• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Front Matter
 Main
 Back Cover














Title: NA 803 D4
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00103335/00001
 Material Information
Title: NA 803 D4
Physical Description: Archival
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00103335
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida International University ( SOBEK page | external link )
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover 1
        Front cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Front Matter
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Main
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Page 33
        Page 34
Full Text
I I '
I ,
I
I . I
I I I
I I
-
I I
I I
I I


I I I I I
I
I
I I
I -
I

I I '
I
I I
.
I
,
I I : I I
I I I I

"I I
I I I I I I I I
I
I
I
I I I
I I
-,
I ,
I I I I I I ,
'
I

I I I I I
I
I I I I
I I
I
I I I I I
I I I I I
I I I
I I I
I
I
I I I I I I I
I I I I I
I I .
I
I I
I .
I I I .
I I

I 1, I I
I I I
I I I I I I
I
I ,
I
I I I
I I I I I I ,
I I
I I I I I I
I I I
I I
I I
I I I I I I
I I .
I I I I
I I
I I I I
I I I I
I
I I I I .
I I I I I I I
I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I
I I
I I I I I I
I I I I
I I
I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I ,
I I I I I
I I I
I I
I I I I I I I I
I I
I
I
I I
I I I I
I I
I I
I I I I
I I .
I I I
I I I I I 11
I I I I I
I I I I ' I , I I I
I I I I I I I I ' I I I I I
I I I I 11 I I I
I I I I I I I I ' 11 I I I I I I
I I I ..- I I 1, -, .
I I I
I I" ,.- 1, I I .....' 1 I ''; I I I .. I"
I I I I I I n l -I.. "
'. ", -',Iz .1 I -, I k ; I ' I .. I I I . ' I I
I I -f . " I -
'- ;''-W 'I. I I . I
I 'I". '- `
I I I I I 'A I ; '. : 1. 11 i, I I .. c
I , .
-'el., f. i', '% I I ,
I IA ..
'. -'. I I I
I I I I I I I I I .1 I I ': '- ,- I
I I I I I I I I I ,'..k I I I I I
I I I I I : '
I I I I I I I :' I I I I I I I I I I I
I ? . I I
I I ., I I I I I I I
I I I I I
I I 11 I I I I I
I I I I I I I
I I .4. I I I I I
I

I I I I I 11 I I I I I I I """ t.,;. .; 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I I I I I I I I I .
'. '. -.... "-' 11 I I I I I I I I ,
I I I I I I I , I I I I I I I I ,
I I I I I I "
I 11 .11 1'-!* I I I I
11 .1 ':' 1, .1-11. I ; I., ";.;_ .. .i: 1, I I I % I
I I I w--'.-- - --- I I
- " '-- ": . I I ....-'..--'-..'- ..... .. . I I
I I I I I ` -, ", -' '! I .. 4'... z , "!-; I - I
11 I I . .; ... ' .; , . -i '. , ,- la '.1 -' 4: : I I 1. 1 I I . : 1 . I I
. .r. I o I 0 .. '.:
I ..' .. . .
I I I I I I I I I I 11.11-.' ';. j : '."'V.I' ., I .". . -, .:' ' : .. .. I I
I I '' ,.- ' 'P' ;.. '. . o:l 6j % " I 11 I I
I I I I :' .. .. . 11 I
I -. .... : I -' .;- .- .. r '...'. .: ,'.-''"*:O ' I
I I I -.:;."' -. e'"-" . . I ' I 'i".-..." e x I
I 1 , .. ., I 11 . -
I I ""'" :'."!. , '. 11 ,. .. .'.V;F ;; .' :-
11 ... .i' I 1. - .::-: .. k:'; I I
I '' I r - I.- : I
I I I I 0 '- "---" l..' '; .. : :.. ;.'- ' "'In "':. . -, I I
n&-' 'Y, I ' z-. .
-, .1 .... ... r I e- '.. ...' ... .. ... I ..', '.. w. ':' .:,;., , ''I I 11
I I I I I p '. ' -,' .. 4 " -, . .. .. ; .- , ", "`."'-'3'% i ' .-. .' '. ..; , ,
I I 11 I , '. ..' 'zi , , : . -;'. '...
,
'.W .-;'- ..... ,,, ." ..' .
I , .. t - -'. ," . .' . , - ., '. .
... ... .1. .. ...... . , . y I
. . ' . t "-'
s .. '%. '" ."i...: ., Z
"I.- :' P.. '.! "", '-"i -. ;- ' ,iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii . '.
11 I I 'z.'- O., , ., .. ... -....'. I., .1 :: .... '.- ; .,
,
A.
., .. '. .1 .1 . '. '.. ". . '. ; "'. I
'7 '4 . ' ' ., -' ' .- ; -- ,-,. ". ., .. I - . .
';' ." .:..' ; .1 .. , 1. "I
.", , ; : '
. ' z :. ..' . Y, I I I
I.- ' I '. : .... .; . ' 1 .1 I ": ? . .
' I I .. .,.,;. .. . ii -i .- ,- ' -- . . :. .:. . '. 11 .. ': ..,,
I . . , '. I :- -:.'' .. I I I., - t-

I .. -;; . ;-- ; .-
' "' I -" ' - 4 ;.-''.' . '; "' -" I '.. I 1. '. I '. .
% ::7c 1 k, : - t U . ,' . ; I .. . I '..
'S ll ... , .; I , . i. '. .. . I I 1,
::. c ': ' -!:. ' '. z' ; '-;-'! --- .
' ,l zr 1. ' I 11 '.. ". , . . .. . ': i !' ". ,,, 'a; ; :
1. I ... . . .. .. '. .. ... .. . .%.
I" .,' ;' .. - ')" 'I. . . .1 ..: i
I : , -,- "'. : ;. 1
. ;t.' I . I .. z- .... . el; ... 't;V' I " ' ',` .. ' ... ... :.' .' . . - I '. - .. !: -1 ",
I ,". .. .' I %, I ;'- 4' 4 i ' .- .'. , . .' .. .. .. ...' .. .1% . 1! .:.
I I % .. I ' I -4. "", ',: , -.' ., . 5.i 4 : . ... -.1 .1 I I i
.1 lwl -, :ii. .. .. - ... ..' .. 1 :1 ": :.- ..: :'. z I
, I . I 1.1";' - . : , , -
-. .7. . '. ..' r. '
:m ' -1 . - : ; , :. :' 11V I
I I I '. ". .:.% 1. .. :'..;. I-.- ,,, . . .. .. ' .. I . ;- -, :. ;-;. .!'.-''-.' ':-:- ';.:. 24
o . .1 1, c ' .e. ..
. I . . '.. '..'.' ',- .1 ... i'6'-- - .. ... .,..,.. - 'i .!- '..;..-. 'i- .. I I
I I 11-1 ' - I . '. '.
- I
" : ..' '. ,A. ' ., ..' ; .: " . --- ' ; q ., . ,;',' - -; '. I .,
...; ' -.4: % '- ' .
I I . ., p i.. r .: ' I. .. .4'-'.. .' li. .. '. I . ., .
I I If, ; .: ; . I I
.. : I I . . I .. :. .. . ., . .-l' '. I '. :.", - :
1, . . '.. , .. T. . .. ..; -- i-I . .. '- .; '.'21. Y.. . .. 1, I -1
, I 'I ; ..' ,- - . 4 .41 .-: i -'..
I I I I % I : - . 1, ", . 0. w f , .l.. .. I 4 ... '.','i- -.... 4
I ;'..l-;'.'.:'- .0" -' -, '.!';'.'j; ,I I
1 4 %, n' ; . "'. ! ; 7 .,.. i -.1 ::.- ;', _ ..;z;. 4 6.
4 1 I I I I 1 4 I I l:--.l-.- j4L-;t ... '." - .." ':%:!: '. ., '. - ,4 , , 4 1 1
1 4 I.' ...'-' I ....... - 1, .... i - 4, ' i.; ,- , '. .; '
11 I i . .. - !:.'. . 4 I ... : '- ' .. : ' -., . , il '. I
% !7" ' ' '... - .' ;' le
., . , 4. " '- , '. I- 1. I c I I
I I : j"'..- . ... ... . '-!.u ;", ' V'. ," '..'f', ,..' '! ', "
I I % : I
: .%la .." I.- -i r .. .. ' ' ' .?
.- ' '4-, 4 ; - 4" ' ' - - ' ",
'.. I '. ". ; I '. ." .. . ; :' . %
.. . )l .. . .
I % % I I I - .. . .. . e ; I ; ;' ., .;.. . . ', -1 .. I 1, I -.1,;Iv.
"4 % I ' . ; . . - 11 , . I
I 1 4 1 % 4 4 , : w . .. . .1 .. ", ''- .-,'., -. zz.,...- '. ,
'x .-'., ., ;.. .,.Z".,%.. 'm'. .. .. j .. , .r ' 4 . ',
., '." - ."i 4 , ...-,Iz , ,.- ... : ., -:1i ' '- I I
I ". : ;j .. ` . .... ,' --. t %
I I 4 4 1 % '- ' 1- In .. - .. . I ,.z A, -, -. . .." :.':". ........ z. '.Ie. I I I % I
' I. ' '.. .11 .. - ; '-': .1. .r.. I .. .. ?'. ..' 4 4 % % I % I 1
4 I I ., . ., .1. j '- ;. ., - I". . .. V .. .. '-. '
% I % I I I '.. ; .... 'w' - '- ::P l.-.'- ". -r- i. .1 9 w '. .. % I
. . ..,:. ' . W : : ..' .. ..'.. v ' -'- %
I I 1 e - .... . .. . %,
.. .1, . , .... .... .. - ,; ii. ;'-
... 4... . . ., .. %.: I I I I I
1, '. ...e.... I ; ;..
.. . , I- '.. . : 1-1 I
I 4 I . 1 4.
I I I , ,% .. .4.1 1 W ie.S ; I . . .1 - Y : I
... I . % I ,. . .. I , - I -, 1, f. K ., -' 4 1 1, I I I I %
I 1;.. ., I '..
-11 -'' '-6, .' ,%; .e,.?" :' ;- 14.% '- ': % I I I
1 % .';' ., - '.. - ; 'Ii"' A '..
a i, : 4 I I ... ... ., '. . 4
.." . .4 .. .' ., . '.
.. ;q,,
I I I I ". . . i; -- '. - : , -;.- v ' I
I I % le-, '.t :-.. , . I % 1 4 i I ;'A '.';"', _ - -- i ". ' .' ".", ' : .' ,t -
) % ; ' ' ;.V; '; '' ;." '. '.- w ''-- '?'."', 1. V"' i I I
I 4 I "'. .;. .' . ;;i I -... ' I I 4 % , I % I .
": - I I j ,N .. I . ..r ':'.."..'." .. ...' ,, I' I % %
1 4 4. :' I 1W .. -. . "'. ,,. I ., . .. .. .1.. ;' .l! . '. . 3. '.' 'e. '. 1 4 I %
'?. "'. ;. - 14 .- ,;.-.I- - 'i e. F'-' -... .- I e I %
I I % I - - ;" . N . ,, ... ' I % 1 4
' % '% % % ';- ".. .. , 'Z I . '. 4. ..' ' ;' ;.' ..,-. % I I % I
:: k N I , . - I t : .-N. .. I I .' I ly I 1
- '- '. I ,- I I ` < '. ,' 4 -, 'E-- . I I
I j ., .;. '. i, I ': .
': 1. %
-I... .. -. 114 . !' I ",' I % I . . ".. I z .. , I, - ,I: ": : I I I I : I
I ....... '; r'.; ...
I % 4 ' 47 . . 4 1 . .' I . I 11 . . . . I .' ;Jl . .- ' 1 4 % %
I I .. '. .... 4 4 : , %
., '- 'i I, .- . , . '; '' I
I I I .1 .. 1. . .. '. ., ' ..... -'- .. . - ;; 6 ... ;' % I I I
e' g: . . . Z '. 1 -.'.. i ...; .. : ; . . . . 6. ," .1
'- . .-. -.1 0 p ': . . ' 4 %, . .
'! . - .< : ".. 11 .. .- , , ,..,- .."' % 4 1 1
I 1 c z I .. I , % . '. '. I I .
'. I 4 % :- L- '. ; .:; . . '! ....
I , ., .. " I . , ';'.. - %
"P .- Z' 1, " 1 , -.-' - '! , ... r -, "t' I, 6 ., '. ; .". -, % % I
"' 4 "'. ,4 1 I'll"i. , ..'
"'. '. '. % r -I . '% '. . I



