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Phase Two, Initial Version: Preservation Microfilming and Cataloging of American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF90000018/00004
 Material Information
Title: Phase Two, Initial Version: Preservation Microfilming and Cataloging of American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publication Date: 2002
Copyright Date: 2002
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature
 Notes
Abstract: NEH grant proposal for cataloging and digitization of volumes from the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF90000018:00004

Full Text






SEND NOTICE OF AWARD TO:
The University o Flonnda
Office of uRcs:erch and Graduate Programs
PO Box 115500/ 211) Gnnter Hall
Gainesville. FL 32011-5500
Phone: (352) 32- 1582
Fax: (352) 392-,%0


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
SPONSORED PROJECTS
APPROVAL FORM


AGENCY APPLICATION DEADLINE
(DO NOT LEAVE BLANK)

Date:

Postmark O receipt


University Project #

Title of Proposal:


(LEAVE ULANK)
PRESERVATION MICROFILMING AND CATALOGING OF AMERICAN AND BRITISH

CHILDREN'S LITERATURE, 1870-1889


Submitted to Sponsor: NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES


UNIVERSITY ENDORSEMENTS: The attached proposal has been examined by the officials whose signatures appear below. The
principal academic review of the proposal is the responsibility of the Department/Center and College. If additional space is needed for
signatures, please provide them on a separate sheet of paper.


Princip investigator: Proect Director)


NAME: John E. Ingram DATE
TITLE: Director for Coll, ns
SOCIAL SECURITY M: TELEPHONE : 352-392-0342
CAMPUS ADDRESS: 204 Library West P.O. Box 117001
DEPARTMENT: Libraries


Co-Principal Investigator: (If Applicable)



NAME: RitaJ. Sri DATE
TITLE: Curator, Baldwin Library
SOCIAL SECURITY: TELEPHONE 352-392-9075
DEPARTMENT: Special and Area Studies Collections


Department Head:



NAME: DATE
TITLE:
DEPARTMENT:


Department Head: (If more than one)



NAME: DATE
TITLE:
DEPARTMENT:


Dean or


NAME: Dale B. Canelas
TITLE: Director of Libraries


DATE


DSR-. (5/00)


Dean or Director: (If more than one)


NAME: DATE
TITLE:





Other Endorsement (If Needed):



NAME: DATE
TITLE:


Vice-President for Agricultural Affairs
(For all projects involving IFAS Personnel)



NAME: DATE
TITLE:


Vice-President for Health Affairs
(For all projects involving JHMHC Personnel)


NAME: DATE
TITLE:



Vice President for Research



NAME DATE
TITLE:
Office of the Vice President for Research and Graduate Programs


Sponsor Code:








TO BE COMPLETED BY PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR
(Do Not Complete Shaded Boxes)


PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR
INGRAM
Last Name (Pnnt or Type)
GEORGE A SMATHERS LIBRARIES
Department or Unit to Administer Account
CO-PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR
SMITH
Last Name (Pnnt or rype)
SPECIAL AND AREA STUDIES COLLS
Department


Title of Project:


IJ IE I
Initials


College


IR I
Initials


Social Secunty Number





Social Secunty Number


GEORGE A SMATHERS LIBRARIES
College


wZZ


PRESERVATION MICROFILMING AND CATALOGING OF AMERICAN AND BRITISH
CHILDREN'S LITERATURE. 1870-1889


INDIRECT COST (IDC):
FOR ALL APPLICABLE IDC ACCRUED, RETURN IDC TO: (CHECK ONE)
r (A) PI and Home Department, College
EIES AND IFAS M (B) PI, CO-PI and their Home Departments. and Colleges (equal split)
FACULTY OMIT (C) PI Center, Home Department. and College.
THIS SECTION. MI (D) PI and Center Only (No Department or College IDC return)
r I(E) OTHER (provide explanation)

NAME OF DEPARTMENT(S) TO ACCRUE IDC, IF APPLICABLE ___
NAME OF CENTER TO ACCRUE IDC, IF APPLICABLE __
IS SPONSOR DOES NOT ALLOW IDC, PLEASE CHECK HERE: E
CERTIFICATIONS AND ASSURANCES COST SHARING CONTACT PERSON:
Exp Date Number YES [] NO __
Human Subjects ] [ 1 1 1]ZZ1 Z Z1 (name)
Animal Subjects EO I I j I PROVIDED BY:
Clinical Trials (number)
Recombinant DNA/RNA O CRIS # (IFAS Only) If DSR has any
Biohazards E (If none, please check here): _questions about this
project.


CATEGORY:
Research O
Training 5
Extension []
Other (Includes: Fellowships, E
Conferences, patient services, etc)


MAILING INSTRUCTIONS:
Mail Original and 14 Copies to: (Check One)
National Endowment for the Humanities 0 First Class
Division of Preservation and Access [3 Federal Express
1100 Pennsylvania Avenue. NW FedEx Acc't. #
Rinnm 41


Washington, DC 20506


SAMAS Acc't. #
] Other


: : .- -.. '. -- .... i. .DSR USE
UPN .1T I A .. :,PROPOSAL DATEr.:.]
,AGENCtI4f0li4lZl | fl
II' J -- 'oI
D A.ML50
R I n r- r


TYPE:
New
Renewal
Continuation
Supplemental
Revised











CHECKLIST FOR PROPOSALS


NOTE: THIS CHECKLIST IS INTENDED AS A GUIDE TO ASSIST YOU
IN THE PREPARATION OF YOUR PROPOSAL. THE
ATTACHED 'SPONSORED PROJECTS APPROVAL FORM'
MUST BE COMPLETED FOR ALL PROPOSALS REQUESTING
EXTRAMURAL FUNDING.


GENERAL
1. The proposed project should be consistent with the objectives of the Department, College and University.
2. All costs should be fully detailed, including the allowable indirect costs, the fringe benefits, health insurance, and any cost
sharing. Remember that the cost sharing must be validated. Increases for salary, equipment and travel costs for multiple-year
projects should be anticipated and included.
3. Does the proposal involve a commitment of the University funds beyond the proposed project period? If so, has the
necessary internal funding been secured to meet this commitment?
4. If the proposal contains privileged/proprietary data, has that data been properly marked?
5. If the proposal involves the use of Human Subjects, Laboratory Animals, Biohazards, etc., you should indicate this in the
certification/assurances section of the Sponsored Projects Approval Form. Specific questions should be addressed to the
appropriate committee chairperson.
6. If the proposal requires subcontracting or other collaborative activities, has a letter of written concurrence been obtained from
the respective institutional official?
7. Graduate training programs should be coordinated with the Graduate School. All new degree programs must be cleared
through Academic Affairs.
8. Has indirect cost reimbursement been requested at the appropriate rate?


PERSONNEL
9. Is the applicant eligible to be a principal investigator? You are reminded that the principal investigator and appropriate
research personnel must have signed the University patent and copyright agreements.
10. Percent effort and personnel salaries must conform to University and agency policies. Remember that new appointments
must be cleared with Academic Affairs and/or Personnel.
11. Assistantship rates must comply with the Graduate School policy.


FACILITIES
12. Are the required space and facilities available without detriment to departmental activities? You are reminded that IFAS and
Health Center personnel should submit their internal space certifications.
13. Have you anticipated needs for building or structure modifications? You should check with the University Planning Office
for requirements involving utilities, floor loading, ventilation, etc.
14. Be sure that the equipment prices in your budget are current. Allow for the delivery and installation charges. Departmental
endorsement on the Sponsored Projects Approval Form confirms that the equipment item is unavailable within the
department or college for shared use.

QUESTIONS OR REQUESTS FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION OR CLARIFICATION SHOULD BE
DIRECTED TO THE DIVISION OF SPONSORED RESEARCH, PROPOSAL PROCESSING OFFICE, 208
GRINTER HALL (392-1582)







* UNIVERSITY OF
: FLORIDA


George A. Smathers Libraries
Director of University Libraries


204 Library West
PO Box 117001
Gainesville. FL 32611-7001
(352) 392-0342/FAX (352) 392-7251
email: dcanelas@mail.uflib.ufl.edu


22 June 2002


Dr. Sandra Goldstein
Associate Director
213 Grinter Hall
Campus


Attn: Judy Harris


Dear Dr. Goldstein:

Attached is our revised budget for the NEH proposal "Preservation Microfilming and Cataloging
of American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889." It requires a cost share of $211,469
over the two-year life of the grant. Most of it will be allocated to salaries, fringes, supplies and
services. However, $20,000 will remain to be raised through development efforts. I agree to the
cost-share as outlined on the attached sheet.

Very truly yours,



Dale B. Canelas
Director of University Libraries



Cc: John Ingram
File


Attachment


Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution











Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889

National Endowment for the Humanities Grant Proposal, May 2003 April 2005


Cost Share from George A. Smathers Libraries


Salaries

Fringe Benefits

Supplies/ Materials

Services**

Subtotal

Indirect Costs

Subtotal

Grand Total


First Year

$47,731

$12,735

$16,066

$10,000

$86,532

$15,306

$101,838

$212,807


Second Year

$52,538

$15,491

$16,335

$10,000

$94,364

$16,605

$119,969


* To Be Raised from Donor Fund-raising Efforts


Both Years

$100,269

$28,226

$32,401

$20,000

$180,896

$31,911

$212,807








APPLICATION COVER SHEET FOR NEH GRANT PROGRAMS

1. NAME OF PROJECT DIRECTOR OR INDIVIDUAL APPLICANT
Q Mr. 0 Mrs. 0 Ms. Q Dr. 0 Prof. Major Field Code:
Name (last, first, middle): INGRAM, JOHN E.
Address: 204 Library West, George A. Smathers Libraries. University of Florida

City: Gainesville State: FL Zip Code: 32611 Email: jeingr@mail.uflib.ufl.edu
Telephone (work): 352-392-0342 (home): 352-338-7558 Fax: 352-392-7251


2. INSTITUTION INFORMATION
Name of institution: UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
City: GAINESVILLE


State: FL Zip Code: 32611


3. TYPE OF APPLICANT (apply as an institution or an individual)
I Institution Q Individual
Type: EDUCATIONAL UNIVERSITY Q University Teacher
Status: Q Private Nonprofit 0 College Teacher/ Indep. Scholar
Il Unit of State/Local Government Q Junior Scholar
Q Senior Scholar


4. APPLYING FOR (check one):
O Challenge Grant
O Collaborative Research
O Exemplary Education Project
Q Faculty Research Award
O Fellowships
0 Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Instit
Q Humanities-based Content for After-School Programs
Q Humanities Focus Grant
Q Institutional Grant (Extending the Reach)
I1 Preservation, Access, & Reference Works


Citizenship
Q US Q Other
Country:
Month/Year:


Q Preservation Assistance Grant
Q Public Programs Consultation Grant
O Public Programs Planning Grant
Q Public Programs Scripting Grant
O Public Programs Implementation or Production Grant
O Scholarly Editions
0 Schools for a New Millennium
0 Summer Seminars Q Institutes for School Teachers
0 Summer Seminars 3 Inst. for College/Univ. Teachers
Q Summer Stipends


5. TYPE OF APPLICATION
M New Q Supplement Current Grant Number(s): Project Field Code: D1
6. PROJECT TITLE: Preservation Microfilming and Cataloging of American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889
7. PROJECT DESCRIPTION (use only space provided):
The University of Florida seeks support from the National Endowment to preserve and make accessible
approximately 8,800 volumes of children's literature, published in the United States and Great Britain between
1870 and 1889. This project is Phase Two of a three-phase program that eventually will encompass about
28,000 volumes. These books form part of the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature at the University
of Florida. The titles will be microfilmed for preservation and cataloged into the national bibliographic databases.
Because about one-sixth of the titles contain color information (mainly Illustrations), which cannot easily be
preserved through microfilm, the project will digitize them to provide intellectual access to the color data. The
digitized titles will be available through CD-ROM, facsimile, and/or the Intemet.


8. REQUESTED GRANT PERIOD From: May 2003
OMB no. 3136-0134 Expires 6/30/03


To: April 2005







APPLICATION COVER SHEET FOR NEH GRANT PROGRAMS Pa~ig

Applicant Name: JOHN E. INGRAM Project Title: Preservation Microfilming Children's Lit.


9. PROJECT FUNDING FOR INSTITUTIONS
(Programs other than Challenge Grants) (Challenge Grants applicants only)
a. Outright Funds $ 414754 a. Fiscal Year #1 $
b. Federal Match $ 0 b. Fiscal Year #2 $
c. Total from NEH $ 414754 c. Fiscal Year #3 $
d. Cost Sharing $ 211469 d. Total from NEH $
e. Total Project Costs $ 626223 e. Non-Federal Match $
f. Total $
10. ADDITIONAL FUNDING
Will this proposal be submitted to another NEH division, government agency, or private entity for funding?
Q Yes Q No If yes, indicate where and when:


11. GRANT ADMINISTRATOR INFORMATION FOR INSTITUTIONS
1 Mr. Q Mrs. Q Ms. 0 Dr. Q Prof. Title:
Name (last, first, middle):
Institution:
Address:


City:
Telephone: Fax:
Employer ID number


State: Zip:
Email:


12. FELLOWSHIPS AND SUMMER STIPENDS
Fellowships and Summer Stipends applicants: List the name, department, and institutional affiliation of your referees.
a.
b.
Summer Stipends applicants: Provide the name and signature of nominating official.
Printed name: Signature:


13. CERTIFICATION
By signing and submitting this application, the individual applicant or authorizing official is providing the applicable
certifications as set forth in these guidelines.
Printed name of individual applicant I authorizing official:
Title of individual applicant / authorizing official: _
Signature: Date:


For NEH use only: date received:


application #:


initials:









PROJECT SUMMARY


The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature is part of the Department of
Special and Area Studies Collections at the University of Florida. The collection includes more
than 90,000 books published for children in the United States and Great Britain from the 17th
through the 20th centuries. The collection is of international significance for researchers who
study historical, cultural, social and literary aspects of children's literature. Current access is
provided through a printed (1981) guide to the collection, a local card catalog, and by means of
title access in the local on-line catalog. (Phase One of this project is adding complete records to
the local and national databases.) A recent internal survey indicates that more than forty percent
of the records created by this grant would be added to the national database as original records.
Although several major collections of historical children's literature have received grants to
support preservation and improved access to their collections, the portion of the Baldwin
collection that is the focus of this project will not reflect a significant overlap with these other
major holdings.

The University of Florida seeks support from the National Endowment for the
Humanities for a multiyear project to preserve and make accessible to researchers approximately
28,000 volumes. The entire project is divided into three two-year phases. Phase Two, the subject
of this current grant application, will continue the objective of completing preservation microfilm
of approximately 8,800 volumes published in the United States and Great Britain from 1870
through 1889. The project also includes a digital component for materials with color illustrations
in them. Color in children's literature increased in importance during the targeted period, and this
aspect of children's literature can substantively inform our current perceptions about changes in
American culture.

Intellectual access to the books will be improved through cataloging the material into
the national bibliographic databases and through the creation of metadata to access the
project's digital portion on the Internet. Titles that display integral use of color to
complete story lines will be mounted on the Libraries' Special Collections homepage.
The current proposal (Phase Two) covers the years of continued expansion in children's
publishing and the increasing presence of color in children's books. Phase One of the
multiyear project covered volumes published between 1850 and 1869 (approximately
8,600 titles). Phase Three will encompass volumes published between 1890 and 1910
(approximately 11,000 titles). Phase Three will be addressed in a subsequent proposal.









TABRE OF CONTENTS


Brief Summary

Narrative

Significance of the project 1
History of the Project 2
Significance of the Historical Period, 1850-1910 2
Color in Children's Literature 5
Condition of the Target Collection 6
Availability of Microfilmed Titles 6
Summary of Objectives 7
Methodology and Standards 7
Plan of Work 12
Staffing 18
Dissemination 21

Budget

Year One Budget B-1
Year Two Budget B-5
Two-Year Budget B-9

Appendices
Appendix # 1 Survey of existing cataloging records
Appendix # 2 Survey of levels of embrittlement
Appendix # 3 Guidelines for cataloging children's books
Appendix # 4 Sample records for enhanced copy and original records
Appendix # 5 Color Management
Resumes of current staff
Letters of Support









SIGNIFICANCE OF THE PROJECT


The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature is a collection of more than 90,000
books published for children in the United States and Great Britain from the 17th through the 21st
centuries. The collection is of international significance for researchers who study historical, cultural,
social and literary aspects of children's literature published in English. The collection supports research
in the following areas: education and upbringing, family and gender roles, civic values, racial, religious,
and moral attitudes, literary style and format, and the arts of illustration and book design. A great
strength of the collection is the many English and American editions of the same work. Materials in this
collection do not circulate, nor are they available through interlibrary loan.

The first phase (1850-1869) of this three-phase project (1850-1910) indicates that more than
forty percent of the records created by this grant will be added to the OCLC national database as original
records (see Appendix 1). For the remainder of the titles for the period 1850 to 1910, current access is
provided through a printed guide to the collection Index to the Baldwin Library of Books in English
Before 1900, Primarily for children, University of Florida Libraries at Gainesville, (Boston, G. K. Hall,
1981), a card catalog, and through title only access in the local on-line catalog. As a result of a current
grait from the National Endowment for the Humanities, approximately 3,500 of 8,600 titles will be
added to OCLC as original records. For the post-1910 twentieth-century titles in the collection,
additional support for cataloging is being provided through a NEFLIN (North East Florida Library
Information Network) cataloging grant. Several major collections of historical children's literature, such
as those housed at the Lilly Library at Indiana University, the American Antiquarian Society, the
Pierpont Morgan Library and the Lena de Grummond Library at the University of Southern Mississippi,
have received grants to support preservation and improved access to their collections. However, the
portion of the Baldwin collection that is the focus of this project will not reflect a significant overlap
with these other major holdings.

The University of Florida seeks support from the National Endowment for the Humanities for a
multiyear project to preserve and make accessible to researchers approximately 28,000 volumes. The
entire project is divided into three phases. Phase Two (a two-year project) aims to create preservation
microfilm of approximately 8,800 volumes published in the United States and Great Britain from 1870
through 1889. The project also includes a digital component for materials with color illustrations in them.
As will be discussed below, color in children's literature increased in importance during the second half of
the nineteenth century, and this aspect of children's literature informs our current perceptions about
changes in American culture.

Intellectual access will be improved through cataloging the material into the national
bibliographic databases and through the creation of metadata to access the project's digital portion on the
Internet. The Curator of the collection will select titles for mounting on this project's Literature for
Children homepage (http://palmm.uflib.ufl.edu/iuv/) that display integral use of color to complete story
lines. The current proposal (Phase Two) covers the years of continued expansion in children's publishing
and the increasing presence of color in children's books. Phase One of the multiyear project covered
volumes published between 1850 and 1869 (approximately 8,600 titles). Phase Three will encompass
volumes published between 1890 and 1910 (approximately 10,000 titles). Phase Three will be addressed
in a subsequent proposal.

Expanded access to the collections will prove important to many established scholars. Professor
Jack Zipes (University of Minnesota) used the Baldwin Library for his fairy tale studies, two of which
were published as Fairy Tales and the Art of Subversion: The Classical Genre for Children and the
Process of Civilization (Wildman Press, 1983), and Victorian Fairy Tales: the Revolt of the Faeries and









Elves (Methuen, 1987). Dr. Geoffrey J. Giles, (University of Florida History Department) published
"Temperance before the temperance movements: some examples from eighteenth-century children's
literature in England and Germany." (History of Education, V. 20, no. 4, 1991). The collection was the
basis for much of the research done by Gillian Avery for her Behold the Child American Children and
their Books 1621-1922 published in 1994 by Johns Hopkins University Press. More recently, Dr. Lucy
Rollin used the Baldwin collection in researching her most recent book, Twentieth Century Teen Culture
by the Decades 1900-1999 (Greenwood Press, October 1999). Drs. Kenneth Kidd and Sidney Dobrin of
the University of Florida Department of English are co-editing a volume on ecology tentatively titled:
"Wild Things: Ecocriticism and Children's Literature", scheduled for publication in 2002, which contains
two articles based on research at the Baldwin collection: Professor Maude Hines, "Implanting sympathy
in nineteenth-century Anglo-American children's literature,", and Cornelia Lambert: "Each Shining Hour:
Religion and Politics in Nineteenth-Century Insect Books."

Each year the American Library Association's Association for Library Service to Children
(ALSC) awards from one to three fellowships to its members for a month of study and research at the
Baldwin Library. The Fellows have studied 19th-century series books, pop-up books, folk tales, family
stories from the 1930s and 1940s, 20th-century editions of Cinderella, poetry for children before Dr.
Seuss, and choral reading and poetry for children. Recent dissertations which contain information gleaned
from the Baldwin Library include "Authority-fashioning in L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of
Oz" by Robert Kosten (1992); "Racial Education: Chesnutt, Twain, and Post-bellum Children's
Literature" by Kevin G. Kendall (1994); and "Music in Our Young Folks, 1865-1873" by M. Elaine
Yontz (1998). It is anticipated that increased numbers of researchers nationally and internationally will
become aware of and use the vast resources at the Baldwin Library as a result of wider dissemination in
the national databases and through availability in microform and digitized formats. The first phase of the
project has already produced requests for ILL of microfilmed titles that have been cataloged into OCLC.
The Center for the Study of Children's Literature and Media at the University of Florida has initiated a
series of short essays for the university's Public Radio affiliate which is uplinked via satellite to nearly
500 interlinked public radio stations across the country. Rita Smith, Curator of the Baldwin Library, is a
regular contributor of essays based on the Baldwin's holdings. The University of Florida understands the
importance of children's literature and the growing demand for courses in this subject: the English
Department has added in recent years two new tenure-track faculty lines to teach undergraduate and
graduate courses. As awareness of the collection's potential for multi-disciplinary use increases,
professors will follow the lead of the university's history of science staff who have already directed one
master's degree candidate to use the collection in the area of natural history and child rearing.


HISTORY OF THE PROJECT

SIGNIFICANCE OF THE HISTORICAL PERIOD (1850 1910)

The last half of the 19th century, from publication of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland (1865)
to Kenneth Grahame's Wind in the Willows (1908) and J.M. Barrie's Peter Pan (1911), is always termed
the Golden Age of American and British children's literature. At mid-19th century in both the United
States and Great Britain, literature written for children was beginning to move beyond the memoir, moral
tale, and instructional books such as Peter Parley's geographies. Authors and their publishers began to
experiment with a broad range of new genres, including fairy tales, fantasy, adventure stories, family
stories, and picture books. Peter Hunt, perhaps England's most distinguished scholar and critic in the
field, characterized this period in Children's Literature, an Illustrated History (Oxford University Press,
1995) as follows:









The year 1850 can be seen as a watershed in the history of the book trade as a
whole, and of children's books in particular. During the second half of the nineteenth
century publishers competed to produce cheaper reading for an expanding market. The
development of publishing for children reflected economic and demographic growth, as
well as a society more sensitive and responsive to children's needs.... From religious
and didactic beginnings, writers were responding to a redefined childhood, one that
required a distinctive literature.... Many authors whose works are still in print and who
had a large influence flourished. In a sense, children's literature was growing-up-away
from adults.

