Group Title: Florida Chautauqua, De Funiak Springs, Fla
Title: The Florida Chautauqua, De Funiak Springs, Fla
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00103297/00009
 Material Information
Title: The Florida Chautauqua, De Funiak Springs, Fla
Alternate Title: Assembly programme
Third Annual session program hand-book
Annual session of the Florida Chautauqua
Florida Chautauqua, our 15th year, 1884-1899
Florida Chautauqua, De Funiak Springs, Florida
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 23-24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Chautauqua
Publisher: Duffy Bros.
Place of Publication: Cuyahoga Falls, O
Cuyahoga Falls, O
Publication Date: 1909
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Chautauquas -- Congresses -- Florida   ( lcsh )
History -- Periodicals -- De Funiak Springs (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
 Notes
General Note: Title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: 1919.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00103297
Volume ID: VID00009
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 42937765

Full Text


TThe Florida
Chautauqua


c'%lie Funiak Springs
Florida







ThemloridaChautaquqvis

DE FUNIAK( SPRINGS, FLORIDA

The Great ~Winter Chautauqua of the South .
February 3rct to March 27th, 1909

The Florida Chautauqua celebrates her twenty-
fifth anniversary on the third of February, Nineteen
Hundred and Nine by the dedication of a new
auditorium capable of seating four thousand people
and Hall of Brotherhood, with imposing columns
and dome, containing rooms for classes in elocution,
literature, Bible study and music. It has been the
aim of the management to present for the coming
session the best artists in their respective lines,
making the hours instructive and inspiring as well
as entertaining. There are stirring lectures on vital
subjects,1literary interpretations, and "Chalk-talks" of

















The New Auditorium

crayon artists; classical recitals and popular songs,
readings from the masterpieces of literature, and
humorous impersonations and character sketches;
instructive illustrated' travelogue and colored mo-
tion pictures; grand concerts and spectacular chil-
~ren's plays. In short, the best thought, the best
expression, the best work born of minds which are
to-day arousing the thinking world are placed before
the patrons of our Chautauqua, causing the Institu-
tion to refer with pride to the recent tribute of
Governor Broward of Florida when hle Isaid\ther eu-i
sider'ed the Florida Chautauqua "Abk~trtoithe Pub-
lic Schools the most valuhi~l''e~dulCaio:nal i$ddskt~ih
the state."
De Funiak Springs is located on the Louisville
and Nashville Railroad, midway between Talla-
hassee and Pensacola. Crowning the crest of the
Blue! Ridge, this Charming city, three hundred feet





CHAUTAUQUA 3
AccesibiityAs De Funiak Springs is situated on
AccesibiitYthe Pensaeola and Atlantic Division
of the Louisville & Nashville midway between
Jacksonville and New Orleans, one hundred and thirty
miles southeast of Thomasville, visitors journeying
southward from Chicago, Cincinnati, St. Louis and
the West, find this spot the most easy of access of
all the Florida Resorts, and year by year make this
the point of destination to the homes of hospitable
friends, cheery hotels and pleasant cottages. Travel-
ers who go early in the season to the tropical part
of the State do wisely to turn aside at Jacksonville
and visit De Funiak Springs on their homeward
journey, not only to attend its Chautauqua, but
also to enjoy its invigorating air.
Our akesThere are many lakes of rare~beauty
Our akesnear De Funiak where those fond of
the water can row and fish to their heart's content.
The nearest are the Stanley Lakes, about three miles


i THEl FLORIDA
above sea level, marks the highest altitude by United
States coast survey in Florida. It is twenty miles
from the Gulf of Mexico, whose breezes come tem-
pered with sweetness and laden with health through
miles of primeval pines. The marvelous lake in the
heart of the town, perfectly round and one mile ,
in circumference, is a dream of beauty. Visitors from
all parts of the world pronounce it one. of the
marked features of our continent, and one of the
world's wonders, for nowhere else between the At-
lantic and Pacific, or indeed in any part of the
globe, has this gem of a lake an equal in symmetry
and ideal perfection. The high, rolling lands by
which it is entirely surrounded, gradually sloping
toward the silvery beach, form a frame-like margin
to the lovely picture, while fine residences amid de-
lightful environments can be seen through the open-
ings for miles in every direction. The scenery
justifies the title of the "Adirondacks of Western


In Alpine Parkr
Florida," and De Funiak has been appropriately
styled "LA Little Venice," with fairy parks,. minia-
ture lake's, tumbling .cascades, waterfalls and foun-
tains. The pine trees that stand on the border of
the lake are giants of the forest, and remain like
Sentinels uarding its beauty. Live oaks and
water oaks are on every hand, while holly bushes
hold up their scarlet berries and nod invitingly to
the passerby. No other place offers such advantages
.to seekers after health, pleasure and entertainment.
~he,~The,.h absolute. purity and curative
.,; qali'ies of her waters make De
Funials widely known las i"the Poland Springs of the
South," while her clear ~atmosphere, bright skies,
high altitude and balmy breezes form an ideal com-
bination for the health-seeker. Alpine Spring is
now everywhere recognized as a complete curative
for those suffering from kidney complaints, It has
restored many to health and vigor.


The Lakre from Hotel Chautauqua

in circumference, which can be seen from the car
window on approaching De Funiak from the west.
On their shores, under the stately pines, can be
found ideal picnic grounds. There is a good shady
drive around them, affording enchanting views.
Lake Cassidy, about nine miles distant, has an
area of over two square miles, the home of the
trout, the bass and the bream. There are also good
livery facilities to the Gulf-side and other points
where hunting and fishing are found.
Al ParkAdjoining the Chautauqua Park
AliePr and Lake, is a delightful resting-
place where the lover of nature, can walk among
stately pines, bask in the sunshine and hear the
sweet music of song-birds mingle with the cadence of
falling waters. Here is Alpine Spring, the crystal
water of which is caught in a "Jacob's Well" of
sparkling granite. .





CHAUTABUQUA


4 THEIR FLORIDA
Excursion tickets are sold over all
Approaches prominent railroads from Ne~wYork,
Chicago, St. Louis, Cincinnati, Philadelphia, Wash-
ington, Pittsburg, and various places in the East
and West. Special Round Trips are issued from
points on the Louisville & Nashville Railroad during
the Assembly. While the Chautauqua is in session,
no winter trip presents so large a return for the
outlay. In orie day the snow banks north of the
Ohio become merely a memory amid the sunny
dreams of the Southland.
,The Hotel Chautauqua, a large
Accommodations and admirably kept hotel, is
fitted with modern conveniences, and furnishes every
possible comfort to its guests. ~Several smaller
hotels also present reasonable rates to tourists, and
there are many cottages with comfortable accommo-
dations. Delightful families from the North have
for years made De Funiak their winter home. Peo-
ple from Iowa, Wisconsin, Dakota, ~Illinois, Ohio,
Indiana, Minnesota, New York and many other
states, make happy all visitors by cordial hos-
pitalty. The Excursions which take place
ExCurit1ns on Saturdays are marked features
of the Chautauqua season. On some of these days
crowded trains bring fully 3,000 people to the Chau-
taugua. The Saturday programs are especially in-
teresting and attractive, and the large auditorium
on the lakeside is always crowded to its utmost
capacity. The Wednesday holidays also afford
opportunity for excursions to various places lof
interest.

Pastimes and Sports goe ure otheDe Fe ia
Springs is its out-of-door life. The lake affords ex-
cellent opportunity for rowing and sailing. A su-
perb orchestra furnishes music in the Hotel Chau-
taugua Dining Room.


BDe])rItInEt of JlRatt'ttti0R.

CLASS WORK ALONG VARIOUS LINES.

The Florida Chautauqua announces the following
departments for the coming season of Nineteen Hun-
dred and Njine, comprising work in Literature,
Music, Voice Culture, Elocution, Physical Culture,
Biblical Literature, and Child-training. The courses
are in the hands of teachers of vtide experience and
national reputation, and every department reveals
a wide range of topics, and a broad field for indi-
vidual study. Special emphasis is laid, as' in the
past, on the Biblical hour and the lectures on litera-
ture, which are the great bulwarks of the Chau-
taugua movement throughout our land. The edu-
cational value of this institution is of the utmost
importance, filling the vast audiences with abiding
inspiration and new ideas. It has been the aim of
the management to place before the people of West-
ern Florida and our Winter visitors the finished
work of leaders in their respective lines. For those
~Saturday excursionists who can remain over the
Sabbath attention is called to the Sunday morning
sermon in the largfe auditorium and the sacred mu-
sic of the assembly orchestra and soloists.' No ad-
mission or gate fee is charged for these religious
exercises-although the eminent divines who de-
liver these wonderful sermons are brought by the
management .at great expense--as it is' the aiim and
purpose of the Florida Chautauqua to scatter .its
messages of hope and cheer to all hearts. The in-
creasing number of people who drive many miles of


Chautauqua Lake





6 THE FLORID~A

a Sabbath morning to hear the great living truths of
Christ's words show the inestimable good the in-
stitution is doing, and reveal the abiding influence
of its presence upon the community and adjoining
counties.



