I 4 .. 'u. ' '.. : ':" . . ;' '. - w - .. .'i %, I
I Z` .'. ;- I i'. .. I . ".



-
11 , I.- - -..- .-. . "'. - -z' % % 1 4
-, I ;. I..
4 ;' '. '.' ;- .' ''! ... "i I ... ., . I., . r' , I
I 4 % ?: ' I .... .. I .- .'. ... :,..; . .. .". .. I I I . ". .. ,,, .-, -- ", '.5" .'. : i '.; ''
. . .. "."..-. -z '. " '. P-1 '. -' -4 I- - '. :.l. 11 I i'.'
1% I f--- % ..", ... : '%.. .. .. .. ., . .. "- .:.: 7- ,. . % .. '
4 1 1 % i ..' . 11-2.. I I .. . .- . ..... .. ..
. . , ';'gl I ` - 1, I'v .. I . .. .: .. 7. 1
' , , . %. ; '. :. I i, -. :.-.. e
I I ' .I- - c . . . . .. .. . " -. :.i, .
, . ';'-" -'.I ; , z %- :-." . .. !'. ' ..' "; V.. "k. ' ., '. .. ' ; .." '. ... I .. -
% 11 ..' ,;. I ;.,.. :V ... .. : -.!,:. 4N- : 'i, '.--:' '.' '7 : .'; -' ; .'. .... ... . '. .. .1 .;I.. .:..- ; I '-, ' ,,, 1" . 4 I : , 4 1
..... .. ". .. " . , .. .z ., .. ; "-':',' ; .. . .. ..' . .. ; : .... -, : ..... . : 7 % % .
.
.. I
... e.
" e. r?.. ", I
.. ..... . ; "'. 'r. I . 1 1 lli .g . .. ....-" ' - .".. It ... ... I .'. ' 4 '.'14 i'- '. " " ."' -, : .. I 11
'. . . ' 1-1 " 3 --- . -. . '.
e ;. 4' '". '-; '. -k; I .. . '%. . -46, ..; ., , . . , r
: 2 ,:: ., : ": , ' - % .i % , ,- .' .. ., . "" f'. "". ", .'. .' "". - .. ...: ..: . .1 I .. ... .. .1 , I I I I


. '. , : -- ; .. j ". ; I
I % 1. "'.'.' .- ' ' . 0. ", .... '. "
" " z' .
.
.
.
.
.
% .y '' . I- . ,
.. I
A .. k . .1 ........ .. 4 . 11 .. .. I . '. i .. : , , -.
;" ' K. ": , % i:z, f .: -'''; I . .". ? '..- I I I , .1 I. .

1 4 1 1 % I r ";" -- v ... '- .... '. '. '. 7- :, '.:. 4 '.% ? I 'N '; % I % % I
I j ' . .; "I . I >'I
_: ; 4 1 1 . I I '-- 5 " -- z' -- - ., 1. ., I. : : ":. , '. 4 1 % .
I % I .- . "; . .."' L ,i . . i.. I
. . I % i & 'i - t i: -' :' .e- '. I.,, .. .... ...
": -, ..' I : 1 4 1 %
' ' I '-' %. '- i:- ", ".
I . 4 % I , .-. . . ; . % I ; 1 4 4
4 ,, . X, :' -'.,..,:!. .: ..!:.. .: -'- ;44 ; - -; I ;'-; . l ll %, I . Y' '; . ,4c , % , I .
% % : :' , .. : "' i '-" , .. .- . , z -; : z .. I '-" " j j, ., . 4 .1 .
I I % I I I 4 ; k 'I . "" 1, I
': I I I ,-- .. 11 ., I .. '. 4 1
1 1 1 % ; ' : --. ." I I - '. :. 41 1 '. : .: I 1 4 1 1
."". I '. v. ..
1, 11 ." ' %".. .. "..
I I i, '.k i, .. .. -. '. " .. e .'. !lj ')'.'.' i : , , . '. .. o ... ' .; e. -' eil-'- A.' % I % '4 1
I" I .. i .-- -'. .... -' ','. I "..'... .. ;... r -; % ., .1 I I I
I I I I . : . ." 'z' -'-., ., '.' ' '' . ....... , .. '' ..' . .. .'
4 1 . 4 1, , ': I. % ' ..' . -, - . ,
.. ., ; .... , . :....- . , 3 - ; : . v; ,, 4
t'. .. . ., .. 1 4 41 1
1 1 . . I i: X.
% I '. A I. .: ; '. ., I
) , ., -, . .. - L " .7. '- ,
4 L'I; - 4 '-':- g., .k. .' ."'T-. '..".- ',- 1. ' - ' ;. I .. .. . I I
... .' .1 -% ;. -5 .' -, ?' .-; . ' . ..... %
.. ) -"."" , . . f ii, n, / .,
% % .. I . ... . '. -4., '" "
% .1 % . 4, .. I- : - I - ... ' ; 1. '..i ., .6. %-l. . .. ,.! 4 %
w ' ; .. .'. ; .. 6 ;' - 4 . - 4 1 4 - I
.. '-.-' . ' ; 1, I ... .; I %
% % I !'. .... 1. . . -- 1 12 % I r 1% X;-. I ;.i... 1. I.A" , ..
.
I I 4 % I % .;-, I .: ..' ' ': -; %.. .'.' 4 ;.,. '4 ; '...-, & ". .; -, 4 .- -1 .1 ' , '
I I I I ... ., . - . I %
.4 , ,,.. .. "; '.;' ':'.' I -, ,. I ' !.. '. ", I % . 4
4 1 .. '. s. ,'& ," '..; I-- '
-
.. i .. .1. : . ... :... I -.
1% I -4 .."c ; ...' I ' ,,, -z '"- . . ill I : . I
I , Z.Z "j, '4 4 1 '.
I % I . Z' - ..; .. ; ', ...... . , i : 4i., '. ;". '.". -.''!
.. .. . . ..' ''; i- I %-. ' .' ' ., "'- ' .. . ; ., ;'-i ". . ':". .
4 1 - I t; . .:. '. % ; I I I
.,..i . "- .... .1 ...' '. . . q' ;.4 ;'-? I % ' , A %
% .. .1 '. - ,-
... .: _: . e
'z 'g : -: . '.'. .". 4. .
I I 0 ... - ., ... ;,..,-- ".'.
11 ". .. . . ' , , '.. .1 "' '' .. .... f -,
4 - . ., e I ..
l'-;' I , f ..' .. l.", ' p k . .... I % I
I I %e I ,v .. - .. 1; .. ' -., '." '. . .1 -'. . lq llo' " 1. ' . --
I ... .. ... 4 e ' 'l. . , i , .
11 I I .. I" ".- - -, .... I ' Z' - 4' ' . . I ., ,I- - A , 4
'% I I 1 I - * ' '. 1 4 , . V .;. '
I 1 1 . .. .. i"-.'.; %.' ", ' -, -- ..." " I % % ..... , 4.
I % I % I .. ." . '.%:' - ' , ; 'yit . , I . . 4 1
.. .4' . , 4. '-' . '. ., I %
4 % I ' . ...' ""' 4 .. I .. "I.,. : ., .
. . i i . . . I z I.,
' 1%.' . . , . 'x . ,. . . v . .' I I
I -- .. - 'j, "4 %% e --.'-: % x e , '
- ... 4 .. ' I I -1, I' 11 I- ,-. 41 '. -;. .- ' e. -' .- '. e n- :; ,". ',' : .. 4 1

