• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Introduction
 Table of Contents
 History
 Macro city
 Micro site
 Legal
 Financial feasibility
 Client/user analysis














Title: Savannah project
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00103196/00001
 Material Information
Title: Savannah project
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida Department of Architecture
Publisher: University of Florida Department of Architecture
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00103196
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page i
    Introduction
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Table of Contents
        Page iv
    History
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Macro city
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Micro site
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
    Legal
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
    Financial feasibility
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
    Client/user analysis
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
Full Text



<.
U U


000D
00D
000
000
N-


2wm

"5II
><5.


(OL,


;
I
















Savannah River Front Project
000
The town of Savannah, Georgia was originally generated as a settlement because of excellent o0E

access to a deep water port. Over the years the river front has been extensively used as a commercial

warehouse and factory district. In recent years the river front has deteriorated progressively and

many of the buildings have fallen into disuse. Presently there is a great interest in renewal of the

river front as a business, commercial, and housing district. Many new shops, restaurants, and business

offices are now moving into the existing warehouse facilities. These old warehouses are magnificent

structures and give the warehouse system significant unity.

The Metropolitan Planning Commission (MPC) is involved in a large scale river front urban

renewal project which includes a pedestrian concourse, boat docks, and park facilities. This project

is now under construction and will reach completion during this year. A city ordinance now exists

against the removal of any of the existing warehouse structures; however, prior to this ordinance a

segment of the warehouse system was removed west of the city hall. Our project will be to reestablish

this link.

There are many forces that should be considered in reacting to the proper replacement of this 0

missing link. The main factors are the lineal movement along the waterfront (River Street), the proper

ending of Bull Street, which is the main north-south access of the city and the old historic district,

the lineal activity along Bay Street which is parallel to the river and is at the top of the river bluff,

and Factors Walk which is the old service system that exists at the median level between Bay Street and

the river front.



















A prospective developer has acquired the property in question and has city approval on the

following functions.

1. A hotel of 230 rooms

2. 62,000 square feet of commercial retail space

3. Parking for 400 autos that will react to the hotel occupants and the above

commercial space

The possibility exists for commercial office space and for condominium apartment facilities.

At this time the developer has no clear definition of the extent of these functions but would entertain

any reasonable proposal by the designer within the limits of the site restrictions. Also, any condominium

apartment facilities will generate an additional 1-1/2 parking spaces per apartment unit.

Vacant property also exists between the city hall and the river front. This property is owned

by the city and can be used by the designer to effect the proper pedestrian entry from Bull and Bay

Streets to the river front. This property can also be used to establish a linear link between our project

and the existing warehouse and city hall complex.

The class visited Savannah on January 13th and 14th to hear a presentation by the Metropolitan

Planning Commission, the architects who are responsible for the river front urban renewal project, and

the developer who owns the site on which our project is to be located. During the visit the design

studio class also collected data here within documented.

















CONTENTS


History to present.........................................


Macro City................................................


Micro Site ............................................


Legal .... ...............................................


Financial Feasibility .....................................



Client/User Analysis....................................



CREDITS


Site Mapping ............. ;................................


Photo Character ...........................................


Photo Documentation .......................................



Instructors ..............................................


Editors ...................................................


Page

1


42


62


79


99


Bob Travelstead
Nelson Griffin

Vicki Hewitt
Roxanne Horvath

Rand Soellner
John Markham

Howard Baker
Allen Moyer

Jim McLean
Pete Johnston
Patsy Orton

George Canelas
John Johnson





Alex Konstantinidis
Albert Martin

Chuck Secord
Rocke Hill

Guy Peterson
Steve Johnson
Ken Kroger

Ira Winarsky
Harry Merritt

Jim McLean
Steve Johnson
Alex Konstantinidis














Intent:
This section covers briefly Savannah's history from its founding
ODO
in 1733 to the present. Specific topics include the founding and DOC
D3O
settlement; the early planning of the town; the evolution of Savannah to
the present time; the site history; historic building materials; 16
criteria for adapting new buildings to the architectural character of
Historic Savannah; the architectural history; an overview of some of
Georgia's leading architects; and an inventory of the historic buildings
near the river front.


