• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Title Page
 Introduction
 Historical overview
 Town development
 Bibliography
 Footnotes
 Conclusion














Title: Monticello, Florida : a study of townscale development
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00103296/00001
 Material Information
Title: Monticello, Florida : a study of townscale development
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: Chase, Charles Edwin
Publisher: Charles Edwin Chase
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00103296
Volume ID: VID00001
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Holding Location: University of Florida
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Table of Contents
    Cover
        Cover
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Historical overview
        Page 2a
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Town development
        Page 8a
        Page 9
        Page 9a
        Page 9b
        Page 10
        Page 10a
        Page 11
        Page 11a
        Page 12
        Page 12a
        Page 12b
        Page 12c
        Page 12d
        Page 12e
        Page 12f
        Page 12g
        Page 12h
        Page 13
        Page 13a
        Page 13b
        Page 13c
        Page 13d
        Page 13e
        Page 13f
        Page 13g
        Page 13h
        Page 13i
        Page 13j
        Page 13k
        Page 13l
        Page 14
        Page 14a
        Page 14b
        Page 14c
        Page 14d
        Page 15
        Page 15a
        Page 15b
        Page 15c
        Page 15d
        Page 15e
        Page 15f
        Page 15g
        Page 16
        Page 16a
        Page 16b
        Page 17
        Page 17a
        Page 17b
        Page 17c
        Page 17d
        Page 17e
        Page 17f
        Page 17g
        Page 17h
        Page 17i
        Page 17j
    Bibliography
        Page 18
    Footnotes
        Page 18a
    Conclusion
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
Full Text



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MONTICELLO, FLORIDA: TOWNSCALE DEVELOPMENT


AE 684
Prof. F. Blair Reeves, Instructor
Charles Edwin Chase
December 3, 1973











INTRODUCTION


The report submitted herein traces the development of Monticello, Florida,

county seat and the single major town of Jefferson County. Situated in the

heart of Florida's 'plantation district' Monticello has its foundation in the

frontier agrarian society of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century

when Florida was but a wilderness territory.

This area, although only thirty miles from Tallahassee, the State capital,

has until recently been overlooked by land developers and the increasing popu-

lation of the state. Within its two square mile area there is represented a

variety of fine examples of early to mid nineteenth century building types.

It also represents a town which sprang up as a result of plantation society

and the commercial needs of Jefferson County. This community and society has

changed little in relation to the rest of Florida,as the central and southern

areas have steadily climbed in importance and population.

The purpose then of this study is three fold; to indicate the history

and the influences of the period which shaped the growth of Monticello, to

trace its development through mapping and photographs, and thirdly as a by-

product, to record the character, scale and quality which reflects its past

within the context of 1973.

The historical survey of facts and influences are not meant to be a com-

plete history, but to indicate pertinent data which has determined Monticello's

growth. The maps portrayed in photographic form are the Sanborn Maps which

were produced as a result of surveys done by the Sanborn Mapping and Publish-

ing Co. The photographs of structures of architectural significance are the

result of numerous visits by the author, and have been produced to respond to





































2


the need of visual commentary to the reader on the quality and significance

of its structures.









































part 1 IA OEVW











MIDDLE FLORIDA AND JEFFERSON COUNTY AN HISTORICAL OVERVIEW


The land between the Appilachicola and Suwannee rivers,or better known

during Florida's territorial period as Middle Florida,was settled as early

as 1702 by Spanish missionaries. However, thier colonization lasted less than

two years with the success of British and Creek Indian raids. The region was

left to its prior inhabitants the Apalachee Indians and later the steady crush

of western and southern migrations from coastal America inhabited the area.

The planters who had left Virginia, the Carolinas, and Georgia found in

the early 1820's fertile soils similar to what they had left behind. The

accounts of Prince Achille Murat who settled in Jefferson County on Econchattie,

later known as Lipona in 1824 described the migration of planters as "came with
2
resolution of founding a new country."2 They brought their possessions in

wagons, with slaves on foot opening roads into the virgin countryside.

Their first homes were simple wooden cabins which were to be replaced by

more substantial and stately mansions. These settlements were to grow into the

plantations of the region which during the second quarter of the nineteenth

century accommodated one half the population and wealth of the territory.

The establishment of civil government in territorial Florida came while

Andrew Jackson swept through the region eliminating British holdings. The

third district court was seated in Middle Florida in 1822,and inaugurated the

movement toward statehood patterned after the NorthWest Ordinance of 1787.3

In March of 1824,Tallahassee became the capital with this distinction came

rapid growth and within twenty years the region surpassed the older settlements

such as Pensacola and St. Augustine in population and wealth.













The treaty of 1823 saw removal of the Seminole Indians and free for

settlement. The rectangular coordinate system established by the federal

government in 1785 for the territory,was laid out and land sales offices opened

in 1825 selling public lands from the Tallahassee land office. Land acquisi-

tion was easier in the region because there were fewer private land grant dis-

putes to settle as compared to such areas as St. Augustine and Newnansville.

It was during 1827 that land east of the Appilachicola River broke away

from Leon County and was designated Jefferson County. The distinction of being

named after President Thomas Jefferson,along with its county seat Monticello

named after his homestead,has never been fully established, however, there were

very strong ties through the Eppes Family. His direct descendants did maintain

land holdings in the county.

Middle Florida's economy was rooted in the plantation system where the

land was good for growing cotton. There were limited commercial services and

survival meant self sufficiency. The smaller planters were soon pushed out

or absorbed by wealthier and more productive plantations. The plantations on

the whole in Jefferson County were not of the grand scale associated with the

Antebellum era and the Civil War although Lyndhurst is an exception. They were

primarily modest attempts at accommodation and comfort on the frontier.

However, their prosperity produced an increase in wealth and political

power which the planters used in Tallahassee. Cash land values increased in

the farming region and crop production was ever increasing, leaving the owners

to take an interest in politics. The 1840's saw these men hold sixteen of
4
thirty-nine lower house seats and five of nineteen senate seats. Their in-

fluence in this newly established and growing governmental body was to set the

tenon for agricultural considerations in the future growth of the state.













Rapid expansion of the cotton industry and the plantation system was due

to the slave labor force which was the backbone of large scale farming. Not

only did the labor bring the product to market, but it also supplied the self

sufficiency needed to survive the lack of adequate communication, transporta-

tion and with it commercial enterprise. Slave labor was the craftsman, the

carpenter, the blacksmith and the wheelwright along with the spinner and the

weaver which completed the independence of the frontier plantation.

However, commercial ventures did arise out of the need for goods that

the plantations could not produce or were agriculture oriented. In 1853, John

Finlayson and General William Bailey founded the Southern Rights Manufacturing

Association in Monticello in which produced cotton fabric on 1500 spindles and

fifty looms. It was a substantial boom to Monticello, thus creating the commer-

cialsm needed to maintain the growth of the town.

The Civil War produced fewer effects in this mid-region than it did in the

coastal areas. Jefferson County,and especially the Monticello vicinity,was

never invaded or destroyed. This was not peculiar in the light that Tallahassee,

the State Capital,was never captured as in many of the other confederate states.

The reduction of commercial manufacturing and availability of goods were

not severely felt because of the insulation in the independence of the planta-

tions. Production was redirected into needs for home use. The war did not mean

destruction, however,it did alter the lives of its people with husbands and the

male position vacant leaving the ladies to take charge. To some extent the

desire to help in the war effort is reflected in the Monticello ladies' theatrical

productions to benefit soldiers and families. Further, Dr. Thomas M. Palmer

(resident of Monticello) along with Mary Martha Reid converted a Richmond,

Virginia home into a 150 bed hospital in 1862.5












The production of foodstuff in this area caused the confederate Impress-

ment Act of 1863 to use Monticello as a commissary warehouse depot for corn,

beef, pork, rice, potatoes, peas, molasses, sugar, and forage. The emphasis

on food production due to the shortages reduced cotton production, and the

blockades impeded their movement to market. Cotton still produced good prices

during wartime, thus its growth and the manufacture of textiles was not ignored.

After the war, federal troops were stationed in the Monticello area, but

it was to maintain law and order due to reports of robberies and violence in

the communities including Tallahassee, Madison, Lake City, Gainesville and

Palatka. This was to mark the beginning of a period in which the influences

of cotton production gave way to industry and the landed gentry were to wane

in importance politically and socially. Slavery as a labor force, the power

structure as well as the social structure of the land owner, and land value

decline due to neglect, are all effects of the Civil War. So strong were these

effects that the plantation system never fully recovered,and gave away to new

industry and business. The Civil War impeded Florida's movement toward a

'cotton state' and its direction was aimed toward capturing the property of

northern industry.

The railroads which had started to develop prior to the Civil War began

to flourish, opening the central and southern areas to further development.

The former Florida Central and Peninsular Railroad,now a part of the Seaboard

Train Line established tracks from Drifton to Monticello in 1856 and completed

the Monticello Branch to Thomasville, Georgia in 1886. The rail systems of

Florida by the end of the century were effectively regulated in the region.

Rail travel of both goods and passengers from Pensacola and Tallahassee to

St. Augustine increased communication with one day round trip service. Lloyd,

Florida,a dining stop, prospered due to the railroad,and Monticello with its













agricultural impetus depended,upon rail served to send its agricultural products

to market. The rail was the economic lifeline to which there is little remain-

ing evidence with the advent of the semi tractor trailer.

The boom of the twentieth century in Florida capitalized upon the natural

wealth, its resources and beauty to attract the economic prosperity it desired.

However, the great impact of this inflow was felt primarily on the coast,such

as Jacksonville, Miami, Key West, Tampa Bay and Pensacola. The middle region

of northern central Florida was to remain within the agrarian context.

World War I saw the railroads contribute to the cause by planting castor

beans along the railroad routes. The Seaboard Air Line planted 10,000 acres

for the U.S. Signal Corp to provide the needed oil for the allied forces.

Little or no evidence other than possible redistribution of agricultural pro-

duction was felt by the Monticello area.

The depression in 1926 deflated property values, increased the public debt,

and closed most of the state's banking. The state's financial institutions and

businesses, including the railroads, were weakened in this early depression

making it almost impossible to withstand the Economic Collapse of 1929. Statis-

tically Florida did not suffer as much, but the amount of recovery was more

severe. Time and the New Deal Era of F. D. Roosevelt began to heal the economy.

These depressed times saw 139 W.P.A. projects within the state to provide work

for the populace. The farmer was again tightening his belt, although agriculture

and textile manufacturing never shared the prosperity the rest of Florida saw

during the twenties. Florida State Farms, located in Monticello, sought to aid

the distressed farmer rather than have him relocate. Contemporary development

in this region has maintained an agricultural basis. The seed companies formed

in the 1830's are the major income producers in the 70's. Gro-Plant Industries



























was established in Monticello and continues to be the backbone of economic

life for many of the areas residents.

It is within these influences that Monticello, Florida, has developed.

The events of state and regional which are historical facts, give evidence to

the physical changes which have shaped the growth of this community. The rise

and decline of the plantation system, the growth of Tallahassee as the state

capital, the influence of the natural resources of the region and its associated

industries such as textiles and seed products, have all contributed to the

development of Monticello.

These forces are reflected in physical planning and development. The grid

pattern established and laid out by the Surveyor General in 1827 is the basis

uponwhich the fabric of this community life has been built and continues to

be maintained today.

























0.rt S: TOWN DepE



























PREFACE


For the purposes of this study the town has been divided into sections

approximating divisions established by the Sanborn Map and Publishing Company.

To facilitate tracing the changes indicated on the map series, they have been

divided into seven sections. They are outlined on the following map to indicate

their relationship and physical interfacing.

This series traces the development of Monticello from 1884 to 1929,which

supplements the data available during this period. Inferences have been made

to this period in the light of the preceding written historical development;

however, it is not the purpose to spell out dates, but to indicate the result-

ing effects of influences during development.





















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I County (t 'rt liHase
2 Jefferson Academy.
3 Howard
4 Presbyterib- tChureh
SMethod ist
6 Episcopal
7 Baptist
8 African M. E
9 Colored Methodil Church.
10 Baptist
11 Post Office
12 TIh Constitution Office, T. R. Fildes, Ed. and Prop.


BEC F9,AUiLI, Ltlo. Jvhliaulee ,Wis

13 The Jrflerson House
14 Partridge B. W Partridge, Prop
15 Palmer ae, p P op
16 61rkias & Turnbul!, (eneia Merchadiw
17';&T Puleston,
18 J. T Budd & Son
19.'C. T. Carroll,
20D S. A. o attorneys t. --
21 T. L. Clark, Attorney&Solicitor.
22 T. B Simkins, Livery
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LEGEND

1. Town Square
2. Jefferson Street North
3. Syndicate and High Streets Northeast of Square
4. Waukeenah Road and Washington Streets East of Square
5. Wirick and Chestnut Streets Northeastern City Limits
6. Industrial Area/Railroad Streets
7. East Washington Street Eastern Extension
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LOCATION


The town laid out in 1827 and established as Monticello in 1828,was

from the outset the county seat of Jefferson County. The growth of this town

is coupled with the development and success of the agricultural environs.

Commercial development dates as early as 1827 with Robinson's general store
8
and postal station. Indications are that the location of Monticello was

an indian village with a topographical location on higher ground (202 feet

above sea level) than seen in the immediate swamps and farming areas.





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TOWN SQUARE


The crossroad of the major east-west and north-south arteries was dedi-

cated to the establishment of the county courthouse. Reports indicate that

a blockhouse was previously located here,and John G. Robinson, proprietor of

the general store, ran the postal station, first social center and courtroom

within this building. The courthouse portrayed in the preceding 1885 litho-

graph was replaced in 1910 with the present Greek Revival brick and stone

structure which some have indicated was modeled after Jefferson's homestead,

Monticello.

Commercial development began to fill in the square and its surrounding

streets. Rectangular structures with short end to the street was common

practice to accommodate as many stone fronts as possible.

The second story of many of these shops was utilized as storage for

cotton, grains or products sold in the stores below. They were not used as

residential units as was the practice in larger cities in the south.

Transportation and thechange in mode from horse and carriage to the

automobile can be seen by the disappearance of the livery and replaced by the

auto repair and gasoline pump station. It is ironic that Lot 15, a cotton

warehouse, gave way to such a facility. This too indicates that cotton had

declined in economic importance for the town, although there are remnants

remaining.

The public well within the square was abandoned when the underground water

system appeared in 1900. So,too,shortly thereafter the wells behind many

homes were covered over.


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The rise of tourism is also indicated with the number of guest homes and

hotels within the city limits. The St. Elmo Hotel was being built in 1884 and

its demise was seen between 1909 and 1922.

Social functions in Bailey's Hall on the second floor of the general

store (Lot 11), indicates a rise in community civic life. Stage scenery was

not available, but it is indicated that travelling troupes performed here and

later across the street at the Opera House above the Perkins Block (Lot 14).

A more detailed investigation reveals modifications and additions to

residential houses and the completion of commercial blocks. The town square

remains the hub of commercialism. Many buildings exist today as those built

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The area immediately north on Jefferson Street was and is today primarily

a residential district. The major changes indicated are those which concern

the adaptation of the house.

The detached kitchen and private well were common place. This practice

of out buildings began to fade with the advent of the decrease in wood for

fuel. The houses often as in the case of the Whitfield House (Lot 32) moved

the kitchen or smokehouse and joined it to the mainpart of the house. These

were maintained as kitchens and a probable location for the water system to

be introduced.

Many fine structures exist in this area from the 1840's, such as the

Wirick Simons House (north half of Lot 4), the Episcopal Church (Lot 36) and

the Budd-Braswell House (Lot 37).

The plantation owner often held this type of house as the 'townhouse.'

The usage of such a structure was prevalent in Monticello as indicated by the

owners who were planters and plantation owners.

The most prominent example of the movement of buildings is the Scott-

Billinger House (Lot 3). This house was moved to this site after an indian

raid and a member of the family killed.

The wealth of the plantation owner is seen in the modest but refined

detailing of the townhouse. The Denham Brinson House is a prime example of

Greek Revival detailing done in the 1840's in the frontier town. The house

type did not drastically change during the evolution in architectural style;

its impact was felt in its refinement.


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HIGH AND SYNDICATE STREETS NORTHEAST OF SQUARE


The area immediately surrounding the African Methodist Evangelical Church

(Lot 102) on York Street has by allindicationbeen predominantly Negro. The

smaller scale dwellings which boarder the railroad and industrial section do

not command much attention, however, such areas still exist today. The "ghetto"

of Monticello is one which is not new,but is a result of separatism established

during the plantation impetus and the post Civil War sentiment which has prevailed.

The Negro School (Lot 23) was removed between 1909 and 1922 and the black-

smith (Lot 101) was converted to an auto repair shop.

One house in particular (southeast corner of Lot 104) pictured in the1885

lithograph still exists in 1929 with little modification.
















KEY
..


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4


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Il
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Scale of Feet
g PEARL 'e-s-=

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1
138




ASH


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141

C iL7
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JULB1922
MONTICELLO


-


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101


4



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TICELLO


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141












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LI
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Sca e of Feet
E. PEARL --, P-=
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FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

post 1841

lot 24 (S)











WAUKEENAH AND WASHINGTON STREETS EAST OF SQUARE


The 1884 map indicates a fire in this area in 1883, however, the damage

seems to have been isolated to Lot 26.

Cherry Street,adjacent to the square,was further developed as a commer-

cial street housing the post office and stores such as billiard hall, market,

candy store, grocery store and furniture shops.

The county jail was located on Lot 22 in which funds had been sought in

the 1830's for improvements to the existing courthouse and jail facilities.

The territorial congress failed to produce the $4,000.00 requisition.

The old school house was located on Pearl Street. The modern facility

is housed in the old Jefferson Collegiate Instituteattributed to the 1840's

located on the south side of West Washington Street. The school now is a

consolidated system of education for the entire county.


































































27



, 4l


z
7--


PEARL


SP


1884


WASHINGTON
fL7 -l2_ rlW aiT


M ILL ROAD



...---...... I
30

Scal. of Feet


1884 -1909

Note further commercial

development along Cherry St.


~bn&

:s


xuc' u /ifonts


I -I---


I: W ;'












23




PEARL B






















-,T-- '-i--i----.- -as
WASHINGTON









o
o a I
















Z7

MILL RDWD


1890




Skale f Feet.
.WAS...H NGTON









*5L '














PEARL


cr
ui


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r .
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Sc.. l o Fc t file


i?8
8~8


g




















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i -




SD G O
D24





7T ------ ----- 7R/
- DOGWOOD


9-"0


ul uu11 U.$_ 1
0000 i... -
O I-MONTCELLO


INTDE3.
C ". m .. .. ... l. .1
*rn i f r


., t t. o .2 t S ). .
" PIy ,t, t ""J. t'o.' rl at it i Lat[ W. t.o oe t


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ii


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28


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so
21'

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24!

12/ /9 I


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116





DOGWOOD


(MONTICELLO)L~
F L


I25



... S


WASHINGTON


IN
28




PERKINS & BERRY he or But rs


U



a


29





m


m
&


4w/ 27 // /22 A /1 /V4 m2 / /27 /1


S30

Scale of Feet
,,,
iI


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-as ___ u&. _____ 2^


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13


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taL











22










...3.. ...40.. ....


5
PEARL


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Sc al of fe-


I I


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!


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330)
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3

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ar
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I


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4
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hi


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----------
4*


5
E. PEARL

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E. DOGWOOD


E. WASHINGTON


E. PALMER MILL RD. B


Scele f( feet
01


-.. -3-..-..


C -N.1929
TF :ICALQ


& -


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s;
-


q


I
flc~
I
P;


BEI











WIRICK AND CHESTNUT STREETS NORTHEASTERN CITY LIMITS


A relatively small scale residential section, it shows a glimpse of

regular subdivision of blocks indicated on Lot 137. These structures are of

twentieth century growth.

Parker Mays Cotton Gin (1922-1929) indicates industrial growth into the

area. Its office structure was built within the street right of way, indi-

cating an almost lack of concern for rigid definition, the street system and

ownership. Often the sheds and porches extended beyond property lines.













XDVlX





P--
o a -
* .. ,. ,, a n


1....... -







a S * 7 y


5 0 i.55,6 U 55 5s -W-.. a. 6
R ulnik 5 --5 M -
ga; '^ i^,,l.t;'a -*L"m *


tt-Sftsb's 455,'fts
--5 5*~ff^(v^' iA 1i~rrpW~ e, HW 5A/45W.


,VD 4,5. SlL./ A
5' D I?
m )-o0A Awaw A< a* ta& J hoF^_ '^
^j~v/^^.^t.^^daTA~t^ .A f t:: ^ ~ '-k


S2s'aaA



I 4l -S


iJ


135

I 1


4 CHESTNUT %


5 K_


Scale of feet


s --------------- I-


s,l B






















r;.


- a
qM 4JL


", 6001 .' I ,i,


w

U

9
U,


,J ., @ .-* 1
f nrE. Mt. ith 160iA
a/om, by e,-ct L .

MONTICELLO

JANUARY 1929\


-. -- aC


=I:



a" SPSAL

SO'--- -.--- ~- S---- ~ at'-
ladka.eu ajy-a Se 1I aaa an.


Il


" CHESTNUT gk'


PARKER MAYS
Corron G0c



U7 T--!TF7n

138


S'-- - -

5i -8


143


Scale of Feet
c..vearwoms..... .,c


1


136





* d


MAR 2A <"" 4-4


..:- .
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u
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~z---.---
*- -- ---
--
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L











RAILROAD STREET AND INDUSTRIAL AREA


The center of industrial growth and railroad transportation developed in

this area. Boardering the eastern edge of the city limits, the Seaboard Air

Line Railroad established the branch to Drifton in 1856 and extended the

line in 1886. Then called the Florida Central and Peninsular Line, it

carried cotton, textile goods, and produce from the farms to the marketplace.

The 1922 maps indicate the Atlantic Coast Line Located their passenger

and freight station on Pearl Street. It was formerly the South Florida and

Western Railroad. The J. M. Henry Planning Mill was well established and

expanded in the period preceding 1929. However, the Monticello Ice Plant was

removed during the same time. There also was a bottling works established,

indicating further economic development in Monticello. The Jefferson County

Products Company was converted into the Monticello Milling Company where

expanded grain warehouses were located.

Housing, too, expanded with further subdivision of property once held

as a single unit (note Lot 37).

This period of 1922 through 1929 is indicated as a prosperous period with

the decline to follow with the Collapse of 1929.

The Monticello Water Works pumping station was located on Pearl Street

(Lot 40) where in 1907 it was expanded to accommodate the electric substation.

Railroad tracks were extended to supply fuel. By 1929 the power plant had

expanded to over fifty percent of the block,indicating expanded electric ser-

vice to the town.



























BLOOMER


YORK


HIGH
397



39
[-------


6





145









8 BLOOMER




146



_______


4f

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o














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S E. YORK







E HIGH

E. HIGH


QDN


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S E. BLOOMER i
i


146


E. YORK
E. YORK


Scale of Feet

1 /Sr Pv






O=T-Th.T SANIOfMR MA PUB.
USlSni Co (tUH.l) -.1 Il = ,.,.
p irh I L. Lr U .,t .1 ff.lb, .,
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---


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DOGWOOD

S,'^. y.1


1884


S HIGH














PEARL


1890


Note changes in Block 40:


additions and complete removal


of the J.M. Henry Mill and


replaced with new structure, and


establishment of waterworks.


Growth is associated with the


advent of electric service .


I.


*1I


DOGWOOD



fi1/
r i; a


P.r














/ -----ONTIft' -

s I s i(EN I

a
^ 38 9





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31








j0 0 03 400 r1 "0 1

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S40
33 3. LJ 3
JOHN HEN r
Co'rrON &6, ~I6 T ftr PL,6 MILL .




DOGWOOD YORK
to. ,T .f- ,B ,-




41 34 35




30 30,j0 30d W
WASHINGTON HIGH
/0 r



3 A ffa4 Lai
















---- C-- -- 3E a7 --- ~

YORK %







S.G38







HIGH
42 SI;


1239
NJw


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f4~idlB
;__-_ 1


0
0
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-- ~--~a---- E-- -H7--
-----------pcxm.- ~---------







40 '--
JOHN /fENRY
Corron 6H, 6STr & Plnlnrn Mlti


S1 i
-- a--- ----snr--



DOGWOOD







41







--.--.-------WASHNTONW---------


Ii


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hi
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---- w- -
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S 32



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hi






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35







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37


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40
J AHNRy, GIN&A"NIH Afu
-.drL r ramoN


= p


R 25





Scale of feet
rt --- -- ^ ----- *' -m -- -a
%i;~~


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j


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4


js


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o .













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PjW O o ST SBN ,-- p\ ,-
ELCCTR/C /IGHT PLIHT ifl/
0 --..- . .

40 G40
L _, y


6~ A',-


MILL RD


174

Scale of Feet


(MONTICELLO
FLA

160


167


MILL. R'D


I I


Y'I
r


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9
u:~ m


















































AfOrNTICELO HOTL






I41



Y' _
3.5


E. PALMER MILL RD.


174


Scale of Feet
,o 0'
































EAST WASHINGTON STREET


This small extension of the eastern artery of town (U.S. 90) indicates

further residential expansion. The roadway was extended prior to 1929 as a

part of the statewide highway expansion program.

Few of these houses are significant with respect to the early history,

however, they remain a part of the residential quality that is seen throughout

the town.
























DOGWOOD


ANDERSON


183
184


EATON LANE%
------------ ^7 4


rMONTICELLQ
a 13FLA.
113
,IP 1


D2


Pusolu JSCooL
170AL


/A LNu-r


171

Scle 100 Ft to o nch


I. 4-
B ,9


PEARL 2


IS

























BIBLIOGRAPHY


Bailey, E. B., "Florida Jefferson County Where it is and what can
be done here," Monticello, 1887.

Gainesville, Florida, P.K. Young Library of Florida History. Manuscript Box,
"Letter to Department of Education concerning Monticello Academy from
McCall."

Indian Defeat, Boston Recorder, April, 1818.

Jefferson County Business League, "Jefferson County Monticello Section,"
(Monticello), (1910).

"Towns and Old Plantations," Federal Writers Program, 1939.

Trebeau, Carlton, A History of Florida, Coral Cables: University of Miami,
1971.

U.S. Office of Economic Oppoertunity, "Jefferson County, Florida," (1964).

Williamson, ., "Jefferson County," Writers Program, Florida, 1939.
(type written)























FOOTNOTES


1. Sanborn Mapping and Publishing Co., Monticello, Florida, New York,
New York, (1884-1929).

2. Trebeau, Carlton, A History of Florida, (Coral Gables: University
of Miami), 1971, p. 136.

3. Ibid., p. 121.

4. Ibid., p. 184.

5. Ibid., p. 225.

6. Ibid., p. 241

7. Williamson, ., "Jefferson County, Florida," Federal Writers
Program, 1939, p. (type written)

8. Ibid., p.

9. Ibid., p.

10. Jefferson County Business League, Jefferson County Monticello
Section, (1910).

11. Trebeau, Carlton W., A History of Florida, (Coral Gables: University
of Miami, 1971), p. 379.











CONCLUSION


Monticello, Florida, can be seen as an example of the southern agricultural

town which has grown and declined within the same frame work as many other

small communities in the south.

It is a particularly fine example of the community which has through its

development maintained a quality of life that is rural in atmosphere and urban

in context. The population has been stable for many years,and is an indication

that it has adapted to the changes without destroying the quality which it

possesses. The decisions which it makes considering increasing population

and land speculation will determine whether this quality will remain.














6I I is. h jrr 212


..-- ... ....... ....... E. PEARL ...-1 ........
w W*W w w I W *


I d ll
I 9__________m____> a1 ____________


.*


I it
I.--a--. --------------




*?' -


CYPREss



I
S ... P..6 M"

1 I 145


IM z


H^^ '


Scale 00 Ft o One Inch



113


E. boGWOOD

SiS
p ... I

,
E. WASHINGTON -...---..J.an.. L,
.I | 11 6


Ub I -


0i
I


I0



U.


177
*
*** i


-i


1 -

S-4- -



|--i Ir 1 S


IB| "BRANT "PL P. iwnfu f
i~ m r lr~7-3~
: z


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112 r
,i U
65fl


30


--t
u .


3 207 132





* 'i I f
S1313






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4 N.192
(ONTIGELLW J
E. PEARL "-'- = A. .. ...

a.




5 I-24
z


W DOGWOOD





.8= -.......== W. WASHINGTON -..'~

2 r 3 j? 9 0 as s


q, nre
4 .lrBr

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15


=, -=r. -= ..% w. PALMER MILL

&'



:i 22


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w

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or,
rr
jr

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r u
.\



iB <''*
JETFCROoN CO'UNT Y ~
/ COURT IOU.,


E. WASHINGTON-


W. WALNUT







211
S zofz
RD. .......





211S

Scale of Feet
I


E. WALNUT "'


W. PEARL


........-.;... ...


", 3









































T


WIRICK-SIMONS HOUSE


c 1830's


lot 4


04


"A^,


I.4L~LE~* L! r.. *,, ~=~*.~B~;~E~RI~C~~ :E" :
tl ~A,
?' iJ
L ;1' I '
yEt~41ljj





Ambulance Driver Says Man Beaten In Jail


A member of the Jefferson County
Ambulance Service said he witnessed
a prisoner being abused in the county
jail and even though he was called to
render first aid was denied the
opportunity to assist the injured man.

Dave Cone, a member of the
ambulance department for the past
four years, said an ambulance was
called to the rear of Jerry's Restaurant
Tuesday afternoon to assist an injured
man.
When he arrived he was told
sheriff's deputies had taken the man


After six months of negotiations,
the school board and the Jefferson
County Education Association, bar-
gaining agent for teachers, finalized a
two year teacher contract last week.
SThe new contract calls for beginning
teacher salaries of $7802.50 while
teachers with 15 years service and a
masters degree will earn $11,805.63.
These salaries are based on ten
months.
Dr. William French, school board
chairman, said he believed the
negotiations produced a reasonable
contract in keeping with the resources
of the county.
Joan Raley, JCEA president whose
members ratified the contract with a
104 to 2 vote, said the voting results
are a fine example of how important
collective bargaining is to teachers
here.
Highlights of the new contract
include two additional paid holidays


to Dr. Luis Roca's office across the
street. Cone said he checked the
doctor's office but found no injured
man there.
When he returned to his ambulance
he received a call over the radio to go
to the county jail because a man was
injured and bleeding.

Cone said he arrived at the jail with
John Davies who also works at the
ambulance department in search of
the person in need of medical
assistance.
Cone said Edward Strickland


opened a door to summon Sheriff
James Scott and the sheriff shoved
Strickland against the wall while the
sheriff and Sergeant Nelson Blount
approached the two ambulance men.

Cone said while the door was open
he saw Tommy McKown handcuffed
and lying bleeding on the floor with
several people standing around him.
He said this is when he saw at least
one blow and possibly others hit
McKown who was being held down.
. The sheriff and Blount told Cone
and Davies there was no need for them


to be there and to "get the hell out."
Cone said about 30 to 45
minutes later he went to Dr. Roca's
office and saw McKown being treated.
Cone said McKown had severe
lacerations on his head and was still
bleeding.

"The ambulance is no play thing,"
Cone said, "we responded to a call
from Clemmons, the jail dispatcher,
only to be denied the opportunity to
render first aid."
"I don't care what he did, but any
man who is hurt deserves the right to


first aid, but the sheriff wouldn't
permit it," Cone said.
In a brief statement, Sheriff James
Scott said he sent all injured parties to
a medical doctor instead of having
them treated by an ambulance service
representative.
With respect to the allegation of a


beating in the jail, the sheriff said
"Those so called witnesses who said
they saw a beating and think I refused
medical care for an injured man
should come forward and testify under
oath when the case comes to court
instead of idly gossiping in the
newspaper."


Major Altercation


A major altercation Involving law
enforcement officials and voung


people In the community occurred
Tuesday afternoon behind Jerry's



Historic



TW 11i1ioTWS orn A

A Monticello landmark for more
than 100 years, the Marvin Anderson
108TH YEAR, NO.19 JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA 32344 15 CENTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1976 building, fell to bulldozers Thursday


afternoon.


The End Of M A Building




Mo


for teachers this year and three next
year, improved grievance procedures
and an opportunity to reopen
negotiations on salaries, supplements
and insurance next year before the two
year contract expires.
Other teacher benefits included in
the contract are $5,000 life insurance,
10 days sick leave of which four may
be used for personal business, full pay
for jury duty or while attending
educational meetings, and assistance
for legal action against teachers.
Since June of 1967, salaries for
beginning teachers have risen from
$4350 to $7802 and salaries for
teachers with 15 years service and a
masters degree have risen from $6305
to $11,805.
This is the second year that the
JCEA represented teachers in
negotiations. Last year the
negotiations took almost eight months
before a contract was signed.


Monticello News Receives

"Blue Ribbon" Designation


The Monticello News has been
named a Blue Ribbon Newspaper by
the National Editorial Foundation.
The award is made to newspapers
who maintain high standards of
coverage and service to the
community.
"We're delighted to be honored
with this award as it says our
publishing philosophy meets the
standards of excellence sought by the
Editorial Foundation," said Editor
and Publisher, Ron Cichon.
Twenty-five criteria, measuring
newspapers against a national
standard are employed in the
evaluation.

Included are coverage of local
government, law enforcement agen-
cies, schools, courts, businesses,
religion, civic, social, cultural events
and youth news.
Also editorials, columns, features,


photographs, typography, design, and
advertising content.
Comprising the staff of the
Monticello News are Debbie Cooksey,
Paula Hayes, Lonna Cichon, Reathea
Pitts, Cindy Crocker, Sylvia Wom-
mack, Neal DeVane, Jeanette Rucker,
Dena Zaras, Ann Conover and Cichon.
Correspondents who contribute
regular columns are Donna Smith,
Marge Trimble, Sue Gramling,
Sterling Graham, Lester Atkins and
Donna Johnston.
The award is the result of efforts of
every person on the staff, Cichon said.
The support the newspaper has
received from the community has
made the paper grown and enabled
additional coverage and features,
Cichon added.
"So while the award carries the
name of the newspaper," Cichon said,
"it is something that reflects on the
entire community."


I, P iz


HANGING the Blue Ribbon award In the Monticello News office are staff
members Paula Hayes, left and Debble Cooksey. (Staff Photo by Ron Clehon]


Grant Leaves County Post


Ike Grant, director of the
Jefferson Ambulance Service for
the past two and a half years,
presented his resignation to County
Commissioners Wednesday morn-
ing.
He will leave his post December
31st.
Grant, a former chief deputy in
the Sheriffs Department, took over
the ambulance service when it was
made a separate department.
He plans to enter private


business here representing the
Lincoln American Life Insurance
Company.
In his letter, Grant thanked
commissioners for the "outstand-
ing cooperation" he has received
from the board while upgrading the
ambulance service.
The board was equally high in
their praise of Grant saying they
appreciated his efforts in making the
ambulance service second to none.


Staff Photos By Ron Clehon and Neal DeVane


Restaurant near a pool hall. Several
arrests were made. Details 4 the


situation were not available\
presstime.



ic Bldg.



Down


at


Teacher Salary


Minimum $7802


I ~ I-- I I --


1, I' I '-


Situated on the corner of N. Cherry
and E. -Washington Streets, the
building was to be saved by the owner,
the Farmers and Merchants Bank.
However, when adjacent buildings
were demolished to make way for the
bank's expansion, the old structure
began to crumble and Building
Inspector B.J. Cooksey ordered it
razed.
Destruction of the historic building
brought a blast from Esther Connolly,
president of the Historical Association
who claimed the Farmers and
Merchants Bank ruthlessly destroyed
the building.
Gary Wright, the bank chief
executive officer, said, "We made
every effort to save the structure but
we were not about to risk the safety of
anydne by attempting to leave the
building as it was."
The bank, which has owned the
Marvin Anderson building for the past
three years had planned to leave the
building standing until March 1 in
order for the Historical Association to
find a way to preserve the building.
The building had been condemned
in November of 1975 but the building
inspector had delayed the time of
demolition in order for students from
the University of Florida School >f
Sture' 0 cud -; ; i I;s. ,; ;

wit r ... group f- at le,4'
two years in an attempt to find scme
alternative to the destruction of thn.
building.
But there were no more extensions for
the old structure on Thursday.
Mrs. Connolly said a preservation
architect had examined the building
and did not consider it really to
collapse.
She said no opportunity was offered
to salvage the valuable plate glass
windows, the mantels from fireplace
or to save a sample of the wooden
joints in the timbers.
Some people who watched the
destruction said they thought the
building was an eyesore and were glad
to see it torn down.
The building was sold to the bank
(Continued on page 2)


Thursday

By Ron Clehon
FIRST it was pet rocks that were a
fad. Now it may be pet ropes. Who
knows what's next?
SOWNERS of King-Merritt Ranch
sent a letter to Fire Chief John
Nelson praising the work of the fire
department in extinguishing a fire
last week at the ranch. The skill of
the department is credited with
saving the barn and ranch home.
POSTAL SERVICE has $15
million in surplus. No rate increase
expected. Wowl
COURTHOUSE Philosopher says
government computers get upset
with surpluses.
HIGHWAY Patrol estimates 27
people will die in Florida traffic
accidents during the 78-hour
Christmas holiday. The patrol is
urging defensive driving.
JEFFERSON residents purchas-
ed $6,166 in Savings Bonds during
October.
PHYSICAL arrangement of the
school board meeting room has
been changed. School board
members now sit on one side of the
table and face the audience. They
previously sat around the entire
table. Additional seats have been
added for the public.
FLO FASTOFF, chamber secre-
tary for the past 14 years, is
resigning as of December 31st.
NEW staffer at the Clerk's office
is Sandy Arce. She's the wife of
Rev. Hector Arce, president of the
ministerial association.
STOCKINGS for each County
Commissioner are hung on th,
fireplace in the commit'
chambers.


"~"=;~i- "
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Historic Building
(Continued from page 1)
three years ago by Joe Anderson, vice
president and comptroller of the bank.
Anderson's father had owned the
building for 50 years.

As demolition crews were destroy-
ing the building, people were taking
bricks and other parts of the building
as souviners of the old structure.

The building had housed a candy
store, insurance agency, pool hall, bar
and cigar factory. County Judge
Charles Anderson once had a law
office located in the building.
Councilman Alfred Foster watched
the demolition and recalled dances
were once held on the second floor of
the Marvin Anderson building.




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