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  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Significance
 History, scope and duration
 Methodology and standards
 Work plan
 Staff
 Dissemination
 Appendix 1.1 : sample listing of...
 Appendix 2.1 : user statistics
 Appendix 5.1 : PALMM - literature...
 Appendix 5.2 : International Digital...
 Appendix 5.5 : Internet Archive...
 Appendix 5.7 : Grant of permis...
 Appendix 6.1 : Imaging equipme...
 Appendix 7.1
 Appendix 8.1
 Appendix 9.1 : Vitae
 Appendix 10.1 : Letters






Preservation and access for American and British children's literature, 1890-1910
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF90000018/00003
 Material Information
Title: Preservation and access for American and British children's literature, 1890-1910
Series Title: Phase Three
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Smith, Rita J,
Publisher: University of Florida
Publication Date: 2007
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: University of Florida.   ( lcsh )
Literature for Children
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: NEH grant proposal for cataloging and digitization of volumes from the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
System ID: UF90000018:00003

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Table of Contents
    Significance
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    History, scope and duration
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Methodology and standards
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Work plan
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Staff
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Dissemination
        Page 23
    Appendix 1.1 : sample listing of books
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Appendix 2.1 : user statistics
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Appendix 5.1 : PALMM - literature for children
        Page 36
    Appendix 5.2 : International Digital Children's Library
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Appendix 5.5 : Internet Archive - Children's Library
        Page 41
    Appendix 5.7 : Grant of permissions
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Appendix 6.1 : Imaging equipment
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Appendix 7.1
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Appendix 8.1
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Appendix 9.1 : Vitae
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    Appendix 10.1 : Letters
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
Full Text





NARRATIVE


Significance

Significance of the Collection

The University of Florida seeks support from the National Endowment for the Humanities for a
two-year project to catalog and digitize volumes from the Baldwin Library of Historical
Children's Literature published in the United States and Great Britain from 1890 through 1910.
7,500 volumes will be fully catalogued and, of those 7,500, the volumes with color illustrations
(approximately 2,500) will be digitized and made freely available for full text searching over the
internet. As part of the digitization process, harvestable metadata will be created and served, and
the electronic packages will be shared with other digital children's literature collections.

The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature is part of the Department of Special and
Area Studies Collections at the University of Florida. The Baldwin Library includes
approximately 100,000 books published for children in the United States and Great Britain from
1656 through 2006. Currently, access is provided through a printed (1981) guide to the
collection, a local card catalog, the University of Florida on-line catalog
(http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/) and the University of Florida Digital Collections (UFDC)
(http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/UFDC/UFDC.aspx?c=juv). All Baldwin Library books have a record
in the University of Florida on-line catalog. Approximately 25,000 of those books are
represented with full bibliographic records and 75,000 with brief provisional records accessible
by title and date only. Digital versions of over 1,100 Baldwin Library books are currently
available on-line through the UFDC and another 590 are available on the Florida Center for
Library Automation (FCLA) Publication of Archival Library & Museum Materials (PALMM)
Literature for Children website (http://palmm.fcla.edu/juv/)

Although the Baldwin Library holds many well-known titles, it also contains titles that are
unknown, titles which, although read and enjoyed by children years ago, have not survived. This
aggregation of well-known and little-known titles has formed a unique collection with a depth
and breadth that other collections of similar material do not duplicate. Although several
collections of historical children's literature have received grants to support preservation and
improve access to their collections in the past, the portion of the Baldwin collection that is the
focus of this project will not significantly overlap with these other major holdings. The
American Antiquarian Society, which has a valuable collection of historical children's books
holds only titles published in American before 1876. The children's literature collections at the
deGrummond Collection at the University of Southern Mississippi and the Kerlan Collection at
the University of Mississippi, both focus on author manuscripts and illustrators' original art and
the bulk of their collections are 20th century. The Arne Nixon Center for Children's Literature at
California State University Fresno, holds primarily 20th century publications and California
authors. Most digitization projects of children's literature collections focus on books recognized
as classics, as representatives of a particular theme, or as the work of a well known author or
artist, and while the mass digitization of academic library collections has received attention and
support in recent years, few of those collections include historical children's books to any great
extent. The digitization of the selected books which contain color illustrations allow for the









exploration of the development of the use of color, an important component of children's
literature. The comprehensive cataloging of British and American children's literature published
during the twenty-one years surrounding the turn of the 20th century with digitization of those
with color illustration is a unique approach.

The Baldwin Library is of international significance for researchers who study historical,
cultural, social and literary aspects of children's literature published in Great Britain and
America. The collection supports research in many areas including education and upbringing;
family and gender roles; civic values; racial, religious, and moral attitudes; literary style and
format; and the arts of illustration and book design. Many children's literature experts have
consulted the Baldwin Library to research their publications. Some scholars bring to the
collection a broad area of interest and use the collection as a base for exploration before
narrowing a topic. Others bring a very specific research need to the collection. With its
extensive holdings, the Baldwin Library is capable of serving both needs. (See Appendix 1 for
publications based on research in the Baldwin Library).

Dr. Maude Hines, Professor of English at Portland State University, recently spent a week at the
Baldwin Library. She came to research boys' adventure novels of the late 19th century published
in America, and became interested, while reading, in scenes of economic exchange including
missionary capitalism and savagery being equated with not understanding the
European/American market economy. Most useful to her was the subject access assigned to the
bibliographic records which included such terms as "national characteristics." During the course
of the week she narrowed her topic to "Missionary Capitalism in Nineteenth Century U.S. Boys'
Adventure Novels." Nearly half of the books she discovered and used were not available at other
collections.

Other recent scholars who have visited the Baldwin Library include Dr. Donelle Ruwe of
Northern Arizona University who studied 19th century variations of the poem "My Mother," Dr.
Phil Nel of Kansas State University, who was interested in R. F. Outcault's story "Buster Brown
Plays David and Goliath" for his forthcoming book on radical children's literature, and Dr. Julie
Smith of the University of Wisconsin, Whitewater, who studied the way Charlotte Tucker used
natural history to construct her representation of animals.

A number of master's theses and doctoral dissertations have been completed using the Baldwin
Library, most recently, a master's degree from the University of Florida English Department
entitled Prisoners of Innocence: American Justice, Children, and Children's Books, 1865-1920
(2006). As awareness of and access to the collection expand, the potential for multi-disciplinary
use increases. Professors will follow the lead of the University's History of Science staff who
have already directed one master's degree candidate to use the collection in the area of natural
history and domesticity for a master's thesis entitled The Child and the Bee: Natural Theology
and Insect Science in Children's Literature, 1825-1855. Currently, a masters degree candidate
from the Sociology Department is researching the role of the father in the Little Golden Books
series for his thesis entitled Little Golden Fathers.

The University of Florida understands the importance of children's literature and demonstrates its
commitment by supporting faculty and programs dedicated to children's literature. The Center
for the Study of Children's Literature and Culture (http://www.clas.ufl.edu/cclc/) at the









University of Florida has created and produces a three-minute radio program, Recess!
(http://www.recess.ufl.edu/center.shtml). The program is recorded by the University's Public
Radio affiliate, linked to a satellite and picked up and broadcast by nearly 500 public radio
stations across the country. Rita Smith, Curator of the Baldwin Library, is a regular contributor
of essays based on the Baldwin's holdings to the Recess! program. The English Department has
four faculty members who teach 14 undergraduate and graduate courses in children's literature
each year. Currently there are 12 MA and PhD students in the Department's Children's
Literature Track, and more than 150 other graduate students who take the children's literature
classes. This is a reflection of the national trend of increased scholarly interest in children's
literature.

Academic scholars are not the only users of the Baldwin Library. Each year the American
Library Association's Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) awards from one to
three fellowships to its members for a month of study and research at the Baldwin Library. The
Fellows have studied nineteenth-century series books, pop-up books, folk tales, family stories
from the 1930s and 1940s, 19th and 20th century editions of Cinderella, and 19th century
alphabet books. This research has resulted in articles and a book, as well as programs which are
shared with the public through public library programs and other community presentations.
Requests for information and anecdotal evidence indicate the digitized books have been accessed
by children, scholars, and home schoolers.

Intellectual access to the Baldwin Library for such varied research activities will be expanded
through cataloging the material and adding the detailed bibliographic records to the national
databases, OCLC/RLIN, and through the creation of harvestable metadata to access the project's
digital component. The digital component will make all aspects of the books with color
illustration, including text, design, illustrations, bindings, and typography, freely available to
anyone with Internet access via the University of Florida Digital Collections initiative
(http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/UFDC/UFDC.aspx?c=juv). The two earlier NEH funded projects
(2000-2002 and 2004-2006) covering the years froml850 to 1869 and 1870 tol889 respectively,
were very successful, as use of both the source collection and the digitized version increased.
(See Appendix 2 for use statistics). This grant application covers the time period from 1890 to
1910, and will build upon that legacy of success to catalog and digitize a set of materials that
represent an important era in children's literature.

The physical collection does not circulate and the material is not available through interlibrary
loan. It is currently housed in closed stacks in a humidity, temperature, and light controlled
environment. The materials are used in the secure reading room of the Department of Special
and Area Studies Collections. Some of the books are quite brittle and special care will be taken
during the digitization process to handle the books in ways that produce the least amount of
damage. The digitization portion of the project will place thousands of children's books from the
late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries on the Internet at no cost to the user and with
minimum damage to the physical item. Digital access will benefit the academic community who
will be able to read the books from their home base as well as people of all ages who enjoy
children's literature and would never encounter the language and art of these older books, except
through digitized versions.









Significance of the Historical Period, 1890 1910


The years from 1890 to1910 produced the full flowering of what has been called the Golden Age
of British and American children's literature that emerged following the publication of Lewis
Carroll's Alice in Wonderland in 1865. Moral tales and religious books with their pious
children largely disappeared and were replaced with stories of adventure and heroism, fantasy
and whimsy. Ideals of one's relationship to God gave way to the importance of social and civic
relationships revolving around family and country. Play, including imaginative play, is no
longer seen as a sign of idleness and an invitation to mischief, but as an important part of a
child's education. Adults are no longer the main characters of books written for children:
children are now the main characters, and they are given the freedom to create imaginary worlds,
to go on adventures and to grow up, just as their literature was growing up.

Peter Hunt, perhaps England's most distinguished scholar and critic in the field, characterized
this period in Children's Literature, an Illustrated History (Oxford University Press, 1995) as
follows:

The development of publishing for children reflected economic and
demographic growth, as well as a society more sensitive and responsive to
children's needs. From religious and didactic beginnings, writers were
responding to a redefined childhood, one that required a distinctive literature.
... Many authors whose works are still in print and who had a large
influence flourished. In a sense, children's literature was growing-up-away
from adults.

The production of and interest in fairy tales, legends and books of fantasy mushroomed, thanks
primarily to the efforts of Andrew Lang who published his first book, The Blue Fairy Book, in
1889 and followed it with a series of similar books. The writings of E. Nesbit brought the
possibility of magic into the everyday life of children. Carlo Collodi's Pinocchio, A Tale of a
Puppet, was translated into English in 1892 and became a best seller on both sides of the
Atlantic. L. Frank Baum published The Wizard of Oz in 1900. J. M. Barrie wrote and staged
Peter Pan in 1904. Fantasies with humanized animals, such as Beatrix's Potter's The Tale of
Peter Rabbit (1902) and Kenneth Grahame's The Wind in the Willows (1908), appeared and
became wildly popular. Fairy tales, magic, and flights of fancy had gained acceptance and
respectability.

There were also, of course, as many books with realistic settings and characters which reflected
the social and cultural milieu of the young readers. The continued presence of and interest in the
British empire inspired, among others, Rudyard Kipling, Robert Louis Stevenson and G. A.
Henty. The waves of immigrants that came to America increased interest in other cultures and in
the childhood experiences of other nationalities. L.C. Page & Company of Chicago published a
series of books, beginning in 1901 with Our Little Indian Cousin (Wade), which implied that all
human beings are family and offered glimpses of child life in other countries as a way to foster
understanding among children of different cultures. The series books of James Otis, Oliver
Optic and Clarence Young took the reader along on the adventures of the Boy Spies, the Navy
Boys, and the Motor Boys. Horatio Alger explored social implications of the urban landscape;









Kate Douglas Wiggin's Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm (1903) and Gene Stratton Porter's A Girl
of the Limberlost (1909) chronicled the triumph of young girls over unhappy domestic situations.
The books written at the turn of the 20th century put children at the center of the action, made
them self-sufficient and set them on self-generated adventure, giving both the authors and the
young readers the opportunity to freely explore other cultures, other eras and other landscapes,
whether real or fanciful.

Dr. Patricia Craddock, Distinguished Professor Emerita of English at the University of Florida,
notes that "because of the intrinsic importance of these books, and because they had ceased to be
governed by rigidly didactic conventions that prevented writers from presenting children and
their lives realistically, the study of the children's literature of the period has major contributions
to make not only to the history and theory of books for children and of child life in general, but
also to the cultural history of England and America."

Most of the authors and titles mentioned thus far are well known to today's reader and
researcher, but surrounding these giants in the field are a host of equally important but lesser
known writers and titles. Tony Watkins, in an essay entitled "History, Culture and Children's
Literature" notes: "The rise of newer forms of literary historicism is connected, in part, with
social change and the effort to recover histories for...minority groups within society. In turn,
these social aims are linked with the recuperation of forgotten texts, including texts that have
never been considered worthy of academic study." (International Companion Encyclopedia of
Children's Literature, 1996, p. 4)

The books of the Baldwin Library are uniquely qualified to reveal this literary and cultural
history. In an article about the Baldwin Library in the Times Literary Supplement, September
17, 1982, Gillian Avery, a British scholar and author of children's books, noted that Ruth
Baldwin, the original collector of these nineteenth-century books, concentrated on buying books
which children had actually read. This collecting philosophy resulted in one of the most
important attributes of the Baldwin Library: not only does it hold multiple editions of the agreed
upon classics of children's literature, it also supports these classics with thousands of less
significant or less known works. There are many titles not collected by other libraries because
they were not considered "important." In the two previous grants approximately half of the
titles catalogued are the only copy of record, indicating that the title has not been collected or
held by any other library and its existence is verified solely by the Baldwin Library copy.

These fugitive titles, read and loved by many children, are now extremely scarce, but are
important to scholars interested in American and British cultural history and literature. The
authors of these unknown books comprise the chorus of other voices that surround and provide a
larger cultural background for classic titles and well-known authors. For example, the Baldwin
Library contains extensive holdings of the fairy tales of Andrew Lang and editions of Hans
Christian Anderson published during this time period, but also has Laura Winnington's The
Outlook Fairy Book for Little People and Edith Ogden Harrison' s The Moon Princes, a Fairy
Tale. G.A. Henty, Harry Castlemon and G. Manville Fenn are all well-known writer of
nineteenth-century boys adventure novels. The Baldwin Library holds hundreds of their titles,
but also holds F. Frankfort Moore's Highways and High Seas, Willis Boyd Allen's Gulf and
Glacier, and Alfred H. Miles' Log Leaves & Sailing Orders, which are all lesser or unknown









titles of novels in the same genre, all published in the last decade of the nineteenth century.
These authors wrote books popular with children in the last years of the nineteenth century, as
did Henty, Castlemon and Fenn, but Moore, Allen, and Miles have now become the unheard
voices.

Lucy Rollin, children's literature critic, author and Professor Emerita of Children's Literature at
Clemson University, wrote in her letter of support for an earlier grant proposal to the National
Endowment for the Humanities, that "[o]ur culture creates, uses, and responds to literature, even
what might be considered ephemeral, for it is in the ephemera, really, that a culture truly reveals
itself; such artifacts are its unguarded moments." One vital function of this grant would be to
make available to researchers in a very immediate and accessible way the wide range of both
classic and fugitive titles held in the Baldwin Library that date to this significant period of
children's literature.

Significance of Color in Children's Literature

During the final decade of the 19th century and the first decade of the 20th century the use of
color in children's book illustration reached its peak with a flood of exquisitely illustrated
children's classics. Richard Dalby, in The Golden Age of Children's Book Illustration, (Gallery
Books, 1991) says:

These years saw the rise of this century's greatest and most popular
illustrators, including Arthur Rackham, Edmund Dulac, Willy Pogany, Kay
Neilsen, Edward J. Detmold, W. Heath Robinson and Jessie Willcox Smith.
This incredible wealth of talent,...the innumerable fine drawings and
paintings combining fantasy, humour and sheer beauty and the array of
masterly pictorial cover designs richly adorned in gilt have never been
equaled.

The digital portion of this project will provide access to thousands of color illustrations by these
and other great artists such as W. W. Denslow, N.C. Wyeth, and L. Leslie Brooke, who were
creating visually innovative and exciting children's books between 1890 and 1910. Many of the
books had full color plates tipped in as well as two- or three-color illustrations scattered
throughout the text. The final years of this time period saw the beginning of the modern picture
book, with the publication ofE. Boyd Smith's The Story ofNoah's Ark (1905) with color
illustrations that not only illustrate the text, but carry the story along.

One of the ways to gauge the place of color in children's literature is to consider not only its
denotative value but also, and perhaps more importantly, its connotative influence on readers. In
author John Cech's letter of support for an earlier similar project, he noted that "aesthetically,
color illustration offered the artist a new, wider vocabulary for representation, thus contributing
dramatically to an expansion of the emotional meaning and other visual information ... in a
given work."

In Myth, Magic, and Mystery: One Hundred Years ofAmerican Children's Book Illustration (a
1996 catalog to accompany an exhibition of American children's book illustration), Michael









Patrick Hearn provided a rational for the need for preservation of color. He noted that "the
purpose of an illustration is to be reproduced, not displayed, and artists have employed certain
short cuts that have not always added to the life of the art. They often scrimped on material.
Papers discolor or disintegrate, colors fade, glues dry out." Much of the original artwork for the
color illustration of children's books produced during this time period has not survived beyond
the published versions, and even the work of the well known artists is in museums and not
readily or easily accessible This project proposes to digitally preserve the color illustrations
(along with the respective texts) contained in this collection, and to make them more widely
accessible. The University of Florida has an institutional commitment to providing long-term
maintenance and permanent availability of the digital images. Additionally, the original artifacts
- the books will continue to be maintained in environmental conditions that will slow the
process of their deterioration.

History, Scope and Duration

This grant application for a two-year project follows up two similar two-year proposals that were
awarded funding to the University of Florida Libraries/Baldwin Library by the National
Endowment for the Humanities in 2000 and 2004. These two projects have been quite
successful.

The 2000 project completed the cataloging and microfilming of 7,418 and the digitization of
1,700 English language children's books published in Great Britain and the United States
between 1850 and 1869. The projected number of titles to be digitized increased from the
proposed 1,400 to 1,700; however, because of unexpected workloads and technical difficulties in
transferring these titles to the FCLA PALMM website (http://palmm.fcla.edu/juv/), only 590 are
currently available on the Internet at that site. After the 2000 project ended, the University of
Florida Libraries established its own digital library on an in-house server. All digitized books
from the 2000 NEH grant, including the 590 which appear on the FCLA PALMM site, are
archived on compact disks and are now queued to be uploaded to the University of Florida
Digital Collections (UFDC) website (http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/UFDC/UFDC.aspx?c=iuv). This
upload will take place when all digitized books from the 2004 project have been made available
on the UFDC site. Besides the catalog record for the source document, a record for both the
microfilm version and the digitized version was also created and contributed to the national
databases.

For the 2004 funded project, which will end September 30, 2006, the microfilming component
was discontinued. As of May 31, 2006, 5,152 of the proposed 7,500 English language children's
books published in Great Britain and the United States between 1870 and 1889 have been fully
catalogued and the target number is expected to be reached by the termination date. The
cataloging component has gone extremely well, with staff from the previous grant providing
stability and experience. By May 31, 2006, 1,720 books have been digitized, with 920 more
expected to be completed by the termination date. The projected total number of digitized titles
for the 2004 grant is now 2,640, approximately 485 short of the original projected goal. The
scanning and metadata application of the digitization component has gone well because of
experienced staff and upgraded equipment, including two new digital cameras and a number of
flatbed scanners. However, the start-up and development of the UFDC and the implementation









of the Greenstone software were not anticipated when the application for the 2004 project was
submitted. This temporary interruption, as well as congestion in the digitization queue with
other projects, has caused the number of digitized volumes to be lower than projected. The
projected number of titles to be digitized also did not take into account the increase in the
number of pages per book that took place during the 1870-1889 time period, which increased the
number of digitized images. The establishment of the website for the digitized books
(http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/UFDC/UFDC.aspx?c=juv) has been up and running since April, 2006.
In the two months it has been operational, over 1,100 books digitized as part of the 2004
proposal have been uploaded and made available. More volumes will be added on a weekly
basis through the end of the grant period. Catalog records for the electronic versions are being
created and contributed to the national databases.