HISTORY of SAVANNAH






O

0!
z


0-


--- m la 3 11 11 Iplr. --- e -I- At-P

















Founding and Settlement

Early in February 1733, a group of colonists arrived in Charleston

from Deptford, England. James Oglethorp, engineer, soldier, and member of

Parliment led this group of 35 families which were to be the trustees of a

settlement to be established south of Charleston in the new Colony of Georgia.

After being well received and encouraged in this venture Oglethorp.and his

party set out for the Savanna River to seek out a location for settlement. In

several letters to the trustees in February 1733, Oglethorp describes the

site that was to become the town of Savannah:

"I fixed upon a healthy situation on about ten miles from the

sea. The river here forms a half-moon, along the south side

of which the banks are about forty foot high, and on the top

flat, which they call a bluff. The plain high ground extends

into the country five or six miles, and along the river side

about a mile. Ships that draw twelve foot water can ride within

ten yards of the bank. Upon the river-side in the centre of this

plain I have laid out the town...



I chose the situation for the town upon an high ground, forty

feet perpendicular above high water mark; the soil dry and

sandy, the water of the river fresh, springs coming out from




















the sides of the hill. I pitched upon this place not only


for the pleasantness of the situation, but because from the


above mentioned and other signs I thought it healthy; for it


is sheltered from the western and southern winds (the worst


in this country,) by vast woods of pine trees, many of which


are an hundred and few under seventy feet high."



j ~
i
r1 ~3
_4- I~h;S-~
D=-,
-----~-~ ,. YL--; ;!
~LLq~~li~hj
~;~jcs~u~i~g~~
S~
tI -
-
i ---
= ;i7--rs
-?.
+ t.
"


--r

















By December 1733, Oglethorp had laid out four wards of the town.

The plan was an imaginative use of lots, streets and open spaces. Each

section or ward had 40 lots each 60 feet by 90 feet. The "Trustee" lots

of the east and west sides of the central square were to be used for the

public buildings, churches, stores, etc. Four "Thything" lots at the

north and south ends of the wards were each divided into five housing

lots.4 The main streets running out from the squares were 75 feet in

width while minor streets were 37-1/2 feet wide, and alleys were 22-1/2

feet wide.-

The settlers were given a one acre lot in the town, a five acre

garden in the "Commons" or open space around the town, and a forty-four

acre farm site.' Property deeds required the settler to build on the

lots within 18 months, and farm at least ten acres of the land within ten

years.

Oglethorp's plan shows a concern for order and control. "Each

ward of the town was run by a constable to whom four tything men

reported for the welfare and good conduct of the families of each tythinq."

The squares were originally intended for defense but in the

1800's became centers of community life with landscaping first being

added in 1810. Squares had different functions; there was the city

market in Ellis Square, a water tower in Franklin Square, and a fire


























house in Washington Square, and all had a pump for water supply.

Oglethorp's plan works extremely well today under the demands

of automobile traffic. The outer streets provide straight thorough-

fares for fast moving traffic while the inner streets, winding through

the system of squares slow traffic to a leisurely rate.

"The squares themselves have no monumentality. They
are too small and too separate. They are certainly
no benefit to modern through traffic. But they create
pools of light in the geometry of a grid-iron plan."

and:

"The square by frequent repetition becomes an integral
part of the street pattern and creates a series of
rhythmically placed openings which give a wonderful
sense of space in a solidly built townscape."


Carl Feiss
















Savannah has had a very erratic history, experiencing times of

general despair and periods of enlightenment and financial prosperity.

In the decade after its founding Savannah went through a time of

struggle. It emerged as a center of the export-import business and com-

modities such as lumber, rice, indigo, sago powder, beef, pork, tar and

turpentine were leading exports to the other colonies and to Europe.r

Most of the buildings in this period were wood, by far the most

plentiful material! The first houses were single story, abhct 22 by 16

feet, in dimension, with a loft overhead and small backyard.1s

Toward 1741, many settlers became discouraged and left for

Carolina and the northern colonies. The Moravians, a peace-loving group,

described Savannah as a "scene of great distress".4

In 1743, only a few months after Olgethorp himself left the town,
-I
Thomas Eyre wrote "Savannah which sometime agone could raise 400 or 500

men is now ruinous, the inhabitants all gone away, and the houses are

tumbling down." '

The Revolutionary War, however, brought activity back to the town

which became the only British stronghold'between Canada and Florida, in

spite of resistance by many loyalists.