Louise Morgan Amsbary

0u~iet.~
The edtlcational value of good music and its re-
fining influence upon mind and character have:
caused this important department during recent
years to become more prominent in all Chautauquas.
It is with pride that we announce Dr. Jackson's
engagement for ten days at the -Chautauqua. As a
teacher and oratorio singer he stands in the first


CHAUTAUQUA 7

.sonnel of the Department of Music, while the Lady
Washington Quartet and Quaker Male Quartet show
the harinonious effects of ensemble and blending
chord as revealed in trained voices.


Literature.
The lectures and courses in literature will be the
best ever presented to our patrons. W. B. Ams-
bary brings one of the strongest list of lectures on the
American platform, conducting the audiences
through the works of James Whiteomb Riley, Rud-
yard Kipling, Henry Drummond,. Gilbert Parker
and Henry Van Dyke, with a rendition of his own
popular poems, "The Ballads of Bourbonnais." Ken-


Wallace Bruce


neth Bruce treats of "American Poetry," Tenny-
son's "Idyls of the King" and "LThe Early English
Drama." Dr. David Beaton, Professor of the Armour
Institute of Chicago, gives us a glimpse of the Scot-,
tish Poets, and American and Foreign Humorists..
Hon. Wallace Bnuce gives in reminiscence incidents;
from the lives of literary men he has known, and
his lecture on "'Washington Irving." Mrs. W. E.
Lewis, of Ohio, presents a course.of interpretative
recitals from the Danish playwright, as well as
our own American authors; Meressa Thompson, of
Illinois, .reads the popular "Rebecca of Sunnybrook
Farm;" Nellie Ambler Crossen, of Ohio, "'When-
Knighthood was in Flower" and the "Story of:
Patsy," and W. Wesley Hummon, "Jim Fenton, the~
Hero of Seven Oaks." The splendid literary lecture
on "Niagara--Thunder of W~aters," is worthy of;
mention under this department. Dr. Parkhurst hase'
spailed no pains in the preparation of this masterly


'Lou J. Beauchamp
rank of American tenors. May T. Haps, soprano,
of Kentucky; Emma DawdyT-Sessoms, contralto, of
Florida; Louise Morgan Amsbary, lyric soprano, of
Illinois; Mary B. Kessler, contralto, of Michigan,
and Anna W. Barnum, soprano, of Florida; teach-
ers and soloists of wide experience, form the per-





8 THE FLORIDA


SCHAUTAUQUA. 9


production. The courses as seen by the variety of the of Oratory : W. B. Amsbary, Estelle Leggett Crow,
foregoing subjects, cover a wide field and afford un- and Mrs. Hardin Burnley, honor graduates of leading
usual opportunity for study. schools of expression.

. -IIrnstrateD Ctratelogue.
,-, 1To see and know a country, to be familiar with its
.5 1-Zs5l.ea history, its characteristics, its people and customs, is
- in itself a liberal education. All have not the oppor-
tunity of seeing Europe, but all can have Europe brought
~to them. S. R. Stoddard will show the "Land of the Mid-
night Sun, " Odd Corners of Old Europe, " Alaska,
'the Land of Ice, and "America's Wonderland." Dr
William E. Cadmus takes us to "1Egypt," to "LJeru-








In Alpine Park


ltocution anD Ex~prtessio n.
The highest expression of art is to attain a cor-
rect interpretation of the great masterpieces of
literature and' to make, as the poet writes, "the
cold word live." Literature and elocution are
therefore closely allied; the first furnishes the ma-
terial, the second the mode of expression. The
Chautauqua management will have on the grounds
the following capable teachers, and any of these
will- give private instruction to those desirous of
taking lessons. Mrs. W. E. Lewis, of the Schuster
School of Oratory; W. Wesley Hummon, of the
Franklin School of Oratory; Margaret Cooperrider
and Nellie Ambler Crossen, of the Columbus School


Among the Pines
salem" and to "Ephesus," while superb motion pic-.
tures show the greatness of America as well as the
charming spots and grand natural scenery of foreign
lands.

XPIotography?.
The Camera Club has played a great part in-the
out-of-door life of the Chautauqua.' It has fur-
nished delightful. excursions, given something to do
on the Wednesday afternoons, and afforded oppor-
tunity for visiting the places of interest near by.
No membership fee will be charged and everyone
is cordially invited to join. It gives zest to the
holiday spirit of the Chautauqua and is one of the
A Wednesday E~ceursion popular organizations.'





CHALUTA;OUQU 11
the average resort town are unknown features in
the delightful democratic life of this American in-
stitution, and nothing has contributed more to this
desired end than the Wednesday Night Informal
Receptions at the Hotel Chautauqua.


10 THEl FLORIDA

~Hope Cawthorn has charge of the School of
Photography and will be glad to meet all members
at the Photographic Gallery at any time, where in-
struction in the use of Kodak and Camera, the de-
velopment of films and negatives will be given.

QEbilbtien's Sout.,
There is a great treat in store for the little ones.
Gertrude Schram, of Illinois, will have charge of
this hour and delight the' children with games,
drills and other forms of instructive entertainment..
The importance of child training as a part of the
Chautauqua course has been emphasized more and
more each year and the necessity of early training
and the great benefit derived from the participation
of the little ones in the spectacular plays presented
on Children's Day have been advocated by kinder;
garten leaders in pamphlet and book. Miss Schram
brings a ripe experience as teacher and trainer, hav-
ing won the title of "'The Lilliputian Entertainer
of America."


On Chautauciua Lake


annitlettsatrt? Day~s
Acs the year Nineteen Hundred and Nine marks
the anniversary of many celebrated men and events
it is fitting that they should find expression in the
coming assembly. It is the tri-centennial obf the
discovery of the Hudson River by the bold navi-


Near De Funiak

gnfotrmal RBeceptions.
The social side of the Chautauqua finds -fitting
expression in the Wednesday receptions, held in the
spacious parlors of the Hotel Chautauqua each
Wednesday night at eight fifteen during the assem-
bly. An interesting musical program will be given
on this occasion and everyone is cordially invited
to attend. The President, Superintendent and DEr~
rectors of the Chautauqua .are always present pni n
these occasions to meet and introduce: all strangers,:
and all visitors have a splendid opportunity to meet
one another and make the acquaintance of the- hos~-
pitable people of De Funiak Springs. The:sqocial
life of the Florida Chautauqua i's one of its charm-
ing' features. The exclusiveness and -monotony ojf


Alpine spring
gator, Hendrick Hildson, and on March 2nd his
memory will be honored with appropriate ceremony.
It is also the tri-centennial of the, birth of John
IVilton, the centennial of the birth of William
Ewart Gladstone, of Alfred Tennyson, of Edgar





CHAUTAUQUA 13

~9atrbt 6 *tei~l
The same rate will apply to "'Saturday Excursions"
as in the past few years, viz.: 85 cents for whole
tickets and 50 c~nts for half ~tickets, sold at all
railroad stations between Pensacola and River June-
tion, and intermediate points, which includes "Ad-
mission for the Day" (vizl.: 25 cents for whole
tickets and 15 cents for half tickets) to all Chau-
taugua entertainments. This has proved a great
convenience, as the mere showing of the return'
railroad coupon is sufficient to .admit bearer to all.
the exercises and entertainments held in the. Audi-
torium. The Saturday attractions are especially
strong. Orators of national reputation, the rnost
popular singers in our land, the best male quanrtets,
ladies' quartets and concert companies, readcers, im- I
personators. hiuniorou e~ntertainers, solioists andl full.


it THE 14LORIDA

Allen Poe, of Oliver Wendell Holmes and of Abra-
ham Lincoln. All of these great men will be re-
membered with appropriate exercises. One of the
great events of the year will be the dedication of
the column to Henry Ward Beecher, to be unveiled
and dedicated by Dr. Newell Dwight Hillis.

23i018 (110#*
The Devotional and Biblical Hour, held each
morning at 10 o'clock in the auditorium, is in the
hands of leading Bible students, and abiding good ,
should be gained from these morning meetings. I
The work will be begun by Rev. Clarence R.
Williams,~ a graduate of Princeton University, who
has devoted his life to the study of the Scriptures.
During this week' at the Chautauqua the entire book
of John, the book that reveals "the heart of Jesus,"
will be studied and interpreted. Dr. J. W. Stagfg,
of Birmingham, Alabama, one of the great Biblical


Hotel Chautauqua
exponehts of the South, gives an inspiring series.
of lectures on the "Ethical Teachings of Jesus."
Dr. J. W. Walden, President of Palmer College, pre-
sents a survey of the Epistle of James. Dr. Davia
< Beaten, of the Armour Institute, of Chicago, shows
the vital relation of the Bible and its teachings to 1
the home and our everyday life. Rev. J. E. Northoutt,
of Florida, draws many truths from the life of
St. Paul. A. W. Hawks, of New York, gives words
of cheer and promise, the result of a life of re-
ligious work. Dr. William E. Cadmus, of Illinois,
a traveller in the Holy Land, portrays the' scenes
made famous by the prophets of old, and explains
many a hidden message. Dr. George Summey, of
New Orleans, La., editor of the Southwestern
Presbyterian and one of the authorities .on Old
Testament Literature, shows the relation of the
Bible to ancient and modern thought. Dr. Fredi-
erick S. Parkhurst, of New York, carries the audi-
ences from the "LPsalm Country" and "Zion" to the
"Fields of Immortality," closing what is unques-
tioriably the greatest list of Bible exponents ever
offered on any Chautauqua platform.


