Group Title: Documentation
Title: Proposed adaptive uses
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 Material Information
Title: Proposed adaptive uses
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida Department of Architecture
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00103204
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text

EAST JACKSONVILLE SCHOOL NO. 3


DOCUMENTATION. BUILDING ASSAY. ADAPTIVE USES.






VOLUME THREE: PROPOSED ADAPTIVE USES


Sports Related

Hospital
Health Club
Professional
Health Club


Football Facilities


Commercial

Factory
Sales/display
Shopping/theater
Shopping/offices

Government








Prepared for the City of Jacksonville, Florida by
Graduate Students in the Department of Architecture,
University of Florida, during the Academic year 1979-80


Ward DuPree
Oslec Fernandez
Diane Gigon
Lester Gonzalez
Mike Johnson


Brent Lane
Bob Mather
Keith Soto
Jim Golden
F. Blair Reeves, Professor
Phillip P. Wisley, Professor































SPORTS RELATED





adaptive use of


public


three
JACKSONVILLE,
ROBERT A MATHER
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
WINTER 1980


school no.


FLORIDA












I would like to dedicate this project to
Robert C. Giebner and F. Blair Reeves at
the Preservation Institute: Nantucket who
sparked my interest in Historic Preservation.


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INTRODUCTION


GOALS

PROGRAMMING METHODS

PROGRAMMING DEFINITIONS

HISTORY

SITE ANALYSIS

SPACE NEEDS

SUMMARY

FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS

DESIGN PHILOSOPHY

DESIGN CONCEPTS

DESIGN DRAWINGS

BIBLIOGRAPHY












With the growth that Florida, and particularly the Jacksonville area,

is experiencing, the need for medical care will soon be beyond the capabilities

of existing facilities. The influx of a growing population of retired and elderly

persons, with their great demand on facilities has prompted the development

of specialized facilities.

There is also the trend, which may or may not still exist, toward a dispro-

portionate amount of time, money and energy being spent on recreation and enter-

tainment. Jacksonville in particular has an ever-increasing desire to come to

the forefront in the southeast as a home for professional and amateur sports.

The recent prospect of the Colts football team coming to Jacksonville was

met with widespread enthusiasm and interest. With that possibility now looking

bleak, other ventures are being looked into.

One possibility, and one that Public School No. 3 could play a part is

the advent of an Olympic training center, where athletes from this country

and from around the world could come to practice, work out and train for olympic

as well as national and international competition. Facilities already exist that

could be adapted to meet the needs of housing, feeding and training athletes,

such as the Gator Bowl and Coliseum.














One important need of the athlete that should not be overlooked is the health

care of the sports participant. Here is where Public School No. 3 could play an

important role in the development of Jacksonville as the sports center of the

southeast and at the same time Jacksonville could save an example of one of

its leading architect's buildings.

The proposal is to adapt Public School No. 3 into an Olympic Village Clinic

where routine testing, physical therapy and emergency care can be provided for

the athletes and support personal, and thereby taking the burden off of existing

hospitals, clinics and doctors.

Because of its proximity to the Gator Bowl and Coliseum, and because of its

large uninterrupted spaces, Public School No. 3 could readily accept a highly

specialized and subdivided function, such as a clinic, with little alteration of

the existing fabric of the building.

The following program provides the initial framework, both quantitatively

and qualitatively, for the adaptive use of Public School No. 3 into an Olympic

Village Clinic.


























The goal of this project is two-fold. First, to dramatically demonstrate

that there exists viable alternatives to the demolition of Public School No. 3.

Second, as an academic exercise, Public School No. 3 is a vehicle for the

exploration of sympathetic adaptive use and compatible new design problems that

are particular to historic and architecturally important buildings.








ISSUES:
Insure that the programming process and responsibilities are clear to all
involved.
Avoid duplicating effort that has already been made in data gathering.
Identify and contact all individuals, organizations and agencies that
can have an effect on the project.
PROCESS:
Formulate and agree upon the programming process, ground rules and responsi-
bilities.
Collect and organize all the work that has been done to this point.
Define the total scope of programming participants (users, organizations,
agencies, etc.).
Orient clinet to the process, their responsibilities, the schedule and
what is needed from them.
Submit work done to this point to client for verification or change.
Identify information still needed for programming.
Hold work sessions with client to gather information.
Review periodicals for similar building types with client.
Document information and submit to client for verification.
Test space needs against budget.
Recycle reduced space allowable back through client if required.


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Balance space and budget.

Distill architectural (form) implications.

Review planning assumptions with client.

Produce report.

Present programming findings to client.


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There are some distinctions that should be made here which will define more speci-

fically how this study fits into the total planning process.

In planning there are definite steps that must be taken to insure a complete and

logical process. They are:

Architectural Programming

Design

Construction Documents

Construction

Projects begin with an Architectural Program which defines in detail what the require-

ments of the facility will be. The information contained in an Architectural Program

serv-s as input for Architectural Design. Here, each space in the building is analyzed

for needed furniture and equipment, personnel to be housed and needed proximity to

other spaces.

The actual Design of the facility translates the program information into first,

Schematic Design concepts, and finally a detailed Design.

Contract Documents consisting of working drawings, specifications and contracts

follow the design of the facility. These instruments provide detailed bases for the

cost estimates and are the documents used by the contractor in Construction of the

Building. (Courtesy of Edward T. White





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MONTHLY AVERAGE PERCENT OF POSSIBLE SUNSHINE

Annual Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June\ July

62 58 59 66 71 71 63 62


MONTHLY TOTAL HEATING DEGREE DAYS (Base 650F)

July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb.

0 0 0 12 144 310 332 246


Aug.

63


Mar.

174


Sept.

58


Apr.

21


Oct.

58


Nov.

61


May June

0 0


Dec.

53


Total: 1239













Preliminary Cost Analysis


Demolition
Elevator
Fire Stairs
Site Work
New Construction
Renovation
Sub-Total


$ 68,750.00
45,000.00
47,000.00
78,000.00
977,760.00
2,250,000.00
$3,466,510.00


Inflation for estimated 18 month construction period:
1,109,283.00

TOTAL $4,575,793.00


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de Apartment: PHYSICAL THERAPY


space:

5 treatment rooms

2 offices

1 restroom

storage

waiting reception

exercise

2 locker/shower/restroom

whirlppol/tankroom


sq. ft.
II!


@ 120

@ 100








@ 430


Total 600

200

36
140

140

500
860

200

Total 2,676







department:


= -


soace:


therapy pool
hot tub
pool equipment room


sa. ft.


Total


1,800
200
200
2,200


POOL


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department:


- II


SDace:


1 4 bed suite
1 2 bed suite
1 nurse station
storage
2 restrooms


IN-PATIENT


sa. ft.


@ 40
Total


700
350
100
200
80
1,430


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department:


LIBRARY


Sac e: ft.

space.: sq. ft.
L...*. ~ II I


Library


Total






department:


= I I


SDace:


Office


HOUSEKEEPING/MAINTENANCE


sa. ft.


Total


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sa. f to------------


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department:


space:

14 Treatment/exam rooms

8 offices

2 nurses stations

2 restrooms

storage

admitting/reception/waiting
(shared with lab and x-ray)


OUT-PATIENT


sa. ft.


@ 120

@ 100

@ 140

@ 45


Total


1680

800

280

90

350

900

4,100


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department:


sDace:


sa. ft.


s ace: s f t,


office
restroom
examination room
waiting/reception
janitor
storage
linen clean
soiled
clean-up
medical supplies
prep
scrub
bulky equipment
operating room
instrument storage


120
25
120
250
25
200
30
30
50
50
200
70
70
450
36
Total 1,726


EMERGENCY


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department:


= -


sDace:


X-ray room
film file
dark room
3 dressing rooms


sa. ft.


@ 40
Total


480
70
144
120
814


X-RAY


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department: LABORATORY


SDace:


lab
2 offices
medical supplies
blood sample room
janitor
4 specimen restrooms
storage


sa. ft.