% % % 11 I I I % .. '. ,.. . -. ,. k. -. :.i' c I I .. . I I
.. 11 11 P. 11 4' . .z -, 1' . '% " ,- :;, ' : . r '. .. ,", I "' -, -, v .' I
I I % 4 1 1 1 i' ' ".. ;-
4 % I '. %: z' , ; ", *.-., I ; -.' '. ' .1 "
% % 1 4 . . "; ..i.. % i , .. .. I . I
;. ;. I "'i'- ". .-. , I .
.. ' ,l 'x '. I .. x. ,. .
.. ' ..... r':' ';' ' ', e ". . ., .. . Z : I .. .1 . 141 . I % . % ' ;., I. , I
4 4 1 1 % " ' ': 4 - ,- i zA.. '-. - -' :5; % I ' .-.A-, ..".... .. l .'
I . .
q, -. "': iv' ,- " 4 . ;., -. I 1 4 4 1 %%
I . . - - .. , 1 ' '.' j : - ' 'T. ; ' .. . - % I I .
% I I 5.' ' ...... :.' .. : - -I,- r., i.. v '
%, 1. . 1. . . I", ,,' ; ";' I
I I --.-. .'. ... .. .. .. ..' v ".. . , .... L'; '. '.. . '' '' ", A v '." .. "'; % .f I
-'-; -, .. ". 11"; -'. '( ;i. -.. ..i : f.i: ' '';'' % I I I
I I I : . .e , ,. , '' % 4 ' ki, -1 % .
%' % -z,- - F . .. .. .. '.
.. '. .. . 4 '- ' ". 1 I .- i.; I I 7- ?7
I .' .. .. .: -. %'-;' I
.. -.. -.' 'f "e; "., z .j: : ..... .;:; . .1. . "'Jm ..
1. .". 4 .& ' ; . ', '. . mi. % I I
4, "' '. 1. . , '; v e 4.1... I .. .. '.
I I I . .. .- .. .. le. I - I I ll:. . '' ... ...
.. ') "'. Y. -"' . ?-" . .
I I., !;z' ..' .4 ';r.-- ` ,. , :' %














ACADEMIA NATIONAL DE ARTES Y LETRAS




DISCURSO DE INGRESO

COMO MIEMBRO DE NUMERO

DE LA

SECCION DE ARQUITECTURA

LEIDO POR EL SENOR

EUGENIO DEDIOT Y RECOLIN

en la sesi6n solemne celebrada por la Academia Nacional de Artes y Letras
la noche del 8 de Abril de 1926.



DISCURSO DE CONTESTACION
por el senior

JUAN MIGUEL PORTUONDO


La Habana
Imprenta "El Siglo XX'
Rep. del Brasil 27
1926


~;?c ~< cs















:; i
II
ill





:i
if .
s









r














































r






























































































































j


t


r' ?
"






























DISCURSO DE INGRESO COMO MIEMBRO DE NUMERO DE
LA SECCION DE ARQUITECTURA DE LA ACADEMIA NA-
CIONAL DE ARTES Y LETRAS, LEIDO POR EL SR. EUGENIO
DEDIOT Y RECOLIN, EN LA SESSION SOLEMN CELEBRADA
LA NOCHE DEL DIA 8 DE kABRIL DE 1926.




jjj t o
I i

| !'

























Sefiores Academicos:


OLAMENTE obligado por la fuerza de las circunstancias,
me hall en esta tribune, convencido de mi carencia
de dotes para ello; pero habiendo sido designado, sin
previa consult, para ocupar un puesto de Academico
en esta docta Corporaci6n, aun cuando reconociera que esa
elecci6n resultaba inexplicable, a mi juicio, existiendo tantos
otros mas capacitados que yo, me encontraba en esta disyunti-
vra: sacrificarmo, exhibiendo ante tan competent auditorio mi
deficiencia, o dejar transcurrir el tiempo reglamentario sin lle-
tar el requisite de la presentaci6n de este trabajo, finico que se
me exigia en correspondencia a tan inmerecida designaci6n. El
temor de que esta filtima manera de resolver el problema, fuese
interpretada de distinto modo a como en realidad debia ser, y
que se considerara, como un desire a quienes me habian favore-
cido con tan honrosa elecci6n, me decidi6 a venir a demostrar pui-
blicamente mi agradecimiento a esta Academia; aunque comnpren-
do que adquiero una nueva deuda de gratitud con tan selectos
Oyentes, por la benevolencia que espero tendran al escuchar la
lectura de este trabajo, despues de saber las razones por las
cuales me veo obligado a imponerles semejante sacrificio.
El tema elegido para este discurso, es L Arquitectura y la
Patrla.
Las construcciones son el testimonio irrefutable de los sen-










6

timientos que acompanaron, tanto a las generaciones que las
edificaron, como a las sucesivas que por ellas transcurrieron,
aceptandolas o haciendolas sufrir modificaciones; ellas son la
historic mas exacta, a nuestro juicio, del modo de ser de los
pueblos de la antigiiedad, superior a la que todas las literatu-
ras puedan exponer. La historic escrita de esas razas, por muy
perfect que se intent, jams podra substraerse a la influencia
del modo de percibir y sentir de los autores que en su redacci6n
intervienen y estos, como los demiAs mortales, son esclavos del
funcionamiento de sus sentidos y sl6o pueden expresar lo que
por medio de ellos perciben; de ahi que, aun cuando se inspiren
en el mismo testimonio de los monuments, s6lo puedan trans-
mitir a sus lectores las impresiones que sus sentidos sean ca-
paces de recibir de aquellos; y en esa nueva fuente de informa-
ci6n, jams podran encontrar otra cosa ni los mis privilegiados
intelectos; mientras que, los monumentos, ahi permanecen des-
componiendo la luz de la historic, como los prismas descomnpo-
nen la luz solar, y asi como por medio de estos cada retina puede
apreciar con toda claridad aquel de los colors del iris que mas
grato le sea, por medio de aquellos, cada cerebro puede meditar
sobre los puntos hist6ricos que mas le seduzcan.
Ahora bien; si la historic result de prima importancia para
las sucesivas evoluciones sociales, L cuil no sera la de las fuentes
irrecusables de la misma y cual de estas puede ser de mas tras-
cendencia que una edificacin ? En ella se descubren la cultural,
los prop6sitos, sentimientos y gustos de los potentados que or-
denaron la obra; se ven igualmente el arte y la sabiduria de
los intelectuales que la dirigieron; luego se llega al conocimien-
to-por los materials, su clase, procedencia y elaboracion-del
grado de adelanto industrial y commercial de cada pueblo y de
cada epoca; y finalmente, por los detalles de la mano de obra,
resalta la capacidad de los elements mis humildes de la socie-
dad, los obreros, los artesanos. CuAl otro testimonio puede
revelar, como este, el modo de ser de esos distintos elements
sociales?
En los monumentos, encuentran material el fil6sofo, el lite-
rato, el artist, el matematico...; todo aquel que quiera pensar,
pues ahi estin esas piedras que, a semejanza de acumuladores,


%~~P~i~~~~ O1BPI












recibieron las manifestaciones de la eivilizaci6n de todos los
pueblos, ann los mas antiguos, para luego trasmitirlas a traves
de los siglos a las generaciones sucesivas; y ellas nos dicen con
inagotable constancia, en su lenguaje, que pudieramos llamar
*idoa y elocuente, c6mo eran sus contemporaneos, cuando les
dieron, a ellas, la facultad de hablar a los pueblos de la pos-
teridad. El hombre luch6 contra la piedra bruta hasta que,
dominandola, la oblig6 a expresar algo; podra su esfuerzo haber
sido grande, y mts si se trata de 6pocas primitivas; pero aquellas
piedras quedan hablando por los siglos de los siglos y, cual
nuestros modernos y efimeros discos fonograficos, repiten sin
cesar lo que la mente del hombre les esculpi6. i Dichosos escul-
tores! i Habeis logrado hacer atravesar vuestros pensamientos
por el torbellino de las razas y los siglos, y llegar a nuestros dias,
para herir nuestros sentidos, los que, d6ciles, vibran y funcio-
nan ante la voluntad p6stuma de vosotros!
Error muy grande cometi6 el hombre, sin duda, cuando cam-
bi6 en absolute la piedra y las tabletas de barro cocido por el
pergamino y el papiro, para dejar manifestados sus pensamien-
tos y su saber. Esto hizo possible que las guerras y persecucio-
nes interraciales o interreligiosas, pudieran borrar ciertos co-
nocimientos y products de antiquisimas civilizaciones, y por
ello afin permanecen ignorados, secrets de las artes e indus-
trias de esas remotas epocas... y, lo que es mas triste de pensar:
que quizAs algfin dia, cansadas de sufrir las classes mas humildes
de los pueblos, los irritantes privilegios que hoy se concede
a la nobleza del dinero y a otras classes sociales, salten como
bestias enloquecidas y en feroz e inconsciente tropel, borren,
convirtiendo en humo y cenizas, lo mas preciado de nuestra civi-
lizaci6n... Medida previsora seria, pensando sin egoismos en
el future, grabar en metals ciertos principios que son las bases
de nuestros tesoros cientificos y de nuestra cultural, a fin de que
puedan sobrevivir a cualquier catastrofe social o universal, quo
sea capaz de destruir, junto con nuestra papeleria, la part
mas intellectual de nuestra humanidad y arrebatar a los super-
vivientes la herencia a que, como sucesores nuestros, tendrian
indiscutible derecho. Esas planchas metalicas serian los mas