Ohautaugua Auditorium and Hall of Brotherhood

orchestra, crayon artists and moving pictures g~ive
to each Saturday a distinctive touch. -

~~Parme6 *lree
During the past year the Presbyterians region have begun the work of building up a first-
class college. They have a beautiful property of
twenty-five or thirty acres, with commodious b~iild-
ings, two squares from Chautauqua Lake. For the
present, under college control, a high-grade academy
is being maintained as initiating and preparatory
to the early ~organization of regular college classes.
The academy (Mr. G.- Clyde Fisher, A.B., Principal)
is well attended and has already an advanced class,
which is doing freshman college work. The presi-
dent of the college, Rev. J. W. Walden, D.D., is at
work canvassing for a permanent college endowment.
Winter Tourists will find in this institution good
school advantages for their sons and daughters.





CHAUTAUQUA. 15


A. W. Hawks


~


a~Y~~
8~~ I Fr,
s
m(d .Ei (d
.s B


THZE PLA TFO R M..

LIST OF TALENT.
Carrico's Concert Band and Orchestra, of Chicago,
will again be at the Florida Chautauqua during the
entire session. The organization is composed of
finished musicians, including Violin, 'Cello, Cornet,
Clarinet. and Euphonium soloists, and is under the
personal directorship of Mr. W. L. Carrico. Entire
concerts from Wagner and the great composers will
be rendered, in addition to the usual popular selec-
tions.
Rev. Newell Dwight Hillis, D. D., of Brooklyn, New
York, will deliver his celebrated lecture on the first
Saturday of the, Chautauqua, and preach a stirring
sermon on the following Sunday. No name is bet-
ter known throughout our country than that of Dr.
Hillis, and the new auditorium will be crowded to
its utmost capacity on this occasion. It is very
fitting that Dr. Hillis should unveil at this time the
memorial column to Henry Ward Beecher, as Dr.
Hillis now occupies the pulpit of Plymouth Church
in Brooklyn, New York, which rang with the elo-
quence of the great pulpit orator of the last gen-
eration.
Dr. Jon Jackson, of New York, the gifted tenor,
will again delight all lovers of music at the Florida
Chautauqua. All West Florida is to be congratu-
lated on the opportunity of again hearing one of the


o a

"O F
.0
O~ 5





ScHAUTAUQUA~n 17

testing repertoire. The readings of Helen L. Wal-
cott have attracted much attention at the Chau-
tauguas the past summer, eliciting great applause.
It is interesting for our patrons to know that Miss
W~alcott studied under Cora Mel Patten and gfradu-
ated from her school of oratory.


16 PHEI FLORIDA

leading singers of our country. Dr. Jackson has
won some of the finest tributes from musicians and
the press all over our land, the general consensus
of opinion being summed up in the following words
which appear in almost every notice: "The best
concert we have ever had."
Hon. Lou J. Beauchamp, of Ohio, has been aptly
styled "Lthe humorous philosopher." He needs no
introduction to our patrons, as his lecture two years
ago brought foi-th one of the largest audiences of
the year. He is a pleasing speaker, illustrating his


From Gertrude Sobram's Children's Play

Rev. David Beaton, D. D., of Illinois, Professor
of the Armour Institute of Chicago, whose lectures
on literary, biblical -and popular subjects have at-
tracted much favorable comment, will appear many
times on the platform.
Hon. Wallace Bruce, of Brooklyn, N. Y., Presi-
dent of the Florida Chautauqua, will deliver two
new lectures entitled, "Literary Men I Have Known"
and "Reminiscences of a Four Years' Consular
Service."


David Beaton


points with a rich fund of humor and anecdote, and
is acknowledged to be one of the most popular lee-
turers on the Chautauqua platform.
Rev. J. Wt. Stagg, D.D., of Alabama, one of the
first orators of the South, will deliver stirring lec-
tures and preach in the large auditorium. The
management is to be congratulated on securing Dr.
Stagg, for few names are better known throughout
the Southland than that of' Birmingham's eloquent
preacher.
The Spaffords, of Illinois, will present two novel
programs consisting of modeling in clay, cartoons,
crayonn drawings, sketches, impersonations, music on
various instruments, foreign and ancient, collected
from all parts of the world.. The Spaffords give the
most striking entertainment on the Chautauqua plat-
form, having appeared with success in almost every
State of -the Union.
The Lady Washington Quartet, of Illinois, rend-
ering songs in costume, present a varied and inter.


W. L. Carrioo

1Mrs. W. E. Lewis, of Ohio, is a reader of wide
experience, having supplemented her work with
special courses of study under Prof. S. H. Clark,
of Chicago, and Prof. S. S. Curry, of lioston. She
is at present a member of the faculty of the Schus-
ter School of Oratory Her course of interpretative
recitals will be of unusual interest.





8 THEl FLORIDA

Rev. Frederick S. ParkhLurst, D. D., of New York,
brings three strong lectures and a splendid list of
Biblical Topics He is an eloquent and entertaining
.speaker. "A Chip of the Old Block" has brought
forth many fine tributes. .
Gertrude Schram, of Illinois, "The Lilliputian
Entertainer," will present the "Roosevelt-Longworth
Wedding Reception" on Children's Day, March 6th.


CHAUTAUQUA. 10

Rev..J. WV. WValden, D. D., of Florida, President of
Palmer College, is a forceful analytical speaker, pos-
sessing a wide range of information and a thorough
grasp of his subject. He will be enthusiastically
re-welcomed by his many friends and admirers.
Hon. Joseph. G. Camp, of Georgia, is one of the great
orators of the South. He has been pronounced by
many able critics the equal of Gordon and Graves.' His
lecture The American King is one of the platform
gems.
Rev. Clarence R. W~illiams, of MVassachusetts, is a
Bible student of wide .experience. His studies in the
Book of John have won him high rank among the
scholars of the present day.
Rev. J. S. Edmonds, of Florida. will conduct the
Bible Hour, giving lessons from the L~ife of Christ.
IMalcolm Bruce, of New York, presents several
evenings of moving pictures, depicting humorous
scenes as well as the great W~onderland of Europe
and America. The films show the highest develop-
ment in motion picture art, and the wonderful hand
painted pictures of celebrated subjects make the
evenings profitable as well as entertaining.
May T. Hays, of Kentucky, soprano, possesses a
strong, well modulated voice. She has held im-
portant church positions in Chicago, in Louisville,
and in other large cities, and has been a striking
figure at the Chautauguas.
W. B. Amsbary/, of Illinois, will give a series of
lecture readings. Mr. Amsbary has no prototype on
the platform. He teaches the simple things of life
in a simple way, giving his own compositions as


W. Wesley Hummon


There will be one hundred children in -the cast.
'rhis is one of ,the recognized platform hits of the
day and th~e auditorium will be crowded, to over-
flowing. It is an exact reproduction bf the White
House Wedding-Reception, acted by ~children from
three to seven years of age.
S. Van WJarnzica,. of Illinois, baritonei one of the
members of the Amphion Male Quartet,, will ap-
pear in concert and solo work.
Brigadiar-General Samuel Pasco,, of Florida, will
make a short address on Veterans' Day, Saturday,
March 13th, and have charge of the morning exer-
cises in the large auditorium.:'
Hon. C. C. Gaines, of New York, President of
Eastman's Busin~ess College, one of the foremost in-
stitutions in our country, will delivery a lecture on
Thomas Jefferson and dedicate a column in the New
Auditorium in honor of that noble statesman and
president.
Hon. James K. Patterson, of Kentucky, President
of the State University at Lexrington, brings wide
prestige to our platform. His reputation through-
out the Southern States is widespread. He pos-
sesses a wonderful flow of rhetoric and eloquence
and his lectures are true classics.