@ 120




@ 25


Total


900
240
100
260
25
100
150
865


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department:


soace:


tITI--- -

office

storage

waiting

work center

restroom


sa. ft.


180

500

180

150

25

Total 1,035


PHARMACY


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department:


sDace:


ADMINISTRATION


P- m. -- f t


director

assistant director

SEL

3 admitting offices

files

records/bookkeeping

waiting/reception

2 public restrooms


sa. ft.


150

120

100

360



200

400

400

1,740


@ 120







@ 200

Total


II


- -







department:


M -


SDace:


lounge
lockers
conference/meeting room
staff dining


STAFF LOUNGE


sa. ft.


Total


250
100
200
400
950


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department:


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soace:


lounge


sa. ft.


Total


LOUNGE


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POOL. I HE- ')rle r


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PHYSICAL THERAPY
POOL
IN-PATIENT
LIBRARY
HOUSEKEEPING/MAINTENANCE
OUT-PATIENT
EMERGENCY
X-RAY


2,676 Sq.Ft.
2,200 Sq.Ff.
1,430 Sq.Ft.
900 Sq.Ft.
480 Sq.Ft.
4,100 Sq.Ft.
1,726 Sq.Ft.
814 Sq.Ft.
865 Sq.Ft.
1,035 Sq.Ft.
1,740 Sq.Ft.
950 Sq.Ft.
860 Sq.Ft.
3,060 Sq.Ft.
22,836 Sq.Ft.
6,850 Sq.Ft.

29,686 Sq.Ft.


PHARMACY
ADMINISTRATION
STAFF LOUNGE
LOUNGE
COURTYARD
SUBTOTAL
30% Mech/Circulation


TOTAL


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The approach taken in the design of this project is one sympathetically
relating to the existing fabric of the building. The following points have been
considered.
-Maintaining the existing plan form, structural system, window and door openings
and principle facades.
-Sympathetically relating new design elements to the existing structure through
space, proportion, materials, rhythm, massing and color.
-Use landscaping to highlight the existing building and reduce the visual impact
of the addition.
-Through the new construction, relate to the monumental scale of Public School
No. 3 as well as the scale of the human form.
-Make the experience of going to a hospital as pleasant as possible through
light, space, landscape and color.


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design


drawings


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Callender, John H. editorry. Time Saver Standards, A Handbook of Architectural
Design, New York: McGraw-Hill, 1966.
Progressive Architecture, Stamford Connecticut: Reinhold Publishing Co., July,
1972, September 1976 and July 1977.
Watson, Donald. Designing and Building a Solar Home, Your Place in the Sun,
Charlotte, Vermont: Garden Way Publishing, 1977.
White, Edward T. Introduction to Architectural Programming, Paperback edition,
Tucson: Architectural Median, 1972.


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HEALTH AND RECREATION CLUB

LESTER T. GONZALEZ









PROBLEM, DEFINITION AND PHILOSOPHY


East Jacksonville Public School Number 3 is located in a deteriorated minority

area in downtown Jacksonville. This area, which is immediately adjacent to the Gator

Bowl and the Jacksonville Coliseum has been experiencing a steady decline in popula-

tion, a great deal of it on a voluntary basis. This steady exodus has resulted in

many abandoned homes and properties which are now of great value not only to the

city but to private developers as well due to their proximity to the downtown area.

After meeting with several city officials the general feel was that the City of

Jacksonville did indeed want to develop the area with sport and recreation related

functions and activities. This would include the possible use of any adaptable struc-

ture within the area, this making Public School Number Three a prime candidate for

this type of development.


PROPOSAL


Within the last few years people have turned their focus toward their bodies.

Everyone from seven to seventy has been involved with some for of recreation ranging

from ping-pong to jogging.

Cities throughout the nation have been faced with the increased demand for health

and recreation facilities. Although the need is usually recognized and sometimes

solved, the funding for these facilities is usually the first to hp riut frnm ti-
















Private investors and developers have capitalized on the fact that governmental agencies

have not been filling the demand. Consequently, countless numbers of new health and

recreation clubs have sprung up all over. Most of them usually specialized in one sport

or another with a majority of them tending toward tennis or racquetball. This overwhelming

trend in health and recreation coupled with the schools easy accessibility and proximity

to the downtown, prompted me to adapt Public School Number Three into a health and racquet-

ball club.

Included within the scope of the program are several racquetball courts, various

rooms for exercise, pro-shop, day care, lounge/restaurant, locker room, sauna and whirl-

pool areas. The club can cater not only to the executive who works downtown all day but

also to the housewife and student both of which could find leisure time to enjoy the

club.

The expected atmosphere is that of a semi-exclusive club where people can come

to relax, socialize and at the same time improve their overall health.









SPACE/FUNCTION ANALYSIS


The building is a two story structure which presently consists of nine enclosed

classrooms, two out-door classrooms, a large auditorium/cafeteria, kitchen, bathroom/

locker rooms, all of these totaling approximately 28,000 square feet.

Under this program the new spatial and functional relationship would be as

follows:

A. Racquetball Courts

Two types of courts would be provided within the facility:

1. Common courts 12 @ 672 sq.ft. Concrete and plaster walls with wooden

floors and glass back wall. There are two viewing levels which would

allow viewing from ground level and from above.

2. Exhibition Courts 2 @ 880 sq.ft. Courts are completely glassed in

on three sides to permit viewing from viewing areas or gallery which

contains seating for approximately 100 people.

B. Exercise Rooms

There will be nine exercise rooms flexible in nature so as to allow for

mixed use. Hardwood floors and exercise mats will dominate. Weight lifting

rooms will be included for both men and women. These rooms will include

universal and nautilus equipment and free weights along with bicycle machines,

rowing machines and several basic boards.










C. Lounge/Restaurant 6,020 square feet

A large 2 1/2 story space with extensive foliage and seating capacity for approximately

100 people will provide food and drink for club members. It will provide table

and waiter service although the menu is expected to be "club sandwich" in nature.

D. Locker Rooms: Men 4,420 sq.ft. Women 4,420 sq.ft.

Both men's and women's locker rooms have a capacity of 400 lockers included within

the locker area. There are shower and dressing facilities, sauna, whirpool,

bar and small lounge area.

E. Reception Area 1,132 square feet

A spacious two story space will be provided as a reception area intended for greeting

potential new members along with security for the club.

F. Administration: Offices 2 224 sq.ft. ; Administrative space 1 315 sq.ft.

Two offices and general administration space will be provided totalling 763 square feet.

G. Pro-Shop 703 square feet

Items to be sold will be based totally on need but there is expected to be a varied

selection of clothes, racquets, balls and other related equipment. Other services

provided would be equipment rental and racquet re-stringing.

H. Day-Care 700 square feet

Intended for the care of pre-school children while their parents enjoy the amenities

of the club.










Preliminary Estimate of Building Costs


Demolition $4/sq.ft.

Existing Building 24,000 sq.ft.

Remodeling $65/sq.ft.
24,000 sq.ft.


Elevator 2 @ $35,000

Stairs 2 @ $22,000
1 @ $157,500


New Construction

Part A $2/cu.ft.
433,840 sq.ft.

Part B $200.00/sq.ft.
5,120 sq.ft.

Part C $45/sq.ft.
4,224 sq.ft.

Stairs 2 @ $63,900


$ 96,000

6,000


1,560,000


70,000

44,000
157,500





$ 867,680


1,024,000


190,080

127,800


Site Work 65,000

Sub-Total $4,208,060

Plus 20% inflation compounded annually for a period of 18 months:

TOTAL $5,554,639













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A PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL TRAINING COMPLEX
OSLEC B. FERNANDEZ










A PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL TRAINING COMPLEX
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


The city of Jacksonville is presently trying to lure a professional football

team to establish Jacksonville as its permanent home. The possibility of a team

are good for the city because of several factors, Among these are:

1) Jacksonville is a major metropolitan area wi'/th major highways crossing

through it, an airport, and a seaport.