- I'. 'YS


8

hermosos z6calos de las Universidades, centros cientificos y de
todo edificio del Estado.
Pero desgraciadamente, cada dia vivimos mfis preocupados
del present que del future; poco caso hacemos de las ensefian-
zas del pasado y si nos interest algo del porvenir, s6lo es el fu-
turo inmediato, aquel al cual pensamos llegar en vida material.
Dificilmente recordamos que en nuestras manos esti, en muchas
ocasiones, el hacer valiosos obsequios a nuestros lejanos suceso-
res, a aquellos que, en nuestras mieditaciones, nos imaginamos
de mil maneras distintas y a los que, a cualquier precio, quisie-
ramos aleanzar con la vista.
Por la intima relaci6n que existed entire el modo de ser de un
pueblo y la arquitectura que este produce, debe deducirse que
el reciproco es cierto, es decir, que el pensar de un pueblo sufre
la influencia de la Arquitectura que lo rodea; esta induce a las
generaciones sucesivas a pensar de acuerdo con ella, conservin-
doles sus tradiciones, sus creencias, sus amores y sus ideales;
de ahi que nosotros necesitemos de nuestra propia arquitectura,
para que nos ayude a conservar esos pensamientos y sentimien-
tos, que son los que forman o constituyen una patria, y no la
bandera y la Constituci6n solamente, como parece que screen la
mayor part de nuestros conciudadanos. Aquellos sentimientos
son como los debiles y al parecer insignificantes filaaientos, en
que termiinan las raises de los Arboles, aun las de los mas cor-
pulentos, y sin los cuales, sin embargo, la vida de estos no
podria subsistir.
Para que Cuba y los cubanos perduremos, desde el punto de
vista national, precisa que esas dos palabras tengan alguin sig-
nificado mas que el estrictamente geografico; es menester que
represented un cuimulo de ideas, de gustos, de principios, nues-
tros, absolutamente nuestros. Conviene explicar, hablando con
today claridad, que nuestro no debe significar sistematicamente
antiamericano, ni tampoeo espaliol recalcitrant. Nada de
esto. S61o necesitamos ser cubanos a secas, es decir: cuales-
quiera que sean sus origenes, esas ideas han de haber sido ya
sancionadas por la voluntad de pasadas generaciones cubanas,
por los mentores do ellas.
Para powder subsistir, necesitamos, hoy per hoy, no revolu-


'
:.j
I~












ciomC~, eaio simnplemente recorder; cultivar el Remember, tan
en bWga entire nuestros amigos de Norteamerica por medio de
Aa i:m16nm ria Building.
SI: T emos que ser absolutamente conservadores de lo genui-
S4Iente criollo; no dejarnos atraer inconscientemente, cual
4i)ile, mariposillas, por la brillante luz del Norte, pero tam-
poCo por huir de ella, retroceder hacia obscuridades medioevales.
En perfect status quo debemos permanecer, en cuanto a
seatimiento, el niayor tiempo possible; y asi como el cristiano
reafirma su fe con el Catecismo y la Biblia, el cubano, para su
fe patri6tica, tiene las histories de sus guerras y, tanto como
6Bista la historic incomparable de la protest literaria, pacifica,
Miat6dica, continue y tan intensamente sostenida por sus inte-
Wectuales durante casi un siglo contra la injusticia; que se da
el easo, a nuestro juicio, de que nada nuevo se necesite escribir
parn encauzar la march patri6tica de este pueblo, como no sea
recordarle que tiene en esas histories, anteriores a su indepen-
dencia, verdaderamente notables, casi impossible de superar y
tan extensas y completes, todo lo que pueda necesitar como guia
inorma para sus presents y futuras acciones...
Edifiquemos la muralla china alrededor de nuestros idea-
'ea y conservemosla intacta, cuidadosamente, hasta que hayamos
'edUado y fortalecido a nuestro joven pueblo, para que sea apto
y est&, dispuesto a recibir y similar convenientemente los bene-
fleioqe de otras mas potentes civilizaciones.
Con este program de defense national tendremos quizas
tambi6n que cooperar a la defense de los tr6picos, para poder
resistir la invasion de los habitantes de las regions del N,orte
del' xando, hacia las cAlidas, las que no s6lo estamos ya sintiendo
on Calbu como consecuencia de los hechos politicos acontecidos,
sino que, con un caracter general, viene aconsejandose por
:algvnos escritores de esos paises. Citaremos como ejemplo a
Willis" J. Abbot, en su obra Panama y els Canal, en la que dice
lo 8igui tte, al hablar de los limits de los Estados Unidos de
Norteam6rica:

Hay fll6sofos de la political, quienes piensan que el- limited Sur de los
Estados Unidos, puede llegar a ser el Estado del Itsmo de Panama.










~,, .











'. 1 0 ,
'. :o i"


Tal cual est". dicho esto, deja. en pie la duda de si tal idea
no es compartida por el author, pero pronto se desvanece la :
misma con esto, dicho a continuaci6n y con una gran dosis de
sarcasmo:

Por cl prescnte, Uncle Sam esta bastante satisfecho con la Zona del .
Canal y con cierta cantidad do influencia diploinatica sobre el Gobierno
de PanamA.

MAs adelante afiade:

Con la cantidad de energia y determinaci6n desarrollada en nuestro
gran noroeste y con las cuales se est& construyendo en la Nueva Ingla-
terra el mayor imperio agricola del mundo,. no obstante los site meaes es
de ventoleras de nieve y tierras heladas; se haria de las sabanas y
valleys de Panama, un lugar -Jardin del mundo. Esto nunca sera reali- :!
zado por su present poblaci6n agricola, pero es incredible que pueda de-:,
jarse a los tr6picos, por largo tiempo, durmiendo bajo el control de pueblos
letargicos e indolentes.

Como vemos, en lo anterior se indica la conveniencia de qui-
tar a los habitantes de los. tropicos el control de su propio suelo,
por la sola raz6n de que alli viviria mejor el agricultor de las:
zonas frias y sabria obtener mejor producgi6n de aquellas
tierras.
Pero no conform el autor con exponer sus puntos de vista
sobre esa material, cita para robustecerlos la opinion de otro es-
critor, Benjamin Kidd, author del libro Evoluci6n Social, co- .
piando de O1 lo siguiente:

Cuando se llegue a colmar el territorio de los europeos que afin
result apropiado para ser ocupado por ellos, y con la creciente den-
sidad de poblaci6n en esos lugarea, es de esperarse que el cFeacierto,
de permitir que una gran extension de la mas rica region del globo, o sea
la comprendida dentro de los tr6picos, permanezca sin desarrollo, con sus
manantiales de recursos perdi6ndose grandemente bajco el manejo de cazas
,de baja eficienoia social, serA comprendido en nuesttra patria y por la
mente de los demas pueblos del Norte.

MAs adelante copia esto otro:




.:. ,, .


:"...' : ' * * .. .o; d '^











11

i ...i bi' I blemente. comprendido, y en no muy distant fecha, que
.uede tolerar nuestra civilizaci6n, es el permanent des-
4 r riecnmasos de esas, las mAp ricas regions de la tierra,
Ao 1e carencia de lao mAs elementales cualidades de eficieneia
..l4t. ila razas que las poseen.
i.. ereo, sefiores, que analogos razonamientos debi6 emplear
,t dt aliz sius hombres, para decidirlos a lanzarse desde el Nor-
S i" l asa as costas del Mediterrhneo.
it a, eomo, afortunadamente para los tropicales, diehos ra-
a kA~tieotos y conclusions son del todo err6neos, es de esperar
.i i, 'iUmine esas mentes ofuscadas, o que alguien les haga
peder la inutilidad de tal invasion; pues como esa indo-
g4 soesY,0 stado letargico no son product de nuestras volun-
t4e a .. o ,de nuestro clima y de todas las circunstancias natu-
n q t(nos rodean, y como ellos no sern capaces de variar
e!;i diciones de la naturaleza, resultarian inevitablemente
i a de .las mismas; y, a poco andar, su flamante raza se
,.:..or: voluntad del Todopoderoso, obligada no s61o a cam-
d.6trajes, sino tambi'n de costumbres y cualidades, para lie-
" pr'ai;.eabo, a ser simples hijos de los tr6picos.
a;. omo, mientras tanto Ilegue esa clarividencia, la in-
i. :ii'ha coneonzado en nuestro pais, y, como gracias al tiempo
% Wrrido .desde Atila a nuestros dias, esa invasion no se hace
:r deza hierro y sangre, sino de oro e intriga; nosotros te-
".. .l.1'itque organizerr nuestra defense, ante el comfin enemigo.
%:.:' t*atata sin embargo, de cavar fosos, ni levantar barricades;
4 itamos armas ni :municiones peara combatir a esos nuevos
,6i A.t" dores; podemos dejarlos pacificamente venir; que la
s.i', :i ,, es decir, la voluntad de Dios, se encargar. de acli-
o destruirlos; pero nuestro deber, nuestra convenien-
Si;'.idar al aliado natural que tenemos en *u obra de absor-
y:.: sto lo haremos, respetando escrupulosamente cuantas
S-ti, ie gustos, inclinaciones, creencias y amores resultedi
a icon sello tropical, y rechazando de plano, sin titubeosi
:. W a alguno, cuanto result ex6tico, y entire ello, sobre todo,i
e"." ~ei. sstente obstinaci6n, cuanto proceda de las patrias de
Pe0tr i.nvasores. iQue en nuestro clima nada encuentren
gt 46 el suyo! Todo debe de ser on 61 de cuflo tropical,