Dr. Patricia Craddock, Professor of English at the University of Florida, notes that "because of the
intrinsic importance of these books, and because they had ceased to be governed by rigidly didactic
conventions that prevented writers from presenting children and their lives realistically, the study of the
children's literature of the period has major contributions to make not only to the history and theory of
books for children and of child life in general, but also to the cultural history of England and America."

Beginning with a gift of 40 children's chapbooks in the fall of 1953, Dr. Ruth Baldwin collected
the books in the Baldwin Library over a period of 35 years. Justin Schiller, a New York City dealer in
early children's books and related juveniliaa", reviewed the published catalogue for the Baldwin Library
in the November 16, 1981, issue of AB Bookman's Weekly. In his review Schiller remarked on the
extraordinary energy Dr. Baldwin demonstrated in building in less than thirty years the 40,000 volume
pre-1900 collection, including a gathering of pre-1820 American imprints second only to the holdings of
the American Antiquarian Society.

She was an omnivorous buyer and more than one colleague has told me the
story (from first hand experience) that she would say, "How much do you want for
that wall of books?" One couldn't afford to attempt such a feat today, but in the
days when children's books were neglected and about half of them were always
priced at under one pound sterling, such an offer seemed possible (if at all
imaginable).
It was in this way that Dr. Baldwin acquired much of her great collection,
and I call it great not just for sheer bulk: her 1756 Collection ofPretty Poems for
the Amusement of Children Three Foot High by Tommy Tagg, published
anonymously by John Newbery, who labeled it "Fifty-Fourth Edition" as a selling
ploy to make his new book already seem a best-seller, is actually the first edition of
which only two copies are known.

Since the catalogue to the Baldwin Library's holdings was published in 1981, more than 13,000 volumes
printed in English in America or Great Britain before 1900 have been added to the collection, including
the heretofore unlocated volumes two, three, and four of The Poetic Garland, or Library of Knowledge
and Mirth [ca. 1807]. The twentieth-century collection, which Dr. Baldwin began in 1977, now holds
more than 40,000 volumes.

Gillian Avery, a British scholar and author of children's books, as well as a fellow of the
American Antiquarian Society, published an article about the Baldwin Library in the Times Literary
Supplement, September 17, 1982, under the title "Building a Library." Avery emphasized particularly
the thoroughness of the Baldwin Library, where she had spent several weeks on separate occasions doing
research:

[Dr. Baldwin] used to visit England for two or three weeks each summer
until 1974-5. Prices were going up, many of the dealers had gone, and she had









reached a stage where she could do most of her buying from catalogues. There was
never any time to check the gaps; nevertheless the holdings for the nineteenth
century are remarkably complete. There are no limited editions or manuscripts, nor
what might be termed the incunabula of children's books: the emphasis has always
been on books that children have read or handled. The library is strong on variants
of a single title: there are, for instance, sixty-seven pre-1900 editions of The Swiss
Family Robinson (including a version done into words of one syllable), on runs of
annuals (all bought singly) and "toy" books.
To the English visitor the great novelty may be in comparing the
nineteenth-century English and American books and encountering a whole range of
authors unknown in this country, and indeed to date very little studied in the United
States. There are genres which are not found on this side of the Atlantic, like the
travelogue books where young Americans embarked on energetic globe-trotting in
series such as Horace Scudder's Bodley books, Charles Asbury Stephens
Knockabout Club, Hezekiah Butterworth's Zigzag Journeys, and Edward Hales's
Family Flight.

The collection constitutes the best available evidence concerning how English and American cultures
inculcated values in children and expressed their own concept of what childhood should be.

Tony Watkins, in an essay entitled "History, Culture and Children's Literature" notes "The rise
of newer forms of literary historicism is connected, in part, with social change and the effort to recover
histories for...minority groups within society. In turn, these social aims are linked with the recuperation
of forgotten texts, including texts that have never been considered worthy of academic study."
(International Companion Encyclopedia of Children's Literature, 1996, p. 4)

The books of the Baldwin Library are uniquely qualified to reveal this literary and cultural
history. Gillian Avery noted that Ruth Baldwin concentrated on buying books which children had
actually read (although to be sure the collection does include more than a few volumes which bear little
evidence that they may actually have been read). This collecting philosophy resulted in one of the most
important attributes of the Baldwin Library: not only does it hold multiple editions of the agreed upon
classics of children's literature, it also supports these classics with thousands of less significant or less
known works. There are many titles not collected by other libraries because they were not considered
"important." These fugitive titles, read and loved by many children, are now extremely scarce, but are
important to scholars interested in American and British cultural history and literature. The authors of
these unknown books comprise the chorus of other voices that surround and provide a larger cultural
background for classic titles and well-known authors. For example, Henry Cadwallader Adams is a
relatively well-known writer of nineteenth-century school stories, which became an important genre after
the popularity of Tom Brown's School Days, first published in 1857. The Baldwin Library has many of
Adam's titles, but also holds Edith Awsby's Three School Friends (1889), Paul Blake's Expelled, A Story
ofEastcote School (1886), and Willis B. Allen's Northern Cross (1887), among many other unknown
examples of the genre. All these titles were published in the last half of the nineteenth century. The
Baldwin Library contains extensive holdings of the novels of Louisa M. Alcott, Charlotte Maria Tucker,
and Horatio Alger, as well as the novels of Emilia Marryat Norris, Robina F. Hardy, and Stella Austin.
Whereas these last three authors also published children's books in the last half of the 19th century, theirs
have now become the invisible voices.

There are also non-fiction examples: Edward S. Ellis, Samuel Goodrich, and Edward E. Hale all
wrote important and well-known histories of the United States for children in the nineteenth century. The
Baldwin Library holds all these titles, but also has Salma Hale's History of the United States (1836),
Robert Adams's History of the United States in Rhyme (1884), and T. F. Donnelly's Primary History of









the United States (1885), as well as 26 other titles on this subject. These less known or unknown fiction
and non-fiction titles are equally important to our understanding of this extremely formative,
transformational time in the history of children's literature. One vital function of this grant would be to
make available to researchers in a very immediate and accessible way the wide range of both classic and
fugitive titles held in the Baldwin Library that date to this significant period of social change.


COLOR IN CHILDREN'S LITERATURE, 1850 1910

One of the ways to gauge the place of color in children's literature is to consider not only its
denotative value but also, and perhaps more importantly, its connotative influence on readers. In author
John Cech's letter of support for this project, he notes that "aesthetically, color illustration offered the
artist a new, wider vocabulary for representation, thus contributing dramatically to an expansion of the
emotional meaning and other visual information ... in a given work". In Myth, Magic, and Mystery: one
hundred years ofAmerican children's book illustration (a 1996 catalog to accompany an exhibition of
American children's book illustration), Michael Patrick Hearn quoted James Johnson Sweeney, former
director of the Museum of Moder Art as follows:

... children's book illustration should never be seen as merely a vessel for the conveyance of
information. Its real role is that played by a Gothic stained glass window in the Middle Ages, or
a mosaic in the apse of a Romanesque church.

Although not specifically stating the nature of the illustrations (i.e., color and/or black and white) it is
very clear from the two examples that he gives, that he has color in mind: Gothic stained glass and
Romanesque mosaics were rather seldom done in anything other than color. In the same vein, Lucy
Rollin wrote in her letter of support for an earlier grant proposal to the National Endowment for the
Humanities, that

Our culture creates, uses, and responds to literature, even what might be considered ephemeral,
for it is in the ephemera, really, that a culture truly reveals itself; such artifacts are its unguarded
moments.

Through the end of the 18th century only a very small portion of book illustrations had color, and
then only by hand. Such extra effort was expensive, and therefore available only to the privileged few
who could afford to present their children with more realistic representations of the world about them.
With the full-blown implementation and acceptance of mechanical color printing during the 19th century,
such "natural" representations of the real world and indeed of the fantastic world of the imagination -
moved from the privileged few to the mass market. Peter Hunt again provides the locus for explanation:

For most of the early nineteenth century, colour book illustrations had meant colouring by hand,
but the development of mechanical colour printing, especially by Edmund Evans, brought an
immense improvement in coloured picture-books for children in the last quarter of the century.

To understand just how "immense" such an improvement in producing children's books with color
illustrations was in the last quarter of the 19th century becomes clearer by examining those decades up to
and in which the process actually advanced.

In support of the need for preservation of color information in addition to that conveyed through
black and white surrogates, Michael Patrick Hearn indirectly provided an additional rational for such
work. He noted that "the purpose of an illustration is to be reproduced, not displayed, and artists have
employed certain short cuts that have not always added to the life of the art. They often scrimped on









material. Papers discolor or disintegrate, colors fade, glues dry out." It is likely that very few examples
of the original artwork for the color illustration of children's books during the second half of the
nineteenth century survive beyond their published versions. As shown through the preliminary
conservation surveys noted later in this proposal, that published material is now seriously in danger of
significant deterioration. This project proposes to preserve the information contained in this collection as
well as make it more widely and easily accessible. Additionally, the original artifacts the books will
continue to be maintained in environmental conditions that will slow the process of their deterioration.


CONDITION OF THE TARGET COLLECTION

More than 83 percent of materials in the target collection are extremely embrittled. Random
survey data compiled in 1996 (see Appendix 2) characterizes embrittlement by double fold test measure,
publication period and place of publication. Findings confirm the results of two earlier random surveys
conducted in 1987 and again in 1992. Each of the surveys was selected in such a way as to ensure 95%
5% accuracy. Slightly less than one quarter of the target collection is so brittle that pages break with
use. Only five percent of the target collection is not embrittled by the threshold (i.e., 5 double folds) at or
below which damaged volumes will not be repaired by University of Florida conservators. Though
degree of embrittlement varies, rates of embrittlement remain relatively consistent from one target period
to the next and from one place of publication to the next. It could be said that volumes published for
children, such as those comprising the Baldwin Library, were never intended to survive their immediate
purpose. Whereas 83 percent of the children's books are embrittled, only 20 percent of general
collections for the same time period from the University of Florida's holdings are embrittled.

The pH of book papers, as would be expected, was universally low among volumes in the target
collection. For 98 percent of the collection, pH does not rise above 4.5 (in contrast to the more permanent
pH of 7.2). Wear (e.g., abrasion, dog-earing, etc.) was reported at a rate of 25.3%. Structural
deterioration (e.g., broken bindings, joint or hinge failure, etc.) was determined to be 12%. These
percentages are comparable to similar deterioration among general collections. Incidence of missing
pages, however, was only 2.1%. Thousands of books from the target collection are at risk because of the
fragility of the paper and the poor, but economically pragmatic nature of their binding structure and
makeup.


AVAILABILITY OF MICROFILMED TITLES IN TARGET COLLECTION

Once the condition of the target collection was established, a sample survey was carried out to
establish availability of microfilmed copies of the materials in other libraries nationwide. The results of
this survey demonstrate that the target collection for this project overlaps minimally with the cataloged
microfilmed collections of other institutions in the survey. The work proposed herein would therefore
largely complement materials cataloged and microfilmed by other institutions.

A sample survey (see Appendix 1), carried out during the preparation of this proposal, showed a
hit rate of 2.1%. Several institutions have microfilmed titles in the target collection for preservation, most
often Brown University and the University of Rochester but also the Cleveland Public Library, Harvard
University, the University of California at Los Angeles, and the University of Pittsburgh. No single
institution appears, however, to have concentrated effort in this area. The University of Florida has
microfilmed 250 19th-century editions of Robinson Crusoe. Although these titles are excluded from the
current proposal, several representative versions have been converted from microfilm to digital (raster), as
examples of the process, and are now available on the project's Literature for Children
(http://palmm.fcla.edu/ uv/) website.











SUMMARY OF OBJECTIVES FOR THE PROJECT


The University of Florida proposes the following activities for the second phase of the grant project
(books printed between 1870 and 1889)

To catalog approximately 8,800 titles through either original or enhanced copy cataloging
To create preservation microfilm of the targeted volumes (and their catalog records which will be
'contributed to OCLC and RLIN)
To create digitized surrogates from the preservation microfilm of titles in black and white that also
contain some color and to replace the black and white microfilm images with scanned images of the
original color material
To build a structural metadata file for the digitized volumes through which to make them Internet
accessible or through CD-ROM.
To derive catalog records for the digitized items, contribute them to OCLC as well as make them
available through the electronic resources online catalogue of Florida's State University System.


METHODOLOGY AND STANDARDS

All work carried out during this project will be organized, presented and disseminated in a
manner that reflects national standards and accepted professional practices. The standards are cited in the
respective sections below.

CATALOGING STANDARDS

Cataloging will conform to the requirements of full-level Anglo-American Cataloging Rules Two
Revised (AACR2R) and to the guidelines already established at the University of Florida libraries for the
enhanced access cataloging of the Baldwin materials (see Appendix 3 and:
http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/rs/catpro/NEHbaldwin.html). All cataloging will include Library of Congress
Subject Headings, subject access through genre terms (USMARC 655 field), and access by publisher,
printer and illustrator, (700 or 710 field). Of the approximately 50 percent of titles for which some level
of cataloging already exists, less than five percent include genre access, and the majority of records do not
include other than "K" level data. Cataloging records for the microfilm copies will include USMARC 007
and 533 fields. The records, which will be created for the digital surrogates, will have an active USMARC
856 field, and follow established standards for cataloging electronic resources. All access points for
names and subjects will be verified for consistency in form and heading use in the local and national
databases, i.e., NACO (Name Authority Cooperative Program) standards. The inclusion of genre terms is
appropriate in this context because researchers in the category of children's literature will as often seek
access to material not only through traditional author, title, and subject approaches, but just as likely
through a term descriptive of the category into which it falls, e.g., alphabet books, courtesy books, fables,
and chapbooks.

All cataloging will be done with the original item in hand and subsequently derived for the
microfilm and digital versions. [Note: The catalog of the Baldwin Library is currently not automated.
Catalogers will therefore consult the Baldwin card catalog and the Index to the Baldwin Library ofBooks
in English Before 1900, Primarily for Children. (G. K. Hall, 1981) for comparative data on editions.] See
Appendix 4 for samples of enhanced copy and original catalog records and for a list of the genre terms to









be applied in USMARC 655 field. See the following URL for procedures for cataloging the Baldwin
collection: http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/rs/catpro/NEHbaldwin.html.

CONSERVATION AS A COMPONENT OF REPRODUCTION

The Conservation Unit Head, John Freund, will work with Reprographics Unit staff and the
Digital Library Center to monitor and mitigate the effects of handling during reproduction. Protective
enclosures will be purchased to house volumes with structural damage, which as a result of their
embrittlement, cannot be repaired. The Senior Conservation Technician, Kenneth McAnlis, will review
volumes and complete repairs.

SELECTION FOR PRESERVATION MICROFILMING

Preservation microfilming will proceed according to two classes of source document.

a) Titles published between 1870 and 1889 entirely in black and white will be microfilmed in
their entirety. The estimated number is 7400 volumes.
b) Titles with color illustrations, will also be microfilmed in their entirety. Color material will
be scanned into digital format (high resolution TIFF files). Later, the microfilm will be
digitized and the digitized color material will be "inserted" to replace the respective black and
white components. In this way, the integrity of the entire volume will be maintained in the
digital version. The estimated number is 1400 volumes.

No additional curatorial review should be necessary, because these items have already been
selected for their enduring research value. All titles in this second phase of the three-phase project, i.e.,
children's literature published in the English language between 1870 and 1889, will be selected for
microfilming or microfilm and color-digitization. In addition to the vast majority of the titles (83 percent)
that are either brittle or unavailable in acceptable microform format (i.e., on polyester base with reduction
meeting current standards), the remaining 17 percent of the collection is included in this preservation and
access project to facilitate research access to the entire corpus.

PRESERVATION MICROFILMING STANDARDS

The filming itself will adhere to guidelines established for preservation quality microfilming by
the Research Libraries Group in their Preservation Microfilming Handbook, edited by Nancy Elkington
(Mountain View, CA: RLG, 1992). Raw film stock will be 35mm, silver gelatin halide polyester film,
conforming to ANSI IT9.11-1989 specifications. Volumes will be filmed using the very latest microfilm
camera technology available. A state of the art microfilm camera was purchased specifically for the
Baldwin grant by the University of Florida in June of 2001. [Further technical information about the
camera can be found at http://crowlevmicrographics.com/images/zeutschel/300 301 .htm.]
Approximately 11 targets per title will be used, including the obligatory technical, bibliographic and
project specific targets.

Residual thiosulfate levels of the processed film will fall within the guidelines specified in
ANSI/NAPM IT9.17-1993. All quality control procedures for camera master negatives will adhere to
ANSI/AIIM MS23-1998 standards, while both negative and positive duplicates will be inspected using
procedures promulgated in ANSI/AIIM MS43-1988. Film failing this inspection process will be refilmed
as necessary. The camera master and print master negatives will be stored at different off-site facilities,
under the environmental guidelines established for long term storage of silver film in ANSI IT9.11-1991.
All generations of film will be stored in acid free, archival quality enclosures as specified in ANSI/PIMA
IT9.2-1998









DIGITIZATION COMPONENT


While microfilm remains the only currently accepted medium for preservation reprography,
preservation microfilm is an inadequate means of preserving color information. Because a sizable
percentage of the collection (approximately one-seventh of the volumes) targeted for Phase Two of this
multiyear project contains color in some format: illustration, frontispiece, title page information, the
project organizers considered four options for color management.

1. Monochrome and continuous tone microphotography (accept color loss);
2. Monochrome microphotography employing the three-color process;
3. Color microphotography; or
4. Hybrid reproduction combining monochrome microphotography and digitization.

An optimal color management strategy must affordably preserve color, with reasonable
maintenance requirements, and provide timely access to color content together with the monochromatic
information accompanying it.

MONOCHROME AND CONTINUOUS TONE MICROPHOTOGRAPHY

This traditional method of preservation microfilming does not provide a functional response to
the needs addressed above. Because monochrome and continuous tone microphotography reduces all
information to shades of gray, such an approach implies an acceptance of color loss, and because there is
no capture of the color information contained in children's books, it is an inadequate strategy for overall
intellectual color management.

THREE-COLOR PROCESS MICROPHOTOGRAPHY

The three-color process is a traditional, if rarely used, method of monochrome microphotography
that would produce film that meets the requirements of preservation microfilming. The process is the
analog equivalent of separating a digital image into component color channels. For any single source-
document page, three exposures are created. The first exposure is made with standard white lighting,
followed by reshoots with, respectively, a yellow filter and a blue filter. Each exposure is committed to
preservation microfilm per RLG specifications.

Color is restored through an on-demand process of additional color filtering and amalgamation of
the filtered separations into one color offprint. The multiple exposures would adversely affect project
cost; and color restoration, when necessary, would be prohibitively expensive. Three-color process
microphotography, at best, is an oblique strategy for color management.

COLOR MICROPHOTOGRAPHY

Color microfilming would immediately and simply meet the requirement for color image capture.
Color microfilm, however, does not meet the requirements for preservation microfilming as recognized
by RLG specifications. Nonetheless, the Commission on Preservation and Access (CPA), reviewing the
findings of its commissioned study of color microphotography (cf,
http://www.clir.orgepubs/cpanews/cpanl49.html), found Ilfochrome Classic (formerly, Ilford's
Cibachrome) microfilm to be an acceptable method for preserving color illustration. Ilfochrome
Classsics' Azo dyes are legendary for their longevity (i.e., light fastness) in dark, cold storage to AIIM
standard (IT9.11).









However, the reasons for not electing color microphotography is this project are several; each is a
factor of time and cost. CPA's report points to the difficulties of Ilfochrome Classic in the production
environment. "With respect to sensitometry, Cibachrome film is slower and has higher contrast making it
somewhat more difficult to work with," the report concludes. Instructions for the film's MRD camera
controller unit (http://www.microcolour.com/mrd www.pdf) illustrate the detail of care that must be
taken. Exposure time is nominally 5% greater than that required for standard monochrome microfilm.
The report continues, "local environmental laws may make processing Cibachrome film difficult;" a
reference to the climate controls that must be taken both during exposure and developing (as well as, in
storage) of the film.

The word "environmental" might be substituted with the word, "economical". The cost of
Ilfochrome Classic compares negatively to that of a hybrid procedure involving standard microfilming for
preservation followed by controlled digitization of color content. "Finally," the report concludes, "in the
case of service and use copies of [Ilfochrome Classic] film, handling damage may nullify any longevity
benefit gained". In its more extensive report, "Preserving the Illustrated Text"
(http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/presillu/presillu.html), also dated 1992, the authors describe Ilfochrome
Classic as an "intermediate technology". Indeed, the report calls for use of "mixed" technologies of
standard microfilming for preservation and digitization of images for color illustrations.


HYBRID MONOCHROME MICROPHOTOGRAPHY with COLOR-DIGITIZATION

Color digitization converts color information to a digital stream of zeros and ones; any given
combination may represent one of twenty-four million colors. Calibrated scans generate "true" colors, -
and assuming calibrated monitors color information is displayed as faithfully as it was captured. Digital
color is stable within active use, storage, and across generations as it migrates forward. Additionally,
color information can be made readily and universally available via the Internet, in contrast to the limited
capacity of the three-color process both for access and verity of color.

However, digitization is not a recognized means of preservation. In a community traditionally
focused upon media life expectancy, digital media hardware and software are relatively short-lived.
Monitoring industry trends and digital assets requires more attentiveness if not more skill than
maintaining a color film archive. Standards and methods for digital image creation, archiving, and
migration are not fully agreed upon or well tested. But, access to storage facilities and the availability of
experienced staff for the support of digital images, in contrast to that for color film, is good. A hybrid
method, microfilming for preservation and digitizing for access, efficiently designed, is optimal.

This project proposes to use the hybrid method; and the particular method adopted by this project
is exactly the approach that is recommended by the Commission on Preservation and Access in its report
on "Preserving the Illustrated Text" (http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/presillu/presillu.html).
Monochrome microphotography is not truly a color management strategy. Both the three-color process
and color microphotography are neither sound nor fiscally justifiable strategies. To mitigate the extensive
storage requirements that would result from scanning complete volumes with limited amounts of color, all
volumes initially will be preservation microfilmed. Subsequently, the microfilm will be converted into
digital surrogates. Pages with color information, scanned from the source document by either flatbed
scanner or digital camera, will replace the page images from the converted microfilms. (See Literature
for Children's "Color Management" page (http://palmm.fcla.edu/juv/color.html) for examples of color
versus film-to-digital reproductions of illustrations).

Each digitized volume will be searchable on the Internet through metadata access points based on
their MARC records to include author, title, date, printer/publisher, genre, and subject terms. The Florida









Center for Library Automation (FCLA) provides automation services that assist the University of Florida
Libraries in meeting its teaching and research objectives for students and faculty. Costs associated with
its services are included as cost share; FCLA's costs are mandated and provided through Florida
legislation. FCLA has established a project code "JUV" through which to create the interface to the
scanned materials. Genre terms will be derived from the American Library Association/Rare Books and
Manuscripts guidelines for genre access to original materials. These access points will take the form of
citation records maintained in a partition of the FCLA bibliographic database dedicated to the Literature
for Children (http://palmm.fcla.edu/juv/). Based on data from Phase One of this multiyear project, each
item will require one hour, or approximately .75 FTE over the two-year project to both derive this access
from the existing MARC record and to create wholly new structural metadata for navigation of the
digitized resources. Unlike resources in other collections, literature for children frequently lacks clearly
delineated structural metadata in the form of printed Tables of Contents; hence, the digitized literature
itself must be read to ensure adequate and appropriate structural representation.