The French tried desperately to capture the town in 1779 with a

flotilla of 40 French ships under the command of Admiral d'Estainy and the

Polish-American patriot Cosmir Pulaski. In the Battle of Savannah the
















French and Americans were defeated after a five day shelling of the town.f

In spite of their victory, the British were prompted to reinforce Savannah

with more troops who remained here until the close of the War in 1782.18

Still Savannah was an outpost removed from most of the activity

in the new United States. Some described it as a wilderness. A merchant

from Liverpool in 1820 complained of howling wolves and alligators lying in

the roads."

Eli Whitney arrived in Savannah in 1793. On a plantation, not

far from town he invented the cotton gin which separated cotton fiber from

the seeds ten times faster than could be done by hand." Savannah was in-

stantly a center of world trade.

"In 1794 Savannah's population was just 2500 with exports less

than $500,000. By 1819 the city had become a showy place, the sixteenth

largest city in America with exports of more than $14,000,000."

Prosperity was displayed in the new brick and stucco homes which

replaced the wooden dwellings of the 1700's.

William Jay was perhaps the most notable architect of this period,

having arrived from England in 1817.2 Jay, introduced the Regency style

of architecture to Savannah which was best represented by the Richardson-
23
Owens-Thomas house, the finest Regency house in America.

Jay was also hired for the Scarborough house now being restored
24
for the Historic Savannah Foundation, Inc. President Monroe visited the















24
house in 1813.

Characteristic of many of Jay's buildings was the use of clas-

sical detail, large plane surfaces and generous, graceful curves. Stucco
25
over brick was commonly used.

Charles B. Cluskey contributed to Savannah architecture by

building a line of stores for cotton storage into the forty foot high bluff

along the river front. 26

Adjacent to these stores, a series of walkways were opened in

1822 connecting the cotton warehouses7 Known as Factors Walk, this two

level system of iron bridges over a cobble stone pathway allowed the cotton

merchants or factors to easily move between the warehouses. Construction

of Factors Walk was continued until 1872, along with excavation into the

bluff.28Stones used for paving the walk and constructing the walls nearby

were once ballast carried from overseas on merchant ships.

The prosperity of Savannah was not soundly established, however,

since many of the merchants were interested only in making a profit and

then moving back to their homes in the north or overseas. There was no

strong middle-class of craftsmen, and most of the labor was done by slaves

or freed slaves.

The cotton industry obviously required a great deal of labor to

produce this growth. Slavery, once prohibited in the Colony of Georgia
became coonplace by 1771.29Those associated with the industry held that
became cormmonplace by 1771. Those associated with the industry held that
















30
slavery "involves life, prosperity, safety and security". Around 1840

half of Savannah's population were slaves and those on the plantations

were responsible for the city's wealth.31

The period of growth started by the cotton industry did not last. c

A fire in 1819 brought progress to a standstill, destroying most of Savannah.

Immediately following this a yellow fever epidemic forced most people to

leave.33

The cotton industry was not to die, however, and brought back a

new period of growth beginning around 1830 which lasted until the Civil

War.34

Soon after the start of the Civil War, Fort Pulaski was taken

and Savannah was helpless against a Union blockade on the river.35

Sherman and the Union troops reached Savannah in December 1864.

Without much resistance the troops occupied the city and most of the houses

remained unharmed. General Sherman was allowed the home of Charles Green

as his headquarters.36

Even though the Civil War caused a temporary economic setback, I

Savannah soon reacquired its previous importance as a trade center. Along

the river front new warehouses were built to handle the overflow of trade.

As Thomas Gamble stated in 1888, "everyone believed that Savannah was at

the open door to an era of unprecedented progress."'37 ---

The rapid economic growth continued into the 20th Century until
















World War I.38After this period, however, new export markets appeared for

cotton and trade fell off in Savannah. Industry, maritime trade and ship-

building continued to grow and today Savannah has nearly 500 ships in its

port each year.40

Only recently has the public attitude changed toward the archi-

tecture which once made Savannah a showplace. Disinterest had been the
41
general feeling and disrepair or destruction had generally been the result.

