Baldwin Library." NEFLIN Workshop, University of Florida, March
17, 2006
"Collecting the Everyday: Popular Culture, the Academic Library and the Scholar,"
Paper presented at the Conference on Comics and Childhood, University of Florida,
February 24, 2006
"Children's Science Books to 1900," A talk and visual presentation on the history of
children's science books. "Transforming Encounters II: Children and Science,
Imagination and Inquiry," a colloquium, at the Unviersity of Florida, February 18-19,
2005.

Grants:
October, 2007. Principal Investigator. 21 month National Endowment for the Humanities
grant to catalog items from the Baldwin Library published from 1890 through 1905
and to digitize and make available through the internet those items with color
illustrations. $285,000
March, 2004. Co-Principal Investigator. Two year National Endowment for the
Humanities grant, to catalogue Baldwin Library holdings dated 1870-1889 and to
digitize and make available through the internet those items from that time period
which contain color illustrations. $298,185
May, 2000. Co-Principal Investigator. Two year National Endowment for the
Humanities grant, to catalogue and microfilm Baldwin Library holdings from 1850-
1869 and to digitize and make available through the internet those items with color
illustrations. $381,220

University Service
Associate Director, Center for the Study of Children's Literature and Culture, an
interdisciplinary center housed in the UF English Department. June, 1997-Present.

National Service:
American Library Association, Association of Library Service to Children, Bechtel
Fellowship Award Committee member, 1998-Present
American Library Association, Association of Library Service to Children, 2005
Caldecott Award Selection Committee, 2003-2005, Appointed, Member









Traveler R. Wendell
Imaging Assistant, Digital Library Center
University of Florida Libraries
P.O. Box 117007
Gainesville, FL 32611-7007

2006 Present
Imaging Assistant, Library Technical Assistant
Digital Library Center
Digitization of books, use of Copibook Digital Scanner, PhaseOne FX Large Format Digital
Scanback Copy System, Epson 1640XL Color Flatbed Scanner, Microtek Scanmaker
9800XL Color Flatbed Scanner, Panasonic High Speed Color Scanner and various Digital
SLRs. Rotational 3-D Imaging, Filming and Editing of Training Videos, Architectural
Photography, Supervise Fifteen students. Troubleshooting of all digitization equipment and
computer interfaces.

2005 2006
OPS Reprographics Technician
Digital Library Center
Filming of Newspapers, use of Zeutschel large format camera, Kodak MD2 large format
camera, Kodak film processor. Various Photoshop duties. Digital imaging using Digital
SLRs. Supervised Eight students. Troubleshooting of all camera equipment, film processor,
and computer interfaces.

2004 Present
Small Business Owner
AgoraPhoto Custom Photography
Photographing various subjects and events including nature, weddings, parties, still lifes, car
shows, sports (including University of Florida for the University Athletic Assoc.), local
human interest stories, promotional photos; filming and editing of entertainment, wildlife and
documentary video; logo and web page creation; web page updating and maintenance; digital
image manipulation using Adobe Photoshop. Scanning of photographs for digital
manipulation. Designed and built complete mobile processing, scanning and printing lab for
instant production of photos in the field.

1992 2008
Freelance Photographer and Journalist
Williston Pioneer and Chiefland Citizen Newspapers
Photographed local sporting events, car shows, various other functions and news stories. The
manipulation of digital images using various graphics programs such as Adobe Photoshop,
Paint Shop Pro. Wrote weekly column including the use of various word processor and
desktop publisher programs; gathered information from county courthouse and city police
department including the retrieval of information from various databases.













Equipment Experience:


Cameras....Copibook Digital Scanner, PhaseOne FX Large Format Digital Scanback Copy
System,, Zeutschel Large Format, Kodak MD2 Large Format, Canon 10-D
DSLR, Nikon DSLR, Olympus DSLR, Pentax ZX-50 35mm SLR, Olympus
Digital C-211 Zoom, Canon Powershot A300 Digital, Sony Cybershot DSC-H
series, Canon GL1 Video Camera, Sony DCR-HC52 Handycam Camcorder, Sony
DCR-SR47/R Handycam Camcorder.

Scanners ...HP Scanjet 2400, Apollo P-2100. Epson 1640XL Color Flatbed Scanner,
Microtek Scanmaker 9800XL Color Flatbed Scanner, Panasonic High Speed
Color Scanner.

Printers .....Epson C84, Epson R300, HP Color Laser Jet 4500, HP Laser Jet 5N, various HP
Inkjets.


Software Experience:

Microsoft Windows 3.0 Vista Professional, Microsoft Office 95 2007, Adobe Photoshop
5.0 CS3, Adobe Go-Live CS, Adobe Elements, Adobe Acrobat.