QUALITY CONTROL FOR COLOR CONTENT

Digital images undergo an inspection for quality control analogous to and as rigorous as that for
preservation microfilm. The major difference consists in 100% image inspection as well as inspection of
the metadata files to ensure accuracy. Images are inspected for skew, resolution (dpi), (no) compression,
image-orientation, and bit-depth in particular. Adobe Photoshop 7.0
(http://www.adobe.com/products/photoshop/main.html) image processing software will be used to
facilitate efficient management of the inspection process and to verify gray and color values per
specification.

Color will be a minimum of 24 bits per pixel. Equipment, either the Microtek 9600XL
(http://www.microtekusa.com/sm9600xl.html) or Epson Expression 1640XL-SE
(http://www.epson.com/cgi-bin/Store/index.jsp) flatbed scanners will be calibrated for color and gray
capture at least once daily using Kodak Q-60 and similar Kodak targets. Current practice entails
calibration as many as four times daily, depending upon the level of use at any given capture workstation.
Color verification measures white, black and red elements, which may deviate from the average of the
standard RGB numeric values by no more than five points. (Cf., also, WORKFLOW DIGITIZATION,
below for digitization of monochrome content from microfilm.)

All digital images for this project will be captured as uncompressed TIFF files, which are stored
immediately upon creation on the Digital Library Center's image server. Digital Library Center (DLC)
staff will review the scanned images at workstations dedicated to and calibrated for such inspections.
Errors noted during inspection will be returned immediately to the scanning workstation for correction
and subsequent review. Images that pass inspection will be updated immediately in the DLC tracking
system and then sent to an "archiving" workstation for migration to gold-based CD-ROMs until images
and their structural metadata can be sent to FCLA, which maintains yet another archive of the digital
images.

ADMINISTRATIVE AND STRUCTURAL METADATA

Administrative metadata is used for purposes of administering (i.e., inspecting, refreshing,
migrating, etc.) the digital objects produced by this project. It is recorded in either or both the DLC's
tracking database and MARC21 catalog records for the microfilm and digital items.









The project's structural metadata contains information to inform construction and navigation of
the digital resources. The DLC and FCLA have implemented an XML-encoded administrative and
structural metadata scheme (MXF-dtd, cf, http://fc I nOe.fcla.edu/-pcaplan/XMLmetadata/MXF.html),
compliant with the NISO Technical Metadata for Digital Still Images
(http://www.niso.org/commitau.html). Both the DLC and FCLA monitor the development of the METS
standard at the Library of Congress and are committed to replace the MXF DTD with the METS DTD as
the standard is finalized. Currently, a version of the Elsevier EFFECT format, is used to display encoded
structural metadata, to link to MARC21 catalog records, and to make pageable JPEG images accessible.
The migration of metadata, cataloging and pageable JPEG images into a version of the University of
Michigan's XPAT system (http://www.dlxs.org/products/xpat.html) at FCLA is ongoing. XPAT provides
greater searchability of structural metadata and, in future as pages images may be converted to text,
affords the integration of searchable text.


PLAN OF WORK

SELECTION OF TARGET COLLECTION

Rita Smith, Curator of the Baldwin Library will select all titles in the second phase of the target
collection (i.e. children's literature published in the English language between 1870 and 1889). Student
assistants trained and supervised by the Curator will pull the books from the shelves for delivery to
cataloging. Items will be identified a) through a card catalog that provides chronological access to the
collection and b) through the library's online catalog which now includes abbreviated records containing
title and some dates of publication (data derived from an inventory of the entire collection completed in
1999). Because the card catalog does not contain the shelf locations of the items, the online catalog must
be used to ascertain the locations. Again, the card catalog contains items with hypothetical dates of
publication, which will be used to identify volumes in the electronic inventory without imprint dates.

CATALOGING THE SOURCE DOCUMENT

The selected titles will be searched initially in LUIS, the State University System's (SUS) on-line
catalog. Titles already in LUIS will have Baldwin Library holdings added. Titles not found in LUIS will
be searched on OCLC. If copy is found, UF holdings will be added and the record exported into LUIS.
This portion of the project is assigned to a Library Technical Assistant (.5 FTE) to verify that the work in
hand matches the OCLC record. After the record has been exported into LUIS, an Archivist-level
technical support person (Jane Anne Carey) will assure quality control by verifying authority work.
Carey will also add research access points for publisher, printer and illustrator (USMARC 700, 710),
subject genre terms (USMARC 655) and an active link to the digitized titles (USMARC 856). This work
will be carried out under the supervision ofTatiana Barr, Head, Humanities and Special Collections
Cataloging Unit. For titles lacking copy in OCLC, a full AACR2 record will be created and added to the
national database by the original records Cataloger. The original records Cataloger (Ruth Sheng) will
also be responsible for contributing name authority records to NACO where necessary and deemed
feasible. All cataloging will conform to AACR2 rules and USMARC Bibliographic Format Standards.

Based on the results from twenty months of cataloging activity during phase one of the current
NEH grant, the complete cataloging sequence for an original record from searching for copy through
full AACR2 enhanced catalog record requires approximately 45 minutes per title. To create an
enhanced copy catalog record requires approximately 20 minutes per title. The percentage of titles in this
second segment of the three-phase project that will require original cataloging is projected to be about 45
percent, or approximately 4000 items. At the above rate of items per hour, it will take about 3000 hours








to complete the original cataloging. At the rate of three titles per hour for enhanced copy cataloging, the
time required for the estimated 4800 titles is approximately 1600 hours. To be added into the measure is
the time required for NACO which will complete the projected FTE requirements for the cataloging staff.

CATALOGING THE MICROFILM

Once the record for the source document has been created, the project microfilmer (Kim Davis),
under the supervision of Tatiana Barr (Head, Humanities and Special Collections Cataloging Unit), will
create bibliographic records for the microfilm versions. These records will derive from the bibliographic
records for the source documents, i.e., the bibliographic description and access information for the source
document will be merged into an OCLC template of constant data information for USMARC fields 007,
533, and 856; these staff members will also update local holdings records in the UF online database. The
estimated time to create these records is 10 minutes per item, or approximately 1500 hours for the
microfilm records. The records will be contributed to OCLC as original records; OCLC will also provide
a tape load into the RLIN database by an arrangement between OCLC and RLIN.

PRE-MICROFILMING/DIGITIZATION

Preservation Department staff working under the supervision ofNelda Schwartz, the
Reprographics Unit Head, will supply all targets according to Research Libraries Group guidelines as
published in its Preservation Microfilming Handbook, edited by Nancy Elkington (Mountain View, CA:
RLG, 1992). Information used to track volumes, generate targets and packing lists, prepare quality control
sheets, and provide technical information used in USMARC fields 007, 533, 583, etc., will be recorded in
the Preservation Department's FILMLOG system.

SELECTION FOR MICROFILMING

Due to statistical analyses conducted during Phase One, titles selected for black and white
microfilming or digitization will not be searched in OCLC and RLIN during this second phase of the
grant. In the majority of preservation microfilming projects, titles selected for filming are searched in
OCLC and RLIN to confirm that the title has not previously been filmed to preservation standards. This
avoids a duplication of efforts. Early results from these searches in Phase One (January and February
2001) showed a 2.1% "hit rate". [Only 2.1% of the titles that were searched showed acceptable available
replacements.] The decision was made by the grant coordinators to discontinue the searching due to the
amount of staff time expended on the effort and the monetary costs associated with the database
searching.

Following microfilming, Preservation Department staff, working under the supervision of senior
microfilm technician, James Clifton, will conduct final visual and density inspections, note chemical test
results, authorize refilming as necessary, and record data. They will generate microform technical
information reports for catalogers and/or other staff who will complete the final stage of cataloging the
microfilm by adding technical information codes to the microfilm record in OCLC and updating
USMARC 533 field. These staff will also prepare microform masters for storage.

MICROFILMING

The University of Florida Preservation Department will serve as the filming agent for this project.
Previous NEH grant filming successfully executed by Preservation Department staff includes two sections
of the RLG sponsored Great Collections Microfilming Project (GCMP2 and GCMP4), the United States









Newspaper Project (USNP), the United States Agriculture Information Network Project (USAIN) and, as
of June 2001, the Baldwin Children's Literature grant.

Once the cataloged volumes arrive in the Preservation Department, their bibliographic
information is entered in a local SQL database, Filmlog, which is used to produce eye legible targets,
generate packing lists, track reshoots, and document storage locations, among other functions. Once the
specific bibliographic targets are generated, the volumes are transferred to the secure camera room. As
noted in the Methodology and Standards section (p.10-11), all filming adheres to preservation guidelines
set out in the RLG Preservation Microfilming Handbook. The film is processed onsite daily, using a
Kodak Prostar Archives microfilm processor. The film is inspected immediately for resolution, density,
legibility, bibliographic completeness, etc. per MS-23.

Batches of inspected camera master negatives will then be sent out for duplication. A second
negative and a positive service copy of each reel are produced during this stage of work. A polysulfide
treatment, used to retard deterioration of the silver images, is performed on both negatives. All
duplication services will be provided by Preservation Resources, an OCLC company, in Bethlehem, PA.

After passing a post duplication inspection process, microfilm will be processed for storage as
required by the RLG Handbook. This includes acid free reel ties and clam shell boxes. The University of
Florida commits in perpetuity to the continued storage, periodic inspection and maintenance of first and
second generation masters, as well as the sale of third generation distribution microfilm. First generation
camera masters are stored under contract with Iron Mountain (formerly NUS) in Boyers, PA, while
second generation print masters are stored under contract with Preservation Resources of Bethlehem, PA.
Distribution microfilm is sold under compliance with current U.S. copyright legislation at cost.
Information about the distribution process can be found at
http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/preserve/repro/Sales/index.html.



DIGITIZATION

Using color (Kodak Q-60 target) calibrated flatbed scanners (either the Microtek 9600XL
(http://www.microtekusa.com/sm9600xl.html) or Epson Expression 1640XL-SE
(http://www.epson.com/cgi-bin/Store/index.jsp), staff at the University of Florida's Digital Library Center
will scan the items selected for digitization into uncompressed TIFF files, which will be archived initially
on CD-ROMs (an additional electronic master will be archived by FCLA, see below). Color materials
from tightly bound volumes are digitized using a digital camera (also color calibrated with the Kodak Q-
60 target), either a Phase One Power Phase FX digital camera-back system (specifications:
http://www.zbe.com/products/satellite/satellite.html and
http://www.phaseone.com/brochures/powerfx.html) or, more frequently, Kodak DC290
(http://www.kodak.com/cgi-bin/webCatalog.pl?product=KODAK+DC290+Zoom+Digital+Camera)
digital camera.

The uncompressed TIFF files are produced at a minimum of 24 bits per pixel, using Adobe
Photoshop 7.0 (http://www.adobe.com/products/photoshop/main.html) image processing software to
guidelines outlined by Anne R. Kenney and Stephen Chapman, Digital Imaging for Libraries and
Archives, (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Library, 1996) and by Anne R. Kenney and Oya Reiger,
Moving Theory into Practice (Mountain View, CA: Research Libraries Group, 2000) and the
accompanying Digital Imaging Tutorial
(http://www.library.cornell.edu/reservation/tutorial/contents.html). Theses guidelines continue to serve
as defacto standards for the digitization of library and archival materials. Color verification procedure









measures white, black and red elements, which may deviate from the average of the standard RGB
numeric values by no more than five points.

A contracted vendors) (currently. both Preservation Resources [Bethlehem, PA] and Pacific Data
Conversion Corporation [Eugene, ORJ) using Mekel high-speed film digitizers, will convert the negative,
print-master microfilm at a minimum of 600 dpi, 8-bit gray scale. All images both those created in-
house or contracted out to a vendor receive quality control and will be derived into JPEGs. The order of
both TIFFs and JPEGs is detailed in structural metadata, relating page order information to intellectual
constructs of chapters, sections, etc.

The Florida Center for Library Automation's Digital'Library Services (FCLA DLS) will receive,
from the DLC, digital images uncompressedd TIFFs and JPEG derivatives) together with structural
metadata via FTP. TIFF images will be used to create additional PDF derivatives for access to printable
page bundles. JPEG derivatives will be encapsulated in HTML, and include a navigation template
allowing users to move through the digital resource as they would a printed volume: i.e., from part to part,
directionally from page to page, and randomly from page to page by means of a "goto" routine. (Cf. the
examples online by searching Phase One collections at http://palmm.fcla.edu/juv/.) FCLA performs
check-sum and write verifications and other automated quality controls on these processes. A more
complete description of these processes is available from Literature for Children
(http://palmm.fcla.edu/juv/aboutpr.html).

Digital Library Center staff will derive provisional records from the bibliographic record when an
item has been selected to be digitized. Once the item has been digitized and scanned according to the
above procedures and mounted on the FCLA server, project staff will end-catalog the record for the
electronic version using guidelines in the Baldwin cataloging procedures
(http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/rs/catpro/NEHbaldwin.html). These records will reside on the Florida State
University System online catalog for electronic resources, and will also be contributed to OCLC as
original records.

DIGITAL ARCHIVING

FCLA archives processed TIFFs into "dark storage", under appropriate climate controls, at Florida's
NorthEast Regional Data Center (NERDC), on standard reel-to-reel magnetic media which is routinely
inspected, refreshed as necessary, and periodically migrated to media. Additionally, consistent with
practice carried over from preservation microfilming, electronic masters are also stored by the Digital
Library Center, on CD-ROMs, each logged with check-sum information and maintained under automated
inspection and migration schedules. With the migration of metadata and images to FCLA's XPAT
system, Open Archives Iniative (OAI) compliant Dublin Core metadata will point to the electronic
resources created by this project.


EQUIPMENT

Two computers with Pentium processors equipped to access local and national databases were
purchased (in Phase One) to provide additional support for the cataloging staff. A digital camera and
copy stand were also purchased to allow for non-intrusive reproduction of the books that cannot be
scanned without harming the objects.

The per title cost will be approximately $71.00 and includes a camera master negative, a print
master negative, a positive use copy, original and enhanced copy cataloging for 8,800 titles, and digital
versions of 1,400 of those 8,800 volumes.












PROPOSED WORK SCHEDULE FOR PHASE TWO


Activities Key:

Document Source Cataloging will entail:

Training of the student assistants to pull materials
Searching LUIS and OCLC
Enhanced copy cataloging
Original cataloging
Creation of NACO records
Record updating will result in the production of Microform Technical Information Reports (i.e.,
machine generated USMARC 007, 533, and 583 code).
Creation of original cataloging, using MTIR, for microfilm versions

Preparation will entail

Collation of the objects
Preservation enclosures for disbound or fragile volumes
Queuing the material for microfilm/digitization
Recording tracking information, as well as production of targets, quality control sheets, and packing
lists.

Microfilming will entail:

Production of microfilm in three generations per ANSI, AIIM and RLG specifications together with
IPI SilverLock polysulfide protection
Completion of the quality control report
Refilming and splicing as necessary.

Digitization will entail:

Preliminary Metadata Component
Derive catalog record into digital library partition and into DLC tracking database
Complete structural metadata skeleton
* Color Component
Establish scanning dpi (per Cornell guidelines) and assign to technician
Scan color source images (24-bit color at established dpi)
Complete image quality control (rescan as necessary)
Link images to STRUCTURAL METADATA
Complete metadata quality control (revise as necessary)
Archive COLOR images and update DLC tracking database
Complete conservation review of scanned materials and return volumes to Baldwin Library
shelves
* Film Conversion Component
Receive film-to-digital images from vendor and complete image quality control











Rename images as necessary and return film to MICROFORMS (LIBRARY WEST)
Link images (without linked color images) to STRUCTURAL METADATA
Complete metadata quality control (revise as necessary)
Archive FILM-TO-DIGITAL images and update DLC tracking database
* File Transfer Component
Derive JPEGs and complete JPEG quality control
FTP images & metadata to FCLA and Update TRACKING DATABASE
FCLA mounts PDF and JPEG-page-turning versions on LITERATURE FOR CHILDREN website.
Verify web versions (revise images and metadata as necessary)
FCLA archives TIFF images and metadata. (DLC maintains a secondary electronic archive
master.)

Post-microfilming activities will entail:


Microfilm inspection by University of Florida staff
Completion of tracking record up-dates
Shipment of accepted film to archival storage
The processing of positives for library use.
Return of objects to shelves.


The following table represents ideal rates of productivity for all project objectives. The rates
reflect lower production figures for quarters with major holidays and/or anticipated summer vacation
schedules


SCHEDULE OF OBJECTIVES (NUMBER OF TITLES FIRST YEAR

May July August October November January February April Total Total Project Total
2003 2003 2003 2004 2004 1styear 2nd year

Document 1200 1200 1000 1000 4400
Source
Cataloging

Preparation 1250 1250 1000 1000 4500

Microfilming 1100 1100 1100 1100 4400

Digitization 200 200 150 150 700

Post-Microfilm/ 600 1200 1200 1200 4200
Digitization
Activities




SCHEDULE OF OBJECTIVES (NUMBER OF TITLES SECOND YEAR

May July August October November January February April Total Project Total
2004 2004 2004- 2005 2005 2nd year


Document
Source
Cataloging


Preparation 1250

Microfilming 1100


Digitization

Post-Mlcroflmi
Digitization


1200


4400 8800



4300 8800

4400 8800

700 1400

4800 8800









STAFFING


DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL AND AREA STUDIES COLLECTIONS

The George A. Smathers Libraries' Department of Special and Area Studies Collections holds the
primary source research collections of the University of Florida. The named collections include the P.K.
Yonge Library of Florida History, the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature, and the
Belknap Collection for the Performing Arts. The area studies collections are comprised of African,
Asian, Jewish, and Latin American materials. The general collections consist of Manuscripts, Rare Books,
and University Archives. Total holdings: 750,000 volumes, 60,000 microfilms, 10 million manuscripts
and archival items. Staff: 22 FTE.

RESOURCE SERVICES DEPARTMENT

The Resource Services Department staff are responsible for creating and maintaining a NOTIS-
based online catalog (to be succeeded by another system in fall, 2001). They contribute original
bibliographic and authority records and holdings information to the OCLC national database and
participate in the CONSER, BIBCO, NACO, SACO and OCLC Enhance national cooperative programs.
As a member of the Research Libraries Group, through the Florida Center for Library Automation, the
Department tape-loads records to RLIN. The Department has previously participated in the National
Endowment for the Humanities and U.S. Department of Education Title IIC Project (RC-21593-88) for
National Database Access to Library Resourcesfor Latin American Studies through Retrospective
Conversion of Latin American Library Materials (1988-1991), the U.S. Department of Education Title
IIC Project for Access to Library Resources in the Baldwin Library, University of Florida (1990-1991),
the National Endowment for the Humanities US Newspaper Program: Florida Newspaper Project,
(1995- to date), and in the Research Libraries Group's Great Collections Microfilming Project, Phase II
and Phase IV, as well as the Research Libraries Group's Archives Preservation Microfilming Project.
Phase One of this project is supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (2000-
2002).

PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT

The Preservation Department was consolidated as a full-service preservation facility in 1987. Its
Reprographics Unit microfilms for preservation, in house, more than 250,000 exposures in an average
year and contracts additional microfilming for preservation to vendors. The Department has received
funding for cooperative microfilming through the preservation initiatives of both the Research Libraries
Group (RLG) and the Southeastern Library Network (SOLINET). Department staff, particularly in the
area of microfilming for preservation, have served on national standards authoring bodies.

DIGITAL LIBRARY CENTER

The mission of the Digital Library Center (DLC) at the University of Florida is to facilitate and
focus the Libraries' development of digital programs and services. Its areas of responsibility include
multimedia databases, digital collections, electronic text applications, online exhibits and finding aids. A
primary goal of the DLC is to enhance the Libraries' role in electronic scholarly communications through
effective and responsive digitization, dissemination, and long-term storage of university research and
resource materials from the Libraries' collections. The Center provides library and university researchers
with equipment and technical expertise for digital imaging and text markup. The Digital Library Center
develops digital resources from collections at the University of Florida. In coordination with the Florida
Center for Library Automation, the Center integrates effective user interfaces to these resources..










The Digital Library Center brings with it several years of experience from the Preservation
Department, together with work funded by the State of Florida (Florida Heritage Project at:
http://palmm.fcla.edu/fh/), the Institute for Museum and Library Services (Linking Florida's Natural
Heritage Project at: http://palmm.fcla.edu/lfnh/), and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation (Caribbean
Newspaper Imaging Project: in process).


ADMINISTRATION AND SPECIAL COLLECTIONS STAFF

John E. Ingram, co-principal investigator, will devote 0.1 FTE of his time to the administration'
of the grant. Ingram currently serves as Director for Collections for the University of Florida George A.
Smathers Libraries. From November 1994 through August 2000, he chaired the Department of Special
(and Area Studies) Collections. From 1979 to 1994, Ingram served as research archivist and curator of
special collections at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. He currently serves on the SOLINET
(Southeast Library Information Network) advisory committee to establish an electronic resource base for
southern history and culture (AmericanSouth.org). Ingram also directed phase one of UF's participation
in the NEH-funded United States Agricultural Information Network (USAIN). He has served on review
panels for both NEH and DOE Title IIC grants. He serves as co-principal investigator for Phase One of
this project.

Rita J. Smith, co-principal investigator, will give 0.2 FTE of her time to this grant. Her
responsibilities will be to select the titles to be cataloged, to assist in training personnel involved in
cataloging the materials, and to resolve questions of curatorial complexity for the collection. Ms. Smith
has a Masters degree in Library Science from the University of Michigan. She has worked in the Baldwin
Library of Historical Children's Literature since 1989, first as Coordinator of Academic Support Services,
and, since 1995, as Curator of the Baldwin Library and Associate University Librarian in the Department
of Special and Area Studies Collections. She served as Project Cataloger from 1990 through mid-1991
for a U.S. Department of Education Title IIC grant to catalog 4,000 titles held by the Baldwin Library.

Student Assistants (540 hours) will remove and replace titles selected for cataloging,
microfilming, digitization, and conservation review. They will work under the supervision of Rita Smith.


CATALOGING STAFF

Tatiana Barr, Head, Humanities and Special Collections Cataloging Unit, will be assigned 0.1
FTE to this grant. Assignment in this proposal will include responsibility for ongoing supervision of
project staff involved in cataloging the source documents, both original and copy records, oversight of
cataloging the microfilm versions, and liaison between the Project Directors (Ingram and Smith) and the
Cataloging Unit to insure consistency in record creation and statistical reporting.

The grant funded Project Original Cataloger (Ruth Sheng, 1.0 FTE), will be primarily
responsible for creating original bibliographic description and access records for selected titles,
contributing these original records to the OCLC database, and assisting other staff in doing the same. She
will create original authority records for names when none exists in the national authority file, contribute
these authority records to the NACO database, and supervise the project Archivist (Jane Anne Carey), in
doing the same. The project cataloger will be responsible for the final quality of all bibliographic and
authority records created for this project.