By September, 2006, through the efforts of the University of Florida Libraries staff and with the
support of the National Endowment for the Humanities, approximately 7,400 titles will have
been microfilmed, 15,000 titles will have been fully catalogued and more than 4,300 will have
been digitized. The digitized volumes are being processed for online full text access as quickly as
possible. Approximately half of the titles have never been previously recorded. Authority
records for series were contributed to the Name Authority Cooperative Program (NACO). The
detailed bibliographic MARC records have provided increased access to these resources for
scholars and researchers working in the field of historical children's literature; additionally, the
availability of selected titles on the Internet has made classics as well as lost and forgotten books
available to a world-wide audience. (See Appendix 2 for use statistics)

The current proposal will be similar to and extend the date range of the previous two funded
grant projects. The University of Florida Library proposes to create full bibliographic records
for 7,500 volumes of English language children's literature held by the Baldwin Library and
published in Great Britain and the United States from 1890 through 1910 and to digitize and
make available on the Internet those with color illustrations, approximately 2,500 books. This era
witnessed the peak of the Golden Age of Children's Literature before the outbreak of the First
World War which changed the entire field of children's literature publishing. Included in the
7,500 books will be fairy tales, adventure stories, series books, poetry, histories, biographies and
domestic tales, by known and unknown authors and illustrators. This inclusiveness will give a
picture of the entire enterprise of publishing for children during those twenty-one years including
classics as well as ephemeral material, all of which is important to the scholar and interesting to
the casual reader.

The University of Florida Library is committed to providing increased access to the Baldwin
Library. Although the support of the NEH has expedited the cataloging and digitization of large
numbers of items, and contributed greatly to the accessibility of this collection of historical
children's literature, additional Library staff continue to catalog other material held by the
Baldwin Library as part of their job assignments. The Library's financial commitment is
supported by the decision to set up and manage their own digital library, by purchasing
equipment best suited to the efficient and careful handling of material, and by providing staff
skilled in the management and maintenance of digital collections and in the operation of the
sophisticated equipment. (See Appendix 3 for an institutional statement of commitment). The
Baldwin Library Digital Collection is only one of a number of such collections









(www.uflib.ufl.edu/UFDC/UFDC.aspx?) supported and managed by the University of Florida
Libraries and the Libraries anticipate adding other important collections as well as increasing its
web presence for many years to come. (For specific information on maintenance of digital
collections, see "Storage, Maintenance and Protection" section in the "Digitizing the Source
Document," below)

Methodology and Standards

This project consists of two major components that need to be discussed in this section. First,
7,500 titles are to be cataloged either in original or enhanced copy cataloging, and second, 2,500
of those cataloged volumes with color illustrations will be digitized and made available freely
over the Web.
Cataloging Printed Works

Approximately 100 titles a week will be removed from the Special Collections stacks and
transported on book carts to the Cataloging Unit of the Cataloging and Metadata Department,
which is located in the same building. The Senior Library Technical Assistant assigned to the
project will check the books into the department electronically, using the bar code assigned to
each title. This information will be on the catalogue record and alert the public that the book is
in the process of being catalogued. If a patron requests use of a book while it is in cataloging,
the book will be retrieved for the patron to use in the Special Collections Reading Room. During
the cataloging process, the books will be stored in a locked metal bookcase near the catalogers'
desks. After cataloging, the books that are going to be digitized will be checked out of
cataloging and into the Conservation Unit; books that are not going to be digitized will be
checked out of the cataloging department and sent back to the Baldwin Library stacks. The
books will never be removed from the building since all departments involved in the cataloging
and digitization processes are located in the same building as the stacks where the books are
permanently housed.

Cataloging will conform to the requirements of full-level Anglo-American Cataloging Rules, 2nd
edition (2002 revision) (AACR2R) and to the guidelines already established at the University of
Florida libraries for the enhanced access cataloging of the Baldwin materials
(http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/alephpro/NEH Baldwin Project Monograph Cataloging_Procedure.h
tm). All cataloging will include Library of Congress Subject Headings, subject access through
genre terms (MARC21 655 field), and access by publisher, printer and illustrator, (700 or 710
field). Of the approximately 50% of titles for which some level of cataloging already exists, less
than 5% include genre access, and the majority of records do not include other than "K" level
data. The records created for the digital version will have an active MARC21 856 field, and
follow established standards for cataloging electronic resources. All access points for names and
subjects will be verified in local and national databases for consistency in form and heading.
The inclusion of genre terms is appropriate in this context because researchers in children's
literature will seek access to material not only through traditional author, title, and subject
approaches, but also through a term descriptive of the category into which it falls, e.g., alphabet
books, courtesy books, fairy tales, and folk tales.









All cataloging will be done with the original item in hand and subsequently a record will be
derived for the digital versions. (See Appendix 4 for samples of enhanced copy and original
catalog records from the previous NEH-funded projects and for a list of the genre terms to be
applied in MARC21 655 field).

Digitization of Volumes with Color

In this third phase, digitization is to be employed as both an access and as a preservation
strategy. All volumes selected for this project are in the public domain. The digitization plan
offers both Internet availability and ensures fitness-for-purpose in secondary uses, such as
facsimile reproduction and classroom uses. To increase discovery of and access to the Baldwin
volumes, the University of Florida will continue to contribute to the freely available
International Children's Digital Library (http://www.icdlbooks.org/), to PALMM Literature for
Children (http://palmm.fcla.edu/iuv/), to the Internet Archive 's Children's Library,
(http://www.archive.org/search.php?query=mediatype%3Atexts%20AND%20collection%3Aiacl
) and to the Open Content Alliance (http://www.opencontentalliance.org/). (See Appendix 5
for a description of these entities and documentation of the relationship with them)

Preparation and processing for digitization

The Conservation Unit Head, John Freund, will work with the Digital Library Center (DLC) and
the Curator of the Baldwin Library to monitor and mitigate the effects of handling during
cataloging and digitization. After cataloging, the books to be digitized will be transported to the
Conservation Unit where Freund will review the physical volumes, noting the condition of the
books previous to digitization. After digitization, he will again review the condition, making
repairs and recommending adjustments in the digitization processes if necessary. Protective
enclosures will be purchased to house volumes with structural damage that, as a result of their
brittle nature, cannot be repaired.

Books will be transported to the DLC from the Conservation Unit after they are catalogued and
after the conservator has reviewed them. Each book will be checked into the DLC electronically,
using the bar code assigned to each title. This information will be on the catalogue record and
alert the public that the book is in the process of being digitized. If a patron requests use of a
book while it is in the DLC, the book will be retrieved for the patron to use in the Special
Collections Reading Room.

Once received into the DLC, Nelda Schwartz, Item Bibliographer, captures the MARC record for
each volume. This record is run through a batch importer program that creates both the XML
bibliographic data files and adds similar bibliographic data to DLC's internal tracking database.
Tracking slips are inserted into each book and then the books are transferred to the imaging unit.
At the end of the digitization process including successful text creation, Schwartz returns the
books to the conservator.

The schematic below shows the basic workflow for bringing these digitized volumes to a global
audience: quality-controlled digital page images are passed to a text-processing unit for text
conversion and mark-up and from there into the web served collections.












.0e


MakU


Scanning Plan: The digitization plan assures highest quality capture with the lowest risk of
damage to nineteenth- and early twentieth-century bindings with brittle animal glues.

All images will be captured at bit depths and resolutions appropriate to textual and binding
characteristics. Tightness of binding, fragility of paper and/or binding, type face characteristics,
and physical size of the item necessitate use of various capture devices. Past experience
indicates that only 50% of the volumes are likely to be suitable for capture by the fastest method:
the Copibook scanner. Other volumes will need to be scanned by slower but less rigorous
methods using the Microtek 9800 XL flatbed scanner, an Epson 1640 XL flatbed scanner, or a
13.7-MP (mega-pixel) Kodak DCS 14n planetary digital camera. When appropriately calibrated,
this equipment achieves highly accurate capture in grey scale and color. Capture will be
sufficient to meet Quality Index requirements as calculated by Cornell University and widely
used within the library digitization community as a standard for determining requisite digital
resolution, i.e., dpi. (See Benchmarkingfor Digital Capture
[http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/conversion/conversion-04.html] and
Establishing a Central Depository for Preserving Digital Image Collections
[http://www.library.cornell.edu/imls/image%20deposit%20guidelines.pdfl. Specifications for
the capture equipment and the book cradle used with the Kodak camera are given in Appendix 6.
Scanning methods chosen will depend on the document characteristics, but will follow the
principals and recommendations set forth in Moving Theory into Practice: Digital Imaging for
Libraries and Archives (Anne R. Kenney and Oya Y. Rieger [Mountain View, Ca : Research
Libraries group, 2000]) and Cornell University's Digital Imaging Tutorial
(http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/contents.html).

Digital Images: The Guidelines for Master TIFF Image Files
(http://palmm.fcla.edu/strucmeta/tiff.html) employed by this project are those established by the
University of Florida for the PALMM cooperative. The master files are uncompressed TIFF
(ITU T.6) images. Scans are scaled to 100% of the source document dimensions. Bit-depth is
24-bit color or 8-bit gray scale; dpi is 300 at a minimum. Color space is sRGB with scanning
software calibrated to a standard RGB palate. Derivative jpg files will be created for use in
OCRing and for web serving.

Images are captured on 80 GB external hard drives and connected via USB ports to computer
workstations running Microsoft Windows XP or higher and Adobe Photoshop CS 2 or higher.
Image processing routines are conservative and are intended to maintain original image quality.
Image de-skew, cropping, and color correction are the common corrections needed.


IL


Tex


Xt










Because color management of images is a key issue in this project, calibration of equipment
will be monitored constantly. Digital camera color fidelity is achieved by color balancing the
digital camera with ANSI IT8.7/2-1993 (Graphic Technology Color Reflection Target for Input
Scanner Calibration. Washington, D.C.: American National Standards Institute, last revised
1993) compliant specifications through the use of targets such as Kodak Q-60 and Q-13. Flatbed
scanner color fidelity is achieved through bundled Q-60 based calibration programs, and the
CopiBook is calibrated through its integrated calibration utility. Monitor gamma and color
calibration is achieved through Monaco Optix 2.0. The supervising technicians have academic
training in both photographic and digital imaging techniques and will determine the correct tonal
values for the 24-bit image according to Q-60 and Q-13 calibrations and adjust each image to
optimize tone and contrast, and to maintain color fidelity.

Quality Control Review: Quality control plays a prominent role in imaging operations. Visual
inspection, together with a query of the file header, will be completed by spot check. Spot check
requires inspection of every image in thumbnail view and of no less than 10% of the images in
full-image view. Spot check against file header is an automated process that alerts Quality
Control Technicians to deficiencies of image files. The Quality Control Unit performs the visual
inspection. This Unit uses specially designed software programs (Pre-QC and Quality Control
Applications) to derive jpg images used in the text conversion, to verify completeness of image
capture, and to create the basic structural metadata.

Text Conversion: Accepted page image files for each volume are saved to a portable hard drive
that is connected to a text-conversion workstation. This station is an Intel Xeon 3 GHz with
Windows XP.

The page images are processed by Prime Recognition optical character recognition (OCR)
(http://www.primerecognition.com/) software. Prime Recognition software is also used by the
digital programs at the University of Michigan and the University of Kentucky and processes
images against a battery of six optical character recognition engines. It chooses the best engine
for the fonts and font sizes on the page. Conversion, together with some automated and
dictionary aided correction, can achieve up to a 99.99% accuracy, depending on printed text
characteristics.

Pages are processed out of Prime Recognition as plain text (TXT) and PDF images with text
behind. For this project, no text tagging is proposed. The University of Florida utilizes locally
programmed routines to create METS (Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard,
http://www.loc.gov/standards/mets/) files that identify and tag structural metadata (e.g., covers,
preliminaries, title pages, chapters, etc.) and will also add bibliographic and administrative
metadata and responsibility statements.

Text Verification and Mark-Up: The text output is manually reviewed and corrected as
necessary. Prime Recognition was chosen by the University of Florida primarily because it
features six OCR engines governed by a voting algorithm. This software is recognized as an
industry leader in producing accurate text conversion. Structural mark-up information, e.g.,
title, bibliographic information, table-of-contents, chapter headings, etc. will be corrected to









100% accuracy. Other texts will not be corrected outside Prime's normal dictionary aided
correction routines until a later date and only as needs dictate.

Once the digital packages are successfully created, they are deployed to Web servers for public
access: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature, Literature for Children, International
Children's Digital Library, and the Open Content Alliance. Packages are also sent to the Florida
Digital Archive for TIFF preservation and the metadata becomes available for harvesting by
service providers. The details of access and preservation are more fully described in the sections
below.
Organization of and access to material

Discovery of digitized texts can occur in several ways: MARC records with linked 856 fields
are in online catalogs of the University of Florida, the Florida state university union catalog,
WorldCat, etc.; OAI compliant metadata is served for harvesting by repositories; and complete
electronic packages are contributed to other online collections such as the International
Children's Digital Library, Literature for Children, and the Open Content Alliance.. The primary
access into the digital collection is through the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's
Literature Digital Collections homepage (http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/UFDC.aspx?c=juv).
This interface has been developed by the University of Florida as part of its broader digital
collection architecture and is based on the Greenstone Digital Library System. This system and
its associated resources are discussed below. An overview of the search and display
functionalities of this system is found in Appendix 7.

Greenstone Architecture: Greenstone's Digital Library System
(http://www.greenstone.org/cgi-bin/library) was chosen as the full text indexing, metadata
storage, retrieval, and search engine for all University of Florida Digital Collections (UFDC)
including the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature Digital Collection. Greenstone
is an open-source digital library system produced and maintained by the New Zealand Library
Project at the University of Waikato. It is promoted by the United Nations to many of our
partners in Africa, the Caribbean, and Latin America. Greenstone has two main components, the
metadata portion and the display portion. While the metadata and indexing portion is strong, the
display portion did not provide some of the functionalities we required. As a result, only the
metadata portion of Greenstone is used. All the bibliographic data ultimately resides in
Greenstone 2.60 running under Linux.

We chose to build a multi-tier architecture with a custom presentation layer. Greenstone forms
the foundation of UFDC. A presentation layer created in C#, utilizing ASP.net provides access to
the web user. The presentation layer will read all bibliographic data from Greenstone and interact
with Greenstone in real-time to perform searches. The Greenstone server will continue to serve
both the data and the image. However, the user will interact with the presentation layer outside of
Greenstone.













PRESENTATION LAYER
( C#, ASP.net, SQL)


Greenstone JPEG 2000 Z39.50


There are several advantages to this architecture beyond its total control over look and feel. This
provides for platform independence. Greenstone could be removed from the data layer and a
variety of other digital library management systems could be used. We can build a hierarchical
collection structure with collection groups, collections, and sub-collections. Using this
architecture will also allow us to store session state and develop user portfolios, should we
decide to do so in the future. This architecture can read data from a variety of sources besides
Greenstone, and it allows the data and images to appear under the same interface. This provides
for a continuous look and feel for the users regardless of the source of the images and data.
Technical specifications and documentation for UFDC development may be found at
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/technical/index.htm .

Database: Data needed to drive the presentation layer are placed in a Microsoft SQL Server
database. This database mainly stores display information. The appearance of collections
depends partly on data stored in the database. This data tells the presentation layer where to look
for the style sheets and banners. It also contains the information about the hierarchy of
collections. The bridge between the presentation layer and the Greenstone collections) is stored
in this database.

The database also stores basic information to assist with the display of items from Greenstone.
This includes the watermarks (or icons) on the left navigation bar, downloads, and the table of
contents. The tables and relationships supporting the presentation layer are given in a diagram at
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/technical/index.htm .

Metadata (MARC): As noted above in the methodology for cataloging, MARC records are
created for all volumes. These records are added to the UF online catalog
(http://uf.aleph.fcla.edu/F), and within scheduled load periods in the OCLC WorldCat and
through the Research Libraries Group (RLG) RLIN. Loads will continue during and after the
intended merger of OCLC and RLIN. As part of this project, the Table of Contents for the
volumes digitized are sent to RichCAT which is part of the Library of Congress's Bibliographic
Enrichment initiative (http://www.loc.gov/catdir/beat/). This initiative is designed to "enhance
the content of Library of Congress bibliographic records and improve access to the information
which the records contain."

Metadata (METS and Greenstone): For volumes that have color and are digitized, national
Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS) metadata is created. The METS files
include structural data about each image file related to a bibliographic resource, as well as









descriptive and administrative information. The bibliographic, or descriptive, data for these
METS files is imported from the catalogue records that are created during the cataloging phase.
METS files are created by an in-house Quality Control Application (see Quality Control Review
above) and the output is reviewed and enhanced, as needed, by our text technicians. METS files
can be viewed by selecting METS Metadata under the Technical Data menu on the navigation
bar to the left of an item being viewed. Also viewable is the Greenstone derivative metadata
format that is automatically created for internal Greenstone use when items are loaded. METS
records are OAI compliant and harvestable. Information on the metadata used in the UFDC
may be found at http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/technical/index.htm#mets.
Samples of the record displayed to the public and of the Greenstone XML metadata are shown in
Appendix 8.

Because the METS records are harvestable, it is expected that they will be incorporated into the
metadata repositories of multiple service providers. OAlster
(http://oaister.umdl.umich.edu/o/oaister/) at the University of Michigan and UIUC Digital
Gateway to Cultural Heritage Materials (http://nergal.grainger.uiuc.edu/cgi/b/bib/bib-idx/) have
harvested the Baldwin metadata from Phase I.

Because UFDC represents the largest set of digital collections supported by Greenstone, a great
deal of supporting programming has been done and will continue to be done to create needed
functionalities in terms of search and display. As presently configured, the full text searching
capabilities of Greenstone are not as robust as desired. Ideally, the result sets would highlight
the search term in the text or metadata wherever found. Additionally, some page images would
be more useful if displayed in the jpg2000 format which allows zooming in and out. Each of
these desired functions are queued to be resolved and programming will occur concurrently with
the grant period; however, grant monies are not being requested.

Storage, maintenance, and protection of data

Preservation of original paper based materials: As outlined more fully in both the Work Plan
and other portions of the Methodology & Standards section, the physical volumes themselves are
monitored at all stages in the project. The volumes never leave the Smathers Library building
and are stored in secure areas during all parts of the project, limiting opportunities for theft or
misplacement. The book cradle as described in Appendix 6: Imaging Equipment only opens the
volume to a 120 degree angle, 40 to 50 degrees less than a microfilm camera and up to 60
degrees less than a flat bed scanner, minimizing the damage caused to the spine of the volume
during imaging. The amount of UV light the volume is exposed to during the scanning process is
equivalent to that of normal reading or photocopying. Storage conditions in the Special
Collections stacks are cool and dry. Finally, all volumes will be returned to the Special
Collections stacks after the project is completed and will be available for future researchers. No
titles will be withdrawn.

Archiving of the electronic output of the digitization project: In practice consistent for all
University of Florida digital projects, redundant digital archives are maintained.









An in-house DLC archive is created by burning TIFF uncompressedd, ITU TIFF v.6, scaled to
100% of original), jpg, text and METS files to gold-based DVDs after the digital packages are
successfully deployed. (cf. Guidelines at http://palmm.fcla.edu/strucmeta/tiff.html). Files are
burned using Roxio Easy Media Creator, v.7 or higher. Roxio software verifies an accurate burn
to ensure the integrity of the archive. DVDs are retained in environmentally controlled storage.
Disks and their contents are logged in the DLC Tracking Database, with MD5 checksum
numbers and file format & version information, in association with administrative and
bibliographic metadata. The Database queues disks and files for inspection every three years and
migration every ten years or upon format obsolescence. In some cases, during migration, a copy
of the migrated digital master may replace the intermediary.

The primary archive is maintained by the Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA), a
division of the University of Florida and the Libraries' partner for digital library collections.
(See Appendix 9 for letter of cooperation) The Florida Digital Archive (FDA)
(http://www.fcla.edu/digitalArchive/index.htm) created by the FCLA was funded by a three year
grant from the Institute for Museum and Library Services in 2002. Completed in 2005, the entire
FDA operation, including 3 FTE, all local servers, hardware and software, and redundant
magnetic tape back ups in Gainesville, Tallahassee and the San Diego Supercomputer Center, is
now in place. Currently, there is no cost to Florida's public university libraries to send content to
the FDA. Should future storage costs be necessary, the University of Florida libraries would
cover all costs associated with UFDC collections including the Baldwin texts.

The Florida Digital Archive is one of a handful of "trusted repositories" and the only such effort
in the United States or United Kingdom given special mention in the recent JISC/University of
Leeds report on digital preservation.1 The software programmed to support the FDA is modeled
on the widely accepted Open Archival Information System
(http://public.ccsds.org/publications/archive/650x0b 1.pdf ). The software, DAITSS
(http://www.fcla.edu/digitalArchive/pdfs/DAITSS.pdf) [Dark Archive In The Sunshine State],
is designed to implement the functional OAIS model and performs traditional repository
functions such as ingest, data management, including all associated metadata, and dissemination
of digital content. It is a dark archive and no public access functions are provided. It supports
the preservation functions of format normalization, mass format migration and migration on
request. An action plan that details how forward migration will occur has been written for TIFF
6.0 files (http://www.fcla.edu/digitalArchive/pdfs/action plans/tiff 6.pdf). Preservation of
Baldwin TIFF files in the FDA will assure future access. Checksum data are tracked for each
file by DAITSS and used to confirm the accuracy of the ingest process. Formal contracts signed
between FCLA and the University of Florida libraries specify the tasks and reporting that are
associated with the curation and retention of all UFDC collections. Cathleen Martyniak and
Erich Kesse are the FDA authorized users from the University of Florida.

As the Baldwin files are loaded into the UFDC for public access, a command in the METS
header directs a copy of the files to the Florida Digital Archive (FDA). The process of
forwarding original uncompressed TIFF images to the FDA is the key component in the

1 As reported in: University of Leeds. Representation and Rendering Project. "Survey and assessment of sources of
information on file formats and software documentation: final report" (2003) -
hIp % i t .jisc.ac.uk/uploadeddocuments/FileFormatsreport.pdf









University of Florida's plan to store, maintain and protect electronic data including the Baldwin
texts for the long term.
Work Plan

Selection of the Target Collection

Rita Smith, Curator of the Baldwin Library, will select all titles of the target collection from the
Baldwin Library (i.e. children's literature published in the English language between 1890 and
1910). Items for selection will be identified through the on-line catalog and a printed card
catalog that provides chronological access to the collection, including items with approximate
dates of publication.

Student assistants, trained and supervised by the Curator, will pull from 80 to 100 books a week
from the shelves and add location codes and bar codes to acid free strips which will be inserted
in each book. A database will be established to indicate that a book has been pulled from the
stacks, pre-processed by the student and sent to cataloging.

Cataloging Workflow and Procedures

When the books arrive in cataloging, they will be checked into cataloging using the bar code
associated with each book. The selected titles will be searched initially in ALEPH, the state
university libraries' on-line catalog. Titles already in ALEPH will have Baldwin Library
holdings added. Titles not found in ALEPH will be searched on OCLC. If copy for the book is
found, UF holdings will be added and the record exported into ALEPH. This portion of the
project is assigned to a Senior Library Technical Assistant (.33 FTE). After the record has been
exported into ALEPH, an Archivist-level technical support person will assure quality control by
verifying authority work. This staff member will bring the record up to full AACR2R cataloging
standards and enhance it with access points for publisher, printer, illustrator (MARC21 700,
710), and subject genre terms (MARC21 655) as required by the Baldwin Cataloging guidelines
and added to the national databases. This work will be carried out under the supervision of the
grant Project Original Cataloger. For titles lacking copy in OCLC, a full AACR2R record will
be created and added to the national databases by the Project Original Cataloger. Both the
Project Original Cataloger and the Archivist will also be responsible for contributing series, and
personal and corporate name authority records to NACO where necessary and deemed feasible.
All cataloging will conform to AACR2R rules and MARC21 Bibliographic Format Standards.

Based on the results from 48 months of cataloging activity during previous similar NEH grants,
the complete cataloging sequence for a record from searching for copy through the creation of a
full AACR2R enhanced catalog MARC record requires approximately 65 minutes per title.
Using that figure, it will take approximately 8,125 hours to complete cataloging of the proposed
7500 titles. The time required for NACO participation will complete the projected FTE
requirements for the cataloging staff.

Following cataloging of the source document, items without color illustration that are not going
to be digitized will be returned to the Baldwin Library, checked in and re-shelved by the students
under the supervision of the Curator of the Baldwin Library.










Conservation Review


Following cataloging of the source document, the items with color illustration will be checked
out of the Cataloging Department and into the Conservation Unit. Each week a book cart of
approximately 30 cataloged books will be sent from the Cataloging Department to the
Conservation Unit. John Freund, Head of the Conservation Unit, will review the books, noting
problems or physical conditions affecting digitization. While the books are in the Conservation
Unit, they will be locked in a secure room. After his review, he will deliver the books to the
DLC. After the books have been digitized, they will be returned to Freund for further review.
The books will then be returned to the Baldwin Library/Special Collections stacks and will be
available to future researchers.

Digitization Workflow and Procedures

When items enter the digitization workflow from the Conservation Unit, they are checked out of
the Conservation Unit and into the DLC, using the bar code that is attached to each book. The
doors to the DLC are always locked and the workspace is considered a secure area.

Nelda Schwartz receives the books and captures the MARC record for each volume. This record
is run through a batch importer program that creates both the XML bibliographic data files and
adds similar bibliographic data to DLC's internal tracking database. Items entered receive
bibliographic identification numbers that are used throughout the digitization process and are
retained in the administrative metadata of the final digital package. Tracking slips are inserted
into each book and then the books are transferred to the imaging unit.

Imaging the item (detailed above in 4.2 Methodology and Standards, Digitizing of volumes with
color) includes scanning the physical object to create the digital images, and post image
processing, e.g., cropping, de-skewing, and color correction. This work is carried out by a
number of scanning technicians who are trained and supervised by Randall Renner, Lourdes
Santamaria, and Traveler Wendell.

Acceptable scanned images are transferred to the Quality Control Unit where they are processed
through two software packages especially designed for the DLC: Pre-QC and Quality Control
Applications. These programs derive jpg images, verify image capture settings are valid, and
create basic structural metadata. The jpg images are checked for missing pages through the spot
checking procedure described in the Quality Control Review above, and the basic structural
metadata is verified and amended as needed. All of these activities are under the supervision of
Jane Pen, the Image Quality Specialist.

This process is followed by text conversion and mark-up where metadata is enhanced, text
created, and both verified for accuracy (detailed above in Methodology and Standards, Text
Conversion and Text Verification and Mark-Up). Text conversion and mark-up are supervised
by Gus Clifton.









After conversion and mark-up are completed, the digital package will be sent to the University of
Florida Digital Collections (UFDC) (http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/) where it loads into the
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature Digital Collection
(http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/UFDC.aspx?c=juv&m=h) and the digital package is burned to a
gold-based DVD as part of the local archive of the DLC. It is sent to FCLA where it is loaded
into the PALMM Literature for Children collection [(http://palmm.fcla.edu/juv/)] and the master
TIFF images and related files are stored in the Florida Digital Archive. It will be sent on DVDs to
the International Children's Digital Library (http://www.icdlbooks.org/) for public serving, to the
Open Content Alliance (http://www.opencontentalliance.org/) and to the Internet Archive's
Children's Library
(http://www.archive.org/search.php?query=mediatype%3Atexts%20AND%20collection%3Aiacl)
(Details of these activities are discussed above in Methodology and Standards, Organization and
Access to Material, and Storage, maintenance, and protection of data. See also Appendix 5).

Upon deployment and archiving of the digital packages, the books are checked out of the DLC
by Nelda Schwartz and returned to the Conservation Unit for damage assessment and condition
review.
Numerical Project Objectives

The following table represents ideal rates of productivity for all project objectives. The
rates reflect lower production figures for quarters with major holidays and/or anticipated summer
vacation schedules.


Schedule of Objectives (Number of Titles) First Year

Oct- Jan-Mar Apr-June July-Sept. Total First Project
Dec 2008 2008 2008 Year Total
2007
Document Source
800 1000 1000 950 3750
Cataloging

Digitization 312 313 312 313 1250 1



Schedule of Objectives (Number of Titles) Second Year


Oct-Dec Jan-Mar Apr-June July-Sept. Total Second Project
2008 2009 2009 2009 Year Total
Document Source
Document Source 800 1100 1100 750 3750 7500
Cataloging

Digitization 312 313 312 313 1250 2500










Staff


Department of Special and Area Studies Collections

The George A. Smathers Libraries' Department of Special and Area Studies Collections holds
the primary source research collections of the University of Florida. The named collections
include the P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History, the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's
Literature, and the Belknap Collection for the Performing Arts. The area studies collections are
comprised of African, Asian, Jewish, and Latin American materials. The general collections
consist of Manuscripts, Rare Books, and University Archives. Total holdings: 750,000 volumes,
60,000 microfilms, 10 million manuscripts and archival items. Staff: 24 FTE. The department
maintains a separate reading room and security stacks for the rare books, manuscripts, university
archives, and the named collections, including the Baldwin Library.

Rita J. Smith, Principal Investigator, will give 0.3 FTE of her time to this grant. Her
responsibilities will be to select the titles to be cataloged, to assist in training personnel involved
in cataloging the materials, to resolve questions of curatorial complexity for the collection, and
monitor financial aspects of the grant. Ms. Smith has a Masters degree in Library Science from
the University of Michigan, She has worked in the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's
Literature since 1989, first as Coordinator of Academic Support Services, and, since 1995, as
Curator of the Baldwin Library and Associate University Librarian in the Department of Special
and Area Studies Collections. She served as Project Cataloger from 1990 through mid-1991 for
a U.S. Department of Education Title IIC grant to catalog 4,000 titles held by the Baldwin
Library. She served as co-principal investigator for the earlier (2000-2002 and 2004-2006) NEH
funded Baldwin Library Preservation and Access Grants.

Student Assistants (540 hours) will remove and replace titles selected for cataloging,
digitization, and conservation review. They will assign location codes and affix bar codes to
acid-free strips before the books are sent to be catalogued. They will work under the supervision
of Rita Smith.

Cataloging and Metadata Department

The Cataloging and Metadata Department staff is responsible for creating and maintaining a
NOTIS-based online catalog. They contribute original bibliographic and authority records and
holdings information to the OCLC national database and participate in the CONSER, BIBCO,
NACO, SACO and OCLC Enhance national cooperative programs. As a member of the
Research Libraries Group, through the Florida Center for Library Automation, the Department
tape-loads records to RLIN. The Department has previously participated in the National
Endowment for the Humanities and U.S. Department of Education Title IIC Project (RC-21593-
88) for National Database Access to Library Resources for Latin American Studies through
Retrospective Conversion of Latin American Library Materials (1988-1991), the U.S.
Department of Education Title IIC Project for Access to Library Resources in the Baldwin
Library, University of Florida (1990-1991), the National Endowment for the Humanities US
Newspaper Program: Florida Newspaper Project, (1995- to date), and in the Research Libraries









Group's Great Collections Microfilming Project, Phase II and Phase IV, as well as the Research
Libraries Group's Archives Preservation Microfilming Project. The Department participated also
in the earlier (2000-2002 and 2004-2006) NEH funded Baldwin Library Preservation and Access
Grants.

Tatiana Barr, Head, Humanities and Special Collections Cataloging Unit, will be assigned 0.1
FTE to this grant. Assignment in this proposal will include responsibility for ongoing supervision
of project staff involved in cataloging the source documents, both original and copy records, and
liaison between the Project Directors (Ingram and Smith) and the Cataloging Unit to insure
consistency in record creation and statistical reporting. Ms. Barr fulfilled the same
responsibilities in the previous NEH funded project.

The grant funded Project Original Cataloger (1.0 FTE), will be primarily responsible for
creating original bibliographic description and access records for selected titles, contributing
these original records to the OCLC database, and assisting other staff in doing the same. S/he
will create original authority records for series and personal and corporate names when none
exists in the national authority file, contribute these authority records to the NACO database, and
supervise the project Archivist in doing the same. The project cataloger will be responsible for
the final quality of all bibliographic and authority records created for this project.

The grant funded Archivist (1.0 FTE)* will be responsible for 1) enhancing all copy cataloging
records imported into the database from OCLC and already existing records to conform to
Baldwin Cataloging Guidelines, 2) assisting the Project Original Cataloger in creating original
bibliographic description and access records for selected titles, 3) contributing both these types
of bibliographic records to the OCLC database, 4) collaborating with other grant staff to create
original series and personal and corporate name authority records when none exists in the
national authority file, and 5) contributing these authority records to the NACO database.
*Archivist is a state-level term for a high-level paraprofessional who works cooperatively with a
professional librarian.

A Senior Library Technical Assistant (SrLTA) in the Resource Services Department of the
George A. Smathers Libraries will be assigned for 0.33 FTE to this grant. The SrLTA will be
responsible for 1) all required searching for existing records in the local database and searching
in OCLC and RLIN for member copy; evaluating this member copy and selecting best matching
record, 2) for importing member copy into the local database from OCLC and RLIN and creating
copy holdings records, 3) for picking up materials to be cataloged and distributing searched
materials to Project Original Cataloger and to the Archivist for original and enhanced copy
cataloging.

Preservation Department, Conservation Unit

The Preservation Department has been recognized as a full-service preservation facility since
1987. The Department is staffed by a total of 6 full-time staff. It is charged with preserving and
making accessible archival and library materials in all formats. The Conservation Unit of the
Preservation Department is responsible for the physical condition of the collections of the









University libraries. Services include repair and restoration, rebinding, de-acidification,
encapsulation, construction of protective enclosures, and environmental monitoring.

John Freund (0.1 FTE) will be responsible for completion of conservation assessments and, as
required, conservation treatments. Mr. Freund has served as the Preservation Department's chief
conservator since 1988. He holds a Certificate of Book Restoration and Binding from the
College of Art and Design at San Francisco State University.

Cathleen Martyniak (.05 FTE) will be responsible, in conjunction with Digital Library Center
staff, for the archiving of the TIFF masters with the Florida Center for Library Automation. She
has served as the Chair of the Preservation Department since 1999. Martyniak has served as the
PI for several microfilming grants, including two through SOLINET and the Florida portion of
the USAIN initiative. Martyniak holds professional memberships in the American Library
Association and the Society of Imaging Science and Technology. Martyniak holds a Masters in
Library Science from the University of Pittsburgh and recently completed a nine month
internship at the Florida Center for Library Automation, where she focused on building a
standards library for use by the staff of the Florida Digital Archives.

Digital Library Center

The mission of the DLC at the University of Florida is to facilitate and focus the Libraries'
development of digital programs and services. Its areas of responsibility include multimedia
databases, digital collections, electronic text applications, online exhibits and finding aids. A
primary goal of the DLC is to enhance the Libraries' role in electronic scholarly communications
through effective and responsive digitization, dissemination, and long-term storage of university
research and resource materials from the Libraries' collections. The Center provides library and
university researchers with equipment and technical expertise for digital imaging and text
markup. The DLC develops digital resources from collections at the University of Florida.

The DLC staff brings several years of work experience in the Preservation Department, together
with work experience from projects funded by the State of Florida (Florida Heritage Project at:
http://palmm.fcla.edu/fh/), the Institute for Museum and Library Services (Linking Florida's
Natural Heritage Project at: http://palmm.fcla.edu/lfnh/), and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
(Caribbean Newspaper Imaging Project: in process).

Erich Kesse, director of the Digital Library Center, provides management oversight for the
digitization portion of this project (0.05 FTE). He served as Chair of the Preservation
Department in the Libraries from 1987 through July 1999. Kesse has completed several
preservation and access projects funded by the Research Libraries Group (RLG), the National
Endowment for the Humanities, and by the Mellon Foundation. He serves as a consultant to the
Southeastern Library Network (SOLINET) and to the University of the Virgin Islands on its
IMLS funded Leadership Award. Kesse holds professional memberships in the American
Library Association and the Association for Information and Image Management. Kesse holds a
Certificate of Preservation Administration from Columbia University in addition to a Master of
Library Science degree from the University of Kentucky.









Stephanie Haas, Assistant Director, Digital Library Center, (0.1 FTE) monitors the workflow
between digitization units. She tracks production schedules and facilitates communication and
trouble shooting between units. Haas is a principal investigator of the IMLS funded Linking
Florida's Natural Heritage project and works extensively on science-related digital projects. She
has served on review panels for the National Science Digital Library for NSF.

Randall Renner, Coordinator of Image Capture Operations, Digital Library Center, (0.50 FTE)
supervises all image capture units. Renner trains imaging staff on new equipment and provides
technical expertise on functional operations. Renner holds a Master of Fine Arts (Photography)
from the University of Florida's College of Fine Arts.

Lourdes Santamaria, Imaging Technician Supervisor, Digital Library Center, (0.30 FTE) hires,
trains, and supervises all of the students who scan Baldwin volumes. Assigns Baldwin image
related tasks to Traveler Wendell and maintains workflow between imaging and QC unit.

Jane Pen, Image Quality Specialist, Digital Library Center (0.5 FTE) supervises the quality
control assessment of the images and the creation of the preliminary XML used to create the
metadata. Pen holds the equivalent of the Master of Library Science degree from Taipei
(Taiwan/Republic of China).

Nelda Schwartz, Coordinator of Bibliographic Control (0.2 FTE) supervises the tracking of all
items through the digitization chain. Schwartz verifies the creation of all cataloging records,
captures data for XML creation and for the tracking database, and verifies completion of digital
package before item is returned.

Gus Clifton, Head of Text Mark-Up (0.2 FTE) supervises the text extraction (OCR) of all texts
scanned, verifies or completes bibliographic and structural metadata, supervises the archiving of
digital packages, and coordinates their delivery to FCLA and UFDC.

Traveler Wendell, Image Processor (0.3 FTE) assists Lourdes Santamaria with image creation
and enhancement of scanned images. Assists in the supervision and training of student
assistants.
Dissemination

The University of Florida Libraries will distribute MARC cataloging records of both the physical
book and the digitized version generated by this project through three bibliographic networks:
the University of Florida on-line catalogue (ALEPH) and the national databases of OCLC and
the Research Library Group (RLG) RLIN. In addition to this bibliographic access, the volumes
containing color illustrations will be available in their entirety in digital form at no cost to the
user on the UFDC at http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/UFDC/UFDC.aspx?c=juv. As mentioned in
previous sections, they will also be made available to other web servers for public access:
PALMM Literature for Children, International Children's Digital Library, the Internet
Archive's Children's Library and the Open Content Alliance. The physical book may be
consulted in the Special Collections Reading Room on the University of Florida campus.










Appendix 1.1


Sample Listing of Books, Articles, Theses and Dissertations
Based on Baldwin Library Research

Books:

Avery, Gillian. Behold the Child, American Children and their Books 1621-1922, Baltimore:
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994.

Darton, Lawrence. The Dartons: An Annotated Check-List of Children's Books Issued by Two
Publishing Houses, 1787-1876, New Castle, Delaware: Oak Knoll Press, 2002.

Humphrey, Mary. Living the Hero's Quest: Character Building Through Action Research,
Westport, Conn.: Libraries Unlimited, 2005

Rollin, Lucy. Ti eInieth Century Teen Culture by the Decades 1900-1999, Westport,
Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1999.

Wunderlich, Richard, comp. The Pinocchio Catalogue: Being a Descriptive Bibliography and
Printing History of English Language Translations and Other Renditions Appearing in the
United States, 1892-1987, New York: Greenwood Press, 1988.

Books in Progress

Smith, Julie. Speaking [of] Animals: a Literary History ofAnimal Autobiography. University of
Wisconsin, Whitwater.

Articles/Chapters

Barban, Leslie. "The Evolution of Children's Literature," in Children & Libraries, Chicago:
American Library Association, v.3, no. 1 Spring 2005

Giles, Geoffrey J. "Temperance Before the Temperance Movements: Some Examples from
Eighteenth-Century Children's Literature in England and Germany," in History of Education, v.
20, no. 4, 1991.

Hines, Maude. "Implanting Sympathy in Nineteenth-Century Anglo-American Children's
Literature," in Wild Things: Children's Culture and Ecocriticism, Sidney I. Dobrin and Kenneth
B. Kidd, eds. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2004.

Marino, Jane. "Joyful Noise: A Study of Children's Music," in Children & Libraries, Chicago:
American Library Association, v. 1, no. 1, Spring 2003.









Appendix 1.2

Sierra, Horatio. "La Leyenda Negra in British and American Children's Literature: 1583 to the
Present" in Mester, Los Angeles: University of California, Los Angeles,
v. 34, 2005.

Smith, Rita J. "Life is Short, Art is Long: Randolph Caldecott, 1846-1886" in The Newbery and
Caldecott Awards: A Guide to the Medal and Honor Books, Chicago: American Library
Association, 2000.

Smith, Rita J. "Those Who Go Before: Ancestors of Eva St. Clare," in The New England
Quarterly, v. 52, no.2, June 1997.

Dissertations and Theses

Camponegro, Ramona. Prisoners of Innocence: American Justice, Children, and Children's
Books, 1865-1920. (2006) MA, University of Florida

Kendall, Kevin G. Racial Education: Chestnutt, Twain, and Post-bellum Children's Literature
(1994) MA, University of Florida.

Lambert, Cornelia C. The Child and the Bee: Natural Theology and Insect Science in
Children's Literature, 1825-1885 (2001) MA, University of Florida.

Norcia, Megan. XMarks the Spot: Victorian Women Writers' Conceptions of Space In
Adventure Narratives and Geography Primers, (2000) MA, University of Florida

Norcia, Megan. "X" Marks the Spot: Victorian Women Writers Map the Empire, (2004) PhD,
University of Florida.

Yontz, Mary Elaine, Music in "Our Young Folks" 1865-1873, (1998) PhD, University of Florida

Theses/Dissertations in Progress

Houp, Trena, Stories Without Words, (2007) PhD, University of Florida

Kitchen, Deeb. Little Golden Fathers (2007) MA, University of Florida

Martin, Cathlena. Charlotte's Website: The Changing Nature of Children's Literature and
Culture (2008) PhD, University of Florida

Sinn, Julie. American Cultural Ideology in the "Little Golden Books. (2006) PhD University
of Florida









Appendix 2.1


Use Statistics


Section 1: Physical Book Collection

Annual on-site use statistics (Julyl June 30) of items pulled from the Baldwin Library stacks
for use in the Special Collections Reading Room, collected from request slips filled out by
patrons:

1997-1998: 352
1998-1999: 478
1999-2000: 366*
2000-2001: 811
2001-2002: 602
2002-2003: 499
2003-2004: 1014
2004-2005: 1364
2005-1/06: 355**

*Does not include 800 items pulled in several weeks for two undergraduate class assignments in
which each student was to peruse and discuss their response to four early (1775-1820) children's
books
**Statistics reflect 12 year of use and a fewer number of children's literature classes taught as a
result of a faculty death, a faculty retirement and a faculty sabbatical.

Section 2: Digital Collection: Literature for Children

The following statistical information is automatically collected and reported by the FCLA Digital
Library Usage Reports (http://www.fcla.edu/FCLAinfo/stats/dlcnt/index.html) Literature for
Children website contains items digitized from Phase I of the National Endowment for the
Humanities grant. Eventually all items digitized with NEH funding will be consolidated onto the
UFDC website which began operation April, 2006, and contains items digitized in Phase II of a
similar grant. Statistics from Phase II follow in Section 3

The number of times that the Literature for Children collection home-page was accessed (Table
1) represents a base for consideration of other use statistics. Users searching the collection
generally come to the collection home page first. Statistics indicate increasing awareness of the
collection both as the University of Florida increases publicity for the collection and as web
search engines index the collection's static web pages.




Appendix 2.2









Collection Home-Page Access:


Year Home-Page Access
2000 (Nov-Dec) 55
2001 (Jan-Dec) 1,063
2002 (Jan-Dec) 2,111
2003 (Jan-Dec) 3,552
2004 (Jan-Dec) 20,936
2005 (Jan-Dec) 21,967
2006 (Jan-Apr) 11,149
N.B. Literature for Children was launched in November 2000.

Access to title table-of-contents (Table 2) indicates user interest beyond the collection home-
page and other documentation.

Table 2: Table-of-Contents List Viewed
Year TOC Views
2002 (Oct-Dec) 1412
2003 (Jan-Dec) 2415
2004 (Jan-Dec) 217,099
2005 (Jan-Dec) 76,361
2006 (Jan-Apr) 38,007
N.B. This level of statistical detail was not compiled prior to October 2002.

Access to individual pages within the document viewed represent further user interest beyond the
table of contents. The following table indicates the number of times a page or part or full-text of
a digital document was displayed.

Table 3: Content Viewed
Year Page displays
2002 (Oct-Dec) 1,923
2003 (Jan-Dec) 49,651
2004 (Jan-Dec) 154,731
2005 (Jan-Dec) 86,257
N.B. This level of statistical detail was not compiled prior to October 2002
N.B. 2006 statistics had not been compiled at the time this Appendix was written.


Section 3: Digital Collection: University of Florida Digital Collections


The University of Florida Digital Collection of Baldwin Library items has been operational since
late March, 2006. The graph below indicated hits on the site from late March through early June,
2006, Since 3/27/2006 there have been 710 sessions with over 41,267 hits
Appendix 2.3










UFDC Children's Literature Monthly Sessions & Hits


18000-
16000
14000
12000

8000

4000
2000
II


March April May June


p- S)e ,ions1, J2 337 219- 31
-Hs per Session 7727 8388 15302 9850
Month
-*--Sessions -i--Hits per Session



Section 4: The International Children's Digital Library

The International Children's Digital Library at the University of Maryland
(http://www.icdlbooks.org/) mounted nine titles digitized by the Baldwin Library during Phase I
(2000-2002). They will be mounting all titles from Phase II (2004-2006) and the current grant
application in the special collections area of their website. Use statistics for those nine books
over the course of a year indicate that the books were accessed 15,729 times with 26,989 total
page views. Cinderella was the most popular book, accessed 3,580 times, with 13,096 individual
page views.

Statistics show that the age of viewers of these pages ranged from 3 years to 70, with the highest
number of viewers being between the ages of 20 and 29. A majority of the viewers were English
speakers, but other users indicated they spoke Chinese, Filipino, French, German, Hebrew,
Persian, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Section 5: The Internet Archive

The Internet Archive (http://www.archive.org/index.php) holds over 400 digitized books from
the Baldwin Library produced during Phase I (2000-2002). Although their statistics do not
indicate when the books were viewed, they do indicate the number of downloads and the interest
in nineteenth century children's literature. A viewer first accesses a written bibliographic
description of the book, and if interested, downloads the item to his computer to read it. As of
May 31, 2006, 7,713 Baldwin Library digitized books had been downloaded for viewing by the
users of The Internet Archive site. The most popular title, with 289 downloads was Practical
Directory for Young Christian Females (1851). Legends from Fairyland (1862) was also
popular.













Appendix 3.1

UNIVERSITY OF

FLORIDA

George A. Smathers Libraries
Office of the Director for Technology Services PO Box 117001
Gainesville, FL 32611-7001
(352) 273-2505
Fax: (352) 392-7251
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu

June 6,2006

Rita J. Smith, Curator
The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature
University of Florida Libraries
Gainesville, FL 32611

Dear Rita,

The Smathers Libraries of the University of Florida have made a strategic commitment to building
strong and rich digital library from our important and unique print collection. We are most
appreciative of funding opportunities such as afforded by the grant program of the National
Endowment for the Humanities. With the grant support for the phased digitizing and cataloging of
our Baldwin collection of Children's Literature, we have been able to make excellent progress in
improving the availability and access to this major collection. In addition, this has been an
opportunity to detail and define strategies for the long-term maintenance and preservation of the
collection.

Concurrent with this grant, the Digital Library Center of the University of Florida has continued to
build other digital collections, including maps, aerial photographs, oral history transcripts,
newspapers, and Florida legislative documents, to name just a few. We are quite proud of the various
Digital Collections we are building for the University. As evidenced in our newspaper projects, we
are evolving our long-standing commitment to the preservation of significant primary resources. The
University of Florida has a tradition of microfilm preservation of Florida and selected Latin American
and African newspapers. Indeed as the Florida site for the USNP project, we were delighted to be
selected for participation in the current National Digital Newspaper Project.

In our transition to digitized access, we are likewise making a commitment to digital preservation. In
August, 2005, the University of Florida Libraries signed an agreement with the Florida Center for
Library Automation (FCLA) to archive our digital collections in the Florida Digital Archive they are
building. This is a long-term commitment that the Library is prepared to support as the details and
costs of such archival storage are better defined in the future. In support of its mission, the Florida
Digital Archive guarantees that all files deposited by agreement with its affiliates remain available,
unaltered, and readable from media. For those materials designated to receive full preservation
treatment, the Florida Digital Archive will maintain a usable version using the best format migration
tools available.


Sincerely,


Martha Hruska
















Appendix 4.1


OCLC: 1884.
Entered:
I Type: a
BLvl: m

Desc: a
> 1 040
1 2 090
1 3 090
> 4 049
1 5 100 1
0 6 245 14
*c by Captain
7 260
8 300
0 9 500
10 510 4
11 700 1
12 740 01
13 752


4434


Rec stat: n


19881206 Replaced: 19950504 U
ELvI: I Srce: d Audn: j Ctrl
Form: Conf: 0 Biog: MRec
Cont: GPub: LitF: 1 Indx
Ills: af Fest: 0 DtSt: s Date
NOC *c NOC I
PR5219.R26 *b B6 1853 1
*b I
FUGG 1
Reid, Mayne, *d 1818-1883. 1
The boy hunters, or, Adventures in search o.
Mayne Reid ; with illustrations by William H
Boston : *b Ticknor, Reed, and Fields, *c 1i
364 p., [12] leaves of plates : *b ill. ; *
"Entered according to Act of Congress, in t
Tryon and Charvat, *c B14b. I
Harvey, William, *d 1796-1866. 1
Adventures in search of a white buffalo. I
United States *b Massachusetts *d Boston. I


sed:


: 0
s: 1853,


20030516
Lang: eng
Ctry: mau




f a white buffalo /
arvey. 1
853.
c 18 cm. I
he year 1852 ..."















Appendix 4.2


Cataloging Record from another institution (see previous record) enhanced for
University of Florida, NEH Grant 2000-2002

LTUF,MORE ALZ9814
NOTIS CATALOGING IOXD
UF,FMT,B,RT,a,BL,m,T/C, ,DT,02/13/01,R/DT,11/08/02,STAT,fn,E/L,I,DCF,a,D/S,D,
SRC,d,PLACE,mau,LANG,eng,MOD, ,T/AUD,j,REPRO, ,D/CODE,t,DT/1,1853,DT/2,1852,
CONT, ,ILLUS,af ,GOVT, BIOGG, ,FEST,0,CONF,0,L/FORM,f,INDX,0,

035/1: : la (FU)bldnneh project 200102
035/2: : la (Source)ONILE180- 2
035/3: : la (OCoLC)18844434
035/4: la (NOTISUF)alz9814
040: : la NOC Ic NOC Id FUG
043: : la n-us-la la n-usp--
049/1: : la FUGG
090/1: : la PR5219.R26 lb B6 1853
099/1: la 23h39469
100:1 : la Reid, Mayne, Id 1818-1883.
245:14: la The boy hunters, or, Adventures in search of a white buffalo / Ic
by Captain Mayne Reid ; with illustrations by William Harvey.
246/1:30: la Adventures in search of a white buffalo
260: : la Boston : lb Ticknor, Reed, and Fields, Ic 1853, c1852 le (Boston :
If T.R. Marvin)
300/1: : la 364 p., [12] leaves of plates : Ib ill. ; Ic 18 cm.
500/1: : la Stereotyped at the Boston Stereotype Foundry.
510/2:4 la Tryon and Charvat, Ic B14b.
650/1: 0: la Hunters Iv Juvenile fiction.
650/2: 0: Ia Natural history Iv Juvenile fiction.
650/3: 0: la Animals Iv Juvenile fiction.
650/4: 0: la Outdoor life Iv Juvenile fiction.
650/5: 0: la Wilderness survival Iv Juvenile fiction.
650/6: 0: Ia Indians of North America Iv Juvenile fiction.
651/7: 0: la Louisiana Lx Description and travel Iv Juvenile fiction.
651/8: 0: la West (U.S.) Ix Description and travel Ix Juvenile fiction.
655/9: 7: la Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ly 1853. 12 rbbin
690/10: 4: la Bldn ly 1853.
700/1:1 : la Harvey, William, Id 1796-1866. 14 ill
700/2:1 : la Marvin, Theophilus Rogers, Id 1796-1882. 14 prt
710/3:2 : la Ticknor, Reed, and Fields. 14 pbl
710/4:2 : la Boston Stereotype Foundry. 14 prt
752/5: : la United States Ib Massachusetts Id Boston.















Appendix 4.3
OC.-" Connexion



OCLC 972831 Held by FUG 16 other holdings


Recstat c Entered 19740806 Replaced 20001204
Type a ELvl I Srce d Audn Ctrl Lang eng
BLvl m Forn Conf 0 Biog MRec Ctry mau
Cont GPub LitF 1 Indx 0
Desc Ills at Fest 0 DtSt s Dates 1872 ,

040 OUN fc OUN *d OCL *d FUG
090 PS1534.D3 *b F56x
049 FUGG
100 1 De Mille, James, Id 1833-1880.
245 1 0 Fire in the woods.
260 Boston, Ib Lee and Shepard. 4c 1872.
300 323 p. tb illus. front., plates. Ic 18 cm.
490 0 B.O.W.C. series, *v 4
599 002391402

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Appendix 4.4
Cataloging Record from another institution (see previous record) enhanced for University
of Florida, NEW Grant 2004-200O
OCLC 972831 Held by FUG 19 other holdings

Rec stat c Entered 19740806 Replaced 20050318
Type a ELvI I Srce d Audn j Ctri Lang eng
BLvI m Form Conf 0 Biog MRec Ctry mau
Cont GPub LitF f Indx 0
Desc a Ills af Fest 0 DtSt t Dates 1872 1871

040 OUN *c OUN *d OCL *d FUG
043 n-cn-ns
090 PS1534.D3 *b F56x
090 *b
049 FUGG
100 1 De Mille, James, *d 1833-1880.
245 1 0 Fire in the woods.
260 Boston : *b Lee and Shepard ; ta New York: *b Lee, Shepard, and Dillingham, tc
1872, c1871 *e ([Boston]: +f Boston Stereotype Foundry)
300 323, [10] p., [3] leaves of plates : b ill.; *c 18 cm.
490 1 B.O.W.C. series ; *v 4
500 Publisher's catalogue follow text and on endpapers.
520 Fourth volume in a series about a boy's club at the Grand Pre Academy in Grand Pre, Nova
Scotia, called the Brethren of the Order of the White Cross, who embark on perilous
adventures.
650 0 Voyages and travels *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Adventure and adventurers *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Boarding school students *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Survival skills *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Sailing *v Juvenile fiction.
651 0 Grand Pre (N.S.) *v Juvenile fiction.
655 7 School stories *y 1872. *2 local
655 7 Publishers' catalogues *y 1872. *2 rbgenr
710 2 Lee and Shepard. *4 pbl
710 2 Lee, Shepard, and Dillingham. *4 pbl
710 2 Boston Stereotype Foundry. *4 str
752 United States *b Massachusetts *d Boston.
752 United States *b New York *d New York.
800 1 De Mille, James, *d 1833-1880. *t B.O.W.C. series; +v 4.

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Appendix 4.5
Original Record, University of Florida, NEH Grant 2000-2002
OCLC 47224033 Held by FUG no other holdings

Rec stat n Entered 20010702 Replaced 20011027
Type a ELvI I Srce d Audn j Ctrl Lang eng
BLvl m Form Conf 0 Biog MRec Ctry enk
Cont GPub LitF f Indx 0
Desc a Ills af Fest 0 DtSt s Dates 1857 ,

040 FUG *c FUG
090 *b
049 FUGG
100 1 Elwes, Alfred, *d 1819?-1888.
245 1 4 The adventures of a bear, and a great bear too / *c by Alfred Elwes; with nine illustrations
by Harrison Weir.
260 London; *a New York: +b George Routledge and Co., *c 1857 *e (London: *f
Thomas Harrild)
300 60 p., [8] leaves of plates : *b ill.; *c 22 cm.
500 Illustrations engraved and signed by various artists, including W. Wight, J. Greenaway, A.J.
Mason, J. Cooper, and W. Measom drawn after Harrison Weir.
650 0 Bears tv Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Temper *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Quarreling *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Success *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Wit and humor, Juvenile.
650 0 Dogs *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Animal welfare *v Juvenile fiction.
655 7 Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) *y 1857. *2 rbbin
700 1 Weir, Harrison, *d 1824-1906. *4 ill
700 1 Greenaway, John, *d 1816-1890. *4 egr
700 1 Mason, Abraham John, *d 1794-1858. *4 egr
700 1 Wright, William, *d 1830-1889. *4 egr
700 1 Measom, William. *4 egr
700 1 Cooper, James Davis, *d 1823-1904. *4 egr
700 1 Harrild, Thomas. *4 prt
710 2 G. Routledge & Co. *4 pbl
752 England *d London.
752 United States *b New York *d New York.

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Appendix 4.6
Original Record, University of Florida, NEH Grant 2004-2006

OCLC 58796201 Held by FUG 1 other holding

Rec stat c Entered 20050404 Replaced 20050621
Type a ELvI I Srce d Audn j Ctri Lang eng
BLvl m Form Conf 0 Biog MRec Ctry enk
Cont GPub LitF f Indx 0
Desc a Ills af Fest 0 DtSt s Dates 1872 ,

040 FUG *c FUG *d OCL
043 po--
090 *b
049 FUGG
100 1 Ballantne, R._M. *q (Robert Michael), +d 1825-1894.
245 1 4 The coral island : *b a tale of the Pacific Ocean / *c by Robert Michael Ballantyne ; with
illustrations by Dalziel.
260 London; *a Edinburgh; *a New York: *b T. Nelson and Sons, tc 1872.
300 438, [8] p., [8] leaves of plates : *b ill.; *c 18 cm.
520 Three English boys, shipwrecked on a deserted island, create an idyllic society despite
typhoons, sharks, wild hogs, and hostile visitors, and then pirates kidnap one of the boys
whose adventures continue among the South Sea Islands.
500 Added title page, engraved.
500 Publisher's catalogue follows text.
650 0 Adventure and adventurers *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Islands *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Outdoor life *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Survival skills *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Natural history *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Survival after airplane accidents shipwrecks, etc. tv Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Pirates *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Rescues *v Juvenile fiction.
650 0 Christian life *v Juvenile fiction.
651 0 Oceania *v Juvenile fiction.
655 7 Robinsonades *y 1872. *2 rbgenr
655 7 Publishers' catalogues *y 1872. *2 rbgenr
710 2 Thomas Nelson & Sons. *4 pbl
710 2 Dalziel Brothers. *4 ill
752 England *d London.
752 Scotland *d Edinburgh.
752 United States *b New York *d New York.

Delete Export- Label- Produce- Submit- Replace- Report Update Validate-
Holdings- Error- Holdings-
Workflow-ln
Process



about:blank 5/31/2006










Appendix 5.1


PALM M : Literature for Children
http://palmm.fcla.edu/iuv/

The PALMM Collections reflect the collaborative effort of Florida's state university libraries. PALMM
Literature for Children is a collection of children's literature from the University of Florida, Florida
State University, and Florida Atlantic University. Responsible for more than 98% of holdings, the
University of Florida is the largest contributor to PALMM Literature for Children.

Legal: The University of Florida's relationship with PALMM is based on the Florida Center for Library
Automation (FCLA, http://www.fcla.edu/) mandate to serve Florida state universities. There is no
legal document, per se, that forms the PALMM relationship. PALMM is an organ of FCLA's Digital
Library Services Division. While technology is managed by the Division, it is administered by the
Digital Development & Access Committee (DDAC) of the State University Libraries
(http://www.fcla.edu/csul/digit/digitpqnew.shtml). The University of Florida is a founding member of
DDAC and led the effort to establish PALMM Literature for Children.

Data Transfer: The University of Florida contributes new content to PALMM Literature for Children by
special FTP methods. Once digitized our content is shipped to FCLA for archiving with the Florida
Digital Archive (http://www.fcla.edu/digitalArchive/index.html) in METS wrappers, containing check-
sums, metadata (MODS, UFDC, DAITTS, etc.), and image (digital master and derivatives for Internet
access) and text files. FCLA processing routines commit these resources to the archive and process
a copy for inclusion in PALMM Literature for Children.
[N.B. Data transfer has been suspended temporarily as FCLA migrates digital library content from
DLXS-based systems to DigiTool based systems. By the time Baldwin NEH Phase 3 funding begins,
data transfer should have resumed.]

Why: The University of Florida contributes to PALMM Literature for Children both to encourage
contributions from other Florida universities and to extend access to the University of Florida
collection to the citizens of Florida, particularly those accessing PALMM for its Floridiana and those
accessing the PALMM Collections for home-schooling uses. While the University of Florida holds
Florida's largest collection of children's literature, Florida State University also holds a sizeable
collection of U.S. and U.K. imprints and Florida International University's Wolfsonian Museum, which
intends to contribute to PALMM Literature for Children, holds early modern continental European
imprints.











Appendix 5.2


International Digital Children's Library
http://www.icdlbooks.org/

The International Children's Digital Library (ICDL) provides free access to children's books from
around the world. By ensuring access to books from many cultures and in diverse languages, it
fosters a love of reading, a readiness to learn, and a response to the challenges of world illiteracy.

ICDL began as a partnership between the University of Maryland and the Internet Archive, collecting
largely contemporary and highly illustrated books for children. Funded originally by the Institute for
Museum and Library Services, the Library is now supported in part by a Foundation at the University
of Maryland. The University of Maryland continues to administer and grow the Library. The Library
continues to request assistance from granting agencies, and, is currently seeking project funding from
the National Endowment for the Humanities also in this round for development of historical
children's literature. Though the University of Florida will contribute to the ICDL, no funds for
the University of Florida contributions are requested by the ICDL grant in this round.

Legal: The University of Florida's relationship with the International Children's Digital Library is based
on a memorandum of understanding, recently revised, with the University of Maryland. (See p. XXX
for a copy of the memorandum)

Data Transfer: The University of Florida contributes new content to the International Children's
Digital Library via disk transfer. Original transfers were made via FTP. Disk transfers allow us to
send content first to the International Children's Digital Library and, subsequently, on to the Internet
Archive/Open Content Alliance. Investigation of alternate transfer methods including FTP or large-
capacity drive transfer, is on-going as we anticipate additional contributions to the Open Content
Alliance. Files transferred are in METS wrappers, containing check-sums, metadata (MODS, UFDC,
DAITTS, etc.), and image (digital master and derivatives for Internet access) and text files. DVD data
disk transfers are on-going.

Why: The University of Florida contributes to the International Children's Digital Library to ensure the
most comprehensive collection of children's literature historic and contemporary and to doubly
insure the preservation of these resources.

Perhaps the most pertinent question is not "why contribute to ICDL?" but, rather, "why continue to
maintain a separate collection at the University of Florida?" Firstly, University of Florida collections
exist within a context; we are committed to maintaining that context for researchers. Our 18th and 19th
century holdings co-exist with other special collections in the social sciences, humanities and the arts.
Children's literature, together with other holdings, informs research in various fields: for example, civil
and moral education; abolition, slavery and race relations, etc. Secondly, maintenance of a local
collection ensures our ability to support intermediate uses: to tag and mine textual data for
specialized uses, e.g., extraction of geographic data, concept mapping, and even integration with
map interfaces uses and methods not supported by ICDL or any of the other digital libraries to
which we contribute.











Appendix 5.3


4 UNIVERSITY OF

FLORIDA

George A. Smathers Libraries Smathers Library
Director of University Libraries PO Box 117007
Gainesville, FL 32611-7007
(352) 392-0342
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/

Special Use License

This Agreement is entered into by the University of Maryland (hereafter, the "Llcensee"), an agency and
instrumentality of the State of Maryland, and the University of Florida, acting on behalf of the Trustees of
the University of Florida, (hereafter, the 'Licensor") and is effective upon execution by Licensor.
This Agreement Is specific to Books digitized by the Licensor from sources in the Public Domain. Digital
masters remain the property of the Trustees of the University of Florida.
In consideration of the mutual covenants and agreements set forth below and other good and valuable
consideration, the parties agree as follows:
1. Licensor hereby grants Licensee a free, nonexclusive right and license to make available, via the
world-wide web, digital versions of Books provided by the Licensor in any and all forms, formats and
media now existing or hereafter developed in connection with the International Children's Digital
Library located at www.lcdlbooke.org, or such other name and URL the Licensee may select in the
future, subject to the following conditions:
a, Licensee shall not charge any fee to access www.lcdlbooks.org or such other Web site
from which the Licensee makes the Books accessible; and
b. Licensee will include an origination notice and acknowledgment of Licensor's license to
University in all displays and publications of the Books, In whole or in part, using the
following format "Held by the University of Florida Libraries. This work is made available
with permission,'; and
c. Where available and practicable, Licensee will employ technological measures that aim
to prevent the downloading and unauthorized further display andlor distribution of the
Books. For additional Information regarding levels of security available, please contact
the Licensee at icdl-rights@cs.umd.edu.
2. Licensor represents and warrants that Books provided are in the Public Domain, that it has full
authority to grant the license under paragraph 1 to Licensee, and that Licensee has no obligation
under copyright law to obtain any additional copyright permissions or clearances to exercise the rights
granted by this license. Licensor will notify the Licensee in writing promptly upon the occurrence of
any event that renders the license granted to the Licensee no longer valid.
3. Any notices required to be provided under this Agreement shall be deemed sufficient if given In
writing and delivered in person or by facsimile or E-mail, confirmed by overnight or certified mail,
postage prepaid and return receipt requested, to the Licensor contact at the address Identified below,
and to the Licensee contact at the address Identified below, or such other address and/or contact as
either party may hereafter designate by notice in writing. A notice shall be deemed effective upon
receipt, Routine communications and inquiries may be made by E-mail.






Pam 1 of 3













Appendix 5.4


Special Use License between the University of Maryland and the University of Florida
per the International Children's Digital Library



Licensor Contact
Name of Contact: ...................... Erich Kesse
Address of Licensee .................. Digital Library Center
Smathers Libraries
P.O. Box 11707
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-7007
Telephone:................................ 1-352-846-0129
Facsimile ................................. 1-352-846-3702
E-mail address........................ dlc@uflib.ufl.edu
Licensee Contact
Name of Contact ....................... Ann Carlson Weeks
Address of Licensee............... University of Maryland/CLIS
International Children's Digital Library (ICDL)
4105 Hombake Building, South Wing
College Park, MD 20742
Telephone:.............................. 1-301-405-2060
Facsimile ......... ............... 1-301-314-9145
E-mail address .......................... cdI-rghts@cs.umd.edu
4. The parties may terminate this Agreement at any time upon written notice. In addition, the Licensor
may terminate this Agreement upon prior written notice to the Licensee of its breach of any condition
under paragraph 1 and the Licensee's failure to cure its breach within thirty (30) days of the
Licensee's receipt of the notice. In the event termination becomes effective under this provision, the
Licensee shall promptly remove Licensor's Books from www.Icdlbooks.org, or such other site as the
Licensee may have established.
5. This Agreement shall be binding upon and Inure to the benefit of the parties hereto and their
respective successors or assigns.
6. The validity, interpretation and effect of this Agreement shall be governed by the laws of the United
States of America,
7. The relationship of the parties to this Agreement is that of independent contractor. Nothing herein
shall be construed to create a partnership, joint venture, or teaming agreement between Licensor and
Licensee. Nothing herein shall be construed to :mply that either party's employees are employees of
the other.
8. In the event any portion of this Agreement that is not vital to its meaning or implementation is held
illegal, void or ineffective, the remaining portions thereof shall remain In full force and effect.
9. This Agreement embodies the entire understanding between the parties. There are no contracts,
understandings, conditions, warranties or representations, oral or written, express or implied, with
reference to the subject matter hereof which are not merged herein, This Agreement may be modified
only upon written agreement of the parties.







Pae 2 of 3











Appendix 5.5


Special Use License between the University of Maryland and the University of Florida
per the International Children's Digital Library


IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties have caused this Agreement to be executed by their duly
authorized representatives as of the Effective Date.

AGREED TO BY:


Licensor
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA:


Dale B. Canelas
Printed Name of Authorized Signatory



Signature of Authorized Signatory

Director, University Libraries
Title of Authorized Signatory


Licensee
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND:

Ann Carlson Weeks
Printed Name of Authorized Signatory


Signature of Authorized Signatory

Director. ICDL Collection Development


Title of Authorized Signatory










Appendix 5.6


Internet Archive : Children's Library
http://www.archive.org/details/iacl

The Internet Archive's Children's Library is intended to provide global access to children about
cultures, societies, etc. The Internet Archive, in turn, extends access to our contributions via its
secondary contributions to other digital libraries, e.g., the new Egyptian Library at Alexandria and, in
particular in the United States, through the Internet Archive Bookmobile
(http://www.archive.org/texts/bookmobile.php). Originally built at a time when the International
Children's Digital Library (ICDL) was being constructed to hold contemporary, highly illustrated
publisher's content rather than historic content being created by institutions such as the University of
Florida. The Internet Archive's Children's Library, which appears as though it will be succeeded by
the Open Content Alliance collections, will continue to receive content from the University of Florida.

Legal: The University of Florida's relationship with Internet Archive is based on a memorandum of
understanding that formed the basis of the International Children's Digital Library (ICDL) founding
partnership, including the Internet Archive and the University of Maryland. (See p. XXX for
memorandum of understanding)

Data Transfer: The University of Florida contributes new content to Internet Archive via disk transfer.
Original transfers were made via FTP. Disk transfers allow us to send content first to the International
Children's Digital Library, now solely maintained by the University of Maryland, and on to the Internet
Archive/Open Content Alliance. Investigation of alternate transfer methods including FTP or large-
capacity drive transfer, is on-going as we anticipate additional contributions to the Open Content
Alliance. Files transferred are in METS wrappers, containing check-sums, metadata (MODS, UFDC,
DAITTS, etc.), and image (digital master and derivatives for Internet access) and text files.
The International Children's Digital Library (ICDL) now accepts historic children's literature. DVD data
disk transfers are on-going.

Why: The University of Florida contributes to the Internet Archive in appreciation of its free
access/open content model. We get absolutely nothing from participation other than knowing that the
partnership is able to extend the useful life and educational purpose of the content.










Appendix 5.7
Grant of Permissions

The Digital Library Center of the University of Florida's George A. Smathers Libraries, acting on
behalf of the Board of Trustees of the University of Florida (hereafter, UF), grants permissions to the
Internet Archive (San Francisco, CA) (hereafter, the Archive) for specific use of digital master files
selected from the Literature for Children collection (http://palmm.fcla.edu/juv/). UF retains all rights.

Duration

The term of this Grant shall be unlimited. It may, however, be terminated by either party within
thirty (30) days of written notification to the other party. Failure to comply with Specific Uses may result in
immediate termination of this Grant.

Inclusions

This Grant is specific to titles digitized by UF and made available to the Archive through the
PALMM Literature for Children collection (http://palmm.fcla.edu/juv/). Copies are made available to the
Archive via direct transfer either from UF or from its agent the Florida Center for Library Automation
(hereafter, FCLA). It includes digital masters in uncompressed TIFF format as well as any derivatives
also transferred.
This Grant is supplemental to an earlier agreement with the International Digital Children's
Library, to which the Archive and UF are party. This Grant in no way alters or effects the terms of that
earlier grant.
UF assumes all responsibilities for copyright clearance and certifies that, to the best of its
knowledge, titles sent are in the public domain. UF reserves the right to require that individual titles be
withdrawn from the Archive should it find its research and copyright clearance to have been incomplete or
incorrect.

Specific Uses

This Grant is intended as a no-cost service of UF. No costs for these or other uses may be
passed back to UF.
The Archive may store digital masters and derivatives for the specific uses laid out herein. It may
process digital masters into other distribution formats, as long as derivation processes do not alter the
essential character of the original item as captured in the digital master.
The Archive may deploy the included resources and derivatives for use in the Archive's Internet
Bookmobile or the Archive's Open Source Books, without restrictions on display, printing, or fair use as
defined by United States of America copyright legislation (Title 17, Section 107). The Archive may not
transfer UF resources to third parties except as required for this specific use. No restrictions shall be
placed on derivatives generated by the Archive, except as follows.
The Archive shall make UF resources available under the keywords "University of Florida".

Signature



Erich Kesse, Director,
Digital Library Center, University of Florida
Thursday, January 08, 2004










Appendix 5.8


Open Content Alliance
http://www.opencontentalliance.org/

The Open Content Alliance (OCA) reflects the collaborative efforts of a group of cultural, technology,
nonprofit, and governmental organizations from around the world that will help build a permanent
archive of multilingual digitized text and multimedia content.
OCA, in a sense, is a successor of the Internet Archive. OCA is administered from offices in the
Internet Archive and thrives on technologies supported by the Internet Archive.

Legal: While the University of Florida is not yet listed as a contributor to OCA, it is our intent to
become a contributor. Our content is already available in the Internet Archive and our permission has
been granted to migrate the data forward into OCA holdings. We anticipate that this relationship will
be formalized with an exchange of letters of understanding before Baldwin NEH Phase 3 funding has
been granted.

Data Transfer: The University of Florida contributes new content to Internet Archive via disk transfer.
Original transfers were made via FTP. Disk transfers allow us to send content first to the International
Children's Digital Library, now solely maintained by the University of Maryland, and on to the Internet
Archive/Open Content Alliance. Investigation of alternate transfer methods including FTP or large-
capacity drive transfer, is on-going as we anticipate additional contributions to the Open Content
Alliance. Files transferred are in METS wrappers, containing check-sums, metadata (MODS, UFDC,
DAITTS, etc.), and image (digital master and derivatives for Internet access) and text files.
The International Children's Digital Library (ICDL) now accepts historic children's literature. DVD data
disk transfers are on-going.

Why: The University of Florida contributes to the Internet Archive in appreciation of its free
access/open content model. We get absolutely nothing from participation other than knowing that the
partnership is able to extend the useful life and educational purpose of the content.

Library of Congress : Bibliographic Enrichment Advisory Team (BEAT)
http://www.loc.gov/catdir/beat/

Bibliographic Enrichment Advisory Team (BEAT) is a catalog enrichment project of the Library of
Congress. BEAT enhances catalog records with table of contents (MARC21 505 field) data and
URLs (MARC21 856 |u) for Internet accessible resources. BEAT enhancements appear in the
Library of Congress catalog and are shared with OCLC, making them available to libraries globally.

Legal: The University of Florida's relationship is inscribed in a memorandum of understanding,
permitting the Library of Congress to use University data and links in its records.

Data Transfer: The University of Florida contributes new content to BEAT via E-Mail of bibliographic
record data and METS/MODS encapsulated table of contents.

Why: The University of Florida participates in the BEAT program as one of several institutions
working to enhance records for improved access to bibliographic information and, where URLs exist,
to freely available openly accessible content for our patrons and the patrons of our partners in the
Caribbean, Africa and Florida.









Appendix 6.1
Imaging Equipment


Four different types of imaging equipment are used to capture volumes depending on the
physical characteristics of volume and its condition. They are the Kodak DCS 14n megapixel
DSLR camera mounted on a copystand with a book cradle, the CopiBook stand-alone scanning
station, Microtek 9800XL flatbed scanners, and an EPSON 1640SU flatbed scanner.

DSLR Cameras:
The Kodak DCS 14n digital cameras are mounted on planetary copystands with a specially
constructed book cradle horizontally positioned under the camera.

Specifications for Kodak DCS 14n:
http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/products/cameras/dcsProl4n/specs.jhtml?id=0.1.2
2.28.3.14.18.14&lc=en

Independent Product Review:
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/kodakdcsl4n/

Capture:
The lossless DCS camera Raw file format will be converted to TIFFs.
Bit-depth:
24-bit color for color images
8-bit grayscale for tonal black and white images

Pixel Resolution:
4500 x 3000 or 3000 x 4500 pixels, depending upon orientation.
Effective Resolution:
Size of Page ............ Effective Resolution
5" x 7" page 600 x 642 dpi
6" x 8" page 500 x 562 dpi
7" x 9" page 428 x 500 dpi
8" x 10" page 375 x 450 dpi
9" x 11" page 333 x 409 dpi
10" x 12" page 300 x 375 dpi

Both the minimum digital resolution threshold for the defacto commercial printing standard and
the optimal resolution setting for Optical Character Recognition systems is 300 dpi.

Lens:
Nikon Nikor 60mm f/2.8D AF Micro-Nikkor lenses are used.
Specifications: (http://nikonusa.com/template.php?cat=l&grp=5&productNr=1987)









Appendix 6.2


Mounting:
Bogen / Manfrotto Super-Repro Copystand 48"
(http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=5094
&is=REG&addedTroughType=categoryNavigation)

Lighting:
Cool Touch (Two Twin 130 wattFluorescent Work Light Stand)
(http://www.naturallighting.com/order/store.php?cm=568&rn=2329&action=show detail).
Daylight bulbs balanced to 6500K are used.

Connections:
Cameras operate tethered via a Firewire (IEEE-1394) connection to the computer, with alternate
storage to 2 GB Compact Flash card on the camera.

The DSLR cameras are used in conjunction with book cradles that have been especially designed
for this project and are similar to "preservation book cradles" in use at the E-texts Center at the
University of Virginia, the national Library of Scotland, and elsewhere. The University of
Florida design, however, is simplified.

The University of Florida's book cradle resembles that used by the University of Virginia's E-
Text center [http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/eaf/cradle.html], but the design is altered to better seat
the book spine and to accommodate variable spine sizes. In this regard, the University of Florida
design resembles the Conservation by Design Ltd. "Preservation Book Cradle"[
httD://www.conservation-bv-desian.co.uk/sundries/sundries38.htmll.









Appendix 6.3


University of Florida's Simplified Book Cradle

The University of Florida book cradle utilizes a stationary base, parallel to the film plane. To
expedite imaging, all odd pages are imaged followed by all even pages. This is fairly typical of
European cradle design. At the University of Florida, a bulk file renaming software utility is used
to achieve correct pagination. The Virginia design, while it allows the volume to be imaged in
one pass, requires that the cradle rock on its base and continually be moved beneath the camera,
thereby necessitating continual adjustment of the cameras height and focus.

Like the University of Virginia cradle, the University of Florida cradle, seen above, places the
book into a position open to less than 120 degrees, the extent of openness common for reading.
Then Florida cradle design, however, has a moveable raised arm that slides in and out to
accommodate the width of the spine and a hammock between the base and moveable arm to seat
and support the spine. The Florida cradle shares this characteristic but is less mechanical. The
Florida design requires fewer initial adjustments and has a more ergonomic form.


Copibook:

Oversized volumes and volumes not requiring special handling are captured using the newly
available CopiBook.


CopiBook R.:B shown









Appendix 6.4


Specifications for the CopiBook:
http://www.iiri.com/copibook/copibook iiri.pdf
Capture:
TIFF will be used
sRGB color-space will be used
Images are captured directly to USB 2.0 Western Digital 80 GB removable hard drives.
(http://westerndigital.com/en/products/products.asp?driveid=109&language=en)
Pixel Resolution:
300 dpi
Bit-depth
24-bit color for color images
8-bit grayscale for tonal black and white images
Bitonal for text images

Lighting:
Cool Touch (Two 65 watt Fluorescent Work Light Stand)
(http://www.naturallighting.com/order/store.php? cmrn=568&rn=2329&action=show_detail).
Daylight bulbs balanced to 6500K are used.

Microtek and Epson Scanners:

A very few selected volumes, those bound in pamphlet style (similar to today's Time or
Newsweek magazines) may be imaged on flatbed scanners. The Digital Library Center operates
13 Microtek 9800XL (http://www.microtekusa.com/sm9800xl.html ) and 3 Epson Expression
1640XL (http://files.support.epson.com/pdf/perl6u/perl6usl.pdf )
scanners. Each is color calibrated weekly utilizing Kodak Q-60 color targets.













APPENDIX 7.1


KEYWORD SEARCH ON


Search Collection: gerE~e
t e ,I I Btaem S rch I Aytned Sarc I He4p

Browse: All Items I By Genre


RESULTS: BRIEF VIEW
DISPLAYS TITLE, AUTHOR, YEAR


5.at:I Rlas tH


m UI


RESULTS: TABLE VIEW
DISPLAYS TITLE, AUTHOR, YEAR,
AND FORMAT


- E~-. *44 N
'S


RESULTS: THUMBNAIL VIEW
DISPLAYS A JPG IMAGE OF THE
COVER OR TITLE PAGE AND LISTS
THE TITLE


I y 0in
an fl--


-- a. a


SSORT BY:
RANK
TITLE
.... 0..- SERIES TITLE
r... ,, i-, -..". AUTHOR
r .s ... .. PUBLISHER
PLACE OF
PUBLICATION
YEAR
FORMAT



S SORT BY:
RANK
TITLE


4<1 .a.J%*t,-


SORT BY:
RANK
TITLE
AUTHOR
YEAR


kytE4 -C


1 .1 I I.. .-


1 PM431 A*. A n HJ


.v'j'













Appendix 7.2


TEXT SEARCH FOR GIRAFFE
TN. Nr"--F'i| S4-1i


TEXT SEARCH


VIEW PAGE IMAGES OR
OR FULL CITATION



CLICKABLE
TABLE OF CONTENTS










RESULTS OF TEXT SEARCH:
GIRAFFE IS FOUND ON THE SIX
PAGES LISTED


"Mc"







I- t~ -





~'- .-
I~ -
"C ~


.. -~-


Pclim 'n74 isorin Inaad a itnry :: wl annlmki
h- l4t p c
Fawrvt 90.6p f I? c:m


VYuw A rh imfi f4fpa) app*aM on I r fall*wIg papiw



Jil 'u
C


CLICKING ON PAGE 7
DISPLAYS THE CONTENTS
PAGE


"THE GIRAFFE" BEGINS ON
PAGE 67


0 1oittcnts.


THE EFIfHST,


KElephaint Corral
The .lEkp:)hal.t ilt

TiIr Liox, -..
T'lie Ti-'ilecr m
The Lionessi and

THE T'. iH,
A T" .*r Hlunt,



TIIHg JAtARn,
Tu]im !tI,


... .. ... t
in Africa, ..... ...
in C -l. ... ... ... ... 17
id thlie Tailor, ...... ... 2


dl thle Lin ... ... ... ... 43
I her C bs, ... ... ... ... 44

4...





... 61

... .. n ... ... C7


'"











Appendix 8.1
Sample: public record for a digitized volume in the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature


Valhunfe I1):
Resourclie I4IftoSi,



Contr ibutor


PlceIof Pubication

Publicationw Dale;
Source InaftlltIon:
Holding LiocalIon:




Format
Subject
Gemi:


REights Management:


UFOOV4M6
MDOU01


Ro1ilodgel now siipenl toy bomks. 70




EVAS. Ednw~d. 1M1906~ Engram~


calO&2
Univershy of Florida
Saldwin Ubrazy of Historical Childiren's Ulerature in hie SpEcial
Coller~ions. George AL Smathers Libraries
Preservationi and Access forArnericarn and N~tish Chiildren's iteiratme,
1670-1 B89 MEN~ PASM-q[.
8 Ieaavs : col. ilL; 25 rm.
Englidh language
Children's poetry 1872.
Cover little.
All riots reserie, Boord efTrustm of the Univeiity of Florida.


Sample: Metadata for the same Baldwin volume consisting of METS header , Descriptive metadata
, Administrative metadata , filesection , and Structure map . A
complete discussion of metadata may be found at
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/development/pres/metadata/mets1.html.



xmlns:METS= Mlip 1 .. .v/METS/"
*.i.In m .,.I = hillp I ,,l v/mods/v3"
..lh iil..k= iliPp ilil,.il .!.Ii/digital/metadata/ufdc/"
-,.ilii ...i.!.= hillp '" ..I /1999/xlink"
*.!!iii 1= ilip ..i ',ll/XMLSchema-instance"
,.!.!ln ..I. I = hlil, .i.n c ..In .II li.n.I/daitss/"
i .ih ...i .'.ilI,,!= hi "lii 1. _. >v/M ETS/
lniilp i'1. .v/standards/mets/mets.xsd
hliip i .>v/mods/v3
liilp 1. !. .ov/mods/v3/mods-3-0.xsd
blip "* l 1 '.', ..l n ..h' i. i l !lc'l.i.[..l. i. /ufdc/
hilp i l..! i'. I..! c.. I/digital/metadata/ufdc/ufdc.xsd
hl ip I !.. c...nI/dls/md/daitss/
hlip I l.. ... i/dls/md/daitss/daitss.xsd">


UF













Appendix 8.2


Quality Control Application, 3.1.7


SMATHERSLIB\narsull







Grammar in rhyme



Routledge's new sixpenny toy books, 70



Crane, Walter
1845-1915

Creator



Evans, Edmund
1826-1905

Engraver



Evans, Edmund
1826-1905

Printer



George Routledge and Sons.

Publisher




London

George Routledge & Sons,
cal 872


English

001762629
AJH5786
12779158
Cover title.
Date from Masse, cited below.











Appendix 8.3


Engraved and printed by Edmund Evans, according to Spencer, I. Walter Crane, p. 50.
Illustrator's name from ad on lower cover.
Publisher's advertisement on back cover.
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889
(NEH PA-50860-00).

Children's poetry -- 1872.
Publishers' advertisements -- 1872.

English language


Bldn -- 1872.



England -- London.




8 leaves : col. ill.; 25 cm.



Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in Special Collections, George A.
Smathers Libraries


All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.








JUV
true
true
l 11 11 1 1i iiin i"-'

bldn.gif
neh.gif
cclc.gif
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ufspec. gif



UF00026638
00001

Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in Special Collections,
George A. Smathers Libraries

<a href="http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/baldwin/baldwin.html">Baldwin Library of
Historical Children's Literature</a> in the <a href="http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/">Special
Collections</a>, <a href="http://www.uflib.ufl.edu">George A. Smathers
Libraries</a>













Appendix 8.4



University of Florida
<a href="http://www.ufl.edu">University of Florida</a>

TEXT


































































Appendix 9.1


FLORIDA C ENTER FOR LIBRARY AUTOMATION
5830 N.W. 39TH AVENUt
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 32606
Phone: (352) 392-9020 Suncom: 622-9020 Fax: (352) 392-9185






June 5, 2006

Dale B. Canelas
Director of Libraries. George A. Smathers Libraries
University or Florida
P.O. Box 11 7(0 I
(i. .2 inllk, FL 32611-7001

Dear Mrs. Canelas,

The Florida Digital Archive, run by the Florida Center for Library Automation, will
provide digital repository services to the University of Florida, George A. Smathers
Libraries, for the TIFF files and all associated metadata created during the Baldwin Phase
3 project.

As of this writing, FCLA does not charge for this service.

Sincerely,




James F. Corey, Director









Rita J. Smith
Associate Librarian and Curator
The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature
Department of Special and Area Studies Collections
University of Florida Libraries, Gainesville, FL 32611

Date May 1, 2006

Recent Work Experience:

January 1994 Present:
Curator, Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature, University of Florida
Library
June 1992-December 1993:
General Humanities Cataloger, University of Florida Library
October 1989-May 1992
Project Cataloger, University of Florida Library, on U.S. Department of Education
Title IIC grant to catalogue books from the Baldwin Library of Historical
Children's Literature

Education:

BA in English, Goshen College, May 1967
MA in Library Science, University of Michigan, June, 1972

Recent Publications:

"The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature," in Journal of Children's
Literature, vol. 31, no. 1, Spring 2005. pp. 48-53.
"Life Is Short, Art Is Long: Randolph Caldecott, 1846-1886," The Newbery and
Caldecott Awards: A Guide to the Medal and Honor Books, p. 11-17. Chicago:
American Library Association, 2000.
"Caught Up in the Whirlwind: Ruth Baldwin," The Lion and the Unicorn, p. 289-302,
Vol. 22, No. 3, September 1998.
Recess! Over 160 essays written for Recess!, a 3-minute program recorded at the
University of Florida and aired nationwide over National Public Radio, including
most recently:
19th Century Environmental Books for Children" March, 2006
"The World Is Round' February, 2006
"Sad-FacedBoy" February, 2006
"The Little House" February, 2006

Recent Papers, Speeches, Presentations:

"The Quest for the Quotidian," a paper presented as part of a panel entitled Culture of
Comics: The Sol and Penny Davidson Special Collection at the University of Florida.
Popular Culture Association Annual Conference, April 13-15, 2006, Atlanta.









"The History of the Baldwin Library." NEFLIN Workshop, University of Florida, March
17, 2006
"Collecting the Everyday: Popular Culture, the Academic Library and the Scholar."
Paper presented at the Conference on Comics and Childhood, University of Florida,
February 24, 2006
"Children's Science Books to 1900," A talk and visual presentation on the history of
children's science books. "Transforming Encounters II: Children and Science,
Imagination and Inquiry," a colloquium at the Unviersity of Florida, February 18-19,
2005.
"Children's Literature in the Baldwin Library" Powerpoint presentation, on the holdings
and history of the Baldwin Library to the "Transforming Encounters: Children's
Libraries Unbound" colloquium held at the University of Florida, April 2, 2004.

Grants:

May, 2000. Co-Principal Investigator. National Endowment for the Humanities, to
catalogue and microfilm Baldwin Library holdings from 1850-1869 and to digitize
and make available through the internet those items from that time period which
contain color illustrations. $381,220
March, 2004. Co-Principal Investigator. National Endowment for the Humanities, to
catalogue Baldwin Library holdings from 1870-1889 and to digitize and make
available through the internet those items from that time period which contain color
illustrations. $298,185

University Service

Associate Director, Center for the Study of Children's Literature and Culture, an
interdisciplinary center housed in the UF English Department. June, 1997-Present.

National Service:

American Library Association, Association of Library Service to Children, 2005
Caldecott Award Selection Committee, 2003-2005, Appointed, Member









Brief Curriculum Vita
Tatiana G. Barr
Head, Humanities and Special Collections Cataloging Unit/Associate Librarian
Cataloging and Metadata Department
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
Gainesville, Fla. 32611
Telephone: (352) 392-0351 ext. 292
FAX: (352) 392-7365
Date: March 17, 2006

Professional Experience:
University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla.
Awarded tenure, June 1, 2005.

Sept. 1999-present Head, Humanities and Special Collections Cataloging
Unit

Oversees, coordinates, and expedites all cataloging activities. Supervises 6 FTE: 3 professionals;
3 paraprofessionals. Responsible for original and complex cataloging of Special Collections and
Humanities materials in all formats, training of staff, and grant-related activities. Establishes
cataloging priorities in consultation with other team members, and librarians and curators in the
Special and Area Studies Collections Department, and affiliated libraries. Liaison with Library of
Congress Subject Authority Cooperative Program (SACO): submits subject heading proposals
generated by staff to the Library of Congress for approval.

Oct. 2004-present NEH Project Cataloging Consultant

10% Faculty assignment to act as project cataloging trainer and cataloging consultant for the 2nd
phase of a project grant supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities for the
"Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1869-1880." Supervise
1 FTE Project Cataloger (Visiting Assistant Librarian); hired and trained Archivist; review work
as required.

Oct. 2000-Oct. 2002 NEH Project Cataloging Consultant

10% Faculty assignment to act as project cataloging trainer and cataloging consultant for the 1st
phase of a project grant supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities for the
"Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1850-1859."

Oct. 2001-Oct. 2002 NEFLIN Project Principal Investigator and Project
Manager.

Wrote grant for 2nd phase of Northeast Florida Library Network Information (NEFLIN) grant
project. Accepted and completed successfully. Supervised 1 FTE.









NEFLIN Project Manager and Trainer.


5% Faculty assignment to be project cataloging trainer and project manager for a one-year
retrospective copy cataloging project grant awarded by the Northeast Florida Library
Information Network (NEFLIN) to catalog 20th century children's literature in the Baldwin
Library of Historical Children's Literature.

Columbia University Libraries, New York, N.Y.

Nov. 1996-Aug. 1999 Reproductions Catalog Librarian

Cataloged all monographic microforms, in all subject areas. Acted as library-wide resource
person for all questions relating to microform and preservation photocopy cataloging. Acted as
trainer and cataloging consultant to NEH-funded microform preservation project "Modern
Economic and Social History". Supervised 1 FTE paraprofessional staff member for shared copy
cataloging and 1 student employee.

Oct. 1998-Aug. 1999 Acting Head, Collection Maintenance Dept.

Reported to head of Public Access. Supervised 2 full-time Library Specialists, 3 student
employees. Responsibilities included: reviewing documentation, eliminating last backlogs,
acting as liaison with other depts.

Stanford University Libraries, Stanford, Calif.

June 1991-Oct. 1996 Slavic Monograph and Serials Cataloger.

Cataloged Slavic, East European, and Baltic language serials and monographs, using standard
cataloging tools and following national standards. Worked with Slavic Curator to establish and
manage cataloging priorities.

New-York Historical Society Library, New York, N.Y.

Oct. 1987-May 1990 Original Monographs Cataloger

Member of a Mellon Foundation funded project team to catalog the Society's collection of
Americana and European literature, following national rare book cataloging standards

Columbia University Libraries, New York N.Y.

Oct. 1986-Sept. 1987 Rare Book Cataloger

Member of a grant-funded cataloging project team for the Edwin R.A. Seligman Collection of
Rare Business and Economic Literature in the Rare Books and Manuscripts Library. Full-level
original cataloging of primarily French materials.


Oct. 2000-Oct. 2001









John Freund
4331 NW 28th Terrace
Gainesville, Florida 32605

johfreu@uflib.ufl.edu
j ohfreu@gru.net

Telephone: -home 352-374-4032
-cell 352-316-1259
-office 352-392-6962

EDUCATION

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
June 1975, BA, Journalism.

San Francisco State, San Francisco, California.
College of Art and Design
September, 1984,
Certificate, Book Restoration and Binding.

WORK EXPERIENCE

Head, Conservation Unit.
University of Florida, Smathers Libraries.
Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007

October 1988 to present.

Responsibilities: Collaborates with Collection Managers to assess and treat collections within the
ability of available resources. Consults with, and assists staff on exhibits, granted activities and
patron and donor requests for tours, information and preservation treatment advice. Supervises
services including : basic to complex repair and restoration, protective enclosure and
environmental/physical conditions monitoring. Trains staff and monitors the work of unit staff,
volunteers and student assistants. Evaluates work flow and progress and maintains standards of
treatment. Performs intermediate and complex repair and restoration for special collections
materials. This may include deacidification and encapsulation, repair and restoration of paper
and bindings including period leather, cloth and paper. Keeps current with the latest
information, literature and research in the conservation field and with the latest equipment and
procedures. Provides information on conservation and preservation to the staff and students of
the University of Florida and to the public.









Workshops Taught


Strap and Hinge.
1984 present
A technique for reattaching the loose covers of tight back leather bound books.

Drop Spine boxes.
1983 present
Construction of custom made drop spine boxes for protection of rare books.

SOLINET Basic Repair Workshop.
1989 2000
Assisted as one of the instructors of several regional workshops.

Recent Presentations:

Book Preservation Basics
Society of Florida Archivists
April 2004

Consultation and Restoration Projects For:

Mathison Museum
Gainesville, Florida
Consulting

Harn Musuem of Art
Gainesville, Florida

State Department of Records
State of Florida, Tallahassee

Florida Historical Society
Cocoa, Florida
Consulting, restoration.

Zora Neale Hurston Museum
Historic Eatonville Community
Consultation, collection review, stabilization.
2002-2004

Catholic Diocese of St. Augustine Archives
Sisters of St. Joseph
St Augustine, Florida
Consulting, restoration
2005 -










ERICH KESSE, Director, Digital Library Center, Associate University Librarian


WORK EXPERIENCE:

DIRECTOR, DIGITAL LIBRARY CENTER.
Smathers Libraries. University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
July 1999 to present. Responsible for creation and implementation of digitization programs. Special
interest in automation issues, development of imaging management information systems

PRESERVATION OFFICER
Smathers Libraries. Preservation Department. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
May 1987 to 30 June 1999

EDUCATION:

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY. School of Library Service. New York, NY. May 1987. Certificate of
Preservation Administration

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY. School of Library and Information Science. Lexington, KY. August
1983. Master of Science, Library Science

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS:

American Library Association. Preservation and Reproduction Section. Preservation &
Digitization Actions: Terminology for the MARC 21 Field 583. (Draft for publication in 2004 by the
Association, Chicago, IL) Served on the committee revising standard terminology and contributor to
document content and structure.

Preservation and Digitisation for the University of Botswana: Education, Democracy and
Development Initiative (EDDI) Project, Report to the Deputy Vice Chancellor, Academic Affairs.
Gaborone, Botswana : University of Botswana, 2003. (Copy available online:
http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/Temporary/Botswana/index.htm)

In the Halo of the Moon: Significance of AmericanSouth.Org for Research. Published in
Workshop on Applications of Metadata Harvesting in Scholarly Portals
(http://metascholar.org/pdfs/MetaScholarFindingsProceedings.pdf) Pp. 56-63. Atlanta, GA : Emory
University Libraries, 2003.

SELECTED PAPERS, SPEECHES, PRESENTATIONS, WORKSHOPS:

Digital Library of the Caribbean. International Project White Paper (Rio Pedras, PR)

Ephemeral Cities. Presentation SOLINET Annual Membership Meeting 2004, Atlanta, GA)
http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/collections/ephemeralcities/ EPC2narrative.pdf

Towards a Digital Library of the Caribbean: Technical Considerations. ACURIL Annual Meeting,
April 29, 2004, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad.

Digital Library Projects Planning Workshop (Instructor) SOLINET Preservation Instruction Workshop
Series, 1998-2002
Digital Imaging Workshops (Instructor), Virgin Islands Library Association Digitization Workshops,
1999-2000.


VITA OF:











SELECTED CONSULTANCIES:


University of Botswana, EDDI Project Consultant For Library Preservation & Digitisation. 2003
Planning consult on for digitisation and preservation at the University of Botswana's Gaborone (Main)
Campus and Harry Oppenhiemer Research Centre in Maun.


U. S. Virgin Islands Culture and History Project. 2000 continuing, UNIVERSITY OF THE VIRGIN
ISLANDS. Consult on technical issues of digitization, cataloging and metadata.
Gold Coast Digitization Project (Consultant on Digitization & Metadata), SOUTH WEST FLORIDA
LIBRARY NETWORK. 2001-2002


SELECTED GRANTS: (funded digital only)
Digital Library of the Caribbean, 2005-2009. Director for Technologies. UF is constructing a multi-
institutional, multi-national digital library, with service bureau features. Funding: $87,000 direct to UF &
$400,000 total project cost to Florida International University and foreign partners (U.S. Dept. of
Education TICFIA)

National Digital Newspaper Program, 2005-2007. Principal Investigator. UF will be digitizing and
contributing Florida newspapers printed between 1900-1910. Funding: $320,959 (NEH)

Rewiring Florida's News: from microfilm to digital, 2005-2006. Principal Investigator. UF will be
initiating a Florida digital newspaper collection building a core collection of 27 current digitized
newspapers. Funding: $95,000 (LSTA)

Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature. Phase II. 2004-2006. Planning Team member
and Digitization coordinator. Digitization component targets color in children's literature; cf,
http://palmm.fcla.edu/iuv/ Funding: $295,507 grant + $102,612 state match (NEH)

Ephemeral Cities. 2003-2004. P.I. and Coordinator. Multi-Institution digitization and GIS project to
link library and museum resources to geographic and temporal systems interfaces via the Internet. Award:
$184,000 (IMLS)

Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature. Phase I. 2000-2003. Planning Team member and
Digitization coordinator. Digitization component targets color in children's literature; cf,
http://palmm.fcla.edu/juv/color.html Digitization expenditures to date: $50,000 grant + $40,000 state
match (NEH)

National Organizations:
AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION: ACRL and ALCTS Various committees as chair and member
from 1983 on.
ASSOCIATION FOR INFORMATION AND IMAGE MANAGEMENT. (1991-1996; 1999): VARIOUS
STANDARDS COMMITTEES; ACTS AS UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES' LIAISON (ON LIBRARIES' MEMBERSHIP).
CENTER FOR RESEARCH LIBRARIES: Collections & Services Advisory Committee. (1999-2002)
NATIONAL INFORMATION STANDARDS ORGANIZATION: Committee AU Member (Metadata
Dictionary for Still Digital Images). (2000/2002)










Stephanie Cornell Haas
Assistant Director, Digital Library Center
University of Florida Libraries, Gainesville, FL 32611-7007
Employment
Assistant Director, Digital Library Center, University of Florida libraries,
Gainesville, FL, April 2000-
Acting Chair/Marston Science Library, University of Florida, Gainesville,
FL, June 1994-June 1995
Assistant Chair/Marston Science Library, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL, June 1993-1998
Environmental Sciences Librarian/Assoc. University Librarian, Marston Science Library,
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 1988- (Tenure granted July 1992)
Selected Professional Activities
International Association of Aquatic and Marine Science and Libraries and Information
Centers (IAMSLIC):
President, 1999-2000
25th Annual Conference Planner and Convener, 1999
President-Elect, 1997
Chair of Metadata Committee, 1996-
Newsletter editor, 2002-2004
Treasurer, 1992-1996


Selected Grants

"From the Air: the photographic record of Florida's lands" funded in 2002 by LSTA. A
cooperative project of the Digital Library Center and the Map & Imagery Library, UF to
digitize and make available over the Internet 40,600 aerial photographs and 600
photomosaic indexes of Florida captured by the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture between 1937 and
1951.

"Identifying the Invaders: creating an online digital herbarium of invasive species"
(http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/natsci/herbarium/cat/imagelistpoisonous.htm) funded by Florida
Department of Environmental Protection. This was a collaborative grant with the University
of Florida Herbarium to digitize and make available over the Web, University of Florida
herbarium specimens of Category II invasive exotics.

"Linking Florida's Natural Heritage: Science and Citizenry" (http://www.fcla.edu/linkfl) will create
a virtual library of Florida ecological information from a set of disparate and heterogeneous
databases located on computers throughout Florida. This is a model program of cooperation
between the Florida Museum of Natural History; the libraries of the University of Florida,
Florida International University, and Florida Atlantic University; and the Florida Center for
Library Automation. The networking technologies used will conform to the latest national and
international standards applicable to information system design including the Z39.50
protocol. (Funded by the Institute for Museum and Library Studies, October 1998)









Selected Publications


2005 "From the Air: the photographic records of Florida's lands." Co-authors: Erich Kesse, Mark
Sullivan, Joe Aufmuth. (Accepted for publication by OSS: International Digital Library
Perspectives for v. 21, no. 2 Summer 2005

2004 "X Marks the Spot: The Role of geographic Location in Metadata Schemas and Digital
Collections." RLG DigiNews, v.8, no.6, Dec. 15 [Online a:
http://www.rlg.org/en/page.php?Page_ID=20492#article1 )

2004 "The Feeding habits of OAISTER catchers, or metadata to go." Proceedings of the 30th
Annual Conference of IAMSLIC helf 5-9 September 2004, Hobart Tasmania, p.113-119

2003 "DARWIN and MARC: A Voyage of Metadata Discovery" Co-authored with Elaine
Henjum and Mary Ann O'Daniel, FCLA and Joe Aufmuth, GIS Coordinator, UF. Library
Collections, Acquisitions, and Technical Services (accepted for publication)

2000 "Linking Florida's Natural Heritage: Science & Citizenry" Co-authored with Priscilla
Caplan. Published in FirstMonday: Peer-reviewed journal on the Internet.
URL: http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue5_6/haas/index.html#h1




Selected Presentations

"Of Deserts, Springs, and Plants: a Freshwater Mosaic" presented at the 26th Annual
Conference of the International Association of Marine and Aquatic Science Libraries and
Information Center by Stephanie Haas, Digital Library Center, Univ. of Florida, Karen Brown,
Aquatic Plants Information Center, Univ. of Florida, and Paula Wolfe, Univ. of Arizona,
Victoria, B.C. 2000

"Linking Florida's Natural Heritage" presented at the Institute for Museum and Library Services
Web-Wise Conference, Washington, March 2000

"Linking Florida's Natural Heritage: Science & Citizenry: A Case Study in Crossing Information
Boundaries" at the session Museum Collection and Natural History Data on the World Wide
Web for Special Libraries Association Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, June 2000.

"Research Metadata on the Web" presented at the 24th Annual Conference of the International
Association of Aquatic and Marine Science Libraries and Information Centers, 1998.

"Florida Ecosystem Management: The Metadata Factor" poster presented at the Natural
Resources Forum, 1998










Randall David Renner
1103 N.W. 4th Street Apt. A
Gainesville, Florida 32601
H. 352.316.3499
W. 352.846.0129
renner(S)ufl.edu

Education

1994 1997 University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
Master of Fine Arts Degree in Creative Photography.

1987 1990 Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida.
Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in Photography; cum laude

Employment

10/2002-Present
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries, Digital Library Center.
Imaging Coordinator, Computer Applications.
Supervision of daily operations of the Digital Library Center and Micrographics
departments. Imaging coordinator for the Digital Library Center's flatbed scanning and
large format digital planetary camera.

8/2001-10/2002
University of Florida, Office of Academic Technology.
Photography Department.
Photographer
Responsible for implementation and daily operation of digital imaging services for the
campus wide photographic service bureau; including equipment specification, integration,
quality control and pricing strategy. Additional responsibilities included photographing
library special collections, artwork, 3-D models, and other subjects, both in a studio
environment and on location. Other technical duties included black and white printing and
processing, and E-6 processing and mounting.

1/2001-8/2001
University of Florida, Office of Academic Technology.
Center for Instructional Technology and Training.
Training Specialist
Responsible for conducting training seminars of graphic software programs to faculty and
staff. Development and revision of new graphic software training programs, and
development of the Instructional Computing Activities Training Program. Specific seminar
content included: Introduction to Digital Media, Web Site Development, Introduction to
Photoshop, Intermediate Photoshop, Graphics for the Web, Digital Video, Acrobat,
FrontPage, PowerPoint, and The Effective Use of Laptops.

1999- 2000
University of Florida, Department of Art and Art History.
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Responsible for instruction, evaluation, and curriculum development of the introductory
digital arts class, Computer Art: Montage.










1998- 2000
University of Florida Brain Institute, Teaching Lab Resources.
Audio Visual Specialist
Management of multimedia and classroom support activities within the Brain Institute,
including multimedia auditorium, conference rooms, audio/video building distribution and
surgical research and training lab. Coordination of scheduling, setup and maintenance of
all multimedia and teleconferencing equipment. Administrative and technical
management of all teleconferencing and multimedia resources including computers,
digital projectors, slide projectors, teleconferencing codecs, scalers, mixers, and amx
controlled systems. Performed preventive and corrective maintenance. Provide
operational instruction of resources to faculty and staff.

1994-1997
University of Florida, Biomedical Media Services, Photography/Graphics
Departments.
Photographer
Responsibilities included the design and creation of photographic and graphic media
including images, text, charts, and graphs. The processing, printing and digital transfer of
biomedical, scientific, and public relations subjects in both film based and digitally
generated formats for teaching, research, publication and display.

1994-1997
University of Florida, Department of Art, Gainesville, Florida.
Graduate Teaching Assistant / Instructor
Fully responsible for instruction, evaluation and curriculum development of beginning
photography courses in the Art department. Courses taught included Black and White
Photography, Figure/Ground, and Image/Order/Idea.

1991 -1993
U Mac International Language Academy, Nishi-Koiwa, Tokyo, Japan.
Program Coordinator / Instructor
Developed specialized English language curriculum, and provided English language
instruction to Japanese students of all age groups in classroom and individualized
settings. Edited foreign correspondence.

1988-1991
Florida State University, Department of Art, Tallahassee, Florida.
Color Darkroom Manager
Designed, supervised and maintained the art department's color darkroom facility
consisting of a photographic studio, a 10 workstation color darkroom, and a Durst RCP-
50 dry to dry processor.









Lourdes Santamaria
2735 SW 35 Place #1806
Gainesville, FL 32608
(786) 423- 4901
gliterl\h Iii hotmail coin



EDUCATION

2005 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Pursuing Masters of Arts in Museum Studies

1999 2003 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Creative Photography, Minor in Art
History -- Cum Laude

EMPLOYMENT
2005 Scanning Supervisor (Program Assistant), Digital Library Center,
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL

Supervision of imaging process and staff using flat bed and high-speed
scanners
Preparation of archival and library materials for digital imaging

2003 2004 Digital Technician, Flair Pro Color Lab, Gainesville, FL

Set up digital files for photographic printing, including color
correction, image sizing, and digital manipulations
Responsible for photographing, researching, describing and listing
store inventory on eBay online auctions

2001 2002 Sales Associate, Victoria's Secret, Miami, FL

Handle all register transactions, including sales, returns, and opening
new credit accounts; as well as assisting customers select their
purchases

2001 Re-shelving Personnel, Marston Science Library, Gainesville, FL

Re-shelve returned library books in corresponding sections and
maintain current inventory lists










2000 Sales Associate, Victoria's Secret, Miami, FL

Handle all register transactions, including sales, returns, and opening
new credit accounts; as well as assisting customers select their
purchases


EXHIBITIONS

2006



2006


2005


2004



2004



2004


2003

2003

2003


2002

2002

2002

2002

2001

2001

1998


FACC Juried Student Arts Exhibition, University Gallery, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL. Juror: Bonnie Clearwater, Director and Chief Curator, Museum
of Contemporary Art, North Miami, FL.

Intolerance, Center for Visual Arts Gallery, Brookdale Community College,
Lincroft, NJ. Juror: Wendell T. Brooks, Professor, The College of New Jersey

Intolerance, Printmaking Council of New Jersey, Somerville, NJ. Juror: Wendell
T. Brooks, Professor, The College of New Jersey

Women in the Middle: Borders, Barriers, Intersections, UWM Union Art
Gallery, Milwaukee, WI. Jurors: Helen R. Klebesadel, Marianna Nunn, Clarissa
Sligh, Gail Tremblay, Flo Oy Wong

Cambridge Art Association National Prize Show, University Place Gallery,
Cambridge, MA. Juror: Robert Fitzpatrick, Pritzker Director, Museum of
Contemporary Art Chicago, IL

Photowork '04, The Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie, NY. Juror: Jennifer
Blessing, Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum New York, NY

Visual AIDS: Postcards From the Edge, Galerie Lelong, New York, NY

Inherited Tourism, The Art Store, Gainesville, FL

FACC Juried Student Arts Exhibition, University Gallery, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL. Juror: Bob Hanning, Curator, Graphicstudio

Most Food Comes by Boat, Sergio Vega Studio, Gainesville, FL

Empathy: An Exercise in Location, The Art Store, Gainesville, FL

E -, /l.nr, But the Bathroom Sink, The Art Store, Gainesville, FL

Digital Works, The Art Store, Gainesville, FL

Sergio's Ocular Migraine, The Ark, Gainesville, FL

Postcards to New York, Macy Gallery, Columbia University, New York, NY

Early Images '98, Borders Gallery, Coral Gables, FL
M-DCPS Juried Photographic Exhibition









Vita of
Jane Pen

Education

2002-present: Santa Fe Community College, Gainesville, FL
Program Continuing education in computer science

1998-2001: Santa Fe Community College, Gainesville, FL
Graduation AAS Spring 2002
Major Software Applications Technologies

1979-1983: Tamkang University, Taipei, Taiwan
Degree Bachelor of Arts
Major Educational Media and Library Science

Work Experience

2001-present: Coordinator for Quality Control. Digital Library Center, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL
Perform quality control on digital images; supervise student assistants; manage
intermediary archive files

1997-2001: Library Assistant. Alachua County Library District, Gainesville, FL
Assist patrons with information inquiry; resolve account problems; issue library cards;
and perform customer services including data entry using SIRSI and office equipment
maintenance.

1996-1997: Library Assistant. Schaumburg High School, Schaumburg, IL
Assisted students with reference inquiry; helped media center director with
material ordering, processing, and displaying. Also assisted computer lab
manager with equipment maintenance and inventory.

1988-1996: Senior Cataloger: Follett Library Resources Co., McHenry, IL
Assisted department head with cataloging and bibliographies consulting, sales support,
and customer service. Reduced production cost of over $5000 per budget year by
rearranging workflow.















EDUCATION


WORK
EXPERIENCE


Nelda M. Schwartz
2503 N.E. 11 Ter., Gainesville, FL 32609
neldas@uflib.ufl.edu
home/352.378.3219 office/352.846.0129 ext.161

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA. Gainesville, Florida
College of Education Spring 1970. Bachelor of Science.
Major: Library Science.

INDIAN RIVER JUNIOR COLLEGE. Ft. Pierce, FL
April 1968. Associate of Arts.


Sr. Archivist
Smathers Libraries. Digital Library Center
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
August 2004 to present
Responsible for maintaining tracking database for print materials
entering the DLC; cataloging preservation microforms; implementing
and analyzing condition surveys; supervising, training and
coordinating student assistants; developing and documenting
procedures for brittle books and sales/distribution of reformatted
materials; coordinating brittle books reformat preparations and
materials routing.

Archivist, Sr. Archivist
Smathers Libraries. Preservation Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
1990 July 2004
Responsible for cataloging preservation microforms; implementing
and analyzing condition surveys; supervising, training and
coordinating student assistants; developing and documenting
procedures for microfilming and brittle books; coordinating brittle
books reformat preparations and materials routing; initiating
replacement orders for brittle materials; occasional serials, theses and
monograph binding.

Library Technical Assistant II
Smathers Libraries. Catalog Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
1975-1989
Responsible for cataloging periodicals and other serials.

Library Assistant
Smathers Libraries. Catalog Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
1973-1975
Responsible for distribution of materials to be cataloged; cataloging
new monographic editions; bibliographic searching of serials; adds;
catalog maintenance.









Clerk-Typist 11,111
Smathers Libraries. Catalog Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
September 1970-1973
Responsible for organization and distribution of unit work; train and
supervise other clerk-typists; preliminary cataloging of theses;
secretarial duties.

PROFESSIONAL
ORGANIZATIONS Florida Library Association (1994)
Co-organized Paraprofessional Workshop

Library Paraprofessional Development Group (1991-1995)
Co-organized three Paraprofessional Conferences having national
attendance.
Developed a procedural manual for planning and hosting workshops
and conferences.









James R. "Gus" Clifton
1918 NW 3rd Ave, Gainesville FL 32603-1501 USA
(352) 379-4858 elwood@ufl.edu

WORK EXPERIENCE

Coordinator, Text Conversion and Mark-up
Preservation Department, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida USA
September 2003 to present
Responsible for all phases of text conversion from digital images and mark-up;
vendor relations and text quality control assurance; configuration and utilization
of PrimeRecognition OCR software; simple applications programming (PERL)
and design of complex specifications for C# applications programming; and hiring
and training of student assistants. Liaison with the Florida Center for Library
Automation for text support services.

Microphotography Technician
Preservation Department, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida USA
September 1996 to 2003
Responsible for all phases of microfilm production:
Hiring, training and supervising full-time staff as well as part-time
student assistants;
Revising old workflows and establishing new ones to fit upcoming
projects and grants;
Interacting with other micropublishers and vendors, including
spending $150,000-200,000 per year on in-house and outsourced projects,
placing orders for equipment and services, and processing and tracking
invoices;
Supervising the duplication and distribution of microfilm to sales
clients;
Distributing microfilm copies to the donors of original documents;
Compiling monthly and annual production statistics;
Developing and managing the unit's microfilm production database;
And creating and updating web-based documentation of library
workflow and procedures.

Microphotography Technician Assistant
Preservation Department, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida USA
April 1993 to September 1996
Responsible for queuing and microfilming documents from several collections.
Secondary assignment: digital scanning technician.

EDUCATION

May 1989 B.A., Anthropology
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences









COMPUTER EXPERIENCE


Operating Systems
Microsoft MS-DOS, Windows 3.1/95/98/2000/NT
Apple Mac OS8.6
UNIX and Linux: Mandrake 7.2/8.2/9.0, Debian 3.0,
University of Florida Grove system

Office Productivity Suites
Microsoft Office 95/97Pro/2000Pro
OpenOffice.org 1.0

Database Management Systems
Symantec Q&A
Microsoft Access, macros and modules

Programming Languages
C on UNIX and PC, some C++ on UNIX
Perl 5.6 on PC and Linux
Microsoft VBA (some) with Excel and Access 97/2000

Markup and Style
HTML4/XHTML1
XMLand DTD
CSS1 and CSS2

Training and Certification
Advanced Microsoft Access, Fall 2000
Microsoft FrontPage 2000, Fall 2000
New Horizons A+ Training, August 1999

LANGUAGES

Italian, German, Latin and French
Best skilled in Italian
Currently studying Spanish









Traveler R. Wendell
Imaging Assistant, Digital Library Center
University of Florida Libraries
P.O. Box 117007
Gainesville, FL 32611-7007

2006 Present
Imaging Assistant, Library Technical Assistant
Digital Library Center
Digitization of books, use of Copibook Digital Scanner, PhaseOne FX Large Format Digital
Scanback Copy System, Epson 1640XL Color Flatbed Scanner, Microtek Scanmaker
9800XL Color Flatbed Scanner, Panasonic High Speed Color Scanner and various Digital
SLRs. Supervise Fifteen students. Troubleshooting of all digitization equipment and
computer interfaces.

2005 2006
OPS Reprographics Technician
Digital Library Center
Filming of Newspapers, use of Zeutschel large format camera, Kodak MD2 large format
camera, Kodak film processor. Various Photoshop duties. Digital imaging using Digital
SLRs. Supervised Eight students. Troubleshooting of all camera equipment, film processor,
and computer interfaces.

2004 Present
Small Business Owner
AgoraPhoto Custom Photography
Photographing various subjects and events including nature, weddings, parties, still lifes, car
shows, sports (including University of Florida), local human interest stories, promotional
photos; logo and web page creation; digital image manipulation using Adobe Photoshop.
Scanning of photographs for digital manipulation. Designed and built complete mobile
processing, scanning and printing lab for instant production of photos in the field.

1992 Present
Freelance Photographer and Journalist
Williston Pioneer and Chiefland Citizen Newspapers
Photographed local sporting events, car shows, various other functions and news stories. The
manipulation of digital images using various graphics programs such as Adobe Photoshop,
Paint Shop Pro. Wrote weekly column including the use of various word processor and
desktop publisher programs; gathered information from county courthouse and city police
department including the retrieval of information from various databases.









Equipment Experience:


Cameras.... Copibook Digital Scanner, PhaseOne FX Large Format Digital Scanback Copy
System,, Zeutschel Large Format, Kodak MD2 Large Format, Canon 10-D
DSLR, Nikon DSLR, Olympus DSLR, Pentax ZX-50 35mm SLR, Olympus
Digital C-211 Zoom, Canon Powershot A300 Digital.

Scanners...HP Scanjet 2400, Apollo P-2100. Epson 1640XL Color Flatbed Scanner,
Microtek Scanmaker 9800XL Color Flatbed Scanner, Panasonic High Speed
Color Scanner.

Printers .....Epson C84, Epson R300, HP Color Laser Jet 4500, HP Laser Jet 5N, various HP
Inkjets.


Software Experience:

Microsoft Windows 3.0 XP Professional, Microsoft Office 95 2003, Adobe Photoshop
5.0 CS2, Adobe Go-Live CS, Adobe Elements, Adobe Acrobat.









POSITION VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT


POSITION: Project Cataloger (temporary two years)

RANK: Visiting Assistant Librarian

REPORTS TO: Head, Humanities and Special Collections Cataloging Unit

SALARY: $40,000

LP#: [to be filled in]


JOB SUMMARY

The Project Cataloger is primarily responsible for original cataloging of titles in the area of
children's literature in English for the period 1890-1910. The Project Cataloger will review the
enhanced copy of the project archivist. The Project Cataloger will be responsible for reviewing
all bibliographic records to guarantee that all records contributed to the national databases meet
national standards of cataloging, and will be responsible for the organization of the project's
workflow and statistics.

RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Organizes and performs original descriptive and subjective cataloging of titles of children's
literature
1890-1910 following the Anglo-American Cataloging Rules Two Revised (AACR2R) and
assigns
Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH). The Project Cataloger supervises the
Project Archivist
in enhancing copy cataloging records following the same standards.
2. Enhances subject access through the application of genre, provenance, and other terms
using the
ALA/ACRL Rare Books Manuscripts Section thesauri as well as locally established genre
terms.
3. Contributes original and enhanced cataloging records to OCLC and authority records to
NACO.
Supervises the Project Archivist in doing the same.
4. Uses the RLIN database to supplement the OCLC database for authorities and
bibliographic
searching.
5. Updates and maintains information in ALEPH for original records contributed to OCLC.
6. Coordinates workflow with project managers and other departments.
7. Reports monthly statistics to project managers.
8. Contributes series, personal and corporate name authority records to NACO.










REQUIRED QUALIFICATIONS


1. A Master's degree in Library Science from an ALA-accredited library school.
2. Two years of experiences cataloging materials in special collections.
3. Two years of original cataloging experience in an academic or research library.
4. Demonstrated experience in searching and cataloging in OCLC Connexion.
5. Experience in creating NACO name and series authority records.
6. Ability to communicate effectively orally and in writing.
7. Demonstrated capacity to work effectively and productively in a team environment.
8. Demonstrated success in working within a project schedule.



THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

The University of Florida is a large, land grant, public educational research institution with a
faculty of approximately 4,000 and a student body of 48,000. It ranks third nationally in size of
student body and eighth nationally in the number of merit scholars enrolled in the freshmen
class. The University is a member of the Association of American Universities and offers the
Ph.D. in more than 90 fields and the Master's degree in more than 120 fields. For more
information please consult the UF homepage at http://www.ufl.edu.

The University of Florida Libraries are members of the Association of Research Libraries, the
Center for Research Libraries, the Research Libraries Group, and SOLINET. The library staff
consists of more than 400 FTE librarians, technical/clerical staff and student assistants. For more
information about the Libraries, please visit http://www.uflib.ufl.edu.

BENEFITS:

Twenty-two vacation days, nine paid holidays, and thirteen days sick leave annually; retirement
plan options; insurance benefits; tuition fee waiver program; no state or local income tax.

APPLICATION PROCESS:

The University of Florida is an equal opportunity employer and is strongly committed to the
diversity of our faculty and staff. Applications from a broad spectrum of people, including
members of ethnic minorities and disabled persons, are especially encouraged to apply.

Please reply by e-mail. Send, as attachments (MS-Word format preferred), a cover letter, resume
and list of three references. Include address, telephone and email information for references.
Please include a 250-word document expressing your opinion on the topic: "Describe the major
issues for providing access to digital collections in an academic environment". Applications
will be reviewed as received. Refer to Position # [to be filled in] when submitting any
application materials. All inquiries and submissions of required application materials should be
sent to Brian Keith, Smathers Libraries Human Resources Officer, at: brikeit(,uflib.ufl.edu









SUMMARY OF POSITION ROLE/RESPONSIBILITIES


WORKING TITLE: Archivist

POSITION NUMBER: 00020144

ALL POSITIONS:

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS OF THE JOB AND THE PERCENTAGE OF TIME SPENT ON
EACH FUNCTION [NOTE: IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT (ADA), IDENTIFY ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS OF A JOB REQUIRED TO BE PERFORMED
WITH OR WITHOUT REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS. REQUESTS FOR REASONABLE
ACCOMMODATIONS TO FACILITATE THE PERFORMANCE OF ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS
WILL BE GIVEN CAREFUL CONSIDERATION.]

50% SHARED CATALOGING

Enhancing all copy cataloging records imported into the database from OCLC and already existing
records to conform to Baldwin Cataloging Guidelines.

15% ORIGINAL CATALOGING

Assisting the NEH Project Cataloger in creating original bibliographic records following Baldwin
Cataloging Guidelines for selected titles.

15% CONTRIBUTING BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORDS

Contributing these bibliographic records to the OCLC database.

10% AUTHORITY RECORDS

Collaborating with NEH Project Cataloger to create original authority records when none exist in the
national authority file.

05% CONTRIBUTING AUTHORITY RECORDS

Contributing these authority records to the NACO database

SUPERVISION RECEIVED. EXPLAIN THE TYPE AND EXTENT OF INSTRUCTIONS OR
DIRECTIONS NORMALLY GIVEN TO THIS POSITION BY THE IMMEDIATE SUPERVISOR.

Detailed procedures are carefully explained as each new responsibility is assigned.
Staff member works with independently, with minimal supervision. Records are reviewed by NEH
Project Cataloger and archivist consults with NEH Project Cataloger as necessary.

SUPERVISION EXERCISED. LIST THE CLASS TITLES AND POSITION NUMBERS OF
POSITIONS UNDER THE DIRECT SUPERVISION OF THIS POSITION.

OPS student assistants









NORMAL WORK SCHEDULE. (ENTER DAYS/HOURS HERE): 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Five days
per week. Total hours per week: 40.

EXPLAIN ANY VARIATIONS FROM THIS SCHEDULE (EX: ON CALL, SHIFT ROTATIONS,
SEASONAL EXTENDED HOURS, TRAVEL, ETC.:

EDUCATION, TRAINING, AND EXPERIENCE. IN ORDER OF IMPORTANCE, STATE ANY
SPECIFIC EDUCATION, TRAINING, EXPERIENCE, KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES
REQUIRED FOR THIS POSITION. IN ADDITION, IDENTIFY THE MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS
AS LISTED IN THE CLASS SPECIFICATION FOR THIS CLASSIFICATION (AVAILABLE AT
www.hr.ufl.edu/departmental/ccestablishing.htm). LIST ANY ADDITIONAL OR PREFERRED
QUALIFICATIONS SPECIFIC TO THIS POSITION.

Minimum Qualifications:
A high school diploma and six years of appropriate experience. Appropriate college coursework or
vocational/technical training may substitute at an equivalent rate for the required experience.

Required:
Knowledge of Anglo-American Cataloging Rules & Library of Congress Subject Headings.
Knowledge of MARC formatted bibliographic information on OCLC, RLIN, and UF ALEPH online
catalog.
Ability to search, edit, and input on OCLC and ALEPH systems.
Knowledge of humanities subject terminology.
Ability to work independently.

REQUIRED LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND OTHER SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS OF
LAW. PLEASE REVIEW THE STATEMENTS BELOW AND PLACE A "Y" IN FRONT OF ALL
THAT APPLY.

THIS POSITION REQUIRES A POST OFFER HEALTH ASSESSMENT.

THIS POSITION IS RESPONSIBLE FOR MEETING THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE RULES OF
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, 6C1-3.022 FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION; PAYMENT TO
VENDORS; PAYMENT PROCESSING GUIDELINES, AS AMENDED, REGARDING THE
APPROVAL AND/OR PROCESSING OF VENDORS' INVOICES AND/OR DISTRIBUTION OF
WARRANTS TO VENDORS.

THIS POSITION REQUIRES LICENSURE, CERTIFICATION, OR OTHER SPECIAL
REQUIREMENTS (PLEASE SPECIFY).

Y THIS POSITION REQUIRES A CRIMINAL BACKGROUND CHECK.

THIS POSITION PROVIDES CARE TO CHILDREN, THE DEVELOPMENTALLY DISABLED,
DISABLED ADULTS, OR IS OTHERWISE DEFINED IN SECTION 110.1127 (3)(A) FLORIDA
STATUTES AND THEREFORE REQUIRES A SPECIAL BACKGROUND CHECK AS DESCRIBED
IN SECTION 435 FLORIDA STATUTES.

THIS POSITION IS SUBJECT TO FEDERAL AND STATE PRIVACY REGULATIONS.

OTHER, PLEASE SPECIFY:












EMPLOYEE AND SUPERVISOR INFORMATION:
EMPLOYEE NAME:
IMMEDIATE SUPERVISOR'S NAME, TITLE, AND POSITION NUMBER:

REVIEWING AUTHORITY NAME AND TITLE:

Elizabeth Y. Simpson
Chair, Cataloging and Metadata Department
822330

CLASSIFICATION CHANGE ACTION COMPLETE ONLY IF REQUESTING A
CLASSIFICATION CHANGE. INDICATE SPECIFICALLY HOW THE DUTIES OF
THIS POSITION HAVE CHANGED SINCE IT WAS INITIALLY OR LAST
CLASSIFIED.















4 UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA

College of Liberal Arts & Sciences 4008 Turlington Hall
Department of English PO Box 117310
Gainesville, FL 32611-7310
(352) 392-6650
Fax: (352) 392-0860

May 17,2006

Rita J. Smith, Curator
The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature
Department of Special Collections
George A. Smathers Libraries
P.O. Box 117007
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611

Dear Rita:

I am very pleased to support your application for a NEH grant to continue the project of
cataloguing and digitizing materials from the Baldwin L library, this time focusing on materials
originally published between 1890 and 1910. The Baldwin is one of the premier archives of
historical children's literature in the world, and provides invaluable research opportunities for
scholars working in children's literature, Victorian studies, religion, history, and related fields.
Particularly unique and significant about the Baldwin is the range and diversity of its holdings.
even within a decade or two (most such collections show diversity but only across a longer
historical period). Furthermore, Ruth Baldwin collected materials that others deemed
insignificant but that have proven immensely instructive. In short, the Baldwin makes possible
projects that aren't viable anywhere else.

Already the collection has facilitated important work. Gillian Avery, the distinguished children's
literature scholar, came from Britain to work in the Baldwin while researching and writing
Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922 (Johns Hopkins. 1994).
Other scholars have made substantial use of the holdings as well. Mary Lenard is a friend of
mine from graduate school, and she spent three weeks here reading nineteenth-century biography
and historical fiction for children, including material from the 1890 to 1910 period. I know that
she found her time here productive, but I should add that not everyone is able to stay as long as
she did (or with a friend). Especially in recent years, many scholars do not have sufficient funds
from their home institutions to do archival research. Some scholars will be able to conduct most
if not all of their research online, and will in turn help promote the Baldwin. The NEH grant will
allow greater access to the Library, allowing scholars to view materials without traveling to
















Florida and/or to plan their research time in the Library more strategically.

As you know, my primary interest is American children's literature from the nineteenth century,
and I joined the faculty here largely to work with the Library's remarkable holdings. The last
several decades of the nineteenth century were among the most significant for children's
literature in many respects. The most important illustrators, such as Kate Greenaway and
Randolph Caldecott, were working at this time. Series books were flourishing; we have a huge
and comprehensive collection. For example, we have several copies of Horatio Alger's Tattered
Tom, which appeared in this period, a title otherwise difficult to find (about a girl who cross-
dresses as a bootblack). This was also the heyday of children's magazines such as St Nicholas,
for which many "adult" writers regularly wrote (among them Harriet Beecher Stowe, Henry
Wadsworth Longfellow, Mark Twain, and Lousia May Alcott). We have complete runs of St.
Nicholas and other important periodicals. Moreover, the enormous demographic and cultural
shifts of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries -- chief among them the mass migration
from country to city, as well as several waves of immigration are reflected in the literature of
the period (including St. Nicholas, which ran well into the new century). Baldwin holdings offer
rich insight into this very important period in our nation's history.

I should note that the Baldwin archive continues to be an important research archive for our
graduate students in English as well as for English scholars more broadly. We've had several
MA and PhD students embark on large-scale research in the Baldwin, most notably Megan
Norcia, who studied late nineteenth-century geography primers and adventure stories. Her
dissertation landed her a tenure-track job at SUNY-Brockport, and her research resulted not only
in a fine dissertation but several article publications in prestigious journals. In Fall 2004, Rita
Smith and I co-taught a graduate seminar called "Into the Archive: Readings in the Baldwin," in
which students developed individual research projects in the Baldwin and reported regularly on
their ongoing work, in a remarkably collaborative spirit. Already one journal publication has
resulted from that course an article about representations of Spain in children's books. More
recently still, a group of our advanced graduate students hosted the Eighteenth and Nineteenth
Century British Women Writers Conference, and curated an exhibit based on Baldwin materials
and other holdings. One of the keynotes for that conference (delivered in the Special Collections
reading room) was given by Lynne Vallone, Professor of English at Texas A&M University,
who spoke on narratives about Mary Queen of Scots, including biographies for children. Lynne
and other scholars attending the conference took time to explore the holdings while in town for
the conference. In short, the Baldwin Library continues to be an invaluable resource for
scholars, and I anticipate that more and more people will make use of it, especially as more
materials are available online.

I'm very excited about this opportunity to improve access to the Baldwin. Please let me know
how I can be of further assistance.

Sincerely,




An Equal Opportunity IriWtlulion




















Kenneth B. Kidd
Associate Professor
Graduate Coordinator


An Equi Oppornity Insiittil















TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY
*,f^ .- C rt. .i: Liberal Arts
Department of English


May 31, 2006

Rita J. Smith, Curator
The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature
Department of Special Collections
University of Florida Libraries
P. O. Box 117007
Gainesville, FL 32611-7007

Dear Rita J. Smith:

As you know, I am a Children's Literature scholar whose work focuses on British and
American children's books of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, so my interest in
the Baldwin Collection and its accessibility is especially keen. I write in enthusiastic
support of the UF Libraries and Baldwin Library's grant application to the National
Endowment for the Humanities. I understand that this grant application will be for the
third and final phase of a larger grant, and will support the digitization and cataloguing of
selected Baldwin Collection children's books dated 1890-1910.

The depth and breadth of the collection make the Baldwin the "holy grail" of children's
literature special collections. Recently, I was the beneficiary of a private tour of the
Baldwin Library, and the facilities, support materials, and especially the collection itself
are most impressive. The reading room is among the most beautiful I have seen and I
yearned to stay and work there. However, most children's literature scholars from
around the country and around the world-not to mention their thousands of students-
cannot visit the Baldwin Library itself. Here is where the catalogue and digitization
project enters the picture. Through the NEH grant to date, many works from the
collection are already available and accessible to a world-wide audience. Phase m of the
grant would bring the on-line collection (in full-record form for all catalogued material
and books with color digitized) up to 1910. This material will be an extremely useful
resource for scholars and students of children's literature as visiting the website is the
closest thing to an actual visit to the library. In fact, the searchable nature of the
catalogue and records makes the website an invaluable research tool. The site is easy to
navigate and the digitized books are large, clear, and beautifully presented.

Given all of these facts, it is especially important to bring the collection's complete
cataloging and digitization up to the beginning of the twentieth century. The period
Phase III will cover (1890-1910) is one of the most significant in Anglo-American
children's literature publishing in terms of the literary quality of many of its classic texts
(works by authors such as Frances Hodgson Burnett, J. M. Barrie, Kenneth Grahame, E.
Nesbit, L. Frank Baum, and Kate Douglas Wiggins, among others) as well as the cultural


IN t SPr I I
A&M 227 Blocke. Building 4227 TAMU ColeIe Station. Texas 77843-4227 (979) 845-3452 FAX (979) 862-2292
Ov-Vi.MN















value of works by lesser-known authors. Those works will become more widely known
and appreciated through the successful completion of Phase HI of the NEH grant (if
awarded). This period represents not only the sentiment and didacticism of the
nineteenth-century view of childhood, but also the innovation in form and content
(including humor and parody) of many works of the turn of the century. During this time
period, both children's play and children's power become more evident and celebrated in
the literature written for a child audience. Works in natural history, biography, and travel
literature also bloomed at this time. Significantly, this period represents a golden age in
children's book color illustration. The digitization of many of the most notable examples
of color printing techniques will greatly support teaching illustration within children's
literature courses. I can imagine numerous creative and innovative courses in children's
literature that will be enhanced through the use of the Baldwin Library's website
offerings.

The multiple access points enabled by the full catalogue records will support research at
the undergraduate, graduate and professional levels. Providing the illustrator, printer,
and genre (sometimes it is difficult to tell the genre of a work from its title), among other
record locators will assist scholars working on history of the book projects, as well as
less-bibliographically-oriented research projects. Scholars can access lesser-known
works and thus enrich their research by considering a wide range of primary materials not
readily accessible in other forms. I find the full-catalogue entries to be very research-
friendly and a model for other special collections to follow

I hope that this project is fully-funded by the NEH. Historical children's literature is a
growing and vibrant sub-field within children's literature studies, yet it is one that is
heavily reliant upon access to rare books. By funding Phase iU of the digitization and
cataloguing grant, the NEH will enable scholars and students world-wide to increase their
knowledge and enhance their scholarship. I give this grant application my highest
recommendation.

Sincerely yours,



Lynne Vallone
Professor











2
















Fpect /hr .fx'ldinf a "/h 1)!


*-SUNY BROCKPORT

Department of English
350 New Campus Drive
Brockport, NY 14420-2968
(585) 395-2503

The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature
Department of Special Collections
George A. Smathers Libraries
P.O. Box 117007
University of Florida
Gaminesville. FL 32611

Attn: Rita J. Smith, Curator
I am an assistant professor in the English Department at SUNY Brockport writing in
support of the NEH initiative to digitize texts from the Baldwin Collection of children's
literature in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries (I 1890-1910).

The collection is unique in the digital world in that it has made available fascinating texts
which enable scholars, students, and the general public the opportunity to study social
codes, imperialism, gender performance, and systems of religious belief. It is the only
resource of its kind, and in terms of quality, accessibility, and coverage, it is becoming
the most respected site for historical children's literature online. olTering a resource
comparable to the Library of Congress' American Memory project or Cornell 'Michigan's
Making of America endeavor. Though more narrowly focused than these two endeavors,
the UF Baldwin Library Digital project nonetheless has a broad appeal to those interested
in studying, reading, or researching children's literature, cultural studies, women's
studies, postcolonial studies, and history.

Digitizing these texts democratizes access to this rich collection-- scholars will no longer
have to travel to Florida just to read these texts; high-qualitv reproductions online will
enhance our ability to think and know about the child-rearing practices of another era. As
well, digitizing these texts also allows students to have the experience of plumbing the
archive for wonders, an opportunity heretofore available only to scholars with the time,
means, and credentials to travel. I am planning to include several of the conduct books
already online in my Fall 2006 Young Adult Literature course as well as the geography
texts like Favell Lee Mortimer's Far Off in my Fall 2006 Children's Literature course.
From my familiarity with the collection (which became the focus of my dissertation
during my graduate work at the University of Florida). I know that there are additional
gems of value and rarity in the collection which Phase III would reveal to the wider
community of readers and scholars. Reference to these texts will facilitate students'
















understanding of the period and will offer an excellent means of contextualizing course
texts like Treasure Island or Captains Courageous or The Secret Garden.

In addition to encouraging scholarship and research, digital versions of these texts will
also assist in preservation of the fragile originals and will offer students the chance to
apply new tools to these old texts and to read them in new and different ways. For
instance, the rich metadata, the inclusion of L library of Congress subject headings
operating beneath the text will allow students to ut] I ize robust search tools to browse the
collection by keyword concepts and to make connections across diverse texts which
would not be possible through access to print analogues even if they were physically
available.

The collection has been important to me both personally and professionally and I would
love to see others benefit from it as well. I have published four articles on the Baldwin
texts in Victorian Review, Children's Literature, Victorian Literature and Culture, and
The Lion and the Unicorn. I have also spoken about the collection at national conferences
like the British Women Writers Conference, the Nineteenth-Century Studies Association,
and the Postcolonial Studies Conference. At these venues, I am consistently asked where
I located such fascinating primary sources, far off the well-trodden path of "classic"
literature; I always point interested colleagues back to the Baldwin. There is definitely a
ready and eager audience for this collection. Once these texts are digitally available, these
primary sources can be the subject of study by a wider range of historians and literary
critics. The fact that my publications and conferences have not exclusively been in
children's literature demonstrates the broad appeal of the collection to nineteenth-century
scholars of both British and American literature, culture, and history.

Please contact me by email imnorcij,, brvkpori edL') if I can offer any additional
support for the creation of this necessary and valuable resource.


Sincerel),



Megan A. Norcia, PhD
Assistant Professor, SLN Y Brockport















3011 411. 4 I4 2 i 33 JE 314.9143 ,FAX
U N IVERSITY OF ,,oV4 ~ 111i..r>.A ilnl.S.t

COLLEGE OF INFORMATION STUDIES



May 24, 2006

Rita J. Smith, Curator
The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611

Dear Ms. Smith:

I am pleased to write in support of your NEH grant proposal to complete the third phase of
cataloging and digitization of children's books from the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's
Literature at the University of Florida. This type of digital research collection is invaluable to
humanities scholars and children's literature specialists.

The Baldwin Library digitization project is pivotal to our work with the International Children's
Digital Library (ICDL) at the University of Maryland. As a result of our partnership with the
University of Florida. the ICDL Research Team has begun the creation of new special
collections of digitized historical children's books that may be cross-searched through the ICDL
interface. The University of Maryland is seeking funding to support additional partners to join
us in this project. Like the University of Florida, these partners will be able to make their
respective special collections available on their home institutions' web sites as well as though the
ICDL interface. We consider the University of Florida's grant application as complimentary to
our own in an effort to preserve and create access to historical children's books, thereby
providing for an expansion of knowledge in literature for children and in children's books as
icons of cultural history.

The quality of the images and cataloging records produced from the Baldwin Collection for the
initial phases of this project are superior, and we look forward to incorporating these materials
into the ICDL. We trust that the Baldwin Library will continue to receive funding to continue
this worthwhile endeavor to preserve and provide access to rare historical children's literature.

Sincerely,



Ann Carlson Weeks, Ph.D
College of Information Studies
University of Maryland College Park









History of Grants


This current grant application is the final phase of a three-part project to catalog and digitize
British and American children's books from the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's
Literature published from 1850 through 1910. To increase access and to preserve content, Phase
I, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (PA-23536-00, $381,220) catalogued
and microfilmed published between 1850 and 1869. To trace the evolution of color in
children's literature, books with color within that publishing range were also digitized. Phase I
started on October 1, 2000. A no-cost extension was granted by NEH in September, 2002 and
the work on Phase I was completed April 30, 2003.

Phase II, to catalog and digitize British and American children's books from the Baldwin Library
of Historical Children's Literature published from 1870-1889 was also supported by a grant from
the NEH (PA-50680-05, $295,507)). For Phase II, the microfilming component was dropped,
but cataloging and digitization of the books has continued. Phase II began on October 1, 2004
and will end September 30, 2006.


































































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