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Backayard magazine
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00103222/00003
 Material Information
Title: Backayard magazine
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: Backayard Publishing, Inc.
Place of Publication: Kingston, Jamaica
Creation Date: 2011
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Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: issn - 0799-1797
System ID: UF00103222:00003

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BACKAYARD DEEM TEaMChief Editor Creative/Art Director Managing Editor Production Managers Contributing Editors 3G Editor Designer/Photo Advisor Fashion Editor Assistant Fashion Editor Stylist Florida Correspondents Contributing Photographers Contributing Writers Caribbean Ad Sales US Ad Sales US Promotions Distribution PR Director Online Amilcar Lewis Noel-Andrew Bennett Madeleine Moulton (US) Clayton James (US) Noel Sutherland Jim Sewastynowicz (US) Phillip Lobban Matt Sarrel Andre Morgan (JA) Cheridah Ashley (JA) Serchen Morris Dexter Pottinger Sanjay Scott, Leroy Whilby Tone, Andre Morgan, EL, Brock Fetch Headline Entertainment, Emily Kunkle Danai Star Ewan, Micro Don Dada Audrey Lewis EL Anna Sumilat Novelty Manufacturing OJ36 Records, LMH Ltd. Audrey Lewis (JA) Sean Bennett (Webmaster) ja@backayard.com usa@backayard.comJAMAICA9C, 67 Constant Spring Rd. Kingston 10, Jamaica W.I. (876)384-4078;(876)364-1398;fax(876)960-6445 email: ja@backayard.comUNITED STATESBrooklyn, NY, 11236, USA e-mail: usa@backayard.com

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YEAHI SAID IT It goes without saying that Jamaican music is a huge part of the world music landscape. Ska and Rocksteady inuenced (before it morphed into Reggae) an entire generation of music, from Hip-hop to Pop and of course Reggae, and it's been doing it since the late 1950s. There has been many hybrids of the music since then, but seldom do those lab created, sub genres survive all but a few have lasted to tell the tale. 'Back to Black' by the late Amy Winehouse is one of those such albums. Amy along with the producer Mark Ronson, successfully blended Ska, Rocksteady and Reggae, sprinkled in a bit of Hip-hop, Rhythm and Blues and made what arguably is a classic album for this generation. Amy Winehouse before her recent and untimely demise, adopted Jamaica as a temporary home, where the late singer recorded tracks for what would have been the most epic and most anticipated album of her career at the Geejam recording studio in Portland. So, what is it about our music and island that draws musicians and producer's alike to our quaint little 'rock'? Is it the food, sun, people or is it a natural mystic? Another musical adoptee who has been successful in more recent times off our island's inuence, are dynamic production duo and DJs, Diplo and Switch collectively known as Major Lazer. Their 2009 offering 'Guns Don't Kill People...Lazers Do." was a not so unfamiliar mash-up of Reggae, Dancehall, Ska, and the piece de resistance, Techno. Techno? Yes, the genre of music known as Techno. Though mash-ups of genres are not unfamiliar and happens more regularly than even remixes at times, this specic blend has propelled Major Lazer into the mainstream spotlight landing them national campaigns with BlackBerry and a production gig with Beyonce (one of the biggest names in music today). They did all this by taking a 'musical syringe' to the island and extracted these specic elements, and coupled it with their musical style, and went as far as to borrow our local talent to complete their elixir. After reviewing all the facts, it begs the question How are other musicians, DJs, and producers able to come to our island and reap immense success and fanfare using our music and talent as the platform to do it, while we struggle to get it right? ELARE WE IN A LOSING GAME?

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YEAHI SAID IT It goes without saying that Jamaican music is a huge part of the world music landscape. Ska and Rocksteady inuenced (before it morphed into Reggae) an entire generation of music, from Hip-hop to Pop and of course Reggae, and it's been doing it since the late 1950s. There has been many hybrids of the music since then, but seldom do those lab created, sub genres survive all but a few have lasted to tell the tale. 'Back to Black' by the late Amy Winehouse is one of those such albums. Amy along with the producer Mark Ronson, successfully blended Ska, Rocksteady and Reggae, sprinkled in a bit of Hip-hop, Rhythm and Blues and made what arguably is a classic album for this generation. Amy Winehouse before her recent and untimely demise, adopted Jamaica as a temporary home, where the late singer recorded tracks for what would have been the most epic and most anticipated album of her career at the Geejam recording studio in Portland. So, what is it about our music and island that draws musicians and producer's alike to our quaint little 'rock'? Is it the food, sun, people or is it a natural mystic? Another musical adoptee who has been successful in more recent times off our island's inuence, are dynamic production duo and DJs, Diplo and Switch collectively known as Major Lazer. Their 2009 offering 'Guns Don't Kill People...Lazers Do." was a not so unfamiliar mash-up of Reggae, Dancehall, Ska, and the piece de resistance, Techno. Techno? Yes, the genre of music known as Techno. Though mash-ups of genres are not unfamiliar and happens more regularly than even remixes at times, this specic blend has propelled Major Lazer into the mainstream spotlight landing them national campaigns with BlackBerry and a production gig with Beyonce (one of the biggest names in music today). They did all this by taking a 'musical syringe' to the island and extracted these specic elements, and coupled it with their musical style, and went as far as to borrow our local talent to complete their elixir. After reviewing all the facts, it begs the question How are other musicians, DJs, and producers able to come to our island and reap immense success and fanfare using our music and talent as the platform to do it, while we struggle to get it right? ELARE WE IN A LOSING GAME?

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1. 15 Seconds All too often it will take a tragedy in order for people to stop and take stock of what is ultimately important in life. However, it is also true that after a tragedy occurs, one can witness the truly giving side of human nature. Thirty-four of Jamaica's most talented artists have come together to create history in the form of a musical masterpiece. This voluntary collaborative effort features both local and international artistes to the likes of Dean Fraser, Bunny Brown, Luciano, Tarrus Riley, Marcia Grifths, Bunny Rugs, Cat Coore and Ruption of Third World, Maxi Priest, Konshens, Chalice, Assassin, Busy Signal, Tony Rebel, Brown Suga, Chevaughn, Clive Hunt, Jimmy Riley, Sherieta, Richie Stephens, Half Pint, Esco Levi, Romain Virgo and AJ Brown. The massive project boasts the instrumental talents of musicians like Dalton Brownie, Wayne Armond, Robbie Lyn, Danny Bassie, Sticky and Harry T. Created in reaction to the 8.9-magnitude earthquake that struck Japan in March 2011, the tune is titled seconds/Youll Rise Again. The heartfelt motion of brotherhood, culture and country sparked the interest of other top worldwide artistes like Maxi Priest (United Kingdom), Pierpoljak (France), Ado Negro (Brazil), Meta Dia (Senegal), Christopher Douglas (Guyana) and Big Mountain from the USA and was produced by Clive Hunt appearing courtesy of Juke Boxx Productions Group. You can support this effort by purchasing the track on iTunes. 2. Compound Island After an electrifying performance at last years Reggae Sumfest, Ne-Yo once again made his way back to Jamdown, but this time wanted to make sure that his Jamaican fans could get a closer look. His personal imprint, Compound Entertainment, launched the Compound Island party series during Emancipation weekend July 29th-30th. WIth a theme of Come Feel the Rhythm, the event featured three energetic parties on the famed Negril hip strip. This event is a precursor to Compound Entertainments eminent long-term investment in Jamaica. With an interest in uncovering new Jamaican talent, Compound will be staging a talent competition to assist young, talented Jamaicans in achieving their dreams of stardom. Applicants will be able to submit videos of their performance in the hope of winning a recording contract with Compound Island. In an interview with the Jamaican Star, Ne-Yo explains, The reason we decided to do this here, besides the obvious talent, is that the Jamaican market is very single-driven, where you have that one special song. We believe that is where the music business is heading right now singles matter more than the album. 3. We Remember Gregory Isaacs VP Records is proud to announce the double-disc collection, We Remember Gregory Isaacs, available August 16, 2011. Saxophonist and producer Dean Fraser has assembled an all-star cast of contemporay singers and musicians to pay homage to the icon, who The New York Times describes as the most exquisite vocalist in reggae. via: VP Records 4. Legitmix For the rst time ever, Diplo and Mad Decent can sell works made using copyrighted music without having to go through the often costly and time consuming music clearance process. This breakthrough is made possible by the revolutionary Legitmix platform. With a few mouse clicks, you can recreate an artist's DJ set, remix, or sample-based song on your computer using your own copies of the copyrighted music they used. The recreated music les are automatically imported into your music library. Artists can now create freely, generate sales of the music they sample and give fans a new way to support their work. Visit www.legitmix. com to learn more. via: Biz3 Publicity5. Gentleman With six albums under his belt and over one million collectively sold in Europe, the German platinum and award-winning singer Gentleman is long overdue for his U.S. debut. Diversity, set for release on Sept 13, 2011 on VP Records, charted at #1 in Germany as well as #2 in Switzerland and Austria and is the follow-up to his Europe platinumselling record Condence. Gentleman is currently touring Europe in support of the album and plans to embark on a U.S. tour beginning in mid-October throughout the Midwest and West. Details and dates will be announced shortly.Via: With Love PR6. Appleton Jamaica Rum has launched accounts on social networking websites Facebook and Twitter, as the brand kicks its summer activities into high gear. Appleton, which has been in production since 1749, is leading its social media push with its most popular product Appleton Special Jamaica Rum. We were waiting for the right time to become a part of this community, and were making sure that we had the right team in place, said Appletons Brand Manager, David Walton. Walton says that over the summer Appleton will be aggressively seeking to capture the attention of social media users with innovative activities and prizes for Appleton followers.Via: Brandon Allwood & Associates7. Reggae gone country VP Records and Warner Music Nashville are proud to announce the release of Reggaes Gone Country on August 30, a seamless musical dialogue between Kingston and Nashville that connects the roots of both genres. The ground-breaking compilation features classic country hits covered by Jamaicas top musicians (Beres Hammond, Tarrus Riley, Tessanne Chin, Etana, Luciano, Sly & Robbie) as well as supporting vocals provided by original recording artist and country icon Larry Gatlin of The Gatlin Brothers. Country music devotee Cristy Barber, Vice President of Marketing and Promotions at VP Records, the worlds largest reggae label, and a Grammy nominated producer for the 2003 dancehall reggaehip hop compilation album Def Jamaica, envisioned this project two years ago and teamed up on lead production with John Rich of the multi-platinum selling country duo Big & Rich and the winner of this years Celebrity Apprentice, and the acclaimed Jamaican saxophonist and top reggae producer Dean Fraser. Reggaes Gone Country is taking some of Jamaicans favorite classic American country songs and putting their beats and whole instrumentation around it while still having that root of country... It is this crazy cool idea, says John Rich. American country music and Jamaican reggae share many similarities. Both genres are rife with love-gone-wrong songs, romanticized gritty outlaw tales and expressions of unwavering spiritual devotion providing guidance through daily struggles, each delivered in their distinctive regional voices, the molasses thick Jamaican patois heard on many reggae tracks and countrys indelible southern twang. Country has been a part of the islands musical catalog for years. Everyone from 20-year-old kids to their grandparents listen to country in Jamaica. People are always so shocked when I say this, but the music plays such an important role in the Caribbean, states Cristy Barber.Via: With Love PR 10. Nathan Clark has passed away at 94 years of age. Some of you might have known this legend for his stellar shoe craftsmanship and build quality, or most popularly the crepe-soled, suede desert boot that was invented for use by the British military during World War IIs Western Desert Campaign. A classic brand in every sense of the word, the style of which has been often duplicated, replicated and very recently rejuvenated in the local fashion scene to the runways in Milan and Paris. For everyone who thought that the authentic 'Clarks' shoes were made by Vybz Kartel in a downtown arcade this is the man you should pay respect and homage to. Thank you Nathan Clark for inspiring a generation to walk with pose, dignity and toothbrushes in our bags. 11. Rocker's NYC In celebration of its 12-year anniversary, Japanese label swagger has teamed up with RockersNYC to release this special edition t-shirt. Each of the short-sleeve tees features a leopard print detail on the front and back with the SWG logo and the number 12. Available in white, black and orange colorways, each of the shirts is priced at ,090 JPY (approximately $78 USD) and can be purchased through select stockists. via: hypebeast.com12. 2012 Mercedes Benz As part of its special edition Black Series range, Mercedes-Benz has upgraded the C63 AMG coupe with a brand new model. Weighing nearly 44 pounds less than its original counterpart, the C63 AMG Coupe Black Series features a M156 6.2-liter V8 engine that boasts 510 horsepower and 457 pound-feet of torque. Sitting much lower than the standard C63 AMG with widened tracks and forged wheels, the model also features modied shift mapping with the AMG Speedshift MCT meaning gear changes in Sport + and Manual modes takes just one tenth of a second. With an estimated market price hovering somewhere around $90,000 USD, the vehicle is expected to ship to Europe in January 2012 while China and the U.S. will get deliveries in March 2012. via: hypebeast.comThink youre 1 Drop Worthy?ja@backayard.com 11 12 10 7 6 5 4 3 2 1BACKAYARD 6 DROP1ONEPLUGS & RELEASES

PAGE 11

1. 15 Seconds All too often it will take a tragedy in order for people to stop and take stock of what is ultimately important in life. However, it is also true that after a tragedy occurs, one can witness the truly giving side of human nature. Thirty-four of Jamaica's most talented artists have come together to create history in the form of a musical masterpiece. This voluntary collaborative effort features both local and international artistes to the likes of Dean Fraser, Bunny Brown, Luciano, Tarrus Riley, Marcia Grifths, Bunny Rugs, Cat Coore and Ruption of Third World, Maxi Priest, Konshens, Chalice, Assassin, Busy Signal, Tony Rebel, Brown Suga, Chevaughn, Clive Hunt, Jimmy Riley, Sherieta, Richie Stephens, Half Pint, Esco Levi, Romain Virgo and AJ Brown. The massive project boasts the instrumental talents of musicians like Dalton Brownie, Wayne Armond, Robbie Lyn, Danny Bassie, Sticky and Harry T. Created in reaction to the 8.9-magnitude earthquake that struck Japan in March 2011, the tune is titled seconds/Youll Rise Again. The heartfelt motion of brotherhood, culture and country sparked the interest of other top worldwide artistes like Maxi Priest (United Kingdom), Pierpoljak (France), Ado Negro (Brazil), Meta Dia (Senegal), Christopher Douglas (Guyana) and Big Mountain from the USA and was produced by Clive Hunt appearing courtesy of Juke Boxx Productions Group. You can support this effort by purchasing the track on iTunes. 2. Compound Island After an electrifying performance at last years Reggae Sumfest, Ne-Yo once again made his way back to Jamdown, but this time wanted to make sure that his Jamaican fans could get a closer look. His personal imprint, Compound Entertainment, launched the Compound Island party series during Emancipation weekend July 29th-30th. WIth a theme of Come Feel the Rhythm, the event featured three energetic parties on the famed Negril hip strip. This event is a precursor to Compound Entertainments eminent long-term investment in Jamaica. With an interest in uncovering new Jamaican talent, Compound will be staging a talent competition to assist young, talented Jamaicans in achieving their dreams of stardom. Applicants will be able to submit videos of their performance in the hope of winning a recording contract with Compound Island. In an interview with the Jamaican Star, Ne-Yo explains, The reason we decided to do this here, besides the obvious talent, is that the Jamaican market is very single-driven, where you have that one special song. We believe that is where the music business is heading right now singles matter more than the album. 3. We Remember Gregory Isaacs VP Records is proud to announce the double-disc collection, We Remember Gregory Isaacs, available August 16, 2011. Saxophonist and producer Dean Fraser has assembled an all-star cast of contemporay singers and musicians to pay homage to the icon, who The New York Times describes as the most exquisite vocalist in reggae. via: VP Records 4. Legitmix For the rst time ever, Diplo and Mad Decent can sell works made using copyrighted music without having to go through the often costly and time consuming music clearance process. This breakthrough is made possible by the revolutionary Legitmix platform. With a few mouse clicks, you can recreate an artist's DJ set, remix, or sample-based song on your computer using your own copies of the copyrighted music they used. The recreated music les are automatically imported into your music library. Artists can now create freely, generate sales of the music they sample and give fans a new way to support their work. Visit www.legitmix. com to learn more. via: Biz3 Publicity5. Gentleman With six albums under his belt and over one million collectively sold in Europe, the German platinum and award-winning singer Gentleman is long overdue for his U.S. debut. Diversity, set for release on Sept 13, 2011 on VP Records, charted at #1 in Germany as well as #2 in Switzerland and Austria and is the follow-up to his Europe platinumselling record Condence. Gentleman is currently touring Europe in support of the album and plans to embark on a U.S. tour beginning in mid-October throughout the Midwest and West. Details and dates will be announced shortly.Via: With Love PR6. Appleton Jamaica Rum has launched accounts on social networking websites Facebook and Twitter, as the brand kicks its summer activities into high gear. Appleton, which has been in production since 1749, is leading its social media push with its most popular product Appleton Special Jamaica Rum. We were waiting for the right time to become a part of this community, and were making sure that we had the right team in place, said Appletons Brand Manager, David Walton. Walton says that over the summer Appleton will be aggressively seeking to capture the attention of social media users with innovative activities and prizes for Appleton followers.Via: Brandon Allwood & Associates7. Reggae gone country VP Records and Warner Music Nashville are proud to announce the release of Reggaes Gone Country on August 30, a seamless musical dialogue between Kingston and Nashville that connects the roots of both genres. The ground-breaking compilation features classic country hits covered by Jamaicas top musicians (Beres Hammond, Tarrus Riley, Tessanne Chin, Etana, Luciano, Sly & Robbie) as well as supporting vocals provided by original recording artist and country icon Larry Gatlin of The Gatlin Brothers. Country music devotee Cristy Barber, Vice President of Marketing and Promotions at VP Records, the worlds largest reggae label, and a Grammy nominated producer for the 2003 dancehall reggaehip hop compilation album Def Jamaica, envisioned this project two years ago and teamed up on lead production with John Rich of the multi-platinum selling country duo Big & Rich and the winner of this years Celebrity Apprentice, and the acclaimed Jamaican saxophonist and top reggae producer Dean Fraser. Reggaes Gone Country is taking some of Jamaicans favorite classic American country songs and putting their beats and whole instrumentation around it while still having that root of country... It is this crazy cool idea, says John Rich. American country music and Jamaican reggae share many similarities. Both genres are rife with love-gone-wrong songs, romanticized gritty outlaw tales and expressions of unwavering spiritual devotion providing guidance through daily struggles, each delivered in their distinctive regional voices, the molasses thick Jamaican patois heard on many reggae tracks and countrys indelible southern twang. Country has been a part of the islands musical catalog for years. Everyone from 20-year-old kids to their grandparents listen to country in Jamaica. People are always so shocked when I say this, but the music plays such an important role in the Caribbean, states Cristy Barber.Via: With Love PR 10. Nathan Clark has passed away at 94 years of age. Some of you might have known this legend for his stellar shoe craftsmanship and build quality, or most popularly the crepe-soled, suede desert boot that was invented for use by the British military during World War IIs Western Desert Campaign. A classic brand in every sense of the word, the style of which has been often duplicated, replicated and very recently rejuvenated in the local fashion scene to the runways in Milan and Paris. For everyone who thought that the authentic 'Clarks' shoes were made by Vybz Kartel in a downtown arcade this is the man you should pay respect and homage to. Thank you Nathan Clark for inspiring a generation to walk with pose, dignity and toothbrushes in our bags. 11. Rocker's NYC In celebration of its 12-year anniversary, Japanese label swagger has teamed up with RockersNYC to release this special edition t-shirt. Each of the short-sleeve tees features a leopard print detail on the front and back with the SWG logo and the number 12. Available in white, black and orange colorways, each of the shirts is priced at ,090 JPY (approximately $78 USD) and can be purchased through select stockists. via: hypebeast.com12. 2012 Mercedes Benz As part of its special edition Black Series range, Mercedes-Benz has upgraded the C63 AMG coupe with a brand new model. Weighing nearly 44 pounds less than its original counterpart, the C63 AMG Coupe Black Series features a M156 6.2-liter V8 engine that boasts 510 horsepower and 457 pound-feet of torque. Sitting much lower than the standard C63 AMG with widened tracks and forged wheels, the model also features modied shift mapping with the AMG Speedshift MCT meaning gear changes in Sport + and Manual modes takes just one tenth of a second. With an estimated market price hovering somewhere around $90,000 USD, the vehicle is expected to ship to Europe in January 2012 while China and the U.S. will get deliveries in March 2012. via: hypebeast.comThink youre 1 Drop Worthy?ja@backayard.com 11 12 10 7 6 5 4 3 2 1BACKAYARD 6 DROP1ONEPLUGS & RELEASES