The grant funded Archivist (Jane Anne Carey, 1.0 FTE) will be responsible for 1) assisting the
Project Cataloger in creating original bibliographic description and access records for selected titles, 2)
contributing these original bibliographic records to the OCLC database, 3) collaborating with other grant
staff to create original authority records when none exists in the national authority file, and 4)
contributing these authority records to the NACO database.

A Library Technical Assistant (Fern Carlson) in the Resource Services Department of the
George A. Smathers Libraries will be assigned for 0.5 FTE to this grant. She will assure the accuracy of
the bibliographic description and consistency of use of names and subjects on member copy brought into
the local online catalog from the OCLC national databases. This staff member will create local holdings
records in the UF online database.

PRESERVATION AND TECHNOLOGY STAFF

Erich Kesse, director of the Digital Library Center, provides management oversight for the
digitization portion of this project (0.05 FTE). He served as Chair of the Preservation Department in the
Libraries from 1987 through July 1999. Kesse has completed several preservation and access projects
funded by the Research Libraries Group (RLG), the National Endowment for the Humanities, and by the
Mellon Foundation. He serves as a consultant to the Southeastern Library Network (SOLINET) and to the
University of the Virgin Islands on its IMLS funded Leadership Award. Kesse holds professional
memberships in the American Library Association and the Association for Information and Image
Management. Kesse holds a Certificate of Preservation Administration from Columbia University in
addition to a Master of Library Science degree from the University of Kentucky.

Stephanie Haas, Assistant Head, Digital Library Center, (0.1 FTE) insures workflow and entry
into scanning queues for both microfilm to digital equivalents and source document scanning. Haas is a
principal investigator of the selection and education components of the IMLS funded Linking Florida's
Natural Heritage project.

Melody Smith, Imaging Technician Supervisor, Digital Library Center, (0.25 FTE) supervises
the daily work of student assistants, provides training for image capture. Smith manages the compilation
of administrative metadata, derives titles into the Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA) Digital
Library partition.

Jane Pen, Imaging Technician Assistant Supervisor, Digital Library Center (0.25 FTE) provide
quality control assessment of both structural metadata and images. Pen coordinates the archiving of
images and their delivery to FLCA. Phase I of this project was her principle assignment. Pen holds the
equivalent of the Master of Library Science degree from Taipei (Taiwan/Republic of China).

Cathleen Mook, chair of the Preservation Department, (0.05 FTE) will be responsible for
management oversight and programming support for automation of project tasks, tracking systems, and
survey databases. Mook has served as Head of Preservation at Tulane University and head of the binding
unit for UF. Mook holds a Master's degree in Library Science with a certificate in advanced preservation
management from the University of Pittsburgh.

John Freund (0.05 FTE) will be responsible for completion of conservation assessments and
surveys and, as required, complex conservation treatments. Mr. Freund has served as the Preservation
Department's chief conservator since 1988. He holds a Certificate of Book Restoration and Binding from
the College of Art and Design at San Francisco State University. Mr. Freund will supervise the work of
Kenneth McAnlis (0.05 FTE). Mr. McAnlis will be responsible for minor conservation treatments and
for the specification of commercially procured protective enclosures. Mr. McAnlis has three years of









experience performing repairs to circulating collections and the construction of a variety of protective
enclosures.

Nelda Schwartz, Head, Reprographics (0.10 FTE), will be responsible for all pre-microfilming
processing including identification, bibliographic searching, and tracking. She will also be responsible
for production of targets, quality control and packing slips, packaging, and related tasks. Student
assistants trained to work with the NOTIS, OCLC, RLIN and FILMLOG databases will assist her. Prior
to being named Head of Reprographics, Schwartz held the Brittle Books Coordinator's position since
1990, where she was responsible for the identification and preparation of volumes from embrittled
materials for microfilming, digitization or commercial replacement. Prior to her preservation assignment,
she held various posts in the Libraries' Catalog Department..

James Clifton, Program Assistant (0.20 FTE), will be responsible for all post-microfilming
quality control and processing. He will also be responsible for the generation of archival storage work
orders and the generation of USMARC information, using the FILMLOG database's reporting systems.
He will also maintain liaison with the microfilming service vendor. Student assistants with previous
microfilm inspection and processing experience will assist Mr. Clifton. Mr. Clifton has held the position
of chief microfilm technician since 1993. He and his staff also operate two Zeutschel 301 microfilm
cameras and one Kodak MRD2 microfilm camera for internal preservation microfilming projects and
perform quality control on more than 500,000 images annually.

Elaine Henjum, Database Coordinator for the Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA)
will serve (0.5FTE) as liaison between the imaging and metadata work to be completed in the project and
the migration of images and metadata to the main frame at FCLA.

DISSEMINATION

The University of Florida Libraries will distribute cataloging records and microforms generated
by this project. Cataloging will be distributed through three bibliographic networks: the Florida Center
for Library Automation (FCLA) WebLUIS (http://www.fcla.edu), OCLC and the Research Library Group
(RLG) RLIN, the latter via tape-load from OCLC. Microforms (35 mm positive silver gelatin) will be
distributed through Inter-Library Loan or the Smathers Libraries' non-profit sales auxiliary services
which averages more than $30,000 in sales annually. These items may also be distributed as CD-ROMs
or DVDs. The University of Florida maintains inter-library loan agreements with members of FCLA,
OCLC and RLG, as well as, through the State Library, to libraries throughout Florida. The sales
auxiliary already makes microfilm copies of 59 newspaper titles and thousands of monograph titles
available. All sales are contingent upon copyright status and distribution agreements. In addition to
cataloging and microforms, the University of Florida plans to make available the book structure survey
data to researchers and to issue a summary of findings in publications. Tabulated data (and possibly raw
data) will be available on the Department's web site. Researchers will be notified of survey data
availability through several electronic list services including those serving the rare books, special
collections and preservation communities. In addition, the University of Florida will initiate discussion
with colleagues nationally and with a bindery, to be elected, on communication of data elements for
facsimile creation.










OM1 No. 3136-0134
Expires 6/30/03


National Endowment for the Humanities
BUDGET FORM


JOHN INGRAM RITA J. SMITH
Project Director

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Applicant Organization


If this is a revised budget. indicate tie NEH application/grant number:


Requested Grant Perixl
FROM 5/03
S mo/yr


THROUGH 4/05
mo/yr


The three-column budget has been developed for the convenience of those applicants who wish to identify the project costs that will be charged to
NEH funds and those that will be cost shared. FOR NEH PURPOSES, THE ONLY COLUMN THAT NEEDS TO BE COMPLETED IS COLUMN C. The
method of cost computation should dearly indicate how the total charge for each budget item was determined.
If more space is needed for any budget category, please follow the budget format on a separate sheet of paper.

When the requested grant period is eighteen months or longer, separate budgets for each twelve-month period of the project must be developed
on duplicated copies of the budget form.

SECTION A- budget detail for the period FROM 5/03 THROUGH 4/04
mo/yr mo/yr

1. Salaries and Wages. Provide the names and titles of principal project personnel. For support staff, include the tide of each position and indicate in
brackets the number of persons who will be employed in that capacity. For persons employed on an academic year basis, list separately any salary
charge for work done outside the academic year.


name/title of position
**J.lngram/ Co-Proiect Dir
R.Smith/Co-Proiect Dir
R.Sheng/Proiect Cataloger
J.Carev/Proiect Archivist
K.Davis/OPS Camera Operator
Student Assts Paging
Other staff See Attached


method of cost computation
no. (see sample)
[1 12 mo. x 10% FTE
[1 12 mo. x 20 % A@ 44121
11 12 mo. x 100% R 37423
[1 12 mo. x 100% 28861
[1 2000 hrs 0, $9.50/hr
[ 540 hrs @ $6.25/hr


SUBTOTAL


NEH Funds
(a)

0
37423
28861
19000
0
14760

$ 100044


2. Fringe Benefits. If more than one rate is used, list each rate and salary base.


Rate salary base
8.3 %of $ 19000
14.06 %of $ 98082
18.73 % of $ 15933


(a)
$ 1577
15811
$0


Cost Sharing
(b)
$ 0
8824
0
0
0
3375
35532

S 47731


(b)
$0
8504
$ 4231


Total
(c)
$0
8824
37423
28861
19000
3375
50292

$ 147775


(c)
$ 1577
24315
$ 4231


SUBTOTAL $ 17388 $ 12735 $ 30123

3. Consultant Fees. Include payments for professional and technical consultants and honoraria.


name or type of consultant


no. of days
on project


daily rate of
compensation
$
$
$
$


a)
$

S
$
$ _


(b)
$
$

$
$ _ _ _
t _ _

i ___


(c)
S
$

$


SUBTOTAL $ 0 $0 $ 0


~









Salaries and Wages May 2003 April 2004 Continuation


Name/Title


J.Ingraim/Co-Project Director
R. Smith/Co-Project Director
R.Sheng/Project Cataloger
J.Carey/Project Archivist
K.Davis/OPS Camera Operator
**E. Kesse/Dir, Digital Library Center
**S. Haas/Asst Dir.,Dig. Lib. Cntr
M. Smith/Imaging Tech. Supervisor
Student Assts./Scanning/metadata
**C. Mook/Chair, Preservation
N. Schwartz/Head, Reprographics
J. Cliflon/Reprographics Technician
J. Freund/Head Conservation
K. McAnlis/Conservation Technician
T. Barr/Head, Spec. Colls. Catalog Unit
J.Pen/Lib Tech Asst, Dig Lib Cntr
E. Henjun/Database Coordinator
Student Assts./QC Microfilm


Method of Cost Computation

12mo. X 10% FTE
12mo. X 20% FTE @ 44121
12mo. X 100% FTE @ 37423
12mo. X 100% FTE @ 28861
2000 hrs.@ $9.50/hr
12 mo. x 5% FTE
12 mo. x 5% FTE
12 mo. x 25% @ 25484
1500 hrs @ $6.00/hr
12 mo. x 5% FTE
12 mo. x 10% @ 38750
12 mo. x 20% @ 27326
12 mo. x 10% @ 41533
12 mo. x 5% @ 26203
12 mo. x 10% @ 45311
12 mo. x 50% @ 21235
12 mo. x 5% @ 51550
960 hrs. @ $6.00/hr


NEH


UF Total Fringe Health


8824


37423
28861
19000


9000


5760


6371


3875
5465
4153
1316
4531
10618
2578


8824
37423
28861
19000


6371
9000

3875
5465
4153
1316
4531
10618
2578
5760


1653
5262
4058
1577


896


545
768
584
185
849
1492
483


701
3505
2986



1527


388
776
611
194
351
3058
194


** In accord with the University of Florida's Indirect Cost Calculations, the salaries of John Ingram, Erich Kesse, Cathleen Mook,
and Stephanie Haas, are accounted for as administrative overhead, an indirect cost

Fringe Benefits

The standard benefit of OPS (Other Personnel Services) is 8.3 percent.
Permanent staff enjoy a fringe benefit rate of 14.06 percent for Florida Retirement System,
and 18.73 percent for the Optional Retirement System. To each rate is added annual health coverage set at:

$2986.00 for single staff person coverage
$3505.00 for spouse coverage
$6106.00 for family coverage.
The amount is prorated according to percentage of time devoted to the grant.










NEH Budget lonr Page 2

4. Travel. For each trip, indicate the number of persons traveling, the total days they will be in travel status, and the total subsistence and
transixrtation costs for that trip. When a project will involve the travel of a number of people to a conference, institute, etc., these costs
may be summarized on one line by indicating the point of origin as "various." All foreign travel must be listed separately

from/to no. total subsistence transportation NEH Funds Cost Sharing Total
persons travel costs + costs = (a) (b) (c)
days
[ $ $ $ $ $
_______(1 ____________ __________________


______________ li II ___________l __(1______________


______________11 11 ____________ __________________
_____________N _(1 ____________ __________________
SUBTOTAL $ $ $

5. Supplies and Materials. Include consumable supplies, materials to be used in the project and items of expendable equipment;
i.e., equipment items costing less than $5,000 and with an estimated useful life of less than one year.

item basis/method of cost computation (a) (b) (c)
Protective enclsoures 1760 @ $6/each $ 0 10560 $ 10560
Blank CD-Roms 3000 @ $1.50/each 4500 0 4500
Microfilm handling gloves 6 dozen @ $20/doz. 120 0 120
Microfilm process chemicals 770 reels @ $7.15/reel 0 5506 5506







SUBTOTAL $ 4620 $ 16066 $ 20686

6. Services. Include the cost of duplication and printing, long distance telephone, equipment rental, postage, and other services related
to project objectives that are not included under other budget categories or in the indirect cost pool. For subcontracts provide an
itemization of subcontract costs on this form or on an atachment.

item basis/method of cost computation (a) (b) (c)
Microfilm duplication 770 reels @ $81/reel $ 52370 $ 10000 $ 62370


SUBTOTAL $ 52370 $ 10000 $ 62370











NEHl Budget Form


7. Other Costs. Include participant stipends and room and board, equipment purchases, and other items not previously listed. Please note that
"miscellaneous" and "contingency" are not acceptable budget categories. Refer to the budget instructions lbr the restriction on the purchase of per-
manent equipment.


basis/methtxl of cost computation


8. Total Direct Costs (add subtotals of items 1 through 7)


NEH Funds Cost Sharing Total
(a) (b) (c)
$$ $












SUBTOTAL $ 0 $ 0 0_


$ 174422 s 86532 $ 260954


9. Indirect Costs (This budget item applies only to institutional applicants.)
If indirect costs are to be charged to this project, CHECK THE APPROPRIATE BOX BELOW and provide the information
requested. Refer to the budget instructions for explanations of these options.

E Current indirect cost rates) has/have been negotiated with federal agency. (Complete items Aand B.)

] Indirect cost proposal has been submitted to a federal agency but not yet negotiated. (Indicate the name of the
agency in item A and show proposed rates) and base(s), and the amounts) of indirect costs in item B.)

O Indirect cost proposal will be sent to NEH if application is funded. (Provide an estimate in item B of the rate that will
be used and indicate the base against which it will be charged and the amount of indirect costs.)

] Applicant chooses to use a rate not to exceed 10% of direct costs, less distorting items, up to a maximum charge of
$5,000 per year. (Under item B, enter the proposed rate, the base against which the rate will be charged, and the
computation of indirect costs or $5,000, whichever sum is less.)


A. DHHS 29 Dec 2000
name of federal agency date of agreement


rates) base(s
20 % of $223634 $

%of $ $
TOTAL INDIRECT COSTS


10. 'Ttal Project Costs (direct and indirect) for Budget Period


NEH Funds Cost Sharing Total
(a) (b) (c)
$ 29420 $ 15306 $ 44726


$ 29420 $ 15306 $ 44726



$ 203842 $ 101838 $ 305680


B-4


Page 3











OMB No. 3136-0134
Expires 6,30/03


National Endowment for the Humanities
BUDGET FORM


JOHN INGRAM RITA J. SMITH
Project Director

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Applicant Organization


If this is a revised budget, indicate the NEH applicatiorgrant number:


Requested Grant Perixl

FROM 5/03
mo/yr


THROUGH 4/05
mo/yr


The three-column budget has been developed for the convenience of those applicants who wish to identify the project costs that will be charged to
NEH funds and those that will be cost shared. FOR NEH PURPOSES, THE ONLY COLUMN THAT NEEDS TO BE COMPLETED IS COLUMN C. The
method of cost computation should clearly indicate how the total charge for each budget item was determined.
If more space is needed for any budget category, please follow the budget format on a separate sheet of paper.

When the requested grant period is eighteen months or longer, separate budgets for each twelve-month period of the project must be developed
on duplicated copies of the budget form.


SECTION A budget detail for the period FROM 5/04 THROUGH 4/05
mo/yr mo/yr


1. Salaries and Wages. Provide the names and titles of principal project personnel. For support staff include the tite of each position and indicate in
brackets the number of persons who will be employed in that capacity. For persons employed on an academic year basis, list separately any salary
charge for work done outside the academic year.


name/title of position
**J.Ingram/ Co-Project Dir
R.Smith/Co-Proiect Dir
R.Sheng/Project Cataloger
J.Carey/Proiect Archivist
K.Davis/OPS Camera Operator
Student Assts Paging
Other staff See Attached


method of cost computation
no. (see sample)
[1 12mo. x 10% FTE
[1 12 mo. x 20 % 0 45445
[(1 12 mo. x 100% @ 38546
[1 12 mo.x 100% 29727
(11 2000 hrs ( $9.75/hr
S] 540 hrs @ $6.25/hr
][


NEH Funds Cost Sharing Total
(a) (b) (c)
$ 0 $ 0 $ 0
0 9089 9089
38546 0 38546
29727 0 29727
19500 0 19500
0 3375 3375
15375 40074 55449


SUBTOTAL $ 103148 $ 52538 $ 155686

2. Fringe Benefits. If more than one rate is used, list each rate and salary base.


Rate salary base
8.3 %of $19500
1.06 %of $ 110400
18.73 %of $ 16411


(a)
$ 1619
15998
$ 0


(b)
$0
11169
$ 4322


(c)
$ 1619
27167
$ 4322


SUBTOTAL $ 1j717 $ 15491 $ 331 0

3. Consultant Fees. Include payments for professional and technical consultants and honoraria.


name or type of consultant


no. of days
on project


daily rate of
compensation

$

$
$
$ _


a)
$
$


$
S

S


() (c)


$
$

$


SUBTOTAL 0 $0 $ 0


B-5









Salaries and Wages May 2004 April 2005 Continuation


Name/Title


J.lngraniCo-Project Director
R. Smith/Co-Project Director
R.Sheng/Project Cataloger
J.Carey/Project Archivist
K.Davis/OPS Camera Operator
**E. Kesse/Dir, Digital Library Center
**S. Haas/Asst Dir.,Dig. Lib. Cntr
M. Smitll/maging Tech. Supervisor
Student Assts./Scanning/metadata
**C. Mook/Chair, Preservation
N. Schwartz/Head, Reprographics
J. Clifton/Reprographics Technician
J. Freund/Head Conservation
K. McAnlis/Conservation Technician
T. Barr/Head, Spec. Coils. Catalog Unit
J.Pen/Lib Tech Asst, Dig Lib Cntr
E. Henjunl/Database Coordinator
Student Assts./QC Microfilm


Method of Cost Computation

12mo. X 10% FTE
12mo. X 20% FTE @ 45445
12mo. X 100% FTE @ 38546
12mo. X 100% FTE @ 29727
2000 hrs.@ $9.75/hr
12 mo. x 5% FTE
12 mo. x 5% FTE
12 mo. x 25% @ 26248
1500 hrs @ $6.25/hr
12 mo. x 5% FTE
12 mo. x 10% @ 39913
12 mo. x 20% @ 228146
12 mo. x 10% @ 442779
12 mo. x 5% @ 226989
12 mo. x 10% @ 446670
12 mo. x 50% @ 21872
12 mo. x 5% @ 553097
960 hrs. @ $6.25/hr


NEH


UF Total Fringe Health


9089


38546
29727
19500


9375


6562


3991
5629
4278
1356
4667
10936
2655


6000


9089
38546
29727
19500


6562
9375

3991
5629
4278
1356
4667
10936
2655
6000


1703
5429
4080
1619


923


561
791
602
191
875
1537
498


701
3505
2986



1527


388
776
611
194
351
3058
194


** In accord with the University of Florida's Indirect Cost Calculations, the salaries of John Ingram, Erich Kesse, Cathleen Mook,
and Stephanie Haas, are accounted for as administrative overhead, an indirect cost

Fringe Benefits (Projected)

The standard benefit of OPS (Other Personnel Services) is 8.3 percent.
Permanent staff enjoy a fringe benefit rate of 14.06 percent for Florida Retirement System,
and 18.73 percent for the Optional Retirement System. To each rate is added annual health coverage set at:

$2986.00 for single staff person coverage
$3505.00 for spouse coverage
$6106.00 for family coverage.
The amount is prorated according to percentage of time devoted to the grant.










NEH Budget Form Page 2

i. Travel. For each tnp. indicate the number of persons traveling, the total days they will be in travel status, and the total subsistence and
transportation costs ior that tnp. When a project will involve the travel of a number of people to a conference, institute, etc., these costs
may be summarized on one line by indicating the point of origin as "various." All foreign travel must be listed separately

from/to no. total subsistence transportation NEH Funds Cost Sharing Total
persons travel costs + costs = (a) (b) (c)
days

_[ [ $____ __ $ $ $
____________________ II II ______________ _____________________

______[1 [] ________ ____________

______[ ( ________ ____________


________Li_[] [_________ ____________
SUBTOTAL $ 0 $ 0 t 0

5. Supplies and Materials. Include consumable supplies, materials to be used in the project and items of expendable equipment;
i.e., equipment items costing less than $5,000 and with an estimated useful life of less than one year.

item basis/method of cost computation (a) (b) (c)
Protective enclsoures 1760 @ $6/each $ 0 $10560 $ 10560
Blank CD-Roms 3000 @ $1.50/each 4500 0 4500
Microfilm handling gloves 6 dozen @ $20/doz. 120 0 120
Microfilm process chemicals 770 reels @ $7.50/reel 0 5775 5775







SUBTOTAL $ 4620 $16335 $ 20955

6. Services. Include the cost of duplication and printing, long distance telephone, equipment rental, postage, and other services related
to project objectives that are not included under other budget categories or in the indirect cost pool. For subcontracts provide an
itemization of subcontract costs on this form or on an attachment.

item basis/method of cost computation (a) (b) (c)
Microfilm duplication 770 reels @ $85/reel $ 55450 $ 10000 $ 65450


SUBTOTAL $ 55450 $ 10000 $ 65450










NEIH Budget Form Page 3


7. Other Costs. Include participant stipends and room and board, equipment purchases, and other items not previously listed. Please note that
"miscellaneous" and "contingency" are not acceptable budget categories. Refer to the budget instructions for the restriction on the purchase of per-
manent equipment.


basis/method of cost computation


NEH Funds Cost Sharing Total
(a) ()) (c)







SUBTOTAL $ $ 0 $0






SUBTOTAL $0 g 0g 0


8. Total Direct Costs (add subtotals of items 1 through 7) $ 180835 $ 93026 $ 273861

9. Indirect Costs (This budget item applies only to institutional applicants.)
If indirect costs are to be charged to this project, CHECK THE APPROPRIATE BOX BELOW and provide the information
requested. Refer to the budget instructions for explanations of these options.

] Current indirect cost rate(s) has/have been negotiated with federal agency (Complete items A and B.)

] Indirect cost proposal has been submitted to a federal agency but not yet negotiated. (Indicate the name of the
agency in item A and show proposed rates) and base(s), and the amounts) of indirect costs in item B.)

O Indirect cost proposal will be sent to NEH if application is funded. (Provide an estimate in item B of the rate that will
be used and indicate the base against which it will be charged and the amount of indirect costs.)

