Group Title: Heating, lighting, ventilation
Title: Slides, part 2
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00103254/00004
 Material Information
Title: Slides, part 2
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: Chase, Charles Edwin
Publisher: Charles Edwin Chase
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00103254
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text



















J4
























AW




I
* 1





SCentral hearth at Penshurst.

t A
i i L


1






I


House at Jamestown, .Virginia, with
hearth and chimney away fiom the
wall of the house. In this case the
hearth was located in line with
the entrance to the house. (Inset)
The hearth was formed by a few
stones and a kettle was supported
over it from a tripod of wood.


* *


















Fireplace at-Jamestown, Virginia, with
a stone wall at the back, but without
jamns Ahood is-dropped from the
ceiling over the hearth to facilitate the
exit of smoke. Notice the very
crudely built hearth of fieldstone.
This fireplace is within an end wall.










., I























































0 1 2 5 4 1 1
-SCALE o -f-,-.-,,-r"-/ e

























II

Albert Museum.-:
i- -



















-0 .! 2. 5 4T rI o I II ?
j -77'



AMC

ffA=






L\




























A lber~t Mluseum.




--MNrl o Isr k -
It .




V.. mT
IIj
Kr. r l(f


10
* ftmmlkk


q ~rAI nr to


A triple fireplace, over 20ft. wide, in the Parliament Hall of Linlithgow Palace, built for

James IV of Scotland (1473-1513).


i


L r I' t 1 r I 1 C


%FW% %Ba


&*g; 1







First-floor plan of the first-stage
house, and the first-floor plan of
the second-stage house in New
England. From Isham and Brown:
iEarly Connecticut Houses.
Courtesy Dover Publications,
Inc.


Sri 7 /T -r I o o t P A


-A-
T


f /T


fLooR PLA I
T /T A I




Aniaflcrnate support was to corbel the masonry outward under it, a plait
often used in cellars for first-floor fireplaces, but rarely for those on the
second floor.


-t
-b' _ri 'h - --------- ----
- :. 2 ;i ''



{j : L j : .X





SFirst-floor plan of the third-stage


S Isham and Brown: Early
SConnecticut Houses. Courtesy
S .-- L Dover Publications, Inc.


T r C A 1. fr I T Qt OR P L AA

C LA A L C H M L T Y P L/
i


































ir4b,
ASK^'-~













~_~f~s~*Alk























~"f;'~~ *
i'
:% i ~k
~Fc*~. 49
Vr ~
, P~ t:. ~- .f~l~...;. "?a"Y~8.:1;~~ .*r
Ipur a 'es.
? ~ g. t '
:r ~h.'
:Q~~ ---
: A, s
~ .8- ,,
5
Y ~a; r.,~ ,~
~r;c~t~
~w~ ~,~ ~:,~x,
a ''.~a~k~Bb~:
I;
"rs~?ci~P~ ''
.ep
h 9~'6~'
i r" 'n ~k~ 5~
rld~L~aL ~'

.I 'r' '5~e~":~
Q a,
:: ,..~

~LC~EIP$B Li~b~b.
Crl


r .

r


This large fireplace is located in the Cloister at Ephrata, Pennsylvania, built in the

first half of the eighteenth century. Most of the fireplaces in the Cloister have

raised hearths similar to this one. The projecting facility at the left end of the

fireplace contains a kettle for a constant supply of hot water. Courtesy Pen-

sylvania Historical and Museum Commission


wk -, 16,


Lc~t --~ .19 -hdl


,













'A


~5 -L~~ 1C
.L1- -~h--I* -
_
,
..
C;_ ---L -51 ;-- --~2:--~~ 5!
'L.5
~ .I;
b- 4
'F=I:
77~r '4 ~t~t
-
4
- AIhi; ... ..r.f ~L `..
v1 C ~-
i
__ ~~c~, :~ -~. Z I,. "
''''~
-
,~ -~ 'i I
3.


\' iS
.. :^q


Unknown and undated artist's sketch of buildings located between York, Penn-


sylvania, and Baltimore, Maryland. The one in the foreground has a centrally


located chimney, while the chimney seems to be on the corner of the building on


the right. Courtesy The Mariners Museum, Neport News, Virginia


~`~cI. ~lf~~"
r


-r.
--~-


~-

-'-~ -- ~ ~~=-=-~;"=~~-1






















Mode of constructing a chimney
such as the ones used at
Plymouth, Massachusetts.
Courtesy Plimouth Plantation







4-


ri


'`4%"n
S.r


a


It
/ 'L .


|,


Fy


I'S


A ,


r- j
N'


*tj
a'
'S
Ku


'S





0~
7.


I%
31f


p. I


*
4. 9]


A.-


I


.9'



714
~ t~4q


I 12


,A.. 1.


A


i ,'
1











Rear view of framework for the
jambs and lintel for a fireplace
(in construction) at Plymouth,
Massachusetts. Notice the
chamfer on the inside bottom
edge of the lintel. Courtesy
Plimouth Plantation


..F,



~j
r~. oV.
p.


c~~s~q~










Views of the Bertolet House located
near Reading, Pennsylvania. (Top left)
Exterior of the house, the location of
the chimine- indicating the division
of rooms within the house. The smaller
room is to the right of the chimney.
(Bottom left) The giant fireplace with
its large hand-hewn lintel. (Right) The
reconstructed fireplace. The function
of the piece of wood on which the
lintel rests is not known. (Below) The
two doorw-ays to the small room and
the great tapering throat of the
chimney which was enclosed in the
loft of the building. Courtesy
Pennsylvania Historical and Museum
Commission


/




















; ~~8~\ .Fx
"''
~~B~Qgai9;9~i'' L ~;r~8~t I 1 88~. ~,
~B~l~i~HB~i ~~
I' r b
' ,~U
~ ;
*

i' ~p ~J

a
i~ ~F~.,eas~ i* ~F6
~ae
r\t r
i ~P9. ~a,~tB~1PY~IPI1 I ~r~e _~ g
~Qg---y~~p~ ~
r a ~PLr~~g&Tr ~ii~8~j~- ~~ ~PI~
*. r ~r'0
~ i a,
a ~
V

r rr

i ::'i& ~5t,c
(.~3
48 .I: r
~a~s~
:a

-~C~ iB
jr :
~
r
*
).~a~a~r


.P~ I

*icl
r..
"' l~.b~
B




t ,~"~:




I 1


~dp~~se


J .
A.


Jw

pA~LS e,


'.


t I






je,


k ,
AGD~


I


,--"


It'at I~


Zc~-,


At


i-~j~
t~: ~WpJ~'1




Construction Sketch of Successful. Fireplace


See Table of


Dimensions.

.1 *


on


Opposite Page


FRONT


ELEVATION


SECTION


PLAN


H- (


TEM


X-X


























Unrestored first-floor fireplace .ir the Trent House, Trenton, New Jersey, show-
ing the curved corner section between the jambs and the back wall. Also shows
the herringbone arrangement of the bricks. (Below) Kitchen fireplace in the
basement of the Trent House, Trenton, New Jersey. This one appears to have
been plastered at one time, but the bricks are exposed at the back where the heat
was the most intense and the plaster deteriorated. Courtesy Historic American
Buildings Survey




- -
- K" C~
I C W I
c ~ ~ ~ ~ : C ~~---- s'


A fine example of a seventeenth-century fireplace in the Thomas Hart House of
Ipswich, Massachusetts, built about 1640- now located in the Metropolitan
Museum of Art in New York City. The radius form between the back wall and
the jambs is a very attractive and functional feature. The hearth is frugally
furnished as most of them probably were at that time. Courtesy of Metropolitan
































"Armada' fireback.















































Dutch firebacks were imported and copied in England. The flowers on this 17th-cenut
fireback at Penshurst include Dutch tulips. It seems to have been cast specially to fit t
wrought-iron basket grate.


Q~sb;F '





(^r <- l.^i -- -" -- --**- -1-- "" .
S-s -'-* ,. ? *-
164~

I f

4 s ~ ~ ,.- I--


Fireplace with bolection
molding and mantel shelf
in the Letitia House in
Philadelphia, built about
1715. This is one of the
earliest surviving mantel
shelves in America.
The coving jambs are
uncommonly large, and
probably aided in
projecting heat into the
room. Courtesy
Philadelphia Museum of Art





':7'

-I-
/

o- A. 'e


1 '1
rr ,=; ^ *. -^^ *,


,r- u '~ftz-;Q i
A. ~Cs
I, /
~.; ~4
*..* .0. (

jL ~ j


,L' 4


lp.
07i;I -, 1


f
4pI*















I

I


a MOM


- 6C


^- ------ ^
lr -- -- lp


.- -
4irr











i n

I Ii I


1111ill


I I


111


Extravagant gouge work on a mantelpiece
found in Berks County, Pennsylvania. Such
work is usually found, in Pennsylvania, or
can be attributed to craftsmen who worked
in Pennsylvania. The delicacy of the work
is evident in the close-up view of the
column. Courtesy Edwin Jackson, Ilc.,
New York City


-- *-~1, I


)I.


~-,.


c r IIi



-rI~II~


hiul~a~


*Vi S..
0 09
II
II~c


t;l


I.


** r*n?*7'Tilrrirmmi.


,Tt ir l"Ps I -1


- ------- ~
L~L----~Q
II ~ Ill~U VI~W,. . Irl.L- -L

9~rm~C~48i~e -~
C~L~~-TZ~;~;~iiaLi~g
~ c
--
;-A"


~i~,"it~"~


n17'Ian~lT1~:
~_~"c~'~s7




THE COSY HEARTH



IMPROVEMENTS IN
THE OPEN
FIRE-PLACE
An improved form of fire-
grate, an early example of
convection heating, de-
scribed and illustrated in a
paper read by Mr. John
Taylor, Junior, M.A.,
F.S.A., at the- Ordinary
General Meeting of the I
Royal Institute of British
Architects, January 12th, .
1863. "An Englishman's
love for his fire-place," he
said, "is so deeply rooted,
that, even supposing it -
could be shewn that a close -il
stove possessed greater
advantages, I am sure he-
would most reluctantly re-
linquish all the comfortable
associations with which it is
connected, although he is
accustomed to turn his back
upon it (one of the Peculiar
privileges of our sex)."

Above: Diagram showing
the action of the grate. (See
page. I5.) Right: The front
of the grate, surrounded
with small radiating china
tiles with serrated edges,
"which, being brought to-
gether, form ornamental
perforations through which
the warm air enters the
room... ." From Papers
read at -the R.I.B.A., session
1862-63, pages 90-93.









This mantelpiece is one of
several in a house built in
Cooperstown, New York, in
1875. It was originally equipped
with fireplaces and a furnace.
"The fireplaces have small grates
for, burning coal. The one shown
here has its summere" fire-board
inplace. The designer of this
mantelpiece virtually exhausted
the shapes of panels which could
be used on such a facility.
Courtesy Mr. and Mrs. M. IV.
Thomas









SI


AV, ~7


=OWNlu


~I1-1


i? I


lilt


k
.Y;;C
I r
.n. ~ ;Sb~ ~ ' -s"'" :
I"X~~ B r0- IU
:'4
'" ,.~
:" "' '
~bB




302 The American Fireplace


FIRE CARRIER
These rectangular boxes of sheet iron were possibly six by six inches
and ten inches long. On one end was a hinged lid for filling and empty-
ing live coals, on the other end a handle for carrying. Because of the
difficulty in lighting a fire before the time of matches, such boxes
were used to carry hot coals from one fireplace to another.



woo wow


Fire carrier of sheet iron. This one is simply made and has holes in the lid for
ventilating the live coals. Kauffman collection



















Chimney crane with modest but
attractive decorative features,
notably the waves in the diagonal
brace. On the left end of the
horizontal bar the date "1796"
is incised. Cranes were hung on
either the right or the left side
of the fireplace. One is known
with a ratchet facility which
permitted raising or lowering it
over the fire. Courtesy Mr. and
Mrs. William Ball








































































































































































































i:


~~J


,jr,/~.J

r
I


;~Su=


I V ,tI







lul

K




S k.


- .


i. .,




















































/


4i


I




* )


A ^


nEi
s ,,,,kt' *Iah

%'
(-** < *


;:jd..'


41 f


Esu


1- 'I'.


u.1
*i*'

-i ^


,- ii
4- 4


lot
*^~


Ar -
17 110
~~,C*IL I i A--
II.f ;


Drawing of


the smoke-jack


described


in Dobson's Encyclopedia.


The tech-


nologists of the time seem to have taken such delight in making the function of a
reasonably simple mechanism sound very complicated.


i i










AS


Steam-jack for turning spits on
the hearth, invented by John
Bailey of New York City in
1792-93. It was advertised in the
newspapers of New York and
was exhibited there in Baker's
New Museum. Steam was
generated in the container on the
left and transferred through a
series of gears to a rotary motion.
The disc with the two slots
motivated the spit. Courtesy
John P. RemenIweyder




~-~7N


Clock-jack for turning spits, without its crank, chain, and weight. Its rotary
mechanism was connected to a spit with a pulley to transfer the power from one
device to the other. The holes in the brackets on the rear end were for attaching
the jack to or over the heavy lintel used in kitchen fireplaces. Courtesy Gertrude
Weber









Dalesme's Heating Machine, 1680.


r
-2-
t rjr
i
;f















346. Cast-Iron Plate of Pennsylvania Dutch
Stove, 1718. Fromn the store of iron plates used
by German and Siwiss colonists the basic heat
source of nineteenth-centurv America as to
develop. This plate isT nscrlliedr: WB llTTiarn
Bransen]; K T F [Koven Tree (Coventry) Fur-
nace]; Gotes Brynlein hat Ihaser die Fyle [God's
Well has Water in Plenty]. (Courtesy Landis
Valley Museum, Lancaster County, Pa.)



























347. Toward Concentration of the Heat Source: The Franklin Stove, c.1740. A
further step toward the cast-iron stove of the 19th century. Thernal efficiency is improved
by passing the combustion gases through flues. Franklin notes that his stove is based
on earlier French experiments.




















































j


Frontispiece of Benjamin Franklin's


brochure about his "Pennsylvanian Fire-


Places." Courtesy The Historical Society of Pennsylvania


W~ .ho


- -~'~13--J~P~'~"W~UW~~"~CC-CL)*IIUIII --. ---*-YLIC-~-_I~-- ---.-~L_:~r_~-_~__ C__ _^ -r r--~C~IC-*W
._~ I IC ___


rr


,1




A c
rf8


A cast-iron five-plate jamb stove,
fired from the kitchen room,
was used to heat the Miksch
Tobacco Shop. This stove, dated
1760, was cast in Pennsylvania
by a furnace and has the Low
German biblical quotation: "Las
Dich Nicht Gelyssten Deines
Neststen Gut," translated "Thou
shalt not covet thy neighbor's
goods." Courtesy Old Salem,
Inc., Winston-Salem, North
Carolina




v


An attractive Franklin-type
fireplace by Wilson, who is
reported to have lived in
Poughkeepsie, New York.
Possibly the "New York" on the
fireplace refers to New York
City. Courtesy Edwin Jackson,
Inc., New York City




Two other views of the Jackson
iron fireplace. One view shows
the attractive decorative frame
around its edge, which permitted
adaptation to the wall or
chimney opening.
The second view shows,a top
view of the hearth with the
opening for the air entry in the
center. This opening could be
closed by swinging a plate which
coincided in size and shape with
the opening. From The Open
Fireplace by J. Pickering Putnam


Fig 121. Front View of Jackson's Ventilating Fireplace.


-i'I




W e come now to a torm oi ventilatinIg .!replace weiULun VunIlI.- wLu.a
remarkable extent the desiderata heretofore set forth, and at thle same
time presents a most pleasing external appearance. In the front eleva-
tion (Fig. 121) we see apparently nothing more than the usual open
fireplace with a frame decorated-in a
Stasteful manner. Trie fi (sh air enters
the room through the openworkcd top
of the frame, at F. The section (Fig.
119) shows us the manner in which this
fresh air is warned. It enters the lower
I cclchamber B B through the register AL,
where it is partially warmed before it
S back and sides of the fireplace. Thence
it enters the chandler D, where it plays
around the short tube forming the chim-
ney-throat, and passes thence through
S the perforated fram above described
into tile :apartment. ig. 122 shows the
plan of the grate and the apparatus for
shutting off the fresh-air supply. This
latter consists simply uf a disc of iron
rotated by a lever so as to close holly
C or in plart the mouth of the fcrsh-air duct
; shown in section at A. Fig. 120 .shows
the small siuioke-ji)cs in the (lhinevy-
JR ,1 throat with the fresh air chamber sur-
SAJ rounding them.
Fig. 119. Jackson's Ventilating Fireplace. Table VII. (Appendix) shows tile
heating power of the .Jackson Fireplace.
Before lighting the fire the anemometer at the register was motionless,








Fig. 120: Plan of Chamber D, directly over the Fire, with Top Plate broken away, showing Flues.


Two views of the Jackson"
patented iron fireplace. The side
view shows the entry of the air
at the bottom point A. It then
rises through the rear channel C
and flows outward through the
channel D, which is filled with
tubes for smoke disposal and
heating the air.
The second view shows the
small smoke pipes in channel D
with the possibility of the fresh
air circulating around the tubes.
From The Open Fireplace by
J. Pickering Putnam











* 1.





* a
U* ..


I


tr .Q


^/L//y//^//


ii


, i s,


_ I^/,


ii


%.. ,%.,


..if,.,.. ^^^^
---
i.. ;.. ..-
4... --.".


r ~
I
L' a-- 1


349 a. Cross Section of Hnlliford's Hunge for a


io


sac,




/

























B.
via
C'







tin) a
ht:







350.
Sauc


1B avarian' 'NoWbleni


sunken sauceipans; with complex flue system healing the whole outer W(

349 h. Top) View of IlHuifornl's Iane for a Biavarian Nobleman.
tlihe cert(er.


E~c'; ~c~
~~:~:~.~
t~r


r
i15~~4,
~i, ~
~B~T~~. ~2~3~~ s


,. ..,







vp op
.hi
1 41W

F
, ." P'T r. V. .

tu me
rl j; df -r s r

%s


II s


-'


~


IIle




No.1 15791. Ono-Hurnor laaIip Stove. I eight,
81 inches ; size of castiron oil fount, :V 2x5! inclies
one 4-inch brass burner soldered to foIunt; weight,
per dozen, 50 lbs. Top tips back to light and triim
the wick. The front is nicely nickel plated, and
is so constructed that the mica frame can be easily
removed to allow the user to replace broken mica or
clean the old one after it becomes smoky or discol-
ored. This stove is better than many lamp stoves
that are being sold for considerably more money.
Every stove warranted. Price each ............ AN
No. 15792. Two-Burner Lamp Stove (see cut).
Height, 81A inches; size of cast iron oil fount, 5%,x
5%4 inches; two 4-inch brass burners soldered to
fount; weight per dozen, 80 lbs. The oil fount and
Stop are nicely japanned; the mica front and swing
doors are nickel plated, and the stove is thoroughly
well finished throughout. This stove has swinging
mica doors, so that the stove can be easily lighted
without tipping back the chimney. Warranted not to leak. Price each......75
No. 15793. Three-Burner Lamp Stove. Height, 8!/ inches; size of cast iron
oil fount, 54xSRz inches; three 4-inch brass burners soldered to fount; weight per
dozen, 120 lbs. Nickel plated front and swing mica doors, japanned top and oil
fount. The combination nickel front and swinging mica'doors are valuable
features entirely original with us, and are covered by U. S. patents. Our lamp
stoves never leak. Every stove is warranted. Price each................... l.
No. 15974. Wicks for above stoves, four inches wide. Each, 3e; per doz., 30c

Summer Queen Oil Stoves.
No. 15795. It is the only stove made with a water
pan, which, by our patented method, is hinged on the
oil tank. This arrangement permits free access to any
part of the stove.
Size No. 1 Single has one burner 3 inches wide. Price
ea c h .................................................. e
Size No. 2 Single has two burners 3 inclies wide. Price
Seach........ ... I.S I
SSize No. 8 Single has two burners 4 inches wide. Price
each... ....... .................... 61.0O
Size No. 31'3 Single has three burners 4 inches wide.
Price each..: ............... ............... 2.OO


double Summer
Queen
Oil Stoves.
Size No. 2 Double has four
burners 3 inches wide.
Price each......... .35
Size No.3 Double has four
burners 4 i ches wide.
Price each. ...3.27
Size No. 31 Double has six
burners 4 inches wide.
Price each.............84.15





No. 157
every pa
1 stove on
Price ea





No. 103.
No. 15799. Reliance No. 102, Double
Stove, has four burners 3 inches wide.
'Price .... ................ .1.00
SReliance No. 1022, Double Stove,
has four burners 4 inches wide.
Price ............ ...... ... 2.20
Reliance No. 103, Double Stove,
has six burners 4 inches wide.
Price......... ..... ............. 82. O


No. 15796.


Reliance Oil Stoves.


797. The Reliance is
articular, and is the
the market, has three
ch.. ..............


a well made stove in
cheapest well made
4-inch burners.
................ $1.3 5


No. 102.
Furnishings for Either Summer Queen or
Reliance.

OVENS.
No. 15799. No. 2 fits No. 2 Single or Double Stove, 11
inches wid4, 12 inches long, 10 inches high. Price
double casing........... ........ 1.55
No. 3 fits No. 3 Single or Double Stove, 13 inches wide,
14 inches long, 12 inches high. Price double
casing...................................... .... .10
No. 3B fits No. 3~/ Single or Double Stove, 14/ inches
wide, 17Y inches long, 13% inches high. Price doble
casing ..........................$......0.. 82.60
No. 15799.


EXTENSION TOPS.
No. 15800. Queen Extension, fitting Nos. 3 and 3Vs
Single or Double Stoves. Price each........ .15
SAD IRON HEATERS,





No. 15801, two sizes.
No.15801. Queon Flat Iron IIeater. No. 3 fits
9,8 tovo. Prico reach ..........................
No.8% fite No. 8' Stove. Price eoch......... 7c


No. 11500.


No. 15802.
The Acme


3 No. 15802. Queen Upright. Thi
No. 3s Summer Queen. Price.....





Central-Draft, Round-W
Cook Stove.


,,,,.,-.....


Our line of Acme Oil Cook Stoves is an embodiment of art a
are modern in d. -igu, honest in construction, perfect in combi
rately finished in nickel and sure to give the best of s:
have spared neither labor nor money to make the Acmle (ook S
11ni i hed, most durablee and best operating oil cook sto
Modern ideas and improvements make them the most convenic
ical stoves ever placed on the market. Our prices are always th
considered.
No. 15803. One-Burner Acme Stove. Height, 17 inches; si
inches; weight, crated, 20 lbs; nickel trimmed;, polished
and burner, 71' inch circular wick. The fount holds one-hi
located back of tlie burner at sufficient distance to keep it perfect
vent the oil from becoming heated. The patent central dr
made entirely of brass, and is a marvel of simplicity (any
or rewick it), The chimney can be tipped back or quickly rero'
trimming or putting in new wick; removable top grate, a big adv
ing stove. Price each........... .... ....... ..... ........ ... .
No. 15M04. Two-Burner Acme Stove (same as cut). Height, 1
top, 15x24 inches; weight, crated, 30 lbs.; nickel trimmed, IM
fount and burners, two 10-inch patent central draft burnei
wicks; give an even, whit oand intensely hot flame; the ipolis
holds 1 gallon ; is provided with patent automatic indicator, and
of the burners at sftlicient distance to keep the oil perfectly co,
remnovable chimneys and top grates are a great advant.
also in light ing triniing and putting in new wick. 1Price each..
No. 15805. 'Throe-Burner Acme Stove. Height, 17 inches; s
weight crated, 35 lbs.; nickel trimmed, polished brass burner. an
circular wick, three powerful 10-inch central draft burners give
flame, and will do all kinds of cooking and baking as well or
gasoline stove. The polished brass fount is provided with the Al
matic indicator, has a capacity of 11/, gallons, and is located bac
at sufficient distance to keep the oil perfectly cool. Price each...


No. 15800. Acume Cook Stove. Height, :0 inches ; Hiz of to
weight (-raied, 8011s. ; mounted on rollers, fll nickel trinmm
brass fount antd burnerM. This stove is a throe-burner stp)
ling i gasoline s Htove in al)tiearanice. It has two 10-inch and on1 II
patent central draft, burger, and will do more aind bItl
baking than most range or gasoline stoves. The polished brns
capacity of 2'2 gallons; are located back of the burners at suflicii
kee ) thimn perfectly cool and prevent, the oil becoming heated, fir
with tour Acme pitemt, automatic intlicator renmovallo chimneys a
Th hiiandsom;t a nd mmost, powerful oil cook stove ever produced.
Priceo ouch, witlhouit oven .............. .....................
Price', with IHissiHai oven ....................................... I
Il'Bv I PAiAIrM r- I 2nh I Von% I& la'iUmln* PiiJi


A COhffP -uP'mD Ku ?T Io u alh.E. &M *bW ED 5PmA Jib AN A Eb iii E 49 J .1idb




- - _-' .- ----7-^LZ'l^^'J-^' -----11*. -

By referring to tile index you can readily turn to the page of
this Catalogue where we illustrate and describe a very select
line of Cayrpets, Rugs, Oil Cloth, Lace Cunrtains, IPortieres, lwin-
dow Shades and Fixtures of all kinds; all quoted at prices so
low that competition should stand not a shado-w ot show for your
trade. You will learn to. prize this Catalogue :a a complete
bureau of information on the great question of where, how and
what to buy.


No. 15919.
DAKD.ALE SUNSHINE.
hard or soft coal or wood.
15926. With hard or soft coal fix-
15927. With wood fixtures.
15928. With both fixtures, add 50
to prices quoted.
1w handsome, low priced heater,
ted with heavy sheet steel, large
sion feed door, spun brass nickel
Nickel top ring, nickel swing top,
I knobs and hinge pins, ash pan and
rrate of best form.
Diameter
of body. Weight. Price.
10 in. 6>5 bs. $5.70
13 in. 9:3bs. 7.50
16 in. 125 lbs. 9.60


THE OAKLING SUNSHINE.
For hard or soft coal.
No. 15919. This stove is made to meet
the demand for an "Oak" at a moderate
price, yet of fine form and perfect con-
struction. Mounted with single fire pot.
Feed door frame extends full width of
the sheet steel from base to top.
Number indicates diameter of sheet
iron cylinder.
No. Weight. Height. Price.
12 98 Ibs. 4l in. $5.10(
14 133 lbs. 51 in. 6.00
17 181 lbs. 58 in. 8.40


No. 15926.






LIVE OAK SUNSHINE.
iVill burn ansything ever used
for fuel.
The Live Oak Sunshine is a G(REAT
B1i4 HEATER, suitable for stores,
school houses, halls, or any illace where
a powerful heater is required; mounted
with Woods' celebrated sheet steel; con-
structed as nearly air tight as possible.
The castings are heavy, smooth and well
fitted. Diameter of body, 22 inches;
height 7 feet; weight, 319 pounds.
No. 15932. With coal fixtures...... $20.40
No. 15933. With wood fixtures..... 20.40
No.15984. With both fixtures...... 22.00


CEM SUNSHINE.
For hard or soft coal.
No. 159410. We sell t.lhe( i to those
whole want a good, durable, reliable
heating i. tov for a small amount of
money. Though very low in prico, it
has every essential 'feat ur of a good
heating stove of this clasS. It does
not, of course, Ihavo all t hli fancy frills
and ,tornaint'ntal extras1 t h:art found
on tlih Idijclt i)riceil Kgotls otf tliis
kid, n t tI is lacking tlI t il
iroiittteservicen anidd uralility. And
isn't it pretty? It costs no mori to
make a handsome stovo than an ugly
one.
Six sizes. Nos. 8, 9), 10, 11, 12 and 14.
Which would you rat her (?wn?
N'-. Weight. Price.
< 47 lbs. $3.00
.9 5: 1 s. 3.0
10 Nt I)s. 4.20
11 67 lbs. 4.80
12 8 lI's. 5.40
14 132 ibs. 7.15


No. 15910.


ROYAL SUNSHINE.
Revertille Ftlue.
No. M194. A inw revi\trtibl, flue
surface burter, wtilh liu-sia itro
body, .'-hakitng traw ctittr grate, cast
iron revcrtible flui oInt tlhe ut-idle, o
the sttve, thiis giving a vtry itmc[
larger fire siactii, t, a give: size 01
sfovo (\,Er their' (lil s't le of ,( oin-tilrc
tion. 'I'T is inllc -lai ii- cli itr if th it
stove, excetit at the l.ltiir atinl l'w\\tl
ems, allowing 't grr-twr ru mit Aid oi
lat from lot t I 1 >i y ft II hpostv
an I th, cai-t ir',ni c l(' n1, 1, tlh;t f,,,n,,
t t' h lui'. \\o rtsjptct .ft'lly a-k 1,1 i,1i
partial ex ,am in l t ion .,ila ( It of t li,
stove, as v(we ,li.,v\it it will fill tlle
requirements of ouir pi patron With
orniamnt oni ttopi, inickl plttd Itaii
plate, foot rails., pi ns and knobh'.
Inside dilii.
No. offiri ,pt. Weight. Price,
112 10 in. 105 Ibs. $19.74
114 12 iii. :i t Ih 2;.1(I
110 14 in. 420 lbs. 26.1


No. 15915.
CAY SUNSHINE.
No. 159419. Full revert ibl flue sur-
face burner. The (iay Stnslhin is a
full revert iblt llue. lussia iron sur-
face, burner of beautiful design anlI
good proport ions. This stove is.
thoroughly well mado in every de-
tail. It meets tlihodifand for a dur-
able, etiicicn tanit I economical stoves
at a very low, Trice. 'The extra fuel
consumed ia ono imonthi in a Htraight
draft cylinder or ciannoni stove would
Iay for tlie difference in price be-
tweeun such a stove and the (ay Sun-
shine.


No.
110
111
112
114
116


Diam.
of
body.
10 in.
11 in.
12 in.
14 in.
16 in.


Height
floor to
top.
Blin.
53 in.
55 in.
60 in.
62 in.


Weight.
115 lbs.
135 lbs.
154 lbs.
212 lbs.


Price.
$10.40
11.40
12.25
14.40
16.50


If a Stove bought of us should not seem to give perfect service,
read the complete instructions on first page of stove Department.
Nine out of ten eases of dissatisfaetlon with a really good stove
like ours is the fault of the chimney or ignorance.


luW!l, Mq,,t dseoount for cash ti full wIth orderwhen comparing our prices with
.i A'; figur 'e ow Mua y ou *ansave. ,


No. 1549.
those of other houa sad


-- -


























-4T
1N 1 I--










359. Combined Fireplace,l Boiler, and Cast-Iron Oven, 1806. A friend of Oliver Evans, imnvntor of the as-
sembly line, offers this very early scheme combining a hot-water boiler and oven with an open fireplace. Bv
drawing a damper either of them will heal by the fire that is used in common. The boiler should have a tube with
brass cock which projecting into the kitchen gives hot water whenever wanted.' (S. W. Johnson, Rural Econ-
o01y, 1806)
360. Improved llangte with Boiler. 1871. In this period the free-standino. uninsulated wvrtical hailpr ut/




















.. .....








.. ... ..... .


































AROI.




































. .. ..... ..






































tN


















~a~-~ou~_
v
1.-~-
~p'
:------5
ap ~.p ~
( t
Tt '8.
-
~z~a; 2 r~
;s~-
~
Bi; ....,
._.'6 Q
r
'-').-- e X~Lt
,r I ..C~~~"~~
c'-''-~-~:i=- 'I
~r~


. .'. .* J


fti


It~ ~ I I*
:'t~


V
Y *I
*I


S.


'I



ip









;. qh
I



;sjli lr-jil

n lr L


SI,


, ^
t6.
'ii..


r -
I


$ I ii

:4`


a
i
'L~4~s~kiBBBd~~ .4.


-L


nt I I 9


























Ir











6 L
arr iP 'Si-

r,^ ~'\-' .-* ** * a

s^,,-' "l


^^^ 9i


I 5

'' I) 1f



JI$ "
C*

JT-~Lr- .
~PL~ eB~ '~~s~ "~r.
~L~~



:Y
8 ~a~~f
s jaB~
, *, .u*
,,~s*
~ ~s,
Q:
6~ P
~
,i
~
~
* ~, a~
,.. -u ~
~ .u .
~~%lrBI*r
~rSi~dri~~e~, -~*C s-- k. ~a~ ~w U ~
"::. ''


;P 1. r






L,
- 7
'~=al
.:Er
''
.tr.~


.e


~p~t\
I ~ '~c
~;~-'~i~;~S~B~ i.~3~~b ~ ~ ~48~:~ -. B.
-, ,
~

:.
9 sYlfi~a~l i I.:. '.



I

---
*.





r




,...
~~siii~ r
r~ 4~.:u'
'+
r .
-I-`- J...
da :9
.v~


''"*
.$ i~-

~srML~c_ ..~
I
P*-a' h
Ct.31vlr, .
"rr a ~. ~gk; 'I
i* f:
~r

.* ~CS-Yb~r
-0~
~!', I c.~~
r k~~.~~ ~
+I
Cc)
.~--*lcq :~ ~ ~~4;`
I It
*b~ r16
p
~7~R"~" ,
rre



I f .~k~s~
I,

....
--- .. '~- ~b, a

~ ~~~

` PI'
*
~' ''
~ ~ .~i~b~k`6~














































































*= 11 1 1 I







11, illf I I




6L A.A I1 I rir ~ ~ tl l L.1 1


~OI ~
.P ~, C
I' .rl~*g
*C~;
~p*= j.
~O 9 1
a '~ r
.C*C
9 r~,CI,,
L"l~v'~ lie
oC
m
~r*r*
.r ca
r
~-4""
Io


~rs


u,









; ,
O1


'I

'cv.


F*.


o


!yr


m.-


.-do


t-e
"L^^-^^ ^^- l


SaP
4 P JU~

~L~.~ Ir~i~ druIC
iiOs t





rI


14*


"a..





'Zn"-.,



II Y ~ tJ

"* -;-* .


Alm


.r .' 1^
*lL~t' ; ^t^^^X
cr,'^ '^'- -
- s h~i''f&...


'I


tr EI


.,,m. .,


rrw"


. ,
* ,-`'


r.

.


t."

4 j..


\"


A~r


O^q


kv


T\' t -


iw *aM


Opp-...


.I
4.


4f


r\
'**;


-.,r4


~iSI~Frc~t I

X'" a ~


6I. f a









The tapered weatherings on the
chimney of the St. George
Tucker kitchen, Williamsburg,
Virginia, are of two eras. The
flat of the eighteenth century, the
lower corbeled of the nineteenth
century. Courtesy Colonial
Williansburg


L~ t ~ ~ \ A r rtA / r ~ I~t C1A rr A ~ C A IL










r ----


An example of American Gothic Victorian
architecture with perforated vergeboards. Its


SI:


chimney tops
fireplaces. Fro


suggest that
m John Maa


it has


ss:


a number of


The) Gingerbread


Age.


Courtesy


Holt,


Rinehart,


and


Winston


Chimney tops on the Bishop House located at
George and Bartlett Streets, New Brunswick,


New


Jersey.


Courtesy


Historic


American


Buildings


Survey


7 ) I
'~Si~~, Na


1- -












































- ----------


a'
j~

,r-~n~~

~rJ1
~i~411








4'


























































00" .404 1,
-N















A


S'
bY,


4^.


J/















































-I -#- "- --







o ... .

r;.. .._* ._* .^... ..... ^
" .... ._ ... ,M, I,,^. !.
dii:~P;; I ; :

































iN/



---


t '


I
AZ


jI I


~rin:


-- C f:C


C~~f~l~
IIIL /.
~lprr
j
1~c4: L'1


Y
d































.'L


Ar


4w,


-- f--M__


__"- -- --.

-... -----


-. .----.--.-.


I -


Yr,







Ilonmemade candle lantern with glass*
panes set in solil pine sides and conical
tin top probably salvaged from a
pierced tin lantern. In the Fitch H louse.










Left to right: Kyal, or "Cape Cod spout lamp," one of a pair; co,
New England, late 1700's or early 1800's. Sheet-iron betty (the (
support is missing). Tin shop lamp, consisting of a wliale-oil 1;
mounted in a tin pan for a reflector. Early nineteenth-century wli
oil lamp from the Hartford area made by a tinsmith with a flair for
classical. Tin whale-oil lamp (c. 1800) modeled closely after M
patented "agitable" lamp of 1787. The last three are development
Miles' patent.


x right: Painted tin Argand lamp
in London by the firm of R.
, "late Argand & Co.," about
a glass chimney originally fitted
e flange around the tubular
.Engraved portrait of Ami
1, lamp inventor. Two tin "port-
luminators," designed by Benja-
"hompson, Count Rumford, a
of Woburn, Massachusetts.







'(4


r


IIdcli*r W\'ithi aI chI.illriiuig rual flavor ( souti11tmr11 Ne\w Lig-
1, varlv 1 800's) 'lirncd vlishaft and caidle cupjs'.
I. ral ci(cs to whc Wlei l (I icatc. til l' Icavcs arc s4)lderecl.


Adjustable wooden candlestand from
Connecticut, a characteristic New Eng-
land example. The short turned arm
with candle socket bored near each
end moves up and down the threaded
shaft, which -is secured in a rough
octagonal block on four splayed legs.
In the Fitch House; a similar stand is
shown in the Fenno House east room
(see The interiors).



Tin chandelier of
ageless simplicity
(early 1800's).
Probably designed for
a tavern ballroom.
131

























Left, Iron "hogscraper" candlestick of late 18th or early 19th century. The sharp-edged
base was convenient for scraping bristles from newly slaughtered hogs. Middle, Patent
model for "hogscraper" candlestick. Patented by Merriam, Harris, Wheeler & Merriam,
of Poultney, Vt., in 1853. Right, Brass candlestick of style used about 1825-1840.






(7 .


t t i lk I h (' [ i p in -.1 yI 1i t


-_ qw -


84 Pair of ormolu candlesticks with cut-glass prisms in
a combination of the Gothic and Rococo revival styles.
Sc ch candlesticks were often called girandoles.
Sleepy Hollow Restorations, Gift of Mrs. Giles Whiting.


A,


TT
-.O

/'I
''A.'^


I
9


^1,






82 f;!l A '.and f htlonze, bear-
i f i; [ ( arditner, N ew
York ( iadiin-r J i :, active as a bronze-
-.stt; ,.I!I i.i rii rn kr r b twt,en 1827 and
Aitl hor', collection.


II


. -. ---;


i




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - Version 2.9.9 - mvs