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My, how things have changed drastically for reggae dancehall music in the last can just go online and search google, youtube or frostwire. Just access any email inbox for the latest Riddimstream or Johnny Wonder email blast and boom you have the chune for FREE. becoming a selector. We had to be wherever the music was, wherever it was being created, distributed, performed and of course sold, then BUY it. Being 14 years of age and trying to do all that after school got out and without transportation was a hard task. Instead, I went to every dance in Brooklyn I that was dealing the latest and greatest reggae, dancehall, rockers and slanging getting to the record shop before the 45's were sold out. If a new riddim or can say, LawdAhMercy. I'd have to venture far into neighborhoods like Crown Heights, Vanderveer and Church Ave to reach different record shops. I took some very long walks back then but it was all worth it when I got home and dropped that needle on that fresh piece of wax, the sound from the speakers playing the brand new Bounty Killer hit from that King Addies clash tape. I had so much love for those records that I would just play them from beginning to end, over and over and over. It drove my parents and neighbors crazy to say the least. Fortunately reggae music was all over the airwaves, too. I'd to listen on HOT97 FM. Another way to hear new chunes was via juggling or sound clash cassette tapes recorded live at parties in Jamaica or New York. Those were some of my favourite recordings to date. Sound Clash tapes with Travelers Int'l, Body Guard, Killamanjaro, Super D, Earth Ruler, LP, Bass Odyssey and King Addies. It didn't get any better than hearing your two favourite sounds go at it, back and forth with big chunes, big speeches and the always-popular "suck yuh madda" phrase to win a trophy. Being that my part of town was made up entirely of West Indians, there was a party all the time. House party, backyard bbq, basement bashment and the livest block parties you could imagine (not because of the gunshots). Every big sound system in East Flatbush would try to string up their sound and this is how I'd get to hear how other sounds juggled and what new chunes they had. Four sounds would be playing on one block and each would bring out every speaker box they owned or borrowed. We would be on one end of the block dancing and vibing to one sound system's selection, then hear a big chune from another sound system's speakers down the block. You'd see the entire DJ MICRO DON DADDA AND THE ART OF NEW YORK TURNTABLISM As a special installment in this issue, we let New York City-based DJ and Selectah, Micro Don Dada, tell Backayard readers a little about growing up in Brooklyn and his thoughts on contemporary reggae turntablism.All words by Micro Don Dada | Photos by Brock FetchBAY : quick plugsBACKAYARD 10

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My, how things have changed drastically for reggae dancehall music in the last can just go online and search google, youtube or frostwire. Just access any email inbox for the latest Riddimstream or Johnny Wonder email blast and boom you have the chune for FREE. becoming a selector. We had to be wherever the music was, wherever it was being created, distributed, performed and of course sold, then BUY it. Being 14 years of age and trying to do all that after school got out and without transportation was a hard task. Instead, I went to every dance in Brooklyn I that was dealing the latest and greatest reggae, dancehall, rockers and slanging getting to the record shop before the 45's were sold out. If a new riddim or can say, LawdAhMercy. I'd have to venture far into neighborhoods like Crown Heights, Vanderveer and Church Ave to reach different record shops. I took some very long walks back then but it was all worth it when I got home and dropped that needle on that fresh piece of wax, the sound from the speakers playing the brand new Bounty Killer hit from that King Addies clash tape. I had so much love for those records that I would just play them from beginning to end, over and over and over. It drove my parents and neighbors crazy to say the least. Fortunately reggae music was all over the airwaves, too. I'd to listen on HOT97 FM. Another way to hear new chunes was via juggling or sound clash cassette tapes recorded live at parties in Jamaica or New York. Those were some of my favourite recordings to date. Sound Clash tapes with Travelers Int'l, Body Guard, Killamanjaro, Super D, Earth Ruler, LP, Bass Odyssey and King Addies. It didn't get any better than hearing your two favourite sounds go at it, back and forth with big chunes, big speeches and the always-popular "suck yuh madda" phrase to win a trophy. Being that my part of town was made up entirely of West Indians, there was a party all the time. House party, backyard bbq, basement bashment and the livest block parties you could imagine (not because of the gunshots). Every big sound system in East Flatbush would try to string up their sound and this is how I'd get to hear how other sounds juggled and what new chunes they had. Four sounds would be playing on one block and each would bring out every speaker box they owned or borrowed. We would be on one end of the block dancing and vibing to one sound system's selection, then hear a big chune from another sound system's speakers down the block. You'd see the entire DJ MICRO DON DADDA AND THE ART OF NEW YORK TURNTABLISM As a special installment in this issue, we let New York City-based DJ and Selectah, Micro Don Dada, tell Backayard readers a little about growing up in Brooklyn and his thoughts on contemporary reggae turntablism.All words by Micro Don Dada | Photos by Brock FetchBAY : quick plugsBACKAYARD 10

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block party run down the street just to vibe to the music. Those were really good times until the rude bwoys started licking shots. I wont mention names, but I remember seeing people run down Flatbush Avenue with stolen amp racks on their backs. You didnt know if the shots were being aimed at someone or just into the air, so everyone would rush into backyards for cover. Five minutes later youd be back on the block, partying. This would happen over and over until you realized that theyre just being shot in the air and you'd just stick around. It became a normal thing like a sound effect to the music. decline of vinyl, came the demise of epic Brooklyn block parties. The way music used to be recorded produced a better quality sound and every aspect of production took patience. Studio time, distribution, pressing albums and singles it all took time and monetary investment. Now with the internet, anyone can produce a song on their laptop and get it online to the masses without spending a dime. The quality of the lyrics and production will never be the same and this is why the reggae and dancehall scene is suffering. In 1995, my sister DJ Maya introduced me to Jah Life Int'l Records (presently at 1234 Utica Ave. Brooklyn, NY). Jah Life Records has proudly served the Brooklyn community since 1984 and is still in the business of selling records (the last of a dying breed). But it is their "Jah Life" record label and recording studio that back to the 1970's with artists like Barrington Levy, Scion Success, Carlton Livingston, Sammy Dread, Beenie Man, and Frankie Paul to name a few. Some of my favorites include, Barrington Levy's "Murderer," Carlton Livingston's "100lb of Collie Weed" and Peter Metro's "Police in a Jamaica." As humble as ever, the owner of Jah Life records (known by his friends simply as Life) lives, breathes and promotes music everyday. Big respect to Percy, Junior, Rambo and Tasha for years of vital reggae music education. Big up to all sounds I grew up with Deadly Assault, Introspect, Lady Stone, Ruff Kutt, Hi-Velocity, Integra, Vigilante, Black Magic, King Fila and remember, buy vinyl. Since todays DJs use digitized MP3 files and select off of laptops (Push-Button DJ is what I call it) there is no use for records or record shops. With the decline of vinyl, came the demise of epic Brooklyn block parties." You can hear Micro Don Dada spin and select every Thursday night in NYC with Max Glazer of Federation Sound at Brand New Machine in the Lower East Side. You can also hear him at the Rice and Peas party every month alongside DJ Maya, DJ Gravy, Max Glazer of Federation Sound and Orijahnal Vibes. For even more Micro, follow him: twitter.com/microdon.

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block party run down the street just to vibe to the music. Those were really good times until the rude bwoys started licking shots. I wont mention names, but I remember seeing people run down Flatbush Avenue with stolen amp racks on their backs. You didnt know if the shots were being aimed at someone or just into the air, so everyone would rush into backyards for cover. Five minutes later youd be back on the block, partying. This would happen over and over until you realized that theyre just being shot in the air and you'd just stick around. It became a normal thing like a sound effect to the music. decline of vinyl, came the demise of epic Brooklyn block parties. The way music used to be recorded produced a better quality sound and every aspect of production took patience. Studio time, distribution, pressing albums and singles it all took time and monetary investment. Now with the internet, anyone can produce a song on their laptop and get it online to the masses without spending a dime. The quality of the lyrics and production will never be the same and this is why the reggae and dancehall scene is suffering. In 1995, my sister DJ Maya introduced me to Jah Life Int'l Records (presently at 1234 Utica Ave. Brooklyn, NY). Jah Life Records has proudly served the Brooklyn community since 1984 and is still in the business of selling records (the last of a dying breed). But it is their "Jah Life" record label and recording studio that back to the 1970's with artists like Barrington Levy, Scion Success, Carlton Livingston, Sammy Dread, Beenie Man, and Frankie Paul to name a few. Some of my favorites include, Barrington Levy's "Murderer," Carlton Livingston's "100lb of Collie Weed" and Peter Metro's "Police in a Jamaica." As humble as ever, the owner of Jah Life records (known by his friends simply as Life) lives, breathes and promotes music everyday. Big respect to Percy, Junior, Rambo and Tasha for years of vital reggae music education. Big up to all sounds I grew up with Deadly Assault, Introspect, Lady Stone, Ruff Kutt, Hi-Velocity, Integra, Vigilante, Black Magic, King Fila and remember, buy vinyl. Since todays DJs use digitized MP3 files and select off of laptops (Push-Button DJ is what I call it) there is no use for records or record shops. With the decline of vinyl, came the demise of epic Brooklyn block parties." You can hear Micro Don Dada spin and select every Thursday night in NYC with Max Glazer of Federation Sound at Brand New Machine in the Lower East Side. You can also hear him at the Rice and Peas party every month alongside DJ Maya, DJ Gravy, Max Glazer of Federation Sound and Orijahnal Vibes. For even more Micro, follow him: twitter.com/microdon.

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BAY : quick plugsMANIFESTO JA: CHANGE THROUGH ART (Kingston, Jamaica)Photos courtesy: Manifesto JA The Jamaica Cultural Development Commission's pilot collaboration Change Through Art (CTA) came to an end on Monday July 11, 2011 at the Ranny Williams Centre with the resounding notion that Jamaica's inner city youths can and should be positively stimulated with the use of our arts. By Partnering with the local advocacy groups the JCDC launched the Change Through Art programme in March to give at-risk male youth the chance to express for youth empowerment through art, Manifesto|Jamaica, administered the May 14 at several locations including UWI Mona and Tuff Gong as well as Grafton Studios. N.B. Workshops incorporated drama, music, visual arts and video production. Over a dozen inner city youth were immensed in an innovative development program that saw them meeting with Dean Fraser, visiting the legendary Tuff Gong Studio and even recording a song with Mikie Bennett in his Grafton Studio. So successful was the Manifesto|Jamaica led music stream that 2 participants, winning) the Mega Mart Song Competition held in Portmore, St Catherine. At the CTA graduation ceremony held at Ranny Williams centre on July 11 famed producer Mikie Bennett stressed the importance of investing in the project "We cant teach everyone the same way," he said, "We need to teach our young men differently. I would love to see that programmes like this are well funded and that there is adequate follow up." Also in attendance at this ceremony were Janet Muirhead of Edna Manley School of the Performing Arts and Dr K'adamawe K'nife who also facilitated JCDC's Change Through Art programme. Gregory Simms of JCDC questioned if the arts is worthwhile to invest in like sports, as many are wondering and Manifesto|Ja representative Anika Kiddoe answered "Most certainly. Human beings are naturally creative. There is an artist inside all of us. And given the unfortunate fact that the education system has let down most of our youth, this is the easiest way to connect with the youths and ensure that they make positive contributions to the society." When asked about how the youths reacted to the JCDC Change Through Art workshops, Kareece Lawrence, Director for Public Relations at Manifesto|Jamaica said that "the team of facilitators are quite impressed with the initiative that the youths have taken & the dedication as well as vigour with which they partook in the programme, despite whatever challenges they are facing where personal access to resources are concerned. The young men who participated in the programme were awarded with from her anticipated album and the evening ended with words of encouragement for youth and inspiration to keep working for arts and culture empowerment in Jamaica. The Manifesto|Ja festival of ART'ical Empowerment, aimed at educating, exposing and empowering youths (primarily the underprivileged) through the arts, will be held in November this year. For more information contact Manifesto|Ja at manifestojamaica@gmail.com or 876 567 4779. BACKAYARD 14

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BAY : quick plugsMANIFESTO JA: CHANGE THROUGH ART (Kingston, Jamaica)Photos courtesy: Manifesto JA The Jamaica Cultural Development Commission's pilot collaboration Change Through Art (CTA) came to an end on Monday July 11, 2011 at the Ranny Williams Centre with the resounding notion that Jamaica's inner city youths can and should be positively stimulated with the use of our arts. By Partnering with the local advocacy groups the JCDC launched the Change Through Art programme in March to give at-risk male youth the chance to express for youth empowerment through art, Manifesto|Jamaica, administered the May 14 at several locations including UWI Mona and Tuff Gong as well as Grafton Studios. N.B. Workshops incorporated drama, music, visual arts and video production. Over a dozen inner city youth were immensed in an innovative development program that saw them meeting with Dean Fraser, visiting the legendary Tuff Gong Studio and even recording a song with Mikie Bennett in his Grafton Studio. So successful was the Manifesto|Jamaica led music stream that 2 participants, winning) the Mega Mart Song Competition held in Portmore, St Catherine. At the CTA graduation ceremony held at Ranny Williams centre on July 11 famed producer Mikie Bennett stressed the importance of investing in the project "We cant teach everyone the same way," he said, "We need to teach our young men differently. I would love to see that programmes like this are well funded and that there is adequate follow up." Also in attendance at this ceremony were Janet Muirhead of Edna Manley School of the Performing Arts and Dr K'adamawe K'nife who also facilitated JCDC's Change Through Art programme. Gregory Simms of JCDC questioned if the arts is worthwhile to invest in like sports, as many are wondering and Manifesto|Ja representative Anika Kiddoe answered "Most certainly. Human beings are naturally creative. There is an artist inside all of us. And given the unfortunate fact that the education system has let down most of our youth, this is the easiest way to connect with the youths and ensure that they make positive contributions to the society." When asked about how the youths reacted to the JCDC Change Through Art workshops, Kareece Lawrence, Director for Public Relations at Manifesto|Jamaica said that "the team of facilitators are quite impressed with the initiative that the youths have taken & the dedication as well as vigour with which they partook in the programme, despite whatever challenges they are facing where personal access to resources are concerned. The young men who participated in the programme were awarded with from her anticipated album and the evening ended with words of encouragement for youth and inspiration to keep working for arts and culture empowerment in Jamaica. The Manifesto|Ja festival of ART'ical Empowerment, aimed at educating, exposing and empowering youths (primarily the underprivileged) through the arts, will be held in November this year. For more information contact Manifesto|Ja at manifestojamaica@gmail.com or 876 567 4779. BACKAYARD 14

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BAY : quick plugsBACKAYARD MAGAZINE ISSUE RELEASEHappy Ending (NYC)Photos by: Brock Fetch Backayard family, Deadly Dragon Sound and Max Glazer of Federation Sound at Happy Ending Lounge in the Lower East Side. The premiere NYC reggae event, this blend of vinyl and contemporary dancehall sets the bar at an all-time high for East Coast reggae. This Spring, Backayard teamed up with Deadly Dragon Sound to celebrate the release of Issue 12, The Women We Love edition at Downtown Top Ranking. A highlight of the event was when special guest performer K-Vibes graced the mic with her big chunes Frenemies and Bye Bye Rebel in a true empress style. Featuring Deadly Dragons Queen Majesty (read up in Issue 12), Scratch Famous, Selector JD and Mr. K spinning strictly vinyl rocksteady, s and s dancehall, lovers rock and with Womens History Month. While Deadly Dragon manned the decks upstairs, Max Glazer of Federation Sound and DJ Autograph spun dancehall for the massive downstairs at Brand New Machine. The NY | JA vibes are strong as Backayard brings with Deadly Dragon and Federation Sound. For more than 8000 pieces of vintage and reissued tunes from every genre of Jamaican music go to www.deadlydragonsound.com and tune in to East Village Radio every Monday from 6-8 PM for a live broadcast at www.eastvillageradio. com/shows/deadlydragonsound. For listening pleasure hit up K-Vibes: http://www.reverbnation.com/kvibes and dont forget to check out free podcasts from Federation Sound at www.federationsound.com. BACKAYARD 16 1 9 6 6 2 0 1 1 C E L E B R A T I N G email: info@tasteejamaica.com website: www .tasteejamaica.com find us on facebook: tasteejamaica

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BAY : quick plugsBACKAYARD MAGAZINE ISSUE RELEASEHappy Ending (NYC)Photos by: Brock Fetch Backayard family, Deadly Dragon Sound and Max Glazer of Federation Sound at Happy Ending Lounge in the Lower East Side. The premiere NYC reggae event, this blend of vinyl and contemporary dancehall sets the bar at an all-time high for East Coast reggae. This Spring, Backayard teamed up with Deadly Dragon Sound to celebrate the release of Issue 12, The Women We Love edition at Downtown Top Ranking. A highlight of the event was when special guest performer K-Vibes graced the mic with her big chunes Frenemies and Bye Bye Rebel in a true empress style. Featuring Deadly Dragons Queen Majesty (read up in Issue 12), Scratch Famous, Selector JD and Mr. K spinning strictly vinyl rocksteady, s and s dancehall, lovers rock and with Womens History Month. While Deadly Dragon manned the decks upstairs, Max Glazer of Federation Sound and DJ Autograph spun dancehall for the massive downstairs at Brand New Machine. The NY | JA vibes are strong as Backayard brings with Deadly Dragon and Federation Sound. For more than 8000 pieces of vintage and reissued tunes from every genre of Jamaican music go to www.deadlydragonsound.com and tune in to East Village Radio every Monday from 6-8 PM for a live broadcast at www.eastvillageradio. com/shows/deadlydragonsound. For listening pleasure hit up K-Vibes: http://www.reverbnation.com/kvibes and dont forget to check out free podcasts from Federation Sound at www.federationsound.com. BACKAYARD 16 1 9 6 6 2 0 1 1 C E L E B R A T I N G email: info@tasteejamaica.com website: www .tasteejamaica.com find us on facebook: tasteejamaica

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BAY : WORLDBEAT

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BAY : WORLDBEAT

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Protoje' | Words AR | Photos ELBAY : eARLY ACCESSEARLYACCESSBACKAYARD 20Tantric and yogic traditions of Hinduism and Buddhism study the seven physical chakras of energetic force centers on the human body. The Japanese code of conduct, Bushido, is based upon seven virtues. And in western culture, there is no other more celebrated and controversial than the notion of the seven year itch. What started as a 19th century saying about skin irritation is of marriage. Aptly, Seven Year Itch is the ironic name given to the debut album of Oje Ollivierre aka Protoje because it actually took seven years to complete. I went to Canada to do pre-law studies but I stopped going in my last semester. I came back home to Jamaica [in 2003] to start doing music, Protoje explains. With two parents heavily involved in the Caribbean music scene, the common assumption is that Protege had it easier than other struggling artistes. The reality is that he did not receive any special favors and instead had to carve out his own niche by knocking on a lot of doors and not receiving an answer when he called Kingston-based producers to listen to his music. When I came back, I was trying to do my own thing, which didnt work out because nobody wanted to voice me. It wasnt until DJ Karim came with Arguments in early 2009 that I really was given a chance, Protoje says of his determination. The subsequent buzz created by the release of the song and video for Arguments soon had Protoje booked for live shows in Kingstons most popular performance venues allowing him to steadily build a sizable and vocal fan base. Once he had put in the work, Protojes cousin, none other than noted producer Don Corleon, came knocking to produce an album. The result? Seven Year Itch. A welcome reward to Protojes ever-expanding fan base, the album was released in early 2011 to rave reviews from both Jamaican and international media. Aside from Arguments, other songs on the album such as Dread, JA and Rasta Love featuring Kymani Marley, have been getting steady airplay on both radio and television airwaves. This year, for the second consecutive year, Protoje is booked for his Indiggnation band, Protoje will showcase his special blend of dancehall, hip-hop, reggae, rock and dub on Jamaicas biggest stage. Just now seeing the fruits of an arduous seven year journey, the lyrics of Protojes Seven Year Itch is a nice summation of his sentiment. Would he take another seven years? Absolutely. His is a true love of the art form. BThis is for my music Blessings for my music It's love for the music Journey on ma music I've been doing this for seven years I never make a dollar never make a change I say nah go give up nah go ever slow You know say me a hold it down for seven more...