2) Jacksonville has already a stadium capable of holding the size crowd

needed to support a professional team.

3) Surrounding the stadium are a coliseum and a baseball park showing

that the city has made some effort in favor of sports promotion.

Along with these pluses are several minuses. These problems would be reasons for a

professional club to skip over Jacksonville in favor of another area:

1) The stadium is in need of a general overall.

2) Stadium parking is minimal at best.

3) At present this area, even though it contains three sports complexes,

does not tie in as a sports unit.

The proposal I am presenting is of a three-fold nature. The step is to refur-

bish the present stadium to meet the standard set forth by the professional football

team. In the same breath construction of a training complex for the professional team









can begin. The ideal site would be in the area surrounding the Gator Bowl. The complex

would not only provide a cohesive base to tie in the present sport complexes but

may also lure another professional sport, which may share the football training

facilities in whole or in part. An example of a compatible sport would be soccer.

The soccer season would not interfere with the football season and the general

practice area requirements are similar. The facilities could also be used as

housing and for practice by collegiate or high school teams playing in the coliseum

or Gator Bowl. There is even a possibility that during the off season the fields

could even be used by the city recreation department for their programs.

The keystone to the sports complex could be Public School No. 3. Surrounding

Public School No. 3 are large parcels of land which could be used as practice

fields. Public School No. 3 has an advantage over a new building in that it is

already an established part of Jacksonville and thus aiding in giving identity

to the newly established team. The economic aspects cannot be overlooked. According

to George Notter, a Boston Architect familiar with adaptive use, "...more often than

not the total dollar expenditure for preservation, including the acquisition of the

property involved, is about the same as new construction. Thus, the plus factor

is achieved by developing the potential assets into a final project of great

amenity one having the right location, more space in either height or volume,

more area or more character material of special quality, or a potential for time










The breakdown of the buildings) will be into three units. One will be a

separate building to house the Jacksonville Sports Authority. The second one

will be Public School No. 3 which will house the administrative and training

unit of the football team and the third building, or the addition to Public School

No. 3, will be the dormitory.

I. Sports Authority Sq.Ft.

-Director 250

-Director's Secretary 200

-Accounting and bookkeeping 400
(1 accountant, 2 bookkeepers)

-General Office Area (3 secretaries) 450

-Receptionist and reception area 300

-Board Room (the board room shall be
immediately adjacent to the receptionist) 400

-Restroom for office staff @130 sq.ft. ea. 260

-Janitorial space 64

II. Professional Football Team

-Team Owner 300

-Coaching Staff (the need is to provide office
space for 13 coaches. Eight of the coaches
will be full-time on the premises during the
season. The remaining five will be traveling
coaches primarily involved in scouting and
recruiting.












II. Professional Football Team (cont'd.) Sq.Ft.

Eight full-time coaches 1,600
Five traveling coaches 750

-Public Relations
This office will handle the overall promoting of the team
to the community, news media, and within the league.
Within this office will be such equipment as a telecopier
and video taping machine.

Three full-time staff 700
Machines 75

-Accounting

Controller (private office) 200
2 Accountants 400

-Conference Room
The conference room will be used for full administrative
meetings either in-house or open to the public and
the press. 700

-Reception Area
For security reasons, the reception area will have no
direct access to the rest of the complex. Within the
reception area will be a trophy and awards display. 700

-File Room
The file room will contain all the business records of
the organization and also will serve as storage for
the office supplies. Also included will be the
mail room. 200


-Ticket sales with 4 staff members.









II. Professional Football Team (cont'd.) Sq.Ft.

-Office Staff Restrooms

Male 220
Female 220

-Custodian Storage and work room one on each level
@ 84 sq.ft. each. 168

-Team Physician
The physician will need an office where he can conduct
his duties from. The office will need such areas as
the physicians private office, private examination
rooms, group check-up room, therapy room, medical
record storage, drug storage.

Private office and records storage 300
Private examination ( 2 @ 75 sq.ft. ea.) 150
Group examination 300
Therapy 400
Drug storage 30
Restroom 36

-Film storage 100
-Film viewing and Group Meeting Rooms
These rooms will be used for the viewing of game
films and also for meetings for the Offensive team,
defensive team, backfield, etc.

Three rooms at 300 sq.ft. ea. 900
Staff and prayer meeting room 700
Offensive/defensive coaches conference 400
(2 rooms @ 200sq.ft. ea.)

-Locker area
The locker area will provide storage for sixty players. 1,600

-Showers
The shower area will be of the gang type with 18
qhowprhpadq 350









II. Professional Football Team (cont'd.) Sq.Ft.

Toweling off area 140
Toilets 300

-Weight Room 1,000

-Equipment Storage
This area will be used for storage of such items as
uniforms, helmets, shoes, footballs, and other athletic
equipment. 1,000

-Dining
It is very important that this area provide a calm and
casual atmosphere. It should be a welcomed break from
the hectic atmosphere of the practice field. 1,200

-Kitchen
A large and well equipped kitchen is needed to provide
a high quality diet for the team members. 764

Pantry 120
Freezer 96
Office 96

-Custodian storage and work room for training area. 100


III. Dormitory
Each unit will be double occupancy with a maximum of 30
units. 7,000

-Showers and restrooms (2 @ 780 sq.ft. ea.) 1,560

-Recreation Rooms
These rooms will be primarily for the relaxation and
recreation of the team members.

Passive 600
Active 600










AUXILIARY FUNCTIONS Sq.Ft.

-Training Fields
Two regulation size training fields will be needed
as part of the complex. One field will be natural
turf, the other astroturf.

-Parking
Parking must be provided for one hundred (100)
vehicles. Players parking should be separate from
visitor and staff.

-Delivery Area
For deliveries and servicing of the building.

-Mechanical Facilities 416


PRELIMINARY COST ANALYSIS

Item Area Total Cost

Demolition 24,964 68,651

Renovation 24,964 $1,373,020

Add on Cost
Fire stairs 320 48,000

Elevator 35,000

New Construction
Additional work in
Public School No. 3 2,696 110,131

Dormitory 17,300 749,090


Sports Authority


126,635


3,100















PRELIMINARY COST ANALYSIS (cont'd.)

Item Area

Parking Area 38,560

Concrete Walkways 5,175


Total Cost

$ 19,280

7,762


$2,537,569


Sub-Total


18% inflation factor for 18-month duration of
the project gives a grand total of:

TOTAL


SQUARE FOOT TOTALS

Buildings

Parking and Walkways

Building Cost per sq.ft.
(w/inflation factor)

Parking and Walkways
(w/inflation factor)


48,056

43,735


$3,263,821




sq.ft.

sq.ft.


$55
$67

$.62
.80






























HEALTH AND RACQUETBALL

KEITH E. SOTO
















INTRODUCTION


East Jacksonville Public School Number Three is located in a minority residential

area of downtown Jacksonville which is currently experiencing a steady decline in popu-

lation. This part of the city is adjacent to the expanding Gatorbowl and Colisseum

sports complex which is changing the areas socio-economic character. Because of the

presence of these sports facilities this area is in transition from predominantly resi-

dential in nature to that of the more transitory sports/recreation/entertainment

functions. It would be unfeasible to work against this tendency, especially in light

of the current trend of voluntary residential relocation. This is leaving many sites

available for alternate development, which the city of Jacksonville now envisions as

suitable for some form of sports complex related activities. This, combined with the

areas close proximity to the downtown central business district makes the location of

East Jacksonville Public School Number Three a prime candidate for re-use in a function

which could tie the sports complex and the central business district together.










PROPOSAL


One function which could be considered extremely compatible with the current trend

of this area would be one which relates to physical activity/movement or entertainment.