O MOORE



1 King St, NEWTOWN NS' 2042
Australia




Nancy Pehlmann,
Gcorl2 A Smathers Libraries
University of Florida



30 May ` 111'



Dear Ms Pehlmann,


I am an academic from Sydney, Australia, and I am currently researching the life of
an influential early Australian, Rev. William Cowper (1778-1858). I came across a
reference in one of his letters which referred to a small tract he had published, based
upon a real-life incident in his pastoral ministry. I guessed that he would have
published it under the name of the girl it concerned, M.larga.et Gold, and with the
Religious Tract Society, and attempted to find whether this tract was still in existence
or not.

I was unable to find it in any online catalogues of libraries in Aulnalia.i or the British
Library, the University of Camnbridge Library, or the Library of Congress. But then
World Cat turned the volume up for me in the University of Florida, the tract being
bound in with about 25 others, catalogued as: The wren's nest. London: Religious
Tract Society, [185-?].

I emailed the librarian, and was soon contacted by Rita J. Smith, Curator of The
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature, who found the tract and arranged
for its digitization for me.

This has been immensely helpful for my research. This little tract provides an insight
into the pastoral ministry of the Rev. Cowper, by giving a slice-of-life which we have
not previously had access to. It also provides a window into one of the early colonial
instituliOns. the Female School of Industry. It provides another example of thc 'dying
well' stories popular in the Victorian era. In short, it has not only been helpful to me
in my narrow interests for Cowper's biography, but it will also prove to be a useful
primary source for Australian Colonial History, hitherto unavailable.












As far as I know, this may be the only ..p: of this tract that has survived. By
digitization, I have been able to view it in my own en'. irinmicnii without the trouble
and expense of a trip to Florida (as much as that would have been delightful, no
doubt!). The Jiiitizati',n also ensures that ihi, tract will now be available to other
scholars for their own research, and so we are all the richer for this kind action.
It has also made me wonder how many more such gems might be hidden in libraries
like this one. Cowper also wrote another tract, which I still have not managed to track
down. The Religious Tract Society published tllu.lnd. of these. Further digitization
projects will, no doubt, be able to discover and make such items widely available. I
look forward to this with keen c...icrn c,-
I am most grateful to Ms Smith, to the Baldwin Library, the digitization team, and to
the University of Florida for their assistance to me in this matter.


Dr Peter G. Bolt
Head of New Testament


//


~L~









, '. UNIVERSITY OF
* FLORIDA

College of Liberal Arts & Sciences 4008 Turlington Hall
Department of English PO Box 117310
Gainesville, FL 32611-7310
(352) 392-6650
Fax: (352) 392-0860

May 27, 2009

Nancy Poehlmann
Rare Books Librarian
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
PO Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000

Dear Nancy:

I am very pleased to support your application for grant support toward the goal of cataloguing
and digitizing select materials from UF's Baldwin Historical Library of Children's Literature.
The Baldwin is one of the premier archives of historical children's literature in the world, and
provides invaluable research opportunities for scholars working in children's literature, British
and American literary studies, religion, history, and related fields. Particularly unique and
significant about the Baldwin is the range and diversity of its holdings, even within a decade or
two (most such collections show diversity but only across a longer historical period).
Furthermore, Ruth Baldwin collected materials that others deemed insignificant but that have
proven immensely instructive. Thus the Baldwin makes possible projects that aren't viable
anywhere else. The focus of the proposed digitization project -materials without clear
publication dates, and most likely original materials with no other existing copies strikes me as
particularly important, as these materials are more likely to disappear and/or to be overlooked
even by serious scholars. These are materials that the Baldwin may alone hold.

Already the collection has facilitated important scholarship both locally and internationally.
Gillian Avery, the distinguished children's literature scholar, came from Britain to work in the
Baldwin while researching and writing Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books,
1621-1922 (Johns Hopkins, 1994). Other scholars have made substantial use of the holdings as
well, including Lynne Vallone, Lucy Rollins, Mary Lenard, Claudia Nelson, and Donelle Ruwe.
In the Department of English a good number of MA and PhD students have embarked on large-
scale research in the Baldwin, most notably Megan Norcia, who studied late nineteenth-century
geography primers and adventure stories. Her dissertation landed her a tenure-track job at
SUNY-Brockport, and her research resulted not only in a fine dissertation but also in a book









manuscript now under contract with Ohio University Press.