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Protoje' | Words AR | Photos ELBAY : eARLY ACCESSEARLYACCESSBACKAYARD 20Tantric and yogic traditions of Hinduism and Buddhism study the seven physical chakras of energetic force centers on the human body. The Japanese code of conduct, Bushido, is based upon seven virtues. And in western culture, there is no other more celebrated and controversial than the notion of the seven year itch. What started as a 19th century saying about skin irritation is of marriage. Aptly, Seven Year Itch is the ironic name given to the debut album of Oje Ollivierre aka Protoje because it actually took seven years to complete. I went to Canada to do pre-law studies but I stopped going in my last semester. I came back home to Jamaica [in 2003] to start doing music, Protoje explains. With two parents heavily involved in the Caribbean music scene, the common assumption is that Protege had it easier than other struggling artistes. The reality is that he did not receive any special favors and instead had to carve out his own niche by knocking on a lot of doors and not receiving an answer when he called Kingston-based producers to listen to his music. When I came back, I was trying to do my own thing, which didnt work out because nobody wanted to voice me. It wasnt until DJ Karim came with Arguments in early 2009 that I really was given a chance, Protoje says of his determination. The subsequent buzz created by the release of the song and video for Arguments soon had Protoje booked for live shows in Kingstons most popular performance venues allowing him to steadily build a sizable and vocal fan base. Once he had put in the work, Protojes cousin, none other than noted producer Don Corleon, came knocking to produce an album. The result? Seven Year Itch. A welcome reward to Protojes ever-expanding fan base, the album was released in early 2011 to rave reviews from both Jamaican and international media. Aside from Arguments, other songs on the album such as Dread, JA and Rasta Love featuring Kymani Marley, have been getting steady airplay on both radio and television airwaves. This year, for the second consecutive year, Protoje is booked for his Indiggnation band, Protoje will showcase his special blend of dancehall, hip-hop, reggae, rock and dub on Jamaicas biggest stage. Just now seeing the fruits of an arduous seven year journey, the lyrics of Protojes Seven Year Itch is a nice summation of his sentiment. Would he take another seven years? Absolutely. His is a true love of the art form. BThis is for my music Blessings for my music It's love for the music Journey on ma music I've been doing this for seven years I never make a dollar never make a change I say nah go give up nah go ever slow You know say me a hold it down for seven more...

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EARLYACCESS ChromeBAY : eARLY ACCESS There are few people in the world that can casually enter into an industry and instantly become a trailblazer. Shaun Chablal, known by most as ZJ Chrome, just happens to be one of those lucky few. Chrome became interested in the art of being a disc jockey in a way that was very different from most people hailing from the land of wood and water. I was watching TV one day and I saw some guy doing some scratching and mi seh, Yo! Chrome recalls, He was doing it on turntables and I had a turntable at home so I got a record and tried it. The critical next step, however, was how to parlay his initial interest into a actual profession. After practicing hol heap in the garage, I went to start playing for Likkle Wicked (area sound system). After playing with them, I just started to get popular. Chrome started small, accepting requests by classmates to play at birthday parties. He was hired by his high school to play at its sports days and other school functions. During this time, Chrome decided that being on the radio was a logical next step in his career path. I went to Northern Caribbean University to do mass communication to go into radio and I even worked at their radio station for a couple of months, he explains. It was at that radio station that Chrome got the experience necessary to be considered for a full-time position but quickly learned that getting on-air was a struggle in itself. I actually heard Zip on the airwaves rejected and I sent in another. I got called in for an audition and failed that. As with many in his position, Chrome made the natural progression from riddim, Chromium was conceptualized while recording dubplates with Busy Signal. Busy did some wicked freestyle and told me I should make a beat so he could record a song with it. Ironically, Busy didnt make it on the track list once the riddim was produced. However, that didnt stop the riddims momentum. Hits such as Twice a Day by Mavado, Work It by Vbyz Kartel and Shake It by Munga Honourable gave Chrome the platform he needed. He pushed on and released two of dancehalls most popular riddims back-to-back: Tripple Bounce featuring Mr Vegass Gallis and Mad Collab which yielded Vbyz Kartels mega hit, Clarks. The success Chrome has earned as a producer, however, has not deterred When asked about the current state of dancehall he does see some failings. You have to know your place: Do you want to be a disc jockey or a selector? A DJ can go out and juggle and hold a vibe, while a selector go out there play more in the dancehall and do alot of MCing over the music. get used to you, it is time for somebody new. Your lifespan in dancehall is very short as a selector, while as a DJ you are able to go outside of the dancehall and do different things such as weddings, anniversaries and corporate events. The life span of a DJ is much longer...and I see myself as a DJ. Fortunately for Chrome, his optimistic outlook on his career has only proven to be an advantage over the rest. B BACKAYARD 22

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EARLYACCESS ChromeBAY : eARLY ACCESS There are few people in the world that can casually enter into an industry and instantly become a trailblazer. Shaun Chablal, known by most as ZJ Chrome, just happens to be one of those lucky few. Chrome became interested in the art of being a disc jockey in a way that was very different from most people hailing from the land of wood and water. I was watching TV one day and I saw some guy doing some scratching and mi seh, Yo! Chrome recalls, He was doing it on turntables and I had a turntable at home so I got a record and tried it. The critical next step, however, was how to parlay his initial interest into a actual profession. After practicing hol heap in the garage, I went to start playing for Likkle Wicked (area sound system). After playing with them, I just started to get popular. Chrome started small, accepting requests by classmates to play at birthday parties. He was hired by his high school to play at its sports days and other school functions. During this time, Chrome decided that being on the radio was a logical next step in his career path. I went to Northern Caribbean University to do mass communication to go into radio and I even worked at their radio station for a couple of months, he explains. It was at that radio station that Chrome got the experience necessary to be considered for a full-time position but quickly learned that getting on-air was a struggle in itself. I actually heard Zip on the airwaves rejected and I sent in another. I got called in for an audition and failed that. As with many in his position, Chrome made the natural progression from riddim, Chromium was conceptualized while recording dubplates with Busy Signal. Busy did some wicked freestyle and told me I should make a beat so he could record a song with it. Ironically, Busy didnt make it on the track list once the riddim was produced. However, that didnt stop the riddims momentum. Hits such as Twice a Day by Mavado, Work It by Vbyz Kartel and Shake It by Munga Honourable gave Chrome the platform he needed. He pushed on and released two of dancehalls most popular riddims back-to-back: Tripple Bounce featuring Mr Vegass Gallis and Mad Collab which yielded Vbyz Kartels mega hit, Clarks. The success Chrome has earned as a producer, however, has not deterred When asked about the current state of dancehall he does see some failings. You have to know your place: Do you want to be a disc jockey or a selector? A DJ can go out and juggle and hold a vibe, while a selector go out there play more in the dancehall and do alot of MCing over the music. get used to you, it is time for somebody new. Your lifespan in dancehall is very short as a selector, while as a DJ you are able to go outside of the dancehall and do different things such as weddings, anniversaries and corporate events. The life span of a DJ is much longer...and I see myself as a DJ. Fortunately for Chrome, his optimistic outlook on his career has only proven to be an advantage over the rest. B BACKAYARD 22

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BAY : off the record Defined as a revival of the arts and a global cultural influence of a collective, the term Renaissance is a fitting name for Renaissance Disco sound. For over twenty years, Renaissance Disco has been successfully bridging the genre gap between hardcore dancehall fans and lovers of hip hop, leaving converts in its wake. BACKAYARD sat down with Renaissances co-founder and unofficial spokesperson Delano Thomas and had a candid, if not revealing, chat about the sounds place in history and what plans they have for the future. Fortunately for BACKAYARD readers, we left our mics on. we had class party. I had to carry it outside because it was too big and jus have a school party. So it was jus in my blood, having a sound or jus dreaming to have a sound. With that the sound was jus in Vineyard Town alone and couple ofce parties and then I link up with Lejeaux. Mixmaster Marvin did come and hear mi play and seh, Yo get Delano on Lejeaux. Then I started playing for Lejeaux, I started engineering, I started doing everything for Lejeaux I was like a one man band. I linked up with Mixmaster Marvin and a bredrin name Devon Chin too. After awhile we start get popular and Devon seh, Yo mek wi start our own sound, and I seh, Yeah that is what I waan do. So in 1989, everybody from over Lejeaux ended up coming over with me and that is how Renaissance got started. What were the challenges of starting a new brand? Well, for me it was easy because we were the front players for Lejeaux. So when we were doing this Renaissance ting everybody knew we were moving on. And we wanted a sound name so we sent a request to all the schools we usually play for to come up wit a name: Holy Childhood, St Andrew, Immaculate. Immaculate came up with the name and because we seh whoever came up with the name, we play for all of dem sweet sixteens, free. It was promo at the same time so we played at all of dem sweet sixteen so we became a sweet sixteen sound. We were doing it for fun at the time; I guess that is why it developed because we were doing it for fun. We went out and play we all had a car wid a sound in it, yuh understand, me did love it. So mi did wah buy the latest speaker box dem and wi put up wi money together and rae rae rae. It was more of a fun ting until it become a business. How did renaissance get started? From the start I was born into a musical, electrical, sound system family. My father was an electrical engineer so we used to have sounds around. From mi a likkle boy, mi a bruk him needle pon him turntable, yuh nuh, in him electronic shop a x equipment. I used to pretend I had a sound system so I used x my sound equipment. I did come from Vineyard Town still so when I came of age, yuh nuh, high school, maybe before that, prep school. My father mek mi play pon him sound called Plus X. I used to add another X on it and call it X Plus X to mek people know it was the junior sound. So mi usually play in Vineyard Town, I mean, even at prep school, St. Theresa when BACKAYARD 24

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BAY : off the record Defined as a revival of the arts and a global cultural influence of a collective, the term Renaissance is a fitting name for Renaissance Disco sound. For over twenty years, Renaissance Disco has been successfully bridging the genre gap between hardcore dancehall fans and lovers of hip hop, leaving converts in its wake. BACKAYARD sat down with Renaissances co-founder and unofficial spokesperson Delano Thomas and had a candid, if not revealing, chat about the sounds place in history and what plans they have for the future. Fortunately for BACKAYARD readers, we left our mics on. we had class party. I had to carry it outside because it was too big and jus have a school party. So it was jus in my blood, having a sound or jus dreaming to have a sound. With that the sound was jus in Vineyard Town alone and couple ofce parties and then I link up with Lejeaux. Mixmaster Marvin did come and hear mi play and seh, Yo get Delano on Lejeaux. Then I started playing for Lejeaux, I started engineering, I started doing everything for Lejeaux I was like a one man band. I linked up with Mixmaster Marvin and a bredrin name Devon Chin too. After awhile we start get popular and Devon seh, Yo mek wi start our own sound, and I seh, Yeah that is what I waan do. So in 1989, everybody from over Lejeaux ended up coming over with me and that is how Renaissance got started. What were the challenges of starting a new brand? Well, for me it was easy because we were the front players for Lejeaux. So when we were doing this Renaissance ting everybody knew we were moving on. And we wanted a sound name so we sent a request to all the schools we usually play for to come up wit a name: Holy Childhood, St Andrew, Immaculate. Immaculate came up with the name and because we seh whoever came up with the name, we play for all of dem sweet sixteens, free. It was promo at the same time so we played at all of dem sweet sixteen so we became a sweet sixteen sound. We were doing it for fun at the time; I guess that is why it developed because we were doing it for fun. We went out and play we all had a car wid a sound in it, yuh understand, me did love it. So mi did wah buy the latest speaker box dem and wi put up wi money together and rae rae rae. It was more of a fun ting until it become a business. How did renaissance get started? From the start I was born into a musical, electrical, sound system family. My father was an electrical engineer so we used to have sounds around. From mi a likkle boy, mi a bruk him needle pon him turntable, yuh nuh, in him electronic shop a x equipment. I used to pretend I had a sound system so I used x my sound equipment. I did come from Vineyard Town still so when I came of age, yuh nuh, high school, maybe before that, prep school. My father mek mi play pon him sound called Plus X. I used to add another X on it and call it X Plus X to mek people know it was the junior sound. So mi usually play in Vineyard Town, I mean, even at prep school, St. Theresa when BACKAYARD 24

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coming right up to. You see, now we started to be at a lot of sessions, yuh nuh, we, Travelers and Stone Love. Any hip hop artiste come down is we deal wid dem but wah happen is the incident with my eye. In everything happen in the April come right down to November when we create Delanos Revenge. Basically, it was saying Delano is coming to take it back because I was missing off the scene for couple months, which seem like a year to me because mi jus lock up caan do nutten. Dehso it start back over again and get bigger because di revenge come out, mi start do more remix and more tings. So di late part of into we become big now. What would you say has changed in the Sound System Business since you began your career? The main thing that has changed is that you have to have a sound to be a DJ now. Once you have a computer even if you caan play. I am coming from the old school weh yuh haf have a sound and I still have a sound. I still have equipment box, maintenance crew, driver, electrician, engineer I still have that. So I did have a bigger responsibility than most other sounds. Next thing again, remix is not even that important because anybody can do it, unless you going to do something different. Like how di guy remix Di Bus Caan Swim [Everybody Laughs] I think is one of the wickedest remixes that me hear from dem time deh til now. The man tek reality and joke and mek into suppim wah mek sense. So yuh haf do something that is different and somebody caan really do it. It is so much easier to do anything now but what him do, is that him do it fast and run at it and get it done. Now people know him for that. The value of DJs drop because of that because yuh have so many Djs. I know my value is still up because I can still get what I charge, but some DJs what dem playing for now is like dem not seeing the future. My son turning a DJ now and I am still meking him try to get a likkle old school vibes because I tell him if him going to do this, him dont want to be playing for likkle or nutten. That is di next ting that change the value. When did Renaissance become a production house? The rst time I started to produce in it was costing mi a bag a money. Cause studio time and this and radio man play it. So we wait and build wi studio in 2002 and that is how we brought out di rst riddim Rebirth in 2003. Then we get a buss, Chancely was producing before him did have couple tune pon di road Icebox wid Killa. Then we come out wid Thunderclap, well Rebirth was built rst in this studio wid Factor, our engineer. Him did go weh a school and come back and is him really push mi to build the tune. So we come up wid Rebirth and all di artiste dem come gi wi dem support, yuh nuh. Wid Thunderclap now, I was jus in my bedroom fooling around and mi come up suppim and mi call Birch and seh, come listen this. Mi did play 90% of di riddim and mi seh come tell mi if di key waan change. Him seh Nah man, dis bad. Me seh, Ok and jus add on him ting and that was one of the biggest Kartel dem Tek or Tek Buddy however you waan seh it. So that is how it start and that is how we start pushing riddims now. After that was Steps, which let me tell you the story about Steps now. It was and everybody did voice on Steps, Sean Paul voice last. Which I didnt even know that it was Lenkys song, when Sean Paul voiced the track I was away so when I come back now. I seh it waan some of our avour inna it so mi chop up him vocals and move di chorus and rae rae rae. So mi call Serani, before him turn artiste, and mi seh, Yo, mi need some breakdowns and him gimme some breakdowns and mi seh, Yeah it sound good! Well, yuh know, seh some artiste nuh like when yuh change up dem ting. So mi call Sean Paul tell him mi have suppim him to listen to but mi fraid mek him listen to it. We never know seh him a go like it but we love it and mi seh to him, If this a go mek we friendship done then bwoy it sticky [Laughs]. So him come and listen to it and we deh inna di car wid him and mi nuh hear him seh nutten and then him start it over. So mi ask him if him like it and him seh, Yeah man, mi love it! So we do di song and everything now and then it start play a foreign. Apparently it wasnt supposed to go on his album but the executive of Atlantic call him and seh, Yo Sean, we need to get this song on the album so you need to do it over Change di lyrics because it was talking about what it was talking about. So we go back in and change it up and it end up Number 5 on the billboard charts. It was one of our most successful riddim on di road. The video did bad too Yeah, dem invite mi. It was done in Las Vegas in the desert. Hol day, scorpion was crawling on the ground and di sun was a 100 and add degrees, no shade. Yeah man, terrible terrible video that, sweat all over [Everybody Laughs]. That was an experience still because mi a tell yuh di honest truth, you see when di video start show, cause me is a man weh sleep wid him T.V on, mi jus a dream bout di song and mi wake up and mi see it. Mi start call everybody, mi jus start sleep wid mi TV pon MTV and every morning it wake mi up. Because it wasnt real to mi, is like it never feel real. Mi end up meet one bag a different people and tour di world and dem thing deh. Then we do Icebreaker in that di gwaan wid a ting wid, Nuh Junjo Nuh Deh Deh. We do hol heap likkle productions even my rst one drop riddim, which nuh people nuh even know, name Legal inna It deh pon Sean Paul latest album, but who voice rst on it was Gentleman from Germany which did really good inna Germany. So that was my rst and only one drop so far. Are you the one responsible solely for the production? I call in musicians but me is a man still, yuh see di Legal riddim mi and Dups from Black Chiney was fooling around and then I put it together. You see wid di Steps riddim, mi call in Serani help mi wid di phrasing and stuff. Even Bling Dog come in and touch two ting so mi always have people helping. Factor help wid Rebirth, Blacks who pass on help us too cause we used to help him mix him riddims. I mek sure when I am building riddims, I have a musician telling mi I am going somewhere wrong wid it. Mi have a hol heap a people my bredrin inna Miami, Sean Wedderburn, Shiah Coore and dem man deh who do so much to help wid di production. What is the future for Renaissance? We have a big sound system, is me do all my party dem. We play on other people sound but when I am doing my personal parties, I use my sound. Not everybody book my sound but it is there available for them. You have the younger generation of the crew which is my 19-year old son, and other young people who putting their input. We still do alot of corporate events and sessions. Production is the future and I am still touring the world...still playing music. The thing about it, as a DJ, dancehall already jus stays the same place and the DJ on one level. Most of my bredrin who do hip hop jus gone pon a different level. So my thing for the future is trying to nd a way how to get dancehall to move on a next level. No matter how many selector yuh see in Jamaica, it still on the same level. Everybody ghting for the same level. We need to move up. My bredrin who is a Jamaican, plays for the Miami Heat, DJ Irie. Him have him own sneakers and him have him own this and that. These are the things where yuh moving forward. I played for Steven Stanley already in LA, I played in the House of Blues. Some of these DJs dont do that dem jus go back inna dem same ting. So I jus make sure I am aligned to people, I was signed to Delicious Vinyl in the s. This is where DJs need to go. That is why I seh I wanted to go to London to play because it will be before 25,000 people. It not jus the regular session yuh should want to play for, we need the DJs be more respected. In terms of the future, that is what I want to do, I want to make sure I am not stepping back. It frustrating when yuh feel that yuh jus deh a one place, it is standard. So that is the biggest problem we have inna di music industry even di artiste cause the artiste dem stagnant too. So is jus the whole industry need to move forward and how we a go mek it move forward. That is the question. When did it become a Business for you? To tell you the truth, when we started to get popular and I started to do remixes. At the time, we couldnt afford dubplates. So I seh I am going to start do some tings and that is how we got popular. They wanted to put us wid Stone Love for a big dance because Legend was the sound that play wid Stone Love back inna days and they gave me one of those nights. I drop some remix the whole night it jus explode from there. So the remix was born and Renaissance was born all over again in 1991. We started doing remixes for other sounds: Stone Love, HMV everybody. People used to line up at mi house door waiting for me to do remix and paying mi, walking out wid money inna mi pocket like crazy [Everybody Laughs]. That is how we got more popular and then Stone Love start to tek us on and bring us to the other side of tings. I remix their stuff and they started premiering my remixes at House of Leo so we got known in the dancehall and the uptown tru I love disco and love hip hop that is how we get dominant in the uptown market. We still name Renaissance Disco now. When Stone Love start put us on some of the dances, we brought the hip hop to the dancehall. That was how the popularity started growing from the dancehall, it started growing from the remixes, it start grow from the uptown parties but we had to nd a way to develop the sound. Although the sound was building, we were still going through wi struggles guring out how we were going to make it protable in some way. [If you dont have computers, you dont] have things to do remix wid. I had to nd ways of doing remixes [without a computer and learn how to do it] so a next man caan jus go round the turntable and do it. There was no CD it was turntable and record box and whatever, you understand. That was how I was sort of untouchable when it came on remixes because nobody could understand how I got that to work because I jus went out of the box. [This] helped me because people started saying that from Delano do it, it mus crazy. How does that process work? Alright, sometimes we didnt get acapellas, I buck up on a mistake one time. I was playing a cassette deck or a DAT machine and it short out and all the vocal came off and the riddim cancel. So I work wid that too, that was one of the trick dem. I got a 4-track machine, 4-track to tape, so we could get four individual tracks to cassette. I had a sampling machine and mixer until I graduate to a drum machine. So I mean it was jus that I was young, fresh and I jus wanted to learn. I was an electronic engineer so I felt that nothing was impossible. Anything I waan do, I jus get it done. It was jus the urge and the love, it was jus that I was a hip hop head still so I jus mixed it with the dancehall and it work. That is the main help of the popularity, it carry mi places where nuff of these DJs or selectors dont even get to face or experience, you know what I mean. It was jus my time I guess and the right time because everything was jus building. I guess it would a grow even if I wasnt doing anything. It would a grow anyway but I guess I catch it at the right time. Which year would say was the turnaround point for your sound? It had to be between di hol a di s and di hol a di 2000s,

