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 Project Profile
 Approval Form
 Letter
 Cost Share
 Application Cover Sheet
 Project Summary
 Table of Contents
 Narrative
 Budget
 Appendices






Preservation and access for American and British children's literature, 1850-1869
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF90000018/00001
 Material Information
Title: Preservation and access for American and British children's literature, 1850-1869
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Ingram, John
Publisher: University of Florida
Publication Date: 2000
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature
Genre:
Spatial Coverage:
 Notes
Abstract: NEH grant proposal for cataloging and digitization of volumes from the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF90000018:00001

Table of Contents
    Project Profile
        Page 1
    Approval Form
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Letter
        Page 4
    Cost Share
        Page 5
    Application Cover Sheet
        Page 6
    Project Summary
        Page 7
    Table of Contents
        Page 8
    Narrative
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
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        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Budget
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Appendices
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
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Full Text



Project Profile


Project Number: 5501484-16


PI: Ingram, J


Sponsor: Natl. Foundation of Arts & Humanities
CFDA#
Contract #

Title: Preservation Microfilming and Cataloging of American and British
Children's Literature, 1850-1869


Start Date: 09/01/2000


End Date: 04/30/2003


Award Amount: $381,220.00


Cost Share:





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
SPONSORED PROJECTS
APPROVAL FORM


University Project # ____
(LEAVE BLANK)

Title of Proposal: PRESERVATION AND ACCESS FOR AMERICAN AND BRITISH CHILDREN"S LITERATURE,
1850-1869

Submitted to Agency/Program: National Endowment for the Humanities, Preservation and Access
(NOTE TO THE P.I.: Please provide mailing instructions on page 2)
UNIVERSITY ENDORSEMENTS: The attached proposal has been examined by the officials whose signatures appear below. The principal academic review
of the proposal is the responsibility of the Department/Center and College. If additional space is needed for signatures, please provide them on a separate
sheet of paper.


Principal Investator: (Pr director)


NAME: John E. Intaa; Date
TITLE: Chair, Dept of Special Collections
CAMPUS ADDRESS: 210 Smathers Library
TELEPHONE: 352-392-9075
SOC. SEC. NO.


Co-Principal Investigator: (If Applicable)


NAME: Rita J. Smith Date
TITLE: Curator, Baldwin Library
TELEPHONE: 352-392-9075
SOC. SEC. NO.


Department Head:


_1 6&7


NAME: Date
TITLE:



Department Head: (If more than one)



NAME: Date
TITLE:


Approval by Dean or Director:

k'q< 4 4e i/1m


/ De '
Date


NAME:
TITLE:


Approval by Dean or Director: (If more than one)


NAME: Date
TITLE:





Other Endorsement (If Needed):


NAME: Date
TITLE:


Approval by Vice-President for Agricultural Affairs
(For all projects involving IFAS Personnel)


NAME: Date
TITLE:



Approval by Vice-President for Health Affairs:
(For all projects involving JHMHC Personnel)


NAME: Date
TITLE:

Official Authorized to Sign for the University:
(Leave Blank)


NAME: Date
TITLE:
Division of Sponsored Research
University of Florida


DSR-l (8/94)


SEND NOTICE OF AWARD TO:
The University of Florida
Office of Research & Graduate Education
PO Box 115500 / 219 Grinter Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611-5500
Phone: (352) 392-1582
Fax: (352) 392-9605


AGENCY APPLICATION DEADLINE
(DO NOT LEAVE BLANK)


Date:


O receipt


D postmark





TO BE COMPLETED BY PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR
(Do Not Complete Shaded Boxes)


PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR
SINGRAM
Last Name (Print or Type)
Special Collections I 1
Department or Unit to Administer Account
CO-PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR
SMITH ___


Last Name (Print or Type)
Special Collections
Department


LW


Initials


Social Security Number
Social Security Number


George A. Smathers Libraries
College


Initials Social Security Number
George A. Smathers Libraries


College


LIZ


izzz


Liz


Title ofProject: Preservation & access for American and British Children's
Literature, 1850-1869
INDIRECT COST (IDC):
FOR ALL APPLICABLE IDC ACCRUED, RETURN IDC TO: (CHECK ONE)
X (A) PI and Home Department, College
S_ (B) PI, CO-PI and their Home Departments, and Colleges (equal split).
EIES AND IFAS __ (C) PI, Center, Home Department, and College. -
FACULTY OMIT (D) PI and Center Only (No Department or College IDC return).
THIS SECTION. (E) OTHER (provide explanation)
NAME OF DEPARTMENTS) TO ACCRUE IDC, IF APPLICABLE __I J 1
NAME OF CENTER TO ACCRUE IDC, IF APPLICABLE
IF SPONSOR DOES NOT ALLOW IDC, PLEASE CHECK HERE: -
CERTIFICATIONS AND ASSURANCES COST SHARING CONTACT PERSON:
Exp Date Number YES C? NO _]
Human Subjects 0 1 El- PROVIDED BY: (name)
Animal Subjects E0 I I1 I I l PROVIDED BY:-
Clinial Trials l (number)
Ci If DSR has any
Recombinant DNA/RNA O questions about
questions about
Biohazards O (If none, please check here): E] this project.
TYPE: CATEGORY: MAILING INSTRUCTIONS:
New [ Research O Mail Original and 15 copies to: (Check One)
Renewal Training a ti Endowment for First Class
Continuation l Extension l Div. of Preservation & Accesi Federal Express
Supplemental l Other (Includes: [I 1100 Pennsylvania Ave,NW, Fedex Acc't. #
Revised l Fellowships, Conferences, Room 411 Samas Acc't. #
patient services, etc.) Washington, DC 20506 OE Other
SI 1 Send _3_ copies to P.I.
DSR USE ONLY

UPN I I I I PROPOSAL DATE:I AGENCY CODE I1I I

AGENCY

DIVISION
BUDGBEG I I : L-I I BUDGEND [I I IE PROJBEG I I : I IPROJEND I I JI
AMT REQUEST ED.I I I I I IJ PROJ AMT REQUEST: I I I I1 IIL3
INDIRECT COSTS-AMT S: E" I I I f RATE: I BASE: I
OFF CAMPUS : [i I Ill RATE: F". BASE: [ II

STAFF: .: I1st CLS:: -- FEDEX: _____ DIRECT: 205: UFRF: OTHER:
RECEIVED: U__ 'UFFL: YES NO NR: INTERNAL: COPIES NEEDED:
DSR- (8/94)


--- ----- ------I









*UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


George A. Smathers Libraries
Office of the Director of University Libraries


PO Box 117001
204 Library West
Gainesville, FL 32611
Tel: (352) 392-0342/Fax: (352)392-7251
Internet


22 June, 1999



Dr. Thomas E. Walsh
Vice President
Research and Graduate Education
219 Grinter Hall
Campus

Dear Tom,


Attached is our NEH proposal "Preservation and Access for American and British
Children's Literature." You will note that the proposal requires a cost share of $198,511.
Most of this will be allocated to salaries, fringes, supplies and services. However, $39,148
will remain to be raised through development efforts. I agree to the cost-share as outlined
on the attached sheet.

Very truly yours,

db&,
Dale B. Canelas
Director of University Libraries







Cc: John Ingram
File


Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action Institution









Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1850-1869

National Endowment for the Humanities Grant Proposal, October 2000 September 2002


Cost Share from George A. Smathers Libraries


Salaries

Fringe Benefits

Supplies/Materials

Services

Other Costs

Subtotal


First Year

$44,368

$13,445

$ 3,600

$12,500

$33,555

$107,468


Grand Total ($107,349 + $91,162)


Second Year

$46,647

$14,267

$ 3,600

$26,648

0

$91,162


$198,511


Both Years

$91,015

$27,712

$ 7,200

$39,148

$33,555

$198,630










fi Project director
a. Name and mailing address:
Ingram John E.

'isb Smathers Library, Dep'ilnent of Special Collecti6'PFi'

University of Florida


Gainesville FL 32611
(ciy) (state) (z:p code)


b. Form of address:Dr.


c. Telephone numbers:
Office: 352 392-9075
(area code)
FAX: 352 846-2746
(area code)


Home: 352 338-7558
(area code)
(area code)


Emailjeingr@mail.uflib.ufl.edu


d. Major field : C7

e. Citizenship U.S.
Other:


(country)


(m nthyear)


OMB No. 3136-013z
Expires: 7/31/OC


a Type of applicant
a. Iby an individual b.| through an organization
ifa, indicate institutional affiliation, if applicable, on line 11
if b, complete block 11 below and indicate here:
c. Type: d. Status:


I


SType of application
a. I new b. D supplement
if b, indicate previous grant number


Program to which application is being made
Division of Preservation and Access


0 Requested grant period
From: October 2000 To: September 2002


Projectfunding
a. Outright funds
b. Federal match
c. Total from NEH
d. Cost sharing
e. Total project costs


$ 430,757
$
S 430.757
$ 223,060
$ 653,817


Field of project D1 l Descriptive title of project
(code) Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1850-1869.
Description of project (do not exceed space provided)
The University of Florida seeks support from the National Endowment to preserve and make accessible some 8,600 volumes of
children's literature, published in the United States and Great Britain, between 1850 and 1869. This project is phase one of a three-
phase program that eventually will encompass 28,000 titles of children's literature published between 1850 and 1910. These books
form part of the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature, housed in the Department of Special Collections at the University of
Florida. Under this project, the titles will be microfilmed for preservation and cataloged into the national bibliographic databases.
Because about one-sixth of the titles contain color information (illustrations, book covers, etc) which cannot easily be preserved
through microfilm, the project will digitize them to provide intellectual access to the color data. The digitized titles will be available
through CD-ROM, DVD, or facsimile reprint, and/or through the Internet.


SWill this proposal be submitted to another government agency or private entity for funding? (If yes, indicate where and when)
no


go Institutional Data
a. Institution or organization:


(name)

(city) (state)
b. Employer identification number:
c. Name of authorizing official:

(last) (first) initiall)

title )


d. Name and mailing address of institutional grant administrator:

(last) (first) (initial)


(state)


Telephone: I Form of Address:
(area code)
FAX: / Email:
(areacode)


SCertification. By signing this application, the individual or the authorizing official of the applicant institution (block 11c) is providing the
applicable certifications regarding the nondiscrimination statutes and implementing regulations, federal debt status, debarment and
suspension, a drug-free workplace, and lobbying activities as set forth in the appendix to these guidelines.


pennedd name)


(signature)


(date)


NOTE Federa aw provides criminal penalties of up to $10,000 r prisonment of up to five years, or both for knowingly providing fase information to an agency of the U. S. Government. 18 U.S.C. Section 1001


HUMANITIES


DIVISION OF PRESERVATION AND ACCESS
APPLICATION COVER SHEET


(zIp code)








PROJECT SUMMARY


The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature is part of the Department of
Special Collections at the University of Florida. The collection includes more than 90,000 books
published for children in the United States and Great Britain from the 17th through the 20th
centuries. The collection is of international significance for researchers who study historical,
cultural, social and literary aspects of children's literature. Current access is provided through a
printed (1981) guide to the collection, a local card catalog, and by means of title access in the
local on-line catalog. A recent internal survey indicates that over half of the records created by
this grant would be added to the national database as original records. Although several major
collections of historical children's literature have received grants to support preservation and
improved access to their collections, the portion of the Baldwin collection that is the focus of this
project will not reflect a significant overlap with these other major holdings.

The University of Florida seeks support from the National Endowment for the
Humanities for a multiyear project to preserve and make accessible to researchers approximately
28,000 volumes. The entire project is divided into three two-year phases. Phase One aims to
complete preservation microfilm of approximately 8,600 volumes published in the United States
and Great Britain from 1850 through 1869. The project also includes a digital component for
materials with color illustrations in them. Color in children's literature increased in importance
during the targeted period, and this aspect of children's literature can substantively inform our
current perceptions about changes in American culture.

Intellectual access to the books will be improved through cataloging the material into the
national bibliographic databases and through the creation of metadata to access the project's
digital portion on the Internet. The Curator of the collection will select for mounting on the
Libraries' Special Collections homepage titles that display integral use of color to complete story
lines. The current proposal (Phase One) covers the years of great expansion in children's
publishing and the introduction of color and its increasing presence in children's books. Phase
Two of the multiyear project will cover volumes published between 1870 and 1889
(approximately 9,600 titles), and Phase Three volumes published between 1890 and 1910
(approximately 10,000 titles). Phases Two and Three will be addressed in subsequent proposals.








TABLE OF CONTENTS


Brief Summary

Narrative

Significance of the project 1
History of the Project 2
Significance of the Historical Period, 1850-1910 2
Color in Children's Literature 5
Condition of the Target Collection 6
Availability of Microfilmed Titles 7
Summary of Objectives 7
Methodology and Standards 8
Plan of Work 13
Staffing 20
Dissemination 24

Budget

Year One Budget B-1
Year Two Budget B-5
Two-Year Budget B-9

Appendices
Appendix # 1 Survey of existing cataloging records
Appendix # 2 Survey of levels of embrittlement
Appendix # 3 Guidelines for cataloging children's books
Appendix # 4 Sample records for enhanced copy and original records
Appendix # 5 University of Florida contract with Micrographics, Inc.
Appendix # 6 Samples of color and black and white images: paper/CD-ROM
Appendix # 7 Description of DataSet.TOC/File naming conventions
Appendix # 8 Rationale for digital camera
Appendix # 9 Binding survey form
Resumes of current staff
Position Descriptions for staff to be hired
Letters of Support








SIGNIFICANCE OF THE PROJECT


The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature is a collection of more
than 90,000 books published for children in the United States and Great Britain from the
17th through the 20th centuries. The collection is of international significance for
researchers who study historical, cultural, social and literary aspects of children's
literature published in English. The collection supports research in the following areas:
education and upbringing, family and gender roles, civic values, racial, religious, and
moral attitudes, literary style and format, and the arts of illustration and book design. A
great strength of the collection is the many English and American editions of the same
work. Materials in this collection do not circulate, nor are they available through
interlibrary loan.

A recent internal survey indicates that over half of the records created by this
grant would be added to the OCLC national database as original records (see Appendix
1). Current access is provided through a printed guide to the collection Index to the
Baldwin Library of Books in English Before 1900, Primarily for children, University of
Florida Libraries at Gainesville, (Boston, G. K. Hall, 1981), a card catalog, and through
title access in the local on-line catalog. Several major collections of historical children's
literature, such as those housed at the Lilly Library at Indiana University, the American
Antiquarian Society, the Pierpont Morgan Library and the Lena de Grummond Library
at the University of Southern Mississippi, have received grants to support preservation
and improved access to their collections. However, the portion of the Baldwin
collection that is the focus of this project will not reflect a significant overlap with these
other major holdings.

The University of Florida seeks support from the National Endowment for the
Humanities for a multiyear project to preserve and make accessible to researchers
approximately 28,000 volumes. The entire project is divided into three phases. Phase One
(a two-year project) aims to complete preservation microfilm of approximately 8,600
volumes published in the United States and Great Britain from 1850 through 1869. The
project also includes a digital component for materials with color illustrations in them.
As will be shown below, color in children's literature increased in importance during the
targeted period, and this aspect informs our current perceptions about changes in
American culture.

Intellectual access will be improved through cataloging the material into the
national bibliographic databases and through the creation of metadata to access the
project's digital portion on the Internet. The Curator of the collection will select titles for
mounting on the Libraries' Special Collections homepage that display integral use of
color to complete story lines. The current proposal (Phase One) covers the years of great
expansion in children's publishing and the introduction of color and its increasing
presence in children's books. Phase Two of the multiyear project will cover volumes
published between 1870 and 1889 (approximately 9,600 titles), and Phase Three volumes
published between 1890 and 1910 (approximately 10,000 titles). Phases Two and Three
will be addressed in subsequent proposals.









Expanded access to the collections will prove important to many established
scholars. Professor Jack Zipes (University of Minnesota) used the Baldwin Library for
his fairy tale studies, two of which were published as Fairy Tales and the Art of
Subversion: The Classical Genre for Children and the Process of Civilization (Wildman
Press, 1983), and Victorian Fairy Tales: the Revolt of the Faeries and Elves (Methuen,
1987). Dr. Geoffrey J. Giles, (University of Florida History Department) published
"Temperance before the temperance movements: some examples from eighteenth-century
children's literature in England and Germany." (History ofEducation. V. 20, no. 4,
1991). The collection was the basis for much of the research done by Gillian Avery for
her Behold the Child, American Children and their Books 1621-1922 published in 1994
by Johns Hopkins University Press. More recently, Dr. Lucy Rollin used the Baldwin
collection in researching her forthcoming book, Twentieth Century Teen Culture by the
Decades 1900-1999 (Greenwood Press, October 1999).

Each year the American Library Association's Association for Library Service to
Children (ALSC) awards from one to three fellowships to its members for a month of
study and research at the Baldwin Library. The Fellows have studied 19t-century series
books, pop-up books, folk tales, family stories from the 1930s and 1940s, and 20'-
century editions of Cinderella. Recent dissertations which contain information gleaned
from the Baldwin Library include "Authority-fashioning in L. Frank Baum's The
Wonderful Wizard of Oz" by Robert Kosten (1992); "Racial Education: Chesnutt, Twain,
and Post-bellum Children's Literature" by Kevin G. Kendall (1994); and "Music in Our
Young Folks, 1865-1873" by M. Elaine Yontz (1998). It is anticipated that increased
numbers of researchers nationally and internationally will become aware of and use
the vast resources at the Baldwin Library as a result of wider dissemination in the
national databases and through availability in microform and-digitized formats. The
University of Florida understands the importance of children's literature and the growing
demand for courses in this subject: the English Department has added in the past year two
new tenure-track faculty lines to teach undergraduate and graduate courses.

HISTORY OF THE PROJECT

SIGNIFICANCE OF THE HISTORICAL PERIOD (1850 1910)

The last half of the 19th century, from publication of Lewis Carroll's Alice in
Wonderland to Kenneth Grahame's Wind in the Willows and J.M. Barrie's Peter Pan, is
always termed the Golden Age of American and British children's literature. At mid-
19th century in both the United States and Great Britain, literature written for children
was beginning to move beyond the memoir, moral tale, and instructional books such as
Peter Parley's geographies. Authors and their publishers began to experiment with a
broad range of new genres, including fairy tales, fantasy, adventure stories, family
stories, and picture books. Peter Hunt, perhaps England's most distinguished scholar
and critic in the field, recently characterized this period in Children's Literature, an
Illustrated History (Oxford University Press, 1995) as follows:








The year 1850 can be seen as a watershed in the history of the book
trade as a whole, and of children's books in particular. During the second
half of the nineteenth century publishers competed to produce cheaper
reading for an expanding market. The development of publishing for
children reflected economic and demographic growth, as well as a society
more sensitive and responsive to children's needs.... From religious and
didactic beginnings, writers were responding to a redefined childhood, one
that required a distinctive literature... Many authors whose works are still
in print and who had a large influence flourished. In a sense, children's
literature was growing-up--away from adults.

Dr. Patricia Craddock, Professor of English at the University of Florida, notes that
"because of the intrinsic importance of these books, and because they had ceased to be
governed by rigidly didactic conventions that prevented writers from presenting children
and their lives realistically, the study of the children's literature of the period has major
contributions to make not only to the history and theory of books for children and of
child life in general, but also to the cultural history of England and America."

Beginning with a gift of 40 children's chapbooks in the fall of 1953, Dr. Ruth
Baldwin collected the books in the Baldwin Library over a period of 35 years. Justin
Schiller, a New York City dealer in early children's books and related juvenilia, reviewed
the published catalogue for the Baldwin Library in the November 16, 1981, issue of AB
Bookman's Weekly. In his review Schiller remarked on the extraordinary energy Dr.
Baldwin demonstrated in building in less than thirty years the 40,000 volume pre-1900
collection, including a gathering ofpre-1820 American imprints second only to the
holdings of the American Antiquarian Society.

She was an omnivorous buyer and more than one colleague
has told me the story (from first hand experience) that she would say,
"How much do you want for that wall of books?" One couldn't
afford to attempt such a feat today, but in the days when children's
books were neglected and about half of them were always priced at
under one pound sterling, such an offer seemed possible (if at all
imaginable).
It was in this way that Dr. Baldwin acquired much of her
great collection, and I call it great not just for sheer bulk: her 1756
Collection of Pretty Poems for the Amusement of Children Three
Foot High by Tommy Tagg, published anonymously by John
Newbery, who labeled it "Fifty-Fourth Edition" as a selling ploy to
make his new book already seem a best-seller, is actually the first
edition of which only two copies are known.

Since the catalogue to the Baldwin Library's holdings was published in 1981,
approximately 13,000 volumes printed in English in America or Great Britain before
1900 have been added to the collection, including the heretofore unlocated volumes two,
three, and four of The Poetic Garland, or Library of Knowledge and Mirth [ca. 1807].








The twentieth-century collection, which Dr. Baldwin began in 1977, now holds more
S; than 38,000 volumes.

Gillian Avery, a British scholar and author of children's books, as well as a fellow
of the American Antiquarian Society, published an article about the Baldwin Library in
the Times Literary Supplement, September 17, 1982, under the title "Building a
Library." Avery emphasized particularly the thoroughness of the Baldwin Library,
where she had spent several weeks on separate occasions doing research:

[Dr. Baldwin used] to visit England for two or three weeks
each summer until 1974-5. Prices were going up, many of the
dealers had gone, and she had reached a stage where she could do
most of her buying from catalogues. There was never any time to
check the gaps; nevertheless the holdings for the nineteenth century
are remarkably complete. There are no limited editions or
manuscripts, nor what might be termed the iricunabula of children's
books: the emphasis has always been on books that children have
read or handled. The library is strong on variants of a single title:
there are, for instance, sixty-seven pre-1900 editions of The Swiss
Family Robinson (including a version done into words of one
syllable), on runs of annuals (all bought singly) and "toy" books.
To the English visitor the great novelty may be in
comparing the nineteenth-century English and American books and
encountering a whole range of authors unknown in this country, and
indeed to date very little studied in the United States. There are
genres which are not found on this side of the Atlantic, like the
travelogue books where young Americans embarked on energetic
globe-trotting in series such as Horace Scudder's Bodley books,
Charles Asbury Stephens Knockabout Club, Hezekiah Butterworth's
Zigzag Journeys, and Edward Hales's Family Flight.

The collection constitutes the best available evidence concerning how English and
American cultures inculcated values in children and expressed their own concept of what
childhood should be.

Tony Watkins, in an essay entitled "History, Culture and Children's Literature"
notes "The rise of newer forms of literary historicism is connected, in part, with social
change and the effort to recover histories for...minority groups within society. In turn,
these social aims are linked with the recuperation of forgotten texts, including texts that
have never been considered worthy of academic study." (International Companion
Encyclopedia of Children's Literature, 1996, p. 4)

The books of the Baldwin Library are uniquely qualified to reveal this literary and
cultural history. Gillian Avery noted that Ruth Baldwin concentrated on buying books
which children had actually read (although to be sure the collection does include more
than a few volumes which bear little evidence that they may actually have been read).