In Fall 2004 and .gain in Fall 2008, Baldwin Curator Rita Smith and I co-taught a graduate
seminar called I t,, the Archive: Readings in the Baldwin," in which students developed
individual research projects in the Baldwin and reported regularly on their ,Ln ,inL ,ork. in a
remarkably collaborative spirit. Several publications came out of that research and several more
are in process now. Two years ago, in conjunction with a graduate seminar I taught on Golden
Age children's literature, Rita and her c, IllC.11 LIcu, curated a terrific exhibit on Alic' on
Wonderland, featuring special editions,. contemporaneous and subsequent Ai',C'e variants,
photographs from early stage productions, and other materials. We also hosted contemporary
artist MILgic Taylor, whose new book of illustrations based on Alice is the subject of an exhibit
at the Ham Museum of Art. Additionally, three years ago, a group of our advanced graduate
students hosted the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century British Women Writers Conference, and
curated an exhibit based on Baldwin materials and other holdings. One of the keynotes for that
conference (delivered in the Special Collections reading room) was given bh Lynne Vallone,
who spoke on narratives about Mary Queen of Scots, including biographies for children. Lynne
and other scholars attending the conference took time to explore the ilildin gi while in town for
the conference. In short, the Baldwin Library continues to be an invaluable resource for scholars,
and I anticipate that more and more people will make use of it, especially as more materials are
available online.

Especially in recent years, and certainly lately with the downturn in the economy, many scholars
do not have sufficient funds from their home institutions to do archival research. Some scholars
will be able to conduct most if not all of their research online, and will in turn help promote the
Baldwin. The digitization of these materials will allow greater access to the Library, allowing
scholars to view materials without tra% \ling to Florida and/or to plan their research time here
more strategically.

I'm very excited about this opportunity to improve access to the Baldwin. Please let me know
how I can be of further assistance.

Sincerely,



Kenneth B. Kidd
Associate Professor
Associate Director, Center for ( Ihildre n's Literature and Culture
kbkiJddl.'uil.edu


An Equal Opportunity Institution




06/11/2009 09:54 FAX 92S5237074


NORTHERN ARIZONA
t*,, UNIVERSITY
SCollege ofArts & Letters


Department of English Northera Arizona Universi 928-523-4911
PO Bog 6032 928-523.7074 fax
Flagstaff. AZ 86011-6032 nau.edu/Onglish
Nancy Poehlmann
Rare Books Librarian.
George A Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
PO Box 11700
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000

June 9, 209

Dear. Ms. Poehlmann,

I write in support of the grant proposal to digitize and catalog the Baldwin Library of Historical
Children's Literature. The Baldwin contains an extraordinary collection of early children's works
and is the repository of numerous undated and virtually unknown early texts. I work at a large
public university in Arizona, and without the efforts of libraries such as the Baldwin, I would not
have access to any rare book collections in the field of children's literature. I teach courses in
early children's literature, and too often my courses and my scholarship are limited by the
availability of texts, I am thrilled that the Baldwin Library is committed to making publicly
accessible digital collections of children's books available on-line.

I was privileged to visit the library in 2006. The policies of the library at that time were
extremely generous to visiting scholars-- was given permission to use my digital camera to
record images and pages from multiple books which were essential to my research project on
early British children's writing (1780-1840). Most of these works were illustrated and many of
the children's poetry works had been set to music. The ability to have a photographic image of an
illustrated or musical text is essential to both my research and my teaching. One simply cannot
take effective handwritten notes that will allow one to describe an image and, further, to describe
the subtle variations between illustrations from one text to another. To copy down musical
notation is an arduous and time consuming task, and one that is fraught with potential copying
errors. Now that these texts are gradually being digitized, I can access the works directly from
my home university For a course I am teaching in the fall on eighteenth-century children's
literature, I am embedding links to Baldwin Library materials so that my course can provide a
truer picture of the rich variety of children's work from this period.

During my research stay at the Baldwin, I was able to read virtually unknown books of early
children's fairy tales. One of these books, The Ruby Ring, is by a little known woman author and
is a fascinating retelling of an Arabic story--there are only two extant copies of the book, and
only one of these, the one at the Baldwin, is in North America. At the time of my visit, I was
preparing a chapter for a reference work on women's fantasy poetry of the nineteenth century.
My discovery of The Ruby Ring was extremely important in that this poem is the first oriental
poetic tale authored by a woman in the nineteenth century. Without the copy at the Baldwin


o002


NAU-ENG DEPT




io003


06/11/2009 09:55 FAX 9285237074


being made available to me, I would not have had any awareness of the text. Other books that I
accessed at the Baldwin were beautifully illustrated copies of children's fantasy poetry. Many of
these texts had marginalia, bookplates, and inscriptions by children and parents. Such ephemeral
markings--available only on original copies of work--are the only way that scholars can gain a
sense of the readership of children's literature. For example, which books were most often given
as school reading prizes (and, hence, contained school prize book plates)' which books appeared
to be much loved by children (and therefore contain scribbles and appear battered)? which books
contained objectionable material that was inked out by parental hands? By digitizing the actual
pages of books (rather than the earlier form of digitizing which created html documents of only
the words of the text), this marginalia will be readily available.