I I ?
1k 41 *''~ **










12

tanto en el conjunto como en el mfis minimo detalle: nuestra
m6sica, nuestros cantos, bailes y trajes, nuestro estilo literario,
pintura y arquitectura, todo, Ln fin, todo ha de her mareada-
mente tropical; resucitemos si es possible, algunas buenas cos-
tumbres nuestras, ya desaparecidas; que cuanto mis hetero-
g6neo result nuestro ambient con respect al de ellos, mas
pronto serfn absorbidos los invasores; y tras de eso vendra el
inerecido castigo: como por esa misma voluntad de la natura-
leza, las razas del Norte seguirfn siendo lo que son, mientras que
las que hayan invadido los tr6picos y especialmente su descen-
dencia, dejarfn de ser lo que sus padres fueron, para convertir-
se, cada vez mas, en tropicales; vendra inevitablemente la falta
de inteligencia entire unos y otros y a la postre la desmembra-
ci6n de los Imperios comerciales que con esas invasiones se pro-
yectan; quedando los tropicales nuevamente separados de los
templados y frios, mientras que la mejor savia, las mejores
fuerzas de estos uiltimos habran sido absorbidas precisamente
por aquellos a quienes intentaban absorber... Nada nuevo aca-
bamos de decir, pues como habeis oido, queriendo hacer l6gicos
pron6sticos sobre las consecuencias de esas futuras invasions,
ha resultado la historic de la desmemnbraci6n de otros imperios
fenecidos.
Dentro de este program de defense national y concretin-
donos a la Arquitectura, debemos evitar que nuestro caracter
sensible siga haciendonos admitir como buenas algunas ideas
importadas de climas distintos, como consecuencia de nuestros
dos exodos emigratorios. Los alrededores del parque del Tuli-
pin, por ejemplo, eran hasta hace poco, testimonio evidence de
esto, y afn quedan por alli elocuentes sefiales de edificios con
sus tejas metflicas, sus buhardillas, sus cierres de guillotina, la
profusion de madera como element constructive en costosas
residencias; todo lo cual el tiempo--i el gran juzgador!-se ha
encargado de reprobar; pues siendo lo bueno relative y depen-
diendo de las circunstancias que lo rodeen, en nuestro clima
cubano s6lo podrin resultar buenas las construcciones verdade-
ramente cubanas.
El extranjero procedente de climas frios, asi como el cubano
educado en esas latitudes, pretenden generalmente poner pocos





,. I


Jaiil
Rif..




:li:!:ir~. ..:.. ;:
L .I ~ i.
''
'
: '` '' I~
:
~I I


i


*~~ -~r I:I~$;


hA


12


b S ro de ventilaci6n y de dimensions restringidas, construir
: ;; h de bonitas tejas vidriadas, pero que no ofrecen mas ga-
ade protecci6n y duraci6n que las proporcionadas por un
?ielmbreado, que debajo de aqu'llas tiene que colocarse y el
e~ ui : estro clima, se reblandece y destruye en breve plazo;
.: .:I.g; le pisos de cement y asfalto, que resultan acumula-
4ia.e las calories solares; entapizan paredes con vistosas
..; y. .papeles que nuestra radiant luz y nuestra atm6sfera,
4 e..i: ad e eloruro de sodio, se encargan de convertir rapidameu-
S',r .i: ueeerdos de pasadas glorias; construyen costosas edifica-
Mie on.abundancia de maderas extrafias, aqui done las alter-
a itl higromktricas y termicas, asi como los insects tropicales,
e Mi. argan de convertir pronto en ruinas; en un clima en que
S, i .i pintura las protege como en aquellos paises, done se ven
St..: iran esas coquetonas casas de campo, en las que el made-
S ire ta se conserva perfectamente y se conservan tambien los
.. ie a que el hombre le da para su mayor lucimiento.
: o:: :.; struir en nuestras ciudades los llamados rascacielos, es
f obtra todas nuestras conveniencias colectivas; podran re-
.' ta un espl6ndido negocio para unos pocos-los poseedores
S: s i... finceas--; pero son perjudiciales a la salud de la mayoria,
a;: que debe ser respetada. Si aun en los Estados Unidos
S:~.s instrucciones resultan nocivas para las casas colindantes
"'. o tesultarfn en esta isla, donde el finico consuelo de sus
~te cotrla la elevada temperature, es la frecuente reno-
: i : del, aire por las brisas diurnas y nocturnas! Tan pronto
u.na u otta falten, nuestro ambient conviertese poco mas
:.!*i .tnf : que en insoportable, except durante nuestro breve
: 'fpe ::en el que soplan los vientos frescos del Norte y Nor-

StI :. ta, por tanto, atentatorio al derecho del pueblo, tolerar
qa o rija construcciones llamadas, por su altura, a dejar
StI eflla oenormes remansos a6reos, incapaces de ser removidos
i m,"inkso fuertes de las corrientes normales. En un edificio
aoio a iuna de esas elevadisimas edificaciones jamAs se per-
i 4 e baieflio de las corrientes que vengan en la direcci6n
deia pitdeoso vecino; su aire s6lo se renovar& cuando a fuerza
de aldO *r se yea compelido a ascender por raz6n de su menor











14

densidad; pero mnucho antes de que esto suceda, ese aire habri
perdido sus condiciones higienicas.
Actualmente, en los Estados Unidos de NorteamBrica, la pa-
tria native de los rascacielos ya ha comenzado la campania efec-
tiva contra ellos. Por primera providencia, en ciertas ciudades
ya no se les permit elevarse ilimitadamente. Alli, en 1908, un
arquitecto protest por amor a sus semejantes y al ornato pi-
blico, contra esas calls desfitaderos, que resultaban como conse-
cuencia de tales construcciones, y ocho afios despues vi6 conver-
tida en ley su protest; ya la ciudad de New York s61o permit
elevarse en el piano vertical de la fachada hasta cierta altura,
y despubs de ella, las obliga a retirar hacia el interior de la
propiedad, en relaci6n con el exceso de altura que se pretend.
Claro esta que la ley lleg6 tarde para muchas calls, que ya son
!4esfiladeros, desprovistas de ventilaci6n y de luz solar; pero de
todas maneras, ello demuestra que han comenzado a declarar
nocivos los tales edificios, y es seguro que luego vendran mas y
mas restricciones sobre los mismos, hasta llegar probablemente
a su total abolici6n; y por qua, nosotros tambien, hemos de
seguir ese process, del error primero y la rectificaci6n despues,
en una material que result ya experimentada y juzgada?
Mentira parece que el Gobierno Colonial velase mas, en ese
punto, por la salubridad y el ornato puiblico que nuestro propio
Gobierno, pues mientras aquel s61o permitia edificaciones de
21.07 metros de alto en las calls de no menos de 25 metros de
ancho, y s61o 14.51 metros en las calls cuya anchura estuviese
comprendida entire 6 y 9 metros, nosotros, que no estamos le-
gislando para una colonia nuestra, sino para nuestro propio
suelo, permitimos atentar a la salubridad del pueblo, en obse-
quio de unos cuantos propietarios.
Dentro del plan national, expuesto anteriormente, debiera-
mos volver incontinenti a nuestra antigua previsora legislaci6n,
suprimiendo en absolute esos elevados edificios en nuestra pa-
tria, y cuando el potentado extranjero quiera invertir su dinero
construyendo en nuestras ciudades, obliguemosle a que fabrique
al estilo tropical, o que no fabrique; y si se decide por lo pri-
mero, le habremos hecho dar un paso hacia su future aclima-
taci6n mental; habremos hecho algo patri6tico, y la belleza de

*t


:'
'
"''II ''
II -:
~ I II











15

izs tr s cudadeta habrf ganado notablemente, pues la exage-
d ~ attrjda de aquellos edificios los hace.desproporcionados y sus
.f .aai unas veces simulan simples casilleros de envases y
:t: 'e" ejnajri monumentales chimeneas y todas, por raz6n de
etpdetiva, parece encorvadas en sentido vertical hacia la
:a:ptlbli.e, cOn aparente amenaza para la seguridad de los
tr"is ntes, .

I lentras que en nuestras construcciones de sabor national
.,.i" 'nofia afrevimos a suprimir ciertos elements decorativos
:d l faehadas, considerados por nosotros como imprescindi-
b"si! o esos monstruos arquitect6nicos, el espiritu de lucro que
l. ~ i.nadra es manifiesta por la supresi6n casi total de los or-
:. :y "ciDomo., por otra part, repetimos, son desproporcio-
s'* : m'osmltaaI en sintesis un atentado al ornato pfiblico y un
..t ,1:. t ate arquitect6nico.
4"m.;ii a grande es que muchos de nuestros conterraneos que-
.det u ionados por el efecto de lo ex6tico, al punto de career que
.e. sn cuna digno de respeto, hijo de la experiencia,
S30rioeCinto0 o de la observaci6n. Si asi no fuese, comprende-
'id te 'tenoemos nuestra arquitectura. No quiere esto decir
41t e i, ,na arquitectura original, distinta de todas las demas,
si.dipe.i rpmete unos estilos y detalles de construcci6n selec-
eioM d entre los conocidos y adoptados con el tiempo, por la
ti' el' a i : opinion de nosotros.
4 I'i1A olvidarse que, tratAndose de viviendas, el arquitecto
l 6 v,.:itod;naparse mas del interior de las mismas que de sus
f'rd ~ porque en la epoca actual, preludio del absolute triun-
i : tie ide.mocraeia y en la que el derecho a la vida, no simple-
miS~rdi ai&n. sino tambien intellectual y de bienestar, tendra
u serr re Oonocido en forma practice a todas las classes sociales,
e1t :luictOe debe comprender que su caricter de artist ha de
Syiborsrir e a consideraciones menos poeticas, pero mas de
a: dt$o eb as, necesidades de esa humanidad, que tanto dere-
eho' ti.M0 sr amada como ,el arte, el cual, a su vez, s6lo vivira
pjlAit~eO t medio de una sociedad bastante feliz para poderse