This collecting philosophy resulted in one of the most important attributes of the Baldwin
Library: not only does it hold multiple editions of the agreed upon classics of children's
literature, it also supports these classics with thousands of less significant or less known
works. There are many titles not collected by other libraries because they were not
considered "important." These fugitive titles, read and loved by many children, are now
extremely scarce, but are important to scholars interested in American and British
cultural history and literature. The authors of these unknown books comprise the chorus
of other voices that surround and provide a larger cultural background for classic titles
and well-known authors. For example, Henry Cadwallader Adams is a relatively well-
known writer of nineteenth-century school stories, which became an important genre
after the popularity of Tom Brown's School Days, first published in 1857. The Baldwin
Library has many of Adam's titles, but also holds Edith Awsby's Three School Friends,
Paul Blake's Expelled, A Story ofEastcote School, and Willis B. Allen's Northern Cross,
among many other unknown examples of the genre. All these titles were published in the
last half of the nineteenth century. The Baldwin Library contains extensive holdings of
the novels of Louisa M. Alcott, Charlotte Maria Tucker, and Horatio Alger, as well as the
novels of Emilia Marryat Norris, Robina F. Hardy, and Stella Austin. Whereas these last
three authors also published children's books in the last half of the 19th century, theirs
have now become the invisible voices.

There are also non-fiction examples: Edward S. Ellis, Samuel Goodrich, and
Edward E. Hale all wrote important and well-known histories of the United States for
children in the nineteenth century. The Baldwin Library holds all these titles, but also
has Salma Hale's History of the United States, Robert Adams's History of the United
States in Rhyme, and T. F. Donnelly's Primary History of the United States, as well as 26
other titles on this subject. These less known or unknown fiction and non-fiction titles are
equally important to our understanding of this extremely formative, transformational time
in the history of children's literature. One vital function of this grant would be to make
available to researchers in a very immediate and accessible way the wide range of both
classic and fugitive titles held in the Baldwin Library that date to this significant period.

COLOR IN CHILDREN'S LITERATURE, 1850 1910

One of the ways to gauge the place of color in children's literature is to consider
not only its denotative value but also, and perhaps more importantly, its connotative
influence on readers. In author John Cech's letter of support for this project, he notes that
"aesthetically, color illustration offered the artist a new, wider vocabulary for
representation, thus contributing dramatically to an expansion of the emotional meaning
and other visual information ... in a given work". In Myth, Magic, and Mystery (a catalog
to accompany an exhibition of American children's book illustration), Michael Patrick
Hearn quoted James Johnson Sweeney, former director of the Museum of Modem Art as
follows:

... children's book illustration should never be seen as merely a vessel for the
conveyance of information. Its real role is that played by a Gothic stained glass
window in the Middle Ages, or a mosaic in the apse of a Romanesque church.









. Although not specifically stating the nature of the illustrations (i.e., color and/or black
and white) it is very clear from the two examples that he gives, that he has color in mind:
Gothic stained glass and Romanesque mosaics were rather seldom done in anything other
than color. In the same vein, Lucy Rollin wrote in her letter of support for an earlier
grant proposal to the NEH, that

Our culture creates, uses, and responds to literature, even what might be
considered ephemeral, for it is in the ephemera, really, that a culture truly reveals
itself; such artifacts are its unguarded moments.

Through the end of the 18th century only a very small portion of book
illustrations were colored, and then only by hand. Such extra effort was expensive, and
therefore available only to the privileged few who could afford to present their children
with more realistic representations of the world about them. With the full-blown
implementation and acceptance of mechanical color printing during the 19th century,
such "natural" representations of the real world and indeed of the fantastic world of the
imagination moved from the privileged few to the mass market. Peter Hunt again
provides the locus for explanation:

For most of the early nineteenth century, colour book illustrations had meant
colouring by hand, but the development of mechanical colour printing, especially
by Edmund Evans, brought an immense improvement in coloured picture-books
for children in the last quarter of the century.

To understand just how "immense" such an improvement in producing children's books
with color illustrations was in the last quarter of the 19th century is only possible by
examining those decades in which the process actually advanced, i.e., most of the period
from 1850 to 1869.

In support of the need for preservation of color information in addition to that
conveyed through black and white surrogates, Michael Patrick Heam indirectly provided
an additional rational for such work. He noted that "the purpose of an illustration is to be
reproduced, not displayed, and artists have employed certain short cuts that have not
always added to the life of the art. They often scrimped on material. Papers discolor or
disintegrate, colors fade, glues dry out." It is likely that very few examples of the original
art work for the color illustration of children's books during the second half of the
nineteenth century survive beyond their published versions. As shown through the
preliminary conservation surveys noted later in this proposal, that published material is
now seriously in danger of self-destruction. This project proposes to preserve it.

CONDITION OF THE TARGET COLLECTION

More than 83 percent of materials in the target collection are extremely
embrittled. Random survey data compiled in 1996 (see Appendix 2) characterizes
embrittlement by double fold test measure, publication period and place of publication.








Findings confirm the results of two earlier random surveys conducted in 1987 and again
in 1992. Each of the surveys was selected in such a way as to ensure 95% 5% accuracy.
Slightly less than one quarter of the target collection is so brittle that pages break with
use. Only five percent of the target collection is not embrittled by the threshold (i.e., 5
double folds) at or below which damaged volumes will not be repaired by University of
Florida conservators. Though degree of embrittlement varies, rates of embrittlement
remain relatively consistent from one target period to the next and from one place of
publication to the next. It could be said that volumes published for children, such as
those comprising the Baldwin Library, were never intended to survive their immediate
purpose. Whereas 83 percent of the children's books are embrittled, only 20 percent of
general collections for the same time period from the University of Florida's holdings are
embrittled.

The pH of book papers, as would be expected, was universally low among
volumes in the target collection. For 98 percent of the collection, pH does not rise above
4.5 (in contrast to the more permanent pH of 7.2). Wear (e.g., abrasion, dog-earing, etc.)
was reported at a rate of 25.3%. Structural deterioration (e.g., broken bindings, joint or
hinge failure, etc.) was determined to be 12%. These percentages are comparable to
similar deterioration among general collections. Incidence of missing pages, however,
was only 2.1%. Thousands of books from the target collection are at risk because of the
fragility of the paper and the poor, but economically pragmatic nature of their binding
structure and makeup.

AVAILABILITY OF MICROFILMED TITLES IN TARGET COLLECTION

Once the condition of the target collection was established, a sample survey was
carried out to establish availability of microfilmed copies of the materials in other
libraries nationwide. The results of this survey demonstrate that the target collection for
this project overlaps minimally with the cataloged microfilmed collections of other
institutions in the survey. The work proposed herein would therefore largely complement
materials cataloged by other institutions.

A sample survey (see Appendix 1), carried out during the preparation of this
proposal, showed a hit rate of 2.1%. Several institutions have microfilmed titles in the
target collection for preservation, most often Brown University and the University of
Rochester but also the Cleveland Public Library, Harvard University, the University of
California at Los Angeles, and the University of Pittsburgh. No single institution
appears, however, to have concentrated effort in this area. The University of Florida has
microfilmed 250 19th-century editions of Robinson Crusoe. These titles are excluded
from the current proposal.

SUMMARY OF OBJECTIVES FOR THE PROJECT

The University of Florida proposes the following activities for phase one of the grant
project (books printed between 1850 and 1869)








* to catalog approximately 8,600 titles, through either original or enhanced copy
* to create preservation microfilm of the targeted volumes
* to create digitized surrogates from the preservation microfilm of titles in black and
white that also contain some color and to replace the black and white microfilm
images with scanned images of the original color material
* to build a structural metadata file for the digitized volumes through which to make
them Internet accessible or through CD-ROM.


METHODOLOGY AND STANDARDS

All work carried out during this project will be organized, presented and
disseminated in a manner that reflects national standards and accepted professional
practices. The standards are cited in the respective sections below.

CATALOGING STANDARDS

Cataloging will conform to the requirements of full-level Anglo-American
Cataloging Rules Two Revised (AACR2R) and to the guidelines already established at
the University of Florida libraries for the enhanced access cataloging of the Baldwin
materials (see Appendix 3). All cataloging will include Library of Congress Subject
Headings, subject access through genre terms (USMARC 655 field), and access by
publisher, printer and illustrator, (700 or 710 field). USMARC 510 field will be used to
cite pertinent bibliographies. Of the 42 percent of titles for which some level of
cataloging already exists, less than five percent include genre access, and the majority of
records do not include other than "k" level data. Cataloging records for the microfilm
copies will include USMARC 007 and 533 fields, and those records for which digital
surrogates will be created will have an active USMARC 856 field. All access points for
names and subjects will be verified for consistency in form and heading use in the local
and national databases, i.e., NACO (Name Authority Cooperative Program) standards.
The inclusion of genre terms is appropriate in this context because researchers in the
category of children's literature will as often seek access to material not only through
traditional author, title, and subject approaches, but just as likely through a term
descriptive of the category in which it falls, e.g., alphabet books, courtesy books, fables,
and chapbooks.

All cataloging will be done with the original item in hand and subsequently
derived for the microfilm and digital versions. [Note: The catalog of the Baldwin
Library is currently not automated. Catalogers will therefore consult the Baldwin card
catalog and the Index to the Baldwin Library of Books in English Before 1900, Primarily
for Children.(G. K. Hall, 1981) for comparative data on editions.] See Appendix 4 for
samples of enhanced copy and original catalog records and for a list of the genre terms to
be applied in USMARC 655 field.








CONSERVATION AS A COMPONENT OF REPRODUCTION


The Conservation Unit Head, John Freund, will work with Reprographics Unit
staff, the Digital Library Center, and the filming agent to monitor and mitigate the effects
of handling during reproduction. Protective enclosures will be purchased to house
volumes with structural damage, which as a result of their embrittlement, cannot be
repaired. The Senior Conservation Technician, Kenneth McAnlis, will review volumes
and complete repairs.

SELECTION FOR PRESERVATION MICROFILMING

Preservation microfilming will proceed according to three classes of source
document.

a) Titles published between 1850 and 1869 entirely in black and white will be
microfilmed in their entirety. The estimated number is 7200 volumes.
b) Titles with less than 50 percent color overall will also be microfilmed in their
entirety. Color material will be scanned into digital format (high resolution
TIFF files). Later, the microfilm will be digitized and the digitized color
material will be "inserted" to replace the respective black and white
components. In this way, the integrity of the entire volume will be maintained
in the digital version. The estimated number is 800 volumes.
c) The remaining titles, i.e., those containing color illustrations, and covers, book
jackets, or other matter with color that accounts for more than 50 percent of
the volume, form a third component. Whereas titles in a) and b) above are
estimated at 150 pages each, this smaller group is set at an average of 50
pages. They will also be microfilmed in their entirety, and the material
containing color will be digitized as in b). Later, the microfilm will be
digitized and the digitized color material will be "inserted" to replace the
respective black and white components. In this way, the integrity of the entire
volume will be maintained in the digital version. The estimated number is 600
volumes.

No additional curatorial review should be necessary, because these items have
already been selected for their enduring research value. All titles in this first phase of the
three-phase project, i.e., juvenilia published in the English language between 1850 and
1869, will be selected for microfilming or digitization and COM. In addition to the vast
majority of the titles (83 percent) that are either brittle or unavailable in acceptable
microform format (i.e., on polyester base with reduction meeting current standards), the
remaining 17 percent of the collection is included in this preservation and access project
to facilitate research access to the entire corpus.

MICROFILMING FOR PRESERVATION

Micrographics, Inc. (Gainesville, Florida) will serve as filming agent for this
project and will microfilm the collections on-site. Micrographics, Inc. holds the








University of Florida's campus contract for microfilming for preservation. Award was
granted in accord with the rules and regulations of the State of Florida, which required
competitive bid and compliance with stated standards as demonstrated by its ability to
produce the requested product (see Appendix 5). Its award and pricing will remain firm,
allowing for an increase of $.03 per exposure at the start of the second year.

Micrographics, Inc. will provide technical targets, reel ties, microfilm boxes,
imaging, processing and duplicating in three generations of microfilm as required for
both raw materials and their use by Research Libraries Group's Preservation
Microfilming Handbook, edited by Nancy Elkington (Mountain View, CA: RLG, 1992).
All first and second-generation microfilms will receive IPI SilverLock polysulfide
treatment. The vendor shall be responsible for an initial quality control inspection, visual
and chemical, and report as required by the Research Libraries Group Handbook.
Microfilm failing the vendor's inspection shall be refilmed or reduplicated as necessary.
In total, and including targets (11 per title), approximately 709,000 exposures will be
made on 788 reels. This figure represents approximately 1,230,000 pages..

Micrographics, Inc. has completed other projects for preservation microfilming
for the University of Florida, including work for the Research Libraries Group's Great
Collections Microfilming Project, Phase II and Phase IV, and the Research Libraries
Group's Archives Preservation Microfilming Project. Micrographics, Inc. is a trade-
member of the Association for Information and Image Management (AIIM). Its
President, Mr. James Craig, has been a personal member of AIIM and served on several
of the Association's standards committees.

INSPECTION, QUALITY CONTROL AND STORAGE

Preservation Department staff working under the supervision of the
Reprographics Unit's chief micrographics technician, James Clifton, will inspect
microfilm supplied by the microfilming agent. Initially, 100% of all microfilm created
for this project will be inspected, dropping to 10% as confidence is built (i.e. usually after
10% completion of a given project). Inspection routines, including visual inspection and
density readings, will comply with Research Libraries Group Handbook. Microfilm that
fails the University of Florida's inspection shall be refilmed or reduplicated as necessary.

Microfilm, which passes inspection and is accepted by the University of Florida,
will be processed for storage as required by Research Libraries Group Handbook and
stored in accord with the strictest implementation of RLG standards, which are available
at: http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/preserve/repro/micrographics/storagel.html. The University of
Florida commits to the continued storage, periodic inspection, and maintenance of first
and second-generation masters, as well as, the sale of third-generation distribution
microfilm. First-generation camera-masters are stored under contract with National
Underground Storage (Boyers, PA). Second-generation printing-masters are stored under
contract with Preservation Resources (Bethlehem, PA). Distribution microfilm is sold in
compliance with current U.S. copyright legislation at cost.








DIGITIZATION COMPONENT


Whereas microfilm remains the only currently accepted medium for preservation
reprography, microfilmed images continue to be an incomplete means of integrated
intellectual access to the total information value of books with color in them. Such
information would be available through a complete reprographic surrogate that included
the color information of the source document. Because a sizable percentage of the
collection (approximately one-sixth of the volumes) targeted for Phase One of this
multiyear project contains color in some format: illustration, frontispiece, title page
information, book coverss, the project organizers considered four options for color
management.

1. Monochrome microphotography (accept color loss).
2. Monochrome microphotography employing the three-color process: exposure
with standard white lighting, followed by reshoots with yellow filters, and
finally blue filters. The multiple exposures would adversely affect project cost
and color restoration when necessary would be prohibitively expensive.
3. Color microphotography, however the challenges of color film preservation
are daunting and few storage facilities are equipped to deal with them.
4. Monochrome microphotography of items containing color, with subsequent
digitization of the microfilm, and the digitization of the color material to
replace the black and white images from the microfilm.

Only options 1 and 4 are viable. However, the first provides no functional
response to the needs addressed above to capture the special information contained in
color in children's books. Because options 2 and 3 realistically do not qualify as sound or
fiscally justifiable approaches to creating preservation surrogates, this project proposes to
use option 4 to provide digital surrogates for items containing color. To mitigate the
extensive storage requirements that would result from scanning complete volumes with
limited amounts of color, all volumes will initially have preservation microfilm (black
and white) produced. Subsequently, the microfilm of books that do contain color
information will be scanned into digital surrogates. The color information, scanned from
the source document (through flatbed scanner or digital camera) will replace the black
and white information on the digitized books. (See Appendix 6 for paper and CD-ROM
examples of color versus black and white reproductions of illustrations).

Each digitized volume will be searchable on the Internet through metadata access
points based on their MARC records to include author, title, date, printer/publisher,
genre, and subject terms. The Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA) provides
automation services that assist the university libraries of the State University System
(SUS) of Florida in meeting their teaching and research objectives for students and
faculty. FCLA will establish a project code "JUV" through which to create the interface
to the scanned materials. Genre terms will be derived from the American Library
Association/Rare Books and Manuscripts guidelines for genre access to original
materials. These access points will take the form of citation records maintained in a
partition of the FCLA bibliographic database dedicated to the Baldwin Library. Based on








data from similar projects, each item will require one hour to create this access from the
existing MARC record, or approximately .75 FTE over the two-year project.

QUALITY CONTROL

Digital images undergo an analogous inspection for quality control as rigorous as
that for preservation microfilm. The major difference consists in 100% image inspection
as well as inspection of the metadata (DataSet.TOC) files to ensure accuracy. (See below
for a description of the latter.) Images are inspected for skew, resolution (DPI),
compression, image-orientation, and bit-depth in particular. ThumbsPlus
(www.cerious.com) image processing software will be used to facilitate efficient
management of the inspection process. PaintShop Pro image processing software
(www.iasc.com/psp5.html) will be used to verify gray and color values per specification.

Color will be a minimum of 24 bits per pixel (specifications below indicate
that both the UMAX scanners and the Kodak DCS 560 digital camera provide for
higher), and in practice bit-depth will be set to the maximum capture capacity of the
equipment. Equipment will be calibrated for color and gray capture at least once daily.
Current practice entails calibration as many as four times daily, depending upon the level
of use at any given capture workstation. Color verification measures white, black and red
elements, which may deviate from the average of the standard RGB numeric values by no
more than five points.

All digital images for this project will be captured as uncompressed TIFF files,
which are stored immediately upon creation on the Digital Library Center's image server.
Digital Library Center (DLC) staff will review the scanned images at workstations
dedicated to and calibrated for such inspections. Errors noted during inspection will be
returned immediately to the scanning workstation for correction and subsequent review.
Images that pass inspection will be immediately updated in the DLC tracking system and
then sent to an "archiving" workstation for migration to gold-based CD-ROMs. The CD-
ROMs will be stored in the security Tape Library maintained by the UF Libraries'
Systems Department at 65 degrees F and 35% relative humidity.

STRUCTURAL METADATA

Administrative metadata will be recorded as much as possible in the USMARC
catalog records for the microfilm and digital items. For digital objects, the project will
implement the requirements and recommendation of the RLG PRESERV MetaData Task
Force, especially for the use of the 007 field (http://www.rlg.org/preserv/presmeta.html,
Appendix 2). This information and additional information used for purposes of
administering (i.e., inspecting, refreshing, migrating, etc.) the digital objects will become
part of and be augmented in the Digital Library Center's tracking system.








DATASET.TOC


The project's DataSet.TOC will contain the structural metadata information that
will tell the Digital Library how to construct the electronic resource for presentation on
the World Wide Web, i.e., FCLA will use the DataSet.TOC to recreate the physical
object in electronic form. A description of the DataSet.TOC and its purpose may be
found at both: http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/dlc/metadata/datasettoc.html and Appendix 7.
Information on file naming conventions and other details may be found at both:
http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/dlc/metadata/struct.html and Appendix 7.

The Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA) will receive the digital
images of the books together with the DataSet.TOC files via FTP. FLCA will then
process the DataSet.TOC files to create a structure for the images. The uncompressed
TIFF images will first be copied onto optical media, and this copy on CD-ROM will
serve as an archive (see above). The TIFF files are then automatically converted to JPEG
images, scaled to 800 pixel width, at 15% compression. These JPEG files are then
encapsulated in HTML, including a navigation template that allows users to move
through the digital resource as they would a printed volume, moving from part to part,
directionally from page to page, and randomly from page to page by means of a "goto"
routine. (Cf. the examples in Appendix 6). Additionally, these JPEG images are
automatically processed to create PDF files for yet another type of Internet access.
FCLA performs check-sum and write verifications and other automated quality controls
on these processes.

PLAN OF WORK


SELECTION OF TARGET COLLECTION

All titles in the first phase of the target collection (i.e. juvenilia published in the
English language between 1850 and 1869) will be selected by Rita Smith, Curator of the
Baldwin Library. Student assistants trained and supervised by the Curator will pull the
books from the shelves for delivery to cataloging. Items will be identified a) through a
card catalog that provides chronological access to the collection and b) through an
inventory database that includes title and date of publication. Because the card catalog
does not contain the shelf locations of the items, the electronic inventory must be used to
ascertain the locations. Again, the card catalog contains items with hypothetical dates of
publication, which will be used to identify volumes in the electronic inventory without
imprint dates.

CATALOGING THE SOURCE DOCUMENT

The selected titles will be searched initially in LUIS, the State University
System's (SUS) on-line catalog. Titles already in LUIS will have Baldwin Library
holdings added. Titles not found in LUIS will be searched on OCLC. If copy is found,
UF holdings will be added and the record exported into LUIS. Rita Smith will supervise








this portion of the project, training a Library Technical Assistant (.5 FTE to be assigned)
to verify that the work in hand matches the OCLC record. After the record has been
exported into LUIS, an Archivist-level technical support person (1.0 FTE, to be hired)
will assure quality control by verifying authority work. S/he will also add research
access points for publisher, printer and illustrator (USMARC 700, 710), subject genre
terms (USMARC 655) and an active link to the digitized titles (USMARC 856). This
work will be carried out under the supervision of Rita Smith. For titles lacking copy in
OCLC/RLIN, a full AACR2 record will be created and added to the national database by
the Project Cataloger. The Project Cataloger (1.0 FTE, to be hired) will also be
responsible for contributing name authority records to NACO where necessary and
deemed feasible. The Project Cataloger will be assisted in the original cataloging by the
Archivist, who will formulate the physical description of the volume and authority
verification, and insure that USMARC field 856 is active for the digitized materials. All
cataloging will conform to AACR2 rules and OCLC Bibliographic Format Standards.
For digital surrogates, structural metadata (DataSet.TOC) files will be written to augment
the bibliographic metadata.

Based on the results from a 13-week study of cataloging random titles in the
Baldwin, the complete cataloging sequence for an original record from searching for
copy through full AACR2 enhanced catalog record requires 30 minutes per title. To
create an enhanced copy catalog record requires 15 minutes per title. The percentage of
titles in this segment of the three-phase project that require original cataloging is about 50
percent, or approximately 4300 items. At the rate of two items per hour, it will take 2155
hours to complete the original cataloging. At the rate of 4 titles per hour for enhanced
copy cataloging, the time required is approximately 1080 hours. To be added into the
measure is the time required for NACO which will complete the projected FTE
requirements for the cataloging staff.