I strongly support the cataloguing and digitizing efforts of the Baldwin Library of Historical
Children's Literature, and I hope that grant monies will enable them to continue this important
service to the academic community.

Sin rely,



Donelle Ruwe, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of English
Coordinator of English Graduate Studies


NAU-ENG DEPT






-n" T I Cnlldhii~oo d s:ludi es hittp:/A:hli: [t dhiood ca:mden s d
RUTGERS T4 4 T
V 405-407 Cooper Sireet Tel 8.56 25 7
CAMDEN -Ca 7den New jersey 08102 1ax, 86C 22 6742






lunee 9, 2c11

Nancy Poehlmann
Rare Books Librarian
George A. Smathers Librarires
University of Florida
P. O. Box 117000
iGine,, ille. FL 32611-7000

Dear Nancy Poehlmann:

I am writing in enthusiastic support of the continued c.iLto, u in i and digitizing of the
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature. I am a Children's Literature scholar
(now working in a Department of Childhood Studies) whose work focuses on British and
American children's books of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, so my interest in
the Baldwin Collection and its accessibility is especially keen The proposed plan to
catalogue and digitize undated books unrecorded in other lbraries and to make lilies
copies freely available is of particular importance to researchers and students alike.

The depth and breadth of lhe collection make the Baldwin the I"h Io, grail" of children's
literature special collections. I have visited the Baldwin library when attending a
conference at the University of Florida and have found the ficilitic,. support materials,
and especially the collection itself to be most impressive. The re idling room is among the
most beautiful I have seen and I yearned to stay and work there. However, most
children's literature scholars from around the country and around the world-not to
mention their thousands of students---cannot visit the Baldwin Library itself. Here is
where the continuation of the catalogue and digitization p,' ;ecls becomes most important
for scholarship and for tkachini-

Through grants to the Baldwin collection to date, many we:ks from the library are
already available and accessible to a world-wide audience. Digitizing the large number
of undated (and potentially original) books would provide researchers and students with
access to an unprecedented archive of public domain works. This material will be an
extremely useful resource for scholars and students of children's literature as visiting the
website is the closest thing to an actual visit to the library. In fact, the searchable nature
of the catala'ce and records makes the website an invaluable research and teci.hling tool.
The site is easy to navigate and the digitized books are large, clear, and beautifully
presented. Given all of these facts, it is especially important to bring the collection
ca.ulin.g and digitization to completion. I can inI1,iIc numerous creative and









innovative courses in children's literature that will be enhanced through the use of the
Baldwin Library's website offerings of currently undated and original materials.

The multiple access points enabled by the full catalogue records supports research at the
InldclrradLuate, graduate and professional levels. Pror. iding the illustrator, printer, and
genre (sometimes it is difficult to tell the genre of a work from its title), among other
record locators assists scholars working on history of the book proiect-. as well as less-
bibliI r.plhicdall-oriented research projects. Scholars can access lesser-known works
and thus enrich their research by considering a wide range of primary materials not
readily accessible in other forms. I find the full-catalogue entries to be very research-
friendly and a model for other special collections to follow.

I hope that this pr, ij~ct is fully funded. Historical children's literature is a g:ro'. ing and
vibrant sub-field within children's literature studies, yet it is one that is heavily reliant
upon access to rare books. By funding a continued cataloguing and digitizing project, the
granting agencies will enable scholars and students world-wide to increase their
knI'-v. lcLde and enhance their scholarship. I give the grant applications my highest
recommendation.

Sincerely yours,



Lynne Vallone
Professor and Chair






IJF *UNIVERSITY of
UK FLORIDA
College of Liberal Arts & Sciences PC Box 117310
Department of English 4008 Turlirngton Hall
Gainesvile, FL 3261 1-7310(
(352) .- -2-6650
Fax: (352) 392-0860




June 19, 2009


Nancy Poehlmann
Rare Books Librarian
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
PO Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000

Dear Ms. Poehlmann:

I am delighted to be able to renew my support of the National
Endowment for the Humanities grant for which the Baldwin Library and
Special Collections are currently reapplying. Such continuing grant
funding would help in significant ways to advance the process of
digitizing and thus preserving and making available the extraordinary
resources of a collection that is, in my judgment, a national treasure in the
field of children's literature.

As I have written in earlier letters for the original grant proposal and
its renew-als, the Baldwin Librar) is one of the truly unique places in this
country where one can study the progres-ion of the visual revolution of
the past three hundred ) ears, as it was registered in books for children.
The grant that began this enterprise has made many of the important
historical works among the Baldwin's holdings readily available to
scholars, critics-, and studInts in the filed, and we ar- seeing important
research into this, fascinating, vital area -- interest that has been sparked by
this ongoing program of digitization. As word of these efforts continues to
spread, there promises to be an even greater expansion, of the awareness
and use of these valuable, historical resources.