0 Applicant chooses to use a rate not to exceed 10% of direct costs, less distorting items, up to a maximum charge of
$5,000 per year (Under item B, enter the proposed rate, the base against which the rate will be charged, and the
computation of indirect costs or $5,000, whichever sum is less.)


A. DHHS
name of federal agency


rate(s) base(s
20 % of $233441 $

% of $ $
TOTAL INDIRECT COSTS



10. Total Project Costs (direct and indirect) for Budget Period


NEH Funds
(a)
$ 30077


$ 30077


29 December 2000
date of agreement

Cost Sharing oItal
(b) (c)
$ 16605 $ 46682


$16605 $ 46682


$ 210912 $ 109631 $ 320543


B-8


item










NEH Budget Form

SECTION 13 Summary Budget and Project Funding


Page 4


SUMMARY BUDGET
T-ansfer from section A the total costs (column c) for each category of project expense. When the proposed grant period is eighteen months or
longer, project expenses for each twelve-month period are to be listed separatelyand totaled in the last column of the summary budget. For proj-
ects that will run less than eighteen months, only the last column of the summary budget should be completed.

First Year/ Second Year/ Third Year/ TOTAL COSTS FOR
from: 5/03 from: 5/04 from: ENTIRE GRANT
Budget Categories thru: 4/04 thru: 4/05 thru: PERIOD

1. Salaries and Wages $ 147775 $ 155686 303461
2. Fringe Benefits 30123 31770 = 61893
3. Consultant Fees 0 0 = 0
4. Travel 0 0 = 0
5. Supplies and Materials 20686 20955 = 41641
6. Services 62370 54450 = 127820
7. Other Costs 0 0 0
8. Total Direct Costs (items 1-7) 260954 273861 = 534815
9. Indirect Costs 44726 46682 91408
10 Total Project Costs (Direct & Indirect) 305680 320543 = 626223


PROJECT FUNDING FOR ENTIRE GRANT PERIOD


1. Requested from NEH:

Outright
Federal Matching

TOTAL NEH FUNDING


$ 414754
$ 0

$ 414754


2.Cost Sharing:

Applicant's Contributions
Third-party Contributions
Project Income
Federal Agencies
TOTAL COST SHARING


3. btal Project Funding (NEH Funds + Cost Sharing) = $ 626223

1. Indicate the amount of outright and/or federal matching funds that is requested from the Endowment.

2. Indicate the amount of cash contributions that will be made by the applicant and cash and in-kdnd contributions made by third
parties to support project expenses that appear in the budget. Cash gifts that will be raised to release federal matching funds should
be induded under Third-party Contributions. (Consult the program guidelines for information on cost sharing requirements.)

When a project will generate income that will be used during the grant period to support expenses listed in the budget, indicate the
amount of income that will be expended on budgeted project activities.

Indicate funding received from other federal agencies.

3. Total Project Funding should equal Total Project Costs.


Institutional Grant Administrator/Individual Applicant. Provide the information requested below when a revised budget is submitted.
The signature of this person Indicates approval of the budget submission and the agreement of the organizatonindiidual tocost
share project expenses at the level Indicated under "Project Funding."


Telephone ( )__


Name and Tide (please type or print)


Signature


$ 191469
$ 20000
$0
$0
$ 211469
gO _


$ 211469







SID: 10153 OL


Beginning of record displayed.


01:C an #12651540
-LD BY FUG 6 OTHER HOLDINGS
OCLC: 12651540 Rec stat:


Entered:
> Type: a
BLvl: m


Desc: a
> 1 010
> 2 040
S 3 050 0
> 4 090
S 5 049
P 6 100 1
P 7 245 14
illustrations
> 8 260
S 9 300
> 10 490 0
> 11 510 4
> 12 600 10


APPENDIX 4.1


Record 1 of 1


19851009 Replaced: 19950321 Used: 19970604
ELvl: I Srce: Audn: j Ctrl: Lang: e.
Form: Conf: 0 Biog: MRec: Ctry: m,
Cont: GPub: Fict: 0 Indx: 0
Ills: af Fest: 0 DtSt: s Dates: 1870,
31-14477 1
DLC *c IUL *d IUL I
PS3007 *b .57 1870 1
*b 1
FUGG I
Trowbridge, J. T. *q (John Townsend), *d 1827-1916. 1
The story of Columbus / *c by John Townsend Trowbridge ; with
by Alfred Fredericks. I
Boston : *b Fields, Osgood, & Co., *c 1870. I
8 p., [4] leaves of plates : *b col. ill. ; *c 27 cm. 1
The Uncle Sam series for American children I
NUC pre-1956, *c 602:447. I
Columbus, Christopher *x Juvenile poetry. I


ng
au


I CAT


~---~--






APPENDIX 4.2
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LTUF MORE AJV0166
NOTIS CATALOGING
UF FMT B RT a BL m T/C DT 11/08/93 R/DT 01/27/94 STAT nn E/L I DCF a D/S
SRC PLACE mau LANG eng MOD T/AUD j REPRO D/CODE s DT/1 1870 DT/2
CONT ILLUS af GOVT BIOG FEST 0 CCNF 0 L/FORM 0 INDX 0

010: : [a 31014477
035/1: : ja (OCOLC)12651540
040: : a DLC (c IUL Id IUL
049: :a FUGG
050/1:0 : ja PS3007 [b .57 1870
100:1 : a Trowbridge, J. T. [q (John Townsend), id 1827-1916.
245:14: [a The story of Columbus / (c by John Townsend Trowbridge ; with
illustrations by Alfred Fredericks.
260: : la Boston : Ib Fields, Osgood, & Co., Ic 1870.
300/1: : a 8 p., <4> leaves of plates : Ib col. ill. ; Ic 27 cm.
440/1: 4: a The Uncle Sam series for American children
510/1:4 : a NUC pre-1956, Ic 602:447.
500/2: a "Engraved and printed in colors by Bobbett, Hooper & Co.," N.Y.
500/3: :a Cover has imprint of Ticknor & Fields.
500/4: :a Printed by Welch, Bigelow & Co., Cambridge.
600/1:10: a Columbus, Christopher Ix Juvenile poetry.


LTUF DONE


655/2: 7:
690/3: 4:
700/1:10:
710/2:20:
710/3:20:
752/4:
752/5: :
710/6:20:
710/7:20:
752/8:


AJV0166
NOTIS CATALOGING


a Children's poetry (y 1870.
a Bldn Jy 1870.
a Fredericks, Alfred. 14 ill
a Fields, Osgood & Co. 14 pbl
a Bobbett, Hooper & Co. 14 egr
a United States b New York |4 New York.
a United States b Massachusetts (d Boston.
a Ticknor and Fields. 14 pbl
a Welch, Bigelow & Co. 14 prt
a United States lb Massachusetts Id Cambridge.






SID: 10153 Ot


Entire record displayed.


APPENDIX 4.3


OLUC ti "GOOD CHILD OR SWEET HOME EMBELLISHED WITH FO...
HELD BY FUG 2 OTHER HOLDINGS
OCLC: 36144786 Rec stat: c


Record 1 of 1


Entered: 19961231 Replaced: 19970109 Used: 19990423
) Type: a ELvl: I Srce: d Audn: j Ctrl: Lang: enc
BLvl: m Form: Conf: 0 Biog: MRec: Ctry: enk
Cont: GPub: Fict: 0 Indx: 0
Desc: a Ills: a Fest:, 0 DtSt: s Dates: 184u,
) 1 040 VZM *c VZM I
> 2 090 PZ8.3 *b .G65 I
> 3 090 *b I
> 4 049 FUGG I
> 5 245 04 The Good child : *b or, Sweet home ; embellished with fourteen
neatly-coloured engravings. 1
> 6 246 10 Sweet home I
P 7 260 London : *b A. K. Newman & Co. *c [184-?] I
P 8 300 30 p. : *b col. ill. ; *c 15 cm. I
) 9 650 0 Children's poetry *y 19th century. I


1 CAT









APPENDIX 4.4
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LTUF MORE ALR7227
NOTIS CATALOGING 10U
JF FMT B RT a BL m T/C DT 01/C7/98 R/DT 05/25/99 STAT nc E/L I DCF a D/S D
SRC d PLACE enk LANG eng MOD T AUD j REPRO D/CODE s DT/1 1840 DT/2 1849
CONT ILLUS a GOVT BIOG FEST 0 CONF 0 L/FORM 0 INDX 0

035/1: : a (Source)ONILE170- 5
035/2: : a (OCoLC)36144786,
040: : ja VZM Ic VZM Id FUG
049/1: : a FUGG
090/1: : a PZ8.3 Ib .G65
245:04: la The Good child : (b cr, Sweet home ; embellished with fourteen
neatly-coloured engravings.
246/1:10: ja Sweet home
260: : ja London : jb A. K. New=an & Co. (c <184-?>
300/1: : a 30 p. : b col. ill. ; Ic 15 cm.
500/1: a Publisher's list of children's toy books on back cover.
500/2: a Rhymed verse.
655/1: 7: a Children's poetry ly 1845.
655/2: 7: a Hand-colored illustrations ly 1845.
690/3: 4: a Bldn ly 1845.
655/4: 7: a Chapbooks ly 1845.

LTUF DONE ALR7227
NOTIS CATALOGING I0UU
550/5: 0: a Chapbooks Ix Specimens.
655/6: 7: a Publisher's advertisements ly 1945.
650/7: 0: a Conduct of life Ix Early works to 1900 Ix Juvenile poetry.
710/1:2 : a A.K. Newman & Co. j4 pbl
752/2: : a England jd London.






APPENDIX 4.5
I CAT : SID: 10163 OL
Entire record displayed.


OLUC an f02794826 Record 1 of 1'
HELD BY FUG 1 OTHER HOLDING
OCLC: 2794826 Rec stat: c
Entered: 19770311 Replaced: 19971221 Used: 19961002
) Type: a ELvl: I Srce: d Audn: j Ctrl: Lang: eng
BLvl: m Form: Conf: 0 Biog: MRec: Ctry: nyu
Cont: GPub: Fict: 1, Indx: 0
Desc: i Ills: Fest: 0 DtSt: 'S Dates: 1856, 1
) 1 040 KSU *c KSU *d OCL 1
> 2 090 PZ6.M22 *b B1 1
0 3 090 *b I
> 4 049 FUGG 1
) 5 100 1 Mackarness, Henry S., *c Mrs., *d 1826-1881. I
0 6 245 14 The blackberries : *b or, Little Rose, and other stories / *c by
Susie Sunbeam (i.e. M. Mackarness]. I
> 7 260 New York : *b J. Q. Preble, *c c1856. I
0 8 300 96 p., [7] leaves of plates : *b ill. ; *c 12 cm. I






APPENDIX 4.6
i


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LTUF MORE AKV7013
NOTIS CATALOGING I0W7
UF FMT B RT a BL m T/C DT 10/02/96 R/DT 10/02/96 STAT nn E/L I DCF i D/S D
SRC d PLACE xx LANG eng MOD T/AUD j REPRO D/CODE s DT/1 1856 DT/2
CONT ILLUS GOVT BIOG FEST 0 CONF 0 L/FCRM 1 INDX 0

035/1: : a (Source)ONILE125- 1
035/2:: a (OCoLC)02794826
040: : a KSU Ic KSU Id FUG
049/1: :a FUGG
090/1: : a PZ6.M22 Ib B1
100:1 : a Mackarness, Henry S., Ic Mrs., Id 1826-1881.
245:14: a The blackberries : jb or, Little Rose, and other stories / Ic by
Susie Sunbeam .
260: : la New York : Ib J. Q. Preble, Ic c1856 le ( : If Nesmith &
Thall)
300/1: : a 96 p., <7> leaves of plates : jb ill. ; c '12 cm.
505/1:0 : a Blackberries or Little Rose--Rinaldo--Busy bee--Good children--
Little match girl.
650/1: 0: a Obedience Ix Juvenile fiction.
690/2: 4: a Bldn fy 1856.
700/1:1 : a Preble, John Q. 14 pbl

LTUF DONE AKV7013
NOTIS CATALOGING IOW7

710/2:2 : a Nesmith & Thall. 14 prt
752/3: : a United States Ib New York Id New York.
Nesmth ~Thal. 1 pr






APPENDIX 4.7
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LTUF MORE A6Z6830
NOTIS CATALOGING ICUU
JF FMT B RT a BL m T/C DT 11/19/90 R/DT 11/21/90 STAT nn E/L DCF a D/S D
SRC d PLACE mau LANG eng MOD T/AUD j REPRO D/CODE s DT/1 18i3 DT/2
CONT ILLUS af GOVT BIOG FEST 0 CONF 0 L/FORM 1 INDX C

035/1: : a (Source)ONILE 316
035/2: : a (OCoLC)22713974
035/3: : a (FU)bldn19901115
040: : a FUG Ic FUG
049: a FUG$ 11 31262045881967
099/1: : la 15hl96
100:00: la M. F. W.
245:10: a Harrie Lee, or, The tempter and the tempted : Ib a story for boys /
:c by M.F.W.
260:0 : ja Boston (No. 9 Cornhill) : lb Henry Hoyt, ec c1863.
300/1: : a 223 p., <3> leaves of plates : jb ill. ; Ic 15 cm.
440/1: 4: a The hillside library
599/1: : a rjs
650/1: 0: a Mothers and sons fx Juvenile fiction.
650/2: 0: a Children and death Ix Juvenile fiction.
650/3: 0: a Christian life Ix Juvenile fiction.

LTUF DONE A-E6830
NOTIS CATALOGING IOUU

550/4: 0: a Children's stories.
655/5: 7: a Juvenile literature ly 1863. 12 rbgenr
690/6: 4: a Boys, Stories for iy 1863.
690/7: 4: a Bldn ly 1863.
700/1:;10: a Hoyt, Henry. 14, pbl
740/2 41: a The tempter andi the tempted.
752/3 : a United States (b Massachusetts Id Boston.






APPENDIT 4.8
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AHF4638


NOTIS CATALOGING -U
UF FMT B RT a BL m T/C DT 09/05/90 R/DT 09/06/90 STAT nn E/L I DCF a D/z
SRC d PLACE enk LANG eng MOD T/AUD j REPRO D/CODE s DT/1 1879 DT/2
CONT ILLUS af GOVT BIOG FEST 0 CONF 0 L/FORM 1 INDX 0

035/1: :a (Source)ONIUF 307
035/2:, : a (OCoLC)22334816
035/3: : a (FU)bldn19900905
040: : a FUG c FUG
049:b : a FUG$ (1 31262044799061
100:10: a Greer, Maria J.
245:10: a My mother's diamonds : Ib a domestic story for daughters at hcc /
Ic by Maria J. Greer ; with a frontispiece by A. Ludovico.
260:0 : [a London (Corner of St. Paul's Churchyard) : Griffith and Farraz, Ic
1879 le (London and Guilford : If Billing and Sons)
300/1: a viii, 336, 32 p., <1> leaf of plates : Jb ill. ; Ic 19 cm.
440/1: 4: a The girl's own favorite library
500/1: : a Includes publisher's catalog.
599/1: : a rjs
650/1: 0: a Forgiveness Ix Juvenile fiction.
650/2: 0: a Mothers and daughters Ix Juvenile fiction.

LTUF DONE AHF4638
NOTIS CATALOGING ~tOTT


650/3: 0:
655/4: 7:
655/5: 7:
690/6: 4:
690/7: 4:
690/8: 4:
700/1:10:
710/2:20:
710/3:20:
752/4:
752/5: :


Children's stories.
Juvenile literature ly 1879. 12 rbgenr
Publishers' catalogues ly 1879. 12 rbgenr
Girls, Stories for ly 1879.
Family stories ly 1879.
Bldn ly 1879.
Ludovico, A. 14 ill
Griffith and'Farran. 14 pbl
Billing and Sons. 14 prt
England [d London.
England d Guilford.






APPENDIX 4.9
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LTUF MORE AHM2-74
NOTIS CATALOGING 0UU
UF FMT B RT a BL m T/C DT 03/23/91 R/DT 12/01/97 STAT fn E/L I DC? a D/S D
SRC d PLACE enk LANG eng MOD T/AUD j REPRO D/CODE s DT/1 1887 ET/2
CONT ILLUS af GOVT BIOG FEST 0 CONF 0 L/FORM 1 INDX 0

035/1: : a (Source)ONILE 41
035/2 : a (OCoLC)232,88317
035/3: a (FU)bldn19910320
035/4: : a (NOTISUF)AHM2674
040: : a FUG Ic FUG
049/1: : a FUG$ (1 31262046534706
099/1: : a 23h1436
100:10: a Greene, Ic Mrs.
245:14: a The cherry tent, or, The schoolfellows / Ic by The Hon. Mrs. Greene
260:0 : a London ; |a New York : Ib Frederick Warne and Co, Ic 1887 le
(London : If Dalziel Bros., Camden Press)
300/1: :a <60> p., <3> leaves of plates : (b ill. ; |c 17 cm.
599/1: : a rjs
650/1: 0: a Theft Ix Juvenile fiction.
650/2: 0: a Obedience Ix Juvenile fiction.
650/3: 0: a Children's stories.

LTUF DONE AHM2 74
NOTIS CATALOGING IOUU

655/4: 7: a Juvenile literature ly 1887. 12 rbgenr
690/5: 4: a School stories ly 1887.
690/6: 4: a Bldn ly 1887.
700/1:10: a Dalziel, Edward, d 1817-1905. 14 ill
700/2:10: a Dalziel, George, d 1815-1902. 4 prt
710/3:20: a Frederick Warne (Firm) 14 pbl
710/4:20: a Camden Press. 14 prt
740/5:41: a The schoolfellows.
752/6: :a England Jd London.









Literature for Children


7/


COLOR MANAGEMENT



* Color in Literature for_Children
* Color Mlanagement Strategies


COLOR IN LITERATURE FOR CHILDREN

One of the ways to gauge the place of color in children's literature is to consider not
only its denotative value but also, and perhaps more importantly, its connotative
influence on readers. John Cech, author of studies on children's literature, in
support of this project, has noted:

"aesthetically, color illustration offered the artist a new, wider vocabulary
for representation, thus contributing dramatically to an expansion of the
emotional meaning and other visual information ... in a given work".

In Myth, Magic, and Mystery : One Hundred Years of American Children's Book
Illustration (Boulder, CO : Roberts Rinehart Publishers, 1996), Michael Patrick
Hearn quoted James Johnson Sweeney, former director of the Museum of Modern
Art as follows:

"... children's book illustration should never be seen as merely a vessel
for the conveyance of information. Its real role is that played by a Gothic
stained glass window in the Middle Ages, or a mosaic in the apse of a
Romanesque church."


Page I of 1)


C()LO(R M, I N.\N G\(I--;II',NT




COLOR MANAGEMENT


Although not specifically stating the nature of the illustrations (i.e., color and/or
black and white) it is very clear from the two examples that he gives, that he has
color in mind: Gothic stained glass and Romanesque mosaics were rather seldom
done in anything other than color. In the same vein, Lucy Rollin, another author of
studies on children's literature, in support of this project, wrote:

"Our culture creates, uses, and responds to literature, even what might
be considered ephemeral, for it is in the ephemera, really, that a culture
truly reveals itself; such artifacts are its unguarded moments."



Through the end of the 18th century only a very small portion of book illustrations
were colored, and then only by hand. Such extra effort was expensive, and
therefore available only to the privileged few who could afford to present their
children with more realistic representations of the world about them. With the full-
blown implementation and acceptance of mechanical color printing during the 19th
century, such "natural" representations of the real world and indeed of the
fantastic world of the imagination moved from the privileged few to .the mass
market. Peter Hunt, in his Children's Literature, an Illustrated History (Oxford,
England : Oxford University Press, 1995), provides the locus for explanation:

"For most of the early nineteenth century, colour book illustrations had
meant colouring by hand, but the development of mechanical colour
printing, especially by Edmund Evans, brought an immense
improvement in coloured picture-books for children in the last quarter of
the century."

COLORING BY HAND
















Image from: A B C of games. (London : Pubd. by A. Park, [ca. 1855])


Page 2 of 9




COLOR MANAGEMENT


Image from variant states of: Jingles & jokes for little folks. (New York: McLoughlin
Bros., c1869.)


MECHANICAL COLORING
I I F


Image from: Field, Louise A. Peter Rabit and His Ma. (Chicago, IL: Saafield
Pulbishing, 1917))


To understand just how "immense" such an improvement in producing children's
books with color illustrations was in the last quarter of the 19th century is only
possible by examining those decades in which the process actually advanced.



In support of the need for preservation of color information in addition to that
conveyed through black and white surrogates, Michael Patrick Hearn indirectly
provided an additional rational for such work. He noted that "the purpose of an
illustration is to be reproduced, not displayed, and artists have employed certain
short cuts that have not always added to the life of the art. They often scrimped on
material. Papers discolor or disintegrate, colors fade, glues dry out." It is likely that
very few examples of the original artwork for the color illustration of children's books
during the second half of the nineteenth century survive beyond their published
versions. Conservation surveys, completed in the University of Florida's Baldwin
Library of Historical Children's Literature, found that published material is now
seriously in danger of self-destruction.



II II


Page 3 of 9


- 1 1 1-1-<




COLOR MANAGEMENT


F -


COLOR MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

While microfilm remains the only currently accepted medium for preservation
reprography, preservation microfilm is an inadequate means of preserving color
information. Because a sizable percentage of children's literature contains color in
some format: illustration, frontispiece, title page information, book coverss, the
Literature for Children's organizers considered four color management strategies.

Monochrome and continuous-tone microphotography (accept color loss);
Monochrome microphotography employing the three-color process;
Color microphotography; or
Hybrid reproduction combining monochrome microphotography and
digitization.

An optimal color management strategy must affordably preserve color, with
reasonable maintenance requirements, and provide timely access to color content
together with the monochromatic information accompanying it.



MONOCHROME AND CONTINUOUS TONE MICROPHOTOGRAPHY

This traditional method of preservation microfilming does not provide a functional
response to the needs addressed above. Because monochrome and continuous
tone microphotography reduces all information to shades of gray, such an
approach implies an acceptance of color loss, and because there is no capture of
the color information contained in children's books, it is an inadequate strategy for
overall intellectual color management.


Page 4 of 9




COLOR MANAGEMENT Page 5 of 9




ABCD
EFGHI
I-JK L
MNOP
QRST
U VWX; ---.....- ...


Images from: The dogs' grand dinnerparty. (New York : McLoughlin Brothers. c1869.)


I r I .







Images from: Edgeworth, Maria, 1767-1849. The bracelets, or, Amiability and industry rewarded. (Philadelphia : Geo. S. Appleton,
1850.)



THREE-COLOR PROCESS MICROPHOTOGRAPHY

The three-color process is a traditional, if rarely used, method of monochrome
microphotography that would produce film that meets the requirements of
preservation microfilming. The process is the analog equivalent of separating a
digital image into component color channels. For any single source-document
page, three exposures are created. The first exposure is made with standard white
lighting, followed by reshoots with, respectively, a yellow filter and a blue filter.
Each exposure is committed to preservation microfilm per RLG preservation
microfilming guidelines.

The split color components (red, green, & blue), below, of the digital image are roughly comparable to the color-filtered images of the
Three-Color Process

r W







vwir ** i* m I**
-- *----- -- .-.------------- ----------
rr*rn-a -r .