CATALOGING THE MICROFILM

Once the record for the source document has been created, a Library Technical
Assistant (to be assigned), under the supervision of the Head, Humanities and Special
Collections Cataloging Unit, will create bibliographic records for the microfilm versions.
These records will derive from the bibliographic records for the source documents, i.e.,
the bibliographic description and access information for the source document will be
merged into a template of constant data information for USMARC fields 007, 533, and
856. These staff members will also update local holdings records in the UF online
database. The estimated time to create these records is 10 minutes per item, or
approximately 1200 hours for the original microfilm records.

PRE-MICROFILMING/DIGITIZATION

Preservation Department staff working under the supervision of Nelda Schwartz,
the Reprographics Unit Head, will carry out physical preparation tasks such as collation.
The microfilm vendor will supply technical targets, and the Reprographics Unit staff will
create the remaining targets according to Research Libraries Group guidelines as








published in its Preservation Microfilming Handbook, edited by Nancy Elkington
, (Mountain View, CA: RLG, 1992). Information used to track volumes, generate targets
and packing lists, prepare quality control sheets, and provide technical information used
in USMARC fields 007, 533, 583, etc. will be recorded in the Department's FILMLOG
system.

SELECTION FOR MICROFILMING

The titles selected for black and white microfilming or digitization will be
searched in OCLC and RLIN, as well as the catalogs of commercial micropublishers
which have worked in juvenilia, e.g., Chadwyck-Healey's The Nineteenth Century:
Children's Literature Collection, and publications containing juvenilia, e.g., Research
Publication's Wright American Fiction. Preservation Department staff working under
the supervision of the Reprographics Unit Head, Nelda Schwartz, will carry out this
work. Because so little microfilming is on-going in this subject area elsewhere, the
University of Florida will queue only those titles in specific overlapping subject areas,
such as religious tracts for children, where overlapping preservation effort is likely.

Following microfilming, Preservation Department staff, working under the
supervision of senior microfilm technician, James Clifton, will conduct final visual and
density inspections, note chemical test results, authorize refilming as necessary, and
record data. They will generate microform technical information reports for catalogers
and prepare microform masters for storage.

DIGITIZATION

Using UMAX flat bed scanners Astra 1200S (specifications for which are at http:
//www.umax.com/graphsite/umaxen/scanners/consumer.cfm?scanners=Astra+1200S)
and Powerlook III (specifications for which are at (http://www.umax.com/professional/
standard/features.cfm?model=PowerLook+III), staff at the University of Florida's Digital
Library Center will scan the items selected for digitization into uncompressed high
resolution TIFF files, which will be archived initially on CD-ROMs. The TIFF files are
produced to specifications outlined by Anne R. Kenney and Stephen Chapman, Digital
Imaging for Libraries and Archives, (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Library, 1996). UF
plans to adopt the subsequent standards or guidelines to be issued by Anne R. Kenney
and Oya Reiger (Corell University) for the Research Libraries Group planned for release
in 2000. UF also plans to monitor and modify applications as standardized (or suggested)
and tested by the Digital Library Federation, the Association for Information and Image
Management, the IEEE, or the American National Standards Institute. Structural
metadata will then be imposed on the digitized images which subsequently will be
migrated to FCLA's (Florida Center for Library Automation) main frame computer space
maintained and routinely backed up by the Northeast Regional Data Center (NERDC).
FCLA, which also maintains the statewide university online catalog (LUIS), will host the
digitized versions of these items.








As noted above, tightly bound, and only tightly bound, volumes cannot or
should not be scanned on flat bed scanners but rather by a digital camera. See
http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/products/cameras/dcs560/dcs560Index.sht
ml for a description of the KODAK PROFESSIONAL DCS 560 digital camera and its
specifications. Appendix 8 discusses the rationale for employing such an approach to
digitizing tightly bound materials.

STRUCTURAL SURVEY OF COLLECTION

Concurrent with preparation for microfilming or digitization, Preservation
Department staff working under the supervision of the Conservation Unit Head, John
Freund, will conduct a structural survey of the materials targeted for Phase One (see
Appendix 9). Whereas the primary purposes of the survey will be to prepare materials for
microfilming or digitization, and to monitor and mitigate the effects of microfilming or
digitization, the survey will also record information about the state and binding of the
materials of the period. No large organized survey of volumes reflecting the influence of
the Industrial Revolution in this period of "the Great Expansion" has been completed.
The University of Florida's Preservation Department has already compiled structural
survey data on more than 1,000 volumes from the period 1850 through 1910. Additional
records would capture and characterize changes that took place throughout this period.
Jeffrey Barr, Curator of Rare Books, will survey the bindings from the perspective of
bibliographic description. A survey form, based on the publications of Sue Allen
(Victorian Bookbindings; Decorated Cloth in America; and to incorporate her
forthcoming Gold on Cloth), will produce a detailed description of each volume.
Individually, the recorded information will be used to test procedures that will allow
facsimiles to be built on demand from the microfilmed or the digitized texts. This work
is proposed as cost-share, with information to be published upon completion both as
articles and, on the Internet, in tabulations.

After all steps in the cataloging, preservation, and reproduction of the title are
completed, the book will be reshelved by student assistants, under the supervision of Rita
Smith, Curator of the Baldwin Library.

EQUIPMENT

Two computers with Pentium processors equipped to access local and national
databases will be purchased to provide additional support for the cataloging staff. A
digital camera and copy stand will be purchased to allow for non-intrusive reproduction
of the books that cannot be scanned without harming the objects.

The per title cost will be $76.00 and includes a camera master negative, a print
master negative, a positive use copy, original and enhanced copy cataloging for 8,600
titles, and digital versions of 1,400 of those 8,600 volumes.








PROPOSED WORK SCHEDULE FOR PHASE ONE


Activities Key:

Document Source Cataloging will entail:

* Training of the student assistants to pull materials
* Training of the Library Technical Assistant to search and match object to copy record
* Searching LUIS and OCLC
* Enhanced copy cataloging
* Original cataloging
* Record updating will result in the production of Microform Technical Information
Reports (i.e., machine generated USMARC 007, 533, and 583 code).
* Creation of original cataloging, using MTIR, for microfilm versions

Preparation will entail

* Collation of the objects
* Completion of the bindings survey
* Preservation enclosures for disbound or fragile volumes
* Searching for acceptable microfilm surrogate
* Queuing the material for microfilm/digitization
* Recording tracking information, as well as production of targets, quality control
sheets, and packing lists.

Microfilming, a vended service, will entail:

* production of microfilm in three generations per ANSI, AIIM and RLG
specifications together with IPI SilverLock polysulfide protection
vendor's inspection
completion of the quality control report
refilming and splicing as necessary.

Digitization will entail:

color scanning of objects as well as bitonal/gray scale scanning of black and white
text per Kenney/Comell guidelines for RLG
visual inspection of the scanned images
creation of structural metadata (Dataset.TOC) files
structural inspection

Post-microfilming activities will entail:

microfilm inspection by University of Florida staff
completion of tracking record up-dates








* shipment of accepted film to archival storage
* the processing of positives for library use.
* Return of objects to shelves.

The following table represents ideal rates of productivity for all project objectives.
The rates reflect lower production figures for quarters with major holidays and/or
anticipated summer vacation schedules. The rates for the first quarter presuppose hiring
and training staff, whereas the final quarter of the project reflects rates based on cleaning
up of problem items in all areas of production.










SCHEDULE OF OBJECTIVES (NUMBER OF TITLES) FIRST YEAR

October December January March April June July September Total Total Project
2000 2001 2001 2001 1" year 2"d year Total


Document 700 1250 1200 1200 4350
Source
Cataloging


Preparation 1000 1250 1250 1200 4700

Microfilming 0 700 1800 1800 4300

Digitization 50 170 200 200 625

Post-Microfilm/ 0 0 1000 2000 3000
Digitization
Activities






SCHEDULE OF OBJECTIVES (NUMBER OF TITLES) SECOND YEAR


October December January March April June July September Total Project
2001 2002 2002 2002 2ND year Total

Document 1200 1250 1250 550 4250 8600
Source
Cataloging


Preparation 1200 1250 1250 200 3900 8600

Microfilming 1000 1400 1400 500 4300 8600

Digitization 200 200 200 175 775 1400

Post-Microfilm/ 1300 1000 1400 1400 5100 8100*
Digitization
Activities



* 500 titles will remain for post-replication activities after the grant is completed, which UF staff will complete.









STAFFING


DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL COLLECTIONS AND AREA STUDIES

The George A. Smathers Libraries' Department of Special Collections holds the
primary source research collections of the University of Florida. The named collections
include the P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History, the Baldwin Library of Historical
Children's Literature, and the Belknap Collection for the Performing Arts. The area
studies collections include Latin Americana, Judaica, and Africana. The general
collections consist of Manuscripts, Rare Books, and University Archives. Total holdings:
750,000 volumes, 60,000 microfilms, 10 million manuscripts and archival items. Staff:
22 FTE.

RESOURCE SERVICES DEPARTMENT

The Resource Services Department staff are responsible for creating and
maintaining a NOTIS-based online catalog. They contribute original bibliographic and
authority records and holdings information to the OCLC national database and participate
in the CONSER, BIBCO, NACO, SACO and OCLC Enhance national cooperative
programs. As a member of the Research Libraries Group, through the Florida Center for
Library Automation, the Department tape-loads records to RLIN. The Department has
previously participated in the National Endowment for the Humanities and U.S.
Department of Education Title IIC Project (RC-21593-88) for National Database Access
to Library Resourcesfor Latin American Studies through Retrospective Conversion of
Latin American Library Materials (1988-1991), the U.S. Department of Education Title
IIC Project for Access to Library Resources in the Baldwin Library, University ofFlorida
(1990-1991), the National Endowment for the Humanities US Newspaper Program:
Florida Newspaper Project, (1995- to date), and in the Research Libraries Group's Great
Collections Microfilming Project, Phase II and Phase IV, as well as the Research
Libraries Group's Archives Preservation Microfilming Project.

PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT

The Preservation Department was consolidated as a full-service preservation
facility in 1987. Its Reprographics Unit microfilms for preservation, in house, more than
250,000 exposures in an average year and contracts additional microfilming for
preservation to vendors. The Department has received funding for cooperative
microfilming through the preservation initiatives of both the Research Libraries Group
(RLG) and the Southeastern Library Network (SOLINET) (see Appendix XXXX).
Department staff, particularly in the area of microfilming for preservation, have served on
national standards authoring bodies.








DIGITAL LIBRARY CENTER


The mission of the Digital Library Center (DLC) at the University of Florida (to
be established July 1, 1999) is to facilitate and focus the Libraries' development of digital
programs and services. Its areas of responsibility include multimedia databases, digital
collections, electronic text applications, online exhibits and finding aids. A primary goal
of the DLC is to enhance the Libraries' role in electronic scholarly communications
through effective and responsive digitization, dissemination, and long-term storage of
university research and resource materials from the Libraries' collections.

The Center will provide library and university researchers with state-of-the-art
equipment and technical expertise for scanning and text markup. Important byproducts
will be the establishment and promulgation of standards for digital library projects, and a
provision for modern and effective methods for responding to user requests for
reproduction of library materials, and effective programs for marketing and distributing
digital products.

The Digital Library Center will develop and implement user-responsive access,
storage, and delivery of digital resources from collections at the University of Florida.
The Center will have primary responsibility for the development of the University of
Florida Smathers Library digital library collection and digital delivery services. In
coordination with the Florida Center for Library Automation, the Center will integrate
effective user interfaces to these resources. Materials will be digitized and marked up for
effective access. These will be electronically delivered on request to support instruction,
distance education, and scholarly research.

The Digital Library Center brings with it several years of experience from the
Preservation Department, work funded by the State of Florida (Florida Heritage Project),
the Institute for Museum and Library Services (Linking Florida's Natural Heritage
Project), and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation (Caribbean Newspaper Imaging
Project).

SPECIAL COLLECTIONS STAFF

John E. Ingram, co-principal investigator, will devote 0.1 FTE of his time to the
administration of the grant. Ingram has chaired the Department of Special Collections
since November 1994. From 1979 to 1994, Ingram served as research archivist and
curator of special collections at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. He currently
serves on the SOLINET (Southeast Library Information Network) and SURA
(Southeastern University Research Association) advisory committee to establish an
electronic resource base for southern history and culture. He also served as UF's
representative for a collaborative effort on digitizing manuscript collections in the
southeastern United States (SESCA) cosponsored again by SOLINET (Southeast Library
Information Network) and SURA (Southeastern University Research Association).
Ingram also directed phase one of UF's participation in the NEH-funded United States








Agricultural Information Network (USAIN). He has served on review panels for both
NEH and DOE Title IIC grants

Rita J. Smith, co-principal investigator, will give 0.3 FTE of her time to this
grant. Her responsibilities will be to select the titles to be cataloged, to train personnel
involved in cataloging the materials, to supervise day to day activities of all personnel
involved in cataloging the source document, both original and copy records. Ms. Smith
has a Masters in Library Science from the University of Michigan. She has worked in the
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature since 1989, first as Coordinator of
Academic Support Services, and, since 1995, as Curator of the Baldwin Library and
Assistant Librarian in the Department of Special Collections. She served as Project
Cataloger from 1990 through mid-1991 for a U.S. Department of Education Title IIC
grant to catalog 4,000 titles held by the Baldwin Library.

Student Assistants (390 hours) will remove and replace titles selected for cataloging,
microfilming, digitization, and conservation review. They will work under the
supervision of Rita Smith.

Jeffrey Barr (0.05 FTE) will be responsible for book structure review, both collection
and analysis of data. Mr. Barr, who serves as Curator of Rare Books in the Library's
Department of Special Collections, received a BA from Goddard College in 1974 and an
M.L.S. from Columbia University in 1986, specializing in rare books. He has been
employed as a Mellon Grant Americana Cataloger at the New-York Historical Society
(1986-1990), Bibliographer for North Pacific Studies at the Oregon Historical Society
(1990-1991), Librarian for Technical Services and later Library Director of the California
Historical Society (1991-1995.)

CATALOGING STAFF

Tatiana Barr, Head, Humanities and Special Collections Cataloging Unit, will be
assigned 0.1 FTE to this grant. Assignment in this proposal will include responsibility for
the training of cataloging staff, oversight of cataloging the microfilm versions, and liaison
between the Project Directors (Ingram and Smith) and the Cataloging Unit to insure
consistency in record creation and statistical reporting.

The grant funded Project Cataloger (to be hired) (1.0 FTE), will be primarily
responsible for creating original bibliographic description and access records for selected
titles, contributing these original records to the OCLC database, and assisting other staff
in doing the same. S/he will create original authority records for names when none exists
in the national authority file, contribute these authority records to the NACO database,
and supervise the project Archivist (to be hired), in doing the same. The project cataloger
will be responsible for the final quality of all bibliographic and authority records created
for this project.

The grant funded Archivist (to be hired) (1.0 FTE) will be responsible for 1) assisting the
Project Cataloger in creating original bibliographic description and access records for








selected titles, 2) contributing these original bibliographic records to the OCLC database,
3) collaborating with other grant staff to create original authority records when none
exists in the national authority file, and 4) contributing these authority records to the
NACO database.

A Library Technical Assistant (to be assigned) in the Resource Services Department of
the George A. Smathers Libraries will be assigned for 0.5 FTE to this grant. S/he will
assure the accuracy of the bibliographic description and consistency of use of names and
subjects on member copy brought into the local online catalog from the OCLC national
databases. This staff member will create local holdings records in the UF online
database.

PRESERVATION AND TECHNOLOGY STAFF

Erich Kesse, chair-designate of the Digital Library Center (July, 1999) will
provide management oversight for the digitization portion of this project (.05 FTE). He
has been Chair of the Preservation Department in the Smathers Libraries since 1987, and
has been at the forefront in U.S. library preservation and digitization programs. Kesse
has completed several preservation and access projects funded by the Research Libraries
Group (RLG), the National Endowment for the Humanities, and by the Mellon
Foundation. Kesse holds professional memberships in the American Library Association
and the Association for Information and Image Management. Kesse holds a Certificate of
Preservation Administration from Columbia University in addition to a Master of Library
Science degree from the University of Kentucky.

Assistant Head, Digital Library Center, (0.05FTE, to be hired) will insure
workflow and entry into scanning queues for both microfilm to digital equivalents and
source document scanning. Secondary supervisor for imaging and interface staff;
coordinates workflow between reprography and the DLC

Imaging Technician Supervisor for the Digital Library Center, (.12FTE, to be hired)
will supervise the daily work of student assistants, provide training for and insure quality
control for image capture. The supervisor will compile or manage the compilation of
structural and administrative metadata, create provisional cataloging or queuing of the
titles in the Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA) Digital Library partition.
Updates treatment queues and metadata and digitizes from source documents and
microfilm as necessary to meet schedules (during university recesses).

Interface Systems Design Specialist for the Digital Library Center, (0.05FTE, to be
hired), will create the digital project database and web interface for the project; will
verify compiled metadata for construction of individual resources and for intellectual
access; will migrate datafiles and directories to the FCLA; and will work with FCLA to
insure timely and appropriate mounting of resources.

John Freund (0.05 FTE) will be responsible for completion of conservation assessments
and surveys and, as required, complex conservation treatments. Mr. Freund has served as








the Preservation Department's chief conservator since 1988. He holds a Certificate of
Book Restoration and Binding from the College of Art and Design at San Francisco State
University. Mr. Freund will supervise the work of Kenneth McAnlis (0.05 FTE). Mr.
McAnlis will be responsible for minor conservation treatments and for the specification
of commercially procured protective enclosures. Ms. McAnlis has three years of
experience performing repairs to circulating collections and the construction of a variety
of protective enclosures.

Cathleen Mook, chair designate of the Preservation Department, (0.05 FTE) will be
responsible for management oversight and programming support for automation of
project tasks, tracking systems, and survey databases. Mook has served as Head of
Preservation at Tulane University and head of the binding unit for UF. Mook holds a
Master's degree in Library Science with a certificate in advances preservation
management from the University of Pittsburgh.

Nelda Schwartz, Head, Reprographics, (0.10 FTE) will be responsible for all pre-
microfilming processing including identification, bibliographic searching, and tracking.
She will also be responsible for production of targets, quality control and packing slips,
packaging, and related tasks. Student assistants trained to work with the NOTIS, OCLC,
RLIN and FILMLOG databases will assist her. Prior to being named head of
reprographics, Schwartz held the Brittle Books Coordinator's position since 1990, where
she was responsible for the identification and preparation of volumes from embrittled
materials for microfilming, digitization or commercial replacement. Prior to her
preservation assignment, she held various posts in the Libraries' Catalog Department.

James Clifton, Program Assistant (0.20 FTE) will be responsible for all post-
microfilming quality control and processing. He will also be responsible for the
generation of archival storage work orders and the generation of USMARC information,
using the FILMLOG database's reporting systems. He will also maintain liaison with the
microfilming service vendor. Student assistants with previous microfilm inspection and
processing experience will assist Mr. Clifton. Mr. Clifton has held the position of chief
microfilm technician since 1993. He and his staff also operate two Kodak MRD2
Microfilm Cameras for internal preservation microfilming projects and perform quality
control on more than 500,000 images annually.

Elaine Henjum, Database Coordinator for the Florida Center for Library Automation
(FCLA) will serve (0.5FTE) as liaison between the imaging and metadata work to be
completed in the project and the migration of images and metadata to the main frame at
FCLA.

DISSEMINATION

The University of Florida Libraries will distribute cataloging records and
microforms generated by this project. Cataloging will be distributed through three
bibliographic networks: the Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA) WebLUIS
(http://www.fcla.edu), OCLC and the Research Library Group (RLG) RLIN, the latter via








tape-load from OCLC. Microforms (35 mm positive silver gelatin) will be distributed
.;. through Inter-Library Loan or the Smathers Libraries' non-profit sales auxiliary services
which averages more than $30,000 in sales annually. These items may also be distributed
as CD-ROMs or DVDs. The University of Florida maintains inter-library loan
agreements with members of FCLA, OCLC and RLG, as well as, through the State
Library, to libraries throughout Florida. The sales auxiliary already makes microfilm
copies of 59 newspaper titles and thousands of monograph titles available. All sales are
contingent upon copyright status and distribution agreements. In addition to cataloging
and microforms, the University of Florida plans to make available the book structure
survey data to researchers and to issue a summary of findings in a publications.
Tabulated data (and possible raw data) will be available on the Department's web site.
Researchers will be notified of survey data availability through several electronic list
services including those serving the rare books, special collections and preservation
communities. Access will be provided to raw data. In addition, the University of Florida
will initiate discussion with colleagues nationally and with a bindery, to be elected, on
communication of data elements for facsimile creation.






National Endowment for the Humanities
BUDGET FORM


OMB No. 3136-0134
Expires 7/31/00


Project Director If this is a revised budget, indicate the NEH application/grant
John E. Ingram Rita J. Smith number
Applicant Organization Requested Grant Period
S FROM 10/00 THRU 9/02
University of Florida mo/yr mo/yr

The three-column budget has been developed for the convenience of those applicants who wish to identify the project costs that will be charged to
NEH funds and those that will be cost shared. FOR NEH PURPOSES, THE ONLY COLUMN THAT NEEDS TO BE COMPLETED IS COLUMN C. The
method of cost computation should clearly indicate how the total charge for each budget item was determined.
If more space is needed for any budget category, please follow the budget format on a separate sheet of paper.
When the requested award period is eighteen months or longer, separate budgets for each twelve-month period of the project
must be developed on duplicated copies of the budget form.