As you know, the University of Florida's Center for Children's
Literature and Culture shares the Baldwin's and Special Collection's
interest in make these materials accessible to a broader, general audience.


The Foundation fr The Gator Nation
An Equal Opportunity Instittion









-2-


We look forward to continuing to work with you on a variety of projects
that will bring the remarkable holdings of the Baldwin Library to national
attention. The public radio program, "Recess!" was one of the most visible
(and audible) of these undertakings. In the eight years it was on the air,
this daily, three-minu te program about children's culture, past and
present, was produced here, at the University of Florida, and then made
available nationally via the Public Radio Satellite System and via the
internet to the 500 in ter-linked stations in the network. Based on audience
profiles for the stations that aired the program, WUFT-FM, our co-
producer of the program, estimated that "Recess!" read a potential daily
audience of 20 million listeners. This program program regularly included
an extremely popular %\ weekly feature by Rita Smith, the Cura tor of the
Baldwin .ibrary, that drew on historical material from the Bald \ in's
holdings and thus began the process of public education about the
collection. Over eight years of production, "Recess!" broadcast over 2,000
programs, with hundreds of these devoted to works in the Baldwin
Library. The transcripts for these programs were posted on the "Recess!"
website (www.recess.ufl.edu), and these transcripts, in turn, linked the
listener to the Baldwin Library and thus to its on-line resources.

As we develop a redesigned version of the Center's website, we will
be working closely with the Baldwin Library to include images from the
historical material that has already been digitized through your current
and, hopefully, future grants. This will serve to further spread the word
about the si ngular nature of this superb collection.

Please let me know\ how I may be of help in the coming months with
your important work.

Yours sincerely,



ohn Cech
ofessor of English
Director, Center for Children's
Literature and Culture











SUNY BROCKPORT
Department of English
The Baldwin Library, Department of Special Collections
George A. Smathers Libraries
P.O. Box 117007
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611

It is my honor to write a letter in support and praise of the Baldwin Collection of Historical
Children's Literature at the University of Florida. A fourth NEH grant would enable additional
cataloging and digitizing of rare materials which are critical to the study of nineteenth-century
childhood as well as women's studies, postcolonial studies, and literature. As an alumna of
Florida, I was fortunate to spend hours researching in this collection during my PhD work; the
quality and breadth of the collection especially in the nineteenth-century is on par with the
British Library and Toronto's Osborne Collection, two other archival sources I have where I
have also conducted research since my Baldwin days. I am currently an assistant professor in the
English Department at SUNY Brockport, doing final revisions on my book manuscript, XMarks
the Spot: British Women Map the Empire, 1790-1895, currently under contract at the University
of Ohio Press. This manuscript is driven by my research of geography primers which I conducted
at the Baldwin.

The collection is unique in the digital world in that it has made available fascinating texts which
enable scholars, students, and the general public the opportunity to study social codes,
imperialism, gender performance, and systems of religious belief It is the only resource of its
kind, and in terms of quality, accessibility, and coverage, it is becoming the most respected site
for historical children's literature online, offering a resource comparable to the Library of
Congress' American Memory project or Cornell/Michigan's Making of America endeavor.
Though more narrowly focused than these two endeavors, the UF Baldwin Library Digital
project nonetheless has a broad appeal to those interested in studying, reading, or researching
children's literature, cultural studies, women's studies, postcolonial studies, and history.

Digitizing these texts democratizes access to this rich collection-- scholars will no longer have to
travel to Florida just to read these texts; high-quality reproductions online will enhance our
ability to think and know about the child-rearing practices of another era. As well, digitizing
these texts also allows students to have the experience of plumbing the archive for wonders, an
opportunity heretofore available only to scholars with the time, means, and credentials to travel. I
included several of the conduct books already online in my Fall 2006 Young Adult Literature
course as well as the geography texts like Favell Lee Mortimer's Far Off in my Fall 2006
Children's Literature course; as well, I guided students through the castaway tales for my Fall
2008 and Spring 2009 courses. From my familiarity with the collection (which became the focus
of my dissertation during my graduate work at the University of Florida), I know that there are
additional gems of value and rarity in the collection which further scanning would reveal to the
wider community of readers and scholars. Reference to these texts will facilitate students'
understanding of the period and will offer an excellent means of contextualizing course texts like


State University of New York College at Brockport 350 New Campus Drive Brockport, New York 14420-2968
(585) 395-2503 FAX (585) 395-2391 brockport.edu










Treasure Island or Captains Courageous or The Secret Garden.