'fee thineoaspecto que el arquitecto tiene que ir asumiendo,
cda:s v1t eon nmis intensidad, de constructor de verdaderas vi-


I '`
ii' I
1"' r
' :
i' I
I' ' :!
i ~ ~! ~ : i
'I
r '' '
"' .'I :
*




111


viendas y no de tumbas para vivos, como calific6 alas casas en
general un literate frances, le obliga a ocuparse primordial-
mente en la relaci6n que existe entire nuestra vida y la luz y
el calor solar, y los vientos reinantes en cada localidad, los
diversos estados higroamtricos de cada clima, las distintas enfer-
medades endemicas en cada zona terrestre; en una palabra:
debe ser ante todo higienista; despues, debe construir de modo
que los que utilicen sus obras queden, on el mayor grado possible,
a cubierto de ciertos accidents, como son los grandes incendios,
las conmociones seismicas, que tarde o temprano pueden pre-
sentarse en todo lugar del globo terrestre, los huracanes o tor-
nados, las inundaciones, dande hayan existido o las condiciones
topograficas indiquen la probabilidad de que ocurran, las inva-
siones del mar, done estas se hayan sentido; en resume, asi
como la cueva primitive del troglodita per sus condiciones de-
bia defenderle de las fieras y resolverle los demas problems
que resultaban vitales para B1, asi nuestras residencias deben
ampararnos de todos los peligros que aun subsisten para la
humanidad.
Satisfechas esas necesidades, respetando las condicionales
que ellas impongan, dentro del campo que ellas dejen libre, que
desarrolle su arte el arquiteeto; que embellezca en buena hora
cuanto pueda; que trate con su buen gusto de hacer agradable
a la vista o corregir las irregularidades o las faltas de estetica
que aquellas exigencias de la higiene y de la seguridad hayan
impuesto. Sabido es que esto result insufrible para el verda-
dero artist; negaci6n absolute del calculo en cualquier forma
que este sea, pero... Ique le hempos de hacer! Si ya pasaron
los tiempos del rey Salom6n, de los templos del Karnack y
Angkor, de las deslumbrantes, archiartisticas y arrogantes ca-
tedrales; si los tiempos han camibiado, y hasta los mismos
iministros de Nuestro Sefior encauzan. las dadivas de los files
mis hacia las escuelas, asilos, hospitals, creches y demas obras
filantr6picas, que a la construcci6n de fastuosos temples, en los
que el arte dominaba hasta sobre el sentimiento religioso y en
cuyas construcciones se consumian err6neamente cuantiosos cau-
dales y enormes cantidades de energia humana, las que, acerta-
damente empleadas, hubieran remediado muchas necesidades so-


16


I I
*










17

eiii: y al remediarlas quizas hubiera disminuido el nufmero de
p:adres8 much mas de lo que hayan podido hacerlo esos fa-
moes templos.
"ointro de este nuevo character, que la evoluci6n de los prin-
cipiA .soiales impone al arquitecto; de proyectar si acaso un
sol .motiumento en que gobierne el Arte, por cada miller de
o: .e c ue estudie de caracter utilitario; por necesidad se ve
oMbgado a preocuparse principalmente de los sistemas de cons-
tre'.id de las dimensions interiors de los departamentos
p la i. mejor conveniencia y no para el mejor lucimiento, de
tofi :steriales a emplear, no desde el punto de vista artistic,
sino: oon miras economicas; despues, por analogas exigencias,
tiea .i que subordinar sus proyectos a determincdas dimensions
ei h:.:.' eeoe, a sun sistemas de cierres y a otra multitud de
dtaeS; e que, en otra 6poca, variaban bajo los mandates de la
est4ti. solainente, mientras que hoy se imponen sobre esta, a tal
plitt, qe. s61o consienten su embellecimiento bajo la condici6n
priniordial de ho ser variados para ese fin.
"'.: et9ra arquitectura tiene que respetar las condiciones del
paf4u atn hasta en los coloridos, pues nuestra brillante luz solar
ii iignal a la de nuestra antigua madre patria ni tampoco a
lia41 Ia1 gran epuiblica vecina, cuyo brillante poderio ha llega-
dp a-4tumnbrarnos, ejerciendo en nosotros exageradamente cier-
ta. mhaaas influencias.
: i( :iinplantar en nuestro clima las dimensions de los
de` art entos. de los pauses frios, es el colmo del absurd, pues
m irt~tid aI loi pequenio result convenient a los efectos de la
calefaei6n artificial, aquf es insoportable y antihigienico a cau-
sa e ia ei*oalecci6n natural. Especialmente, la dimension altura
de. ear respetada por los arquitectos, de acuerdo con la que la
expe.:enia Qe nuestros antepasados nos ha dejado de manifies-
toa. as is varas o mis de puntal de los edificios correspon-
diefrie: E ia."poca, que pudi6ramos llamar la Edad Media Cuba-
nao, sedtiilecieron de modo definitive cuando el tiempo fall
favor ra eiemerite a esa altura y en contra de las existentes en an-
terioipe c0nstruceiones; como las que pudieron verse reciente-
mente:!~il rm itirse la entrada en el antiguo Convento de Santa
;Clara pero nuestros antecesores jams se les ocurri6 darles









,. ,..,. ,, ., .I . !. ..









18

el puntal .de esos famosos bungalows, recientemente importados1
en nuestro pais y que, por sus proporciones, semejan mas bien
caballerizas que viviendas.
Si tuvieramos alguna fe en lo nuestro, nos dariamos cuenta
de que esos grandes huecos de puertas interiores, rasgados casi
hasta el techo, son los que la experiencia demostr6 que per-
mitian, aun en los dias de gran calma atmosferica, la ficil
renovaci6n del aire viciado por nuestra respiraci6n y nuestros
sudorosos cuerpos; nos dariamnos cuenta de que esos huecos no
permitian la acumulaci6n de grande volumenes de aire enra-
recido, como sucede hoy entire los techos y los cerramentos de las
puertas bajas.
Aunque el element extranjero ponder las ventajas de
aquellos cierres de cristales, a traves de los que en su infancia
contemplaba el paisaje cubriendose paulatinamente de blanca
nieve y por los cuales ni polvo ni insects podian penetrar",
no debe el native contagiarse con esa inclinaci6n al cristal, pues
no debe olvidar que la brisa no lo atraviesa; que la graduaci6n
de nuestras fuertes corrientes de aire s6lo es possible por medio
de persianas, y que estas, ademas, permiten encauzar la direc-
ci6n de esas corrientes, pudiendo dirigirlas a voluntad hacia el
techo o el piso, segfin que las circunstancias lo requieran, mien-
tras que los cierres de cristales nada de esto permiten hacer.
En cuanto a estilos de arquitectura, en la composici6n de
las fachadas y en material de ornamentacion, lo de antanio que
mas abunda en nuestra capital son los ejenMplares del Renaci-
miento espafol, del Plateresco, del Churrigueresco y del estilo
llamado de Herrera, en Espaia, y aunque el gusto del native
supo escoger, con posterioridad a aquellas construcciones, otros
models mas serious, del Renacimiento frances e italiano, debe
observarse que aun el Churrigueresco, cuando una mano hkbil
lo restaura convenientemente, luce atractivo, a tal punto, que
para muchos que de antiguo conozcan con menosprecio esos tro-
zos de arquitectura, despues de restaurados estos les produce
la impresi6n de algo tuevo, demostrindose con ello que lo peor
en esas decoraciones, no es el estilo en si, sino su imperfect y
casi tosca ejecuci6n, por deficiencia en los materials y por falta,
en aquellos tiempos y en nuestro suelo, de obreros competentes.


111 1










19


Existen en esta ciudad algunas de esas restauraciones que ates-
tiguan 1o exu~esto.
Nuestros arquitectos, en el breve plazo de veinticinco afios,
que pr6xirnamente llevan de ejercicio professional, han sabido
introdtucir variedad en nuestras construcciones, dando cada dia
un aspect mAs coquet6n a nuestras nuevas barriadas; ellos, en
general, respetando lo que el tiempo y la experiencia habian
sancionado, evolucionaron en la ornamentaci6n, distribuci6n, etc.,
corrigiendo viejos errors. Mas, por desgracia, recientemente
se nota una tendencia a despreciar por complete el resultado de
esa experiencia y de la tradici6n, suplantando todo ello por dis-
tribuciones, dimensions, ornanentos y elements constructivos
ajenos; por un conjunto, en fin, de peregrinas ideas, que resul-
tan del todo inadecuadas a nuestras circunstancias climatol6gi-
cas, a nuestras necesidades, y no tienen mas explicaci6n que el
deseo manifesto de sustituir lo carac-eristico cubano por todo
aquello que procede de la America del Norte..
El afecto que en los Estados Unidos de Norteam6rica profe-
san a sus estilos Colonial y Post-Colonial, es exactamente simi-
lar al que nosotros recomendamos a los cubanos para Cuba y sus
antigiiedades. Esos llamados estilos s61o son remembranzas de
la arquitecturma en uso por sus antepasados, cuando empez6 a
existir esa naei6n; y a pesar de que dicha arquitectura, como
puede comprobarse, es fria y pobre on la mayor parte de los
casos, no obstante, merece el amor y la preferencia de un grande,
rico y poderoso pueblo, tan s61o porque es el recuerdo de sus
antepasados. IInitemos nosotros ese ejemplo de amor y respeto
a. lo antiguo y propio, maxime siendo esa fuente de inspiraci6n
entire nosotros, mis variada y expresiva que la de ellos.
Si nuestra clase acomodada desea introducir ann mas va-
riantes en sus construcciones, tiene en el Renacimiento italiano
fuente inagotable donde saciar sus ansias por lo bello, con la
double ventaja de que estas construcciones, por la mayor seme-
janza en los climas, resultan perfectamente adaptables a nuestro
pais, tanto en conjunto como en detalles, y de que los ideals
que en nuestro pueblo puedan despertar, siempre serAn los de
la raza nuestra.
Italia$ pals dos veces ya campe6n del Arte, sin duda reserve