The destruction of the historic city market in 1953 enraged many people to

concern and the threatened destruction of the Davenport house in 1955

brought about some action.42

The Historic Savannah Foundation was started to prevent any

further destruction or abuse of such historic landmarks. One hundred per-

cent restoration of 1100 buildings is the main objective of the Foundation
43
and most of this work has already been accomplished. In addition, new

structures are critiqued to determine if they are compatible in the context

of the community very often they are not and are rejected.

Historic Savannah is greatly involved in the economic welfare of

the community and it is figured that a one dollar investment by the

Foundation produces $30 worth of return to the community.44

The Foundation was one of the first to start a system of "re-

volving funds" which lends money to individuals or groups wishing to
45
purchase an historic building and restore it themselves. Restrictions are
















established to prohibit changing the appearance of the architecture.

After a long period of decline in importance the downtown area

began to grow in 1948 when downtown merchants had to respond to the loss

of business to the suburbs46 Broughton Street, evenstreets south of the

river, becomethe main downtown shopping strip. The residential area,

located in the two and one-half square mile historic district is becoming

a haven for middle-income groups pushing lower income groups to the outside
47
districts. Presently there are pockets of low-income groups in this area

interspersed among the middle and high-income groups. Significant dev-
lopment of the downtown district happened between 1958 and.1973.48

Although the warehouse district by the river front had been

dormant for the past since the 1920's, a $7.5 million River Street
49
renewal project started in 1971 has pumped new life into this area." There

were six shops in the warehouses in 1973 and this has increased to present

number of 60 restaurants, bars, and shops50 Offices occupy some of upper

floors, but there is still much floor area not in use.

The River Front Renewal project started about 1966 and was

approved in 1973 with funding of 54.5 million?1 The Environmental Protection

Agency kicked in some of the funding while the city provided the bulk of

the funds.52

The function of the development was twofold: 1) to stabilize the

shoreline and develop a usable public area, and 2) to control and collect


WA9AZe4oSre -seCrpoxa






















sanitary sewage along the river.53

Two significant architectural factors were the very active river

which had a great deal of traffic generation spectator interest, and the
54
long, narrow site, 60 feeet by 1/2 mile long.

Also important was the historic appeal of the area and its
55
potential as a major tourist center with the warehouse redevelopment.

Construction began on August 1, 1976 and is expected to end by


56
March 1977.

S ,


* .
f,


CLL,5V-Y'S RMFVL-MEPT toie2-s


(


V


IL
b.I.


*--


~
I
s.- `'~ trptg


















Site History

The first building on this site was constructed around 1789.

This was a wood structure .iith a brick foundation. The building was

destroyed by fire about 1801.57

There were warehouses on lots 6, 7, and 8 of our site con-

structed in 1801 which were probably the first of the long line of

warehouses along the river front. These were wood buildings on brick

foundations. It is speculated that this foundation was originally

pyramids of brick on mats of wood cross-ties.

This warehouse complex was burned but later rebuilt between 1807
59
and 1810.- The warehouse structure was particularly notable for its

steeple which stood up one story above the bluff, a noticeable land-
60
mark in pictures of the Savannah river front.

Fire once again destroyed this group of buildings. They were

again replaced in 1889 only to be destroyed by fire shortly after this
61
construction.

A year later the property was taken over by the Savannah Grocery
62
Company which built a six story brick warehouse. Wood timber was used

as framing between the brick load bearing walls.
































Replacing masonry and sandstone as a material in many structural

uses, cast iron was shaped into columns, lintels, and arches, which also

simplified construction.69 Uses as balastrades for stairs and balconies

the cast iron adds visual richness from its form and the projected

patterns of light and deep shadows.70










li

a)w
tIt'o








iE F[ F F
Elf if "ll E

fi rI IIn



I r- r -
~jrr fI:F frr- ~ i a liK


t16
S1A


PPO9SEqoTF


F"00 -MF- SlTF-.



























Criteria For New Buildings in Historic Savannah

To preserve the character of the old neighborhoods in Savannah,

the Historic Savannah Foundation has adopted 16 criteria to be considered

in the design of new buildings. This criteria was developed by Paul

Muldawer an architect in Atlanta, for the Central Savannah Area.71 To be

acceptable a new building must comply with at least six of these 16

criteria. The following sketches are presented in the article "Criteria

of Urban Design Relatedness" in the January, 1971 issue of Historic

Preservation. These criteria listed on the next three pages do not

necessarily apply to our project.