In the United States today there has been a great resurgence of interest in physical

fitness along with the sports racquetball and tennis. This is true not only for house-

wives and students, who have traditionally had the leisure time available in which to

pursue such interests, but also for the new breed of business executives who have found

that an improved physical condition also improves their business senses. Many companies

now find it good practice to encourage their executives to change their sedentary habits

in order to increase their morale, productivity and overall health; thus the cost of

a health club to the company is much less than the cost of lost time due to employee

illness and indifference.

The East Jacksonville Public School Number Three is in the enviable position of

being located in an area which has the potential of cater to not only the sports and

recreation patrons of the Gatorbowl/Colisseum complex but also to the central business

district executive who wishes to release his physical and emotional tensions after a long,

hard days work. A health club/racquetball facility would achieve this aim by providing

the sports patron and busy executive an opportunity to relax and exercise in one con-

venient, central location. This health club/racquetball complex, and its related





























facilities, would require enough space to fully utilize the existing structure of Public

School Number Three in addition to utilizing a new structure connected with the old

school.











PROGRAM


This facility shall include not only a health club with its emphasis on physical

fitness but also a recreation complex made up of racquetball facilities and a swimming

pool which caters to members only. This program also includes a small, club related

restaurant and bar and a pro shop which will carry a variety of athletic and sports

equipment.

Membership shall consist of 1,000-1,500 members depending on local economic

condition.


Required Spaces

A. Racquetball Related

1. 8 racquetball courts with galleries
for observation

2. Office for two trainers/coaches

3. Equipment Rental Area
(racquets, balls, etc.)

B. Swimming Related

1. 25 M olympic sized pool

2. Swim lockers and changing area

3. Office for two swim coaches and equipment
rental area


Square Footages

8 @ 1125 sq.ft. ea.




100

100




2,700

1,000

100









Required Spaces

C. Gymnasium Related

1. Gymnasium workout room containing:

1 universal gym
4 bicycle machines
2 treadmills
2 rowing machines
2 weight lifting stations
2 back boards

D. Complex Related Functions

1. Men

a. Locker room (800-1000 lockers)

b. Dressing Area 80-90 dressing l

c. Showers (seven stalls)

d. Sauna

e. Steam room

f. Whirpool

g. Massage room with 2 stations

2. Women

a. Locker room (400-500 lockers)

b. Dressing Area (40-50 dressing

c. Showers (5-7 stalls)

d. Sauna


Square Footages



1,200


ockers


lockers)


900

900

300

80

80

65

100


600

600

300

80








Required Spaces Square Footages

2. Women (cont'd.)

e. Steam Room 80

f. Whirpool 65

g. Massage room with 2 stations 100

3. Office for complex manager 150

4. Office for two technicians 150

5. Office for reception/locker distribution/ 200
secretary

6. Conference/display area 300

E. Auxiliary Spaces

1. Eating facilities

a. Restaurant Dining Room
w/view of courts and pool (80 person capacity) 1,000

b. Kitchen/clean-up 900

c. Bar/Lounge (table and bar service 40 persons) 700

d. Vending lounge for court areas 600
seating and vending machines

2. Pro-Shop: number and size of spaces are variable
according to need. One or two shops divided
among five spaces have been provided for. 3,500

3. General Storage as necessary

4. Janitorial Rooms as necessary

1; F1 p^tri-I7/' A r -> r-i^~->-I- '--- -- I











COMPATABILITIES


There are some functions in this health club program that do not adapt themselves

easily to the structure of the old schoohouse. To put racquetball courts in the building

would not only be structurally difficult but also highly incompatible with the spirit of

this fine old structure. Therefore, the extremely active functions such as the racquet-

ball courts, gymnasium and, of course, the 25 metre swimming pool must be housed in a

separate structure. The graceful character of the old building seems ideally suited

to the support functions of this complex such as the shower/sauna/steam areas, locker

areas, central administration, restaurant, and pro-shop area.

Because of its proximity to public access the ground floor of Public School Number

Three shall be reserved for more public functions. Here will be located the pro-shops

in the former classrooms and the restaurant in the former auditorium. These spaces will

be totally open to the public yet have either a physical separation or controlled access

to the private club spaces. Thus, even non-members of this health club can have some

use of the building. It is debatable whether or not the pro-shops and restaurant will

have sufficient appeal to draw the non club member to the area, however, the shops and

restaurant can be of such a caliber that some non health club patrons will be enticed

to use this complex. Of course, the health club members will often use these facilities.





















The control center of the health club proper shall be located on the second floor

of Public School Number Three where it is out of both public view and circulation. Here

the central administration shall be contained along with the locker rooms, showers,

saunas, steamrooms, and whirpools. It will be from this location on the second floor

that the health club patron shall have direct access to the racquetball, gymnasium

and swimming facilities of the new structure.

Through the use of Public School Number Three for the health club support facili-

ties the old structure actually will become the backdrop for the new facility which

contains the actual sports related functions. The new structure will become an addi-

tion to the school house which, through the use of a vernacular shcool gymnasium form,

merges integrally with the old building while maintaining an identity of its own.










PRELIMINARY COST ESTIMATE


Building Demolition

1. Demolition of two classrooms and
gutting of interior @ $3 sq.ft.

Total Cost of Demolition:


Building Renovations

1. Fire stairs (new construction) @$175 sq.ft.

2. Elevator (new construction)

3. Restaurant/bar @ $50 sq.ft.

4. Retail shops @ $25 sq.ft.

5. General Health Club construction @$40 sq.ft.

6. Specialized health club construction
(showers, saunas, whirpools, etc.)

Total Cost of Renovations:

New Construction

1. Racquetball courts @$40 sq.ft.

2. Pool @$58 sq.ft.

3. Offices/lounge/gymnasium @$40 sq.ft.

4. Large Atrium enclosure @$20 sq.ft.

Total Cost of New Construction:


$175,000

35,000

120,500

189,000

390,040

300,000


$1,209,540



500,000

301,600

150,800

104,000

$1,056,400


Cost


$ 75,040

$ 75,040

















Site Work

1. Building Demolition for new construction
and parking @$15 sq.ft.

2. Parking construction @$.50 sq.ft.

3. Concrete walks @$1.50 sq.ft.

Total Cost of Site Work:


TOTAL PROJECT COST


Inflation Costs

1. Simple inflation multiplier of 18% per
year for 1.5 years


TOTAL ADJUSTED COST OF CONSTRUCTION


Cost

210,000


12,570

4,000

$226,570



$2,567,550


$ 693,200


$3,260,750































COMMERCIAL































WINDCHASER INDUSTRIES

MICHAEL J. JOHNSON











INTRODUCTION


Public School No. 3 has been abandoned since 1973. It is located near the Gator

Bowl complex in an area which was the focal point for riots in the 1960's. Although

accessibility is excellent the reputation of the locality has been a deterrent in en-

couraging commerce into the area. In order to stimulate the growth of commerce it

is necessary to establish a business district starting with self-sufficient operations,

such as small industry, which already exists in a scattered fashion among abandoned

commercial buildings in the neighborhood.

Designed by Klutho in the early 1900's, after the fire, Public School No. 3

not only possesses excellent accessibility but also visibility from Alt. U.S. I and

U.S. 90. A dominant characteristic of the building is its massive scale. With 12

foot high ceilings throughout an industrial task could be housed within the structure

with minimal change. To best exemplify this the manufacturing of sailboats will be

used as a vehicle.

Although the old school does not possess any historical value, it does reflect

the architectural style of that period. Symmetrical in plan, it consists of a central

body flanked by two wings, one to either side. Decoration consists of masonry relief

bands surrounding window openings and the base of the building, one central porch,










two wing porches and several terra cotta brackets flanking the eaves above at the

exterior. Inside there still exists some rather unique column capitals. All of

these features should be respected in the adaptive use plan of the building.