Margaret cooperider
well as those of Riley Parker, Drummond, Van
Dyke, and others. His rendition of He was a
Bronson," a tale of the Southern Feuds, written es-





GRAU'rAOQUAB 21B

Rev.' George Summey, D. D., Editor of the South-
western Presbyterian, of New Orleans, La., will
bring renewed zeal and inspiration to the Devotional
Hour. Dr. Summey is recognized as a leading au-
thority on Old Testament and Hebraic literature.
Meressa Thompson, of Illinois, presents her origfi-
nal monologue, "Rebecca of Sunnybrook Far~m,"
and several miscellaneous programs. Her readings,
artistically rendered, strike a common 'chord of
sympathy and appeal to all.
Alice Carrico,; of Chicago, a violinist of ability,
will be at the Chautauqua the entire season. She


20 THEJ PLORIDA

pecially for him by Opie Read, is on'e of the plat-
form masterpieces.
Mary Campbell, of Florida, pianist, is a true
musician, entering into solo and accompaniment with
the zeal and joy of the artist. She will be heartily
re-welcomed by our patrons.
Rev. William E. Cadmus, D. D., of Illinois, brings a
splendid list of Biblical subjects and three superbly
illustrated lectures on Egypt, Jerusalem and
Ephesus. These slides were made~ from pholto-
graphs taken by Dr. Cadmus while in the Holy Land
and have been artistically hand colored.
Mrs. ion Jackson, of New York, violinist, will
appear in concert work and play obligates in the
song recitals of Dr. Jackson.
IMajor-General E. M. Law, of Florida, will de-
liver the oration on Veterans' Day, March 13th, in
the large auditorium.


Dr. Ion Jackson
Margaret Cooperrider, of Ohio, has met with suc-
cess as a delineator of humorous character. Her reci-
tations in costume are especially popular.
Captain R. E. Rose, of Florida, state chemist, will
deliver an address on Agricultural Day.
S. R. Stoddard, of New York, brings four su-
perbly illustrated lectures. It will be remembered
that Mr. -Stoddard's slides were among the finest
ever presented at our Chautauqua. He will receive
a hearty greeting by all of our patrons.
P. H. Rolfs, of Florida, President of the State
Experimental Station, will deliver a lecture on
Agricultural Day, March 20th, in the large audi-
torium.
H. Lanener, of Chicago, concert violinist, will ap-
pear in several concerts, rendering solos, with or-
~chestral accompaniment*
Louise Morgan Amsbary, of Illinois, has delighted
large audiences. She was soprano soloist in the
leading churches in San Francisco, California, and
has since appeared with great success in many
states on the Chautauqua and Lyceum platforms.


Alvin 11ische


was a pupil of Emil Sauret, the eminent French
teacher, and has studied with several other noted
instructors.
Nellie Am'bler Crossen, of Ohio, brings a new
repertoire of readings. Her presentation of "W~hen
Knighthood was in Flower" and "The Story of
Patsy"~ have placed her services in demand on the
Lyceum courses.
A. B. Rische, of Texas, 'Cellist, whose stronff,
firm tones have made him one of Chautaugua's fa-
vorite soloists, will appear many times in concert.
worki.
Mrs. Hardin Burnley, of New York, is one of the
acknowledged society entertainers in the great
m'etropolis. Her programs are original, and she has
the proud distinction of hearing many of her com-





ctaitAUntrtl e9

Emma Dawdyd Sessoms, of Florida, will be heart-
ily re-welcomed by our many patrons. She glos-
sesses a clear full contralto voice of unusual power
and sweetness. Her recitals range from the clas-
sical to the more popular selections and reveal the
artistic feeling of the true musician.
Estelle Leggett Crow, of Florida, will be heartily
re-welcomed by her many friends at the Chautau-
qua. Her repertoire combines a wide range of
subjects, both dramatic anld humorous, presented in
a delightful manner. :
Kenneth Bruce, of New York, will give three.
popular lectures, "'Ten Times Ten," -"American
Genius" and "American Poetry." Referring to
These a recent press notice said: "The lectureg.
sparkled with wit, humor- and eloquence and ~ever~yi'
point was brought out in a telling manner."
Walden, the 1Magician, presents a program of
'wonder and bewilderment, including "'The Hindoo's
Chest,". "Growth of Flowrers," "1Birth of Old


2s THE1 FIDRIDA

positions recited from the platform by celebrated
artists. She is especially natural in child imper-
sonations, and in this work has won hearty tributes
from celebrities and press.


In Alpine FarB

Anna W. Barnum, of Florida, soprano soloist,
will appear in several coricerts.
Frank Allen Peake, of Kentucky, the humorous
entertainer, has become justly popular, as a promi-
nent Chautauqua attraction. He has a large list of
lecture subjects and his popular entertainment is
arranged so as to appeal to all audiences.
IMary B. Kessler, of Michigan, is one of the
prominent contralto soloists of the northwest. She
has had a wide experience as teacher, church so-
loist and concert artist, and her full. clear notes.
have won splendid testimonials.


Carrico's Orobestra, at the Hotel Chautauqua


Glory," "The Ghost Dance of Hindosta," "The En-
chanted Blocks," "'The Rewitched Flag and Candle,"
''The Supper of Pins," "The Magic Box," and many
other marvelous' tricks and illusions.
A. W. Hawks, of New York, the Sunshine Man,
will be at the Chautauqua an entire week, giving hu-
morous and entertaining lectures. He needs no intro-
duction to a West Florida audience as he is one of
our most popular attractions and a universal favor-
ite.
The Quaker IMale Quartet will spend four days at
the Chautauqua, giving three full concerts. Their
voices are strong and clear, blending in perfect:
harmony. The humorous selections in costume al-
ways make a decided hit, and the variety of their:
program responds to the taste of all Chautauqua
audiences.


Lake stanley

Rev. J. B. Northoutt, of Florida, will conduct the
Biblical Hour, presenting different phases in the
life of. St. Paul.





CHAUTA~UQUA 25


Alice Carrico.


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The Florida Chautauqua
TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION

DETAILED PROGRAlV

WEDNESDAY--FEBRUARY 3.
7.30 Addresses of Welcome by President Wallace Bruce,
of Brooklyn, N. Y.; President J. W. Walden, of Pal-
mer College, De Funiak Springs, Fla.; Mayor W. W.
Flourney, De Funiakr Springs, Fla.; Superintendent
Kenneth Bruce, of New York City; S. R. Stoddard,
of New-York; resident ministers, and prominent citi-
zens who were present at the first Chautauqua in
.1885. Selections by Carrico's' Concert Orchestra, of
Chicago; Mrs. Hardin Burnley, reader; Mary B.
K~essler, contralto; Alice Carrico, violinist; Estelle
Leggett Crow, reader; Alvin Rische, 'cellist. Ad-
mission Free.
THURSDAY--FEBRUARY 4
10.00 Biblical Hour : "The Gospel Accoring to St. John,''
Rev. Clarence R. Williams.
3.00 Concert: Mary B. K~essler, ~donti.B.lto ; Estpl leIeggett
Crow, reader; Mrs. Hardin Burnley, reader; Car-
rico's Orchestra.
7.45 Musical Prelude: Carrico's Orchestra, of Chicago.
83.00 Illustrateq L~ecture: "Eiurope's Odd Corners," S. R.
Stoddard.


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P11110 011ege

Rev. J. W.~ WALDEN, D. D., President

DE, FUNIAK SPRINGS, FLORIDA



Palmer COllZege Academy

G. CLYDE FISHER, A. B., Principal

'11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111


CH-AUTAUQUA 27


ParelltS from the North will
find in this Institution a place
tO put their sons and daugh-
' (teS during their Winter stay
ill FlOrida. A good faculty
of seven teachers. Depart-
IlelltS for Musical and Busi-
11SS COUTSCS.


Second Term


BOard and Tuition Very
Reasonable

For further information, address

M R. G. CLYDE FISHER

De Funiak Springs Florida



nOpe Cawthon Photo Studio
ARTISTIC PORTRAITS BY PHOTOGRAPHY

We have on Sale a Full Stock of-
KODAKS, PHOTO SUPPLIES, PICTURES,
FRAMES, SOUVENIRS, POST CARDS,
NOVELTIES, Etc.

A fine souvenir book containing 20 pages of Photo
Views of De Funiak Springs and vicinity will be sent
to any one, postpaid, for 30 cents.


26 THEl FLORIDA

FRIDAY--FEBRUARY 5.
10.00 Biblical Hour: "The Beginning of Faith and Un-
belief" (John L.-v.), Rev. Clarence R. Williams.
3.00 Readings and Child Impersonations: Mrs. Hardin
Burnley.
7.45 Musical Prelude: Mary B. K~essler and Carrico's Or-
chestra.
8.00 Illustrated Lecture: "Under the Midnight Sun," S. R.
Stoddard.

SATURDAY--FEBRUARY 6.
ANNIVERSARY DAY.
10.00 Biblical Hour : "The Development of Faith and Un-
belief" (John vi.-zil.), Rev. Clarence R. Williams.
11.00 Concert: Mrs. Hardin Burnley, reader; Mary B.
K~essler, contralto; Estelle Leggett Crow, reader;
ABnna W. Brnmum, soprano; Carrico's Orchestra.
2.30 Orchestral Concert: Carrico's Orchestra, of Chicago.
3.00 Lecture: "John Ruskin and his Message to the 19th
Century," Dr. Newell Dwight Hillis. .
7.00 Entertainment: Mary B. K~essler, contiralto; Mrs.
Hardin Burnley, child impersonator; Alice Carrico,
violinist; Estelle Leggett Crow, reader; Carl Hahn,
cornetist; Anna W. Barnum, soprano; Carrico's Or-
chestra, and motion pictures in colors.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 7.
9.30 Sunday School in the various churches.
11.00 Sermon in the new Auditorium, Dr. Newell Dwight
Hillis. Sacred Music: Mary B. K~essler and Car-
rico's Orchestra.
5.00 Chautauqua Sabbath Vesper Service in the Audi-
torium.