1. A MANPATCeY 9uieltEJMET TUTAr -EWJ
BUILLovIS 5E CDnSTro-=-D -Tb A.
EIqR4T Wii TikJ 10 oF' 1JE41ZE
"A--4Tr ofr xrBli toill .




-. F1RoET(co of F-T FACAD.- -"
Ee-LATnOUSUIP wEEj&TI-IK .s VrlH
A1p 4qE1GiHT oF T)E FnNOT J--vl-Anro







ATTo or IwoJPT TO 1 tF-qelU or wml\tos AN D -








4- 4TIo o, so ors7e vi 1 THE r- ~f.E-t rwE. '"yTM
4.sg -A o-,teeP, teon- T. Ac-PyTno- OFo
eSr1F AS VA> k)-e*sz- E0uEMF-r3S yTiHH 6r
i~~~Z4YrL (n~t~.T*f-













DOfl Un aL

'v thin
K-.i.?^ ^^


2.5. or FA O r4 r- O OfLeeS o
rtZT-rT. '.4T"M or ecoupz.e-r
2onLP^ 8MAS S T- sPACes Re-eM)




c6jecots3 .A-r A 0TIiMre CAJ ns.c


7. 0L-=LAn o FS4%P or MATeR-mL IT4TwM
A4 A4Mea T4- PzBni::NWJAKT MhAT L-
MAY eFL 'Ta.v., 1s t e., STeceO tAu-c4
,E513p or. ore- Tt=L-...


.LA 3-(op( oS CCoPSo OF- M AL-O
A FA2TToe.
C. Ee-LATnT^2>4lP Of t7XT-ocES .

/O. _LATlosi-p OF A^.lITeCTOfAL... DETAILS.
nse4E- MA iZC-Lo 'e COmeLCes>, IIMELS,
CMA-lEsl, aWcHT 0tE ToCL
CL( M Eys, E-TC..











11. PeLAlnosHIp OF "o APes. My-
1 0L...3CE5L eABLE-, MA3DSD 0, P,
oe OTreaPs.
12- Wt/L- OF CrO-TIlO3Jl IMC.LOPIES
BEU ck WAqLLWS WG0 OC4T (fLO
Se;,A s MASsEs.'S'
is. -L.A-nos.AItP OFr LDSc PPIhO
1p-r Tfis 4cEce is? Moze.. wriTf
f MA- ss ADD C^^ri^o1iTY.




i4. 120oo00c <3 T= MY BA P)E- C&MIAy C .c
I1 TYE. OSI Tr P4CW- PA4\le-ES Co-,S. l- STotlES,
(itZA, ITM 7Lo ...cF- T'A.y O orrTe- M4ATE ALS.




S E.sZrA~E=.4 y -T :t st.zF otr-
.coSTOEOnco& 5sD AM ^AIDLc--






TqE-= vt01or efL.LEVA\nCo

















Materials

The architectural character of Old Savannah is created in part by an

"historic patina" which has resulted from the blending of fine detailing,

patterns and textures of material, and thoughtful landscaping.63

The architecture of the 1800's uses,according to Historic Savannah,

three locally manufactured building materials which are responsible, in part,

for the unique appearance and mood of the historic district.64

"Savannah Grey Brick", once used as a backing for other necessary

types or stucco or as an exposed surface is now valuable as a decorative

veneer.6These large masonry units "soft and porous, rich in color and

texture" and often stained from the lime mortar are being used in many

renovated buildings.66

Tabby, another local building product, was used as material for

non-load bearing walls around courtyards and gardens. This was constructed
67
by pouring cement, stones, and oyster shells into wooden forms. This was
63
often covered with stucco and painted shades of tan and gray. Many of these

walls in the historic section of Savannah have lost their stucco veneer

revealing the texture of the tabby material.

Cast iron is probably the most popular building material from the

Savannah area, becoming widely used in central Georgia and South Carolina

as well.


