SECTION A budget detail for the period FROM 10/00 THRU 9/01
mo/yr mo/yr
1. Salaries and Wages Provide the names and titles of principal project personnel. For support staff, include the title of each position and indicate
in brackets the number of persons who will be employed in that capacity. For persons employed on an academic year basis, list separately any
salary charge for work done outside the academic year.
method of cost computation NEH Funds Cost Sharing Total
name/title of position no. (see sample) (a) (b) (c)
*John Ingram/Co-Project Dir 1 12 mo. x 10% FTES0 s 0 so_ 0

Rita Smith/Co-Project Dir 1 ] 12mo. x30% @ $37,282 0 11,185 11,185

Project Calaloger/To be hire [1 ] 12 mo. x 100% @ $33,000 33,000 0 33,000
Project Archivist/To be hired 1 ] 12 mo. x 100% @ $22,000 22,000 0 22,000

Student Assts/Paaing ] 390 hrs. @ S5.75/hr. 0 2,243 2,243
Student Assts/Scanning [ ] 1168 hrs. @ $5.75/hr 6,716 0 06,716
Other staff see attached [ ] 0 30,940 30,940


SUBTOTAL


s 61,716


2. Fringe Benefits. If more than one rate is used, list each rate and salary base.
rate salary base (a)
8.3 % of s 8,959 s557

See attached for 19 % of $ 97.125 19,848
detail, plus health SUBTOTAL s 20,405
insurance
3. Consultant Fees. Include payments for professional and technical consultants and honoraria.
no. of days daily rate of
name or type of consultant on project compensation (a)
NONE s s






SUBTOTAL S


s 44,368



(b)
s186

13,259

s13,445



(b)




$ ...



s ____


$ 106,084



(c)
s743

33,107
$ 33,850



(c)
s






S5 __








Salaries and Wages October 2000 September 2001


Method of Cost Computation


NEH UF Total


*Erich Kesse/Chair, Digital Library Center
*Cathleen Mook/Chair, Preservation
Nelda Schwartz/Head, Reprographics
James Clifton/Reprographics Technician
John Freund/Head Conservation
Kenneth McAnlis/Conservation Technician
Jeffrey Barr/Curator, Rare Books
Elaine Henjum/Database Coordinator
Tatiana Barr/Head, Special Collections
Cataloging Unit
Library Technical Assistant (to be assigned)
*Assistant Director/Digital Library Center
Imaging Technician/DLC (to be hired)
Interface Systems Design Specialist


12 months x 5% FTE
12 months x 5% FTE
12 months x 10%@ $33270
12 months x 20% @ $23154
12 months x 5% @ $36731
12 months x 5% @ $22154
12 months x 5% @ $35022
12 months x 5% @ $43594


12 months x 10%@ $40500
12 months x 50%@ $17000
12 months x 5% FTE
12 months x 12%@ $20922
12 months x 5% @ $20922


* In accord with the University of Florida's Indirect Cost Calculations, the salaries of John
Ingram, Erich Kesse, Cathleen Mook, and the Assistant Director, Digital Library Center, are
accounted for as administrative overhead, an indirect cost



Fringe Benefits

The standard benefit of OPS (Other Personnel Services) is 8.3 percent.

Permanent staff enjoy a fringe benefit rate of 19 percent to which is added health coverage set at:

$2298 for single staff person coverage
$3047 for spouse coverage
$4699 for family coverage.

For existing staff, the amount is prorated according to percentage of time devoted to the grant.
For staff to be hired, the highest level of coverage is used.


B-2


Name/Title


3327
4630
1837
1108
1751
2180


4050
8500


2511
1046


3327
4630
1837
1108
1751
2180


4050
8500


2511
1046


Continuation








NEH Budget Form Page:

4. Travel. For each trip, indicate the number of persons traveling, the total days they will be in travel status, and the total subsistence and transpor-
tation costs for that trip. When a project will involve the travel of a number of people to a conference, institute, etc., these costs may be summarized
on o e line by indicating the point of origin as"various." All foreign travel must be listed separately.

no. total subsistence transportation NEH Funds Cost Sharing Total
from/to persons travel costs + costs = (a) (b) (c)
days
Nl.MIlC _


$


S













SUBTOTAL


$













$0
S 0


S













S 0
5 ____


$


5. Supplies and Materials. Include consumable supplies, materials to be used in the project and items of expendable equipment; i.e., equipment
items costing less than $5,000 and with an estimated useful life of less than one year.


item basis/method of cost computation (a) (b) (c)

Protective enclosures 600 @ $6.00 each $ s 3,600 3,600

Blank CD-ROMs 1650 @ $1.50 each 2,475 2,475













SUBTOTAL $ 2,475 $ 3,600 $ 6,075

6. Services. Include the cost of duplication and printing, long distance telephone, equipment rental, postage, and other services related to project
objectives that are not included under other budget categories or in the indirect cost pool. For subcontracts provide an itemization of subcontract
costs on this form or on an attachment.

item basis/method of cost computation (a) (b) (c)

Micrographics,lnc 350,000 exposures @ $.35/exp. s110,000 $12,500 s 122,500


$ 12,500 122,500
$ $ -


SUBTOTAL


iuviur


$ 110,000






NEH Budget Form Page 3

7. Other Costs. Include participant stipends and room and board, equipment purchases, and other items not previously listed. Please note that
mrrscellaneous" and "contingency" are not acceptable budget categories. Refer to the budget instructions for the restriction on the purchase of perma-
nent equipment.
NEH Funds Cost Sharing Total
item basis/method of cost computation (a) (b) (c)

Kodak Digital Camera (DCS 560) camera + accessories 0 30,000 30,000
Camera Copy Stand one @ $355 0 355 355

Cataloging Work Station 2 x $1,600 each 0 3,200 3,200










SUBTOTAL S 0 $ 33,555 S 33,555

8. Total Direct Costs (add subtotals of items 1 through 7) $194,596 $107,468 $302,064


9. Indirect Costs (This budget item applies only to institutional applicants.)
If indirect costs are to be charged to this project, CHECK THE APPROPRIATE BOX BELOW and provide the information
requested. Refer to the budget instructions for explanations of these options.

F] Current indirect cost rates) has/have been negotiated-with federal agency. (Complete items A and B.)

E Indirect cost proposal has been submitted to a federal agency but not yet negotiated. (Indicate the name of the
agency in item A and show proposed rates) and base(s), and the amounts) of indirect costs in item B.)

SIndirect cost proposal will be sent to NEH if application is funded. (Provide an estimate in item B of the rate that will
be used and indicate the base against which it will be charged and the amount of indirect costs.)

E Applicant chooses to use a rate not to exceed 10% of direct costs, less distorting items, up to a maximum charge of
55,000 per year. (Under item B, enter the proposed rate, the base against which the rate will be charged, and the
computation of indirect costs or $5,000, whichever sum is less.)

DHHS 11 December
A.


1997


name of federal agency


rates)
19.4 %of

%of
_______%of


base(s)

$170,890



TOTALINDIRECTCOSTS


10. Total Project Costs (direct and indirect) for Budget Period


date of agreement

NEH Funds Cost Sharing
(a) (b)

$21,262 $ 11,914



$21,262 s 11,914


$215,858 g 119,382


Total
(c)
( c )

s 33,176



s 33,176


$ 335,240






National Endowment for the Humanities
BUDGET FORM


OMB No. 3136-0134
Expires 7/31/00


Project Director If this is a revised budget, indicate the NEH application/grant
John E. Ingram Rita J. Smith number:
Applicant Organization Requested Grant Period
FROM 10/00 THRU 9/02
University of Florida molyr molyr

The three-column budget has been developed for the convenience of those applicants who wish to identify the project costs that will be charged to
NEH funds and those that will be cost shared. FOR NEH PURPOSES, THE ONLY COLUMN THAT NEEDS TO BE COMPLETED IS COLUMN C. The
method of cost computation should clearly indicate how the total charge for each budget item was determined.
If more space is needed for any budget category, please follow the budget format on a separate sheet of paper.
When the requested award period is eighteen months or longer, separate budgets for each twelve-month period of the project
must be developed on duplicated copies of the budget form.
SECTION A budget detail for the period FROM 10/01 THRU 9/02
mo/yr mo/yr
1. Salaries and Wages. Provide the names and titles of principal project personnel. For support staff, include the title of each position and indicate
in brackets the number of persons who will be employed in that capacity. For persons employed on an academic year basis, list separately any
salary charge for work done outside the academic year.


name/title of position
*John Ingram/Co-Project Dir

f.ita Smith/Co-Project Dir
Project Calaloger/To be hire
Project Archivist/To be hired

Student Assts/Paging
Student Assts/Scanning
Other staff see attached


method of cost computation
(see sample)
12 mo. x 10% FTE
12 mo. x 30% @ $40,537
12 mo. x 100% @ $34,000
12 mo. x 100% @ $23,000

390 hrs. @ $5.85/hr.
1168 hrs. @ $5.85/hr


NEH Funds
(a)
sO
0
34,000
23,000
0

6,833
0 -


SUBTOTAL $ O,OJ30

2. Fringe Benefits. If more than one rate is used, list each rate and salary base.
rate salary base (a)
8.3 % of s9,115 ,567

See attached for 19 % of S 101,365 20,980
details, plus health SUBTOTAL S 21,547
insurance
3. Consultant Fees. Include payments for professional and technical consultants and honoraria.
no. of days daily rate of
name or type of consultant on project compensation (a)
NONE s s






SUBTOTAL S


Cost Sharing
(b)
sO
12,190
0
0
2,282
0
32,175

s 46,647


(b)
s189
14,078

s14,267


(b)







S
$ _____


Total
(c)
s0
12,190
34,000
23,000
2,282

6,833
32,175
s110,480


(c)
s756
35,058

s35,814



(c)

$ _






S _____









Salaries and Wages October 2001 September 2002


Name/Title


*Erich Kesse/Chair, Digital Library Center
*Cathleen Mook/Chair, Preservation
Nelda Schwartz/Head, Reprographics
James Clifton/Reprographics Technician
John Freund/Head Conservation
Kenneth McAnlis/Conservation Technician
Jeffrey Barr/Curator, Rare Books
Elaine Henjum/Database Coordinator
Tatiana Barr/Head, Special Collections
Cataloging Unit
Library Technical Assistant (to be assigned)
*Assistant Director/Digital Library Center
Imaging Technician/DLC
Interface Systems Design Specialist


Method of Cost Computation

12 months x 5% FTE
12 months x 5% FTE
12 months x 10% @ 34270
12 months x 20% @ 24154
12 months x 5% @ 37833
12 months x 5% @ 22798
12 months x 5% @ 36073
12 months x 5% @ 44902


12 months x 10% @ 41715
12 months x 50% @ 18000
12 months x 5%
12 months x 12% @ 21550
12 months x 5% @ 21550


NEH UF Total


3427
4831
1892
1140
1804
2245


4172
9000


2586
1078


3427
4831
1892
1140
1804
2245


4172
9000


2586
1078


* In accord with the University of Florida's Indirect Cost Calculations, the salaries of John
Ingram, Erich Kesse, Cathleen Mook, and the Assistant Director, Digital Library Center, are
accounted for as administrative overhead, an indirect cost


Fringe Benefits

The standard benefit of OPS (Other Personnel Services) is 8.3 percent.

Permanent staff enjoy a fringe benefit rate of 19 percent to which is added annual health coverage set at:

$2482 for single staff person coverage
$3291 for spouse coverage
$5075 for family coverage.

The above rates reflect an 8 percent increase.
For existing staff, the amount is prorated according to percentage of time devoted to the grant.
For staff to be hired, the highest level of coverage is used.


B-6


Continuation









NEH Budget Form Page:

4. Travel. For each trip, indicate the number of persons traveling, the total days they will be in travel status, and the total subsistence and transpor-
tation costs for that trip. When a project will involve the travel of a number of people to a conference, institute, etc., these costs may be summarized
on one line by indicating the point of origin as "various." All foreign travel must be listed separately.

no. total subsistence transportation NEH Funds Cost Sharing Total
from/to persons travel costs + costs = (a) (b) (c)
days
A I/f"l I


I '4 Li I '4


$


S


SUBTOTAL


$ 0












$0


$o


$






0


5. Supplies and Materials. Include consumable supplies, materials to be used in the project and items of expendable equipment; i.e., equipment
items costing less than $5,000 and with an estimated useful life of less than one year.


item basis/method of cost computation (a) (b) (c)

Protective enclosures 600 @ $6.0d each $_ 3,600 $3,600

Blank CD-ROMs 1650 @ $1.50 each 2,475 2,475













SUBTOTAL $ 2,475 3,600 6,075

6. Services. Include the cost of duplication and printing, long distance telephone, equipment rental, postage, and other services related to project
objectives that are not included under other budget categories or in the indirect cost pool. For subcontracts provide an itemization of subcontract
costs on this form or on an attachment.

item basis/method of cost computation (a) (b) (c)

Micrographics,Inc 359,000 exposures @ $.38/exp. 110,000 26,648 136,648


SUBTOTAL $ 110,000 26,648 136,648
SUBTOTAL $ $ 1 $--L:__









NEH Budget Form Page 3

7. Other Costs. Include participant stipends and room and board, equipment purchases, and other items not previously listed. Please note that
"miscellaneous" and "contingency" are not acceptable budget categories. Refer to the budget instructions for the restriction on the purchase of perma-
nent equipment.
NEH Funds Cost Sharing Total
item basis/method of cost computation (a) (b) (c)

NONE _$__ _














SUBTOTAL $ 0 $0 S0_

8. Total Direct Costs (add subtotals of items 1 through 7) $197,855 91,162 $ 289,017


9. Indirect Costs (This budget item applies only to institutional applicants.)
If indirect costs are to be charged to this project CHECK THE APPROPRIATE BOX BELOW and provide the information
requested. Refer to the budget instructions for explanations of these options.

[] Current indirect cost rates) has/have been negotiated with federal agency. (Complete items A and B.)

] Indirect cost proposal has been submitted to a federal agency but not yet negotiated. (Indicate the name of the
agency in item A and show proposed rates) and base(s), and the amounts) of indirect costs in item B.)

SIndirect cost proposal will be sent to NEH if application is funded. (Provide an estimate in item-B of the rate that will
be used and indicate the base against which it will be charged and the amount of indirect costs.)

f Applicant chooses to use a rate not to exceed 10% of direct costs, less distorting items, up to a maximum charge of
55,000 per year. (Under item B, enter the proposed rate, the base against which the rate will be charged, and the
computation of indirect costs or $5,000, whichever sum is less.)

DHHS 11 December
A.


name of federal agency


rates)
19.4 %of

%of
______%of


base(s)

$152,369



TOTALINDIRECTCOSTS


10. Total Project Costs (direct and indirect) for Budget Period


r1997


date or agreement

NEH Funds Cost Sharing
(a) (b)

S 17,044 $12,516



S 17,044 $12,516


$214,899 S103,678


Total
( C )

$ 29,560



$ 29,560


S 318,577










SECTION B Summary Budget and Project Funding

SUMMARY BUDGET
Transfer from section A t.e total costs (column c) for each category of project expense. When the proposed grant period is eighteen months or
longer, project expenses for each twelve-month penod are to be listed separately and tctalec in the last column of the summary budget. For prciects
that will run less than eighteen months, only the last column of the summary budget should be completed.


Budget Categories

1. Salaries and Wages

2. Fringe Benefits


First Year/
from: 10/00
thru: 9/01
S105,984

33,831


Second Year/
from: 10/01
thru: 9/02
110,480

35,814


3. Consultant Fees 0 0


0 0


4. Travel


5. Supplies and Materials

6. Services

7. Other Costs

8. Total Direct Costs (items 1-7)

9. Indirect Costs


10. Total Project Costs (Direct & Indirect)


6,075

122,500

33,555

S 302,064

S23,176

$ 335,240


6,075

136,648

0

$ 289,017

29,560

S318,577


Third Year/
from:
thru:


TOTAL COSTS FOR
ENTIRE GRANT
PERPJO


S _= 216,464
69,645

0

0

12,150


s



s


259,148

S 33,555

= 591,081

= s 52,736

= s 653,817


PROJECT FUNDING FOR ENTIRE GRANT PERIOD


1. Requested from NEH:


Outright

Federal Matching


TOTALNEH FUNDING


S 430,757

S 0


5 430,757


2.Cost Sharing:

Cash Contributions

In-Kind Contributions

Project Income

TOTAL COST SHARING


3. Total Project Funding (NEH Funds + Cost Sharing) = 653, 817

1. Indicate the amount of outright and/or federal matching funds that is requested from the Endowment

2. Indicate the amount of cash contributions that will be made ready by the applicant or third parties to support project expenses that appear in the
budget. Include in this amount third-party cash gifts that will be raised to release federal matching funds. (Consult the program guidelines for
information on cost sharing requirements.)

Occasionally, in-kind (ncncash) contributions from third parties are included in a project budget as cost sharing; e.g., the value of services or
equipment that is donated to the project free of charge. If this is the case, the total value of in-kind contributions should be indicated.

When a project will generate income that will be used during the grant period to support expenses listed in the budget, indicate the amount of
income that will be expected on budgeted project activities.

3. Total Project Funding should equal Total Project Costs.

Institutional Grant Administrator/Individual Applicant. Provide the information requested below when a revised budget is submitted. The
signature of this person indicates approval of the budget submission and the agreement of the organization/individual to cost share project
expenses at the level indicated under "Project Funding:

Telephone (__)________
Name and Title (please type or print)


Date


Signature


S 223,060

$0


s 223,060


NEH Budget Form


Page 4





APPENDIX 1.1


BALDWIN LIBRARY

BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD AVAILABILITY

Sample Size
I 1850-1869 I 1870-1890 1891-1910 1850-1910
All Titles I 341 volumes 338 volumes 199 volumes 878 volumes
Unknown Origin 5 volumes 2 volumes I 0 volumes 7 volumes
US. Imprints 231 volumes 184 volumes 108 volumes 523 volumes
U.K. Imorints I 105 volumes 152 volumes I 91 volumes 348 volumes

Cataloging in University of Florida & State University System (SUS-NOTIS):
S 1850-1869 1870-1890 I 1891-1910 1850-1910
Total 6.2 % 10.7 % 17.6 % 10.5 %
U.S. Imprints 7.4 % 16.8 % 25.0 % 14.3 %
1.7 % UF 3.8 % UF 9.3 % UF 4.0 % UF
5.6 % other SUS 13 % other SUS 15.7 % other SUS 10.3 % other SUS
U.K. Imprints 3.8% 3.3 % 9.9 % 4.9 %
0.9 % UF 2.0 % UF 3.3 % UF 2.0 % UF
2.9 % other SUS 1.3 % other SUS 5.5 % other SUS 2.9 % other SUS


Cataloging in Bibliographic Databases: Paper copies
I 1850-1869 1870-1890 I 1891-1910 1850-1910
All Titles 42.2 % 44.4% 55.3 % 4,5.8 %
Unknown 0.6 % 0 % 0% 0 0%
U.S. Imprints 47.2 % 52.7 % 75.0 % 54.9 %
1.3 % UF 2.2 % UF 4.6 % UF 2.3 % UF
45.9 % nonUF 50.5 % nonUF 70.4 % nonUF 52.6 % nonUF
U.K. Imprints 31.4 % 34.9% -31.9% 33.0 %
0%UF 0.7 % UF 1.1 %UF 0.6 % UF
31.4 % nonUF 34.2 % nonUF 30.8 % nonUF 32.5 % nonUF


Cataloging Institutions: Incidence of Cataloging as of 5 June 1997.
Only those institutions with the highest incidence of cataloging for titles in the Baldwin Library have been listed by name.
indicate that the holdings of other institutions were not identified.
This chart does not address overaooping holdings. Overiap is implied by the chart above.


Exclusion does not


_1850-1869 1870-1890 1891-1910 1850-1910
INSITrUTION Percentage of Percentage of Percentage of Percentage of
341 volumes 338 volumes 199 volumes 878 volumes
American Antiquarian 22.0% 9.0% 0.0% 11.7%
Society
Brown University 4.1% 8.8 % 6.0 % 6.4
Cleveland Public Library 2.3% 3.2% 8.5 % 4.1%
Dartmouth University 3.5 % 1.4 % 3.0% 2.6 %
Detroit Public Library 3.5 % 4.7 % 5.0 % 4.3 %
Duke University 3.8 % 3.5 % 6.0 % 4.2 %
Emorv University 2.3 % 1.2 % 3.0 % 2.1%
Gonzaea University 0.8 % 1.2% 0.0 % 0.8 %
Harvard University 8.5 % 6.5% 9.5% 8.0 %
Illinois State University 1.7 % 4.7% 0.0% I 2.5 %
(Continued on next page)






APPENDIX 1.2


Cataloging Institutions: Incidence of Cataloging as of 5 June 1997. (continued)
1 1850-1869 I 1870-1890 1 1891-1910 1850-1910
INSTITTION Percenrage of Percentage of Percentage of Perceacuge of
341 volumes 338 volumes 199 volumes 878 volumes
Indiana Lniversitv 2.9 % o 2.9 % 5.0 % I 3.4 %
Kansas State University 2.3 % 5.0% 2.0 % I 3.3 %
.Michigan State University 3.2% I 2.9 %. 5.0 % 1 3.5 %
Presbyterian Historical 0.8% 4.1% 5.0% 3.1%
Society (Philadelohia)
Southern Illinois University 4.6 % 4.4 % 4.0 % 4.4 %
University of California. 1.7 % 3.2% 7.0 % 3.5%
Berkeley
University of California, 3.8% 7.4% 10.6 % 6.7%
Los Angeles
University of California, 1.1 % 1.4 % 4.0 % 1.9 %
Santa Barbara
University of Pittsburgh 3.8% 4.1 % 5.0% 4.2 %
University of Rochester 2.3 % 5.3 % 8.5 % 4.9 %
University of South Carolina 3.5 % 3.8 % 0.5 % 3.0%
University of South Florida 2.0% o 2.0 % I1.5 % 1.9%
University of Southern 2.9 % 2.3 % 4.0% 3.0%
IMississiopi
University of Texas, 35 % 1.4 % 0.5 % 2.1%
Humanities Research Center
University of Virginia, 2.6 % 5.0 % 75 % 4.7 %7
Charlottesville

Ranked by Percentage Incidence, 1850-1910.
01. American Antiquarian Society (11.7 %)
02. Harward University (8.0 %)
03. University of California, Los Angeles (6.7 %)
04. Brown University (6.4 %)
05. University of Rochester (4.9 %)
06. University of Virginia, Charlottesville (4.7 %)
07. Southern Illinois University (4.4 %)
08. Detroit Public Library (43 %)
09. Duke University (4.2 %)
10. University of Pittsburgh (4.2 %)
11. Cleveland Public Library (4.1%)
12. Michigan State University (3.5 %)
University of California, Berkeley (3.5 %)
13. Indiana University (3.4 %)
14. Kansas State University (33 %)
15. Presbyterian Historical Society (Philadelphia, PA) (3.1 %)
16. University of South Carolina (3.0 %)
University of Southern Mississippi (3.0 %)
17. Dartmouth University (2.6 %)
18. Illinois State University (25 %)
19. Emory University (2.1 %)
University of Texas, Humanities Research Center (2.1 %)
20. University of California, Santa Barbara (1.9 %)
University of South Florida (1.9 %)
21. Gonzga University (0.8 %)





APPENDIX 1.3


BALDWIN LIBRARY

REPLACEMENT AVAILABILITY

Sample Size
S 1850-1869 1 1870-1890 I 1891-1910 I 1850-1910
All Titles J 341 volumes 338 volumes 199 volumes 878 volumes
Unknown Origin 5 volumes 2 volumes 0 volumes 7 volumes
U.S. Imrints 231 volumes 184 volumes 108 volumes 523 volumes
U.K. Imorints 105 volumes 152 volumes 91 volumes 348 volumes

Reformats on OCLC/SUS-NOTIS:
1850-1869 1870-1890 1 1891-1910 1850-1910
Microcard 0% 2.4 % 1.0% 1.1 %
2.1 % US 1.0 % US 1.0 % US
0.3 % UK 0%UK 0.1 % UK
All Microfiche 1.5 % of titles 4.1 % of tides 7.5 % of tides 3.9 % of titles
0.6 % US 2.4 % US '2.5 % US 1.7 % US
0.9 % UK 1.8 % UK 5.0 % UK 2.2 % UK
Microfiche (Pre88) .3 % of titles 1.5 % of titles 1.0 % of tides 0.9 % of tides
20 % of fiche 35.7 % office 13.3 % of fiche 23.5 % of fiche
0 % US 1.2 % US 1.0 % US 0.7 % US
.3% UK 0.3% UK 0%UK 0.2 % UK
Microfiche (Post88) 1.2 % of ties 2.7 % of tides 6.5 % of tides 3.0 % of tides
.80 % of fiche 64.3 % office 86.7 % of fiche 76.5 % of fiche
.6 % US 1.2 % US 1.5 % US 1.0 % US
.6 % UK 1.5 % UK 5.0 % UK 1.9 % UK
All Microfilm 4.1% 5.6% 10% 6.0%
3.2 % US 5.3 % US 9.5 % US 5.5 % US
0.9 % UK 0.3% UK 0.5 % UK 0.6 % UK
Microfilm (Pre88) 2.1 % of tides 4.4 % of tides 4.5 % of tides 3.5 %
50 % of all film 78.9 % of film 45 % of film 58.5 % of film
1.8 % US 4.4 % US 4.5 % US 3.4 % US
0.3 % UK 0%UK O%UK 0.1% UK
Microfilm (Post88) 2.1 % of titles 1.2 % of tides 5.5 % of ties 2.5 %
50 % fall film 21.1% offilm 55 % offilm 41.5 % of film
1.5 % US 0.9 % US 5.0 % US 2.1 % US
0.6 % UK 0.3 % UK 0.5 % UK 0.5 % UK
Reprint 0.3 % of titles 0.3 % of titles 1.5 % 0.6%
0.3 % US 0 % US 1.0 % US 0.3 % US
0%UK 0.3% UK 0.5% UK 0.2 % UK

NOTE re: "Pre88"
Microforms produced prior to 1988 were unlikely to have been mastered to preservation "standard" or,
particularly, on polyester film required by preservation "standard".
RLG preservation microfilming guidelines were first introduced in 1983 as a section of the RLG
Preservation Manual. The guidelines were fleshed out with a second, 1986, edition of the Manual. They
came into their own, published as the RLG Preservation Microfilming Handbook, edited by Nancy
Elkington, in 1992.
ANSI IT9.1, first published in 1988, represented a compilation and major revision of the standards,
formerly PH1.28, PH1.41, and PH1.66, for the stability of silver-gelatin microfilm, the type used in
mastering microforms. It firmly fixed preservation or "archival" requirements in the standards for tie first
time.






APPENDIX 2


BALDWIN LIBRARY

DOUBLE FOLD TEST (DFT) MEASUREMENTS

Sample Size
I 1850-1869 I 1870-1890 I 1891-1910 I 1850-1910
All TitlesI 195 volumes 187 volumes I 109 volumes I 491 volumes

Simple Tabulation by Period
Table contains rounding errors.
PERIOD DFTO DFT1 I DFT2 DFT3 DFT4 I DFTS I NB I TOTAL
1850-1869
% Row 21.5 23.1 23.1 14.9 10.3 2.6 4.6 100
Cum. Row 21.5 44.6 67.7 82.6 92.9 95.5 -
1870-1890
% Row 24.6 26.2 16.6 12.8 12.8 2.7 3.7 100
Cum. Row 24.6 30.8 47.4 60.5 73.3 76.0 -
1891-1910
% Row 31.2 25.7 25.7 8.3 4.6 0.9 3.7 100
Cum. Row 31.2 56.9 82.6 90.9 95.5 96.4 -
TOTAL
% Column 24.8 24.8 21.2 12.6 10.0 2.2 4.3 100
Cum Row 24.8 49.7 70.9 83.5 93.5 95.7 -


Cross Tabulation by Place of Publication
PLACE DFTO DFT1 I DFT2 I DFT3 DFT I DFT5 NB I TOTAL
Unknown
% Row 33.3 23.3 23.3 10.0 6.7 0.0 3.3 100
Cum Row 33.3 56.6 79.9 89.9 96.6 96.6 -
U.S.
% Row 30.0 23.7 19.8 10.6 7.8 1.7 6.5 100
Cum Row 30.0 53.7 73.5 84.1 91.9 93.6 -
U.K.
% Row 22.7 27.4 18.8 12.8 10.5 2.2 5.6 100
Cum Row 22.7 50.00 68.83 81.61 92.15 94.39 -





http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/rs/catpro/baldmonocatpro.html


APPENDIX 3.1


BALDWIN MONOGRAPH CATALOGING PROCEDURE

For general project guideline, see Baldwin Cataloging Proiect Guideline

I. Search LUIS Search item by title

Zero LUIS Proceed to Step II. Search OCLC
Full record in LUIS Proceed to Step VII. Adds

II. Search OCLC Follow the OCLC Searching/Best Copy Selection procedure. Pay special attention
to the following: Date (on title page, verso of title page, last date listed, date on back of book),
Publisher, Size (within 2 cm in size and 10 pages in length)

OCLC record found:
Update/Export record Proceed to Step III. Copy Cataloging
Zero OCLC
Search RLIN
Deliver item to Archivist, Contributed Cataloging Proceed to Step VIII. Original
Cataloging.

III. Copy Cataloging Edit records and add local access points. Follow the Local Descriptive Editing
of Existing OCLC Monograph.Copy procedure. Pay particular attention to the following:

Change "0" to "f' code in L/FORM fixed field. Do not consider poetry and drama to be
fiction.
Add "j" code in AUD fixed field for juvenile fiction or literature.
Add the following fields to all Baldwin records:
035: : (FU) bldn project yyyymm
Example: 035: : Ja (FU) bldn project 199811
690: 4: Ja Bldn
Example: 690: 4: Ja Bldn |y 1946
Date range use the mid-date.
Example: 182- use 1825
1830-1840, use 1835
No date follow the steps below:
1. Look for an inscription with date. Use the date with brackets around it.
Example:
Add a 500 note indicating where you found the date.
2. Search LUIS for works by the same author and make an educated guess. If
author wrote in the 1930's, input
3. Search OCLC for a different edition. Also search works by the same author
and make an educated guess.
4. Search RLIN.
5. Confer with Baldwin Catalog Librarian.

Be sure to also include the date in the 260 field and in the Fixed field.

Additional 246 field for varying forms of title
Titles separated by "or" in 245 field .
Example (AMA 5392): 246:30: la Saved by an aeroplane
Title is different on cover
Example: 246:30 : la Cameron MacBain, backwoodsman


6/18/99 3:53 PM


Baldwin Monograph Cataloging Procedure


I of4




Baldwin Monograph Cataloging Procedure


APPENDIX 3.2 http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/rs/catpro/baldmonocatpro.html
APPENDIX 3.2


Title at head of title page
Example: 246:30 : ]a At head of title: Jackson Scholz.

-. Add to 260 field other additional imprint information
Printer information found in title page, verso of title page or back of book.
Example (AMA6625): Je (Cambridge : If The Riverside Press)
Two or more places of publication
Include the first two named places in U.S. or the first named place outside of U.S. plus
one place in U.S.
Example (AMA5390): 260: : ja New York; la Chicago
260:: Ia London; la New York
No place of publication follow the steps below:
1. Search the publisher's name in LUIS. If other records with the same publisher have
a place, use the same place with brackets around it.
2. Search RLIN
3. Confer with Baldwin Catalog Librarian

Check for series, do authority work, trace the series (may be a 490/800). Follow current
cataloging rules for series description and treatment.

Additional 500 field for general note (may contain multiple 500s in each record)
Other information on item
Examples:
500: : a "A Morrow book for young Americans"--jacket.
500: : la Verso oft.p.: Published October 1913.

Add 505 field for content note. Do not add 740 fields for titles in the content note. The 505
field is keyword searchable.

Add 590 when Baldwin copy lacks plates
Example: 590: : Baldwin Library copy lacks plates

Additional 650 subject fields) where necessary.

Additional 655 fields)
Author's signature or inscription on the title page or somewhere else subdivided by year
of publication
Example: 655: 7: la Author's inscriptions (Provenance) ly 1924. 2 rbprov
Author's presentation inscriptions to a particular named person subdivided by year of
publication
Example: 655: 7: la Author's presentation inscriptions (Provenance) ly 1924. 12
rbprov
Book (dust) jacket subdivided by year of publication
Example. 655: 7: Ia Dust jackets (Binding) ly 1945. 2 rbbin
Book plate subdivided by year of publication
Example: 655: 7: IA Bookplates (Provenance) ly 1920. 12 rbprov
Publisher's advertisement
Example: 655: 7: la Publishers' advertisements ly 1911.12 rbgenr
Reward label subdivided by year of publication
Example. 655: 7: la Prize books (Provenance) ly 1905. 12 rbprov
Shape of book is not square or rectangular
Example: 655: 7: la Shaped books (Publishing) |y 1905. 12 rbpub

Additional 7xx added entry fields (may contain multiple 7xx in each record) beyond those on
the national level cataloging copy. Do not use 14.
Engraver
Example: 700:1 : a Siberell, Ann.


2 of 4 6/18/99 3:53 PM





APPENDIX 3.3 http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/rs/catpro/baldmonocatpro.html


Illustrator
Example: 700:1 : a Dunton, Herbert.
Printer
Example: 710:2 : la R. Charles & Son.
Publisher
Example: 710:2 : a Award Publications Limited.

IV. Holdings screen

Change cataloging status to "h"
Add initial in title note field
Change class code "I" to "Y"
Change location code to "bldn"
Add accession location number
Add bar code and create item record

V. Authority Verification

"BAM" all records
Verify all names and series in LTLC or LTUF

VI. Labeling/Barcoding

On acid free tab:
Write in pencil clearly on creased side of tab the location accession number
Example: 23h62173
Apply bar code on other side of tab at the very top
Insert tab on last page of item
Multiple copies of same title consider the copy with dust jacket as copy 1.
No tattle taping or further end-processing is needed

VII. Adds Generally follow Monographic Copy Adds and Monographic Volume Adds procedures.

Pay special attention to adding local access points as in Step III. Copy Cataloging

VIII. Original Cataloging Follow Original Cataloging Procedure for Monographs.

Pay particular attention to adding local access points as in Step III. Copy Cataloging.
Add appropriate 650 subject fieldss.
Add genre terms useful for isolating types of books. Genre terms are subdivided by the date
that is in the 260 field and further subdivided by 12 local, 12 Icsh or 12 rbgenr.
Example. 655: 7: ja Children's poetry ly 1954. 12 Icsh

The following are genre terms used by the Baldwin Library.

Note: Except for Primers (Instructional books), information in parentheses below is not to be
included in the 655field in the record.

Alphabet books I y ---. 12 rbgenr
Alphabet rhymes ly ---. 12 rbgenr
Baseball stories ly ---. 12 Icsh
Basketball stories ly ---. 2 Icsh
Bedtime stories ly ---. 12 local
Bildungsromane ly ---. 12 rbgenr (coming of age stories) "
Biographies ly ---.12 rbgenr
Books with pop-up illustrations ly ---. 12 local (actual pop-ups)
Books with movable illustrations ly ---. 12 local (movable parts)


6/18/99 3:53 PM


Baldwin Monograph Cataloging Procedure


3 of 4




http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/rs/catpro/baldmonocatpro.html


APPENDIX 3.4


(Use both if book has both. See also "Toy and movable books" and "Metamorphic pictures")
Captivity narratives ly ---. 12 rbgenr
Catechisms y ---. 12 rbgenr
Chapbooks ly ---. 2 rbgenr
Children's plays ly ---. 12 Icsh
Children's poetry ly ---. 2 Icsh
Children's sermons |y ---. 2 rbgenr
Children's songs ly ---. 12 Icsh
Christmas stories ly ---. 12 Icsh
Courtesy books ly ---. 2 rbgenr
Cries ly ---. 2 rbgenr
Etiquette books ly ---. (2 rbgenr (Use with 650:: Etiquette for children and teenagers)
Fables ly ---. 12 rbgenr
Fairy tales ly ---. 12 rbgenr
Family stories ly ---. 12 local
Fantasy literature ly ---. 12 rbgenr
Fictional biography ly ---. 12 rbgenr
Folk tales ly ---. 12 rbgenr
Football stories ly ---. 12 Icsh
Gift books ly ---. 12 rbgenr
Hymns ly ---. 12 rbgenr
Imaginary voyages ly ---. 12 rbgenr
Jestbooks ly ---. 12 rbgenr
Limericks ly --. 12 Icsh
Metamorphic pictures |y ---. 12 rbgenr (transformations, harlinquinades)
Mystery and detective fiction ly ---. 12 rbgenr
Nonsense literature ly ---. 2 Icsh
Nonsense verse ly ---. 12 rbgenr
Nursery rhymes ly ---. 12 rbgenr
Primers (Instructional books) ly ---. 12 rbgenr (very early textbooks for young readers)
Printers' advertisements ly ---. 12 rbgenr
Publishers' advertisement ly ---. 12 rbgenr
Publishers' catalogues ly ---. 12 rbgenr
Puzzles ly ---. 2 rbgenr
Readers [y ---. 12 rbgenr
Riddles |y ---. 12 rbgenr
Robinsonades ly ---. 2 rbgenr
School stories ly ---. 12 local
Sea stories ly ---. |2 rbgenr
Sports stories ly ---. 12 rbgenr
Textbooks ly ---. 12 rbgenr
Toy and movable books ly ---. 12 rbgenr (If book has neither pop-up nor movable parts, but is a
toy book with things such as flaps, scratch and sniff material, etc. use 655: : |a Toy and
movable books)
War stories ly ---. 12 rbgenr
Western stories ly ---. 12 rbgenr


Return to: CatPro, RSD Homepaae


Prepared by: Fern Collins and Phek Sit
Last updated: April 28, 1999
URL: http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/rs/catpro/baldmonocatpro.html


6/18/99 3:53 PM


Baldwin Monograph Cataloging Procedure


4 of 4





APPENDIX 4.2


Printed for rjs on 05-25-1999. Page 1


LTUF MORE


AJV0166


NOTIS CATALOGING IOUU
UF FMT B RT a BL m T/C DT 11/08/93 R/DT 01/27/94 STAT nn E/L I DCF a D/S D
SRC PLACE mau LANG eng MOD T/AUD j REPRO D/CODE s DT/1 1870 DT/2
CONT ILLUS af GOVT BIOG FEST 0 CONF 0 L/FORM 0 INDX 0

010: : a 31014477
035/1: : a (OCoLC)12651540
040: :a DLC Ic IUL Id IUL
049: :a FUGG
050/1:0 : ja PS3007 Ib .S7 1870
100:1 :a Trowbridge, J. T. Iq (John Townsend), Id 1827-1916.
245:14: a The story of Columbus / Ic by John Townsend Trowbridge ; with
illustrations by Alfred Fredericks.
260: : la Boston : lb Fields, Osgood, & Co., Ic 1870.
300/1: : a 8 p., <4> leaves of plates : lb col. ill. ; Ic 27 cm.
440/1: 4: a The Uncle Sam series for American children
510/1:4 : a NUC pre-1956, Ic 602:447.
500/2: : a "Engraved and printed in colors by Bobbett, Hooper & Co.," N.Y.
500/3: : a Cover has imprint of Ticknor & Fields.
500/4: : a Printed by Welch, Bigelow & Co., Cambridge.
600/1:10: a Columbus, Christopher Ix Juvenile poetry.


LTUF DONE


655/2: 7:
690/3: 4:
700/1:10:
710/2:20:
710/3:20:
752/4: :
752/5: :
710/6:20:
710/7:20:
752/8: :


AJV0166
NOTIS CATALOGING


Children's poetry ly 1870.
Bldn ly 1870.
Fredericks, Alfred. 14 ill
Fields, Osgood & Co. 14 pbl
Bobbett, Hooper & Co. 14 egr
United States b New York Id New York.
United States b Massachusetts Id Boston.
Ticknor and Fields. 14 pbl
Welch, Bigelow & Co. 14 prt
United States Ib Massachusetts Id Cambridge.


IOUU





SID: 10153 OL


Entire record displayed.


APPENDIX 4.3


OLUC ti "GOOD CHILD OR SWEET HOME EMBELLISHED WITH FO...
HELD BY FUG 2 OTHER HOLDINGS
OCLC: 36144786 Rec stat: c
Entered: 19961231 Replaced: 19970109 U
) Type: a ELvl: I Srce: d Audn: j Ctrl
BLvl: m Form: Conf: 0 Biog: MRec
Cont: GPub: Fict: 0 Indx
Desc: a Ills: a Fest: 0 DtSt: s Date!
) 1 040 VZM *c VZM I
) 2 090 PZ8.3 *b .G65
) 3 090 *b
) 4 049 FUGG
) 5 245 04 The Good child : *b or, Sweet home ; embell.
neatly-coloured engravings.
) 6 246 10 Sweet home I
> 7 260 London : *b A. K. Newman & Co. *c [184-?] 1
) 8 300 30 p. : *b col. ill. ; *c 15 cm. I
) 9 650 0 Children's poetry *y 19th century.


Record 1 of 1


sed:



: 0
s: 184u,


19990423
Lang: eng
Ctry: enk


ished with fourteen


I CAT





APPENDIX 4.4


Printed for rjs on 05-25-1999. Page 1


LTUF MORE ALR7227
NOTIS CATALOGING IOUU
UF FMT B RT a BL m T/C DT 01/07/98 R/DT 05/25/99 STAT nc E/L I DCF a D/S D
SRC d PLACE enk LANG eng MOD T/AUD j REPRO D/CODE s DT/1 1840 DT/2 1849
CONT ILLUS a GOVT BIOG FEST 0 CONF 0 L/FORM 0 INDX 0

035/1: : a (Source)ONILE170- 5
035/2: : a (OCoLC)36144786
040: :a VZM Ic VZM Id FUG
049/1: : a FUGG
090/1: : a PZ8.3 jb .G65
245:04: la The Good child : Ib or, Sweet home ; embellished with fourteen
neatly-coloured engravings.
246/1:10: a Sweet home
260: : a London : Ib A. K. Newman & Co. Ic <184-?>
300/1: :a 30 p. : b col. ill. ; Ic 15 cm.
500/1: :a Publisher's list of children's toy books on back cover.
500/2: a Rhymed verse.
655/1: 7: a Children's poetry fy 1845.
655/2: 7: a Hand-colored illustrations ly 1845.
690/3: 4: a Bldn |y 1845.
655/4: 7: a Chapbooks |y 1845.

LTUF DONE ALR7227
NOTIS CATALOGING IOUU

650/5: 0: a Chapbooks Ix Specimens.
655/6: 7: a Publisher's advertisements ly 1945.
650/7: 0: a Conduct of life Ix Early works to 1900 Ix Juvenile poetry.
710/1:2 : a A.K. Newman & Co. 14 pbl
752/2: : a England Id London.





APPENDIX 4.5
CAT


SID: 10163


Entire record displayed.


OLUC an #0279
HELD BY FUG -
OCLC: 27948
Entered:
) Type: a
BLv1: m


Desc: i
) 1 040
) 2 090
) 3 090
) 4 049
' 5 100 1
) 6 245 14
Susie Sunbeam
) 7 260
) 8 300


Record 1 of 1


4826
1 OTHER HOLDING


26 Rec stat: c
19770311 Replaced: 19971221 Used: 19961002
ELvl: I Srce: d Audn: j Ctrl: Lang: eng
Form: Conf: 0 Biog: MRec: Ctry: nyu
Cont: GPub: Fict: 1 Indx: 0
Ills: Fest: 0 DtSt: s Dates: 1856,
KSU *c KSU *d OCL
PZ6.M22 *b Bl
*b
FUGG
Mackarness, Henry S., *c Mrs., *d 1826-1881.
The blackberries : *b or, Little Rose, and other stories / *c by
[i.e. M. Mackarness]. I
New York : *b J. Q. Preble, *c c1856.
96 p., [7] leaves of plates : *b ill. ; *c 12 cm.





APPENDIX 4.6


Printed for rjs on 05-27-1999. Page 1



LTUF MORE AKV7013
NOTIS CATALOGING IOW7
UF FMT B RT a BL m T/C DT 10/02/96 R/DT 10/02/96 STAT nn E/L I DCF i D/S D
SRC d PLACE xx LANG eng MOD T/AUD j REPRO D/CODE s DT/1 1856 DT/2
CONT ILLUS GOVT BIOG FEST 0 CONF 0 L/FORM 1 INDX 0

035/1: : a (Source)ONILE125- 1
035/2: : a (OCoLC)02794826
040: : a KSU Ic KSU Id FUG
049/1: : a FUGG
090/1: : a PZ6.M22 Ib B1
100:1 : a Mackarness, Henry S., Ic Mrs., Id 1826-1881.
245:14: a The blackberries : Ib or, Little Rose, and other stories / Ic by
Susie Sunbeam .
260: : la New York : Ib J. Q. Preble, Ic c1856 le ( : If Nesmith &
Thall)
300/1: : a 96 p., <7> leaves of plates : Ib ill. ; Ic 12 cm.
505/1:0 : a Blackberries or Little Rose--Rinaldo--Busy bee--Good children--
Little match girl.
650/1: 0: a Obedience Ix Juvenile fiction.
690/2: 4: a Bldn Iy 1856.
700/1:1 : a Preble, John Q. 14 pbl

LTUF DONE AKV7013
NOTIS CATALOGING IOW7

710/2:2 : a Nesmith & Thall. 14 prt
752/3: : a United States Ib New York Id New York.





APPENDIX 4.7


Printed for rjs on 05-25-1999. Page 1



LTUF MORE AHH6830
NOTIS CATALOGING IOUU
UF FMT B RT a BL m T/C DT 11/19/90 R/DT 11/21/90 STAT nn E/L I DCF a D/S D
SRC d PLACE mau LANG eng MOD T/AUD j REPRO D/CODE s DT/1 1863 DT/2
CONT ILLUS af GOVT BIOG FEST 0 CONF 0 L/FORM 1 INDX 0

035/1: : a (Source)ONILE 316
035/2: :a (OCoLC)22713974
035/3:: a (FU)bldn19901115
040: : a FUG Ic FUG
049: : a FUG$ 11 31262045881967
099/1: : ja 15h196
100:00: a M. F. W.
245:10: a Harrie Lee, or, The tempter and the tempted : lb a story for boys /
Ic by M.F.W.
260:0 : a Boston (No. 9 Cornhill) : Ib Henry Hoyt, Ic c1863.
300/1: : a 223 p., <3> leaves of plates : Ib ill. ; Ic 15 cm.
440/1: 4: a The hillside library
599/1: : a rjs
650/1: 0: a Mothers and sons Ix Juvenile fiction.
650/2: 0: a Children and death Ix Juvenile fiction.
650/3: 0: a Christian life Ix Juvenile fiction.

LTUF DONE AHH6830
NOTIS CATALOGING IOUU

650/4: 0: a Children's stories.
655/5: 7: a Juvenile literature ly 1863. 12 rbgenr
690/6: 4: a Boys, Stories for jy 1863.
690/7: 4: a Bldn |y 1863.
700/1:10: a Hoyt, Henry. 14 pbl
740/2:41: a The tempter and the tempted.
752/3: : a United States Ib Massachusetts Id Boston.





APPENDIX 4.8


Printed for rjs on 05-25-1999. Page 1


LTUF MORE


AHF4638


NOTIS CATALOGING IOUU
UF FMT B RT a BL m T/C DT 09/05/90 R/DT 09/06/90 STAT nn E/L I DCF a D/S D
SRC d PLACE enk LANG eng MOD T/AUD j REPRO D/CODE s DT/1 1879 DT/2
CONT ILLUS af GOVT BIOG FEST 0 CONF 0 L/FORM 1 INDX 0

035/1: : a (Source)ONIUF 307
035/2: : a (OCoLC)22334816
035/3: : a (FU)bldn19900905
040: : a FUG Ic FUG
049:b : a FUG$ 11 31262044799061
100:10: a Greer, Maria J.
245:10: a My mother's diamonds : Ib a domestic story for daughters at home /
IC by Maria J. Greer ; with a frontispiece by A. Ludovico.
260:0 : la London (Corner of St. Paul's Churchyard) : Griffith and Farran, Ic
1879 le (London and Guilford : If Billing and Sons)
300/1: : a viii, 336, 32 p., <1> leaf of plates : Ib ill. ; Ic 19 cm.
440/1: 4: a The girl's own favorite library
500/1: :a Includes publisher's catalog.
599/1: : a rjs
650/1: 0: a Forgiveness Ix Juvenile fiction.
650/2: 0: a Mothers and daughters Ix Juvenile fiction.


LTUF DONE


650/3: 0:
655/4: 7:
655/5: 7:
690/6: 4:
690/7: 4:
690/8: 4:
700/1:10:
710/2:20:
710/3:20:
752/4: :
752/5: :


AHF4638
NOTIS CATALOGING

a Children's stories.
a Juvenile literature ly 1879. 12 rbgenr
a Publishers' catalogues |y 1879. 12 rbgenr
a Girls, Stories for jy 1879.
a Family stories [y 1879.
a Bldn ly 1879.
a Ludovico, A. 14 ill
a Griffith and Farran. 14 pbl
a Billing and Sons. 14 prt
a England d London.
a England d Guilford.


IOUU





APPENDIX 4.9


Printed for rjs on 05-25-1999. Page 1



LTUF MORE AHM2674
NOTIS CATALOGING IOUU
UF FMT B RT a BL m T/C DT 03/23/91 R/DT 12/01/97 STAT fn E/L I DCF a D/S D
SRC d PLACE enk LANG eng MOD T/AUD j REPRO D/CODE s DT/1 1887 DT/2
CONT ILLUS af GOVT BIOG FEST 0 CONF 0 L/FORM 1 INDX 0

035/1: : a (Source)ONILE 41
035/2: : a (OCoLC)23288317
035/3: : a (FU)bldn19910320
035/4: :a (NOTISUF)AHM2674
040: : a FUG Ic FUG
049/1: a FUG$ |1 31262046534706
099/1: la 23h1436
100:10: a Greene, Ic Mrs.
245:14: a The cherry tent, or, The schoolfellows / Ic by The Hon. Mrs. Greene
260:0 : a London ; la New York : Ib Frederick Warne and Co, Ic 1887 je
(London : f Dalziel Bros., Camden Press)
300/1: : a <60> p., <3> leaves of plates : |b ill. ; Ic 17 cm.
599/1: : a rjs
650/1: 0: a Theft Ix Juvenile fiction.
650/2: 0: a Obedience Ix Juvenile fiction.
650/3: 0: a Children's stories.


LTUF DONE


655/4: 7:
690/5: 4:
690/6: 4:
700/1:10:
700/2:10:
710/3:20:
710/4:20:
740/5:41:
752/6: :


AHM2674
NOTIS CATALOGING


a Juvenile literature ly 1887. 12 rbgenr
a School stories ly 1887.
a Bldn iy 1887.
a Dalziel, Edward, d 1817-1905. 4 ill
a Dalziel, George, d 1815-1902. 4 prt
a Frederick Warne (Firm) 14 pbl
a Camden Press. 14 prt
a The schoolfellows.
a England Id London.


IOUU





APPENDIX 4.10


Printed for rjs on 05-25-1999. Page 1



LTUF MORE AHD1624
NOTIS CATALOGING IOUU
UF FMT B RT a BL m T/C DT 07/09/90 R/DT 11/20/90 STAT nn E/L I DCF a D/S D
SRC d PLACE enk LANG eng MOD T/AUD j REPRO D/CODE s DT/1 1895 DT/2
CONT ILLUS a GOVT BIOG FEST 0 CONF 0 L/FORM 1 INDX 0

035/1: : a (Source)ONIUF 238
035/2: : a (OCoLC)21981437
035/3: : a (FU)bldn19900709
040: : a FUG Ic FUG
049:b : a FUG$
100:10: a Walton, Amy.
245:10: a Thistle and rose : lb a story for girls / Ic by Amy Walton ; with
four illustrations by R. Barnes.
260:0 : la London : |b W. & R. Chambers, Ic 1895.
300/1: :a 250, <2> p., <4> leaves of plates : b ill. ; Ic 19 cm.
500/1: :a Includes publisher's catalog.
500/2: :a Imprint also notes publisher's location in Edinburgh.
599/1: :a rjs
650/1: 0: a Grandfathers Ix Juvenile fiction.
650/2: 0: a Duty Ix Juvenile fiction.
650/3: 0: a Children's stories.

LTUF DONE AHD1624
NOTIS CATALOGING IOUU

655/4: 7: a Juvenile literature ly 1895. 12 rbgenr
655/5: 7: a Publishers' catalogues ly 1895. 12 rbgenr
690/6: 4: a Girls, Stories for ly 1895.
690/7: 4: a Bldn ly 1895.
700/1:10: a Barnes, R. 14 ill
710/2:20: a W.&R. Chambers Ltd. 14 pbl
752/3: : a England Id London.
752/4: : a Scotland Id Edinburgh.





APPENDIX 5.1


UNIVERSITY OF

FLORIDA


Administrative Affairs
Purchasing Division


Elmore Hall, Room 102
PO Box 115250
Gainesville, FL 32611-5250
Tel: (352) 392-1331
Fax: (352) 392-8837


April 1, 1996


PURCHASING NOTICE NO. FY 97-42


TO:


FROM:.

SUBJECT:


SDEANS, DIRECTORS AND DEPARTMENT
CHAIRPERSON

.Barbara J. Martm Purchasing Agent

Annual Contract for Microfilming Services


In an effort to obtain the best prices possible for all departments of the University, the
Purchasing Division has completed Bid No. 96B-144YC.

Said bid has resulted in an Annual Contract with the vendor shown as follows to provide
the University with the items listed. If you are requesting items on the contract please
enter the above bid number on your requisition.

This contract is effective from April 1, 1996 through June 30, 1999 with an option to
renew for two(2) additional (1) one year periods,July 1, 1999 through June 30, 2000, and
July 1, 2000 through June 30, 2001 upon written notice t6 and written acceptance by the
vendor.


VENDOR:



FEID:

CONTACT:


ITEMS COVERED:


Micrographics, Inc.
1925 NW 2nd Street
Gainesville, FL 32609

SVF 592039588002

Jim Craig, (352) 372-6039
Fax # (352) 378-6039


See Page 2


All questions concerning this contract should be directed the Purchasing Division,
Elmore Hall, Room 102, Attention: Barbara J. Martin, 392-1331 Ext. 314.


Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action Institution





APPENDIX 5.2


MICROGRAPHICS, Inc. PAGE 2


Bid No. 96B-144YC

Pricing Sheet

1. Microfilming, 16mm film, excludes processing and duplication.
Price per image...... $0.02245
2. Microfilming, 35mm film, excludes processing and duplication.
Price per image.......$0.31
3. Processing, 16mm silver gelatin 100ft. reel film (including processing,
processing agent's quality control, reel, box, and tie.)
Price per reel........ $2.75
4. Processing, 35mm silver gelatin 100ft. reel film (including processing,
processing agent's quality control, reel, box, and tie.)
Price per reel........ $5.95
5. Methylene Blue Test Price per test ........ $14.85

S. Microfiche Jacketing, including jacket formatting and loading of 16mm
and/or 35mm reel format films, including the cost of the formatting, loading,
jackets and creation of headers.
Price per jacket,
16mm, 5 channel......$0.59

16mm, 6 channel...... $0.71

35mm, 2 channel..... .$0.61

7. Duplication, second generation negative, 16mm silver gelatin 100ft. reel
(including duplication, duplication agent's quality control, reel, box and tie.)
Price per reel.........$7.37
8. Duplication, second generation negative, 16mm diazo 100ft. (including
duplication, duplicating agent's quality control, reel, box, and tie.)
Price per reel ........ $6.50
9.a., Duplication, second generation negative, 35mm silver gelatin 100ft. reel
(including duplication, duplication agent's quality control, reel box and tie.)
Price per reel ........ $16.10
9.b., Duplication, second generation negative, 35mm diazo.
Price per reel ........ .$12.75
10. Duplication, of microfiche Price per fiche ....... .$0.45
11. Preparation of records. Price per hour ....... $14.25
12. Record Retrieval. Per Retrieval........ .$1.75
13. Price, pickup and delivery Per event......... .$7.50
14. Certified destruction of records. Per cubic foot ........ $5.50













































































1'. 7 .i










AI, r 4.. -'







The Dog's Grand Dinner Party
Image Print
Type: Tagged Image File Format (TIFF), uncompressed Hewlett-Packard 5P
Si ze: 197 M3
Dimensions* 2112 x 3500 poxels, 5 28 x75 imches
Pixels Per Inch' 4CO
Pixel Depth/Colors: 4 bIl/16 shades/Grey scale
"r ., ':.." ,











Plxel Per~; inch' 4CO'r1': ~,
Pie el/Clr:4hi/6saesGe cl


















'-A .- '. *' ~

: .L.,,.% *-*- ~-l-*3i -


S U .1 r l o .-





LA re t H 1 1, T n eI, a .., I .1.- Z-ll I t"

1'F L I 11 1 I L
i-s


























fl






Jenny Jingle's Little Prattler
Image Pint
Type Tagged image File Format (TIFF), uncompressed Hewmeit-Packard 5P
Size: 19 7MB
Dimensions 2112 x 3500 pixels, 5 28 x 8 75 imcnes
Pixels Per Inch: 400
Pixel Depth/Colors: 4 bit/16 shades/Grey scale



















































The Terrier, though wild, had the sense to be quiet,
For, when females are present, there should be no riot.
There was no ill-humor, which happiness clogs,
*And I think I may say they were all happy Dogs.

The ladies were delicate, genteel, and pretty,
And some, I am told, were remarkably witty;
They danced with delight, quite forgetting all sorrow,
Not thinking their legs would be tired to-morrow,





The Dog's Grand ODnner Party
Image Print
Type- Tagged Image File Format (TIFF), uncompressed Hewlett-Packard 5P
Size 20.9MB
Dimensions 2428 x 3730 pixels. 6.07 x 9.32 Imches
Pixels Per Inch- 400
Pixel Depth/Colors: 4 bit/16 shades/Grey scale


'Xr~----------------------























































WICKED WILLY WIMBLE-coutinued.
Hia sti,,sl was poor old Brindle, As bold ;m Alexaniler,
His lance it was a spindle; Or any great commander,
An old tin pot So brave and stout,
For a drum he got, Be rode about,
Hi: martial fires to kindle. Until bu meit a GUaudor.
Said Will, "I wonldr canm ho
Eat up so brave a Manay?"
When it began
To hiss, he ran
And cried ut, Sae me, (ranny!"




..nri;, is an .I k~PR f "r 1.1 t l-rlmS

T h. o T IC.l?.n!. ) h. r *' frrt, l ',ffi. urrc.i : 3 r .Ar. t r l. ater;.t: ^

P:, rl. P--I Il;'l It,)
i ^., 'Cftl 'le.. '' -l : 1 0'7 1 t IW. ".C. o' K.









































































Sugar and Spice
Image Print
Type: Tagged Image File Format (TIFF), uncompressed Hewlett-Packard 5P
Size. 10.2 MB
Dimensions: 1630 x 2076 pixels, 4.08 x 5.19 inches
Pixels Per Inch: 400
Pixel Depth/Colors: 4 bit16 shades/Grey scale
.. .- ..;. _. ._ .
.-- .-, -... .-'- r ;-
i'












Pixel ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ _~L Det/oos 4b;6sadsGe cl


-- -.-_--~-----~--"--
I --~ -- -




http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/dlc/metadata/datasettoc.html


DataSet.TOC


MISSION
Mission
Statement
Goals
Committee
PROJECTS
SELECTION
COPYRIGHT
PREPARATION
DIGITIZATION
MARK-UP
METADATA
Administrative
Structural
Identifier
File Naming
DataSet.TOC
CATALOGING
MAINTENANCE
STAFF
RESEARCH
SEARCH


STRUCTURAL METADATA
The DataSet.TOC



WHAT IS A DATASET.TOC?
and
WHAT DOES IT DO?

The DataSet. TOC is a file created to facilitate the load of
electronic resources into the Florida Center for Library
Automation (FCLA) Digital Library. Its contents and
structure are determined by FCLA staff and the requirements
and limitations of the Digital Library.

The DataSet.TOC contains "structural meta-data",
information that will tell the Digitial Library how to construct
the electronic resource for presentation on the World Wide
Web. Think of it as a set of printer's instructions to the
binder.

Simply put, the DataSet. TOC does this:

identifies the files or pages comprising an electronic
resource;
defines the order of pages, and
says which pages belong to particular chapters;
establishes the order of chapters, and
says which chapters belong to which volumes; and
indicates the order of volumes.

BUILDING THE DataSet.TOC

Building the DataSet. TOC file begins prior to or during
digitization. At this time, information about an item's content
and structure are compiled.

The University of Florida's Digital Library Center anticipates
automating this process but an automated tool is not yet
available. Until it is available, DataSet. TOC files must be
created using word-processing software. DataSet. TOC files
are saved as text files (*.txt), initially named dataset. txt.

DataSet. TOC files will be saved in the directory containing
the digitized files that they describe. Be careful to save the
DataSet. TOC file in the correct directory. Each DataSet. TOC
file is (re-)named dataset.toc.


6/18/99 4:38 PM


APPENDIX 7.1




DataSet.TOC


[TOPOF THE DATASET.TOC TREE
Information used to identify and structure the piece.
(MANDATORY. NOT REPEATABLE.)
TAG NAME DEFINITION
tO Tree Level Top Used to assign a
Bibliographic Identifier Bibliographic Indentifier
(tree level: top) with a set of image files.
st Structure Type A code that tells the digital
library what kind of
material is being structured
and how to process it.
)LEVEL ONE OFTHE DATASET.TOC TREE
Title information
(MANDATORY. NOT REPEATABLE.)


2 of 4 6/18/99 4:38 PM


http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/dlc/metadata/datasettoc.html
APPENDIX 7.2

BEFORE YOU BEGIN

1. Each unique bibliographic unit (i.e., title, collection,
etc.) will have its own unique DataSet. TOC, identified
with its own Bibliographic Identifier.
2. Additionally, each bibliographic item will have been
cataloged and queued for digitization.
3. And, finally, you will have either completed digitization
and named files or you have determined how you will
name files created during digitization.

COMPILING THE DataSet.TOC

You are now ready to compile the DataSet. TOC. The
following table outlines the data-elements used to compile
the file. Each tag starts a new line. Use tags in the order listed
below. If you have decided to build the DataSet. TOC during
scanning, you may wish to print and use DataSet. TOC
Construction Forms (PDF file). Examples of use follow the
table.

It may be helpful to think of the structure of the following
table as that of a pine tree. It branches out as with each
data-element group. Data-element groups have start tags
beginning with the letter "t", for example, tO, tl, t2, t3.




http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/dlc/metadata/datasettoc.html


APPENDIX 7.3


tl Tree Level One
Bibliographic Identifier
(tree level: top)
fk File Key
(IG+NOTIS number)




ft File Title


fa File Author

mf Manifestation File
Information


Used to assign a
Bibliographic Indentifier
with a set of image files.
Information used to link the
digital resource with its
cataloging.
Records the Institutional Group
(IG) followed, without space, by
the System Number (NOTIS
number), e.g., QFABC1234.
Full title of the
bibliographic unit as
recorded in cataloging.
Author's full name as
recorded in cataloging.
Lists file types and names.
File type occurs with square
brackets, e.g., [TIFF]. HTML
and TIFF are the only valid file
type at this time.
File types and names are
separated by one space.


LEVEL TWO OF THE DATASET.TOC TREE
Volume/Issue information
(OPTIONAL. REPEATABLE.)


t2 Tree Level Two
vl Volume Number

is Issue Number

pr Page Range


dt Date
np Number of Pages



pn Page Numbers

mf Manifestation File
Information


Left empty
Volume number as
recorded on the item.
Issue number as recorded
on the item.
Starting and ending page
numbers separated by a
dash.
Date of issue
Total number of files
comprising the digital
resource, including covers,
fly-leaves, plates, etc.
Actual file names as found
on the source document.
Lists file types and names.
File type occurs with square
brackets, e.g., [TIFF]. HTML
and TIFF are the only valid file
type at this time.
File types and names are
separated by one space.


6/18/99 4:38 PM


LEVEL THREE OF THE DATASET.TOC TREEI
Article/Part/Chapter/etc. information
(MANDATORY. REPEATABLE.)


DataSet.TOC


3 of 4




http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/dlc/metadata/datasettoc.html


APPENDIX 7.4


t3 Tree Level Three
(Bibliographic Identifier +
Sequential File Group
Number)
ti Title of Item



au Author



mf Manifestation File
Information


Used to order "t3" sibling
groups.


Title of the article, part,
chapter, etc. as found either
on the item or in an
authorized finding guide.
Author of the article, part,
chapter, etc. as found either
on the item or in an
authorized finding guide.
Lists file types and names.
File type occurs with square
brackets, e.g., [TIFF]. HTML
and TIFF are the only valid file
type at this time.
File types and names are
separated by one space.


STRUCTURE TYPES

At present, only one structure type (susd01) is used for
digital library resources created from library materials. Other
codes are planned.

Related information:

Examples of DataSet. TOC Use
Bibliographic Identifier
File Naming



Copyright, University of Florida, 1999
The University of Florida, acting on behalf of the State University System of
Florida, reserves all rights to this text. No part shall be downloaded or stored in a
retrieval system other than as required for browsing. It may not be reproduced,
printed or copied without permission from the University of Florida or except as
allowed under the terms of current copyright legislation.
For more information or permissions, contact the Digital
Library Center at dlc(~mail.uflib.ufl.edu


Last Revised: 1999 April 13.


6/18/99 4:38 PM


DataSet.TOC


4 of 4




http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/dlc/metadata/struct.html


MISSION
Mission
Statement
Goals
Committee
PROJECTS
SELECTION
COPYRIGHT
PREPARATION
DIGITIZATION
MARK-UP
METADATA
Administrative
Structural
Identifier
File Naming
DataSet.TOC
CATALOGING
MAINTENANCE
STAFF
RESEARCH
SEARCH


STRUCTURAL METADATA

STRUCTURAL METADATA


UNDER CONSTRUCTION

Structural metadata is information about the composition and
structure of the digital resource. It is information intended to
establish the order and relation of files within the resource.
And, it is used both to indicate how those files should be
displayed and how those displays should act.

Select from the following procedures for Structural MetaData
completion:

Establishing a Bibliographic Identifier
File-Naming Procedures
Comnnilin, a DataSet.TOC

See also, ADMINISTRATIVE METADATA.



Copyright, University of Florida, 1999
The University of Florida, acting on behalf of the State University System of
Florida, reserves all rights to this text. No part shall be downloaded or stored in a
retrieval system other than as required for browsing. It may not be reproduced,
printed or copied without permission from the University of Florida or except as
allowed under the terms of current copyright legislation.
For more information or permissions, contact the Digital
Library Center at dlc(.mail.uflib.ufl.edu


Last Revised: 1999 February 03.


6/18/99 4:39 PM


Structural Metadata


APPENDIX 7.5




http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/dlc/metadata/filenaming.html


File Naming Conventions


MISSION
Mission
Statement
Goals
Committee
PROJECTS
SELECTION
COPYRIGHT
PREPARATION
DIGITIZATION
MARK-UP
METADATA
Administrative
Structural
Identifier
File Naming
DataSet.TOC
CATALOGING
MAINTENANCE
STAFF
RESEARCH
SEARCH


STRUCTURAL METADATA
File Naming Conventions

The following procedures assume the limitations of the FCLA
Digital Library
that will serve the digital versionss.

File naming by any other name is paginatingg." It is the
processes of giving the pages or files, comprising a digital
resource, unique names so as to structure and reference them
for display or use.

File naming procedure varies for the type of digital resource
that will be produced. The reproduction of analog resources
in digital formats presents the opportunity to either faithfully
reproduce the analog source-document, page-by-page, or to
recreate it in a new fashion.

A faithful and full reproduction is known as an "electronic
facsimile." Electronic facsimiles are appropriate to resources,
such as rare books and manuscripts, for which the value of
original pagination is important. Electronic facsimiles bear a
one-to-one correspondence to the source-document; for every
source-document page there is corresponding electronic file.

A reproduction in any other format is known as a
"re-engineered resource. Re-engineered resources are
appropriate to resources that would benefit from organization
distinct from the pagination of the source document. Such a
resource may either pull pages together or split them part. It
may be desired to enhance or optimize the resource in digital
version.

Here are simple examples of the same source-document as an
electronic facsimile and as a re-engineered resource.

Select the procedures set you would like to see.

Electronic Facsimile Procedures
Re-Enuineered Resource Procedures

The Digital Library Center is working on programs to
automate file-naming.