MONDAY-FEBBRUARY 8.
10.00 Biblical Hour: "The Revelation of ~Jesus to His
Own" (John zili.-zvil.), Rev. Clarence R. Williams.
3.00 Concert: Mrs. Hardin Burnley, reader; Mary B3.
K~essler, contralto; Estelle Leggett Crow, reader, and
Carrico's Orchestra.
7.45 Musical Prelude: Carrico's Orchestra.
8.00 Illustrated Lecture: "Aaaska, the Land of Ice,"
S. R. Stoddard.

TUESDAY--FEBRUARY 9.
TENNYSON'S DAY.
10.00 Biblical Hour: "The Triumph of Faith" (John xvill.-
xxi.), Rev. Clarence R. Williams.
3.00 Lecture: "The Idyls of the King," Kenneth Bruce.
7.45 Musical Prelude: Carrico's Orchestra, of Chicago.
Readings from Tennyson by Mrs. Hardin Burnley and
Estelle Leggett Crow.
8.00 Illustrated Lecture: "America's Wonderland," S. R.
Stoddard.

WED11ESDAY--FEBRUARY 10.
10.oo Biblical Hour : "The Bible of To-day," Rev. Clarence
R. wiliams.
2.00 Organization of the Camera Club.
8.15 Informal Reception at the Hotel Chautauqua. Mu-
sical Program: Mary B. K~essler, contralto; Mrs. Hai*-
din Burnley, reader; Elstelle Leggett Crow, reader;
A~lice Carrico, violinist; Mary Campbell, pianist.


111111111111111111111111111111111 lllls1111111111111181111111111111111111'


Begins Jan. 30








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WHOLESALE AND RETAcIL DEALER IbT


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Successor to F. C. EATON



Chautaoua qaStore"


I CARRY A FULL LINE OF


; Fancy and Staple Groceries

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES IN SEASON

HEALTH FOODS A SPECIALTY


LADIES AND GENTS'

FURNISHINGS

-FREE AND PROMPT DELIVERY---


CHAUTAUQUA


28 THEl FLORIDA
THURSDAY--FEBRUARY 11.
10.00 Biblical Hour: "Excursions in the Psalm Coun-
try," Dr. Frederick El. Parkhurst.
3.00 Concert, Lady Washington Quartet, assisted by
Carrico's Orchestra, of Chicago, and Louise M. Ams-
bary, soprano.
7.45 Musical Prelude: Carrico's Orchestra.
8.00 Lecture: "James Whitcomb Riley-Interpretations of
his dialect poems," W. B. Amsbary.

FRIDAY-FEBRUARY 12*
LINCOLN'S DAY.
10.00 B rlial lour: "The Gateway," Dr. Frederick S.

3.00 Readings: ''The Ballads of Bourbonnalfs," W. B.
Amsbary.
7.45 Musical Prelude: Carrico's Orchestra and Lady
Washington Quartet.
8.00 Lecture: "A Chip of the Old Block," Frederick S.
Parkhurst.
SATURDAY -FEBRUARY 13.
10.00 Biblical Hour: "The Fields of Immortality," Dr.
Frederickr S. Parkrhurst.
11.00 Grand Concert : Louise M. Amsbary, soprano: Alice
Carrico, violinist; Carl Hahn, cornetist; Helen L.
watcott, reader, and Carrico's Orchestra.
2.80 Orchestral Concert: Carrico's Orchestra, of Chicago.
3.00 Lecture: "The Humanity of Man," Frank Allen Peake.
7.00 Concert:. Lady Washington Quartet, assisted by
H~elen L. Walcott, reader; W. B. Amsbary, reader,
and Alvin Risiche, 'cellist.
SUNDAY--FEBRUARY 14.
9.00 Sunday School in the various churches.
11.00 Sermon in the new Auditorium, Dr. Frederick 9. Park-
hurst; sacred music, Lady Washington Quartet,
Louise M. Amsbary, and Carriso's Orchestra.
5.00 Chautauqua Sabbath Vesper Service in the Audito-
rium.

MONDAY--FEBRUARY 15.
10.00 Biblical Hour: "The Shepherds' Song," Dr. Fred-
erick S. Parkhurst.
3.00 Lecture: "Rudyard Kipling--The real Poet-Laureate
of the Anglo-Saxon," W. B. Amsbary.
7.45 Musical Prelude: Carrico's Orchestra.
8.00 Lecture: "Luckr and Pluck," Frederick S. Park-
hurst.
TUESDAY--FEBRUARY 16.
10.00 Biblical Hour: "A Walk about Zion," Dr. Frederick
S. Parkhurst.
3.00 Lecture: "Niagara--Thunder of Waters," FBrederlek
S. Parkhurst.
7.45 Musical Prelude: Lady Washington Quartet.
8.00 Lecture Recital: "Some Phases of American and
Foreign Humor," W. B. Amabary.


BIGyGEST


BUSIEST


BEST


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ON THE CIRCLE





CHAUTAUQUA 81



B. -P MORI



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BTOS.' Clothing,
Cluett and Monarch Shirts


A Nobby Line of Neckwear,
Hosiery, Underwvear, Etc.,
on Hand at All Times .. .


Visitors Always Welcome


B. P. MORRIS


30 THE FLOR1IDA

WEDNESDAY---FEBRUARY 17.
10.00 Biblical Hour: "The Religious Life of the People,"
Dr. Frederick 8. Parkhurst.
3.00 Reception to the Camera Club at the home of the
Superintendent.
8.15 Informal Reception at the Hotel Chautauqua. Musi-
cal Program: Lady Washington Quartet; W. B.
Amsbary, reader; Mary Campbell, pianist; Alice Car-
rico, violinist.
THURSDAY--FEBRUARY 18.
EDGAR ALLEN POE'S DAY.
10.00 Biblical Hour: "The Land of the Book," Dr. Wil.
liam E. Cadmus.
3.00 Lecture Reading: "The French Canadian in Liter-
ature-interpretations from Drummond, Parker and
Van Dyke," W. B. Amabary.
7.45 Readings from Poe by Meressa Thompison and W. B.
Amsbary.
8.00 Concert: Lady Washington Quartet.

FRIDAY--FEBRUARY 19.
10.00 Biblical Hour: "The Catacombs," Dr. William E.

3.00 Cneer : S. Van Warnica, baritone; Alvin Rische,
cellistt, and Chautauqua String Quintet.
7.45 Musical Prelude: Carrico's Orchestra.
8 .00 Illustrated Lecture : "Egypt," William E. Cadmus.

SATURDAY-FEBRUARY 20.
10.00 Biblical Hour: "The Coliseum and the Early Chris-
tfan Martyrs," Dr. William E. Cadmus.
11.001 Grand Concert: Meressa Thompson, reader; 8. Van
Warnica, baritone; Frank Walo, clarinetist; Mary
Campbell, pianist, and Carrico's Orchestra.
2.30 Orchestral Concert: Descriptive pieces, Carrico's Or-
chestra, of Chicago.
8.00 Lecture: "Ten Times Ten," K~enneth Bruce.
7.00 Entertainment: "LFairyland" and "The Talisman;"
Superb Motion Pictures in colors; Chautaunua Brass
Quartet; Mderessa Thompson, reader; B. Van War-
nica, baritone; Carrico's Orchestra of Chicago.
SUNDAY--FEBRUARY 21.
9.00 Sunday School in the various churches.
11.00 Sermon in the new Auditorium, Dr. William E.
Cadmus. Sacred Music by` 8. Van Warnica and Car-
rico's orchestra.
5.00 Chautauqua Sabbath Vesper Service in the A~udi-

MONDAY--FEBRUARY 22.
WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY.
10.00 Biblical Hour: "Dinner with an Arab," Dr. William
E. Cadmus.
3.00 Patriotic Concert: National airs by Carrico's Or-
chestra, appropriate songs and readings by S. Van
Warnica and Meressa Thompson.
7.45 Musical Prelude: Carrico's Orchestra.
8.00 Illustrated Lecture: "Ephesus and the Seven
Churches," William E. Cadmus.


~


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Drinks, Ice Cream and Confectionery,
Exclusive Agency for Lowney's Candies,-
Oysters any style and quantity, Lunches
and Short Orders served promptly, Largest
Line of Smokers' Supplies in the city. We
make a Specialty of Florida and California
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REMEMBER THE NAME


It s Murray s


HARRY E. MURRAY, Proprietor


R/IIURRAY'S





CHAUTAUQUA 37

Improved and Unimproved Property For Sale in all parts of the
City stores. on~ces and Dwellings for Rent. we have the Local
Agency of Fifteen of the strongest, and Best English and American
FirelInsura~nceCompanies.
J. J. Hooton Jas. C. Watson

HOOTON & WATSON
Successors to Thos. C. Watson & Co.
Established 1879

Real Estate, Rental and

Insurance Ag~ents. .

SBLOUNT BUILDING, PENSACOLA, FLA.
Rent Collections a Specialty
We solicit your patronage whether you want to Buy or Sell Real
Estate, Negotiate a Loan, Rent an Otlice, Reut a Store
or Dwelling or Insure same


American National Bank
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA
C. WT. LAMAR, President
M. E. CLARK, Vice-Pres. and Cashier
JOHN PFEIFFER, Assistant Cashier
J. W. ANDREWS, Assistant Cashier
Capital Stock $300,000 Surplus $150,000
Designated Depository of United States
"DIRECTORS
Henry L. Covington W.H.M~ilton
Bryan DunwodyT James McI~ugh, Sr.
Frank Reilly WT. L. Cawthon
W. S. Rosasco Tho's V. Hannah
T. F. McGourin McI~enzie Oerting
Ca's.AW. Lamar M. M. Covington

Accounts of individuals, corporations and firms solicited.
Four per cent. interest paid on time deposits



OPTICIA*


82 THE FLORIDA

TUESDAY--FEBRUARY 3.
10.00 Biblical Hour: "Sheei and the Lord's Supper," Dr.
William E. Cadmus.
3.00 Concert Recital: Meressa Thompson and 8. Van
Warnica.
7.45 Musical Prelude: Carrico's Orchestra.
8.00 Illustrated Lecture: "Jerusalem," William E. Cad-
mus.

WEDNESDAY--FEBRUARY 24.
10.00 Biblical Hour: "Damascus," Dr. Williain E. Cadmus.
3.00 Meeting of the Camera Club.
8.15 Informal Reception at the Hotel Chautauqua. Musi-
cal Program: Emma Dawdy-Sessoms, contralto;
Meressa Thompson, reader; Alvin Rische, cellistt; B.
Van Warnica, baritone, and Carrico's Orchestra.

THURSDAY--FEBRUARY 25.
10.00 Biblidal Hour: "The Reasonableness of a Revela-
tion," Dr. George Summey.
3.00. Orchestral Concert: Carrico's Orchestra, of Chicago.
7.45 Musical Prelude: E~mma. Dawdy-Sessoms and Car-
rico's Orchestra.
8.00 Reading : "Rebecea of Sunnybrookr Farm," Meressa
Thompson.

FRIDAY--FEBRUARY 26.
MILTON'S DAY.
10.00 Biblical Hour: "The Methods of a Revelation," Dr.
George Summey.
3.00 Leture: "Reminiscences of a Four Years' Consular
Service," Hon. Wallace Bruce.
8.00 Song Recital: Emma Datwdy-Sessoms.

SATURDAY--FEBRUARY 21.
10.00 Biblical Hour : "The Internal Proofs of a Revela-
tion," Dr. George SPummey.
11.00 Grand Concert : Emma Dawdy-Sessoms, contralto;
Alice Carrico, violinist; Chautauqua Brass Quartet,
and Carrico's Orchestra.
3.00 Lecture: "The American King," Hon. Joseph G.
Camp.
7.00 Entertainment: Walden, the Magician and Illusion-
ist, assisted by Elmer Lazone, presenting an original
program of wonder and bewilderment, including a
series of new feats of legerdemain surpassing any-
thing heretofore achieved in the realms of magic.

SUNDAY--FEBRUARY 28.
9.00 Sunday School in the various churches.
11.00 Sermon in the new Auditorium: Dr. George Summer.
Sacred Music by Emma Dawdy-Sessoms and Carrico's
Orchestra.
5.00 Chautauqua Babbath Vesper Service la the Audi-
Stodrtu,


'DR. G. S_ AM ES


Graduate Optician




Office in Cockran's Jewelry Store


DE FUNIAK SPRINGS - FLORIDA





t THEl FLORIDA

MONDAY--MARCH 1. .
10.00 Biblical Hour: "The External Proofs of a Revela-
tion," Dr. George Summey.
3.00 Orchestral Concert : Carrico's Orchestra of Chicago.
7.00 Chldren's Hour: Conducted by Gertrude Schram.
7.45 Musical Prelude: Carrico's Orchestra.
8.00 Reading: "Tom Grogan," Mrs..WT. E. Lewis.


TUESDAY--MARCH 2.
HENDRICK HUDSON'S DAY.
10.00 Biblical Hour : "The Miracle and its Purpose," Dr.
George Summey.
3.00 Lecture : "Washington Irving," Hon. Wallace Bruce.
4.00 Children's Hlour: Conducted by Gertrude Schram.
7.45 Orchestral Prelude: "Moonlight on the Hudson."
8.00 Reading: "If I were King," Mrs. W. E. Lewis,
closing with a film of moving pictures showing the
Discovery of the Hudson River and the Legend of the
Headless Horseman of Sleepy Hollow, from K~enneth
Bruce's "Historic Hudson."


WEDNESDAY--MARCH 3.
10.00 Biblical Hour: "The Authority of the Attested Reve~
lation," Dr. George Summey.
3.00 Reception to the Camera Club at the home of the
President.
4.00 Children's Hour : Conducted by Gertrude Schram.
8.15 Informal Reception at the Hotel Chautauqua. Musi-
cal Program : Alice Carrico, violinist Mrs. W. E.
Lewis, reader; Mary Campbell, pianist.


THURSDAY--MARCH 4.
OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES' DAY.
10.00 Biblical Hour: "Successive Phases of St. Paul's
Christian Experiences," Rev. J. E. Northcutt.
3.00 Reading : "King Reni's Daughter," Mrs. W. E. Lewis.
4.00 Children's Hour : Conducted by Gertrude Schram.
7.45 Musical Prelude: Catrrico's Orchestra. Readings from
the poems of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Mrs. W. E.
Lewis.
8.00 Lecture: Dr. J. W. Stagg.


FRIDAY--MARCH 5.
10.00 Biblical Hour : "Studies in the Ethical Teachings
of Jesus," Dr. J. W. Stagg. *
3.00 Reading : "An Evening in Dixie," Mrs. W. E. Lewis,
assisted by the orchestra.
4.00 Children's Hour: Conducted by Gertrude Schram
7.45 Musical Prelude': Carrico's Orchestra.
8.00 Ente~rtainment by "The Spaffords;" Pictures in
Crayon, Modeling in Clay, Comedy and Music.


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Correspondence Solicited

W.H. MILTONJ~ President


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SF URNITUR E


Hardware, Harness, Sadlery, Crockery,
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Proprietors of City Market


CHAUTAUQUA


WMa. H. KNOWLES, President
W. K. HYER,,JR., Vice-President and Cashier
T. W. BRENT and W. N. ROBERTS, Assistant Cashiers

Th 6 irSt NatOnal Bankr

Of feHSco~la

SPENSAGOLA, FLORIDA

SDesignated Depository of the United States


DIRECTORS
Wm. H. Knowles
t .


F. C. Brent
D. G. Bren~


W. A. Blount
K. Hyer, Jr.


Interest Patid in Savingfs Department


~P~ices Alzpovs Riglzt


Casli or Credit





CHAUTAUQUA 37

THE WALTON COUNTY ABSTRACT

AND REAL ESTATE COMPANY.


SThis Company is located in the Mc Lean Office
Building in De Funiak Springs, Fla. aird is pre-
pared to make abstracts of title on short notice,
conveyancing, write policies in Prudential
LifeInsuanceCompnyalso representatives
of Fire Insurance Cmae.Hv ag it
of Timbered and cut over lands, farms and city
lot fo e a rgis ydoup sat 1ob

estate in W~alton County can be obtained at
our office. This company will be under the
management of Mr. James A Me Lean who for
the past 22 years has served as Clerk of the
Circuit Court.
We extend a special invitation. to all to call
on us whether on business or not.






THAT GIVES THE NEWS OF DE FUNIAK
SPRINGS AND THE CHAUTAUQUA IS






WEEKLY, $1 PER YEAR; SIX WEEKS
ON TRIAL, ONE DIME

Address THE BREEZE

De Funiak Springs, .Fla.



The De Funiak Herald


A VERY GOOD W~EEK(LY NEWSPAPER

GIVES ALL THE REAL NEWS WHILE IT IS NEW



Job Prinlting of the Kind that Pleases


. L. S. Cleveland, Propr.


:'Subscription $1.00 per year In advance


86 THEF FLORIDA -

SATURDAY--MARCH 6.
CHILDREN'S ;DAY.
10.00 Biblical Hour : "Studies in the Ethical Teachings
of Jesus," Dr. J. W. Stagg.
11.00 Grand Concert : Humorous Readings, J. W. Stagg :
Dramatic Readings, Mrs. W. E. Lewis; 'cello solo.
A. W. Rische and Carrico's Orchestra.
2.30 Orchestral Concert: Carrico's Orchestra of Chicago.
3.00 Grand Entertainment, consisting of cartoon and
landscape drawing, music on foreign and anglent in-
struments, fire pictures, sculpture and clay modeling,

7.00 Ga Secaacua 1 ildre 's Plafor "The Roosevelt-
Longworth Wedding Reception." One hundred chil-
dren in the cast. The popular extravaganza of the
day. Exact reproduction of the great social event
given by children from three to seven. Presented by
Gertrude Schram.

SUNDAY--MARCH 7.
9.00 Sunday School in the various churches.
11.00 Sermon in the new Auditorium: Dr. J. W. Stagg.
Sacred Music by Carrico's Orchestra.
5.00 Chautauqua Sabbath Vesper Service in the Temple
in Alpine Park.

MONDAY--MARCH 8.
10.00 Biblical Hour : "Studies in the Ethical Teachings
of Jesus," Dr. J. W. Stagg.
3.00 Lecture: "American Poetry," K~enneth Bruce.
7.45 Musical Prelude: Carrico's Orchestra.
8.00 "One Hour of Impersonations, Imitations ~and Ven-
triloquism," W. Wesley Hummon.

TUESDAY-MARCH 9.
10.00 Biblical Hour : "Studies in the Ethical Teachings of
Jesus," Dr. J. W. Stagg.
3.00 Monologue: "Jim F~enton, the Hero of Seven Oaks,"
W.~ Wesley Hummon.
7.45 Musical Prelude: Carrico's Orchestra.
8.00 Lecture: Dr. J. W. Stagg.

WEDNESDAY--MARCH 10.
10.00 Biblical Hour: "Studies in the Ethical Teachings of
Jesus," Dr. J. W. Stagg.
3.00 Meeting of the Camera. Club.
8.15 Informal Reception at the Hotel Chautauqua. Musi-
cal Program: J. W. Stagg, readings; Wallace
Bruce, original recitations: Alvin Rische, 'cellist;
W. Wesley Hummon, impersonations, and Carrico's
Orchestra.

THURSDAY--MARCH 11
GLADSTONE'S DAY.
10.00 Biblical Hour: Conducted by.Rev. J. S. Edmonds.
3.00 Lecture: "Literary Men I Have Kinown," Hon. Wal-
lace Bruce.
7.45 Musical Prelude: May T. Hays and Carrico's Orches-
tra.
8.00 Lecture: "Scotland in Song a~d story," David :Beatons


Advertising and Job Printing rates on application





88 THEIR FLORIDA

FRIDAY--MARCH 12*
10.00 Biblical Hour: "The English Bible and Civic and
Religious Progress," Dr. David Beaton.
3.00 Lecture: "Thomas Jefferson," Hon. C. C. Gaines.
7.45 Musical Prelude: May T. Hays and Carrico's Orches-
tra. .
8.00 Lecture: "The Wit and Humor of England, Ireland,
Scotland and America," David Beaton.

SATURDAY--MARCH 13.
VETERANS' DAY.
10.00 Biblical Hour: "The Literary and Educational Valur
of the Bible," Dr. David Beaton.
11.00 Veterans' Rally, under the command of Brigadier-
General Samuel Pasco; Major-General E. W. Law,
orator of the day. Music by orchestra and soloists.
2.30 Orchestral Concert: Carrico's Orchestra, of Chicago.
3.00 Lecture: "Mistaktes, or the Blunders of Humanity,"
Hon. Lou J. Beauchamps.
4.00 Miscellaneous and Patriotic Program, under the au-
spices of the Daughters of the Confederacy.
7.00 Grand Concert : May T. Hays, soprano; Alice- Car-
rico, violinist: W. Wesley Hummon, the impersonator
and ventriloquist; Alvin Rische, cellistt; Carrico's Or-
chestrn; closing with moving pictures.

SUNDAY--MARCH 14.
9.30 Sunday School in the various churches.
11.00 Sermon in the new Auditorium, Dr. David Beaton.
Sacred muqle by May T. Hays and Carrico's Orches-
tra.
5.00 Chautauqua Sabbath Vesper Service in the Temple
in Alpine Park.

MONDAY-MARCH 15.
10.00 Biblical Hour: "The Building of the Family Life,"
Dr. David Beaton.
3.00 Concert: Margaret Cooperrider, reader; May T. Hays,
soprano; Frank Walo, clarinetist; H. Lanzner, vio-
linist, and Chautauqua Brass Quartet.
7.45 Musical Prelude: Carrico's Orchestra.
8.00 Lecture: "Little Masterpieces---or the Message of
Poetry to Modern Life," David Beaton.

TUESDAY-MARCH 16.


CHAUTAUQUA 3

W. H. MILTON, President. M. M. MORRISON, Vice-President.
G. B. CAMPBE LL, Cashier.


CAPITAL, 535,000

lhe FirSt national Bankr


Of De Hiak Srings

COMMENCED BUSINESS OCT. I, 1904
This bank tenders depositors all banking facili-
ties and every accommodation which their
business, balance and responsibility warrants.


SMOKE






Bank Note Cigars


DIRECTORS
Daniel Gampbell
E. P. Rose
M. M Morrison
S K~. Gillis
J. J.McCaskilll


W. H. twilton
G. B. Campbell
H. L. Covington
W. J. Daniel


W. H. Knowles
E. W. Thorp
M. R. Burton
J. E. McLeod


10.00

3.00
8.00


Biblical Hour: "Motherhood and the Home," Dr.
I)avid Beaton. .
Lecture: "Amerlean Genius," Ke-nneth Bruce.
Concert: Margaret Cooperrider, reader; May~ T.
Hays, soprano; Alice Carrico, gjolinist, and Chautau-
qua String Quintet.


WEDNESDAY--MARCH 17i.
10.00 Biblical Hour: "Fatherland and Citizenship-The
Work of Men in Church and State," Dr. David Beaton.
3.00 Meeting of the Camera Club.
8.15 Informal Reception at the Hotel Chautauqua. Mu.
sical Program: May T. Hays, soprano; Margaret
Cooperrider, reader; Mary Campbell, pianist; Alvin
Rischt, 'cellist,


FRANK REILLYk


Distributor



PENSACOLA, FLORIDA


FLOURNOY &E CO., Inc.



J. MOSS PLOURNOY, 1Mgr.



011tfitterS for Ladies and Gientlemen


PLOURNOY. BLOCK


Phone 59


DE FUNIAK SPRINGS, FLORIDA





CHAUTAUQUA 41

SAVE MONEY
BY TRADING IN
"FLOURNOY BLOCK"


Dry Goods, Notions, Hats, Hardware,

Tinware, Fancy and Heavy Groceries

FINE SHOES A SPECIALTY
AND PRICES TO SUIT THE: CUSTOMERS
Visitors and residents cordially invited to inspect our stock


W.T T. MVAY


40 THE FLORIDA ,

THURSDAY--MARCH 18.

10.00 Biblical Hour: "A Survey of the Epistle of James,!'
Dr. J. W. Walden.
3.00 Song Recital: Dr. Ion Jackson.
8.00 Concert: The Quaker Male Quartet.


FRIDAY--MARCH 19.

10.00 Biblical Hour: "A Survey of the Epistle of James,"
Dr. J. W. Walden.
3.00 Farmers' Rally : Address by Prof. P. H. Rolfs, Diree-
tor of the Experimental Station of Florida; Captain
R. E. Rose, State Chemist, and C. K. MeQuarrie, See-
retary West Florida Agricultural Society.
8.00 Concee1t: The Quaker Male Quartet.


SATURDAY-MARCH 20.

AGRICULTURAL DAY.

10.00 Biblical Hour: "A Survey of the Epistle of James,"'
Dr. J. W. Walden.
11.00 Farmers' Rally: Addresses, "Diversified Farming,"
P~rof. P. H. Rolfs; "Fertilizers," Captain R. E. Rose:
"Southern Dairying," C. K. Mc~uarrie; "EIxperiments
with K~udzu," C. E. Pleas. Music by soloists and or-
chestra.
2.30 Orchestral Concert: Carrico's Orchestra, of Chicago.
3.00 Con ertr Dr. Ion Jac sn etencoe; iMarg1re aroprp

violinist.
8.00 Grand Concert: The Quaker Male Quartet.


SUNDAY--MARCH 21.

9.30 Sunday School in the various churches.
11.00 Sermon in the new Auditorium, Dr. J. K. Patterson.
Sacred music : Dr. Ion Jackrson and Carrico's Orches-
tr.
5.00 Chautauqua Sabbath Vesper Service in the Temple
in Alpine Park.

MONDAY-MARCH 22.

10.00 Biblical Hour: Conducted by A. W. Hawks.
3.00 Reading: "The Story of Patsy," Nellie Ambler Cros-
sen.
7.45 Musical Prelude: Carrico's Orchestra.
8.00 Lecture: Hon. James K. Patterson.


TUESDAY--MARCH 23.

10.00 Biblical Hour: Conducted by A .W. Hawks.
3.00 Lcture: "Lord Byron," K~enneth Bruce.
8.00 Song Recital: Dr. Ion Jackson.


'Phone 7


Free Delivery


THE RACKET "

H. THORNBER, Proprietor

THE CHEAPEST CASH STORE IN WEST FLORIDA


We carry Dry Goods, Notions,

LadieS' and Gents' Furnishings,

Fancy Goods, Linens, Fancy China, Etc.

Our prices are as low and sometimes lower than the
largest stores in the country
See our windows and local papers for prices

DE FUNIAK SPRINGS, FLA.



At the Millinery Store

You will find for Ladies all the
Latest Styles and Novelties


Dry Goods and Ready Made

Garments, &c.

Give us the pleasure of showing
you our line


W. E. PARISH & CO.

De Funiak Springs, Fla,'





42 THEl FLOEklDA


SCHATTU&TAUQ 43


WEDNESDAY-MARCH 24.
10.00 Biblical Hour: Conducted by A. W. Hawks.
3.00 Meeting of the Camera Club.
8 :15 Informal Reception at the Hotel Chautauqua. Mu-
sical Program: Dr. Ion Jackson, tenor; Nellie A~m-
bler Crossen, reader; Mrs. Ion Jackson, violinist; A.
W. Hawks, recitations.


THURSDAY--MARCH 25.
10.00 Biblical Hour : Conducted by A. W. Hawks.
3.00 Reading: Nellie Ambler Crossen, assisted by Alice
Carrico, violinist; Alvin Rische, 'cellist.
8.00 Wagnerian Concert by Carrico's Concert Orchestra, ol
Chicago.


FRIDAY--MARCH 26.
10.00 Biblical Hour : Conducted by A. W. Hawks.
3.00 Reading "W~hen K~nighthood Was in Flower," Nellie

8.00 Song Recital: Dr. Ion Jackson.


SATURDAY--MARCH 27.
10.00 Biblical Hour: Conducted by Rev. J. E. Northeutt.
11.00 Concert: Nellie Ambler Crossen, reader; Frank
Walo, clarinetist; H. Launmer, violinist, and Chau.
taugua Stringed Quintet.
2.30 Orchestral Concert: Carrico's Orchestra of Chicago,
in descriptive selections.
3.00 Lecture: "Sunshine and Shadows," A. W. Hawks.
7.00 Grand Concert: Dr. Ion Jacktson, tenor; Alice Car-
rico, violinist; Nellie Ambler Crossen, reader; Carl
Hahn, cornetist; Carrico's Orchestra, closing with
motion pictures in colors.


MORRIS BEAR, President MAx L. BEAR, Secretary
P. D' BEVILLE, Local Representative


THE LEWIS BEAR

CO M PANY


Wholesale Grocers and Grain


"CORNO" -The Wholesome and
best feed for horses and mules


BE ACH, RO GERS &c CO.

MANUFACTURERS OF


R~OUGH AND DRESSED

BUI~ MA RAL

MOULDING. BRACKETS AND
TURNED WOOD
DEALERS IN SASH, DOORS, BLINDS, Etc

De Funiak Springs, Florida



KING & CO.


in their new brick block on the old site
south of Court Holuse, keep
a full supply of


Dry Goods, Groceries,

Feed, Hardware, etc.

EVERYTHING
NEWI AND UP-TO-DATE


Glly r 31srta G~lanutnuqua
DIRECTORS .
WALLACE BRUCE, Prest. W. T. MAY, Vice-Prest.
N. COLVER, Secretary. JAS. A. McLEAN, Treas.
KCENNE~TH BRUCE, Superintendent.
W. C. Eddy G. B. Campbell
Mrs. Wallace Bruce J..J. Fiitzgerald
Mrs. George H. Abernethy Mrs. W. J. Keyser




CHAUTAUQUAt 45

Chautauqua Barber Shop
Headquarters for all kinds of

FIRST-CLASS TONSORIALL WORK


THE NE STORE
Next Door to W. L.Cawthon's Beak
On your way to the Post Office
We carry a Pall Line of
Up-to-Date Groceries, Shoes and Dry Goods
Call in and see our Line
R. H. JACKSON, Proprietor
DE FUNIAK SPRINGS, FLA.

Te New Met od Laundry

OF PENSACOLA, FLo.

is represented at De Funiak Springs,
Flat., by J. W~. WILSON & SON, at
thle City Barber Shop.

ALL WORK GUARANTEED

Basket Goes Wednesday and Returns Saturday

McKINNON &c COMPANY
Dealers in Beef, Pork, Sausage, Vegetables, Etc.
'Phone No. 60
National Bank Building DE FUNIAK( SPRINGS, FLA.

WNOO D
Parties wanting GOOD DRY WOOD can get it of
T. J. FLOUfRNO"Y, with prompt delivery.


44 THE: FLORIDAL


HOT AND COLD BATHS


WALTER MATTHEW1S, Proprietor


& SONj


Teleplyope No, 138.


De Funiak Springs, Fla.


DE FIJNIAIC SPRINGS, FLA.


.The Central MVarket

Fresh Meats and Vegetables

LOWEST PRICES
FREE AND PROMPT DELIVERY

Julion C. Prescott, Proprietor
Phone 78 DE FUNIAK SPRINGS, FLA.

REMEIVBER THE

CITY BARBER SHOP
IN THE BRICK BLOCK
A newly fitted up 4-chair shop where you can always
get First;-Class Hair Cuts and Shaves by up-to-date
Barbers Also get your Laundry attended to promptly
REMEMBER THE PLACE

J. W. WILSON a SON

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable


II. M. WADSWORTH,
(POPgRIETOR)

De Funiak Springs, Fla.

GOOD TEAMS
CAREFUL DRIVING, PROMPT SBRVIGB


BUCHANAN


Plumbiing, Pipe Fitting, Tin- and Sheet
YrOn W1ork







S. KM. G-ILLIS
Attorney at Law and Solicitor in Chancery
Personal and prompt attention given
to all matters intrusted to his care
DE FUNIAK SPRINGS, FLA.

THE CITY MARKET
The Headquarters for Fresh Meat and
Vegetables at lowest prices
The W. A. Laird Co., Proprietors

H. E. WNICKERPSHAM
Funeral Director and
Licensed Embalmer
DE FUNIAK SPRINGS, FLA.


CHAUTAIUQUA. 47
SOUTHERN STATES LIFE INS. CO.
Burton B. Murray,
General Agent for West Florida.
Room No. 2 P ldornoy Block,
De Funiak Springs, Pla.

DRESSMAK ING



Bus3a IwaN h tth Satisfaction Guaranteed

WILLIAM DREYER

ARE II TECT

DE FUNIAK SPRINGS, PLORIDA

J. N~. MCLEA N, ~M. D.
Office and Residence : Baldwin Avenue
Office Hours: 8 to 10 A. M., 1 to 4 P. M.
DE FUNIAK SPRINGS, FLORIDA

L. F. COCHRAN
WATCH MAKER AND JEWELER
LOWEST PRICES WORK GUAIRANTEED
NEW BRICKBLBOCK
DE FUNIAK SPRINGS, FLA.

L., F. CAWITHON

DENTIST

Office, North Room, Photo Building

DR. C. E. THOMVPSON
M. D., O. M. Trinity University, Toronto, Canada
F. T. M. S. Trinity Medical School, Toronto, Canada
SL. K. Q. C. P. Dublin, Ireland
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office: Rooms 5 and 7, Flournoy Block

DR. C. B. MVcKINNON
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office at Dr. Landrum's Drug Store
Residence 'Phone, 47; Office 'Phone, 4.


DR. C. A. LANDRUIM Drug Store
Dealer in DR SGO M DCINES,

De Funiak Springs, Fla.

Daniel Campbell & Son
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
Agents for the sale of Farming and Timber Lands
DE FUNIAK SPRINGS, FLORIDA
Branch Office, Milton, Florida.

TAPPAN BROTHERS
DE FUNIAK SPRINGS, FLA.
BRICKLAYERS AND PLASTERERS
Dealers in Brick, Lime, Cement, Hair, etc.
Work solicited in adjoining towns.
Prices according to quality of work.

JOHN M. LAIRD &e CO.
Dealers in
-General Mlerchandise
Phone No. 5 De Funiak ~Springs Fla.


WV. WU. FLOURNOY

LAWYER


Flournoy Block


DE FUNIAK SPRINGS, FLA.





48 THE FrLORIDA.


Room No. 2


FLOURNOY BLOCK


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~~i;;; ;s~r :r. .li. ~I~ 'i'
::~::~:~;~b I?
:I
IIJ~~ :~~-~d4 iC "i'i


De Funiak Springs


ITis an important policy
of this banlk to give
careful personal con-
sideration to customers'
requests and to render the
prompt decisions which
mean so much to every
business man. You are
invited to open an account
with us . . . .





Interest allowed on time deposits





W. L. CAW7THON, Banker
(Not Incorporated)
De Funiak Springs, Florida



Chas. Murray, Jr.

SUCCESSOR TO E. R. SPRAGUE



Fire, Life, Accident and

Health, Plate Gilass, Tornado

and Automoble Insurance


= = = Florida





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