SAILBOAT MANUFACTURING REQUIREMENTS


The process of sailboat construction is done in two major steps. The first in-

volves the creation of the fiberglass shell and the second is the construction of the

structural frame and, whenever desired, cabin within the shell. The formation of

the shell is done in a mold where the fiberglass resin is sprayed or brushed over

cloth and allowed to dry. Each boat has a hull and deck mold. The structural frame

which can be steel or wood or a combination of both is installed within the hull.

The cabin is constructed next with the sealing of the deck mold to the hull and frame

as the final step of construction. Touch-up work and polishing is all that remains

before the boat is ready for the water. All exterior painting is done as a pigment

additive to the fiberglass while being applied to the mold.


SPATIAL ANALYSIS


Public School No. 3 is a two-story building with a central body flanked by two

symmetrical wings. The customer lounge and display will be located on the first floor

of the central body since the main entrance is there. Administrative offices will be










located above this on the second floor. These two spaces will be the only air-conditioned

spaces in the facility. Within these spaces all original column capitals and

one of the stairwells shall be restored to their original state. Structural changes

need only be minimal with the partial removal of some of the interior walls and one

of the stairwells. An infill floor will be required in place of the absent stairwell.

The remainder of the building will house the industrial process of sailboat manufacturing.

In each of the wings of the building are classrooms located along the north and

south elevations. The north side rooms are larger and removal of dividing interior

partitions is a simple process which requires no structural modification. By gutting

each of these rooms four large spaces, one per floor per wing, are created. The rooms

on the first floor will house the molds for the larger boats (25', 23', 21' and 19')

while one of the rooms on the second floor houses the smaller ones (16', 14' and 12')

and the other the carpentry shop.

Dividing the two wings on the south side, and directly south of the central body

is an auditorium with a ceiling height of 25'. This room shall be used as the main

assembly room for the larger boats. The fiberglass shells and structural and cabin

elements are transported into this room and assembled in one of the five assembly

bays. The boats and/or shells are supported from above on a rolling-winch monorail

system. The assembly bays are flanked on either side by transport bays which facilitate

both floors. The monorail system extends through the assembly room out into the boat










yard where the boats are finally washed and polished. The monorail/winch system is

also used to overcome the difference in height between the assembly room floor and the

boat yard surface at grade elevation. Outside, the monorail system is covered by an

aluminum roof and is separated from the inside by rolling aluminum doors. Once again,

the column capitals inside the auditorium shall be restored. The structural changes

are minor. The stage area must be removed for one of the transport bays and some

of the exterior infill walls on the south-side shall be removed where the monorail

system penetrates.

The smaller classrooms within the building along the south side will house bulk

and shelf storage as well as an employee lounge and restrooms. The only code requirement

necessary to bring the building up to regulation safety standards are two fire stairs

and exits which will be located at the end of both wings.


ADDITIONAL CONSTRUCTION


Since the majority of the manufacturing process can be housed within the old

school, additional construction will be minimal. Security and control of the boat-

yard as well as boat storage and a delivery bay are the only necessary additions.

Due to the massive scale of the school, all additions should respond accordingly.

In order to control and secure the activities in the boat yard an enclosure is

required. Since ordinary fence fabric doesn't meet the scale requirements of the










old school, an exaggeration is necessary. With the use of a five foot deep tie beam

supported 24 feet above grade by 12" or 8" pipe columns the fence fabric can be used

as an infill and respond to the scale of the existing structure. The tie beam might

also be used as a linking element for future expansion.

The boat storage shall be located along the western portion of the boatyard,

with maximum exposure to Florida Avenue, the busiest of the streets bordering the

site, It is incorporated into the fence structure utilizing the tie beam as a means

of supporting the roof. The north and south walls are masonry while the west enclosure

is glass, providing a visual display of the boats. The east side is left open to the

boatyard. Inside an "I" beam frame similar to the "I" beam construction of the mono-

rail is used to support the boats in storage.

Between the old school and boat storage is mast storage and the delivery bay.

Housed within the bay is a hydraulic lift for access to the second floor and a ramp

which facilitates the height change between the first floor and grade elevation.

In order to respect the geometry of the old school building any new construction

shall fall short of tying into the original structure. This separation shall be

bridged above with a skylight.

Site development shall include parking for thirty cars, a delivery entrance

and a sailboat loading entrance. Parking shall be divided into two areas. One at

street side parallel to the north facade (main entrance) and the other a parking lot













for eighteen cars between Florida Avenue and the boat storage addition. This will allow

for observation from a car at a closer view than from this street and encourage parking

and getting out for a more detailed examination. Between the parking lot and storage

shall be a patio to insure passerbys that their visit is welcomed.


BUILDING AREAS AND COST ESTIMATION


Existing Building

Additional Construction

Boat Yard

Parking

Demolition

Renovation*

New Construction

Site Work

TOTAL COST


24,000 Sq.Ft.

3,300 Sq.Ft.

9,520 Sq.Ft.

30 cars


$ 11l,000

1,353,000

306,000

55,500

$1,825,500


*Although the cost of renovation for Public School No. 3 is equal to or may exceed the
cost for a new replacement structure, replacement at the same quality would be virtually
impossible.






























DESIGN CENTER SOUTH

WARD DUPREE











DESIGN CENTER SOUTH


A designer's interior furnishings retail company, which operates nationwide,

has decided to locate a facility in Jacksonville. Their research has convinced them

of the vitality and growth potential of this urban area. Its strategic geographic

location is well suited to facilitate the transport of their merchandise, a good deal

of which is imported. The facility which they desire would accommodate regional offices,

warehouse and shipping, as well as a retail center for the Jacksonville market.

The company's administration is aware of the skyrocketing cost of new con-

struction, and in their search for a building site is exploring the possibility of

adapting an existing structure to their needs. They have become interested in the

former Jacksonville Public School No. 3, due to its proximity to the port; its easy

access from a major expressway and high visibility, and because of the amount of open

land around it. Convinced of the viability of this approach, they have commissioned

a building design which will meet their needs.


PROGRAM


The facility envisioned will function simultaneously as a display showroom,

operations center for regional activities including management, buying, shipping,









and importing, and will house studio space for design services.


SPACE AND FUNCTIONAL NEEDS

Display 15,000 sq.ft. (net)

This is to be the primary function of the facility, and should be the purpose

which the community will perceive. It is the desire of the owners that the building

convey a strong image. Various types of merchandise will be displayed, including home

and office furniture, floor and wall coverings, lighting fixtures, and selected works

of art. Flexibility is desirable in this space (spaces), as exhibits will be changed

constantly.

Sufficient circulation should be provided to allow easy movement and leisurely

perusal of the displays.

Sales Staff

Information/staff area 150 sq.ft.

Sales Manager Office 150 sq.ft.

Assistant Sales Manager 100 sq.ft.

Closing Room (2) 100 sq.ft.

Sample/catalog area 100 sq.ft.

A staff of 5-10 sales persons, an assistant manager, and a manager will be responsi-

ble for customer assistance in examination of merchandise and sales arrangements.

The information/staff area will be an orientation point for customers. It should









station for sales staff, it should provide for some seating and desk space.

The closing rooms are semi-private spaces where customers and sales staff may

conclude selections and arrangements.

The manager and assistant manager are responsible for sales operations, and

should have semi-private and separate offices.

A sample and catalog area should provide seating for customer inspection.

There should be adjacency between major displays and all sales spaces, and

an easy flow between all of these spaces.

Office


Staff/business entrance
reception/secretary

Office storage

General Office

Office manager

Executive Suite
President
Vice-President
Secretary/reception (2)
Waiting


Duplication/mail

Design offices

Conference room

Staff lounge


200

100

2,000

150


sq.ft.

sq.ft.

sq.ft.

sq.ft.


200 sq.ft.
200 sq.ft.
200 sq.ft.
150 sq.ft.
750 sq.ft.

150 sq.ft.

800 sq.ft.

200 sq.ft.

500 sq.ft.










The office aspect will be the secondary function of the building, and should

be on the second floor. There should be a separate entrance for staff and business

which bypasses the display area.

The secretary/reception area will control access to the office area, and the

switchboard will be located here. Space for two secretary/receptionists.

The general office area should provide space for approximately 20 clerical

type spaces initially, with sufficient space to allow infill growth at a later

date.

The office manager will require a semi-private space adjacent and accessible

to office area.

The executive suite should be central to the office area but discreet within

it. The executive functions are for corporate level buying and market strategies.

The executive secretaries will control access to this area; a comfortable waiting

space should be provided.

The duplication/mail room will contain office machinery and should be easily

accessible and central.

Design offices should provide a drafting/work station, each station con-

taining two 3'x7' tables. Reference material storage should be provided. There

should be acoustical separation from general offices, and should be accessible to

retail customers.











The staff lounge should provide kitchenette and tables for eating, and casual

seating. A bathroom should be adjacent.

Storage/Dock

Dock as needed

Storage 5,000 sq.ft.

Shipping office 200 sq.ft.


The dock should provide for the loading/unloading of trucks, and should accomo-

ate a tractor with a 30'-40' trailer. Three bays are desired, and there should be

room for a small forklift to operate. Provision for trash removal.

The storage should be easily accessible to the forklift and other equipment for

movement of bulky items. A clear ceiling height of 12' is desirable. Where second

level storage is utilized, a freight lift should be provided.

The shipping office should provide space for a shipping manager and clerk,

plus record storage.

General

Circulation stairs, emergency exits as necessary, elevator movement and

circulation is important to display areas and should be generous.

Toilets for the use of staff and customers; on each floor and in storage/

warehouse area.









Mechanical controlled atmosphere is important. Spaces should be acoustically

isolated from major spaces. Telephone switching, electrical panels, heating, cooling,

and ventilating.

Janitorial/storage 150 sq.ft. Maintenance of the building cleaning, supply

storage and sinks.

Parking employee and customer spaces. Provide from 50-75 spaces.


SOLUTION


An examination of the building has shown it to be sufficiently sound to accommodate

the desired functions, but considerable new construction is necessary to meet the program.

The existing building can accommodate office functions and some display. New construc-

tion will be necessary for dock and storage space and to expand display capability.

The existing building possesses a strong symmetrical order which would be both

difficult and self defeating, in terms of providing a strong image, to deny. This

order provides the basis for the organization of the new function within the existing

structure and an ordering criteria for new construction.

The concept is basically very simple. An extension of the transverse (N-S axis)

of the building greatly expands the auditorium space of the school, which becomes a

very large, open centralized display space. This space is exposed through glass walls

and framed by light steel members, which are in juxtaposition to the masonry mass of

Klutho's building. This mass is echoed in the warehouse addition which buttresses










the extended display area on the south and is of masonry construction with a steel

roof structure.

In the original building, display spaces are created in former classroom spaces

on the first floor. All partition walls are removed and new circulation defining parti-

tions are erected. The major bearing wall to the north of the corridor is replaced by

a series of columns carrying a girder; this is repeated on the second floor.

Client entry is through the original, axial, northern porch, which is extended

to penetrate into the volume of the building. The original stairs are removed and

floored over; vertical circulation for the customer is in the major display space

only, through a series of partial level changes or an elevator.

Staff entry is off axis, in the southwestern quadrant of the building. This

entry also penetrates the volume of the building; here with a landscaped entry court.

The creation of this court and entrance requires the removal of a portion of the

floor of what were formerly the outdoor classroom spaces. The staff entry opens

directly to the sales staff area; the major display space, and a new stair leading

up to the offices.

The second floor is devoted to office space, which is located in the northern

half of the structure. Open plan offices are used for flexibility in planning and

the executive office suite is located centrally on the second floor, within discrete

spaces.









Mechanical rooms and toilets are located in the southeast quadrant of the original

building for maximum acoustical isolation.

The glass extension is flanked on either side by large landscaped area, which

act as a foil between inside and outside, and further enrich the void between the

two masonry masses. Within this display area, a series of platforms rises, counter

clockwise, 1/4 level at a time, around the space, which is open and skylit in the

center, and overlooked by balcony from the office wing.

Delivery and service access is from the south, through the warehouse addition.

It includes a mechanical room to service the new construction, as well as a main

janitorial space. A large door opens into the display area for easy movement of

large items.

On site parking is provided for employees, approximately 20 spaces, adjacent

to the staff entrance and Florida Avenue. Customer parking is provided in the

lot to the north of the site, to be cleared and leased by the city for this purpose.

The layout of the customer lot continues the symmetrical organization, emphasized

even in the landscape plantings.


Old Total Square Feet = 28,000

New Total Square Feet = 6,613 (warehouse)
8,000 (display)
1,000 (staff, lounge, entry)

= 16,000 sq.ft.










Costs

Although costs in a rehabilitation project of this sort are very hard to predict

due to the uniqueness of the building, a rough estimate was derived by using some

gross costs per square foot. These costs were taken from current cost estimating

guides, and from conversations with an architect familiar with rehabilitation projects.

In this particular case, there were four major categories into which expenses

fell:

Demolition

Rehabilitation

New Construction

Sitework


Demolition which would entail removal of all old finishes; removal of existing

boiler room and other building on the site, and alterations to structure, was cal-

culated on the basis of $3.00/sq.ft.

Gross building area (existing) = 24,000 sq.ft.

$3.00/sq.ft. x 24,000 sq.ft. = $72,000

Renovation Calculated on the basis of $64/sq.ft. which covers costs of high

quality wall, floor and ceiling finishes, completely new sash, new plumbing and

electrical.









Added to the cost for renovations would be the expense of two hydraulic

elevators at approximately $35,000:

2 x $35,000 = $70,000

new egress stairs @ $150/sq.ft.

2 x $133 sq.ft. x $150/sq.ft. = $40,000

new main stairs at $200/sq.ft.

2 x 312.5 sq.ft. x $200/sq.ft. = $125,000


New Construction

The new portions in this project are relatively non-complex, and far less

costly than renovations. Costs are based on a national average for building type.

Warehouse $15.10/sq.ft. $1.25/cu.ft.

124,800 cu.ft. x $1.25/cu.ft. = $156,750

Retail Stores

$23.95/sq.ft., $1.82/cu.ft.

65,935 cu.ft. x $1.82/cu.ft. = $120,000

SiteWork

Paving, walks, landscape:

Paving $.50/sq.ft. x 6,000 sq.ft. = $3,000

Walks $1.30/sq.ft. x 3,000 sq.ft. = $3,900

Landscape set as percentage of budget.










ROUGH TOTAL

$ 72,000

$1,560,000

70,000

40,000

125,000

156,750

120,000

6,900


$2,160,750

plus inflation


Demolition

Renovations

Elevators

Five stairs

Main stairs

Warehouse (New)

Showroom (New)

Sitework


for estimated 18 month construction time @ 20% per annum


.20 x $2,160,750

+432,150

.10 x $2,592,900

+259,290


= $432,150



- $259,290


$2,852,190


TOTAL






























THE OLD SCHOOL
DINNER, THEATER, GALLERIES, LUXURY SHOPPING

BRENT M. LANE











ADAPTIVE USE AND ADDITIONS TO PUBLIC SCHOOL NUMBER THREE PROGRAM

Scope and Intent

It is the intent of this program to delineate the opportunities and constraints

presented by the existing property and its immediate surround; to suggest a strategy

for its productive and profitable reuse; to define the underlying issues, philosophy

and approach to this project; and to describe the major space allocations thus required.

The project has been approached from the standpoint of the private investor,

with the assumption that theC ity of Jacksonville can better serve its interests by

selling the building at a nominal price to a developer who can provide the capital

necessary to rehabilitate the property. This will have the effect of putting the property

back into productive use and provide some tax contribution to the City, while re-

ducing the City's exposure to liability concerning the unoccupied building.

No attempt has been made to evaluate the structural integrity of the building

or its conformance to state and local building codes. The primary concern in this case

is with reuse and solution of design problems related to its new use.


Project Context

Public School Number Three is located approximately one mile northeast of the down-

town area and immediately to the west of the Gator Bowl Complex. This district is










undistinguished in its composition and may be considered a "blighted area" beyond

recovery without the impetus of a major outside investment. At present the only such

force is the City itself, through its efforts to acquire substantial acreage around

the Gator Bowl for sports and recreation purposes; while this is clearly desirable, it

represents an extremely intermittent use and low productivity in the short run, and

does nothing to stimulate compatible commercial and light industrial enterprises in

the area. This combination of underutilization and depressed value make a joint

public/private development within this district an attractive possibility. Further-

more, its proximity to both the central business district and to major transportation

arteries contribute considerably to its potential as an accessible and relatively

uncongested destination.

On the other hand, there are a number of constraining factors to consider. Most

available routes from the downtown area are less than satisfactory, and access from

the expressway can be confusing. There is no real linkage with the Gator Bowl

facility, either pedestrian or vehicular. Finally, there is no existing "core" of

related businesses in the area on which additional firms could be attracted.


Strategy and Proposal for Reuse

The strategy and proposal which follow are based upon three assumptions regarding

the current and future state of the building and the area around it.









1) The district is no longer a viable residential area and will ultimately be

enveloped by a large multi-use district composed of, a) the Gator Bowl

complex; b) an industrial/commercial park and; c) A marina and riverfront

development.

2) Public School Number Three is not currently a viable city property (in fact,

jt is a liability) and should therefore be disposed of, in order to avoid

any further cash drain and liability exposure.

3) The building does have some architectural significance to the State and to

the City and should therefore be placed on the National Register of Historic

Places.

The most appropriate strategy for the future use of this building and site is

relatively simple. The city should turn the property over to a private investor

either by sealed bids or by negotiation. Included in the transfer should be some pro-

vision for a reduced tax liability for a five-to seven=year period, contingent upon

development of the property, as an additional incentive to the investor. Acceptance

of the building onto the National Register will provide further tax incentives in

the form of rapid amortization of the required capitalization.

Given the expected tax incentives and nominal purchase price, the problem becomes

one of defining an appropriate use for the property. The use of a strong image or

"anchor" is essential to identify and draw customers to the complex. In this case

the restaurant/lounge/night club/dinner theater serves as the basis for a courtyard









shopping complex of luxury and retail establishments. While such a facility might well

be inappropriate in isolation in this district, it is assumed that other commercial and

professional complexes will take advantage of the local tax incentives provided for

development of the district. Thus, "The Old School", being a landmark building and a

retail/entertainment anchor, could indeed begin the district rehabilitation.

The project is proposed in two phases, both to allow investment flexibility and

to delineate the adapture use of the existing building (Phase I) from the new construc-

tion of the addition (Phase II). This also allows for more rapid cost allocation when

estimating project costs.


Approach and Philosophy

There are two major issues involved in the combination of adaptive use and compati-

ble new design. The first is how to retain and interpret sympathetically the distin-

guishing features of the original building while minimizing the compromises implicit in

adapting the building to a new use and functional program. The second is how to add to

the original in an equally sympathetic manner without undue "tension" between old and

new, in terms of scale, texture, fenestration, circulation, details and other related

aspects.

Public School Number Three is distinguished primarily by its prairie school in-

fluences the porches, belt courses and brow roofs of the north, east and west sides.

The Sullivanesque brackets located under the brow roofs are the only other important














elements. Thus, these elements are all to be retained and restored, the remainder

of the facades will simply be replastered and painted. Original windows will be re-

placed with similarly proportioned bronze anodized aluminum-clad units of thermopane

glass. The original building will alternately appear virtually restored to its original

condition. The interior, however, will be gutted except for structural bearing walls;

new partitions and finishes will be installed as designed. Several structural modi-

fications areplanned in order to accommodate planning of new spaces.

The Phase II addition to the building respects the original building in scale,

proportion and in the way it "touches" the original. It acts as a "garden wall"

around a central courtyard between old and new, and is "attached" to the existing

building only be means of the covered arcades which wrap around the court on both

levels. Thenew is thus respectful of the original by standing away, creating a

"dialogue" and a necessary tension between the two. The porch columns of the original

are the symbolic/common elements, being repeated on the streetside entries to the

addition, as the "entry gateway" to the courtyard, and in the colonnade which wraps

around the inside edge of the addition.










Space Analysis

The following section describes and delineates the formal and functional characteris-

tics of all major spaces in the project, their relationships and adjacencies, their gross

areas and any modifications required by the solution (Phase I only).

Key to designations: FCT functional characteristics

FML formal characteristics

REL spatial relationships and adjacencies

MOD modifications to structure (Phase I only)


A. Phase I: Original Building

A-l. First Floor

1. Lobby/Entry 630 square feet

FCT Serves as the primary entrance to the original building. Seating

to left, out of circulation. Cashier's window and office to right.

FML Ceiling open to second floor exposes two luxury shop displays on

either side above, with balcony/landing to "gaslight alley" luxury

shopping in center. Pressed metal ceiling above.

REL Connects to stair/elevator and to main corridor.

MOD Center ceiling removed. Upper side and center walls removed,

railings installed.









2. Office 210 square feet

FCT Serves as restaurant manager's office and cashier's station.

REL Connects with lobby and main corridor.

3. Main Corridor 640 square feet

FCT Serves as primary connecting link from lobby to theater, private

dining and lounge.

FML Pressed metal ceiling down to tops of pilaster capitals. Colon-

nade opening into theater. Panelled doors to lounge and private dining

at both ends.

REL Primary connecting link to all first floor public spaces.

4. Lounge 2,680 square feet

FCT Serves as bar and lounge for facility. Small stage for live enter-

tainment. Seats 80-100 persons. Separate entrance on east side.

FML Quiet and subdued space with wide variety of seating. Cofferred

pressed-metal ceiling with indirect lighting. Hanging plants, panelled

wainscoting.

REL Connects with main corridor. Adjacent to public restrooms.

MOD Remove two 12' sections of bearing wall; place beams to carry

loads above.

5. Dinner Theater 2,660 square feet

FCT Serves as evening dinner theater seating 100-120 persons. Can










also be used as night club with live entertainment on stage.

FML Lattice trusses exposed above; lighting, ductwork and silk banners

penetrate and hang from trusses. Rear half of seating raised 14".

REL Connects with main corridor, kitchen and lunch dining terrace.

MOD Remove existing dropped ceiling. Install lighting and ductwork

in trusses.

6. Kitchen 1,530 square feet (Phase I)

FCT Serves 100-120 full course dinners for theater; with Phase II,

serve 200-220 lunch meals.

REL Connects with theater and lunch dining terrace (Phase II).

Service entry on west side.

MOD Remove three 26' partitions. Install equipment

7. Private Dining 800 square feet

FCT Serves as private party and banquet dining room. Seats 40-60

waiter's station.

FML Dropped tofferred ceiling; panelled wainscoting.

REL Connects with private and main corridors and with kitchen.

8. Conference Dining 800 square feet

FCT Serves as business luncheon and dinner dining or as banquet

dining. Seats 20-40 persons. Waiter's station.









9. Public Elevator and Stair 210 square feet

FCT Connects first floor lobby with "gaslight alley" luxury shopping

on second floor.

10. Public Rest Rooms 300 square feet

11. Stage 430 square feet

12. Prop Storage and Assembly 930 square feet

13. Theater Dressing 490 square feet

14. Service Entrance 420 square feet

15. West Corridor 700 square feet


FIRST FLOOR:

Gross Area 14,130 Square Feet

Net Assignable 10,530 Square Feet


A-2. Second Floor

1. Second Floor Landing and Balcony 190 square feet

FCT Serves as landing/waiting area for elevator and stair.

FML Adjacent to balconies of luxury shops on sides. Overlooks lobby

space.

REL Connects with "gaslight alley" and vertical circulation.

MOD Install hydraulic elevator in place of east stair.

2. "Gaslight Alley" Corridor 2,020 square feet












FCT Runs entire length of second level. Links all shops and provides

egress;by public stair and through exterior courts to Phase II complex.

FML Pressed metal ceiling to tops of pilaster capitals. Gas lights

on high sidewalls. Panelled wainscoting both side walls. Wooden

signage for luxury shops. Display windows flush in walls. Open

windows overlooking theater.

REL Primary connecting link of second level ties all spaces and

means of egress.

MOD Install ceiling, gas lights, signs, display windows. Open windows

onto theater.

3. Luxury Shops (5) 5,650 square feet

FCT Provide retail shopping spaces for items such as rare books,

oriental carpets, prints, leather goods, etc.

FML Cofferred pressed-metal ceilings, track lighting on perimeters,

wainscoting.

MOD Remove partitions, install double doors. Build office and

storage spaces.

4. Service Elevator 90 square feet

5. Public Elevator and Stairs 210 square feet

6. Exterior Courts 960 square feet









SECOND FLOOR: Phase I:

Gross Area 10,660 Square Feet 24,790 Square Feet

Net Assignable 5,650 Square Feet 16,180 Square Feet



B. Phase II

B-1. First Floor

1. Retail Shops (13) 18,400 square feet

FCT Provide retail shopping facilities with the potential for use as

commercial/professional rental. The larger spaces can be easily adapted

for use as restaurants.

FML Shops are entered from open-air arcade. Display windows all fron-

tage. High band awning windows to outside. Dropped acoustic ceiling.

REL All shops work off of arcade and are oriented onto courtyard.

Second floor arcade leads to exterior courts as transition into old

building.

2. Lunch Dining Terrace 2,530 square feet

FCT Serve as casual dining space for lunch menu. Seating for 100-

120 persons.

FML Glass-enclosed two-story space overlooking courtyard. Canvas

awnings provide sun control and diffuse light.

REL Connects with theater to north. courtyard and arcades on both





















3. Kitchen Addition 450 square feet

4. Public Elevator 200 square feet

5. Public Stairs 800 square feet

6. Service Elevators 600 square feet

7. Arcade Corridor (second level) 3,100 square feet



PHASE II:

Gross Area 26,680 Square Feet

Net Assignable 21,380 Square Feet










Preliminary Cost Estimates


Phase I

Fees, permits and contingencies

Site Clearing

Structural and Floors

Stairs and Elevators

Interior Finishes

Furnishings and Equipment

Exterior Finishes

Landscaping and Sitework

Paving

Total Cost

Cost / sq.ft.


Phase II

Fees, permits and contingencies

Sitework

Foundations and Structural

Masonry

Stairs and Elevators


$ 60,000

20,000

380,000

122,000

281,000

345,000

180,000

35,000

76,000

$1,564,000

$63.04




$ 80,000

25,000

450,000

525,000

210,000

















Interior Finishes

Equipment

Exterior Finishes

Landscaping

Paving

Total Cost

Cost / sq.ft.


Total Cost at March 1, 1980

(Phase I plus Phase II)

Total Cost for 18-month construction


$ 264,000

250,000

186,000

80,000

97,000

$2,167,000

$81.22


$3,731,000


period, 20% annual inflation factor:


$4,924,920

Total Adjusted Cost Discounted to present value, 13.5% mortgage:

$4,026,600































OLYMPIC VILLAGE CENTER

DIANE M. GIGON











ADAPTIVE USE PROPOSAL FOR JACKSONVILLE PUBLIC SCHOOL NUMBER THREE:

"OLYMPIC VILLAGE CENTER"


Goal

The purpose of this project is to rehabilitate an historically and architecturally

significant building as well as to revitalize a blighted portion of the City of

Jacksonville.


Program

The project site, near the Jacksonville Coliseum, has been proposed to be used

for an Olympic Village. This idea becomes a premise for the feasibility of an "Olympic

Village Center". The center will be used by the athletes living in housing surrounding

the site as well as the general public. The solution, which involves the adaptive use

of the existing Public School Number Three and the compatible design of an addition to

it, will offer business and social activity. The center will become a place to go, a

place to gather, day or night.

The existing building will be modified to contain 10 retail shops, a bar, and

an exhibition space. The existing two story structure, with its spacial division, will

adapt well to these uses. The former classroom spaces will be used for retail shops and

the bar, and the former auditorium space will be used for exhibition. The addition









building will contain office space, two shops, and a restaurant.

Building Concept

The addition will repeat the existing building mass and attach to it in a way that

a courtyard will be created. The raised court, level with the floor of the existing

building, will command a ceremonial approach upward on a major axis. Perpendicular

to this axis will be the main entrance and exhibition space. From this point the

building will allow a continuous pedestrian flow with places to pause. The addition

will complete the rear facade of the existing building which presently appears unfinished.


Building Details

The straight horizontal lines in the existing building, typical of the style

of Prairie School Architects, will be complimented in the addition. Cantilevered

horizontal forms will be used at the entrances and at the roof addition over what was

previously Public School Number Three's open air classroom space. Columns carrying the

existing cantilevered entrance roofs will be repeated but in a larger scale enclosing

the courtyard. The water line base will also be continued from the existing building

to the addition.


Exterior Space

The courtyard, surrounding the existing oak tree, will have random informal

seating. Fountains and landscaping will enhance the outdoor eating space of the

restaurant. Off-site parking will be provided at the adjacent block to the east of










Spaces

Retail Shops -- (12) 10,410 sq.ft.

function: they will cater to the shopping needs of the athletes and the general

public and will be a source of income for the City.

content: they will provide sportswear and equipment, convenience items as found

in drug stores, and bicycle or roller skate rental in keeping with the

village atmosphere.

relationship: the shops will be positioned so that a two story mall will be

created, connecting the existing building with the addition.


Bar -- 1,932 sq.ft.

function: it will provide entertainment and a place to socialize during the day

and at night.

content: in addition to the bar seating, informal seating arrangements will

focus on an entertainment platform for live bands or solo performers.

Movies will also be scheduled. Food selection will be limited to

horsdoeuvres.

relationship: the bar, with the restaurant, will be a focal point at night after

the offices and shops close. They will keep the center alive as visitors

will be able to windowshop between these two points.










Exhibition -- 1,723 sq.ft.

function &
content: this space will be used by the shop owners for exhibition of merchandise

or for exhibits by athletes.

relationship: this space will serve as the major entrance for the shopping area

and will be open to the second floor above.

Restaurant -- 7,884 sq.ft.

function: it will provide a broad selection of dining experiences and a place to

socialize day or night.

content: the restaurant will contain indoor seating facilities for 150 persons

and outdoor seating for 50 persons. There will be an outdoor bar and

a bakery at the entrance.

relationship: the variety of seating arrangements will afford different views

from serene plantings and fountains to the activity of pedestrian

movement in and out of the center.

Offices -- 6,678 sq.ft.

function: the offices will be leased by professionals or used by the athletes

for meeting rooms.

content: the flexibility of the open office plan will allow the spaces to be

divided as needed.














CONSTRUCTION COSTS


Demolition Cost $3/sq.ft.

New Elevator

(3) stairs @ $250/sq.ft. floor

(2) fire stairs @ $150/sq.ft./floor

Renovation Costs $35/sq.ft.

New Construction $40/sq.ft.

Site Deck Work $25/sq.ft.


$ 68,100

32,000

138,000

48,000

794,500

590,720

150,000


$1,821,320

1,857,746

2,229,295


2,452,225


$2,452,225


Sub-Total

Landscape Work 2%

First Year @ 20% inflation


1/2 year @ 10% inflation


TOTAL COST




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