In addition to encouraging scholarship and research, digital versions of these texts will also assist
in preservation of the fragile originals and will offer students the chance to apply new tools to
these old texts and to read them in new and different ways. For instance, the rich metadata, the
inclusion of Library of Congress subject headings operating beneath the text will allow students
to utilize robust search tools to browse the collection by keyword concepts and to make
connections across diverse texts which would not be possible through access to print analogues
even if they were physically available.

The collection has been important to me both personally and professionally and I would love to
see others benefit from it as well. The work I did while at the Baldwin launched my career and
led to a string of publications. I have published four articles on the Baldwin texts in Victorian
Review, Children's Literature, Victorian Literature and Culture, and The Lion and the Unicorn:
"The Imperial Food Chain: Eating as an Interface of Power in Women Writers'
Geography Primers." Victorian Literature and Culture 33.1 (2005): 253-68.
"Playing Empire: Children's Parlor Games, Home Theatricals, and Improvisational
Play." Children's Literature Association Quarterly. 29.4 (Winter 2004): 294-314.
"Angel of the Island: L.T. Meade's New Girl as Heir of a Nation-Making Robinson
Crusoe." The Lion and the Unicorn 28.3 (September 2004): 345-62.
"The Adventure of Geography: Women Writers Un-Map and Re-Map Imperialism."
Victorian Newsletter 103 (Spring 2003): 19-28.
My current work on children's nineteenth-century guidebooks to London is also drawn from
research I conducted at the Baldwin in the summer of 2008. I have presented on this research at
the Midwest Victorian Studies Association and Children's Literature Association conferences in
the spring and summer of 2009. Over the summer, I will revise this for publication as well.

I have also spoken about the collection at national conferences like the British Women Writers
Conference, the Nineteenth-Century Studies Association, and the Postcolonial Studies
Conference. At these venues, I am consistently asked where I located such fascinating primary
sources, far off the well-trodden path of "classic" literature; I always point interested colleagues
back to the Baldwin. There is definitely a ready and eager audience for this collection. Once
these texts are digitally available, these primary sources can be the subject of study by a wider
range of historians and literary critics. The fact that my publications and conferences have not
exclusively been in children's literature demonstrates the broad appeal of the collection to
nineteenth-century scholars of both British and American literature, culture, and history.

Please contact me by email (mnorciaa@brockport.edu) if I can offer any additional support for the
creation of this necessary and valuable resource.


Sincerely,


Megan A. orcia, PhD
Assistant Professor, SUNY Brockport














National Endowment for the Humanities
Budget Form
Project Title: Phase IV

Section A-Year #1
Budget detail for the period from: June 1, 2010 May 30, 2011


1. Salaries & Wages


Name/Title of Position
Project Cataloger
Project Library Associate I
N Poehlmann, PI, Rare Books Librarian
J A Carey, Metadata Resource Management Librarian
Library Assistant III
R Smith, Baldwin Library Curator
L Taylor, DLC Director
J Pen/Image Quality Specialist
R Renner/Coordinator Image Capture
L Santamarna/Imaging Tech Supervisor
M Mariner,Head, Text Mark Up
T Wendell, Image Processor
Student Assts/Paging
Student Assistants/QC/Prellminary Metadata
Student Assistants/Mark Up
Student Assistants/Scanning Staff
Subtotal Salaries & Wages


Computation NEH Funds Cost Share
Method (a) (b)


100% of $42,000
80% of $31,228
20% of $52,020
20% of $45,714
33% of $30,652
10% of $55,135
10% of $55,045
50% of $35,255
41% of $40,770
30% of $33,447
20% of $33,447
30% of $24,597
216 hrs @$725
534 hrs @ $8 13
184 hrs @ $8 13
4,540 hrs @ $7 25


42,000 $
24,982 $
4 $
1 $
3 $
1 $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
4,341 $
1,496 $
32,915 $
105,735 $


$
$
10,404 $
9,143 $
10,115 $
5,514 $
5,505 $
17,628 $
16,716 $
10,034 $
6,689 $
7,379 $
1,566 $
1 $
$
$
100,692 $


2. Fringe Benefits


Rate Salary Base
331% $ 76,049
42 1% $ 17,494
278% $ 72,565
05% $ 40,318
Subtotal Fringe Benefits


3. Consultant Fees

Name or Type of Consultant


No of days in project


SUB-TOTAL


4. Travel

From/To


# Subsistence Costs +


SUB-TOTAL

5. Supplies and Materials

Item Computation Method
Tivoli Tape Archiving for in-house storage 150 @ $1 50
4 workstations/OptiPlex GX620 DT 4@ $2,207
4 USB 2 0 80GB External harddrives 4@ $85
4 pks Adobe Photoshop CS 2 4 @ $129
SUB-TOTAL