Images from: The dogs'grand dinnerparty. (New York : McLoughlin Brothers, c1869.)




COLOR MANAGEMENT


Images from: Edgeworth, Maria, 1767-1849. The bracelets, or, Amiability and industry rewarded. (Philadelphia : Geo. S. Appleton,
1850.)

Color is restored through an on-demand process.of additional color filtering and
amalgamation of the filtered separations into one color offprint. The multiple
exposures would adversely affect project cost; and color restoration, when
necessary, would be prohibitively expensive. Three-color process
microphotography, at best, is an oblique strategy for color management.















COLOR MICROPHOTOGRAPHY

Color microfilming would immediately and simply meet the requirement for color
image capture. Color microfilm, however, does not meet the requirements for
preservation microfilming as recognized by RLG preservation microfilming
guidelines. Nonetheless, the Commission on Preservation and Access (CPA),
reviewing the findings of its commissioned study of color microphotography, found
Ilfochrome Classic (formerly, Ilford's Cibachrome) microfilm to be an acceptable
method for preserving color illustration. Ilfochrome Classsics' Azo dyes are
legendary for their longevity (i.e., light fastness) in dark, cold storage to AIIM
standard (IT9.11).

But, the reasons for not electing color microphotography as a color management
strategy are several; each is a factor of time and cost. CPA's report points to the
difficulties of Ilfochrome Classic in the production environment. "With respect to
sensitometry, Cibachrome film is slower and has higher contrast making it
somewhat more difficult to work with," the report concludes. Instructions for the
film's MRD camera controller unit illustrate the detail of care that must be taken.
Exposure time is nominally 5% greater than that required for standard monochrome
microfilm. And, the report continues, "local environmental laws may make


Pag~e 6 of 9




COLOR MANAGEMENT Page 7 of 9


processing Cibachrome film difficult;" a reference to the climate controls that must
be taken both during exposure and developing, as well as, in storage of the film.

The word "environmental" might be substituted with the word, "economical". The
cost of Ilfochrome Classic compares negatively to that of a hybrid procedure
involving standard microfilming for preservation followed by controlled digitization of
color content. "Finally," the report concludes, "in the case of service and use copies
of [llfochrome Classic] film, handling damage may nullify any longevity benefit
gained". In its more extensive report, "Preserving the_Illustrated Text", also dated
1992, the authors describe Ilfochrome Classic as an "intermediate technology".
Indeed, the report calls for use of "mixed" technologies of standard microfilming for
preservation and digitization of images for color illustrations.


ABCD
EFGH:
IJ K Li
















Images from: Edgeworth, Maria, 1767-1849. The bracelets, or, Amiability and industry rewarded. (Philadelphia : Geo. S. Appleton,
1850.)
HYBRID MONOCHROME MICROPHOTOGRAPHY WITH COLOR DIGITIZATION











Color digitization converts color information to a digital stream of zeros and ones;
any given combination may represent one of twenty-four million colors. Calibrated
scans generate "true" colors. And, assuming calibrated monitors, displayed color
information is as faithfully as it was when captured. Digital color when optimally
maintained and migrated, is stable with York McLoughin active use, storage and across869.)
Images from: Edgeworth, Maria, 1767-1849. The bracelets, or, Amiability and industry rewarded. (Philadelphia : Gee. S. Appleton,
1850.)



HYBRID MONOCHROME MICROPHOTOGRAPHY WITH COLOR DIGITIZATION

Color digitization converts color information to a digital stream of zeros and ones;
any given combination may represent one of twenty-four million colors. Calibrated
scans generate "true" colors. And, assuming calibrated monitors, displayed color
information is as faithfully as it was when captured. Digital color when optimally
maintained and migrated, is stable within active use, storage and across
generations as it migrates forward. And, color information can be made readily and
universally available via the Internet, in contrast to the dull and limited capacity of
the three color process.

But, like color microphotography, digitization is not a recognized means of


,,rr r rrrnnn




COLOR MANAGEMENT Page 8 of 9


preservation. In a community traditionally focused upon media life expectancy,
digital media, hardware and software each are relatively short-lived. Monitoring
industry trends and digital assets requires more attentiveness if not more skill than
maintaining a color film archive. Standards and methods for digital image creation,
archiving, and migration are not fully agreed upon or well tested. But, access to
storage facilities and the availability of experienced staff for the support of digital
images, in contrast to that for color film, is good. A hybrid method, microfilming for
preservation and digitizing for access, efficiently designed, is optimal.

This project proposes to use the hybrid method; and the particular method adopted
by this project is exactly as recommended by the Commission on Preservation and
Access' report on "Preserving the Illustrated Text". Monochrome microphotography
is not truly a color management strategy. Both the three-color process and color
microphotography are neither sound or fiscally justifiable strategies. To mitigate the
extensive storage requirements that would result from 24-bit scanning of whole
volumes with limited amounts of color, all volumes initially will be preservation
microfilmed. Subsequently, the microfilm will be converted into digital surrogates in
8-bit gray-scale. Pages with color information, scanned from the source document
by either flatbed scanner or digital camera, will replace the page images from the
converted microfilms.


IABCD
.EFGH
-J K L
;MNOP j

IU VWX 0 --
YZ

Images from: The dogs'grand dinner party. (New York : McLoughlin Brothers, c1869.)



BRACELET&F




Images from: Edgeworth, Maria, 1767-1849. The bracelets, or, Amiability and industry rewarded. (Philadelphia : Geo. S. Appleton,
1850.)




Literature for Children
A State University System of Florida PALMM r
Project









Resumes of Principal Staff for Project

John E. Ingram, Project Director
Rita J. Smith, Co-Project Director
Ruth Sheng
Jane Anne Carey
Erich J. Kesse
Stephanie Haas
Melody Smith
Cathleen L. Mook
Nelda Schwartz
James Clifton
Elaine M. Henjum
Tatiana Barr
John Freund
Jane Pen










VITA (2002)


JOHN E. INGRAM


Professional Address:
204 Library West Voice: 352-392-0342
P.O. Box 117007 Fax: 352-392-7251
Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007 Email: jeingr@mail.uflib.ufl.edu


PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries.

2000 present Director for Collections

An officer of the library sharing leadership responsibilities with senior management. Administers and
provides leadership for the collections program with a budget of $8,000,000 for 2000-2001 and $7,500,000 for
2001-2002; bears principle responsibility for ensuring effective and responsive collections in support of the
University's teaching and research programs. Leads in integrating digital and print based collections into a
cohesive university collection and plays major role in library's fundraising program. This officer has line
responsibility for the Departments of Collection Management and Special and Area Studies Collections: 40
staff positions. Coordinates Collections Divisional activities with the Public, Technical, and Support Services
Divisions. Responsible for relations with professional and/or governmental organizations involved in
planning state, regional or national collection responsibilities (e.g. ARL, RLG, CRL, sub-groups of ALA,
etc.). The Director for Collection Management participates with other directors and library managers in
general library planning, budgeting, policy making, priority setting.

1994 -2000 Chair, Department of Special and Area Studies Collections

Responsible for the overall development and management of the Smathers Libraries' special collections and
area studies, including rare books, archives, manuscripts, maps, prints, photographs, and other special material
and area studies in Florida history, Latin Americana, Judaica, and Africana. Holdings: 250,000 books and 10
million manuscript and archival items for special collections, and 500,000 volumes, 60,000 rolls of microfilm,
and other materials for area studies programs. Responsible for the department's public and technical services,
personnel management and supervision (22 FTEs), space management, and collection development (materials
budget in excess of $600,000 and endowments of more than $1,000,000. Serves as secretary and treasurer for
the Howe Society, a friends' group for special collections, and edits The Howe Society Newsletter. Serves as
key spokesperson and liaison to Libraries and university administrations, professional and scholarly
organizations, faculty, students, and the general public in advancing the status of the collections.

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Department of the Library.

1984 1994 Curator for Library Special Collections

Administer the special collections of the Foundation Library: manuscripts, rare books, architectural
collections (including architectural, archaeological, and landscape drawings), maps, graphic arts, and
microforms. Responsible for Library preservation and conservation decisions and for the acquisition of rare
and out-of-print materials. Chief contact between donors and the Foundation for rare library materials.
Reference librarian for library collections. Collection development for history faculty. Fiscal and personnel
responsibility for two professional FTEs, and student assistants, volunteers, and interns (20 people). Member
of Foundation committees for preservation, museum programming, African-American History, emergency
response, and pest management.










1991 1994 Research Division Coordinator, Bruton Heights Education Center

Coordinate planning, research and development, space requirements for staff and collections, and transfer of
four administrative departments within the Research Division: Library, History, Architectural Research, and
Archaeological Research to a new education complex. Work with the consulting architects and Foundation
staff to insure a successful conclusion to the project within budgetary guidelines. The Division employed
approximately 50 FTEs and had an operating budget above $2 million. My supervisor was the vice-president
for research.

EDUCATION

Brown University, Providence, RI, 1968-1977: Ph.D. (Slavic Linguistics).
Fordham University, New York, 1963-1968: B.A., M.A. (Russian Language and Literature).
National Archives and Records Service,. 1978: Certificate in Archives Administration

AWARDS AND HONORS RECEIVED

2000-2002 National Endowment for the Humanities, Preservation and Access

Project: Preservation Microfilming and Cataloging of American and British Children's Literature, 1850-1869;
co-P.I. University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries. Total award: Direct and indirect costs: $381,220,
$223,060 cost share from UF.

1996-1997 National Endowment for the Humanities, Preservation and Access

Project: United States Agricultural Information Network Preservation Project, coordinator for University of
Florida's participation in this NEH funded grant, P.I. Total award: $13,236.

1992 National Endowment for the Humanities, Summer Stipend Grant

Project: to complete the transcription and proofreading of John Evelyn's unpublished manuscript "Elysium
Britannicum," Christ Church College, Oxford.

1992 American Philosophical Society Grant

Project: to complete the transcription of John Evelyn's unpublished manuscript "Elysium Britannicum," Christ
Church College, Oxford.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

John Evelyn, Elysium Britannicum, or the Royal Gardens, editor, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001.

"Books 'adapted to the capacities of young gentlemen and ladies'," in Colonial Williamsburg, (Summer 2001), pp. 62-
69.

"From Handel's Acis and Galatea to American Harmony: Going to the Source for the Music of Eighteenth-century
Williamsburg," in Colonial Williamsburg, (Spring 2000), pp. 24-29.

"John Evelyn's 'Elysium Britannicum' Provenance, Condition, and Transcription," in John Evelyn's "Elysium
Britannicum" and European Gardening,, Therese O'Malley and Joachim Wolschke-Bulmahn, eds., Dumbarton Oaks
Colloquium on the History of Landscape Architecture 17 Washington, DC., 1998.

The William Blathwayt Papers at Colonial Williamsburg, 1631-1722. Guide to the Microfilm Collection, editor, UPA
Academic Editions, 1989.










Rita J. Smith
1417 NW 17'h Terrace, Gainesville, FL 32605
ritsmit(trnmail. flib.ull.cdu
home: 352.276.0511 office: 352.392.0369

EDUCATION

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
M.A. in Library Science, June 1973

Goshen College, Goshen, IN
B.A. in English, June 1967

WORK EXPERIENCE

George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida

Curator and Associate Librarian. The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's
Literature. Department of Special Collections (.7 FTE)
July, 1995-Present

Responsible for all aspects of a collection of 93,000 rare and historical children's books dating from the
17"' through the 21 centuries. Provides reference service to patron requests on-site and via the mail, email
and the telephone on a national and international level; creates guidelines for collection development,
including gifts, transfers, and purchase of books for the collection, through the annual endowment
accounts. Undertakes research involving the historical children's literature collection and publishes results.
Prepares workshops, classes, and seminars about historical children's literature for faculty, students,
librarians, and the general public. Publicizes the holdings of the library as well as important acquisitions,
exhibitions and events by attending meetings, giving presentations, and providing interviews. Continues to
enhance preservation of the collection.

Associate Librarian. Resource Services Department (.3 FTE)
July, 1995-Present

Provides intellectual access to the Baldwin Library by creating original and enhanced copy records; trains
and collaborates with members of the Contributed Cataloging Section and the Special Collections,
Architecture and Fine Arts and Humanities Section to establish projects which enhance intellectual access
to the collection; develops cataloging standards for Baldwin records.

General Humanities Cataloger. Resource Services Department
January, 1994-June, 1995

Education Created original catalog records for monographs in subject areas included in Library of Congress
Classification Schedules B-BX (Religion, Philosophy and Psychology), P-PZ (Language and Literature)
and Z (Bibliography and Library Science.

Coordinator, Academic Support Services, The Baldwin Library of Historical
Children's Literature, Department of Special Collections
July, 1991-December 1993









In lieu of an appointed Curator for the collection, responsible for all aspects of the Baldwin Library, a
collection of 90.000 rare and historical children's books from the 17"' through the 20'h centuries.

RECENT GRANTS AND FUNDED PROJECTS

Co-Principle Investigator on a $653.8 17 preservation and access grant proposal to the
National Endowment for the Humanities to catalog and microfilm 10,000 titles
held in the Baldwin Library. submitted July, 1999, awarded April, 2000; began
October 1, 2000.
/
Contributed to the narrative and formulation of a I-year grant proposal to copy catalog
4,000 20th century Baldwin Library items. Awarded by Northeast Florida Library
Information Network (NEFLIN): Awarded July, 2000; began October 1, 2000.

Contributed to the narrative written for the grant to preserve and microfilm Kohler
Victorian theology pamphlets and publications of American and British tract
societies. The grant was awarded through SOLINET with funding from the
National Endowment for the Humanities, 1997.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS AND CREATIVE WORK

"Life is Short, Art is Long: Randolph Caldecott, 1846-1886." In Newbery and Caldecott
Awards. A Guide to the Medal and Honor Books. Chicago: American Library
Association. 2000, p. 11-17.
"Things Found In Books: Baseball Cards," essay broadcast over public radio station
WUFT as part of "Recess" program, September, 1999
"Things Found In Books: Inscriptions," essay broadcast over public radio station WUFT
as part of "Recess" program. September, 1999
"Jane Taylor and Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star," essay broadcast over public radio station
WUFT as part of"Recess" program, September, 1999
(and over 60 other similar essays in the past two years)
"Caught Up in the Whirlwind: Ruth Baldwin," The Lion and the Unicorn, a Critical
Journal of'Children's Literature, vol. 22, no. 3, September, 1998. P. 289-302
"Just Who Are These Women: Louise Seaman Bechtel and Ruth Marie Baldwin."
Journal of Youth Services In Libraries, Winter. 1998. p. 161-170.
"Those Who Go Before: Ancestors of Eva St. Clare," New England Quarterly, p. 314-
319, June, 1997

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS AND SERVICE (CURRENT)

American Library Association
Association of Library Service to Children, 1989-Present
Chair: National Planning of Special Collections Committee, 1999-Present
Children's Literature Association, 1989-Present
The Howe Society, 1995-Present
Friends of the Books Arts Press, 1997-Present









Ruth Sheng
Curriculum vitae
9817 S.W. First Place, Gainesville, FL 32607
Tel: home (352) 332-7240 work (352) 392-0351
E-mail: RSheng @ mail.uflib.ufl.edu

Higher Education

M.L.S. School of Library Science, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, 1978
Special areas: "Advanced Cataloguing on-non-book materials," "Management
of Special Libraries," and "On-line Literature Search and Computerized Data
Retrieval"
M.A. School of Graduate Studies, Case Western Reserve University, 1976
Major: Art History
B.A. College of Liberal Arts. National Taiwan University, 1969
Major: History

Professional Experience

Project Cataloger, Preservation and Access for American and British Children's
Literature, 1850-1869. Awarded by the National Endowment or the Humanities,
Department ofSpecial Collections, University ofFlorida, Gainesville, FL
October 2000 Present
Create original bibliographic description and access records for selected titles.
Contribute these original records to the OCLC database, and also create the microfilm
copies of those records into the OCLC database. Perform copy cataloging duty as
needed. Establish authority records for personal names, cooperative bodies, and series;
the series records would be reviewed and then submitted to NACO, the National
database. Prepare the statistic report of all records created for the project. Supervise the
Project Archivist and Library Technical Assistant to maintain quality control of
cataloging records and to assure the efficient workflow in the cataloging team.

Adjunct Lecturer, Department oJfAfrican & Asian Language and Literatures, University
of Florida, Gainesville, FL 1996-1997 & 1998-1999
Taught two college level second-year Chinese courses each year for both the Fall and
Spring semesters. The focus of the courses placed upon learning how to read, write, and
speak Chinese as the foreign language. Worked closely with other faculty members in
course design and material selections. Frequently served as student advisor to help them
in pursuing international studies or advanced opportunities.

Docent, Harn Museum of Art, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 1994-1999
Represented the Museum to the public by conducting the knowledgeable tours on the
existing exhibits. In 1996, served as a consultant to utilize the Library of Congress
system to set up an open library in the museum study center. In the summer of 1997,
carried on the full responsibility for scholarly research on preparing the exhibition on
Chinese jade carving called "In a Venerable Vein: Chinese Jade Carving."










Teacher, Curriculum Counselor, Principal, and Chairperson of the Board, Gainesville
Chinese School, Gainesville, FL 1989-1996
Served as one of the founders for the School. Actively involved in works including policy
making, curriculum setting, students counseling, and teaching Chinese as a foreign
language. Chinese history and culture, and art courses as Chinese painting and
calligraphy. Served as principal in 93-94 and as chairperson of the board in 94-95.

Curator of Oriental Visual Collections, Slide Photo Collection, Department of Art &,
Archaeology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 1982-1985
Provided total responsibility for the Collection development to support research and
teaching facilities of Oriental art in the Department. Established a new classification
system for Oriental visual resources. Performed complex and comprehensive searching
and research on material selections and acquisitions. Worked closely with the faculties
and subject experts to reinforce material selection and Collection development; cataloged
and classified new acquisitions. Provided reference services and user guidance.

Oriental Slides and Photos Cataloguer, Visual Collections, Fine Arts Library, Fogg Art
Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 1981-1982
Organized and maintained the general function of the Oriental Slides and Photos
Collection. Developed, refined, and revised the classification system as needed.
Cataloged slides and photographs in Oriental art; performed also in reference, public
services, and student supervising.

Chinese Cataloger, Title II-C Project, Gest Oriental Library & East Asian Collection,
Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 1979-1981
Cataloged/re-cataloged classical Chinese books of the original Gest Collection, mostly
rare editions and manuscripts. Performed complex bibliographic searching and research.
Prepared progress reports and reported directly to the Curator.

Librarian, Johnson Atelier, Technical Institute ofSculpture, Princeton, NJ 1978-1979
Organized and maintained a new special collection of monographs, serials, photographs,
slides, and new clippings on sculpture casing. Performed all technical services.
Designed computerized data retrieval system for sculpture casting techniques.

Library Assistant, Sears Library, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
1976-1977
Worked as the head of reserve material section in a large university science library.
Shared the responsibility with the periodicals librarian for checking in periodicals, serials
and government documents in the visual index and on the OCLC terminal. Also worked
as the senior assistant to head of the Circulation Department.

Associations: Beta Phi Mu (International Library Science Honor Society), Chinese
Language Teachers Association, Chinese-American Library Association







Jane Anne Carey

3177 NW 12th" Street Gainesville, FL 32609 352/375-2823 e-mail jacarey48@yahoo.com


Summary of Qualifications

In-depth knowledge of the cataloging of historical children's literature.
Recognized excellence in Interlibrary Loan supervision at the largest academic library in
Florida.
Broad grasp of an academic library's issues and objectives.
Adeptness in using research materials and various information resources.
Expertise in providing public service to faculty, staff and students.
Sincere commitment to fostering excellent team relations and morale.


Employment
Archivist Cataloger
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature, University of Florida, Gainesville FL
12/00 to present
Edited and enhanced catalog records with access points for subjects, publishers,
printers, engravers, illustrators, and binding terms.
Created original catalog records for 19th Century Children's literature.
Created authority records for series titles.
Maintained a cumulative list of subject headings used for Baldwin Library literature.
Maintained a cumulative list of engravers, illustrators, and lithographers used for
Baldwin Library literature.

Library Technical Assistant Supervisor/Senior Library AssistantlLibrary Technical
Assistant
Interlibrary Loan, University of Florida Libraries, Gainesville, FL
12/93-11/00
Maintained quality of service over a 6 year period when requests increased by 30% and
FTE remained static.
Supervised, trained, and maintained payroll for full and part time staff.
Participated in several office projects and pilot studies.
Processed interlibrary loan requests using online bibliographic networks.
Created a Borrowing Policy and Procedure Manual.
Implemented the use of online requests and tested library automation software.
Acted as information technology liaison to the department staff on matters concerning
computer hardware and software.
Created a project to evaluate and eventually reduce the number of cancelled borrowing
requests.

Branch Manager
Novel Ideas Book Store, Gainesville, FL
9/88-3/94
Managed a book store (comics, games, science fiction) in a well-traveled retail center.
Oversaw the addition of mainstream materials to a previously genre-only store.
Assisted in the transition to computerized patron and stock records.






J. A. Carey page 2
Supervised 5-7 sales clerks and handled regular turnover and training of new
employees.
Created both topical and seasonal window displays.
Initiated and maintained an anti-censorship "Banned Book" section.

Law Office Assistant
Patrick A. Carey, P. A., Orlando FL
4/92-10/93
Reconciled a large backlog of client's bank statements.
Prepared clients' files for attorney review.
Reordered the filing system.


Presentations and Publications

Workshops
Interlibrary Loan Borrowing procedures presentation at a NEFLIN Workshop.

Presentations
Florida Library Association Library Research Interest Group Research Showcase.

Class Projects and Displays
Interlibrary Loan practices and research survey presentation.
Document Delivery for University of Florida off-campus IFAS stations webpage.
Comparison of SuDocs to LC and Dewey Classification systems presentation.
History of the "Federal Writers Project" in Florida presentation.
"Ask Aine" a tongue-in-cheek advice column for historical re-enactors webpage.
"Art of the Kimono" a history of Japanese costume webpage.
Ethnographic comparison of Medieval Celtic and Japanese cultures display.

Publication
"Interlibrary Loan requests for locally held items" Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document
Delivery, and Information Supply; v. 11(1), November 2000.

Works in Progress
In progress, "A comparison of children's literature on natural history in the 1850's and
1990's: Apparently a picture does equal a thousand words," (article).


Education

Bachelor of Arts; Rosary College (now Dominican University), River Forest, IL, 5/70.

Master of Arts in Library Science; University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 8/99.