^.^s* -










20

afn grande sorpresas a la humanidad, cuando vuelvan a estar
en su apogeo esos latinos, que tienen la facultad de impulsar su
cerebro por medio del coraz6n.
Asi como Italia jamAs acept6 de lleno, por no convenir a su
clima y costum'bres, el estilo G6tico, ,ni otras artes ex6ticas,
aun cuando stas dominaban por complete al resto de Europa,
asi nosotros debemos resistirnos a aceptar todo lo extranjero
que se encuentre en identicas condiciones. Como consecuencia
de esa resistencia de Italia, se inici6 alli el Renacimiento antes
que en otros paises, creindose ese hermoso estilo, bello sobre
todo, porque en 61 predomina la 16gica.
Convencidos debieran star los artists de que cuantas veces
ha.n intentado implantar estilos y decoraciones il6gicas, la vida
de estos ha sido efimera; asi ha sucedido en nuestro pais, para
honra nuestra, con el llamado modernismo cataldn.
Sabido es que el arte verdadero siempre sera el product de
lo que exijan las costumbres, necesidades, prop6sitos y medios
naturales de una localidad.
Nada hay en arquitectura que seduzca tanto como lo 16gico;
por esto, el arte Griego result superior al Romano, y el Renaci-
miento italiano al de los demas paises; 16gica y proporci6n sou
el todo; un simple lienzo de pared con una abertura practicada
en 61, puede producer agradable o mala impresi6n, segfin que
ambas cosas se relacionen.
El Renacimiento italiano, con su caracteristica de que todo
sea verdad o lo parezca; con sus elements decorativos simulan-
do siempre respetar los elements de la construcci6n, con cada
adorno en su lugar y cada lugar con su adecuado adorno, encan-
ta y nunca hastia. el jams pudo aceptar errors, como los
que vemos en el estilo Misi6n, que entire nosotros se intent im-
plantar, en el cual unos aleros con pretiles o unos pretiles con
aleros, dejan el Animo confuso, tratando de indagar c6mo ese
tejado pudo meters dentro de esa azotea o si fu6 la azotea la
que cay6 sobre el tejado.
La aspiraci6n supreme de nuestro pueblo es conservar y
consolidar su nacionalidad, pues aun en el element que injus-
tamente llamamos anexionista, palpita ese deseo, que alienta su
coraz6n, siendo finicamente su cerebro el que lo cree irrealizable,


J~ii












21

Soi errors cometidos y de los fracasos que venimos
St::ener que transformarnos de subditos de una mo-
a pea en ciudadanos de una Repiblica de America.
,je impone contribuir a conservar nuestra personali-
^ti9inal, por medio de la convergencia de circunstan-
4i4as; y entire ellas, repetimos, esta nuestra arquitec-
tos estilos; que los ideales si perduran triunfan, cual
t fuerzas de la naturaleza a causa de su perdurabili-
Mi4 a demostrar esto iltimo, como final de este trabajo,
iLte, que pudieramos llamar "anecdota de la Na-

ratusto edificio de nuestra antigua Maestranza, donde
i6 hall instalada esta Academia, y en el cual nos
oi~ sta nehe, mirando hacia el lugar done fueron
siudiantes de Medicina, existian desde antes de
.,0-9s f6rreos enrejados de ventanas, cuyas grapas
iit~~aas en la durisima roca que puede observarse
;i !Sin duda alguna, ese empotramiento debi6 ha-
l l o.l requisitos, para que su solidez correspondiera
i 'iB 'l, :adecuadas para una c'rcel; satisfechos de-
4ii .a'rtesano y el director de la obra, de que, fra-
'i, esultarian poco menos que inarrancables,
lqlae por ley natural, por ley divina, el oxigeno y
illl y euando se encuentran se unen dando naci-
6ido diez veces mayor en volume que el hierro
SiMientras la parte libre del enrejado, a su gusto
ifni:n~atural, el hierro de las grapas, aprisionado
iE4:: hombre, veiase imposibilitado de realizarlo; no
Sgeo penetr6 a travis de esos espacios invisibles
em;o pez6 a ejercer su derecho, pero faltaba sitio
i pudiera surgir: el opresor lo habia cuidado-
#mo; mas convencido aqu'l de su derecho a la
.may6': a cada circunstancia favorable, a cada
| p:edra, bien proviniera 6sta del celeste trueno,
I o 0de las salvas de artilleria, presto aprovech6
tl- ante y espacio para acufiar la capilar grieta
Slel paso atras que en esa lucha di6 la roca jams
:; asi, paso a paso, por su derecho a existir,
.. .


I i4,;
;-e ~~
"''~ :;';3
;.I ~ i.
~..
~' E`.; ?I,~;? :~
";
:~ i-;~I::~:';"'


:; *
; ;.











22


la ayuda del tiempo y la constancia en la lucha, form6se el
6xido, disgregandose la roca; y mis propios ojos pudieron ver,
al regreso de la emigraci6n, libertadas las grapas. Ellas tam-
bien habian rechazado la opresi6n!...
Sefiores: sea la libertad nuestro oxigeno, seamos nosotros el
hierro y sea nuestra nacionalidad el 6xido.































4'o
B.."

















































)STESTACI6N AL DE INGRESO DEL SR.

EOT Y RECOLIN, COMO MIEMBRO DE N6-

00CI6N DE ARQUITECTURA, LEIDO POR EL

., JU AN MIGUEL PORTUONDO EN LA

f'C-ELtEBRADA EL DIA 8 DE ABRIL DE 1926.






















'. .
., i


















:i '
, ~ ~ z


:I
Is





V




0 Ji
A'












IN
c.



























IEt honor de dirigir mi modest palabra a
a' auditorio al contestar el discurso de in-
|:i."Acad6mico electo sefor Eugenio Dediot,
& I~tnra acaba de deleitarnos y que regla-
ei :rvirle de paso previo para la toma de
..i empefio asaz dificultoso para mi que
. qud la oratoria concede a los ungidos
.t.o enfrascado toda la vida en las abstru-
e!, en sus multiples aplieaciones; pero
Sell por la Secci6n de Arquitectura, y
b Mia:ti eionies que sefialan nuestros Esta-
,,iaun deber ineludible, el cumplimiento

jIa' Ac~ademia Nacional de Artes y Le-
| dd sefior Dediot para oubrir un cargo
tet :vamante en su Seeei6n de Arquiteetu-

iler .r la conocida modestia del senior De-
o arquitecto, sus trabajos en el largo
o la profesion son arguments bas-
m : nuevo acad6mico prestigia con au
il*ti o len nuestra Universidad; y que,
i ,La tmedida de sus fuerzas, a rear la


__ ___ I __ _____










26

De origen frances, el autor de sus dias, en la decade gloriosa,
fu6 deportado a M6xico por el representante entonces de la
naci6n dominadora, Conde de Valmaseda, como consecuencia de
sus ideas, y de ahi sobrevino la p6rdida de los bienes con que
contaba para subvenir a las necesidades de su familiar; y vuelto
a Cuba posteriormente, nunca logr6 de nuevo prosperar, y su-
cumbi6 con el inmenso pesar de que sus hijos tuviesen que sufrir
las estrecheces de su escasez de recursos.
Huerfano de padre el senior Dediot, teniendo necesidad de
trabajar, le resultaba impossible asistir con puntualidad a los
cursos oficiales de la carrera de Maestro de Obras, y fue el pri-
mer alumno de ensefianza libre en la Escuela Profesional de La
Habana, en aquella epoca existente; en ella profundiz6 la arit-
m"tica y Algebra para poder dar classes particulares a sus dem's
condiscipulos, proporcionandole sus emolumentos lo indispen-
sable para tender a sus gastos.
Terminados sus studios en esa forma, y sin oportunidad
de ejercer la profesi6n, se inici6 la revoluci6n por la indepen-
dencia el 24 de febrero de 1895, y el senior Dediot, que habia
seguido las predicas del ap6stol de nuestras libertades, no podia
permanecer sordo a los clamores de su patria y se traslad6 a la
tierra hospitalaria de Yucatan, en la Repuiblica 1Mexicana, para
contribuir desde alli con su esfuerzo y sus pequefios recursos
a la liberaci6n de Cuba.
Ya en la emigraci6n, so afili6 a los clubs revolucionarios, de
acuerdo con los cubanos que como 61 pensaban. Su titulo de
Maestro de Obras, que tantos esfuerzos e insomnios le habia
costado, no le proporcion6 ventaja alguna. De moment, para
abrirse paso y constrefiido por las circunstancias, tuvo que
aceptar empleos ajenos a la profesi6n. No se abate, sin embar-
go, al encontrarse en mala situaci6n econ6mica: es delineante,
mide fincas, construye caminos de macadam1, hace los diver-
sos trabajos que se le presentan, aunque sin resultado practice,
hasta que, pasado el 1? de enero dq 1899, dia en que se arri6
para siempre la bandera de la dominaci6n espafiola, regres6 a
Cuba, cerrando su parentesis emigratorio, con la satisfacci6n
del cubano que ha cumplido su deber.
Ya vuelto al seno de la patria redimida, result que su titulo










27

de Obras no le capacitaba come antes para ganarse
que se habia creado la Escuela de Ingenieros y Ar-
'tuvo que volver a ser estudiante: ingres6 en ese
Ytt y, tras lucidos examenes, obtuvo en buena lid
,,AA'rquitecto, que le pone en condiciones de ejercer
iYfesi6n, con lo que comienza su carrera, llegando
bo': otener la clientele de personas distinguidas de
dad. Entre las construcciones de la epoca en que
i o:dciado a otros profesionales, merecen citarse, por
A fbbrica de tabacos que fue de Beck; por su sun-
*Nsidencia del senior Truffin, Villa Mina, en Buena-
t n:i on, por la rapidez de su ejecuci6n, en site
ide Ore, en la esquina que forman las calls de
e; y el Asilo Truffin, en Marianao.
't~a ba esta labor, fue durante cuatro anos Ca-
: te aultativo de los Bomberos del Comercio de
gIgo gratuito-, Arquitecto Municipal de Guana-
hIanao temporalmente.
ApU a otras personas, constituy6 la muy acre-
b .i:alque gira en la actualidad con el nombre de
o .Comipafiia, en la que figuran cinco arquitectos,
~i ido en esta capital numerosas obras, que no
: .i trabajo personal exclusive de nuestro nuevo
i|'tstado, ademas, su concurso a todas las socie-
i".iiOU: se han constituido en La Habana relacio-
ai 6n, siendo socio fundador de la Sociedad de
itectos de Cuba, miembro de la Sociedad Cu-
S y del Colegio de Arquitectos.
Wel 'ieo academic sobre la Arquitectura y la
N -ishab:is tenido oportunidad de comprobar por su
,Ai!~" disertaci6n en la que, a manera de sintesis,
Sdeb entenderge por mtestra arqwitectura; y
a refiere, no es un trabajo para demostrar
Siqi era las galas de conocimientos bibliograficos
te, se desarrolla, sino que trae finica y exclu-
que el author on su larga prictica professional
i para hacer mns viables aqui las construe-
a *





Bien sabido es que los. estilos en la Arquitectura se han ido
modificando en las distintas epocas de la historic, con el fin de
adaptarlas a las exigencias especiales de cada pais, debido a las
costumbres, manera de vivir de sus habitantes y otras condicio-
nes, con especialidad las climatol6gicas, y en consecuencia se
ha ido formando en cada naci6n un estilo propio o especial en
la construcci6n de la vivienda particular; y en este sentido, en.
Cuba ha tenido que construirse de acuerdo con las condiciones
de su clima, celido, debiendo tener por tanto la vivienda pun-
tales altos, grandes huecos para puertas y ventanas rasgadas
hasta el pavimento, amplios patios y jardines, portales al frente,
y pocos pisos, tratandose siempre de armionizar las necesidades
locales con la belleza en la construcci6n. Por eso el senior Dediot
ataca sin piedad ese afan de imitaci6n de algunos profesionales
y personas de nuestras classes pudientes, quc han introducido en
un pais tropical, como el nuestro, las edificaciones cle otro pais en
que la nieve se acumula en sus calls y parques, impide el tran-
sito y hace victims de sus consecuencias a los series que lo ha-
bitan y no tienen los recursos necesarios para librarse de ellas.
En esta ciudad, con sus antiguas calls estrechas, que re-
cuoerdan la epoca colonial, hemos visto que han sido autorizados
edificios de mis de tres pisos y los llamados rasacwielos, a
los cuales el nuevo academico fustiga con el lItigo de su critical
professional.
Son esos edificios genuinamente americanos y en cielto modo
necesarios en aquel pais, pero inadecuados a nuestro clima y
costumbres, y perjudiciales a la salud, ademis de que, carecien-
do casi por complete de ornaments, resultan una burla al gusto
de lo bello y perjudican grandemente la educaci6n artistic de
nuestros hijos, a quienes se les hace career que las convenien-
cias y el interest particular de sus duefios deben anteponerse a
las de la higiene y la belleza de la ciudad en que se habitat.
Las ideas esbozadas por el senior Dediot y su logica critical de
esas construcciones inadaptables a este pals, son tan acertadas
y estan en la conciencia de todos, que ya los organisms oficiales
estfn estudiando este asunto.
La Junta Nacional de Sanidad, velando con interest por la
higiene piblica, tiene en proyecto actuahJente la modifieaci6n


'75


28









29

.de1 las Ordenanzas Sanitarias, que se refiere a la
tbana, y, aunque no .se ha resuelto afn definitiva-
e ar gtrarse que fundandose en la imperiosa necesi-
.iedificios tengan la luz y ventilaci6n adecuadas,
dis los que se construyan o modifiquen en alturas
t pisos deberAn tener pasillos laterales por sus
jIades y a toda la longitud o profundidad del solar
4e, de tal manera, que queden aislados completa-
A.oitros en un ancho que no sera menor de dos
iia ademrs, que en los edificios que tengan mas
a:A&rea maxima que se pueda fabricar a partir
6i:'n menor que el area de fabricaci6n de los
y otras modificaciones en consonancia con
iisa higiene modern. Parece que por ahora
i lai altura de los edificios, lo que deberia
t das las otras plausibles disposiciones, pues
i-,L Unidos de America, pais de origen de estas
a, ya se ha fijado un limited maximo a la altu-
it: lmuchas ciudades, y en New York, aunque
l t altura, se exige que se retire la fachada
I :'la' propiedad despues de fabricarse hasta
W aco"n con la altura total que se pretend

h:i hablafdo el senior Dediot de la necesidad
#iP4i5dsl pueblo cubano para mantener la nacio-
iS nosotros necesitamos conservar nuestra
.0 a v que nos ayude a sostener los pensa-
t (qui 'onstituyen una patria, y no la ban-
:aixmtente; y asi debe ser, en efecto, pero
d-S setos sentimientos en todos los com
ide Cuba, debido probablemente a la ne.
& t.^teahutmana, de dar forma material a sus.
id:::deates para acercarse a ellos en algdn
!'eotlistruye o manda construir, no ya un
$oista :permitido s6lo a los favorecidos por
tiM simplee casa, aprovecha esta oportunidad
ifqtesla Arquitectura lo permit, aquellas
Ios m&s de acuerdo con sus ideals, y










30


esto es lo que motiva en nuestra capital las tres tendencies que
en ella existen:
1. El estilo que puede llamarse norteamericano, represen-
tado por el Bungalow, el Cottage y el Rascacielo, con sus de-
ficiencias eni puntales,, en dinmensiones de los departamentos
y de los huecos de ventil.aci6n y quie es, sin embargo, el pre-
ferido por aquellos a quienes el deseo de ver a Cuba engrandeci-
da, les induce a copiar todos los habitos, costumbres y gustos
del Norte, y de ahi el affn de introducir en un clima t6rrido las
distribuciones y los elements constructivos de los climas frios.
2. El estilo que puede llamarse Espaniol, con las mismas
deficiencies de puntal y dimensions, y con el error de sus pare-
des en imitaci6n a rfistico, que sirven para la facil acumulaci6n
del polvo y de cuantas particular e insects pululan por nues-
tra calida y fermentativa atmnsfera; estilo adoptado prin-
cipalmente por aquellos que, por afioranza, se consuelan, o in-
tentan consolarse, rodeAndose de todo lo que pueden reunir de
pasadas epocas que no han de volver.
3. La arquitectura eclectica, y que tambien puede Ilamarse
cubana, con sus dimensions y detalles, sintesis de trescientos
afios de experiencia en este pais, que es la continuaci6n de la
que antiguamente seguia el cubano cuando le era dable fabricar,
en su afan de cultural y de perfeccionamiento, y es la que habra
de perdurar, porque esta en armonia con las necesidades, con-
veniencias, costumbres e ideales cubanos.
Si, la uni6n del pueblo cubano para la defense national debe
ser nuestro lema siampre, y en esto debemos star de acuerdo
todos, porque asi como el native de Inglaterra no quiere ser otra
cosa que sufbdito de Su Majestad Britanica, y el que ha nacido
en Francia tiene en alta honra ser ciudadano frances, asi el cu-
bano debe tambien enorgullecerse en pertenecer a la Repuiblica
de Cuba, aunque sea una naci6n pequenia, dispuesto siempre a
recibir con los brazos abiertos todos los progress del human
saber, pero teniendo especial empeio en adoptarlos sin perder
en manera alguna su peculiar existencia como naci6n latino-
americana, conservando su idioma, costumbres y las demas cir-
cunstancias que la hacen inconfundible con cualquiera otra na-
cionalidad, por rica, grande y civilizada que sea, porque la










31

.tidencia de la patria, conseguida con la realizaci6n de he-
ieroicos y sacrificios sin tamafio, no puede quedar al arbi-
' :una generaci6n careciente do ideales y sin mas ambicio-
, la de conservar un efimero bienestar que no traspasa
Ahrales del sepulcro.
i.nueva generation debe ser educada en los mas severos
pios de amor a la Repiblica y de compenetraci6n absolute
^ ideals que guiaron a nuestros martires, para que la
, de la patria, sintesis hermosa de todas nuestras aspira-
Ssaludada por los libertadores y emigrados, antes, much
de que la ronca voz de los cafiones la anunciara por la
Iez del planet como simbolo de nueva y naciente nacio-
k* perdure en el seno del hermosisimo Golfo Mlexicano
a, ultima presea que nos dejara el portentoso siglo XIX
i por las presents generaciones para caer en el abismo
*ble de Ia eternidad.









































iA









































































































































































.. ......... .










































































di













..........

















.. ...... .































































































































































































































it :3:,




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - Version 2.9.9 - mvs