Daily rate of
compensation





Transportation
Costs =


NEH Funds (a)
$ 8,269
$
$ 11,676
$ 194
$ 20,139



NEH Funds (a)
$
$


Cost Share
(b)
$ 16,903 $
$ 7,365 $
$ 8,497 $
$ 8 $
$ 32,773 $


Cost Share
(b)
$ -$
$ $


Total (c)

42,000
24,982
10,404
9,143
10,115
5,514
5,505
17,628
16,716
10,034
6,689
7,379
1,566
4,341
1,496
32,915
206,427





Total (c)
25,172
7,365
20,173
202
52,912


Total (c)


NEH Budget Form

Page 2


$ -$
$ -$


NEH Funds (a)
$ 225
$ 8,828
$ 340
$ 516
$ 9,909


Cost Share
(b)


Total (c)
225
8,828
340
516
9,909


NEH Budget Form
Page 3


Basis/Method of Cost
Computation


Cost Share
NEH Funds (a) (b)


$ 135,783 $ 133,465 $ 269,247


6. Services


SUB-TOTAL


7. Other Costs

Item


SUB-TOTAL


$ -$


Total (c)


8. Total Direct Costs











9. Indirect Cost Computation NEH Budget Form
Page 4
This budget item applies only to institutional applicants. If indirect costs are to be charged to this project,
CHECK THE APPROPRIATE BOX BELOW and provide the information requested. Refer to the budget
instructions for explanations of these options.


X Current indirect cost rates) has/have been negotiated with federal agency. (Complete items A and B.)

o Indirect cost proposal has been submitted to a federal agency, but not yet negotiated. (Indicate the
name of the agency in Item A and show proposed rates) and base(s) and the amounts) of indirect
costs in item B.)

o Indirect cost proposal will be sent to NEH if application is funded. (Provide in Item B an estimate of
the rate that will be used and indicate the base against which it will be charged and the amount of
indirect costs.)

o Applicant chooses to use a rate not to exceed 10% of direct costs, less distorting items, up to a
maximum charge of $5,000 per year. (Under Item B, enter the proposed rate, the base against which
the rate will be charged, and the computation of indirect costs or $5,000 per year, whichever value is
less.)

o For Public Program projects only: Applicant is a sponsorship (umbrella) organization and chooses to
charge an administrative fee of 5% of total direct costs. (Complete Item B.)

Item A. Name of federal agency: DHHS

Date of agreement: 07/06/06

Item B.
NEH Cost Share
Funds (a) (b) Total (c)
Rate(s) Base(s)
33.60% $ 269,247 $ 45,623 $ 44,844 $ 90,467

TOTAL INDIRECT PROJECT COSTS $ 45,623 $ 44,844 $ 90,467

10. Total Project Costs $ 181,406 $ 178,309 $ 359,715
(Direct and Indirect) for budget period













National Endowment for the Humanities
Budget Form
Project Title: Phase IV


Section A-Year #2
Budget detail for the period from: June 1, 2011 May 30, 2012

1. Salaries & Wages


Name/Title of Position
Project Cataloger
Project Library Associate I
N. Poehlmann, PI, Rare Books Librarian
J.A. Carey, Metadata Resource Management Librarian
Library Assistant III
R. Smith, Baldwin Library Curator
L. Taylor, DLC Director
J. Pen/Image Quality Specialist
R. Renner/Coordinator Image Capture
L. Santamaria/Imaging Tech. Supervisor
M. Mariner,Head, Text Mark Up
T. Wendell, Image Processor
Student Assts/Paging
Student Assistants/QC/Preliminary Metadata
Student Assistants/Mark Up
Student Assistants/Scanning Staff
Subtotal Salaries & Wages


Computation NEH Cost
Method Funds (a) Share (b)


100% of $42,000
80% of $31,228
20% of $52,020
20% of $45,714
33% of $30,652
10% of $55,135
10% of $55,045
50% of $35,255
32% of $40,770
30% of $33,447
20% of $33,447
30% of $24,597
216 hrs. @ $7.25
534 hrs @ $8.13
184 hrs @ $8.13
4,540 hrs @ $7.25


42,000
24,982












4,341
1,496
32,915
105,735


10,404
9,143
10,115
5,514
5,505
17,628
13,046
10,034
6,689
7,379
1,566



97,022


2. Fringe Benefits


Salary Base
33.1% $ 72,380
42.1% $ 17,494
27.8% $ 72,565
0.5% $ 40,318
Subtotal Fringe Benefits


NEH Funds
(a)
$ 8,274
$
$ 11,676
$ 194
$ 20,144


Cost Share
(b)
$ 15,698
$ 7,367
$ 8,497
$ 8
$ 31,570


NEH Budget Form
Page 5


Total (c)

$ 42,000
$ 24,982
$ 10,404
$ 9,143
$ 10,115
$ 5,514
$ 5,505
$ 17,628
$ 13,046
$ 10,034
$ 6,689
$ 7,379
$ 1,566
$ 4,341
$ 1,496
$ 32,915
$ 202,757




Total (c)
$ 23,972
$ 7,367
$ 20,173
$ 202
$ 51,714


3. Consultant Fees

Name or Type of Consultant


4. Travel


From/To
Gainesville FL/Chicago IL


Daily rate of
No. of days in pr(compensation


SUB-TOTAL



#
1
SUB-TOTAL


Subsistence Transportation
* Costs+ Costs =
$314


NEH Funds Cost Share
(a) (b)
$ -$
$ $


NEH Budget Form


Total (c)


Page 6


$ 314 $ -$ 314
$ 314 $ -$ 314


5. Supplies and Materials

Item


Computation
Method


SUB-TOTAL


NEH Funds Cost Share
(a) (b)


Total (c)


$ -$ -$


6. Services


NEH Budget Form
Page 7


$ -
$ -


SUB-TOTAL


Basis/Method of
Cost
Computation


NEH Funds Cost Share
(a) (b)


Total (c)


SUB-TOTAL


$ 126,193 $ 128,592 $ 254,785


7. Other Costs


Item


8. Total Direct Costs









9. Indirect Cost Computation NEH Budget Form
Page8
This budget item applies only to institutional applicants. If indirect costs are to be charged to this project,
CHECK THE APPROPRIATE BOX BELOW and provide the information requested. Refer to the budget
instructions for explanations of these options.


X Current indirect cost rates) has/have been negotiated with federal agency. (Complete items A and B.)

o Indirect cost proposal has been submitted to a federal agency, but not yet negotiated. (Indicate the
name of the agency in Item A and show proposed rates) and base(s) and the amounts) of indirect
costs in item B.)

o Indirect cost proposal will be sent to NEH if application is funded. (Provide in Item B an estimate of
the rate that will be used and indicate the base against which it will be charged and the amount of
indirect costs.)

o Applicant chooses to use a rate not to exceed 10% of direct costs, less distorting items, up to a
maximum charge of $5,000 per year. (Under Item B, enter the proposed rate, the base against which
the rate will be charged, and the computation of indirect costs or $5,000 per year, whichever value is
less.)

o For Public Program projects only: Applicant is a sponsorship (umbrella) organization and chooses to
charge an administrative fee of 5% of total direct costs. (Complete Item B.)

Item A. Name of federal agency: DHHS

Date of agreement: 07/06/06

Item B.
NEH Cost Share
Funds (a) (b) Total (c)
Rate(s) Base(s)
33.60% $ 254,785 $ 42,401 $ 43,207 $ 85,608

TOTAL INDIRECT PROJECT COSTS $ 42,401 $ 43,207 $ 85,608

10. Total Project Costs $ 168,593 $ 171,799 $ 340,393
(Direct and Indirect) for budget period










National Endowment for the Humanities
Summary Budget
Project Title: Phase IV


First Year


1. Salaries & wages $
2. Fringe benefits $
3. Consultant fees $
4. Travel $
5. Supplies & materials $
6. Services $
7. Other costs $
8. Total direct costs $
9. Indirect costs $
10. Total project costs $

1. REQUESTED FROM NEH


Outright


Federal Matching

TOTAL NEH FUNDING


206,427
52,912


9,909


269,247
90,467
359,715


$ 349,999

$ 3

$ 349,999


TOTAL COSTS FOR
Second ENTIRE GRANT
Year PERIOD


202,757
51,714

314



254,785
85,608
340,393


409,184
104,626

314
9,909


524,032
176,075
700,107


2. COST SHARING

Applicant's contributions
Third-party contributions
Project income
Other federal agencies
TOTAL COST SHARING


3. TOTAL PROJECT FUNDING (Total NEH Funding + Total Cost Sharing): $ 700,107


350,108



350,108









List of Participants

Carey, Jane Anne
Freund, John
Mariner, Matthew
Pen, Jane
Poehlmann, Nancy
Renner, Randall
Santamaria, Lourdes
Schwartz, Nelda
Smith, Rita
Taylor, Laurie
Wendell, Traveler

Letters of Support


Bolt, Peter
Cech, John
Kidd, Kenneth
Norcia, Megan
Vallone, Lynne
Ruwe, Donelle


University of Florida
University of Florida
University of Florida
University of Florida
University of Florida
University of Florida
University of Florida
University of Florida
University of Florida
University of Florida
University of Florida


Moore College
University of Florida
University of Florida
SUNY, Brockport
Rutgers University
Northern Arizona University


Letter of Commitment


University of Florida


Schipper, Rachel