Erich J. Kesse
525 N.E. 9th Avenue, Gainesville, FL 32601-4411
erich@mail.uflib.ufl.edu or kesse@ufl.edu
home/325.375.4476 office/352.846.0129 office fax/352.846.3702


WORK
EXPERIENCE


.EDUCATION


CONSULTANT
& VOLUNTEER
POSITIONS
and
INTERNSHIPS


RECENT
GRANTS &
FUNDED
PROJECTS


DIRECTOR, DIGITAL LIBRARY CENTER.
Smathers Libraries. University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
July 1999 to present
Responsible for creation and implementation of digitization programs.
Supervision of 4 FTE full-time staff and 8 FTE part-time staff. Administration of vendor
contracts and budgets. Digitization grant development and administration, as well as product
marketing. Management of operations exceeding 100,000 images/pages annually.
Special interest in automation issues, development of imaging management information
systems
PRESERVATION OFFICER
Smathers Libraries. Preservation Department. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
May 1987 to 30 June 1999
RARE BOOK CATALOGER
Smathers Libraries. Catalog Department. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
April 1984 September 1986


COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY. School of Library Service. New York, NY
May 1987. Certificate of Preservation Administration
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY. School of Library and Information Science. Lexington, KY
August 1983. Master of Science, Library Science
XAVIER UNIVERSITY. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Cincinnati, OH
May 1982. Bachelor of Arts


DIGITAL PROJECTS PLANNING WORKSHOP LEADER. SOLINET. Atlanta, GA
January 2000 present (Two-day workshops offered on irregular schedule)
IMLS DIGITAL PROJECT CONSULTANT. University of the Virgin Islands. Charlotte
Amalie, VI
Education grant November 1999 January 2000;
Leadership grant January 2001 present
PRESERVATION CONSULTANT. YIVO Institute. New York, NY
January- May 1987
CATALOG LIBRARIAN. Cincinnati Historical Society, Cincinnati, OH
October 1983 April 1984. Part-time assignment.
LIBRARIAN/ARCHIVIST. Taft Museum, Library, Cincinnati, OH
November 1983 April 1984. Part-time assignment.
ASSISTANT IN SPECIAL COLLECTIONS. Transylvania University, Library, Lexington, KY
April June 1983. Part-time assignment.


Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature. Phase I. 2000-.
Planning Team member and Digitization coordinator. Supported by the National Endowment
for the Humanities.
Digitization component targets color in children's literature; cf,
http://susdl.fcla.edu/juv/color.html
Caribbean Newspaper Imaging Project. Phase II. 1999-.
Planning Team member and Digitization coordinator; wrote Phase II work-plan. Supported by
the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation,
Pilot to evaluate Optical Character Recognition applications to imaged newspapers as a
machine alternatives to human indexing.
Florida Heritage Project. 1999-
State of Florida/SUS digitization project funded through the Florida Center for Library
Automation (FCLA).
Project planning team member. Planning Group Chair (1997-1998). Project Chair (1999-
2000).






Erich J. Kesse


RECENT
GRANTS &
FUNDED
PROJECTS
(Continued)


MEMBERSHIPS


Resume (26 June 2002)


Linking Florida's Natural Heritage Project. 1998-
Institute of Museum and Library Services funded digitization project.
Project planning team member. Principle Investigator for reprographic sub-contract.
U.S. Agricultural Information Network Project. Part 2: Preservation Microfilming, 1998-
1999.
Principle Investigator at the University of Florida. Supported by the National Endowment for
the Humanities; a national project, coordinated from Cornell University.
Florida Geological Survey Project. 1997-1999.
Principle Investigator. Preservation microfilm and digitize the complete publications of the
Florida Geological Survey. Supported by the State of Florida.
U.S. Newspaper Project, Florida. Phases 1 & 2 Cataloging & Preservation Microfilming,
1996-1999.
Planning Team member and Preservation Microfilming coordinator. Supported by the
National Endowment for the Humanities; a state project, coordinated from the University of
Florida.
Caribbean Newspaper Imaging Project. Phase I. 1996-1998.
Planning Team member and Digitization coordinator. Supported by the Andrew W. Mellon
Foundation.
Pilot project to digitize Caribbean Newspapers: Diario de la Mariana (Havana, Cuba) and La
Nouvelliste (Port-au-Prince, Haiti).
Eric Eustace Williams Project. 1996-.
Project designer and Principle Investigator. Supported by the State of Florida.
Project to list, preservation microfilm and digitize works by and about Dr. Eric Williams, first
Prime Minister of Trinidad & Tobago.
Newspaper Microfilming Projects Current. 1987-1999.
Principle Investigator. Supported by the State of Florida


AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION.
ACRL. Rare Books & Manuscripts Section. (1983-)
ALCTS.
Organization and By-Laws Committee. (2001-2003)
Cataloging & Classification Section. (1983-)
Preservation & Reproduction Section. (1983-)
Reproduction. Standards Committee. (1988-1990, 1991-1993,
Chair 1991-1992)
Preservation. Management Committee. (1989-1991)
Intellectual Access Committee. (1994- various appointments, Chair
1998-2000)
USMARC 583 Task Force. (1996-1998, Chair 1997-1998)
ASSOCIATION FOR INFORMATION AND IMAGE MANAGEMENT.
(1991-1996; 1999)
Various Standards Committees; Acts as University of Florida Libraries liaison (on Libraries'
membership).
CENTER FOR RESEARCH LIBRARIES.
Collections & Services Advisory Committee. (1999-2002)
NATIONAL INFORMATION STANDARDS ORGANIZATION.
Committee Member (Metadata Dictionary for Still Digital Images).
(2000/2002)
RESEARCH LIBRARIES GROUP.
Preservation Committee/PRESERV. (1990-) University of Florida Libraries
representative.
Preservation Committee. Advisory Committee. (1992-1993)
PRESERV. Advisory Committee. (1999-2001)










Stephanie Cornell Haas
Assistant Director, Digital Library Center
University of Florida Libraries, Gainesville, FL 32611-7007

Professional Abstract

Throughout my professional career, I have been involved with environmental/natural resource
information. My professional interests include introducing end-users to the rich array of
information resources available, developing alliances between diverse groups of information
providers, and creating new electronic resources that serve multiple audiences.

Employment

Assistant Director, Digital Library Center, University of Florida libraries,
Gainesville, FL, April 2000-
Acting Chair/Marston Science Library, University of Florida, Gainesville,
FL, June 1994-June 1995
Assistant Chair/Marston Science Library, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL, June 1993-1998
Environmental Sciences Librarian/Associate University Librarian, Marston Science Library,
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 1988- (Tenure granted July 1992)
Science Librarian/Assistant Professor, Colorado State University
Libraries, Ft. Collins, CO 1987-88
Information Specialist, Professional Information Center, Southeastern
Metropolitan Board of Cooperative Services, Denver, CO 1985-87
Assistant Librarian, Denver Botanic Gardens, Denver, CO 1984-85
Department Head, Denver Museum of Natural History Library, Denver, CO
1975-1984

Education

M.A. Instructional Design- University of Florida, classes taken 1990-91.
Post Graduate Fellow- Environmental Studies, University of Denver, 1979-1980.
M.A.- Library Science, University of Denver, August 1971.
Graduate Study- Recreational Leadership, Purdue University, August 1969.
B.S.- Psychology, Purdue University, August 1969. Attended summer sessions at Loyola,
Chicago (1967); University of the Americas, Mexico (1968); University of Minnesota,
Lake Itasca Biology Station (1969).

Selected Professional Activities

International Association of Aquatic and Marine Science and Libraries and Information Centers
(IAMSLIC):
President, 1999-2000
25th Annual Conference Planner and Convenor, 1999
President-Elect, 1997
Chair of Metadata Committee, 1996-
Treasurer, 1992-1996
Member of Web site planning committee, 1995-
Site selection Committee, 1994

Florida Biotic Information Consortium, 1994-
Chair of Steering Committee, 1994-









Planned meetings for 1994 at Archbold Biological Station, 1995 at University of
Florida. Co-planned 1996 meeting held at Tall Timbers Research Station,
Tallahassee; 1997 meeting held at NOAA in Miami; convened 2000 meeting of
the FBIC Bibliographic Database Working Group, Mote Marine Laboratory,
November 2000
Developed and maintain FBIC Web site
Coordinated the uploading of the Florida Freshwater Bibliography which
Is searchable on the FBIC homepage.
State Biodiversity Database Survey Committee, Fish and Wildlife Information
Exchange 1996. Assisted with soliciting information on species data from
state agencies

Consulting

1997 Consultant to the Bahamas Biodiversity Data Management Project Team.
Assisted in the creation of a Bahamas Natural Resources Database including the
construction of a preliminary thesaurus; co-presenter at a three day workshop at the
College of the Bahamas, Nassau, Bahamas "The Bahamas Natural Resource
Bibliography and MetaDatabase: A Workshop on Information Technologies."

1996 Met with Ray Carthy, Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit,
USGS to discuss homepage for the Unit.

1995 Work with the faculty and staff of the Center for Wetlands, University of Florida on
avenues for making publications available electronically

1994 Part of review team for evaluation of Fisheries Review and Wildlife
Review,U.S. National Biological Survey, held March 1994, Ft. Collins, CO

1994 Consulted with Natural Rescues Branch of the Eglin Air Force
Base on handling of information, July 1994.

Selected Grants

"Linking Florida's Natural Heritage: Science and Citizenry" (http://www.fcla.edu/linkfl) will
create a virtual library of Florida ecological information from a set of disparate and
heterogeneous databases located on computers throughout Florida. This is a model
program of cooperation between the Florida Museum of Natural History; the
libraries of the University of Florida, Florida International University, and Florida
Atlantic University; and the Florida Center for Library Automation. The networking
technologies used will conform to the latest national and international standards
applicable to information system design including the Z39.50 protocol. (Funded by
the Institute for Museum and Library Studies, October 1998)

"Development of a Biotic and Water Quality Information Database for the Unique
River-Okefenokee swamp-St. Mary's River Watershed, Florida and Georgia,
with Georefenced Distributions of Fish Species." With George Burgess, Florida
Museum of Natural History, and Steve Walsh, Southeast Science Center, BRD,
USGS (Submitted 17 December 1999, not funded)

Selected Publications

2000 "Linking Florida's Natural Heritage: Science & Citizenry" Co-authored with
Priscilla Caplan. Published in FirstMonday: Peer-reviewed journal on the
Internet.









URL: http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue5_6/haas/index.html#h1
1999 "Ecology and Ecosystem Management: Core Journals and Indexes" Co-
authored with Catherine W. Lee and Anita L. Battiste. Science &
Technology Libraries, v.18, no.1, p.3-24
1998 Florida's Environmental Mosaic: Balancing the Everglades and
Disneyworld" Florida Libraries, v.41, no.4, p.88-89
1998 "Metadata Mania: An Overview" in Proceedings of the 23rd Annual
Conference of IAMSLIC, Charleston, South Carolina, October 1997
1997 "Scientific Research on the Natural History of the Bahamas: An Overview
of the Published Literature" in Bahamas Biodiversity Data Management
(BDM) Report-95, Final Report, October 1997. p.96-107
1997 "Holes in the Dike: Is Cambridge Scientific Losing Water?" in Proceedings of the 22nd
Annual Conference of IAMSLIC, Monterey Bay, California, October 13-18, 1996.

Selected Presentations

"Of Deserts, Springs, and Plants: a Freshwater Mosaic" presented at the 26th Annual
Conference of the Interational Association of Marine and Aquatic Science Libraries
and Information Center by Stephanie Haas, Digital Library Center, Univ. of Florida,
Karen Brown, Aquatic Plants Information Center, Univ. of Florida, and Paula Wolfe,
Univ. of Arizona, Victoria, B.C. 2000
"Linking Florida's Natural Heritage" presented at the Institute for Museum and Library Services
Web-Wise Conference, Washington, March 2000
"Linking Florida's Natural Heritage: Science & Citizenry: A Case Study in Crossing Information
Boundaries" at the session Museum Collection and Natural History Data on the World
Wide Web for Special Libraries Association Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, June 2000.
"Research Metadata on the Web" presented at the 24th Annual Conference of the
International Association of Aquatic and Marine Science Libraries and
Information Centers, 1998.
"Florida Ecosystem Management: The Metadata Factor" poster presented at the
Natural Resources Forum, 1998
"Metamania: An Overview of Metadata" presented at the 23rd Annual Conference
of the International Association of Aquatic and Marine Science Libraries
and Information Centers, 1997.
"Holes in the Dike: Is Cambridge Scientific Losing Water?" presented at 22nd
Annual Conference of the International Association of Aquatic and Marine
Science Libraries and Information Centers, 1996
"Florida Biotic Information Consortium," presented at the 6th Annual
Meeting of the Natural Resources Information Council, 5-8 August 1996.
"Florida Biotic Information Consortium," presented at the Organization of
Fish and Wildlife Information Managers meeting, 15 July 1996.
"Serious Science on the Web," presented at the Florida and Caribbean Chapter, Special Libraries
Association meeting "Riding the Internet Waves, 2 February 1996, Gainesville, FL
"The Agriculture/Environment Interface: Locating the Relevant Literature." Presented at the
Second Environmentally Sound Agriculture Conference, Orlando, FL, March 20-22,
1994.







Melody-Ann Jones Smith




8008 NW 31st Ave APT. 202 Gainesville, FL. 32606 + USA
Fax 1-352-335-8950 + Home Phone 1-352-335-8146 Email blackfellcaearthlink.net

WORK EXPERIENCE
April 2000 Present PROGRAM ASSISTANT / PRODUCTION COORDINATOR, DIGITAL
LIBARY CENTER. Smathers Libraries. University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
Responsible for coordination and supervision of digital image production and metadata creation, as
well as addressing quality control issues and handling file transfer protocols. Responsible for creation
and implementation of staff training programs regarding metadata creation, digital image creation,
quality control procedures, as well as some archival and tracking procedures. Resolution of metadata
and material handling issues as necessary. Supervision 1 FTE full-time staff member and up to 24
FTE part-time OPS staff. Scheduling of material arrival, processing, and return. General Office duties
including but not limited to staff scheduling, staff assignments, timecard review, payroll liaison.

1998-1999 TAX PREPARER H & R BLOCK
Complete tax interview with client to determine the most advantageous and accurate method to file
their tax return, Careful explanation of the electronic filing process and any current H&R Block
programs to give the client a thorough understanding of what is available to them and how it will
benefit them, Complete all required Block administrative forms, Attend all mandatory training, Assist in
proper office appearance, Handle electronic file processing, Resolve client service issues, Assemble
returns, Obtain all required signatures, Complete bookkeeping procedures each night, complete
opening and closing procedures as assigned.

1998 OFFICE MANAGER CAPPADONNA BUILDERS & CONTRACTORS
Write Contracts, Place Bids for Contract Jobs, A/R, A/P, Schedule appointments, Monitor and
periodically update ledgers, review and balance company accounts, update year-end ledgers, Floor
plan design and reconstruction, Computer aided design, File maintenance, Finance referrals, Mortgage
Company liaison, and oversee daily office duties.

1996-1998 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT WYNN CONSTRUCTION
A/R, A/P, Data Entry, Occasional Payroll, Receptionist duties, and some experience in residential
design and computer aided drafting. Duties include but not limited to typing, filing, basic bookkeeping
responsibilities, and general office work

1995-1998 Dynamics Director / D.J. PARTY CENTRAL ENTERTAINMENT COMPLEX
Completely trained to operate any and all of the sound and lighting equipment in any of the three clubs
on the complex property. Dynamics Director coordinating performances, practices times and work
schedules for staff of 28 +. Filled in periodically as comptroller. Assisted with liquor control, as well as
handling beer and wine inventory. Helped designed spreadsheets to be used in inventory reports.

1994-1995 ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE OCALA FORD MOTORS, INC.
Representative for approximately 500 A/R accounts, with duties including but not limited to payment
collection, data entry, statement processing, account maintenance, weekly financial reports, as well as
general typing and filing. Filled in for cashier and receptionist periodically due to high turn over rate in
those positions.

EDUCATION
UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX. School of Business Administration. Phoenix, AZ Current Enrollment. GPA -
3.89
TREVECCA NAZARENE UNIVERSITY. Nashville, TN Attended two years. Average GPA 3.5








Cathleen L. Mook

2046 N.E. 9th Street
Gainesville, FL 32609
cathy@mail.uflib.ufl.edu
Employment July 1999 to Present University of Florida Gainesville, Florida
Head, Preservation Department
Responsible for administration of fifteen FTE Preservation Department staff
including binding, conservation and analog reprographics units. Duties
include:
Define, implement and allocate resources to achieve annual strategic
plans for Department consistent with Library wide goals: please see
http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/preserve/goals/00-0 /index.html for details
Grant writing and administration, including United States Agriculture
Information Network (USAIN), United States Newspaper Project
(USNP), SOLINET CPMP4, SOLINET CPMP5
Act as liaison between Department and larger library, university and
vendor communities
Develop, implement and maintain disaster response, recovery and
rehabilitation plans

June 1998 June 1999 University of Florida Gainesville, Florida
Head, Binding Unit
Responsible for overall operation of five FTE decentralized binding unit
distributed over eight buildings.

June 1997 June 1998 Tulane University New Orleans, Louisiana
Head, Preservation Department
Responsible for coordination of three FTE Preservation Department
including binding and conservation programs.

Education December 1996 University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA
Certificate of Advanced Study in Preservation Administration
Awarded by the School of Library and Information Science. Funded by
1996 University Microfilm Inc. Preservation Fellowship

December 1995 University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA
Masters in Library Science
Awarded by the School of Library and Information Science

Professional American Library Association- Member since 1993
Memberships
Association for Library Collection and Technical Services (ALCTS) -
Member since 1994

Preservation and Reformatting Section (PARS) Member since 1994.
Currently member of PARS Nominating Committee, PARS representative to
ALCTS Membership Committee, Chair of Film Fest Planning Committee












Nelda M. Schwartz
2503 N.E. 11 Ter., Gainesville, FL 32609
neldas@mail.uflib.ufl.edu
home/352.378.3219 office/352.392.6962


EDUCATION
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA. Gainesville, Florida
College of Education
Spring 1970. Bachelor of Arts in Education
Major: Library Science; Minor: English Literature.

INDIAN RIVER JUNIOR COLLEGE. Ft. Pierce, FL
April 1968. Associate of Arts.

WORK EXPERIENCE
Senior Archivist
Acting Head, Head of Reprographics
Smathers Libraries Preservation Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
1998 to present

Responsible for overseeing of Reprographics Unit microfilming,
sales and distribution, and brittle books sections in addition to ensuring
grant funded projects are enacted and completed in a timely manner.
Continue to have responsibility for carrying out all Brittle Books Program
activities, web development and cataloging duties.

Archivist
Smathers Libraries. Preservation Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
1990 to 1998

Responsible for cataloging preservation microforms; implementing
and analyzing condition surveys; supervising, training and
coordinating student assistants; developing and documenting
procedures for the web-based manual for microfilming, brittle
books and scanning; coordinating brittle books reformat
preparations and materials routing; initiating replacement
orders for brittle materials; departmental systems liaison;
serials, theses and monograph binding.

Library Technical Assistant II
Smathers Libraries. Catalog Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
1975-1989

Responsible for cataloging periodicals and other serials;
supervising and training student assistants; distribution and
bibliographic searching of serials; catalog maintenance;
developing and documenting procedures.











Library Assistant
Smathers Libraries. Catalog Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
1973-1975

Responsible for distribution of materials to be cataloged;
cataloging new monographic editions; bibliographic searching of
serials; adds; catalog maintenance.

Clerk-Typist II,III
Smathers Libraries. Catalog Departmer't
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
September 1970-1973

Responsible for organization and distribution of unit work;
train and supervise other clerk-typists; preliminary cataloging
of theses; secretarial duties.

COMPUTER EXPERIENCE
MS-DOS, Windows'95/98; Offic6 Professional 2000
Programming Language experience
HTML 4.0 mark-up, including forms, tables

PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
Florida Library Association (1994)
Co-organized Paraprofessional Workshop
Library Paraprofessional Development Group (1991-1995)
Co-organized three Paraprofessional Conferences having national
attendance.
Developed a procedural manual for planning and hosting workshops and
conferences.




James R. "Gus" Clifton. Vita.


James R. "Gus" Clifton
1918 NW 3 Avenue
Gainesville FL 32603-1501 USA
ausclif(mail.uflib.ufl.edu
home 352.338.0354 office 352.392.6962 x163


EDUCATION


WORK
EXPERIENCE


COMPUTER
EXPERIENCE


AWARDS


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA. Gainesville, FL
College Liberal Arts and Sciences
January 1997 present. Studying fourth semester in Italic:
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA. Gainesville, FL
College of Law
August 1989 May 1991. Twoyears completed
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA. Gainesville, FL
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
May 1989. B.A., Anthropology
HUDSON HIGH SCHOOL. Hudson, FL
June 1985. Diploma awarded


.ICROPHOTOGRAPHY SECTION CHIEF
Smathers Libraries. Preservation Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
September 1996 to present
Responsible for all phases of microfilm production:
hiring, training and supervising student assistants;
interaction with other micropublishers and vendors:
sales of microforms to clients;
production statistics and database develpoment and management;
creating and updating micrographics website
MICROPHOTOGRAPHY IMAGING TECHNICIAN
Smathers Libraries. Preservation Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
April 1993 to September 1996
Responsible for queueing and microfilming of newspapers from Florida,
Latin America, East Central Africa, and other places.
Secondary assignment: digital scanning technician.
ASSISTANT MANAGER
Godfather's Pizza. 1405 NW 23 Ave., Gainesville, FL 32605
August 1991 September 1996
Responsible for supervision and management of restaurant crew; payroll;
and deposits.


Operating Systems
Windows 95/NT, Windows 3.1, MS-DOS
Software Applications
MSOffice 95/97, including Word, Excel, Access, Power Point and Outlook98;
Paint Shop Pro; HTML Assistant Pro
Programming Languages
HTML 4.0 mark-up, including forms, tables, frames, image maps

Libraries' Staff Recognition Award, "Mover and Shaker', December 1997


6/18/99 5:06 Pf


me.d//iolol" ..- --*- .. --- -- -.- ..-.--. ..-"





Elaine M. 11af]um


10254 S.W. 55th Lane. Gainesville, Florida 32608 (352)335-0712 (home) (352)392-9020 (work)


EDUCATION

University of Denver. Graduate School of Librarianship azi Information Management. Denver
Colorado. M.A..

Bemidji State University. Bemidji, Minnesota. B.A. in E:sory.

EXPERIENCE

Database Coordinator. Florida Center for Library Automation, Gainesville, Florida. January
1996-present.

Responsibilities include design, loading and indexing functions for the SUS Electronic
Collection of journal citation databases, full-text files and imaged data; specifications for
database conversion and load programs; database quality control including accuracy, currency
and data integrity.

Serve as backup on database management for the ten library catalogs supported by FCLA;
coordinate with vendor, library and FCLA staff on technical issues; participate in project teams
for indexing and presentation design, development and maintenance and provide user support
to library staff.*

User Services Librarian for Cataloging and Authority Coritrol. Florida Center for Library
Automation, Gainesville, Florida. February 1985-Januar 1996.

Responsibilities were to support and assist staff at the libraries within the ten State University
System institutions in the areas of authority control, catalog maintenance and special database
loading.

Provide training, consulting, and support documentation; monitor users for problems or needs
related to the NOTIS system.

Have written specifications and developed strategies to load authority records from various
vendors (BNA, UTLAS, OCLC, LC (LCSH and NAF) NLM (MeSH) as well as to load
bibliographic records from multiple sources (OCLC, EBSCO, CIS, MARCIVE, AES, Brodart).