Related information:


* Bibliographic Identifier


6/18/99 4:39 PM


APPENDIX 7.6









Appendix 8


Rationale for using a Digital Camera in lieu of a Flat Bed Scanner

1. Using a flat bed scanner and inflicting as little force as necessary to scan these items, images
always bear the clear indication of gutter shadow.
2. The animal glues used in 19th-century binding were applied thickly by today's standard.
Those glues have become extremely brittle. Even with little force, spines crack. Although
some force would be required with a digital camera, the book would be opened at a 90-degree
rather than 120-degree angle. Volumes would also be opened during microfilming to a 120-
degree angle, albeit beneath the platen of a spring loaded book cradle, which will provide
extra support.
3. The sewing in these volumes has weakened over time through exposure to acids released
from brittle papers. The effect of turning pages wears poorly upon threads. The reduced
angle of openness necessary for imaging by a digital camera mitigates damage resulting from
reproduction. The Department of Special Collections will advise users of the collection that
microfilm or digital surrogates must be used rather than the original objects.


An illustrated rationale of the benefit of a digital camera:

Image One: Digital Camera equivalent.
Image Two: Minolta book scanner or microfilm equivalent.
Note the color copy was made by dismantling a volume for scanning on a flat bed scanner, which
would not be acceptable practice for the collections in Special Collections.
Image Three: Example from a volume that could not be disbound.
Note that the gutter margin is shadowed as a result of uneven illumination cause by the pages not
sitting flat on the platen of the scanner. A Digital camera, with a properly arranged lighting
system (already on-site), will illuminate the pages evenly, making for a fully readable text.




APPENDIX 8.2


E was an Esquire


was an Esquire, widi ii-olent Brow

FL
was a Farmer, and followed the Plough


was a Gamester, who had but Ill Luck


was a Hunter, and hunted a Buck


s an Innkeeper, who loved to Bouse
was an Innkeeper, who loved to Bouse


Image One




APPENDIX 8.3


E was an Esqwire


was an Esquiwr, witll Ii-ulcnt Browv




was a Farmer, and followed the Plough




was a Gamester, who had but ll ILuck




was a Hunter, and hunted a Buck



was an Innkeeper, who loved to Bouse


Image Two





APPENDIX 8.4







h.
of^rth'AflWI have notieeived l'at n. jii':id re
g ch b;ti i u oiet rr' i imec iamcoricw i-riom ..
it'i e'lhiIrnmornin -ad i nre of opintoe dt
to itkrlka liw.loromewh're. '' They further stari '
-tihai'wih' to be friendlI-, 'arepreparingn '
ter nired'dn s-.r..1 have no'&coubt hur hither'
a'11hto hatit is rpre9rented to be'(fro'ri 15i '
-.io .; .- .
d'the beqt means or knowing their ,tir n t
de'ih' ilriiisht had nearly 3,000 emo
'dre rmind b G a light,' I fel cvern dirpos. :'
s;aibnd.ITcel'confidet I can repel (as wrong as 'i'-'
ikmmatniibna hnldnut) anyfnrce they c.n brio against
plied:'r'cnlorierM'Donald for.a upplp : n.'provisoni-
tW lt have refused to supply the chiefs with corni.d til '
fliitile.are returned, and every thing settled below r
-- *. .. .-.,-.- '

Fri'- -.S "inrot obedient servant,
d)- ':. D. .. CLINCH. -'
,Lr. Col. -Uhl f. C .--an ..
Gpin, Conmidg. ,....... .
aSe iring the ab an Indian has arrived from iG --
W'mne tbiathechLtethare all broke u'p, anrid hTiat.' i.di
wy hojnujs,,andconirms ,tlie report-that I hkle blenr ..
,B ---a"" .- .. -- .. ._
l.. :-- .j -.-"j-- ",
No. "2.

F..rt -rair;, .May 911., S31 .

iumrunicatinns of the .d and 7trh instant, Idid mf s .V'
Ve yon all the information I was in pnsiessnn-o r~- -
ti, fmovemeonts of the Indiars, near the confluence of
btnhouchir. t v
ei'cing, the Prince, several or the'chiefs that live
Lr.'Imbly, arrived .it this pnst. 'The prince told
tonh evern things ha. lan in hls' power to inuoce the
against the Negrn Frt, and to let the white pe-
i y ee cr na wuld nor li to hi;" .










Image Three




APPENDIX 9
BALDWIN LIBRARY OF HISTORICAL CHILDREN'S LITERATURE
PUBLISHERS' BINDINGS SURVEY


Publisher:


Date:


Place: New York


Philadelphia


Boston London Other:


NO BINDING


STYLE


_"Bulletin Board" layout
_ Flat Poster Style
_Professional Layouts
_ Asymmetrical Layout
_Symmetrical Layout

CLOTH

PATTERN

_ Ungrained
_Bead Grain
_Bold Rib Grain
_Marbled
_Morocco Grain
_Net Grain
_Rib Grain
_Ribbon-Embossed
_Ripple grain
_Sand Grain
_Silk Grain
_Wave Grain

COLOR

Black
Blue
_Brown
_Gray
Green
_Orange
_Purple
_Red
_White
_Yellow


ENDPAPERS


DECORATION

STAMPING

__ Blind
_ Border
Center
_Fillet
Frame
_Geometric
Panel


ORNAMENT

Corner Pieces
_ Delicate Curling
_ Eastlake-style
_ Inlays
_ Onlays
_ Large Emblematic Pictorials
Small Emblematic Pictorials
_ Small Generalized Vignettes
SPublishers Monograms

COLOR PRINTING

Black
Reflective Black
Blue
Brown
Gold
_Gray
Green
_Orange
_Purple
Red
Silver
White
Yellow


BOARDS


Back
_ Back Blind
_Beveled
Front
_Front Blind
_Spine
Pictorial Cover
_Plain Cover
Printed Cover


EDGES

Color
Gilt
_ Marbled/Patterned
_ Sprinkled

LETTERING/LABELS

SClassic Roman Lettering
_Flowing Lettering
SCloth Labels
_ Paper Labels
_Engraved Paper Labels
_Printed Paper Labels

PAPER

Pictorial Cover
_Plain Cover
Printed Cover

ARTISTS' EVIDENCE


_Binder's Tickets
SSigned Binders
_ Signed Designers
_Signed Engravers


_Patterned
_Pictorial
_Plain


MISCELLANEOUS
x.
Dust Jacket
_ Presentation Binding
SCustom (Bespoke) Binding


Call #:








Resumes of Principal Staff for Project

John E. Ingram, Project Director
Rita J. Smith, Co-Project Director
Erich J. Kesse
Cathleen L. Mook
James Clifton
Nelda Schwartz
Elaine M. Henjum
Tatiana Barr
John Freund
Jeffrey Barr









October 1998


VITA

JOHN E. INGRAM


Current Residence: Professional Address:

2247 NW 11th Avenue Department of Special Collections
Gainesville, Florida 32605 210 Smathers Library
USA P.O.Box 117007
352-338-7558 Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
Voice: 352-392-9075 Fax: 352-846-2746
Email: jeingr@mail.uflib.ufl.edu


PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries.

1994 present Chair, Department of Special Collections and Area Studies

Responsible for the overall development and management of the Smathers Libraries' special collections and
area studies, including rare books, archives, manuscripts, maps, prints, photographs, and other special material
and area studies in Florida history, Latin Americana, Judaica, and Africana. Holdings: 250,000 books and 10
million manuscript and archival items for special collections, and 500,000 volumes, 50,000 rolls of microfilm,
and other materials for area studies programs. Responsible for the department's public and technical services,
personnel management and supervision (22 FTEs), space management, and collection development (materials
budget in excess of $600,000 and endowments of more than $1,000,000. Serves as secretary and treasurer for
the Howe Society, a friends' group for special collections, and edits The Howe Society Newsletter. Serves as
key spokesperson and liaison to Libraries and university administrations, professional and scholarly
organizations, faculty, students, and the general public in advancing the status of the collections.

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Department of the Library.

1984 1994 Curator for Library Special Collections

Administer the special collections of the Foundation Library: manuscripts, rare books, architectural
collections (including architectural, archaeological, and landscape drawings), maps, graphic arts, and
microforms. Responsible for Library preservation and conservation decisions and for the acquisition of rare
and out-of-print materials. Chief contact between donors and the Foundation for rare library materials.
Reference librarian for library collections. Collection development for history faculty. Fiscal and personnel
responsibility for two professional FTEs, and student assistants, volunteers, and interns (20 people). Member
of Foundation committees for preservation, museum programming, African-American History, emergency
response, and pest management.

1991 1994 Research Division Coordinator, Bruton Heights Education Center

Coordinate planning, research and development, space requirements for staff and collections, and transfer of
four administrative departments within the Research Division: Library, History, Architectural Research, and
Archaeological Research to a new education complex. Work with the consulting architects and Foundation
staff to insure a successful conclusion to the project within budgetary guidelines. The Division employed
approximately 50 FTEs and had an operating budget above $2 million. My supervisor was the vice-president
for research.





2


EDUCATION

Brown University, Providence, RI, 1968-1977: Ph.D. (Slavic Linguistics).
Fordham University, New York, 1963-1968: B.A., M.A. (Russian Language and Literature).
National Archives and Records Service,. 1978: Certificate in Archives Administration

Special Qualifications

Information Systems: OCLC; MARC AMC; DOS: WordPerfect; Macintosh: Word, PageMaker.
Languages: Russian, Latin, French, German, other Indo-European languages.

AWARDS AND HONORS

1992 National Endowment for the Humanities, Summer Stipend Grant

Project: to complete the transcription and proofreading of John Evelyn's unpublished manuscript "Elysium
Britannicum," Christ Church College, Oxford.

1992 American Philosophical Society Grant

Project: to complete the transcription of John Evelyn's unpublished manuscript "Elysium Britannicum," Christ
Church College, Oxford.

1991-1992 Institute for Museum Services

Preservation survey of architectural, landscape, and archaeological drawings collection. The Colonial
Williamsburg Foundation, Williamsburg, Virginia.

PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

"Security of cartographic collections," panelist. Miami International Map Fair, February 1998.

United States Agricultural Information Network Preservation Project, coordinator for University of Florida's
participation in this NEH funded grant, 1996-7.

Monticello Electronic Library Pilot Project (SOLINET), coordinator for University of Florida's participation in this
SOLINET directed NTIA-funded grant, 1996-7.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

John Evelyn's "Elysium Britannicum, or the Royal Gardens", editor and transcriber. (University of Pennsylvania Press,
September, 2000.

"John Evelyn's 'Elysium Britannicum' Provenance, Condition, and Transcription," in John Evelyn's "Elysium
Britannicum" and European Gardening,, Therese O'Malley and Joachim Wolschke-Bulmahn, eds., Dumbarton Oaks
Colloquium on the History of Landscape Architecture 17 Washington, DC., 1998.

The Colonial Williamsburg Research Collections in Microform, A Guide, editor, UPA Academic Editions, 1992.

Child's Play? Children's Books in Early America, exhibition catalog, published by the International Board on Books for
Young People, 1990.

The William Blathwayt Papers at Colonial Williamsburg, 1631-1722. Guide to the Microfilm Collection, editor, UPA
Academic Editions, 1989.









Rita J. Smith
1417 NW 17th Terrace, Gainesville, FL 32605
ritsmit(rmail.uflib.ufl.edu
home: (392) 376-0511 office: (352) 392-0369



EDUCATION University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
M.A. in English, with a concentration in Children's Literature, in
progress (15 hours completed)

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
School of Library and Information Science
Masters Degree in Library Science, May, 1973

Goshen College, Goshen, Indiana
B.A. in English, May, 1967


WORK EXPERIENCE Curator and Assistant Librarian,
Department of Special Collections, University of Florida, 1995-present

Duties and responsibilities: Curatorial responsibilities for the Baldwin
Library of Historical Children's Literature, including collection
development and management, cataloging, public services and reference,
public relations, supervision of student assistants and coordination with
the preservation department.

General Humanities Cataloger,
Resource Services Department, University of Florida, 1993-1995

Duties and responsibilities: Original cataloging of monographs in subject
areas related to religion, philosophy, psychology, language and literature;
application of subject headings to shared copy and to UF dissertations;
contribution of original authority records to NACO.

Coordinator, Academic Support Services,
The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature, University of
Florida, 1991-1993

Duties and responsibilities: Create original and copy cataloging records
for books in the Baldwin Library; serve patron requests both on-site and
via the mail and phone; supervise student assistants.

Visiting Instructor Librarian and Project Cataloger,
The Baldwin Library and the Catalog Department, University of Florida,
1990-1991

Duties and responsibilities: Serve as the supervising cataloger on a
Department of Education Title IIC grant; do original cataloging,
including rare books cataloging, of 3,000 selected Baldwin books;
supervise a staff of 5; develop, with others in the Catalog Department,
models for Baldwin records; create a special genre terms subject list;
establish workflow; and help write the final report of the Principal
Investigator of the project.










Erich J. Kesse
525 N.E. 9th Avenue, Gainesville, FL 32601-4411
erich(fSmail.uflib.ufl.edu
home/325.375.4476 office/352.392.6962 office fax/352.392.6597


WORK
EXPERIENCE


EDUCATION


RECENT
GRANTS
and
FUNDED
PROJECTS


DIRECTOR, DIGITAL LIBRARY CENTER
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
July 1999 to present
Responsible for policy and procedural development of the digitization facilities and programs.
Supervision of 5 FTE full-time staff. Administration of vendor contracts and budgets. Grant
development and administration.

PRESERVATION OFFICER
Smathers Libraries. Preservation Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
May 1987 to July 1999
Responsible for creation and implementation of preservation programs including binding,
conservation, digital imaging, microphotography, and processing, as well as, definition or
programming automation of preservation information.
Supervision of 11 FTE full-time staff. Administration of vendor contracts and budgets.
Preservation grant development and administration.
Manages in-house facilities to conserve library materials, microfilm to preservation standard,
and digitize from bound and unbound source documents and from microfilm, microfiche and
photo-negatives, with microform production exceeding 250,000 images (500,000 pages) and
digital imaging exceeding 100,000 images/pages annually.

RARE BOOK CATALOGER
Smathers Libraries. Catalog Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
April 1984 September 1986
Responsible for descriptive and subject cataloging of rare books and manuscripts.



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY. New York, New York
School of Library Service
May 1987. Certificate ofPreservation Administration

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY. Lexington, Kentucky
School of Library and Information Science
August 1983. Master ofScience, Library Science
Specialization in rare book and manuscripts cataloging

XAVIER UNIVERSITY. Cincinnati, Ohio
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
May 1982. Bachelor ofArts
Dual program of Philosophy and English literature



Caribbean Newspaper Imaging Project, Phase II. 1999-.
Planning Team member and Digitization coordinator; wrote Phase II work-plan.
Pilot project to evaluate Optical Character Recognition applications to imaged newspapers and
to test machine alternatives to human indexing.
Supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.











RECENT
GRANTS
and
FUNDED
PROJECTS


Florida Heritage Project. 1999-
State of Florida/SUS digitization project funded through the Florida Center for Library
Automation (FCLA).
@ 12,000 images total for four institutions.
Project planning team member.
Coordinator for the University of Florida's participation
Digitization service vendor for Florida State University, the University of North Florida, and
the University of West Florida.
Document procedure for the majority of Project facets, including use of the FCLA digital
library.
Linking Florida's Natural Heritage Project. 1998-
Institute of Museum and Library Services funded digitization project.
@ 2,000 volumes.
Project planning team member.
Principle Investigator for reprographic sub-contract

U.S. Agricultural Information Network Project.
Part 2 : Preservation Microfilming, 1998-1999.
Principle Investigator at the University of Florida.
Preservation microfilm Florida agriculture and agrarian literature.
Served on planning committee that established the Project in the early 1990s.
Supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, a national project coordinated from
Comell University.
Florida Geological Survey Project. 1997-1999.
Principle Investigator. (University of Florida Libraries funded project)
Preservation microfilm and digitize the complete publications of the Florida Geological
Survey.
Supported by the State of Florida.
U.S. Newspaper Project, Florida.
Phases 1 & 2 : Cataloging & Microfilming, 1996-1999.
Planning Team member and Preservation Microfilming coordinator.
Preservation microfilm Florida newspapers.
Supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, a state project coordinated from the
University of Florida.
Caribbean Newspaper Imaging Project, Phase I. 1996-1998.
Planning Team member and Digitization coordinator.
Pilot project to digitize Caribbean Newspapers: Diario de la Mariana (Havana, Cuba) and La
Nouvelliste (Port-au-Prince, Haiti).
Supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.
Eric Eustace Williams Project. 1996-.
Project designer and Principal Investigator.
Project to list, preservation microfilm and digitize works by and about Dr. Eric Williams, first
Prime Minister of Trinidad & Tobago.
Supported by the State of Florida.


Page 2 of 2




ka.imUcc11 J1. IvIvv.. I'".


Cathleen L. Mook
3625 SW 30th Terrace, Apt. B Gainesville, FL 32608
cathy@mail.uflib.ufl.edu
home/325.372.6826 office/352.392.6962 office fax/352.392.6597


WORK
EXPERIENCE


EDUCATION


Head, Binding Unit
Smathers Libraries. Preservation Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
June 1998 to present
Responsible for overall operation of thirteen member binding
unit distributed over eight buildings. Duties include training
staff on use of binding automation software, administering
binding contract and budget and tracking monthly and yearly
statistics.

Head, Preservation Department
Howard Tilton Memorial Library
Tulane University, New Orleans, LA
June 1997- June 1998
Responsible for coordination of three member Preservation
Department, including binding and conservation programs.
Duties included managing in-house conservation lab, training
staff on use of binding automation software, administering
departmental budget, and tracking monthly and yearly
statistics.


University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA
School of Library and Information Science
December, 1996 Certificate ofAdvanced Study in Preservation
Administration


University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA
School of Library and Information Science
December, 1995 Master ofLibrary Science

University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, MN
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
May, 1991 Bachelor ofArts


INTERNSHIPS and
FELLOWSHIPS


COMPUTER
EXPERIENCE


1996 UMI Preservation Fellow
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA
January 1996 -December 1996
Researched, designed and produced physical survey instrument
for monographic, photographic and archival collections of
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
Preservation Intern
Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation
Pittsburgh, PA
December 1994 -December 1995
Responsible for conducting physical condition survey of 250
folio and quarto rare plant monographs.


Operating Systems (OS) experience
MS-DOS, Windows'95, Mac OS


6/18/99 5:04 PM


L..4U11~~~~~~~~~~~1I- Ii k 1.fl VY-p AJ lNt".' VT J -.'.,il I A~f /3A 0 -J"161/iLiIA)/ &iaJU "l Ti ins A-s.55JJS5L5








James R. "Gus" Clifton
1918 NW 3 Avenue
Gainesville FL 32603-1501 USA
gusclifamail.uflib.ufl.edu
home 352.338.0354 office 352.392.6962 x163


EDUCATION


WORK
EXPERIENCE


COMPUTER
EXPERIENCE


AWARDS


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA. Gainesville, FL
College Liberal Arts and Sciences
January 1997 present. Studyingfourth semester in Italian
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA. Gainesville, FL
College of Law
August 1989 May 1991. Twoyears completed

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA. Gainesville, FL
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
May 1989. B.A., Anthropology
HUDSON HIGH SCHOOL. Hudson, FL
June 1985. Diploma awarded


MICROPHOTOGRAPHY SECTION CHIEF
Smathers Libraries. Preservation Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
September 1996 to present
Responsible for all phases of microfilm production;
hiring, training and supervising student assistants;
interaction with other micropublishers and vendors;
sales of microforms to clients;
production statistics and database develpoment and management;
creating and updating micrographics website

MICROPHOTOGRAPHY IMAGING TECHNICIAN
Smathers Libraries. Preservation Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
April 1993 to September 1996
Responsible for queueing and microfilming of newspapers from Florida,
Latin America, East Central Africa, and other places.
Secondary assignment: digital scanning technician.
ASSISTANT MANAGER
Godfather's Pizza. 1405 NW 23 Ave., Gainesville, FL 32605
August 1991 September 1996
Responsible for supervision and management of restaurant crew; payroll;
and deposits.


Operating Systems
Windows 95/NT, Windows 3.1, MS-DOS


Software Applications
MSOffice 95/97, including Word, Excel, Access, Power Point and Outlook98;
Paint Shop Pro; HTML Assistant Pro
Programming Languages
HTML 4.0 mark-up, including forms, tables, frames, image maps

Libraries' Staff Recognition Award, "Mover and Shaker", December 1997


6/18/99 5:06 PM


J allies .i. Uu"- v-tifv ln. inr.


"rr.r,,r urr --- -ur ~ i ur -rl u rl I-~L L>




Neicaa m. ,wiwa U.L-. v i..


EDUCATION


WORK
EXPERIENCE


COMPUTER
EXPERIENCE


PROFESSIONAL


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA. Gainesville, Florida
College of Education
Spring 1970. Bachelor ofScience.
Major: Library Science.
INDIAN RIVER JUNIOR COLLEGE. Ft. Pierce, FL
April 1968. Associate ofArts.


Archivist
Smathers Libraries. Preservation Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
1990 to present
Responsible for cataloging preservation microforms;
implementing and analyzing condition surveys;
supervising, training and coordinating student assistants;
developing and documenting procedures for the web-based
manual for microfilming, brittle books and scanning;
coordinating brittle books reformat preparations and
materials routing; initiating replacement orders for brittle
materials; departmental systems liaison; serials, theses and
monograph binding.
Library Technical Assistant II
Smathers Libraries. Catalog Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
1975-1989
Responsible for cataloging periodicals and other serials;
supervising and training student assistants; distribution and
bibliographic searching of serials; catalog maintenance;
developing and documenting procedures.

Library Assistant
Smathers Libraries. Catalog Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
1973-1975
Responsible for distribution of materials to be cataloged;
cataloging new monographic editions; bibliographic
searching of serials; adds; catalog maintenance.

Clerk-Typist II,III
Smathers Libraries. Catalog Department
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
September 1970-1973
Responsible for organization and distribution of unit work;
train and supervise other clerk-typists; preliminary
cataloging of theses; secretarial duties.


Operating Systems (OS) experience
MS-DOS, Windows'95

Programming Language experience
HTML 3.2 mark-up, including forms, tables

Florida Library Association (1994)
Co-organized Paraprofessional Workshop


6/18/99 5:06 PM


Nelda M. Schwartz
2503 N.E. 11 Ter., Gainesville, FL 32609
neldasf@,mail.uflib.ufl.edu
home/352.378.3219 office/352.392.6962


l of 2




Elaine IVi. Henjum


10254 S.W. 55'h Lane. Gainesville, Florida 32608 (352)335-0712 (home) (352)392-9020 (work)


EDUCATION

University of Denver. Graduate School of Librarianship and Information Management. Denver
Colorado. M.A..

Bemidji State University. Bemidji, Minnesota. B.A. in History.

EXPERIENCE

Database Coordinator. Florida Center for Library Automation, Gainesville, Florida. January
1996-present.

Responsibilities include design, loading and indexing functions for the SUS Electronic
Collection of journal citation databases, full-text files and imaged data; specifications for
database conversion and load programs; database quality control including accuracy, currency
and data integrity.

Serve as backup on database management for the ten library catalogs supported by FCLA;
coordinate with vendor, library and FCLA staff on technical issues; participate in project teams
for indexing and presentation design, development and maintenance and provide user support
to library staff.

User Services Librarian for Cataloging and Authority Conitrol. Florida Center for Library
Automation, Gainesville, Florida. February 1985-January 1996.

Responsibilities were to support and assist staff at the libraries within the ten State University
System institutions in the areas of authority control, catalog maintenance and special database
loading.

Provide training, consulting, and support documentation; monitor users for problems or needs
related to the NOTIS system.

Have written specifications and developed strategies to load authority records from various
vendors (BNA, UTLAS, OCLC, LC (LCSH and NAF) NLM (MeSH) as well as to load
bibliographic records from multiple sources (OCLC, EBSCO, CIS, MARCIVE, AES, Brodart).

Participated in design development for a PC interface to load both bibliographic and authority
records into NOTIS from OCLC as well as from other sources. Responsible for testing software,
implementation assistance, training documentation and ongoing enhancements.

Responsibilities included significant support and development in the creation and
maintenance of the numerous citation databases locally mounted and maintained by FCLA ;




Elaine M. Henjum


10254 S.W. 55'h Lane. Gainesville, Florida 32608 (352)335-0712 (home) (352)392-9020 (work)


EXPERIENCE (continued)

CataloginQ Coordinator. University of Denver. Penrose Library. Denver, Co. August 1980-
January 1985.

Responsible for coordinating the work flow through the Cataloging Department using the OCLC
online cataloging system. Hired, trained and supervised 4 full-time and 7 part-time library
assistants.

Reclassification Project Coordinator. University of Denver. Penrose Library. Denver, Co.
August 1979-July 1980.

Established and coordinated a project to reclassify materials from Dewey to LC using OCLC.
Hired, trained and supervised 3 full-time library assistants. Also responsible for original
cataloging.

Visiting Instructor. University of Denver. Graduate School of Librarianship and Information
Management. Denver, Co. Summer 1982.

Instructor for 'Storage and Retrieval of Library Materials II', a 4-credit class emphasizing the
effective use of OCLC and Library of Congress classification schedules and subject headings.

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIP AND SERVICE (current)

American Library Association (ALA) (member)
Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS)
Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL)
Library Information & Technology Association (LITA)
MARBI, Intern 1995-1996.
MARBI 1996-
Bylaws Committee, 1993-1996.
Reference and Adult Services Division (RASD)
RASD Collection Development and Evaluation Section (CODES) Computer
Based Methods and Resources Committee, 1994-1996.
Florida Library Association (member)
FLA Academic Libraries Section/ Fla. ACRL chapter Board of Directors, 1995-
SFLA Academic Libraries Academic Section chair/FACRL president (1998-1999)
National Standards Organization.
Appointed by the Board of Directors to the NISO Standards Committee AL to develop
an American National Standard for Holdings Statements for Bibliographic Items. April
1995-




Vita: John Freund http://karamelik.eastlib.ufl.edu/home/john/vita.html

John Freund
4331 NW 28th Terrace
Gainesville, Florida 32605
johfreu@nervm.nerdc.ufl.edu

telephone number -home/ 352-374-4032
office/352.392-6962

EDUCATION
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, Minnesota
June, 1975, BA, Journalism.

San Francisco State
San Francisco, California
College of Art and Design
September, 1984,
Certificate, Book Restoration and Binding.

WORK EXPERIENCE

Head, Conservation Unit.
Smathers Libraries. Preservation Department University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
October 1988 to present. Responsible for: Collaborates with Collection Managers to assess and treat
collections within the ability of available resources. Supervises services including : pamphlet binding,
basic and complex repair, restoration, protective enclosure and environmental/physical conditions
monitoring. Trains staff and monitors the work of Unit staff, volunteers and OPS and evaluates work
flow and progress.

Circulation and Stack Manager.
Jonsson Library of Government Documents
Stanford University. Palo Alto California.
June 1983 to September 1988.
Responsible for: Supervision of the Circulation desk and the students manning it. Sending out monthly
overdue notices, and billings. Maintenance of the open stacks and the supervision of the student
receivers. Provided reference assistance two three hours/ day.

Food Service Manager
SAGA Corporation
Menlo Park, California
September 1975 to jan 1983.
Responsible for: Management of all aspects of contract food services.

INTERNSHIPS

Sutro Library
San Francisco State University
San Francisco, CA.
Refurbishment of the reference collection.
September March 1982-83

San Anselmo Theological Seminary
San Anselmo California
October December 1983
Responsible for: Preservation and restoration of the Libraries special collections.

COMPUTER EXPERIENCE
Operating Systems (OS) experience


10/26/98 10:03 AM







Jeffrey A. Barr
S1500 NW 16t* Avenue, Gainesville FL 32605
jefbarr@mail.uflib.ufl.edu
home: (352) 376-5572 office: (352) 392-0321


EDUCATION Columbia University, New York, New York
Masters in Libr-ry Scienc=. 1986. Major. Rre Book P-ogm

University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California
1977, 1979-1981. Ground in Asian Sicdies
Major: C.assical Chinese, No degree

Goddard College, Plainfield, Vermont
BA.1974. Major: Aalydcal Psychology

WORK EXPERIENCE Librarian for Rare Books and Special Collecrions
Department of Special Collecions, University of Florida,
Oc:. 1995 -Present

Responsible for the managceaen of the are books colledon.

Library Director, North Baker Research Library
California Historical Society, San Francisco, California
June 1992 Oc:. 1995

Responsible for the management of all hIrary operaions.

Librarian for Technical Services, North Baker Research
Library
Caifornia Historical Society, San Francisco. Caifornia
Nov. 1991- June 1992

Responsible for all aspect of tenical services.

North Pacific Studies Librarian,
North Pacific Studies Center, Oregon historical Society
Portland, Oregon. Oct. 1989 May 1991

Responsible for readingg the collecdon. developing nd !imDlmcent ng all
h"orary functions for the Center. with an acquisidons budge of 5160,000.

Mellon Grant Cataloger
New-York Historical Society, New York. New Yor
Oct. 1985 Sept 1989

Responsible for caraloging Am.-cnca and rare bcoks in the RL-N
daCtbase, using AACR2. BDR3, LCSH. and LC cLassificadon schedules.








Position Descriptions for Staff to be Hired


Project Cataloger
Project Archivist
Library Technical Assistant
Assistant Head, Digital Library Center
Interface Systems Specialist
Program Assistant, Scanning Supervisor







Position: Project Cataloger, Original catalog records


Rank: Assistant-in or Associate-in/University Libraries

Reports to: Curator, Baldwin Library (Co-Project Director for grant)

Job summary

The Project Cataloger is primarily responsible for original cataloging of titles in the area
of children's literature in English for the period 1850-1869. The Project Cataloger will review
the enhanced copy of the project archivist. The Project Cataloger will be responsible for
reviewing and contributing records to national standard


Responsibilities

1. Organizes and performs descriptive and subject cataloging of titles children's literature in
accord with the following standards: Anglo-American Cataloging Rules Two Revised
(AACR2R) and Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH). Supervises the project
archivist in doing the same.
2. Enhances subject access through genre terms using the ALA/Rare Books and Manuscripts
Sthesaurus guidelines.
3. Contributes original cataloging records to OCLC and authority records to NACO. Supervises
the Project Archivist in doing the same.
4. Uses RLIN to supplement OCLC database for authorities and bibliographic searching..
5. Establishes new name authority records for name changes necessitated by AACR2R
6. Updates and maintains information in LUIS for original records contributed to OCLC.
7. Coordinates workflow with project managers.
8. Reports monthly statistics to project managers.


Requirements

1. A Master's degree in Library Science from an ALA-credited library school.
2. Two years of experience cataloging materials in special collections.
3.1 Two years of original cataloging experience in an academic or research library
4. Demonstrated experience in working with OCLC or RLIN databases, including MARC book
formats
5.i Ability to communicate effectively orally and in writing
6. Demonstrated capacity to work effectively and productively in a team environment.
7. Demonstrated success in working within a project schedule.





Supervisor's Initials

UNIVERSITY OF


FLORIDA


Incumbent's Initials
STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF FLORIDA
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
UNIVERSITY SUPPORT PERSONNEL SYSTEM
POSITION DESCRIPTION


CURRENT DESCRIPTIVE DATA FOR COMPLETION BY PERSONNEL Position
UPON FINAL ACTION Number:
NOTE: COMPLETE NUMBERED ITEMS PER INSTRUCTIONS Approved Class Title: Approved
Class
Code:
1. Position Number: 2. Requested Classification Action: Transaction: Effective Date:
O Establish [0 Update [ Change Title
3. Class Code: 4. Class Title:
Archivist
5. Vice President: 6. Division:
Academic Affairs George A. Smathers Libraries
7. Department: 8. Section:
Resource Services Contributed Cataloging
9. Subsection 10. Subsection:

11. City: 12. County: Signature of University Personnel Date:
Gainesville Alachua Director:
13. Describe functions in terms of outcomes/results rather than method used or how ajob is normally accomplished.
Note: Management retains the right to modify or add duties at any time
a) Essential Functions of the Job [Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), identify essential functions of a job required
to be performed with or without reasonable accommodations. Requests for reasonable accommodations to facilitate the performance of essential
functions will be given careful consideration.]
% of time
for each

JOB SUMMARY:




SPECIFIC RESPONSIBILITIES:

1 Cooperative original cataloging: develops descriptive and basic subject methodology; creates computer 60
catalog records for children's literature collection materials. Arranges records in computer catalog for
optimum information retrieval. Keeps current with procedures and documentation; recommends and drafts
enhancements to same.

2. Shared cataloging: independently evaluates member contributed catalog records for children's literature 20
from national bibliographic databases (OCLC and RLIN) to determine whether they correctly describe the
library holdings. Creates subject headings when the record lacks them.

3. Evaluates indexing terms used in catalog records for consistency. Creates additional terms to enhance 20
patron access to materials being added to the computer catalog. Creates and reviews authority records.
Contributes to the establishment of controlled access headings for nationwide use.



Page 1 of 3


Printed June 18, 1999





Incumbent's Initials


b) Marginal Functions of the Job [Note: For purposes of ADA, these functions are marginal only to individuals covered under the ADA who are unable
to perform these functions with or without reasonable accommodation because of a covered disability.]

N/A


14. List the class titles and position numbers of positions under the DIRECT supervision of this position.

OPS student assistants


15. Machines and equipment used regularly (indicate percentage (%) of time in the operation of each.)

OCLC Terminal and printer Personal Computer Photocopier



REQUIREMENTS FOR THIS POSITION
(Attach additional sheets as necessary)

16. Describe the type and extent of instructions or directions normally given to the incumbent of this position by the immediate supervisor.

Detailed procedures are carefully explained as each new responsibility is assigned


17. Working Hours: a) Daily from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. b) Total hours per week 40; c) Explain any variations in workweek, split shifts, on-call status, or
rotations.


18. Education/Training/Experience
In order of importance, state any specific education, training, and experience, and knowledge, skills, and abilities required for this position. Note that
these requirements must be related to the essential functions and at least equal to the minimum qualifications stated on the official class specification.

Knowledge of Anglo-American Cataloging Rules and Library of Congress Subject Headings.
Knowledge ofLC Classification Schedules.
Knowledge of MARC formatted bibliographic information on LUIS, OCLC, and RLIN.
Ability to work independently.
Ability to search, edit, and input on LUIS and OCLC systems.
Knowledge of humanities subject terminology.
Understanding of local cataloging practices.
Ability to work collaboratively with staff within and outside the Department.

19. Required Licenses/Certifications/and other Specific Requirements of Law.
Please review the statements below and check all that apply.

_ This position requires a post-offer employment physical.

SThis position is responsible for meeting the requirements of Section 215.422. Florida Statutes, as amended, regarding
the approval and/or processing of vendors' invoices and/or distribution of warrants to vendors.

_ This position requires licenser, certification, or other special requirements described below:

_ This position requires a police background check.

_ This position requires fingerprinting.

SThis position requires a child care provider security check as required under Sections 402.305 and 402.3055, Florida
Statutes.

_ Other, please specify.
Page 2 of 3


Printed June 18, 1999


Supervisor's Initials






Supervisor's Initials Incumbent's Initials


CLASSIFICATION CHANGE ACTION
(Complete only if requesting classification change)


20. Indicate specifically how the duties of this position have changed since it was initially or last classified. Use additional sheets, if necessary.


21. Other Characteristics of the Position

Describe other characteristics of the position such as physical, mental, and environmental factors essential to the satisfactory performance of the functions of
the position, or other characteristics which have not otherwise been described in the position description.




SIGNATURES


22. I certify that I have reviewed and been provided a copy of the current position description for the position to which I am assigned.




Name of Employee (Please print or type) Signature Date



23. I certify that the statements above, to the best of my knowledge, accurately describe the position. I understand that intentional falsification of this
documentation is in violation of State statutes and may result in disciplinary action or prosecution.




Name of Immediate Supervisor Class Title Position No. Signature Date



24. Reviewing Authority:




Name and Class Title (Please print or type) SIGNATURE DATE




Name and Class Title (Please print or type) SIGNATURE DATE




Name and Class Title (Please print or type) SIGNATURE DATE


Page 3 of 3


Printed June 18, 1999





Supervisor's Initials Incumbent's Initials


UNIVERSITY OF


, FLORIDA


,STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF FLORIDA
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
UNIVERSITY SUPPORT PERSONNEL SYSTEM
POSITION DESCRIPTION


CURRENT DESCRIPTIVE DATA FOR COMPLETION BY PERSONNEL Position
UPON FINAL ACTION Number:
NOTE: COMPLETE NUMBERED ITEMS PER INSTRUCTIONS Approved Class Title: Approved
Class
Code:
1. Position Number: 2. Requested Classification Action: Transaction: Effective Date:
O Establish Z Update O Change Title
3. Class Code: 4. Class Title:
Library Technical Asistant
5. Vice President: 6. Division:
Academic Affairs George A. Smathers Libraries
7. Department: 8 Section:
Resource Services
9. Subsection 10 Suosection-
11. City: 12 County. Signature of University Personnel Date"
Gainesville Alachua Director:
13. Describe functions in terms of outcomes/results rather than method used or how ajob is normally accomplished.
Note: Management retains the right to modify or add duties at any time
a) Essential Functions of the Job [Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), identify essential functions of a job required
to be performed with or without reasonable accommodations. Requests for reasonable accommodations to facilitate the performance of essential
functions will be given careful consideration.]
% of time
for each

JOB SUMMARY:

Verify preliminary bibliographic records from searching OCLC database for copy-for items in hand.


SPECIFIC RESPONSIBILITIES:

1). Assure the accuracy of the bibliographic description in member copy downloaded into local online catalog 30

2). Assure consistency in use of names and subjects from the OCLC national databases. 30

3). Create local holdings records in the SUS (State University System) online database, LUIS. 40










Page 1 of 3


Printed June 18, 1999






Supervisor's Initials Incumbent's Initials


b) Marginal Functions of the Job [Note: For purposes of ADA, these functions are marginal only to individuals covered under the ADA who are unable
to perform these functions with or without reasonable accommodation because of a covered disability.]
N/A


14. List the class titles and position numbers of positions under the DIRECT supervision of this position.
N/A


15. Machines and equipment used regularly (indicate percentage (%) of time in the operation of each.)
OCLC Terminal and printer Personal Computer Photocopier


REQUIREMENTS FOR THIS POSITION
(Attach additional sheets as necessary)

16. Describe the type and extent of instructions or directions normally given to the incumbent of this position by the immediate supervisor.
Detailed procedures are carefully explained as each new responsibility is assigned


17. Working Hours: a) Daily from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. b) Total hours per week 40; c) Explain any variations in workweek, split shifts, on-call status, or
rotations.


18. Education/Training/Experience
In order of importance, state any specific education, training, and experience, and knowledge, skills, and abilities required for this position. Note that
these requirements must be related to the essential functions and at least equal to the minimum qualifications stated on the official class specification.

Knowledge of Anglo-American Cataloging Rules and Library of Congress Subject Headings.
Knowledge of LC Classification Schedules.
Knowledge of MARC formatted bibliographic information on LUIS, OCLC, and RLIN.
Ability to work independently.
Ability to search, edit, and input on LUIS and OCLC systems.
Knowledge of humanities subject terminology.
Understanding of local cataloging practices.
Ability to work collaboratively with staff within and outside the Department.

19. Required Licenses/Certifications/and other Specific Requirements of Law.
Please review the statements below and check all that apply.

SThis position requires a post-offer employment physical.

This position is responsible for meeting the requirements of Section 215.422, Florida Statutes, as amended, regarding
the approval and/or processing of vendors' invoices and/or distribution of warrants to vendors.

This position requires licenser, certification, or other special requirements described below:

This position requires a police background check.

This position requires fingerprinting.

This position requires a child care provider security check as required under Sections 402.305 and 402.3055. Florida
Statutes.

SOther, please specify.
Page 2 of 3


Printed June 18, 1999






Supervisor's Initials


CLASSIFICATION CHANGE ACTION
(Complete only if requesting classification change)


20. Indicate specifically how the duties of this position have changed since it was initially or last classified. Use additional sheets, if necessary.



21. Other Characteristics of the Position

Describe other characteristics of the position such as physical, mental, and environmental factors essential to the satisfactory performance of the functions of
the position, or other characteristics which have not otherwise been described in the position description.




SIGNATURES


22. I certify that I have reviewed and been provided a copy of the current position description for the position to which I am assigned.




Name of Employee (Please print or type) Signature Date



23. I certify that the statements above, to the best of my knowledge, accurately describe the position. I understand that intentional falsification of this
documentation is in violation of State statutes and may result in disciplinary action or prosecution.




Name of Immediate Supervisor Class Title Position No. Signature Date



24. Reviewing Authority:




Name and Class Title (Please print or type) SIGNATURE DATE




Name and Class Title (Please print or type) SIGNATURE DATE




Name and Class Title (Please print or type) SIGNATURE DATE

Nae n Cas ite Peaeprnto tpe IGATR DT


Page 3 of 3


Printed June 18, 1999


Incumbent's Initials




Supervisor's Initials Incumbent's Initials


.. UNIVERSITY OF


FLORIDA
ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROFESSIONAL
POSITION DESCRIPTION
CURRENT DESCRIPTIVE DATA FOR COMPLETION BY PERSONNEL Position Number:
UPON FINAL ACTION
NOTE: COMPLETE NUMBERED ITEMS PER INSTRUCTIONS Approved Class Title: Approved Class Code:

1. Position Number: 2. Requested Classification Action: Transaction: Effective Date:
TBA, (M) Establish (J) Update ([) Change
3. Class Code: 4. Class Title: Signature of University Personnel Director Date
TBA Assistant Head, DLC
5. Vice President: 6. Division:
Academic Affairs University Libraries.
7. Department: 8. Section:
Digital Library Center
9. Subsection: 10. Subsection: 13. Proposed Class Title:

11. City: 12. County: 14. Proposed Class Code:
Gainesville Alachua

Attach Additional Sheets If Necessary to Properly Describe the Position
Describe functions in 15 and 16 below in terms of outcomes and results rather than method used or how a job is normally
accomplished. May include physical, mental, and environmental factors as noted in the directions for completing this form.
Management retains the right to modify or add duties at any time.

15. Essential Functions of the Job (Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), identify essential functions of a
job required to be performed with or without reasonable accommodations. Requests for reasonable accommodations to facilitate the
performance of essential functions will be given careful consideration.)

1. ADMINISTRATIVE RESPONSIBILITIES (35%)
2. DATA MANAGEMENT (30%)
3. MANAGEMENT OF DLC STAFF (25%)
4. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT (10%)

See attachment for DETAILED POSITION RESPONSIBILITIES



15a. Policy-making and/or Interpretation

Incumbent interprets the University's and Libraries' mission and goals as they apply to digitization for teaching and research.

Incumbent has responsibility, in collaboration with FCLA, other DLC and other Libraries staff, for the development of policy and
procedure related to the selection, preparation, creation, and maintenance of digital resources. The incumbent also:
a) Suggests policies and students relating to digitization and develops suggested policies through library wide-committees and
task forces;
b) Interprets copyright legislation as it relates to digital reproduction and distribution in a variety of digital and analog formats;
and
c) Documents policy and procedure in Web based manuals.

15b. Program Direction and Development

Incumbent serves under the direction of the Director of the Digital Library Center, and participates in the establishment and
implementation of goals and objectives, particularly at the project production level.
Liaisons with the Libraries' divisional management committees to develop service oriented programs and projects, and develops
strategies for funding that appeal to or are designed for individual and corporate donors, foundations and granting agencies.
.* .
** '.'




Supervisor's Initials Incumbent'


15c. Supervision Exercised (list organizational units under position's direct supervision and titles and position number of positions directly
supervised)

Supervises a rid'Cordinales active ii6of
S1 FTE Programmir Analyst/Interface and Database Specialist (LPN #TBA)and
.1 FTE program Assistant/Electronic Imaging Supervisor (LPN #821680).

ee,~att ach-d, Oganrzation-faC h-at.





15d. Level of Public Contact (statement of internal and external business contact, include frequency and scope)

Public contact is service oriented and brings the incumbent into contact with vendors and publishers, as well as professional
associations:
1. Frequency of vendor contact is moderate and relates to contracting and associated technical and fiscal matters;
2. Frequency of publisher contact is moderate and relates either to procurement of copy and distribution rights or to the mark-up
and production of DLC products for commercial sale/republication.
3. Frequency of professional contact is moderate and generally entails standardization of technical services and the negotiation
of cooperative projects with technical or subject specialists.




15e. Monetary Responsibility (amount and consequence of error)

Incumbent monitors resource funds allocated for digital reproduction, mark-up, etc. within budgets, particularly the Library
materials OCO, the OPS, and EXP (expense) budgets grant by the State of Florida, foundations and granting agencies. Within
this scope, the incumbent estimates fiscal need for supplies and equipment, services, etc..

Incumbent plans, places orders and forwards invoices for processing in compliance with the State of Florida's vendor payment
legislation.




15f. Statement of Responsibility for Confidential Data (the disclosure of which would be prejudicial to the successful operation of the
SUS)

Maintains confidential data relating to the evaluation of personnel and the maintenance of confidentiality during bids/RFPs for
commercial services.








16. Marginal functions of the Job ( Note: For purposes of ADA, these functions are marginal only to individuals covered under the ADA
who are unable to perform these functions with or without reasonable accommodation because of a covered disability.)

There are no marginal functions.


2 of 5 Pages for LP#


- ------- --




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