PAGE 31

coming right up to. You see, now we started to be at a lot of sessions, yuh nuh, we, Travelers and Stone Love. Any hip hop artiste come down is we deal wid dem but wah happen is the incident with my eye. In everything happen in the April come right down to November when we create Delanos Revenge. Basically, it was saying Delano is coming to take it back because I was missing off the scene for couple months, which seem like a year to me because mi jus lock up caan do nutten. Dehso it start back over again and get bigger because di revenge come out, mi start do more remix and more tings. So di late part of into we become big now. What would you say has changed in the Sound System Business since you began your career? The main thing that has changed is that you have to have a sound to be a DJ now. Once you have a computer even if you caan play. I am coming from the old school weh yuh haf have a sound and I still have a sound. I still have equipment box, maintenance crew, driver, electrician, engineer I still have that. So I did have a bigger responsibility than most other sounds. Next thing again, remix is not even that important because anybody can do it, unless you going to do something different. Like how di guy remix Di Bus Caan Swim [Everybody Laughs] I think is one of the wickedest remixes that me hear from dem time deh til now. The man tek reality and joke and mek into suppim wah mek sense. So yuh haf do something that is different and somebody caan really do it. It is so much easier to do anything now but what him do, is that him do it fast and run at it and get it done. Now people know him for that. The value of DJs drop because of that because yuh have so many Djs. I know my value is still up because I can still get what I charge, but some DJs what dem playing for now is like dem not seeing the future. My son turning a DJ now and I am still meking him try to get a likkle old school vibes because I tell him if him going to do this, him dont want to be playing for likkle or nutten. That is di next ting that change the value. When did Renaissance become a production house? The rst time I started to produce in it was costing mi a bag a money. Cause studio time and this and radio man play it. So we wait and build wi studio in 2002 and that is how we brought out di rst riddim Rebirth in 2003. Then we get a buss, Chancely was producing before him did have couple tune pon di road Icebox wid Killa. Then we come out wid Thunderclap, well Rebirth was built rst in this studio wid Factor, our engineer. Him did go weh a school and come back and is him really push mi to build the tune. So we come up wid Rebirth and all di artiste dem come gi wi dem support, yuh nuh. Wid Thunderclap now, I was jus in my bedroom fooling around and mi come up suppim and mi call Birch and seh, come listen this. Mi did play 90% of di riddim and mi seh come tell mi if di key waan change. Him seh Nah man, dis bad. Me seh, Ok and jus add on him ting and that was one of the biggest Kartel dem Tek or Tek Buddy however you waan seh it. So that is how it start and that is how we start pushing riddims now. After that was Steps, which let me tell you the story about Steps now. It was and everybody did voice on Steps, Sean Paul voice last. Which I didnt even know that it was Lenkys song, when Sean Paul voiced the track I was away so when I come back now. I seh it waan some of our avour inna it so mi chop up him vocals and move di chorus and rae rae rae. So mi call Serani, before him turn artiste, and mi seh, Yo, mi need some breakdowns and him gimme some breakdowns and mi seh, Yeah it sound good! Well, yuh know, seh some artiste nuh like when yuh change up dem ting. So mi call Sean Paul tell him mi have suppim him to listen to but mi fraid mek him listen to it. We never know seh him a go like it but we love it and mi seh to him, If this a go mek we friendship done then bwoy it sticky [Laughs]. So him come and listen to it and we deh inna di car wid him and mi nuh hear him seh nutten and then him start it over. So mi ask him if him like it and him seh, Yeah man, mi love it! So we do di song and everything now and then it start play a foreign. Apparently it wasnt supposed to go on his album but the executive of Atlantic call him and seh, Yo Sean, we need to get this song on the album so you need to do it over Change di lyrics because it was talking about what it was talking about. So we go back in and change it up and it end up Number 5 on the billboard charts. It was one of our most successful riddim on di road. The video did bad too Yeah, dem invite mi. It was done in Las Vegas in the desert. Hol day, scorpion was crawling on the ground and di sun was a 100 and add degrees, no shade. Yeah man, terrible terrible video that, sweat all over [Everybody Laughs]. That was an experience still because mi a tell yuh di honest truth, you see when di video start show, cause me is a man weh sleep wid him T.V on, mi jus a dream bout di song and mi wake up and mi see it. Mi start call everybody, mi jus start sleep wid mi TV pon MTV and every morning it wake mi up. Because it wasnt real to mi, is like it never feel real. Mi end up meet one bag a different people and tour di world and dem thing deh. Then we do Icebreaker in that di gwaan wid a ting wid, Nuh Junjo Nuh Deh Deh. We do hol heap likkle productions even my rst one drop riddim, which nuh people nuh even know, name Legal inna It deh pon Sean Paul latest album, but who voice rst on it was Gentleman from Germany which did really good inna Germany. So that was my rst and only one drop so far. Are you the one responsible solely for the production? I call in musicians but me is a man still, yuh see di Legal riddim mi and Dups from Black Chiney was fooling around and then I put it together. You see wid di Steps riddim, mi call in Serani help mi wid di phrasing and stuff. Even Bling Dog come in and touch two ting so mi always have people helping. Factor help wid Rebirth, Blacks who pass on help us too cause we used to help him mix him riddims. I mek sure when I am building riddims, I have a musician telling mi I am going somewhere wrong wid it. Mi have a hol heap a people my bredrin inna Miami, Sean Wedderburn, Shiah Coore and dem man deh who do so much to help wid di production. What is the future for Renaissance? We have a big sound system, is me do all my party dem. We play on other people sound but when I am doing my personal parties, I use my sound. Not everybody book my sound but it is there available for them. You have the younger generation of the crew which is my 19-year old son, and other young people who putting their input. We still do alot of corporate events and sessions. Production is the future and I am still touring the world...still playing music. The thing about it, as a DJ, dancehall already jus stays the same place and the DJ on one level. Most of my bredrin who do hip hop jus gone pon a different level. So my thing for the future is trying to nd a way how to get dancehall to move on a next level. No matter how many selector yuh see in Jamaica, it still on the same level. Everybody ghting for the same level. We need to move up. My bredrin who is a Jamaican, plays for the Miami Heat, DJ Irie. Him have him own sneakers and him have him own this and that. These are the things where yuh moving forward. I played for Steven Stanley already in LA, I played in the House of Blues. Some of these DJs dont do that dem jus go back inna dem same ting. So I jus make sure I am aligned to people, I was signed to Delicious Vinyl in the s. This is where DJs need to go. That is why I seh I wanted to go to London to play because it will be before 25,000 people. It not jus the regular session yuh should want to play for, we need the DJs be more respected. In terms of the future, that is what I want to do, I want to make sure I am not stepping back. It frustrating when yuh feel that yuh jus deh a one place, it is standard. So that is the biggest problem we have inna di music industry even di artiste cause the artiste dem stagnant too. So is jus the whole industry need to move forward and how we a go mek it move forward. That is the question. When did it become a Business for you? To tell you the truth, when we started to get popular and I started to do remixes. At the time, we couldnt afford dubplates. So I seh I am going to start do some tings and that is how we got popular. They wanted to put us wid Stone Love for a big dance because Legend was the sound that play wid Stone Love back inna days and they gave me one of those nights. I drop some remix the whole night it jus explode from there. So the remix was born and Renaissance was born all over again in 1991. We started doing remixes for other sounds: Stone Love, HMV everybody. People used to line up at mi house door waiting for me to do remix and paying mi, walking out wid money inna mi pocket like crazy [Everybody Laughs]. That is how we got more popular and then Stone Love start to tek us on and bring us to the other side of tings. I remix their stuff and they started premiering my remixes at House of Leo so we got known in the dancehall and the uptown tru I love disco and love hip hop that is how we get dominant in the uptown market. We still name Renaissance Disco now. When Stone Love start put us on some of the dances, we brought the hip hop to the dancehall. That was how the popularity started growing from the dancehall, it started growing from the remixes, it start grow from the uptown parties but we had to nd a way to develop the sound. Although the sound was building, we were still going through wi struggles guring out how we were going to make it protable in some way. [If you dont have computers, you dont] have things to do remix wid. I had to nd ways of doing remixes [without a computer and learn how to do it] so a next man caan jus go round the turntable and do it. There was no CD it was turntable and record box and whatever, you understand. That was how I was sort of untouchable when it came on remixes because nobody could understand how I got that to work because I jus went out of the box. [This] helped me because people started saying that from Delano do it, it mus crazy. How does that process work? Alright, sometimes we didnt get acapellas, I buck up on a mistake one time. I was playing a cassette deck or a DAT machine and it short out and all the vocal came off and the riddim cancel. So I work wid that too, that was one of the trick dem. I got a 4-track machine, 4-track to tape, so we could get four individual tracks to cassette. I had a sampling machine and mixer until I graduate to a drum machine. So I mean it was jus that I was young, fresh and I jus wanted to learn. I was an electronic engineer so I felt that nothing was impossible. Anything I waan do, I jus get it done. It was jus the urge and the love, it was jus that I was a hip hop head still so I jus mixed it with the dancehall and it work. That is the main help of the popularity, it carry mi places where nuff of these DJs or selectors dont even get to face or experience, you know what I mean. It was jus my time I guess and the right time because everything was jus building. I guess it would a grow even if I wasnt doing anything. It would a grow anyway but I guess I catch it at the right time. Which year would say was the turnaround point for your sound? It had to be between di hol a di s and di hol a di 2000s,

PAGE 32

BAY : off the record Metromedia sound system has the distinction of being one of the not the original sound. Created with the moniker of The Great Sebastian by Tom Wong in the 1950s, the sound became Metromedia when Lou Gooden took over the helm in 1971 after Wong emigrated form Jamaica. Lou, after some years, passed the sound to its current proprietor, Haldaine James, otherwise known worldwide as Jimmy Metro. WIth the addition of deejay Peter Metro in 1981 who was witty, funny and lyrically-driven on the mic, Metromedia sound took off. BACKAYARD recently sat down with Jimmy to discuss the illustrious past of the sound, its bright and promising future and his opinion on the business of owning a contemporary sound system. How did you become the owner of Metromedia? In the early s, my friend Lou Gooden operated a club called Baby Brother in Crossroads and Metromedia was the resident set. I was working at Dynamic Sounds and through the love of the music I link up wid Lou at the club and started playing the set there. Lou migrated to the United States after a couple of years and during that time I started to buy equipment for myself. I fall in love with the name Metromedia so I decided to continue using [it]. Lou actually got the name from a record label with a group called The Winstons on it. When Lou left for the States, how did you inherit the sound? Well, there was no equipment or records it was jus the name that I ended up using. I actually started it on my own in 1975. Where was the sound based? Was it still Crossroads? No, in Woodford Park, I have been living in this area since about 1968. When did you start to play outside of Woodford Park? Dem time deh it was a small, small, small system. We used to jus do likkle area jig, likkle bars, roadside and house party. After that we started to build up the sound but even before I had a certain level of equipment we had a vast following. Because I used to be at Dynamic Sounds, music wasnt a problem. So as soon as the records press you got them Right. Right as soon as the records come out and then I used to link up wid other record companies like Federal. So music wasnt a problem, especially for me who was the one who actually played in the early days. Going up to the early s, we had a selector who we used to call Snack Jack. Him used to live in Woodford Park and during that time you used to have big sound like Gemini, Black Scorpio, Virgo, Afrique who used to deh down by Franklin Town. Where Metromedia got the big break is when I link up wid Peter Metro. At the time he wasnt even Peter Metro, him used to call himself Peter Ranking but hear wah happen now. There was another Peter Ranking down by Greenwich Farm wid a brother name General Lucky. It always cause a likkle mix up, yuh nuh, who is who. So one night he was DJing same place down here and him seh him is no longer Peter Ranking he is now Peter Metro. It happened that around 1983. I went to England with Peter Metro, Josey Wales, Snack Jack and Sister Verna. That tour gave us some management problems but overall good. So basically during that time, Metromedia was off the road. Is not like now when yuh travel yuh jus send some selector and the sound still productive. We actually spent around 9 months in England, so we were off the road for that time in Jamaica. We came back from England and the selector Snack Jack decided that he wasnt coming back so when we reached back we started looking for a new selector. Peter Metro and Sky Juice was friend so Peter brought in Sky Juice. We also linked up wid Zuzu, Wayne Wonder, Ashman a whole lot of people. How important was having singers and Djs afliated with your sound? All of the names you hear mi call like Zuzu, Peter Metro, Dr C, Squidly Rank and Wayne Wonder was exclusive to Metromedia. Not sure something like that would happen now Inna dem time deh dancehall used to different. How a Dj mek him name in dem days, deh is be a part of a sound system. Is not like now you hear about a particular artiste who have nuh connection wid a sound. When yuh talk about sound like Jah Love yuh talk about Brigadier Jerry, Stereograph wid Josey Wales and Charlie Chaplin, Black Scorpio wid General Trees and SassaFras, Lees Unlimited and Yellowman and going back to Gemini wid Wellington Irie and Ringo, so every sound had a name brand Dj attached to it. What used to happen is that a Dj would move from one sound to another sound. But Peter Metro adopt him name from the sound... So him couldnt move Yeah! (laughs) But him used to freelance and whatever whatever. Is jus like now you have selector, who we call Pouchie, him jus move round wid him music in him pouch. Dem days deh it was more stable wid us still. After the early s, how did the sound system business progress for you? In the mid s, after coming back from England, we started a Wednesday night thing right here in Woodford Park. Gemini was one of the rst sound that start a Wednesday night ting at Brentford Road by a place called Love Shack. Stone Love used to be around Adams Lane Torrington bridge di same Wednesday night. That was one of the big breaks for us. At that Wednesday night ting, you nd all the big DJ there: Shabba Ranks, in fact, Cutty Ranks that was where him come round deh come shine him light and actually mek back him name. He actually ended up on our sound, too. Going up to the later part of the s, the music started to change. What happened you had the sound system Classique they used to jus play straight music. So what they used to do is go round and voice the artiste dem and yuh nd that the crowd start react to it. Stone Love was a similar ting while we were there still using our live Djs but the people dem after a while now dont want to hear it right throughout the night. They more wanted to hear a mix of music, likkle calypso, likkle souls and whatever else. We actually made a change in the late s and started cutting alot of dub plates. When we did have di Dj, dem we never need cut no dub plate, yuh nuh, we di have live dub plate. In the late s, early s, we started to add more selectors to the sound. We brought in people like Oliver, Scratchy, Lucan Silver a whole lot of dem. We had around 6 of dem in s during some good times when it came on to music. My experience with Metromedia goes back to the cassettes I used to listen to Dem cassettes was more s cassettes, mid-s coming up to the early part of the s dancehall cassettes. So the s were good for Metromedia because of the expanded roster? Because the base was here and we could still send some selectors overseas and still play here. We started in Woodford Park and always stayed in Woodford Park. What has changed in the business for you? Most of the s, we were still using vinyl dem time the business was really, really good. Since the CDs come in, the whole business change. Vinyl is something where a man caan jus get up and tek a record and copy a record. You have to go through a process. Now a CD, you deh yahso wid yuh laptop and yuh copy it and thats it. Music is much easier to come by now and that is why you have so many selectors or so-called selectors we call dem Pouchie. Honestly, sound business is here to last but some of these people who come into the business, they are hustling it. And we the foundation people weh set a standard over the years, alot of time we put into it. A hol heap a night life, family life get messed up and all these tings to keep it to a standard. We try our best to keep it clean even though we get harassed by police or the law of the land. But these people jus come inna di ting and start hustling it. Even some a di songs BACKAYARD 28

PAGE 33

BAY : off the record Metromedia sound system has the distinction of being one of the not the original sound. Created with the moniker of The Great Sebastian by Tom Wong in the 1950s, the sound became Metromedia when Lou Gooden took over the helm in 1971 after Wong emigrated form Jamaica. Lou, after some years, passed the sound to its current proprietor, Haldaine James, otherwise known worldwide as Jimmy Metro. WIth the addition of deejay Peter Metro in 1981 who was witty, funny and lyrically-driven on the mic, Metromedia sound took off. BACKAYARD recently sat down with Jimmy to discuss the illustrious past of the sound, its bright and promising future and his opinion on the business of owning a contemporary sound system. How did you become the owner of Metromedia? In the early s, my friend Lou Gooden operated a club called Baby Brother in Crossroads and Metromedia was the resident set. I was working at Dynamic Sounds and through the love of the music I link up wid Lou at the club and started playing the set there. Lou migrated to the United States after a couple of years and during that time I started to buy equipment for myself. I fall in love with the name Metromedia so I decided to continue using [it]. Lou actually got the name from a record label with a group called The Winstons on it. When Lou left for the States, how did you inherit the sound? Well, there was no equipment or records it was jus the name that I ended up using. I actually started it on my own in 1975. Where was the sound based? Was it still Crossroads? No, in Woodford Park, I have been living in this area since about 1968. When did you start to play outside of Woodford Park? Dem time deh it was a small, small, small system. We used to jus do likkle area jig, likkle bars, roadside and house party. After that we started to build up the sound but even before I had a certain level of equipment we had a vast following. Because I used to be at Dynamic Sounds, music wasnt a problem. So as soon as the records press you got them Right. Right as soon as the records come out and then I used to link up wid other record companies like Federal. So music wasnt a problem, especially for me who was the one who actually played in the early days. Going up to the early s, we had a selector who we used to call Snack Jack. Him used to live in Woodford Park and during that time you used to have big sound like Gemini, Black Scorpio, Virgo, Afrique who used to deh down by Franklin Town. Where Metromedia got the big break is when I link up wid Peter Metro. At the time he wasnt even Peter Metro, him used to call himself Peter Ranking but hear wah happen now. There was another Peter Ranking down by Greenwich Farm wid a brother name General Lucky. It always cause a likkle mix up, yuh nuh, who is who. So one night he was DJing same place down here and him seh him is no longer Peter Ranking he is now Peter Metro. It happened that around 1983. I went to England with Peter Metro, Josey Wales, Snack Jack and Sister Verna. That tour gave us some management problems but overall good. So basically during that time, Metromedia was off the road. Is not like now when yuh travel yuh jus send some selector and the sound still productive. We actually spent around 9 months in England, so we were off the road for that time in Jamaica. We came back from England and the selector Snack Jack decided that he wasnt coming back so when we reached back we started looking for a new selector. Peter Metro and Sky Juice was friend so Peter brought in Sky Juice. We also linked up wid Zuzu, Wayne Wonder, Ashman a whole lot of people. How important was having singers and Djs afliated with your sound? All of the names you hear mi call like Zuzu, Peter Metro, Dr C, Squidly Rank and Wayne Wonder was exclusive to Metromedia. Not sure something like that would happen now Inna dem time deh dancehall used to different. How a Dj mek him name in dem days, deh is be a part of a sound system. Is not like now you hear about a particular artiste who have nuh connection wid a sound. When yuh talk about sound like Jah Love yuh talk about Brigadier Jerry, Stereograph wid Josey Wales and Charlie Chaplin, Black Scorpio wid General Trees and SassaFras, Lees Unlimited and Yellowman and going back to Gemini wid Wellington Irie and Ringo, so every sound had a name brand Dj attached to it. What used to happen is that a Dj would move from one sound to another sound. But Peter Metro adopt him name from the sound... So him couldnt move Yeah! (laughs) But him used to freelance and whatever whatever. Is jus like now you have selector, who we call Pouchie, him jus move round wid him music in him pouch. Dem days deh it was more stable wid us still. After the early s, how did the sound system business progress for you? In the mid s, after coming back from England, we started a Wednesday night thing right here in Woodford Park. Gemini was one of the rst sound that start a Wednesday night ting at Brentford Road by a place called Love Shack. Stone Love used to be around Adams Lane Torrington bridge di same Wednesday night. That was one of the big breaks for us. At that Wednesday night ting, you nd all the big DJ there: Shabba Ranks, in fact, Cutty Ranks that was where him come round deh come shine him light and actually mek back him name. He actually ended up on our sound, too. Going up to the later part of the s, the music started to change. What happened you had the sound system Classique they used to jus play straight music. So what they used to do is go round and voice the artiste dem and yuh nd that the crowd start react to it. Stone Love was a similar ting while we were there still using our live Djs but the people dem after a while now dont want to hear it right throughout the night. They more wanted to hear a mix of music, likkle calypso, likkle souls and whatever else. We actually made a change in the late s and started cutting alot of dub plates. When we did have di Dj, dem we never need cut no dub plate, yuh nuh, we di have live dub plate. In the late s, early s, we started to add more selectors to the sound. We brought in people like Oliver, Scratchy, Lucan Silver a whole lot of dem. We had around 6 of dem in s during some good times when it came on to music. My experience with Metromedia goes back to the cassettes I used to listen to Dem cassettes was more s cassettes, mid-s coming up to the early part of the s dancehall cassettes. So the s were good for Metromedia because of the expanded roster? Because the base was here and we could still send some selectors overseas and still play here. We started in Woodford Park and always stayed in Woodford Park. What has changed in the business for you? Most of the s, we were still using vinyl dem time the business was really, really good. Since the CDs come in, the whole business change. Vinyl is something where a man caan jus get up and tek a record and copy a record. You have to go through a process. Now a CD, you deh yahso wid yuh laptop and yuh copy it and thats it. Music is much easier to come by now and that is why you have so many selectors or so-called selectors we call dem Pouchie. Honestly, sound business is here to last but some of these people who come into the business, they are hustling it. And we the foundation people weh set a standard over the years, alot of time we put into it. A hol heap a night life, family life get messed up and all these tings to keep it to a standard. We try our best to keep it clean even though we get harassed by police or the law of the land. But these people jus come inna di ting and start hustling it. Even some a di songs BACKAYARD 28

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dem weh a record dem a change di beat to sound more hip hop, we need to stick to the roots. You still have some sound like we and Stone Love a try keep the ting natural. We still able to travel all over the world considering that we coming from way back inna di s and we still recognized the foundation at least set. We get called up for all different type of dances a man would seh him wah Metromedia to play wid a Stereograph or a Black Scorpio a foundation dance and we can still t into modern ting what is happening now. We still have all our foundation tune dem and we keep up-to-date, you have younger people that come into the system. So they would want to hear a different sort of music like a Movado or a Kartel. But the foundation will never die.. You have some session like Good Times at Mas Camp is more s and s and that crowd age-range is like 18 to 25 or 30 years-old. So you see, there will be always an appreciation for good music. We are still being requested all over the island and plus the US, England, Canada and the other Caribbean islands. What do you think about the future of Metromedia and sound system business in general? With the sound system business, all of us need to get more organized and bring back the Sound System Association. There was started by Louise Frazier Bennett, unfortunately she died some years ago. But right now we have something in the making and you will hear about it soon. What is happening now with the night noise act is they are enforcing it more. So with this new association, hopefully we can lobby with the government and see if we can get the time extended. The future of Metromedia look good with Sky Juice, Oliver, Skully, Jiggy Hunks and we have selector overseas called Lucan Silver. I still play my old hits we might get some dance that we might haf call in Peter Metro but overall that is the current lineup.

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dem weh a record dem a change di beat to sound more hip hop, we need to stick to the roots. You still have some sound like we and Stone Love a try keep the ting natural. We still able to travel all over the world considering that we coming from way back inna di s and we still recognized the foundation at least set. We get called up for all different type of dances a man would seh him wah Metromedia to play wid a Stereograph or a Black Scorpio a foundation dance and we can still t into modern ting what is happening now. We still have all our foundation tune dem and we keep up-to-date, you have younger people that come into the system. So they would want to hear a different sort of music like a Movado or a Kartel. But the foundation will never die.. You have some session like Good Times at Mas Camp is more s and s and that crowd age-range is like 18 to 25 or 30 years-old. So you see, there will be always an appreciation for good music. We are still being requested all over the island and plus the US, England, Canada and the other Caribbean islands. What do you think about the future of Metromedia and sound system business in general? With the sound system business, all of us need to get more organized and bring back the Sound System Association. There was started by Louise Frazier Bennett, unfortunately she died some years ago. But right now we have something in the making and you will hear about it soon. What is happening now with the night noise act is they are enforcing it more. So with this new association, hopefully we can lobby with the government and see if we can get the time extended. The future of Metromedia look good with Sky Juice, Oliver, Skully, Jiggy Hunks and we have selector overseas called Lucan Silver. I still play my old hits we might get some dance that we might haf call in Peter Metro but overall that is the current lineup.

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No bullshit. That is what Stone Love has been giving dancehall fans for over three decades. Founded, and still operated by, Winston Wee Pow Powell, Stone Love is regarded by the music industry as one of the most successful and consistent sound systems of all time with landmark achievements and accolades littered throughout the history of Jamaican music. Impressively, Stone Love is no less relevant today as they continue to be one of the innovators in the sound system game. BACKAYARD was lucky enough to grab a few minutes with Wee Pow to inquire about his inspirations and aspirations for his sound. Photos by: Andre MorganBAY : off the record

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No bullshit. That is what Stone Love has been giving dancehall fans for over three decades. Founded, and still operated by, Winston Wee Pow Powell, Stone Love is regarded by the music industry as one of the most successful and consistent sound systems of all time with landmark achievements and accolades littered throughout the history of Jamaican music. Impressively, Stone Love is no less relevant today as they continue to be one of the innovators in the sound system game. BACKAYARD was lucky enough to grab a few minutes with Wee Pow to inquire about his inspirations and aspirations for his sound. Photos by: Andre MorganBAY : off the record

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BACKAYARD 34 When did you start Stone Love? Stone Love started I would say way back. About 1972 inna da region deh Stone Love started I would say way back. About 1972 inna da region deh as a component set. Those days were the days when a sound system was normally ampliers weh yuh use to transmit sound to speaker boxes. For those who dont know what an amplier is, they were built locally by audio technicians, electrical engineers, what have you. Yuh have tube ampliers, valves what they call it, where the wattage is lower than what yuh have now on a set. We started on a component set until moving to building our own ampliers to our specications. All of this was because of your interest in music? It was an inborn concept; di love for the music was there from day one. In di early days, my father was a promoter who put on events around holiday time. Being around sound system from the early days gave me that motivation to own one for myself. Was the name of the sound always Stone Love? No, there were a few others before di name Stone Love, but since Stone Love, thats it. When you started the sound, where was your base? Most of my playing was done in this area, yuh know. I grew up in this area Eastwood Park Gardens. Right in front of Tarrant Baptist Church that is where everything started. I bought my rst component set from a technician that lived there. I started playing outside of my community long long after. Outside of my community is what I call country and I never really like go country go play. My likeness of di music at di time was more of di soul music, whereas country man nuh love soul. Is jus that now things get globalized, so now country man a hear everything, yuh can go there and play Celine Dion and all dem ting deh [Everybody Laughs]. First time country man nuh waan hear nuh Ray Charles unless a man a punch that inna jukebox. So mi never used to like play a country so it was many years after we started to go a country like Glengoffe (which was a special place we used to go regular) and Guava Ridge near to Mavis Bank. Which was me alone playing at that time I mean used to have one or two likkle yute used to come round and help out still but me was the main name selector. When did you start to bring on other selectors on the roster? That has to be around 12 years after around or dem region deh. Which Rory was di rst one. He used to play on a next sound, which me and that sound di have an engagement couple weeks before and him jus like my sound and left di other one and come pon my sound. I know that in that era, sound systems used to have certain DJs aligned them. Which artistes were aligned to your sound? Di sound dem that used to have DJs aligned to their sounds were di sound dem that was classied as a rub a dub sound. Which I was a soul sound not to seh I didnt try a likkle of the rub a dub ting which didnt work out at di time. While I was at it, Eric Scorcher who do Roach Inna Di Corner, was my DJ at di time. When personally do you feel that the break happened for your sound? The real break happened after I trained Rory to know our Jamaican yard music. He was more like the punk man so even though I was a souls man I still did know my roots. I collect across the board nutten nuh miss me. After a while Rory jus get good, wid him training, yuh nuh [Everybody Laughs]. Things jus start happening. We move into the remote area of Kingston like Jones Town we move from uptown where we used to play like house party, to downtown where we play at bars in di ghetto. The real buss happened round 1987 when we start to play inna Cross Roads in front of the State Theater on Thursdays. [This location worked well because] we were playing at Admiral Pen Lane which is almost in Jones Town at Torrington Bridge on a Monday. On a Wednesday we used to alternate playing wid Classique. At that time, Rae Town was in its full glory. Whenever Classique couldnt come down to Torrington Bridge for some reason or another then we would t in. That is how the promoters from Cross Roads know of us then dem bring we to Cross Roads. People were trying to bring a club vibe to the street but yuh had more rub a dub sound than soul set. That would be more of a mixture of music and that is how Stone Love get the name juggling sound. That name come from di jugglists the two turntable ting into dancehall now and everybody excited bout that. Juggling ting get to di people dem. The whole format of di music change, people all lef from Negril come a Stone Love and go back home and work inna di morning. What was happening too, we start doing alot of specials; dubplates. It is not like now weh man a call suppim a special, true him name call pon it, but special dem day deh when a artiste gi you a special, him nuh gi a next man, a you alone hol that. When wi cutting special or dubplate, let mi give yuh this example: Lets say a Stereo One wid Lieutenant Stitchie dem have dem own a crowd so di main pulla of di crowd would be Lieutenant himself. Mi cut a portion a special wid Lieutenant and when people come a Stone Love dem think she Stitchie in deh live and direct. So forth wid di rest a sound dem like Admiral Bailey who di have di bredrin sound called Roots Melody who did have Clement Irie as well, Metromedia who di have Peter Metro, Arrows would have Chicken Chest, you name dem. So we jus go to all the rub a dub sounds and tek dem main DJs and cut special so wi did have all a dem inna one place now. It was then that Lieutenant Stitchie get sign to Atlantic Records, di man come a Jamaica and see a big crowd a Cross Roads and waan know wah a gwaan. At the end of di day it was a Lieutenant Stitchie special a tear down di place that was how him get him break too. When did you start to take that success overseas? When we buss out now was di same yard connection. Man lef Jamaica, gone a foreign and jus start mek di request for di sound. In those days yuh have sounds like Jack Ruby, King Jammys, Tubbys when dem go a foreign dem haf carry dem whole system and di last sound that do that was Classique and him carry half him system. Wah really happen, is that I observe wah gwaan is that most of di man dem dont come back wid di sound and every man is important. Even di man who lift up di box is impor tant to di sound so when dem run off when yuh come back yuh ting change. Me have my own dem weh never come back so I decide seh, Well, I nah go tour wid my system because when I come back I waan see everybody. First place we went was Canada likkle after [Hurricane] Gilbert, we never carry nutten, yuh nuh. But when we go up deh we feel it, nutten good never up deh, in terms of equipment. So di next time when we go back wi carry our two turntable, Technics 200, di king for all turntable and probably still now. So next time we did carry dem and we did overweight wid dem too so we did haf mek di console outta board, is not like now weh yuh ting weh yuh can go jus slip it in and carry it. That was di only ting wi carry a foreign was two turntables. So how successful was the s for Stone Love? Everything jus start to happen and get big that if we were so dominant before we get go a foreign it mek it worse now since we a go a foreign dem caan hol wi. Wi a see everything up deh, wi have everything a wi disposal. IS NICE WHEN YOU SETUP YOUR SYSTEM AND GO OUT DEH AND A NEXT MAN CAAN EVEN COME CLOSE TO HOW YOU SOUND. THAT IS A JOYFUL FEELING, SOUND QUALITY WE AL WAYS TRY TO BE DI BEST AT THAT.When we come back a Jamaica, everything new and bigger because lets say music producers like Gussie Clarke down at Musicworks or King Jammys. Their songs used to release a foreign before it release a Jamaica, sometime it not even release inna Jamaica. Is not like now, when a song mek today you hear pon di radio di next day. Yuh haf have a link a foreign to get dem song deh so now we a play music inna Jamaica weh nobody else a play. So di radio station man haf come a Stone Love and listen wah a gwaan and try get that music. What is different about owning a sound today as opposed to earlier in your career? The only thing I like about the new innovations in music is di weight. Yuh can have a million songs holding on a thumbdrive when rst time yuh have to travel wid a big record box weh all two man caan lift up. That is di only ting I like cause di business mash up. Yuh hardly can come up wid anything unique or different from anybody else. Yeah, everything jus normalized yuh haf jus smart stay abreast a tings. Everything reveal to babe and suckling now. What keep mi going is that dominance we had from before in which we nah go stop work still but everybody right a now deh pon di same level. What has been the most memorable moment for you owning this sound? There is alot of tings weh me remember, yuh nuh. But mostly I am a creative person and most of di ting dem on di sound system I do it myself. That would a give me di edge over most man, is nice when you setup your system and go out deh and a next man caan even come CLOSE to how you sound. That is a joyful feeling, sound quality we always try to be di best at that. B

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BACKAYARD 34 When did you start Stone Love? Stone Love started I would say way back. About 1972 inna da region deh Stone Love started I would say way back. About 1972 inna da region deh as a component set. Those days were the days when a sound system was normally ampliers weh yuh use to transmit sound to speaker boxes. For those who dont know what an amplier is, they were built locally by audio technicians, electrical engineers, what have you. Yuh have tube ampliers, valves what they call it, where the wattage is lower than what yuh have now on a set. We started on a component set until moving to building our own ampliers to our specications. All of this was because of your interest in music? It was an inborn concept; di love for the music was there from day one. In di early days, my father was a promoter who put on events around holiday time. Being around sound system from the early days gave me that motivation to own one for myself. Was the name of the sound always Stone Love? No, there were a few others before di name Stone Love, but since Stone Love, thats it. When you started the sound, where was your base? Most of my playing was done in this area, yuh know. I grew up in this area Eastwood Park Gardens. Right in front of Tarrant Baptist Church that is where everything started. I bought my rst component set from a technician that lived there. I started playing outside of my community long long after. Outside of my community is what I call country and I never really like go country go play. My likeness of di music at di time was more of di soul music, whereas country man nuh love soul. Is jus that now things get globalized, so now country man a hear everything, yuh can go there and play Celine Dion and all dem ting deh [Everybody Laughs]. First time country man nuh waan hear nuh Ray Charles unless a man a punch that inna jukebox. So mi never used to like play a country so it was many years after we started to go a country like Glengoffe (which was a special place we used to go regular) and Guava Ridge near to Mavis Bank. Which was me alone playing at that time I mean used to have one or two likkle yute used to come round and help out still but me was the main name selector. When did you start to bring on other selectors on the roster? That has to be around 12 years after around or dem region deh. Which Rory was di rst one. He used to play on a next sound, which me and that sound di have an engagement couple weeks before and him jus like my sound and left di other one and come pon my sound. I know that in that era, sound systems used to have certain DJs aligned them. Which artistes were aligned to your sound? Di sound dem that used to have DJs aligned to their sounds were di sound dem that was classied as a rub a dub sound. Which I was a soul sound not to seh I didnt try a likkle of the rub a dub ting which didnt work out at di time. While I was at it, Eric Scorcher who do Roach Inna Di Corner, was my DJ at di time. When personally do you feel that the break happened for your sound? The real break happened after I trained Rory to know our Jamaican yard music. He was more like the punk man so even though I was a souls man I still did know my roots. I collect across the board nutten nuh miss me. After a while Rory jus get good, wid him training, yuh nuh [Everybody Laughs]. Things jus start happening. We move into the remote area of Kingston like Jones Town we move from uptown where we used to play like house party, to downtown where we play at bars in di ghetto. The real buss happened round 1987 when we start to play inna Cross Roads in front of the State Theater on Thursdays. [This location worked well because] we were playing at Admiral Pen Lane which is almost in Jones Town at Torrington Bridge on a Monday. On a Wednesday we used to alternate playing wid Classique. At that time, Rae Town was in its full glory. Whenever Classique couldnt come down to Torrington Bridge for some reason or another then we would t in. That is how the promoters from Cross Roads know of us then dem bring we to Cross Roads. People were trying to bring a club vibe to the street but yuh had more rub a dub sound than soul set. That would be more of a mixture of music and that is how Stone Love get the name juggling sound. That name come from di jugglists the two turntable ting into dancehall now and everybody excited bout that. Juggling ting get to di people dem. The whole format of di music change, people all lef from Negril come a Stone Love and go back home and work inna di morning. What was happening too, we start doing alot of specials; dubplates. It is not like now weh man a call suppim a special, true him name call pon it, but special dem day deh when a artiste gi you a special, him nuh gi a next man, a you alone hol that. When wi cutting special or dubplate, let mi give yuh this example: Lets say a Stereo One wid Lieutenant Stitchie dem have dem own a crowd so di main pulla of di crowd would be Lieutenant himself. Mi cut a portion a special wid Lieutenant and when people come a Stone Love dem think she Stitchie in deh live and direct. So forth wid di rest a sound dem like Admiral Bailey who di have di bredrin sound called Roots Melody who did have Clement Irie as well, Metromedia who di have Peter Metro, Arrows would have Chicken Chest, you name dem. So we jus go to all the rub a dub sounds and tek dem main DJs and cut special so wi did have all a dem inna one place now. It was then that Lieutenant Stitchie get sign to Atlantic Records, di man come a Jamaica and see a big crowd a Cross Roads and waan know wah a gwaan. At the end of di day it was a Lieutenant Stitchie special a tear down di place that was how him get him break too. When did you start to take that success overseas? When we buss out now was di same yard connection. Man lef Jamaica, gone a foreign and jus start mek di request for di sound. In those days yuh have sounds like Jack Ruby, King Jammys, Tubbys when dem go a foreign dem haf carry dem whole system and di last sound that do that was Classique and him carry half him system. Wah really happen, is that I observe wah gwaan is that most of di man dem dont come back wid di sound and every man is important. Even di man who lift up di box is impor tant to di sound so when dem run off when yuh come back yuh ting change. Me have my own dem weh never come back so I decide seh, Well, I nah go tour wid my system because when I come back I waan see everybody. First place we went was Canada likkle after [Hurricane] Gilbert, we never carry nutten, yuh nuh. But when we go up deh we feel it, nutten good never up deh, in terms of equipment. So di next time when we go back wi carry our two turntable, Technics 200, di king for all turntable and probably still now. So next time we did carry dem and we did overweight wid dem too so we did haf mek di console outta board, is not like now weh yuh ting weh yuh can go jus slip it in and carry it. That was di only ting wi carry a foreign was two turntables. So how successful was the s for Stone Love? Everything jus start to happen and get big that if we were so dominant before we get go a foreign it mek it worse now since we a go a foreign dem caan hol wi. Wi a see everything up deh, wi have everything a wi disposal. IS NICE WHEN YOU SETUP YOUR SYSTEM AND GO OUT DEH AND A NEXT MAN CAAN EVEN COME CLOSE TO HOW YOU SOUND. THAT IS A JOYFUL FEELING, SOUND QUALITY WE AL WAYS TRY TO BE DI BEST AT THAT.When we come back a Jamaica, everything new and bigger because lets say music producers like Gussie Clarke down at Musicworks or King Jammys. Their songs used to release a foreign before it release a Jamaica, sometime it not even release inna Jamaica. Is not like now, when a song mek today you hear pon di radio di next day. Yuh haf have a link a foreign to get dem song deh so now we a play music inna Jamaica weh nobody else a play. So di radio station man haf come a Stone Love and listen wah a gwaan and try get that music. What is different about owning a sound today as opposed to earlier in your career? The only thing I like about the new innovations in music is di weight. Yuh can have a million songs holding on a thumbdrive when rst time yuh have to travel wid a big record box weh all two man caan lift up. That is di only ting I like cause di business mash up. Yuh hardly can come up wid anything unique or different from anybody else. Yeah, everything jus normalized yuh haf jus smart stay abreast a tings. Everything reveal to babe and suckling now. What keep mi going is that dominance we had from before in which we nah go stop work still but everybody right a now deh pon di same level. What has been the most memorable moment for you owning this sound? There is alot of tings weh me remember, yuh nuh. But mostly I am a creative person and most of di ting dem on di sound system I do it myself. That would a give me di edge over most man, is nice when you setup your system and go out deh and a next man caan even come CLOSE to how you sound. That is a joyful feeling, sound quality we always try to be di best at that. B

PAGE 40

BAY : off the record How did you get into the sound business? It is quite a history but I can give yuh a brief headline. I get my name Jack from my love of race horses. Mi used all own a horse weh win bout 10 race mi inna di s. But anyway dem did have a horse name Jack which was a big horse. Mi bredrin did love that horse so him look pon mi one day and seh Bwoy yuh big like Jack yuh nuh and di Scorpio come from di sound. I rst got involved in it from around 1969 when I bought my rst little dulcemina case, yuh probably wouldnt a know bout that because yuh a yute. One side of it was a turntable and speaker, so normally it easy to setup. Now I bought that as my rst music buy and I always remember the rst two LP wah mi buy: Delroy Wilson Good All Over and Heptones On Top two Studio One albums. In my community of Drewsland, when I bought that, there was nobody else inna that likkle community with a music. So me as a likkle yute wid that used to attract a crowd and when mi put on my LP, people used come and hol a vibe. So it gradually gwaan until I open a likkle shop right at my place in Drewsland. A likkle board shop and start to sell some fry sh and dumpling and all dem ting deh and Friday night time mi start to play music. People come and hang out, dem all come and gamble. This happened until 1970, things get likkle brighter cause the shop usually bring in a likkle extra funds. So I ended up buying an amplier from a guy downtown, this amplier was tube amp. Now nuff people dont know what is tube amp especially the younger generation. The more it play, the warmer it get and the better it play. It was a 4 Kt amplier; in addition to that I bought two boxes. [Once I had this, things started] to develop till I go enter inna a competition. There was a ruling sound inna Maverlery called Black Solidarity, tru I start to create a vibe on my cor ner. This guy from Maverley called Sassafras come wid a sound called Soul Expert but me and him used to go to school so him come and tell mi that my sound sound good. Because him live a Maverley and him and di Black Solidarity wasnt close, dem decide have a clash between our two sounds. We a rule Drewsland and Solidarity a rule Maverley so di clash end up happen right below my gate. That night I never forget, I had Black Magic who was General Trees brother and Sassafras on the sound. I came out victorious from my rst clash, yuh nuh. How was that for your career? It was like a new beginning! After that I took it to a next level. Dem time deh mi used to push mi sound pon a likkle cart because mi never have nuh transportation so mi end up buy a station wagon and mi start carry di sound on top of it. Next clash, the guys dem seh dem waan clash mi inna Maverley because the last clash was in Drewsland dem a bawl bout crowd favourite. When mi guh a Maverley mi a tell yuh it even worser pon dem [Everybody laughs]To be honest, di sound jus tek off from that. In what way? Mi start develop pon it now, so that my rst big clash gainst a big sound was me versus King Stereograph. Stereograph did jus come in because actually in those days U Roy used to play for King Tubbys, but then Daddy U Roy decide to build him own ting. When I seh clash I mean a friendly ting because Stereograph did have a young Josey Wales and young Charlie Chaplin while mi did have Sassafras and Ranking Trevor. such as General Trees and Sassafras on the sound system scene, to producing reggae classics that truly inspired generations, Black Scorpio is easily one of the most reputable clash sounds and record labels dancehall music has ever seen. Behind it all is owner Jack Scorpio, know by his friends as Maurice Johnson. BACKAYARD was pleased to have the opportunity to sit down with one of the greatest of the Jamaican music biz and chat about the roots of the legend that is Black Scorpio.

PAGE 41

BAY : off the record How did you get into the sound business? It is quite a history but I can give yuh a brief headline. I get my name Jack from my love of race horses. Mi used all own a horse weh win bout 10 race mi inna di s. But anyway dem did have a horse name Jack which was a big horse. Mi bredrin did love that horse so him look pon mi one day and seh Bwoy yuh big like Jack yuh nuh and di Scorpio come from di sound. I rst got involved in it from around 1969 when I bought my rst little dulcemina case, yuh probably wouldnt a know bout that because yuh a yute. One side of it was a turntable and speaker, so normally it easy to setup. Now I bought that as my rst music buy and I always remember the rst two LP wah mi buy: Delroy Wilson Good All Over and Heptones On Top two Studio One albums. In my community of Drewsland, when I bought that, there was nobody else inna that likkle community with a music. So me as a likkle yute wid that used to attract a crowd and when mi put on my LP, people used come and hol a vibe. So it gradually gwaan until I open a likkle shop right at my place in Drewsland. A likkle board shop and start to sell some fry sh and dumpling and all dem ting deh and Friday night time mi start to play music. People come and hang out, dem all come and gamble. This happened until 1970, things get likkle brighter cause the shop usually bring in a likkle extra funds. So I ended up buying an amplier from a guy downtown, this amplier was tube amp. Now nuff people dont know what is tube amp especially the younger generation. The more it play, the warmer it get and the better it play. It was a 4 Kt amplier; in addition to that I bought two boxes. [Once I had this, things started] to develop till I go enter inna a competition. There was a ruling sound inna Maverlery called Black Solidarity, tru I start to create a vibe on my cor ner. This guy from Maverley called Sassafras come wid a sound called Soul Expert but me and him used to go to school so him come and tell mi that my sound sound good. Because him live a Maverley and him and di Black Solidarity wasnt close, dem decide have a clash between our two sounds. We a rule Drewsland and Solidarity a rule Maverley so di clash end up happen right below my gate. That night I never forget, I had Black Magic who was General Trees brother and Sassafras on the sound. I came out victorious from my rst clash, yuh nuh. How was that for your career? It was like a new beginning! After that I took it to a next level. Dem time deh mi used to push mi sound pon a likkle cart because mi never have nuh transportation so mi end up buy a station wagon and mi start carry di sound on top of it. Next clash, the guys dem seh dem waan clash mi inna Maverley because the last clash was in Drewsland dem a bawl bout crowd favourite. When mi guh a Maverley mi a tell yuh it even worser pon dem [Everybody laughs]To be honest, di sound jus tek off from that. In what way? Mi start develop pon it now, so that my rst big clash gainst a big sound was me versus King Stereograph. Stereograph did jus come in because actually in those days U Roy used to play for King Tubbys, but then Daddy U Roy decide to build him own ting. When I seh clash I mean a friendly ting because Stereograph did have a young Josey Wales and young Charlie Chaplin while mi did have Sassafras and Ranking Trevor. such as General Trees and Sassafras on the sound system scene, to producing reggae classics that truly inspired generations, Black Scorpio is easily one of the most reputable clash sounds and record labels dancehall music has ever seen. Behind it all is owner Jack Scorpio, know by his friends as Maurice Johnson. BACKAYARD was pleased to have the opportunity to sit down with one of the greatest of the Jamaican music biz and chat about the roots of the legend that is Black Scorpio.

PAGE 42

BACKAYARD 38 Our rst clash over inna Portmore near Caymanas Park that went well so after that we got more requests and we started to make our name from there. 1971-72 we started in addition to the Friday night ting, an every Thursday night down at Drewsland that night was more like a talent search. Anybody could come and DJ and earn a prize and a chance to mek yuh name on the sound. It happened that the Thursday night developed so big that people from as far as Negril start to come there. My Thursday night ting come before the House of Leo and all dem other tings the only place that might have a name before was Rae Town. My place was the place in the s coming up into the s. I could name the artistes who come and make dem name at my place. Mi a voice Beenie Man from him a nine year-old and man like Shabba Ranking. As a matter a fact, di rst time Shabba come round my place dem run him. Remember seh him ugly, so di people dem did a mouth him. So mi did haf pick up di mic and say, This man ugliness have nothing do wid di music. It was di same ting Yellowman haf face round my place. Buju Banton himself tell me this when him a do some special for my sound and I go pay him, him she, Scorpio might be yuh dont even know wah yuh do my career a me pay yuh. Him was telling me that when him come around my place and Dj, me and this guy called Colour Chin was doing di percentage. So when Buju Dj him did sound different, so when him nish Colour Chin took the mic and gave him 20 percent. Deep down, when I was listening to this yute, I was thinking that this yute deserve more than 20 percent cause him sound different from the rest. So I decide to put 50 percent on the 20 percent that Chin give him and call it 70 percent. He was there telling me this history which mi never remember, him seh from mi gi him that 70 percent, him coulda see himself as an artiste. Him actually go to Chancery Lane the next day to voice him rst song Riley. Me never know di love him have inna him heart mi, him all bring mi out on stage wid him in Germany. Yuh have plenty more artistes like that. I tell yuh that Headley Avenue is a legacy for dancehall. What that venue do for this music industry is unbelievable. I ended up in addition to dealing wid di sound, producing music as well. Who were the people you started recording? Sassafras and General Trees. As a matter a fact, when General Trees come in him come DJ wid such a different style that when him a get di forward dem, the place a mash up. Man a beat down the zinc that surround my place. Him di have a lyrics called Kick It In and when him she, kick it in di man dem kick it in! (Everybody Laughs) If yuh go down a Headley Avenue right now, yuh woulda see the concrete mi haf build right round di place because a that! When Trees a buss, Junjo Lawes was the producer-of-the-moment inna di late s going in the s. Him and Jammys was doing most of the recordings dem time deh when me carry Trees and Sassa to Junjo because him did a focus pon him artiste dem weh pon him sound it seem like nobody never wah buss mi artiste even though my artiste dem hot. To be honest, that force me into producing. I never forget my song was a song name Pink Eye wid Sassafras in 1978. Then I start to record General Trees in and come out wid song like Minivan, Minibus People and Gone a Negril. All these songs became great hits. Because mi used to record my ting different while Daddy U Roy, Ranking Trevor and Big Yute used to record on the version, I used to bring in live musicians and we build di riddim to match the artiste lyrics. Check out songs like Gone a Negril have a riddim that was made specially for that song. Everybody might seh Sleng Teng was di rst computer riddim, but check Every Posse Get Flat wid BloodFire Posse that was the rst and dem same one come do Lazy Body riddim which was another computer riddim before Sleng Teng. Lazy Body was a hit because of how it arrange and how it mek. There is so many tings to talk about away from the sound and about recording in the studio with great artistes and those great moments. I was working at Channel One and then I leave and work at Dynamic Sounds and in the s, I seh no mek I build my own studio at Headley Avenue. Songs like I Saw Zion Inna Vision (Garnett Silk), Friends for Life (Dennis Brown) and Style & Fashion (Papa San) all come from Headley Avenue. Were you still working with your sound at that point? How yuh mean, man! The sound is still there! As a matter of fact, I never give my sound to this day. Inever give up Black Scorpio sound. My sound is there ready anybody want to play out, it is ready and I am ready. It reach a stage that, yeah I have my selector dem but I am the boss. So I will play depending on the session. This coming Thursday, I will leaving to England to have a clash wid David Rodigan and a sound name Saxon. When mi come back from that mi have a date in Club Amazura wid Jammys and Downbeat. That is a true icons of dancehall clash mi nuh have nutten against Beenie Man, Mavado or Kartel but a man caan tell me seh is dem man deh a dancehall when from me born mi a go a dance, yuh nuh. A we help create this. When did you start to travel overseas with your sound Black Scorpio? My rst trip overseas was 1984New York at the Biltmore Ballroom. It was presenting General Trees, Shuka Shine and Sassafras. We were the men of the moment in Jamaica and it was Clinton Nesberry that took we up. I remember actually lling Biltmore Ballroom the gate was actually ripped off when General Trees start to Dj because he was really hot at the time. My second time was around a clash with a sound name Papa Monk. From that, more dates started to come in. I clashed Addies in the lates into the s. As a matter of fact, every time since then I go overseas it is for a clash. Would you say that the late s into the s was the best time for your sound? To be honest, the s was where we really made for ourselves. But one of the ting dem that divert mi a likkle bit from the sound was the production. As GT Taylor seh to mi, Bwoy Scorpio yuh gi up di sound to do bere producing. At that time, I used to manage Mega Banton as well, so most of my time was diverted from the sound. But as I said before, I always had my sound. I love my sound like how I love my children dem and my wife, I dont give my sound for nothing. Dont care what happen, I keep my sound in position where if yuh call me to play now, it ready. What happen to sound ting nowadays is the changes. What I dont like about the sound ting nowadays is the time a dance start kicking. That throw me off, when I see crowd coming to dance 3 oclock, 3 oclock we a pack up go home. The noise factor, yuh nuh, when a 7 oclock a morning time, people a go a church and a Dj deh pon di mic a gwaan di most way, I dont think it is right. I think that is one of the ting why the government have to put on some restriction on what is happening. As a soundman, all I see nowadays is di streetside ting. If a man have a sound then yuh have a selector come wid some CDs, which I dont have a problem with, but when I go to that session is not until 2 or 3 oclock I see some people turn up. Inna my days from 8 oclock di Dj start work and by 10 oclock, dance ram the latest 11 and by 3 oclock, it done and all liquor sell off and we sell hundreds of beer. Nowadays, is daylight before yuh start sell some liquor and that is what throw me off nowadays dancehall and nowadays dance. So when a man a hire me him haf hire me different, it haf be within a time weh me like. The dances weh me play wid Jammys and Rodigan to be honest round 2 oclock it is over. It always entertaining and the people enjoy it. How many people do you have on your sound currently? I have three selectors and three man who work wid di box plus a truck driver and a engineer. What do you think about the actual business of owning a sound today? No! The sound itself is not protable like before. What I used to get 30 years ago, I not getting that right now. That is a total loss to where sound is concerned right now. I think the restriction and the violence kinda change up di ting. People used to pay to come into session, nowadays people a tell people to come buy out the bar. So yuh cant demand the same amount of money. Me and Wee Pow from Stone Love was talking about it and him a seh is the same ting reach him. Wee Pow seh if him never have him Wednesday night ting him couldnt survive. People not even keeping dance like before because of the factors me seh before. It hard tell a man seh yuh waan $50,000 or $100,000 a date when di people dem a come at 2 AM the same time when the police a come lock off di dance. That is where we as sounds losing money. Who I think making some money is the man walking wid him CD dem. Dem might benet more than me who have di sound because the sound haf nd lift di box, we haf nd electrician, is a total work by itself. But that still dont take me from my sound, I am a man like Daddy Roy we love our sound. Mi is not di man who would want to play on another man sound, di only time mi play pon people sound is when I go to foreign. If mi deh inna Jamaica mi rather yuh book my sound. But as I said, things and times change and yuh haf adjust yuhself. So I play on P.A. system like when me and Jammys play at mas camp but normally yuh couldnt get me on another man sound. B I LOVE MY SOUND LIKE HOW I LOVE MY CHILDREN DEM AND MY WIFE, I DONT GIVE UP MY SOUND FOR NOTHING.

PAGE 43

BACKAYARD 38 Our rst clash over inna Portmore near Caymanas Park that went well so after that we got more requests and we started to make our name from there. 1971-72 we started in addition to the Friday night ting, an every Thursday night down at Drewsland that night was more like a talent search. Anybody could come and DJ and earn a prize and a chance to mek yuh name on the sound. It happened that the Thursday night developed so big that people from as far as Negril start to come there. My Thursday night ting come before the House of Leo and all dem other tings the only place that might have a name before was Rae Town. My place was the place in the s coming up into the s. I could name the artistes who come and make dem name at my place. Mi a voice Beenie Man from him a nine year-old and man like Shabba Ranking. As a matter a fact, di rst time Shabba come round my place dem run him. Remember seh him ugly, so di people dem did a mouth him. So mi did haf pick up di mic and say, This man ugliness have nothing do wid di music. It was di same ting Yellowman haf face round my place. Buju Banton himself tell me this when him a do some special for my sound and I go pay him, him she, Scorpio might be yuh dont even know wah yuh do my career a me pay yuh. Him was telling me that when him come around my place and Dj, me and this guy called Colour Chin was doing di percentage. So when Buju Dj him did sound different, so when him nish Colour Chin took the mic and gave him 20 percent. Deep down, when I was listening to this yute, I was thinking that this yute deserve more than 20 percent cause him sound different from the rest. So I decide to put 50 percent on the 20 percent that Chin give him and call it 70 percent. He was there telling me this history which mi never remember, him seh from mi gi him that 70 percent, him coulda see himself as an artiste. Him actually go to Chancery Lane the next day to voice him rst song Riley. Me never know di love him have inna him heart mi, him all bring mi out on stage wid him in Germany. Yuh have plenty more artistes like that. I tell yuh that Headley Avenue is a legacy for dancehall. What that venue do for this music industry is unbelievable. I ended up in addition to dealing wid di sound, producing music as well. Who were the people you started recording? Sassafras and General Trees. As a matter a fact, when General Trees come in him come DJ wid such a different style that when him a get di forward dem, the place a mash up. Man a beat down the zinc that surround my place. Him di have a lyrics called Kick It In and when him she, kick it in di man dem kick it in! (Everybody Laughs) If yuh go down a Headley Avenue right now, yuh woulda see the concrete mi haf build right round di place because a that! When Trees a buss, Junjo Lawes was the producer-of-the-moment inna di late s going in the s. Him and Jammys was doing most of the recordings dem time deh when me carry Trees and Sassa to Junjo because him did a focus pon him artiste dem weh pon him sound it seem like nobody never wah buss mi artiste even though my artiste dem hot. To be honest, that force me into producing. I never forget my song was a song name Pink Eye wid Sassafras in 1978. Then I start to record General Trees in and come out wid song like Minivan, Minibus People and Gone a Negril. All these songs became great hits. Because mi used to record my ting different while Daddy U Roy, Ranking Trevor and Big Yute used to record on the version, I used to bring in live musicians and we build di riddim to match the artiste lyrics. Check out songs like Gone a Negril have a riddim that was made specially for that song. Everybody might seh Sleng Teng was di rst computer riddim, but check Every Posse Get Flat wid BloodFire Posse that was the rst and dem same one come do Lazy Body riddim which was another computer riddim before Sleng Teng. Lazy Body was a hit because of how it arrange and how it mek. There is so many tings to talk about away from the sound and about recording in the studio with great artistes and those great moments. I was working at Channel One and then I leave and work at Dynamic Sounds and in the s, I seh no mek I build my own studio at Headley Avenue. Songs like I Saw Zion Inna Vision (Garnett Silk), Friends for Life (Dennis Brown) and Style & Fashion (Papa San) all come from Headley Avenue. Were you still working with your sound at that point? How yuh mean, man! The sound is still there! As a matter of fact, I never give my sound to this day. Inever give up Black Scorpio sound. My sound is there ready anybody want to play out, it is ready and I am ready. It reach a stage that, yeah I have my selector dem but I am the boss. So I will play depending on the session. This coming Thursday, I will leaving to England to have a clash wid David Rodigan and a sound name Saxon. When mi come back from that mi have a date in Club Amazura wid Jammys and Downbeat. That is a true icons of dancehall clash mi nuh have nutten against Beenie Man, Mavado or Kartel but a man caan tell me seh is dem man deh a dancehall when from me born mi a go a dance, yuh nuh. A we help create this. When did you start to travel overseas with your sound Black Scorpio? My rst trip overseas was 1984New York at the Biltmore Ballroom. It was presenting General Trees, Shuka Shine and Sassafras. We were the men of the moment in Jamaica and it was Clinton Nesberry that took we up. I remember actually lling Biltmore Ballroom the gate was actually ripped off when General Trees start to Dj because he was really hot at the time. My second time was around a clash with a sound name Papa Monk. From that, more dates started to come in. I clashed Addies in the lates into the s. As a matter of fact, every time since then I go overseas it is for a clash. Would you say that the late s into the s was the best time for your sound? To be honest, the s was where we really made for ourselves. But one of the ting dem that divert mi a likkle bit from the sound was the production. As GT Taylor seh to mi, Bwoy Scorpio yuh gi up di sound to do bere producing. At that time, I used to manage Mega Banton as well, so most of my time was diverted from the sound. But as I said before, I always had my sound. I love my sound like how I love my children dem and my wife, I dont give my sound for nothing. Dont care what happen, I keep my sound in position where if yuh call me to play now, it ready. What happen to sound ting nowadays is the changes. What I dont like about the sound ting nowadays is the time a dance start kicking. That throw me off, when I see crowd coming to dance 3 oclock, 3 oclock we a pack up go home. The noise factor, yuh nuh, when a 7 oclock a morning time, people a go a church and a Dj deh pon di mic a gwaan di most way, I dont think it is right. I think that is one of the ting why the government have to put on some restriction on what is happening. As a soundman, all I see nowadays is di streetside ting. If a man have a sound then yuh have a selector come wid some CDs, which I dont have a problem with, but when I go to that session is not until 2 or 3 oclock I see some people turn up. Inna my days from 8 oclock di Dj start work and by 10 oclock, dance ram the latest 11 and by 3 oclock, it done and all liquor sell off and we sell hundreds of beer. Nowadays, is daylight before yuh start sell some liquor and that is what throw me off nowadays dancehall and nowadays dance. So when a man a hire me him haf hire me different, it haf be within a time weh me like. The dances weh me play wid Jammys and Rodigan to be honest round 2 oclock it is over. It always entertaining and the people enjoy it. How many people do you have on your sound currently? I have three selectors and three man who work wid di box plus a truck driver and a engineer. What do you think about the actual business of owning a sound today? No! The sound itself is not protable like before. What I used to get 30 years ago, I not getting that right now. That is a total loss to where sound is concerned right now. I think the restriction and the violence kinda change up di ting. People used to pay to come into session, nowadays people a tell people to come buy out the bar. So yuh cant demand the same amount of money. Me and Wee Pow from Stone Love was talking about it and him a seh is the same ting reach him. Wee Pow seh if him never have him Wednesday night ting him couldnt survive. People not even keeping dance like before because of the factors me seh before. It hard tell a man seh yuh waan $50,000 or $100,000 a date when di people dem a come at 2 AM the same time when the police a come lock off di dance. That is where we as sounds losing money. Who I think making some money is the man walking wid him CD dem. Dem might benet more than me who have di sound because the sound haf nd lift di box, we haf nd electrician, is a total work by itself. But that still dont take me from my sound, I am a man like Daddy Roy we love our sound. Mi is not di man who would want to play on another man sound, di only time mi play pon people sound is when I go to foreign. If mi deh inna Jamaica mi rather yuh book my sound. But as I said, things and times change and yuh haf adjust yuhself. So I play on P.A. system like when me and Jammys play at mas camp but normally yuh couldnt get me on another man sound. B I LOVE MY SOUND LIKE HOW I LOVE MY CHILDREN DEM AND MY WIFE, I DONT GIVE UP MY SOUND FOR NOTHING.

PAGE 44

BAY : off the record ancehall aficionados from any corner of the globe will agree that Lloyd James, owner and producer of King Jammys label, has one of the most impressive discographies of anyone who has ever sat around a soundboard. With the release of Wayne Smiths [Under me] Sleng Teng in 1985, dancehall music reached a new frontier of digital rhythm and the rest is history. More uncommonly known is that Lloyd James also has a convincing record as sound system operator of King Jammys Super Power. In a rare interview, BACKAYARD sits down to ask this living legend about, among other things, his special love of super-powered amplifiers. DBACKAYARD 40

PAGE 45

BAY : off the record ancehall aficionados from any corner of the globe will agree that Lloyd James, owner and producer of King Jammys label, has one of the most impressive discographies of anyone who has ever sat around a soundboard. With the release of Wayne Smiths [Under me] Sleng Teng in 1985, dancehall music reached a new frontier of digital rhythm and the rest is history. More uncommonly known is that Lloyd James also has a convincing record as sound system operator of King Jammys Super Power. In a rare interview, BACKAYARD sits down to ask this living legend about, among other things, his special love of super-powered amplifiers. DBACKAYARD 40

PAGE 46

BAY : Feature BOTH THE PRODUCTION AND DI SOUND SYSTEM TING MI NUH FEEL IS UP TO THE STANDARD OF MY DAYS WHEN MI, METRO, STONE LOVE AND SCORPIO USED TO PLAY. When did you start your sound? This sound system business, mi start that in 1963. Mi used to work wid King Tubbys a long time. Mi learn mi trade a King Tubbys technician work, yuh nuh. So mi always follow King Tubbys sound. Mi did jus decide to get my own sound and get support from King Tubbys. When you started your sound, where was your base? Just here in the Waterhouse area mi used to play. Small box, yuh nuh, jus a small likkle discotheque and then we jus build on and build on until we get a big sound. When would you say was the height of your sounds popularity? The height begin in 1967 or dem time deh. We did get bigger and by we did start rule certain tings. Tubbys used to play out and me play inside of Waterhouse but 1970 now mi migrate and guh a Canada. Mi guh up deh and have a next sound too while di one down yah still a play. The sound inna Canada did name Jammys same way. Mi did den come home back inna 1976. Go weh round 6 years, but the 6 years bear alot of fruit, di yute dem born over deh and all dem ting deh. So mi come home and build a bigger sound and then mi guh England an artiste tour me and Bunny Lee and the Aggrovators. After that, I was di engineer inna Tubbys studio and start produce. Mi actually produce Black Uhuru rst album inna 1977 which was the reason why mi guh England inna di rst place to do business wid dah album deh. While in England doing business wid the Black Uhuru album [and other projects], I was building some power ampliers. True everything deh a England weh can build di ting dem powerful so mi build bout three amplier and bring dem out and start back my sound pon a bigger level. Everybody supposed to see that and seh Boy, Jammys come back hard Yeah man!! Jammys back pon di road. What did you do with the sound in Canada? Nah man, mi left that inna Canada wid mi bredrin dem. Dem did jus do dem own ting till it jus fade out. Because most of dem man deh never really live a Canada still so when some a dem go back a New York di sound jus fade out. After we start play out pon a regular basis. Before mi left the rst time, we used to go out and play all a country. But when mi come back from England, we start build bigger boxes and we got alot of dates and we name ourselves Super Power because di power we were playing with, nobody did a play wid dem power deh dem time deh. One a my amp was around 4000 watts, dem time deh 4000 watts was alot of power. So wid the three a dem mi did a play wid round 12,000 watt. The ultimate mi did reach was about 60,000 watts when me park my sound. All of the big ting dem that did keep, the football matches, champs that used to gwaan up a stadium, a Jammys used to play up deh dem time deh. My sound used to be the P.A system up deh. So how was s for your sound? Bigger and better, each time wi grow. In the s, mi become a full-edged producer remember mi a come from the s. So inna di s, mi have my own studio, mi nuh work a King Tubbys nuh more. Mi start produce my own ting dem, everything jus tek off big. Sound system tek off big, production tek off big. Wouldnt the success of one affect the other? Well, I used to have good people round me like Bobby Digital. In fact the hol a Waterhouse used to work yahso. We still go on alot of tours to place like Japan, Australia, New Zealand and Europe. I was the top producer for the hol a di s, see di trophy dem deh to show you. Producer of the Year for 6 years straight and Sound of the Year how much year, no sound never bad like we. Inna di s, the music level started to decline. Vinyl did a guh down then CD come in and wid it come hol heap a piracy and ting. It never really encourage mi and mi start do most of my work aboard dem time deh. Because is the money wi a work fah, yuh nuh, so when you deal wid tings aboard you get more chips(Laughs) So you licensed alot of your music overseas? All of the big companies my ting release to. Inna di s, I was aboard most so mi never play a Jamaica more than so, very rare mi play inna Jamaica. Mi mostly deh inna Europe we used to carry our DJ dem Admiral Bailey, Chaka Demus, Risto Benji, Colin Roach, Anthony Malvo di hol a dem used to come wid we. It was a complete package we give dem. When dem go pon other sound (to record dub plate) it never used to matter to me because we still coulda get our specials. Mi mek all album wid special already, yuh nuh, and it sell good inna Europe. So there wasnt really ever a lull in your sound system career? A lull in Jamaica, mi never get a chance to play here so much because mi did haf go aboard. The ting did kinda pon down inna Jamaica so me jus focus aboard to play. Mi have my fan base all over and the promoter dem always want me to ram up the dancehall and mek money (Everybody Laughs) How do you feel about the standard of todays music? Both the production and di sound system ting mi nuh feel is up to the standard of my days when mi, Metro, Stone Love and Scorpio used to play. Because wid Stone Love, dem time deh when mi was the president of the Sound System Association, we guide dem along the way, how dem charge and dem ting deh. And most of dem likkle young sound cause nuh a dem out nuh old like my sound. But nowadays the music that is been produced mi nah beat it down because di yute couldnt produce di type of music mi produce. Because dem a yute and dem have a different way of thinking and focus inna dem head. But musically speaking now, mi nuh really hear much producer a produce anything wid substance like wah me used to produce and still produce. The sound system dem haf play most of what is produced now. My sound dont really play what is being produced now we play back from my time or special pon di riddim dem from dem time deh. We a mek di special dem now wid a particular focus on dem time deh wid a modern feel. Mi nuh really a lick out against the ting fully, but dem waan more music in dem production. It dont have to be live instrument, yuh nuh, but all mi hear now is some drum & bass ting not enuff melodies and dem ting deh. What do you feel about people coming from overseas and sampling our music? Well mi get pay my tings dem. That is why you have to have your house in order, you understand, the man dem who waan have dem house in order, dem haf get dem tings together. A man sample my ting, mi haf get pay for it or injunction a go gainst it, cau mi have my ting inna order. Tell you truth, yuh nuh, if dem never see the greatest of our music deh wouldnt sample it. So mi kinda like that inna sense because if haf sample our ting it only mean seh dem caan build it demselves, that mean seh our ting great. You get your ting in order so you can get pay for that sample. Even my son Jam 2, produce a track for Hulk Hogans daughter and him never gi dem permission to use it and dem use it on the T.V show and never gi him credit for it. Now him place a injunction gainst it and it deh inna the courts. How you feel about your sons following in your footsteps? That is a natural feeling for mi because mi did know seh that was gonna to happen. Dem born inna it, dem grow inna it and dem never see dem father do anything else other from technician work and music. So dem jus cling to that you know what I mean. One of the time dem mi send John John go Miami go win a clash wid Silverhawk and Arrows. Dem help mi alot too wid di special dem cause dem deh pon di street everyday so dem know wah a gwaan. B

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BAY : Feature BOTH THE PRODUCTION AND DI SOUND SYSTEM TING MI NUH FEEL IS UP TO THE STANDARD OF MY DAYS WHEN MI, METRO, STONE LOVE AND SCORPIO USED TO PLAY. When did you start your sound? This sound system business, mi start that in 1963. Mi used to work wid King Tubbys a long time. Mi learn mi trade a King Tubbys technician work, yuh nuh. So mi always follow King Tubbys sound. Mi did jus decide to get my own sound and get support from King Tubbys. When you started your sound, where was your base? Just here in the Waterhouse area mi used to play. Small box, yuh nuh, jus a small likkle discotheque and then we jus build on and build on until we get a big sound. When would you say was the height of your sounds popularity? The height begin in 1967 or dem time deh. We did get bigger and by we did start rule certain tings. Tubbys used to play out and me play inside of Waterhouse but 1970 now mi migrate and guh a Canada. Mi guh up deh and have a next sound too while di one down yah still a play. The sound inna Canada did name Jammys same way. Mi did den come home back inna 1976. Go weh round 6 years, but the 6 years bear alot of fruit, di yute dem born over deh and all dem ting deh. So mi come home and build a bigger sound and then mi guh England an artiste tour me and Bunny Lee and the Aggrovators. After that, I was di engineer inna Tubbys studio and start produce. Mi actually produce Black Uhuru rst album inna 1977 which was the reason why mi guh England inna di rst place to do business wid dah album deh. While in England doing business wid the Black Uhuru album [and other projects], I was building some power ampliers. True everything deh a England weh can build di ting dem powerful so mi build bout three amplier and bring dem out and start back my sound pon a bigger level. Everybody supposed to see that and seh Boy, Jammys come back hard Yeah man!! Jammys back pon di road. What did you do with the sound in Canada? Nah man, mi left that inna Canada wid mi bredrin dem. Dem did jus do dem own ting till it jus fade out. Because most of dem man deh never really live a Canada still so when some a dem go back a New York di sound jus fade out. After we start play out pon a regular basis. Before mi left the rst time, we used to go out and play all a country. But when mi come back from England, we start build bigger boxes and we got alot of dates and we name ourselves Super Power because di power we were playing with, nobody did a play wid dem power deh dem time deh. One a my amp was around 4000 watts, dem time deh 4000 watts was alot of power. So wid the three a dem mi did a play wid round 12,000 watt. The ultimate mi did reach was about 60,000 watts when me park my sound. All of the big ting dem that did keep, the football matches, champs that used to gwaan up a stadium, a Jammys used to play up deh dem time deh. My sound used to be the P.A system up deh. So how was s for your sound? Bigger and better, each time wi grow. In the s, mi become a full-edged producer remember mi a come from the s. So inna di s, mi have my own studio, mi nuh work a King Tubbys nuh more. Mi start produce my own ting dem, everything jus tek off big. Sound system tek off big, production tek off big. Wouldnt the success of one affect the other? Well, I used to have good people round me like Bobby Digital. In fact the hol a Waterhouse used to work yahso. We still go on alot of tours to place like Japan, Australia, New Zealand and Europe. I was the top producer for the hol a di s, see di trophy dem deh to show you. Producer of the Year for 6 years straight and Sound of the Year how much year, no sound never bad like we. Inna di s, the music level started to decline. Vinyl did a guh down then CD come in and wid it come hol heap a piracy and ting. It never really encourage mi and mi start do most of my work aboard dem time deh. Because is the money wi a work fah, yuh nuh, so when you deal wid tings aboard you get more chips(Laughs) So you licensed alot of your music overseas? All of the big companies my ting release to. Inna di s, I was aboard most so mi never play a Jamaica more than so, very rare mi play inna Jamaica. Mi mostly deh inna Europe we used to carry our DJ dem Admiral Bailey, Chaka Demus, Risto Benji, Colin Roach, Anthony Malvo di hol a dem used to come wid we. It was a complete package we give dem. When dem go pon other sound (to record dub plate) it never used to matter to me because we still coulda get our specials. Mi mek all album wid special already, yuh nuh, and it sell good inna Europe. So there wasnt really ever a lull in your sound system career? A lull in Jamaica, mi never get a chance to play here so much because mi did haf go aboard. The ting did kinda pon down inna Jamaica so me jus focus aboard to play. Mi have my fan base all over and the promoter dem always want me to ram up the dancehall and mek money (Everybody Laughs) How do you feel about the standard of todays music? Both the production and di sound system ting mi nuh feel is up to the standard of my days when mi, Metro, Stone Love and Scorpio used to play. Because wid Stone Love, dem time deh when mi was the president of the Sound System Association, we guide dem along the way, how dem charge and dem ting deh. And most of dem likkle young sound cause nuh a dem out nuh old like my sound. But nowadays the music that is been produced mi nah beat it down because di yute couldnt produce di type of music mi produce. Because dem a yute and dem have a different way of thinking and focus inna dem head. But musically speaking now, mi nuh really hear much producer a produce anything wid substance like wah me used to produce and still produce. The sound system dem haf play most of what is produced now. My sound dont really play what is being produced now we play back from my time or special pon di riddim dem from dem time deh. We a mek di special dem now wid a particular focus on dem time deh wid a modern feel. Mi nuh really a lick out against the ting fully, but dem waan more music in dem production. It dont have to be live instrument, yuh nuh, but all mi hear now is some drum & bass ting not enuff melodies and dem ting deh. What do you feel about people coming from overseas and sampling our music? Well mi get pay my tings dem. That is why you have to have your house in order, you understand, the man dem who waan have dem house in order, dem haf get dem tings together. A man sample my ting, mi haf get pay for it or injunction a go gainst it, cau mi have my ting inna order. Tell you truth, yuh nuh, if dem never see the greatest of our music deh wouldnt sample it. So mi kinda like that inna sense because if haf sample our ting it only mean seh dem caan build it demselves, that mean seh our ting great. You get your ting in order so you can get pay for that sample. Even my son Jam 2, produce a track for Hulk Hogans daughter and him never gi dem permission to use it and dem use it on the T.V show and never gi him credit for it. Now him place a injunction gainst it and it deh inna the courts. How you feel about your sons following in your footsteps? That is a natural feeling for mi because mi did know seh that was gonna to happen. Dem born inna it, dem grow inna it and dem never see dem father do anything else other from technician work and music. So dem jus cling to that you know what I mean. One of the time dem mi send John John go Miami go win a clash wid Silverhawk and Arrows. Dem help mi alot too wid di special dem cause dem deh pon di street everyday so dem know wah a gwaan. B

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Big Ship doing it big as usual, Chinos self titled album delivers with many of the familiar club bangers we are already used to such as Never change (from mawning), Protected and Pon your head. The 15 track debut album from Chino keeps listeners vibing from start to nish with a feature from rising talent Denyque on the track Driving me insane. Chino smoothly ows through his album offering more than your typical Dancehall album with songs such as Badness, God Nah Sleep, and for the lovers out there Leaving (seal the link) and Ruff it up. In all you are getting a bang for your buck from this album, Chino delivers with a great album delivering both the songs we have grown accustomed to as well as some exclusive tracks which make for a great listen. 2 Scoops CHINO Chino Big Ship | Rating:

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Big Ship doing it big as usual, Chinos self titled album delivers with many of the familiar club bangers we are already used to such as Never change (from mawning), Protected and Pon your head. The 15 track debut album from Chino keeps listeners vibing from start to nish with a feature from rising talent Denyque on the track Driving me insane. Chino smoothly ows through his album offering more than your typical Dancehall album with songs such as Badness, God Nah Sleep, and for the lovers out there Leaving (seal the link) and Ruff it up. In all you are getting a bang for your buck from this album, Chino delivers with a great album delivering both the songs we have grown accustomed to as well as some exclusive tracks which make for a great listen. 2 Scoops CHINO Chino Big Ship | Rating:

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JAH MELODY ITHIOPIA LOVE CRAZY RICHIE SPICE LETS GO 77 KLASH BROOKLYN ANTHEM CODE FOR THE STREETS LUCIANO WISH YOU WERE MINE RatingREGGAE/DANCEHALL CLASSIC RAISED THE BAR AIGHT NOT SPECIAL POP DOWN sBAY : REVIEWS Ok, so legend has it that after being interviewed by BACKAYARD, Zj Chrome quickly went home called all his friends and recorded all of the Contra riddim in one night. Hmm alright so it didnt really happen like that but the riddim is an impressive piece of work nevertheless. Stellar efforts from Tifa, I Octane, Vybz Kartel, Mavado and Tony Matterhorn really set the pace on this riddim which conrms Chrome as one of the producers that fans can truly depend on to get the best out of whoever he voices on a track. Released for summer party consumption, Contra is guaranteed to be juggled in and out of DJ selections at least up until Christmas which, as most of you know already, is like several lifetimes in dancehall. AR Run di place, run di place as Assassin says Boardhouse records was condent that this riddim would be running the place. Despite not having a very large lineup of artistes on the riddim, Run Di Place by Boardhouse records seems to be doing well for itself, getting spins on radio and parties alike. 2 Scoops With a throwback vibe mixed with some new school avor, Blaze Fia Riddim gives listeners a diverse range of talent, from Tarrus Riley to Sean Paul to Zj Liquid all wrapped around a fast paced rockers beat. There is no shortage of talent on this riddim which needs to get even more air time all around, Dutty Rock Music produced a good riddim that even some old timers can appreciate. 2 Scoops CONTRAZJ CHROME RUN DI PLACEBOARDHOUSE BLAZE FIADUTTY ROCK MUSIC CR2O3 | Rating: Boardhouse Records | Rating: Dutty Rock Music | Rating: CALIFORNIA GREENBLACK JUDAHRating: After a tremendous media push for their single with Warrior King Mercy Please, not much was heard from Black Judah at least on these shores. Until now that is with the release of the EP California Green. The Black Judah duo, who are based in LA, are unique if only because that despite their differing backgrounds they could come together so seamlessly and actually get it to work with minimum fuss. The lead single features Snoop Dogg which, if I were to be truly honest, does nothing really for the track. I gure he was recruited because of the subject matter of the song but Black Judah in my mind could deliver the message just as well sans the Dogg Father. The rest of the EP is pretty standard fare except for the excellent Mercy Please the energy and sound of which if replicated will stand Black Judah in good stead for the future. ARJohn John | Rating: THE SCRIPTURES: MUSIC IN MY SOULSIZZLA KALONJIHeres one that snuck under the table. Its been a while since weve heard from the Kalonji. Not one to leave us empty handed for too long, he comes forth bearing a studio length album with production from Lloyd James Jr. (John John) of the Jammys empire. This 13 track unexpected thrill, has rudiments of his 2002 Da Real Thing album, with tracks like God Bless My Mama and Let it Be. The production stays classic with standard drum and bass beats, (sampling of course from the Jammys family catalogue), and is taken to another level with the incorporation of hip-hop breaks and ows which Sizzla manages effortlessly on tracks such as the rock inuenced Jump for Joy and Let it Be. Songs such as In Jamaica, Jah is My Shield, I Love You, and the title tracks Scriptures and Music in my Soul, settles the album back down like a cool summer breeze like only Sizzla can do. This LP though it was a sneak attack, is a welcomed summer offering from Sizzla and the Jammys camp. Though it didnt surpass the benchmark classic Da Real Thing its not too far off. ELFOR W ARD MUSIC META AND THE CORNERSTONESRating: Reggae music is only as successful as it is because of its ability, right from the get go, to inspire people far from 17 59 0 N, 76 48 0 W coordinates. Meta Dia, originally from Senegal, was so inspired by the genre that shortly after arriving in the US, he formed the Cornerstones which itself consisted of members all who bring differing inuences to the band. And it is collectively all these inuences from the Caribbean, African to American and even Middle Eastern that brings us Forward Music, an introspective look on the world and the people in it. One listen and it easy to see why Meta and the Cornerstones have such a fervent following and why that said following continues to grow. Smooth and easy but with a strong underlying message would be the best way to describe all the tracks on the album however for me, Somewhere in Africa is the best of the lot and would easily be a part of anybodys extended playlist. Forward Music gives further proof that native Jamaicans do not have a monopoly on delivering classic reggae music. AW TUN UP LOUDYOUNG VETERANSCAPTAINBABY GYoung Veterans | Rating:Yard Vybz / King Jammys | Rating:Recently there have been calls for producers to return to core dancehall riddims as the prevailing wisdom is that recent releases are too similar to hip hop tracks. The duo (Sekou and Sheldon) at Young Veterans seemed to base their whole production of Tun Up Loud on that premise. This extremely simple riddim brings back memories of mid to late nineties dancehall when productions where not so dominated by phrases borrowed from hip hop tracks. Look out for Capleton, Perfect, T.O.K, Shane O and the return of Fantan Mojah. Take your time to savour the music and dont forget to swag responsibly. AW Yard Vybz Entertainments Captain riddim is a sweet little offering out of the Baby G / Kings Jammys camp. With sampling undoubtably from the illustrious Jammys catalogue, this ve track one drop riddim is short, compact and lled with a super-eclectic artiste line up. Since its only ve tracks (including version) all the songs are stellar. The riddim starts off with the locally dormant Sizzla with a tune called Murder, the next track on this fantastic four riddim, is Tarrus Riley with Soul Grabber, second to last is Jah Cure with Feel it a haunting song about the homeless and less fortunate and the day to day struggle of life. Wayne Marshall rounds out the selection with the title track Captain, as he asks the question, Captain, should we abort the trip. A tting question to the times at hand. Overall a good offering. ELBACKAYARD 46 YOU THINK YOUR ALBUM OR RIDDIM IS WORTHY TO GO UNDER THE GUILLOTINE? E-MAIL IT TO US: JA@BACKAYARD.COM

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JAH MELODY ITHIOPIA LOVE CRAZY RICHIE SPICE LETS GO 77 KLASH BROOKLYN ANTHEM CODE FOR THE STREETS LUCIANO WISH YOU WERE MINE RatingREGGAE/DANCEHALL CLASSIC RAISED THE BAR AIGHT NOT SPECIAL POP DOWN sBAY : REVIEWS Ok, so legend has it that after being interviewed by BACKAYARD, Zj Chrome quickly went home called all his friends and recorded all of the Contra riddim in one night. Hmm alright so it didnt really happen like that but the riddim is an impressive piece of work nevertheless. Stellar efforts from Tifa, I Octane, Vybz Kartel, Mavado and Tony Matterhorn really set the pace on this riddim which conrms Chrome as one of the producers that fans can truly depend on to get the best out of whoever he voices on a track. Released for summer party consumption, Contra is guaranteed to be juggled in and out of DJ selections at least up until Christmas which, as most of you know already, is like several lifetimes in dancehall. AR Run di place, run di place as Assassin says Boardhouse records was condent that this riddim would be running the place. Despite not having a very large lineup of artistes on the riddim, Run Di Place by Boardhouse records seems to be doing well for itself, getting spins on radio and parties alike. 2 Scoops With a throwback vibe mixed with some new school avor, Blaze Fia Riddim gives listeners a diverse range of talent, from Tarrus Riley to Sean Paul to Zj Liquid all wrapped around a fast paced rockers beat. There is no shortage of talent on this riddim which needs to get even more air time all around, Dutty Rock Music produced a good riddim that even some old timers can appreciate. 2 Scoops CONTRAZJ CHROME RUN DI PLACEBOARDHOUSE BLAZE FIADUTTY ROCK MUSIC CR2O3 | Rating: Boardhouse Records | Rating: Dutty Rock Music | Rating: CALIFORNIA GREENBLACK JUDAHRating: After a tremendous media push for their single with Warrior King Mercy Please, not much was heard from Black Judah at least on these shores. Until now that is with the release of the EP California Green. The Black Judah duo, who are based in LA, are unique if only because that despite their differing backgrounds they could come together so seamlessly and actually get it to work with minimum fuss. The lead single features Snoop Dogg which, if I were to be truly honest, does nothing really for the track. I gure he was recruited because of the subject matter of the song but Black Judah in my mind could deliver the message just as well sans the Dogg Father. The rest of the EP is pretty standard fare except for the excellent Mercy Please the energy and sound of which if replicated will stand Black Judah in good stead for the future. ARJohn John | Rating: THE SCRIPTURES: MUSIC IN MY SOULSIZZLA KALONJIHeres one that snuck under the table. Its been a while since weve heard from the Kalonji. Not one to leave us empty handed for too long, he comes forth bearing a studio length album with production from Lloyd James Jr. (John John) of the Jammys empire. This 13 track unexpected thrill, has rudiments of his 2002 Da Real Thing album, with tracks like God Bless My Mama and Let it Be. The production stays classic with standard drum and bass beats, (sampling of course from the Jammys family catalogue), and is taken to another level with the incorporation of hip-hop breaks and ows which Sizzla manages effortlessly on tracks such as the rock inuenced Jump for Joy and Let it Be. Songs such as In Jamaica, Jah is My Shield, I Love You, and the title tracks Scriptures and Music in my Soul, settles the album back down like a cool summer breeze like only Sizzla can do. This LP though it was a sneak attack, is a welcomed summer offering from Sizzla and the Jammys camp. Though it didnt surpass the benchmark classic Da Real Thing its not too far off. ELFOR W ARD MUSIC META AND THE CORNERSTONESRating: Reggae music is only as successful as it is because of its ability, right from the get go, to inspire people far from 17 59 0 N, 76 48 0 W coordinates. Meta Dia, originally from Senegal, was so inspired by the genre that shortly after arriving in the US, he formed the Cornerstones which itself consisted of members all who bring differing inuences to the band. And it is collectively all these inuences from the Caribbean, African to American and even Middle Eastern that brings us Forward Music, an introspective look on the world and the people in it. One listen and it easy to see why Meta and the Cornerstones have such a fervent following and why that said following continues to grow. Smooth and easy but with a strong underlying message would be the best way to describe all the tracks on the album however for me, Somewhere in Africa is the best of the lot and would easily be a part of anybodys extended playlist. Forward Music gives further proof that native Jamaicans do not have a monopoly on delivering classic reggae music. AW TUN UP LOUDYOUNG VETERANSCAPTAINBABY GYoung Veterans | Rating:Yard Vybz / King Jammys | Rating:Recently there have been calls for producers to return to core dancehall riddims as the prevailing wisdom is that recent releases are too similar to hip hop tracks. The duo (Sekou and Sheldon) at Young Veterans seemed to base their whole production of Tun Up Loud on that premise. This extremely simple riddim brings back memories of mid to late nineties dancehall when productions where not so dominated by phrases borrowed from hip hop tracks. Look out for Capleton, Perfect, T.O.K, Shane O and the return of Fantan Mojah. Take your time to savour the music and dont forget to swag responsibly. AW Yard Vybz Entertainments Captain riddim is a sweet little offering out of the Baby G / Kings Jammys camp. With sampling undoubtably from the illustrious Jammys catalogue, this ve track one drop riddim is short, compact and lled with a super-eclectic artiste line up. Since its only ve tracks (including version) all the songs are stellar. The riddim starts off with the locally dormant Sizzla with a tune called Murder, the next track on this fantastic four riddim, is Tarrus Riley with Soul Grabber, second to last is Jah Cure with Feel it a haunting song about the homeless and less fortunate and the day to day struggle of life. Wayne Marshall rounds out the selection with the title track Captain, as he asks the question, Captain, should we abort the trip. A tting question to the times at hand. Overall a good offering. ELBACKAYARD 46 YOU THINK YOUR ALBUM OR RIDDIM IS WORTHY TO GO UNDER THE GUILLOTINE? E-MAIL IT TO US: JA@BACKAYARD.COM

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s s s s SWEET W ATASUMMER FLINGMONTE CARLO W ASH BELLY INSIDE DI RIDDIMEquiknoxx aka Bird Gang has released another riddim that can only be described as an alternative to the norm. Wash Belly is brash and cacophonous with a serious bass line which should hold its own in any club. With identity being important for any genre, Wash Belly seems to successfully blur the lines between dancehall and hip hop especially with the appearance of hip hop superstar Missy Elliott on Fun with, superstar in her own right, Spice. But that track was not the only one that caught the ear both T.O.Ks Swagger Right and Capletons Hide (When Dem See Me) will have people dancing in between chuckling at some of those songs lyrics. Whats not to like? AW I always wondered why the summer in Jamaica gets so much love. I mean it couldnt be the weather because it is technically summer year round. I guess must be the anticipation of it that really gets everybody excited about enjoying life to the fullest. Dancehall producers and artistes are denitely not exempt from this wave of good feeling as Chimney Records demonstrate with their latest offering entitled Summer Fling. Along with the Gully GodMavados catchy release Final Destination Imma Need Security with Supa Hype, Munga and Chi Ching Ching and Beenie Mans latest I Love The Girls featuring Versatile the songs only serve to highlight how crazy partying gets around this time. Not sure if this riddim will be relevant past this summer but as the name of the riddim suggest please feel free to enjoy it while it lasts. AR Monte Carlo is a departure from the normal Dj Wizzle/Purple Skunk productions you know and loved. Dj Wayne known in the world of Jamaican music as one of Irie FM most popular radio personalities is a known champion of mostly hardcore dancehall. Lucky, for us, he tapped into his softer side with this soulful reggae/ one drop riddim sure to soften even the hardest of hearts. Standout tracks are Aint Giving Up Ikaya, Next to Me Sophia Squire, Wake Me Up Da Professor and Missing You Cecile. A quality release which strives and succeeds in reminding us that true love, despite its ups and downs, is ultimately worth it. AR Producers should stop putting out rushed dancehall riddims only to appeal to an audience who all seem to suffer from A.D.D. (Attention Decient Disorder), and focus more on sweet reggae music, which is widely considered the life-blood of Jamaica. It is with this thought in mind that Jukeboxxs most recent contribution Sweet Wata wins. Molded by the deft hands of Shane Brown and his team, Sweet Wata has all the familiar harmonies and melodies associated with roots music with just enough new additions to keep the beat interesting. Sweet Wata has Beres Hammond, Queen Ifrica, Busy Signal among others featured on tracks which explore topics from love to social commentary. A real landmark production hopefully it will nd the right audience that would appreciate this sonic effort especially in these times. AW

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s s s s SWEET W ATASUMMER FLINGMONTE CARLO W ASH BELLY INSIDE DI RIDDIMEquiknoxx aka Bird Gang has released another riddim that can only be described as an alternative to the norm. Wash Belly is brash and cacophonous with a serious bass line which should hold its own in any club. With identity being important for any genre, Wash Belly seems to successfully blur the lines between dancehall and hip hop especially with the appearance of hip hop superstar Missy Elliott on Fun with, superstar in her own right, Spice. But that track was not the only one that caught the ear both T.O.Ks Swagger Right and Capletons Hide (When Dem See Me) will have people dancing in between chuckling at some of those songs lyrics. Whats not to like? AW I always wondered why the summer in Jamaica gets so much love. I mean it couldnt be the weather because it is technically summer year round. I guess must be the anticipation of it that really gets everybody excited about enjoying life to the fullest. Dancehall producers and artistes are denitely not exempt from this wave of good feeling as Chimney Records demonstrate with their latest offering entitled Summer Fling. Along with the Gully GodMavados catchy release Final Destination Imma Need Security with Supa Hype, Munga and Chi Ching Ching and Beenie Mans latest I Love The Girls featuring Versatile the songs only serve to highlight how crazy partying gets around this time. Not sure if this riddim will be relevant past this summer but as the name of the riddim suggest please feel free to enjoy it while it lasts. AR Monte Carlo is a departure from the normal Dj Wizzle/Purple Skunk productions you know and loved. Dj Wayne known in the world of Jamaican music as one of Irie FM most popular radio personalities is a known champion of mostly hardcore dancehall. Lucky, for us, he tapped into his softer side with this soulful reggae/ one drop riddim sure to soften even the hardest of hearts. Standout tracks are Aint Giving Up Ikaya, Next to Me Sophia Squire, Wake Me Up Da Professor and Missing You Cecile. A quality release which strives and succeeds in reminding us that true love, despite its ups and downs, is ultimately worth it. AR Producers should stop putting out rushed dancehall riddims only to appeal to an audience who all seem to suffer from A.D.D. (Attention Decient Disorder), and focus more on sweet reggae music, which is widely considered the life-blood of Jamaica. It is with this thought in mind that Jukeboxxs most recent contribution Sweet Wata wins. Molded by the deft hands of Shane Brown and his team, Sweet Wata has all the familiar harmonies and melodies associated with roots music with just enough new additions to keep the beat interesting. Sweet Wata has Beres Hammond, Queen Ifrica, Busy Signal among others featured on tracks which explore topics from love to social commentary. A real landmark production hopefully it will nd the right audience that would appreciate this sonic effort especially in these times. AW

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RICH IN LOVE PEOPLE TALK SHAKA ZULU PICKNEY FOREVER AND ALWAYSA HOUSE IS NOT A HOMEBLACK WOMANRASTA LOVELOVERS HOLIDAY I CANT RECALL SWEET JAMAICA LATELY SUFFERERS HEIGHTS NATTY COME OVER YE THOUGH I WALK NATURE CALLING NONE A DEM SUMMER TIME PEPPER NO LOVE INNA DEM TALK HOW MI FEEL STAR BOY REBEL DANCEHALL HERO NO LONG TALKING RUN DI PLACE NOW YOU SEE ME HELLO BAD MIND MAKE UP SEX NUH RAMP WID ME LOVE MI LIFE ROMAIN VIRGO ETANA TARRUS RILEY HEZRON FREDDIE MCGREGOR RICHIE SPICE PROTOJE f/ K. MARLEYCOLLIN LEVY aka ILEY DREADTONY REBELMR. VEGAS, SHAGGY/ J. WALESLAZAH CURRENT DUANE STEPHENSON SHARON TUCKER VYBZ KARTEL SOPHIA SQUIRE JAH ARMY DEM NUH DONE RIGHT MAN FI YUH NO BODY BAG ORDERS DELILAH SWAGGING TINGS A COME TO BUMP NO TRUST PEOPLE THE ALMIGHTY S. MARLEY/ D. MARLEY I-OCTANE ROBERT MINOTT PROPHECY KASHU MAN MAVADO W. MARSHALL/TIFA/FAMBO BUJU BANTON BRAMMA GRAMPS Ghetto Youths Human Rights Prod. World Beat / Kirkledove Jah Alone Records Human Rights Prod. Mansion Records Washroom Ent. Pure Music Di Genius Pure Music SHABBA RANKS VYBZ KARTEL MAVADO I-OCTANE ASSASSIN MAVADO D.I. f/ C. ANDERSON VYBZ KARTEL BEENIE MAN ASSASSIN OVERMARS CHAN DIZZY CHERINE ANDERSON I-OCTANE MAVADO Lifeline Music VP Records Bombrush Records Whatage Music Steelie and Clevie Penthouse Don Corleon Kings of Kings Penthouse Records Clifford Ray Music Guerrilla Music VP Records Effective Music Ent. Human Rights Prod. Tremor Mod./Bedroc Di Genius Adidjaheim Di Genius Cashflow Dj Frass Chimney Records Taxi CR2O3 Productions Seanizzle Boardhouse Chimney Records Head Concussion Ward 21 Cash Flow Di Genius 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 MUSIC PHILL CHART [ SUMMER ] REGGAE CHART DANCEHALL CHART BUBBLERS (REGGAE) BUBBLERS (DANCEHALL)THE INFORMATION PROVIDED IN THIS CHART IS BASED ON WAH GWAN IN THE STREETS AND ON THE RADIO. NO BIAS, JUS DI REAL TING!

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RICH IN LOVE PEOPLE TALK SHAKA ZULU PICKNEY FOREVER AND ALWAYSA HOUSE IS NOT A HOMEBLACK WOMANRASTA LOVELOVERS HOLIDAY I CANT RECALL SWEET JAMAICA LATELY SUFFERERS HEIGHTS NATTY COME OVER YE THOUGH I WALK NATURE CALLING NONE A DEM SUMMER TIME PEPPER NO LOVE INNA DEM TALK HOW MI FEEL STAR BOY REBEL DANCEHALL HERO NO LONG TALKING RUN DI PLACE NOW YOU SEE ME HELLO BAD MIND MAKE UP SEX NUH RAMP WID ME LOVE MI LIFE ROMAIN VIRGO ETANA TARRUS RILEY HEZRON FREDDIE MCGREGOR RICHIE SPICE PROTOJE f/ K. MARLEYCOLLIN LEVY aka ILEY DREADTONY REBELMR. VEGAS, SHAGGY/ J. WALESLAZAH CURRENT DUANE STEPHENSON SHARON TUCKER VYBZ KARTEL SOPHIA SQUIRE JAH ARMY DEM NUH DONE RIGHT MAN FI YUH NO BODY BAG ORDERS DELILAH SWAGGING TINGS A COME TO BUMP NO TRUST PEOPLE THE ALMIGHTY S. MARLEY/ D. MARLEY I-OCTANE ROBERT MINOTT PROPHECY KASHU MAN MAVADO W. MARSHALL/TIFA/FAMBO BUJU BANTON BRAMMA GRAMPS Ghetto Youths Human Rights Prod. World Beat / Kirkledove Jah Alone Records Human Rights Prod. Mansion Records Washroom Ent. Pure Music Di Genius Pure Music SHABBA RANKS VYBZ KARTEL MAVADO I-OCTANE ASSASSIN MAVADO D.I. f/ C. ANDERSON VYBZ KARTEL BEENIE MAN ASSASSIN OVERMARS CHAN DIZZY CHERINE ANDERSON I-OCTANE MAVADO Lifeline Music VP Records Bombrush Records Whatage Music Steelie and Clevie Penthouse Don Corleon Kings of Kings Penthouse Records Clifford Ray Music Guerrilla Music VP Records Effective Music Ent. Human Rights Prod. Tremor Mod./Bedroc Di Genius Adidjaheim Di Genius Cashflow Dj Frass Chimney Records Taxi CR2O3 Productions Seanizzle Boardhouse Chimney Records Head Concussion Ward 21 Cash Flow Di Genius 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 MUSIC PHILL CHART [ SUMMER ] REGGAE CHART DANCEHALL CHART BUBBLERS (REGGAE) BUBBLERS (DANCEHALL)THE INFORMATION PROVIDED IN THIS CHART IS BASED ON WAH GWAN IN THE STREETS AND ON THE RADIO. NO BIAS, JUS DI REAL TING!

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BAY : WWWNEVER A BAD TIME TO READ BACKAYARD MAGAZINE ODESSA AND ISLAND FRIENDS HARDROCK JAMAICA IF IT WASNT OFFICIAL BEFORE ITS OFFICIAL NOW, JAMAICA IS THE HOTTEST DESTINATION SPOT IN THE REGION. HARD ROCK CAFE OCHO RIOS IS LOCATED IN THE HEART OF THE OCHO RIOS SHOPPING DISTRICT IN THE FAMED TAJ MAHAL SHOPPING PLAZA. EQUIPED WITH A 180-SEAT RESTAURANT, A LIVE MUSIC STAGE, AND A ROCK SHOP OFFERING COLLECTIBLE ITEMS THAT OCCUPY THE ENTIRE FIRST FLOOR. RARE MEMORABILIA ADORNS THE WALLS INCLUDING PHOTOS OF PRINCE AND THE ORIGINAL LYRICS FOR JAMMIN HANDWRITTEN BY BOB MARLEY, ADDED TO THE MIX ARE PRICELESS ITEMS FROM ROCK LEGENDS LED ZEPPELIN AND GEORGE CLINTONS FUNK BAND, PAR LIAMENT.WWW.HARDROCK.COM WWW?WHERE.WHEN.WHOBackayard Magazine Issue Release (Happy Ending, NYC) (New Kingston, Jamaica)BACKAYARD 52

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BAY : WWWNEVER A BAD TIME TO READ BACKAYARD MAGAZINE ODESSA AND ISLAND FRIENDS HARDROCK JAMAICA IF IT WASNT OFFICIAL BEFORE ITS OFFICIAL NOW, JAMAICA IS THE HOTTEST DESTINATION SPOT IN THE REGION. HARD ROCK CAFE OCHO RIOS IS LOCATED IN THE HEART OF THE OCHO RIOS SHOPPING DISTRICT IN THE FAMED TAJ MAHAL SHOPPING PLAZA. EQUIPED WITH A 180-SEAT RESTAURANT, A LIVE MUSIC STAGE, AND A ROCK SHOP OFFERING COLLECTIBLE ITEMS THAT OCCUPY THE ENTIRE FIRST FLOOR. RARE MEMORABILIA ADORNS THE WALLS INCLUDING PHOTOS OF PRINCE AND THE ORIGINAL LYRICS FOR JAMMIN HANDWRITTEN BY BOB MARLEY, ADDED TO THE MIX ARE PRICELESS ITEMS FROM ROCK LEGENDS LED ZEPPELIN AND GEORGE CLINTONS FUNK BAND, PAR LIAMENT.WWW.HARDROCK.COM WWW?WHERE.WHEN.WHOBackayard Magazine Issue Release (Happy Ending, NYC) (New Kingston, Jamaica)BACKAYARD 52

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BAY : WWW WWW?WHERE.WHEN.WHOBACKAYARD 54 (New Kingston, Jamaica) Vibes is Right (Wickie Wackie, Jamaica) photos by: Oliver & Gareth Daley

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BAY : WWW WWW?WHERE.WHEN.WHOBACKAYARD 54 (New Kingston, Jamaica) Vibes is Right (Wickie Wackie, Jamaica) photos by: Oliver & Gareth Daley