Participated in design development for a PC interface to load both bibliographic and authority
records into NOTIS from OCLC as well as from other sources. Responsible for testing software,
implementation assistance, training documentation and ongoing enhancements.

Responsibilities included significant support and development in the creation and
maintenance of the numerous citation databases locally mounted and maintained by FCLA "'


--





Elaine M.I Henjum


10254 S.W. 55'" Lane. Gainesville. Florida 32608 (352)335-0712 (home) (352)392-9020 (work)


EXPERIENCE (continued)

Cataloging Coordinator. University of Denver. Penrose Library. Denver. Co. August 1980-
January 1985.

Responsible for coordinating the work flow through the Cataloging Departent using the OCLC
online cataloging system. Hired, trained and supervised 4 full-time and 7 part-time library
assistants.

Reclassification Project Coordinator. University of Denver. Penrose Library. Denver, Co.
August 1979-July 1980.

Established and coordinated a project to reclassify materials from Dewey to LC using OCLC.
Hired, trained and supervised 3 full-time library assistants. Also responsible for original
cataloging.

Visiting Instructor. University of Denver. Graduate School of Librariarship and Tnformation
Management. Denver, Co. Summer 1982.

Instructor for 'Storage and Retrieval of Library Materials II', a 4-credit class emphasizing the
effective use of OCLC and Library of Congress classification schedules and subject headings.

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIP AND SERVICE (current)

American Library Association (ALA) (member)
Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS)
Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL)
Library Information & Technology Association (LITA)
MARBI, Intern 1995-1996.
MARBI 1996-
Bylaws Committee, 1993-1996.
Reference and Adult Services Division (RASD)
RASD Collection Development and Evaluation Section (CODES) Computer
Based Methods and Resources Committee, 1994-1996.
Florida Library Association (member)
FLA Academic Libraries Section/ Fla. ACRL chapter Board of Directors, 1995-
FLA Academic Libraries Academic Section chair/FACRL president (1998-1999)
National Standards Organization.
Appointed by the Board of Directors to the NISO Standards Committee AL to develop
an American National Standard for Holdings Statements for Bibliographic Items. April
1995-










John W. Freund
4331 NW 28th Terrace, Gainesville, Florida 32605
johfreu ).mail.uflib.ufl.edu
home/352 374 4032 office/352 392 6962


EDUCATION San Francisco State University.
San Francisco, California.
College of Art and Design.
September 1984. Certificate of Book Restoration and Binding.

University of Minnesota.
Minneapolios, Minnesota.
College of Journalism.
June 1975. Bachelor of Arts.


WORK
EXPERIENCE Conservator, and Head, Conservation Unit.
Preservation Department, Smathers Libraries
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7001
October 1988 to Present.

Responsible for assessing and treating the collections within the
availability of available resources. Supervised services including
pamphlet binding, basic and intermediate repair,, protective enclosures
and environmental /physical conditions monitoring. Performs complex
repair and restoration. Trains and supervises Unit staff, volunteers and
OPS, evaluates work flow and progress and maintains standards of
treatment. Performs intermediate and complex repair and restoration for
special collections materials. This may include deacidification and
encapsulation, repair and restoration of paper and bindings
including period leather, cloth and paper.

Keeps current with the latest information, literature and research in the
Conservation field and with the latest equipment and procedures.

Instructor
Basic Bookbinding and Restoration
San Francisco State University
San Francisco, California.
1984-85.


Circulation and Stack Manager.
Jonsson Library of Government Documents
Stanford University, Palo Alto California.
June 1983 September 1988.










Freund page 2.


INTERNSHIPS Sutro Library
San Francisco State University
San Francisco, California
September 1982 -83.

San Anselmo Theological Seminary
San Anselmo, California
October- December 1983.

CURRENT PROJECTS

In collaboration with the UF Chemistry Department, currently working
on the development of equipment to clean books and paper using laser
technology.

In conjunction with the Baldwin Phase I Project, researching the
identification of artists and engravers of stamped book
cover illustration (U.S.) between the years 1800-1910.

Participating in a 18 month study on the use of data-loggers and
specialty software in the tracking of temperature, humidity
data and life expectancy for books and paper in the libraries.









Phone (352) 846-0129
E-mail jpen@mail.uflib.ufl.edu

Jane Pen


EDUCATION
1998-present:
Degree
Major

Classes taken







1979-1983:
Degree
Major


Santa Fe Community College, Gainesville, FL
Received AS Spring/2002 GPA 3.9
Computer Information Systems Analysis

Introduction to computing, Introduction to Internet, Introduction
to networking, Microcomputer architecture, Data processing
math, Visual Basic I & II, Programming in C++, Access 2000,
Operating system, Excel 2000, PC management, Professional
development for Information Technology Students, Document
productions (Microsoft office applications), Adobe Photoshop,
Firework, and Web authoring (Dreamweaver/XHTML).

Tamkang University, Taipei, Taiwan
Bachelor of Arts
Educational Media and Library Science


WORK EXPERIENCE
2001-present: Library technical assistant. Digital Library Center, University of Florida
Ensure the quality of the physical units of digitization (TIFF, JPEG and other images) and their
corresponding structural metadata files for Baldwin project (a core collection of
Literature for Children) under the supervision of Imaging Production Coordinator. Assist
program assistant in coordinating student workers and volunteers working in the Imaging
Section. Help streamline processes to assure highest quality and rapid throughput of
digitizing products.

1997-2001: Library assistant. Alachua County Library District, Gainesville, FL
Assisted patrons with information inquiry, resolved account problems and customer
services functions, using SIRSI system. Duties also included office equipment
maintenance.

1996-1997: Library reference assistant. Schaumburg High School, Schaumburg, IL
Assisted students with reference inquiry, helped media center director with material
processing. Also assisted computer lab manager with equipment maintenance.

1988-1996: Cataloger. Follett Library Resources Co., McHenry, IL
Assisted department head with cataloging k-12 materials and bibliographies consulting
with school librarians and other customers. Reduced production cost to over $5000 per
budget year by rearranging workflow and organizing presentation facility.

CERTIFICATION AND MEMBERSHIP
MOUS certificate in Microsoft Excel 2000
Member of the Alpha Zeta Phi Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa








Letters of Support


James F. Corey, Director, Florida Center for Library Automation
John Cech, Professor of English, University of Florida
Linda Smith, Chair, Special Collections, University of North Florida
Kenneth B. Kidd, Assistant Professor, Department of English, University of Florida
Lucy Rollin, Professor of English, Clemson University
Gillian Avery, Historian of Children's Literature, Oxford, England







____ FLORIDA CENTER FOR LIBRARY YA UTOMATION
S1 2002 NW 13TH Streer, Suite #320
U ,/. Gainesville, Florida 32609
.C Plhone: (352) 392-9020 or SUNCOMi 622-9020 FLx: (352) 392-9185


June 24, 2002
Dale 8. Canales
Director of Libraries
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
PO Box 117001
Gainesville, Fl. 32611-7001

Dear Ms. Canelas,

This is a letter of support for the grant application being submitted by John E. Ingram, Director for Collections
at the University of Florida Smathers Libraries to the National Endowment for the Humanities. This project
seeks over a three-phase program, of which this application is for Phase Two to preserve and make
accessible approximately 28,000 volumes from the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature.

FCLA is currently supporting storage, retrieval and access to materials converted during Phase One of the
grant. More detailed information as well as access to the materials is available at: http://palmm.fcla.edu/juv/

In support of Phase Two of this project, The Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA) will continue to:

(1) provide computer storage for the digital reproductions as a result of this project. All data will be integrated
into FCLA's standard support for large digital objects including security, back-up, migration and data
refreshing; and,

(2) provide access to the digital reproductions and the associated access aids. FCLA will generate indexes
for the MARC records and related digital documents via current ability in WebLUIS. FCLA continues to
develop/enhance software to provide more sophisticated search and navigation within its digital library. FCLA
uses an IBM SP2 (9076), AIX 4.3.3, with current storage capacity at approximately 3 terabytes, two Sun 280
machines and a SAN storage device capable of 14 terabytes of storage with ongoing plans for expansion.

FCLA is an agency within the Florida Board of Education, Division of Colleges and Universities and is
administered by the University of Florida. We maintain the software system that provides online access to the
collections of the state supported university libraries. This system, which is known publicly as WebLUIS (Web
Library User Information Service located at http://webluis.fcla.edu) provides access to each university's library
collection and, for author, title, subject and keyword queries, provides access to all the library collections
simultaneously. Support for digital library services are outlined in more detail and can be accessed at
http://www.fcla.edu/dlini/dlinipg.html

We recognize the significance of the Baldwin Library and the importance of expanded access for scholars.
As participants with a support role in the project, we are very excited about the prospect of working together
with the University of Florida Smathers Libraries to bring these materials online.

Sincerely,


James F. Corey, Director
Florida Center for Librar Automation
AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/ EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
University of Florida Florida State University Florida A &M University Universit of South Florida Florida Atlantic University
Gainesville Tallahassee Tallahassee Tampa Boca Raton

University of West Florida University of Central Florida University of North Florida Florida International University Florida Gulf Coast University
Pensacola Orlando Jacksonville Miami Ft. Meyers








4 UNIVERSITY OF
SFLORIDA
College of Liberal Arts & Sciences PO Box 117310
Department of English Gainesville, FL 32l11-7310
(352) 392-0777

June 22, 2001


Dr. John E. Ingram
Associate Director
210 Smathers Library
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611


Dear John:

I am delighted to be able to renew my support of the National Endowment for
the Humanities grant for which the Baldwin Library and Special Collections are
currently reapplying. Such continuing grant funding would help in important
ways to advance the process of cataloging, preserving, and making available the
extra-ordinary resources of a collection that is, in my judgment, a national treasure
in the field of children's literature.

As I wrote in my earlier letter for the original grant proposal, the Baldwin
Library is one of the truly unique places in this country where one can study the
progression of the visual revolution of the past three hundred years, as it was
registered in books for children. Your recent grant for beginning this enterprise has
already begun to make many.of the important historical works among the Baldwin's
holdings readily available to scholars, critics, and students in the field, and we are
already beginning to see the first signs of research into this fascinating, vital area
being sparked by this undertaking. As word of the project continues to spread, there
promises to be a significant expansion of the awareness and use of these valuable
historical resources.

As you know, the University of Florida's Center for the Study of Children's
Literature and Media shares your interest in making these materials accessible to a
broader, general audience. We look forward to continuing to work with you on a
variety of projects that will bring the remarkable resources of the Baldwin Library to
national attention. The Public Radio program "Recess!" is the first of these efforts.
It is a daily, three-minute program about children's culture, past and present, that is
produced here, at the University of Florida, and is then made available, nationally,
via the Public Radio- Satellite System, to, the 500 inter-linked, stations in that
network. Based on the most recent audience profiles for the stations that are airing










WWW.r<'.s.s.ifl.tll 2-



the program, WUFT-FM, our co-producer of the program, estimates that "Recess!"
currently reaches a daily listening audience of 20 million people. This program
regularly includes an extremely popular weekly feature by Rita Smith, the Curator
of the Baldwin Library, that draws on historical material from the Baldwin's
holdings and thus has already begun this process of public education. To date we
have produced over 500 original"Recess!" programs, with nearly 100 of these based
on Baldwin materials. The transcripts for these programs have been posted on the
"Recess!" website (www.recess.ufl.edu). We hope that in the development of the
site this coming year, it will be possible to include color images from the historical
material that you have already been digitalized through your current and,
hopefully, future grant efforts.

Please let me know how I may be of help in the coming months with your
important work.

Yours sincerely,



Jn Cech
Professor of English
Director, Center for the Study
of Children's Literature and Media



















A co-production of the University of Florida's WUFT-FM and The Center for the Study of Children's Literature and Media
UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA






UNIVERSITY OF
NORTH 4567 St. Johns BIuIT Road. South
FLO RIDA Jacksonville, Florida 32224-2645
(904) 620-2553 Fax (904) 620-271)
THOMAS G. CARPENTER LIBRARY
P.O. Box 17605, Jacksonville. FL 32245-7605


June 10, 2002

John E. Ingram, Chair
Department of Special Collections
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
Gainesville, Fla. 32611

Dear Dr. Ingram,

I am writing in full support of the University of Florida's grant proposal to the National
Endowment for the Humanities to preserve and catalog-a large portion of the Baldwin Library of
Historical Children's Literature.

In 1992-93 I received a professional development leave from my home institution to do a special
collections project at the University of Florida. At the time, I was a professional cataloger with
twenty years of experience in original cataloging of all types of material. I was thoroughly
familiar with the use of the Anglo-American Cataloging Rules, 2nd ed., revised (AACR2R) and
the various US MARC format standards but had little practical experience in special collections.
I was fortunate to be selected to work in the Baldwin, cataloging a wonderful collection of
editions of Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, spanning the years from the first to modem editions. It was
a fascinating and unique experience for a cataloger to see so many editions of the same work
together and to work in international databases (OCLC and RLIN) creating many original
bibliographic records. As a cataloger and bibliographic researcher, I cannot state too strongly the
tremendous enrichment to intellectual access that results from the full cataloging of such
materials. There is a striking contrast between the title only access to the Baldwin which I had at
the time- and which still exists today for parts of the collection- and the detailed records giving
authors, printers, illustrators of all types, and subject and genre access. The contrast
demonstrates clearly the special scholarly potential of children's literature in many academic fields.
The visual aspects alone, which I understand are being made accessible through selective
digitization, will enrich the usefulness of the materials in art, economic and social history, and
bibliography, to name the most obvious. The preservation aspects of the project will preserve an
important part of American cultural history.


Beyond the intellectual excitement of working in the Baldwin, I developed a great respect for Dr.
Baldwin and gained some insight into her world of collecting. She must have been a great lady to
know, full of drive and enthusiasm for her collection and the vision of what it would mean in the
future to scholars. The University of Florida has the foresight to add to the collection in a
significant way and, with the grant proposal, plans to extend the ability to "visit" the collection


Equal Otpprtunitv/Equal Access/Affirmative Action Institution









John Ingram ... Baldwin Library NEH proposal ... Page 2



both through increased catalog access and the techniques of digitization.

I recommend support of the proposal without qualification.


Sincerely,



Linda L. Smith
Head, Cataloging Dept.
Thomas G. Carpenter Library
University of North Florida
Jacksonville, FL 32224





.7"- "I 207 7-!

| UNIVERSITY OF

SFLORIDA

College of Liberal Arts & Sciences PO Box 117310
Department of English Gainesville, FL 32611-7310
(352) 392-6650
Fax: (352) 392-0860

July 13, 2001

Dr. John E. Ingram
Director of Collections
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611

Dear Dr. Ingram,

I am very pleased to support your application for a NEH grant to catalog, microfilm, and
digitize materials from the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature, particularly
books dating from 1870 to 1889. The Baldwin is one of the premier archives of
historical children's literature in the world, and provides invaluable research opportunities
for scholars working in children's literature, Victorian studies, religion, history, and
related fields. Particularly unique and significant about the Baldwin is the range and
diversity of its holdings, even within a decade or so (most such collections show
diversity but only across a longer historical period). Furthermore, Ruth Baldwin collected
materials that others deemed insignificant but that have proven immensely instructive.
In short, the Baldwin makes possible projects that aren't viable anywhere else.

Already the collection has facilitated important work. Gillian Avery, the distinguished
children's literature scholar, came from Britain to work in the Baldwin while researching
and writing Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922 (Johns
Hopkins, 1994). Other scholars have made substantial use of the holdings as well,
among them Lynne Vallone, Mary Lenard, and our own John Cech. Mary Lenard is a
friend of mine from graduate school, and she spent three weeks here reading
nineteenth-century biography and historical fiction for children. I know that she found
her time here productive, but I should add that not everyone is able to stay as long as
she did (or with a friend). The NEH grant will allow greater access to the Library,
allowing scholars to view some materials without traveling to Florida and/or to plan their
research time in the Library more strategically.

As you know, my primary interest is American children's literature from the nineteenth
century, and I joined the faculty here three years ago largely to work with the Library's
remarkable holdings. The last several decades of the century were among the most
significant for children's literature in many respects. The most important illustrators,
such as Kate Greenaway and Randolph Caldecott, were working at this time. Series
books were flourishing; we have a huge and comprehensive collection. For example, we
have several copies of Horatio Alger's Tattered Tom, which appeared in this period, a
title otherwise difficult to find (about a girl who cross-dresses as a bootblack). This was










also the heyday of children's magazines such as St. Nicholas, for which many "adult"
writers regularly wrote (among them Harriet Beecher Stowe, Henry Wadsworth
Longfellow, Mark Twain, and Lousia May Alcott). We have complete runs of St. Nicholas
and other important periodicals. I tell my. graduate students that many. dissertations are
waiting to be discovered in the Baldwin.

In fact, I know that I speak for my colleagues in saying that the Baldwin is fast becoming
an important part of our graduate program. A year ago I taught a graduate seminar in
children's culture, and several students began research projects in the Baldwin. One
graduate student in German worked with late nineteenth-century movable/pop-up
books, and made iinages available for the class on CD-ROM. Another, a graduate student
in History, Cornelia Lambert,. began working on nineteenth-century insect guides,
examining that fascinating literature in light of social, religious, and scientific history.
That research became the basis for both a master's thesis and an article to be published
in a forthcoming volume on children's literature and ecocriticism. Another student in the
class researched children's books published during. World War II. Megan Norcia, now a
doctoral candidate in English, began research in the Baldwin several years ago under the
supervision of Professor Pamela Gilbert, examining late nineteenth-century, woman-
authored travel stories and geography textbooks. I am currently serving on Megan's
dissertation committee, and I can verify, that the Baldwin has enabled an absolutely
fascinating investigation, which I believe will become a significant contribution to Anglo-
American Victorian studies, children's literary studies, and gender studies.

I'm very excited about this opportunity to modernize and improve access through
technology. Please let me know how I can help with the process. I also want to thank
you and Rita Smith, Curator of the Baldwin Library, for your support of these and other
efforts, and for your.general enthusiasm and goodwill.

Sincerely,



Kenneth B. Kidd
Assistant Professor, English







CLEMSON
U N I V E R S I T Y
UNIVERSITY
June 17, 2001



To: The National Endowment for the Humanities

From: Lucy Rollin, Professor of English

Re: Grants for the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature


[ discovered the Baldwin collection several years ago when I was working on two projects: a
history of American teens in the 20th century, and 19'h century American nursery rhymes.
I had the pleasure of working for a week among its materials, with the able and attentive help of
the staff there.

The Baldwin collection is unique in that it contains what we might call "real" children's books. In
my research I found, for example, a remarkable selection of early 20th century series books, the
most popular reading for teens during that time. I also found a selection of popular nursery rhyme
books which offered new insights into how readers and illustrators interpreted these rhymes. Such
materials are becoming increasingly interesting and valuable to the community of children's
literature scholars as we turn our attention less to what adults recommend and more to what
children actually read and enjoy. When I was in the last stages of assembling illustrations for my
book on teens, I found the staff at the Baldwin especially helpful. They are not only
professionals, they are human beings who understand the fun of scholarly work as well as the
demands of it.

The Baldwin collection is unusual in its preservation of what might appear ephemeral, and thus all
the more valuable to those of us interested in children's literature. I suspect, though I understand
librarianship only very generally, that cataloguing such materials must present particular
challenges; this makes me especially grateful to the Baldwin for its care and thoroughness.

I understand that the Baldwin has already completed Phase 1 of its cataloguing of 19th century
materials with your help. As they move into Phase II of this complex project, I hope they will be
able again to rely on your support, for this is a project certainly worth supporting. The materials
they work with lets scholars like me-and all those interested in young people-get past the
bewildering changes in children's external lives and see those things which children today still
share with those in the past.

With gratitude for your past support,



Lucy Rollin
Professor of English







) 1' ARTMENT )F ENG LISH 1
I .., i~..~..I. .. ...,. \, .I ) ....,, ,, 1|1 frroltT w r Ix 34O52 (:Ictr1i'i, S( 29' 4.O-52 1









32 Charlbury road, Oxford CX2 6~U

10 June, 1997






T the Naticnal Endcwrmen t c r rhe aniT4ies

I have been asked by the University of Flcrida to endorse
their project to catalogue and microfilm the 1850-1910 holdings
of the Baldwin Library. I have knwc. this collection since the
very early days of its arrival at Gainesville, and indeed it
was the sighc of American children's books shelved side by side
with the English ones that gave me, when I discovered that
there was no history of the former, the very bold idea of
attempting to write one myself, albeit from the wrong side of
the Atlantic. With the help of a Laverhulme grant I did make
frec-qunt visits to the US, but in no other library could I find
such a full range of 19th centur-y American books, and when my
own history finally appeared tan years later I dedicated it to
the memory of Ruth Baldwin because it never have been written
.without the resources of her collection. What makes it unique
and so especially valuable is that she included the ephemera of
the past, feeling like John Jo-hson who assembled the Johnson
Collection of Printed Ephemera now housed in the Bodleian
Library here that the history of a people is to be found in
its waste paper just as much as in its literary classics and
arz treasures. But printed ephemera of the sort Ruth Baldwin
collected is very fragile, and even then I could see that it
was fast crumbling away. It needs to be microfilmed so that it
is still there for future generations.
And there is another, geographical point. Gainesville is
dauntingly far away from.other libraries. When students and
researchers (both-British and American) ask me about the best
collection of children's books I always cite the Baldwin
Library because only there can they see such an extraordinarily
full range of American AND English books, but I know that they
are deterred by the difficulty of getting there. The existence
of a complete catalogue together with microfilms would be an
enormous boon to potential readers all over the world.

z,^ A =--y









HISTORY OF GRANTS FOR THIS PROJECT

None



NEH is funding a related project for the preservation microfilming and cataloging of
8600 volumes of children's literature from the Baldwin Library at the University of
Florida for the period 1850-1869 at a level of $381,220 (September 2000 September
2002).









OMB no. 3136-0134
Expires 6/30/03


National Endowment for the Humanities
DIVISION OF PRESERVATION AND ACCESS
INSTITUTIONAL FACT SHEET


Name of Applicant: George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 117001

Cit. Gainesville, State: FL ZIP co

Type of institution: (Please choose only one.)

Museum historical organization historic site or house
archives _public library L.college, university or r
Larts or cultural organization "other:

Governance of organization: E"state Oprivate nonprofit
county "municipal E


..32611


research library




other:


Location of organization: LJrural [Lurban or suburban

Year founded: 1853

Number of visitors/users in most recent fiscal year: n/a

Please note: Libraries, archives, museums, etc. that are part of a larger organization
(such a college or university) should provide budget and staff information for their institutional unit.

Amount of operating budget in most recently completed fiscal year 23,946,680

Number of ull-time paid staff members: 311 FTE

Number of part-time paid staff members: 90.5 FTE (Students)

Number of volunteers: 0

Only applicants for Preservation Assistance Grants should complete the remainder of this form.
Schedule of open hours:

Has your institution ever had a preservation or conservation assessment? rfes ]No

If yes, date of the assessment:__

Name(s) of assessor(s):

Has your institution evr engaged a preservation consultant for purposes other than a general preservation
or conservation assessment? I es 5No
If yes, briefly elaborate: