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Picturesque Jamaica
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00103316/00002
 Material Information
Title: Picturesque Jamaica with descriptive text of the island. Gold Medal Jamaica Exhibition 1891. Honorable Mention Paris Exhibition 1867
Physical Description: 76 p. : ill. ; 23 x 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Duperly (A.) and Sons
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Kingston
Publication Date: 1891?
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Pictorial works -- Jamaica   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Jamaica
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 81469391
System ID: UF00103316:00002

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Introduction
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Main
        Page 4
        Page 5
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Full Text





Picturesque


Jamaica


A. Duperly & Son
with descriptive text of the Island


Gold Medal Jamaica Exhibition 1891


o Honorable Mention Paris Exhibition 1867


Leaders and Pioneer Photographers of the Island



Established in the year 1840.
Extensive and finest Studio in Kingston, 85 King Street.













T HE Island of JAMAICA was discovered by CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS in 1494 during his second voyage to the "NEW WORLD"
and after remaining in SPANISH OCCUPATION for 101 years, was surrendered to an ENGLISH expedition in 1655. From its
central position as regards the other WEST INDIAN ISLANDS being in direct track between EUROPE, the UNITED STATES,
and the ISTHMUS of PANAMA, cannot but furnish advantages and conveniences for trade and commerce between these points
which are not to be found elsewhere and when the PANAMA CANAL is an accomplished fact, JAMAICA will undoubtedly be a
= necessary branch of that enormous undertaking and must largely benefit by the increased traffic, that will pass in this direction. The
length of the Island is 144 miles, its greatest width is 49 miles. The Island is divided into three countries: SURREY, CORNWALL
and MIDDLESEX, and sub-divided into 14 Parishes. The surface of the Island is extremely mountainous and attains considerable
altitudes particularly in the eastern part, where the central range is known as the BLUE MOUNTAINS (Western Peak) 7,360 ft. A
great diversity of climate is therefore obtainable from a tropical temperature of 300 (Eigthy degrees) at the sea coast and the THERMOMETER
falls to 45 and 50 on the tops of the mountains (highest) and with a dryness of atmosphere that renders the climate of the mountains of
JAMAICA particularly deligthful and suitable to the most delicate constitutions. There are many MINERAL SPRINGS in JAMAICA, most of
them possessing valuable properties for the cure of various diseases and infirmities of the body. TWO of these are particularly famed, the hot
sulphur springs of BATH and the warm salt spring at MILK RIVER. o The BOTANIC GARDEN-CASTLETON, beautifully situated in the
parish of St. Mary, on the Junction road between KINGSTON and ANNOTTA BAY. (Elevation 580 ft.) The HOPE GARDEN of 220 acres
is situated near the foot of the hills in the LIGUANEA PLAINS and is 5 miles from KINGSTON. o The HILL GARDEN and 'CINCHONA
PLANTATION is situated in the parish of St. ANDREW on the slopes of the BLUE MOUNTAINS about 21 miles from KINGSTON by way
of GORDON TOWN.
The total estimated population in 1904 was 797,528 of which 14,692 were white, the rest were coloured, Black, Coolies, Chinese and
others not stated.
The scenery of the Island is of surpassing beauty, the view from Stony Hill over the plain of Liguanea being both grand and
panoramic in effect. The celebrated ROARING RIVER FALLS of which are famed for their grand beauty, the picturesque view of the rolling
pastures of St. Ann and far famed FERN VALLEY (GULLEY). The town of PORT ANTONIO is very picturesque and can boast of the
possession of the largest hotel in the Island. The scenery of the RIO ORANDE VALLEY and JOHN CROW Mountains is amongst the finest.
The military cantonment at NEWCASTLE on one of the spurs of the BLUE MOUNTAIN RANGE is the station of the white troops.
It is situated 3974 feet above the sea amid the most charming scenery and in very healthy climate.
The town of LUCEA is possibly the healthiest as well as the most picturesque place in JAMAICA. The SANTA CRUZ Mountains
are well known for their charming climate, which is at the same time both cool and dry, the residents are justly proud of the bracing air of
these mountains and the beautiful scenery. MANDEVILLE is the chief town of MANCHESTER and is one of the prettiest towns in the Island.
Its situation on the top of a mountain 2.200 feet above sea level is extremely picturesque. The ,,BOG WALK, is one of the finest bits of
scenery in the road to LINSTEAD. A torrent gushing in misty depths and fighting its downward course among scattered rocks the narrowness
of the ravine orden through which it rushes and the steepness and loftiness of the precipice on either side with the richness and variety of
tropical vegetation growing in all the exuberance of its foliage on every spot where a plant can. rest --- these feature unite in imparting to
the scenery all the imposing effect of blending beauty and grandeur.











T OURISTS generally find from November to April the best time to visit Jamaica as it is then the coolest. Day after day the joyous
hours are passed away with the tourists favourite hobby: PHOTOGRAPHY. They can get plates and films developed at even the
shortest notice; while the local stores can supply all their wants. Visitors to the Island will find FIRST CLASS HOTELS and
BOARDING HOUSES in all the towns and at REASONABLE PRICES. The ROADS of the Island are kept in fine order so that
TRAVELLING every where is easy and AUTOMOBILING is a comfort and a pleasure. All towns and places of interest are
� connected by the main roads. There are DAILY TRAINS, also CABS and TAXI-CABS can be hired at moderate prices. The
ELECTRIC CARS run in the city and the suburbs. Seeing JAMAICA is the best way to appreciate it. Now what I mean by seeing
Jamaica is not merely to look around the city, but to go into the heart of the interior and explore nature. To go at will into an
atmosphere of beauty, joy, and gladness, the most convenient way to get to the centres of interest is by day trip excursions in cabs
or automobiles from KINGSTON to CASTLETON.
The BLUE MOUNTAINS no matter how nervous or tired one may be the cooling shade beneath the green foilage of the towering
hills, the numerous and lofty palms, and inviting bamboos in the CASTLETON GARDENS under which rustic tables and benches are set
inviting the visitors to set out their picnic baskets. Here in these beautiful valley beyond the hills no rules of etiquette are needed The pure
air, the calm restful appreciation of it all, gives infinite satisfaction, unalloyed pleasure. SPANISH TOWN, the old capital of historic memory,
comes next, the BOG WALK, and the RIO COBRE IRRIGATION CANAL, full of picturesque sights. A trip by boat on the Canal is
very enjoyable, then back to the Capital and luncheon or dinner can be ordered at the RIO COBRE HOTEL which is always very
much patronized by American Tourists. After resting at this Hotel, visitors can then take train to EWARTON, on to HOLLY MOUNT
or the MONEAGUE, then on to ST. ANNS called the GARDEN OF JAMAICA and the far-famed FERN GULLY, and then on the
north side of the Island to ROARING RIVER FALLS. Very interesting photographs of the several places mentioned will be seen in this book.
So far as Jamaica is concerned it is no exaggeration to say that one of the chief attractions is its CLIMATE. Indeed it would not be
surprising if the visitor should find his supreme delight in some aspect of the Island that has not even been mentioned in these line; for after
all nature as the greatest of all artists reveals such elements of colour, mystery, and beauty, that elsewhere in Jamaica will be found
scenes, glimpses, vistas, and surprises to delight the eye and enthrall the mind. We have had but a passing glance at some of the attractions
that this little Island holds out to the traveller, tourist, or invalid, but whatever may be said or thought either for health, love or business
concerning the Island, it is only those who have witnessed the manifold glories becomes entranced by the thousand, and one perfect
pictures from natures most delicate brush and felt, the refreshing influences of her glorious climate. Who can best endorse the justness
of her claim to be JAMAICA - -



"THE PEARL OF THE ANTILLES."












































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The "Shark" papers.
The Captain and crew of the brig "Nancy" were tried in the old Court House, S. W. corner of Harbour and Hanover streets, Kingston, in 1771, and, through papers
recovered from a Shark's maw off Tacmel Haiti, convicted. These papers are at the Jamaica Institute, East S, and the head of the Shark in the British Museum.

76




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