FOOTNOTES

1. Mills Lane, Savannah Revisited, Beshire Press,
Savannah, 1973, p. 11.
2.
3. Mills Lane, p. 11.
4. Ibid.
5.
6.
7.
8. Mills Lane, p. 13.
9.
10. Mills Lane.
11. "The Savannah Story", Historic Preservation, National
Trust for Historic Preservation, Washington, D.C.,
January 1969, p. 10.
12. Ibid.
13. Ibid, p.11.
14. Mills Lane, p. 36.
15. Ibid, p.37.
16. Ibid, p. 39.
17. Ibid.
18. Ibid.
19. Ibid, p. 51.
20. Ibid, p. 52.
21. Ibid.
22. "The Savannah Story", p. 11.
23. Ibid.
24. Ibid.
25. Mills Lane, p. 71.
26. "The Savannah Story", p. 12.
27. Mrs. Mary Morrison, interview, January 14, 1977.
28. Ibid.
29. Mills Lane, p. 79.
30. Ibid, p. 81.
31. Ibid, p. 74.
32. Ibid.
33. Ibid.
34. Ibid.
35. Ibid, p. 121.

















36. "The Savannah Story", p. 12.
37. Mills Lane, p. 131.
38. "The Savannah Story", p. 14.
39. Ibid.
40. Ibid.
41. Ibid, p. 16.
42. Ibid.
43. Ibid, p. 17.
44. Ibid, p. 20.
45. "Revolving Funds", Historic Preservation, National
Trust for Historic Preservation, Washington, D.C.,
April, 1971, p. 30.
46. Sacksmans, lecture, January 14, 1977.
47. Ibid.
48. Ibid.
49. Ibid.
50. Eric Meyerhoff, lecture, January, 14, 1977.
51. Ibid.
52. Ibid.
53. Ibid.
54. Ibid.
55. Ibid.
56. Ibid.
57. Ibid.
58. Mrs. Mary Morrison.
59. Ibid.
60. Ibid.
61. Ibid.
62. Ibid.
63. Historic Savannah, Historic Savannah Foundation,
Incorporated, Savannah, 1968, p. 43.
64. Ibid.
65. Ibid.
66. Ibid.
67. Ibid.
68. Ibid.
69. Ibid.
70. Ibid.
71. Paul Mauldawer, "Criteria of Urban Design Relatedness", Historic
Preservation, National Trust for Historic Preservation,
Washington, D.C., January 1971, p. 29.
















_*:1 'S ARCHITECTU.-.AL -IST R UR7 4,.


Ceorgia's architectural history followed close-
ly that pattern which characterized .merican
culture along the Atlantic coast; in Savannah
as in the older colonies the.to-:nscape remain
essentially English. The demand for the ex-
ploitation of great areas of land and the wide ii
base of property ownership created a new con-
cept of the town with its embracing road system.
Tomochichi, the intelligent and capable chief
of the Creeks, befriended the Oglethorpe co-
lony and visited the English king but there
was no cultural merger. J-xcept for agricultural
and hunting techniques, the settlers borrowed
little else from the incians.
-"rly towns in Georgia were almost invarir-ly I
laid out after a pre-determined pattern. In coast
tol eor o,' Cglethorpe was responsible for
the four towns which assumed the Savannah pat-
tern, tha most beautiful of ell "ew ,orld plins.
Thase are 1- tinguished by spacious boulevards
and alternatin- sumres still to be seen there '
and it Bruns--:ick. In the nineteentn century,
urbanism took different form in the piedmont
where te casual arrangement of scares reflec-
ted the frontier's preference for informal de-

nhereare only a handful of houses from the
cerid before the Revolution but exter.sive do- .
cu-mcnts do remain to complete our ;knc.=--:i e
of this period. Prefabric ted houses ;e-re r-
re, )y trlet a n,11-
dered by Crlethoroe from colonel Bull in h.r
lest-nc. ( all the lIter st-e.s- the :derl,
Creek Revivl, hot hic R evival, and t"i vilt "B
1- or Italiaqnate- them e re numerous e ':am -.,,e.
which sre -among the most representative of their e
kind in the South.
Althu ug the ninet enth: centur- w's to elong
to the professional architect, its opening" yersr
witnessed the building cf imaginative hou:es
b o 7 T c!s ir 4in- o 17 I. e of f I st
of the gen -.t aen am.-r.urs in he great tra-diti-n. Rich rd son-(wens-Thomas iuse
Architect- William Jay


















The domestic architecture of William Jsy,
unrivalled in spacial experiments, suggests the
sophisticated manner of Sir John Soane, sltnc'gh
there is no evidence that Jay was his pup-il...
In the 130's Charles B. Ciuskeyfbecame the lera-
ding architect in the Savannah area. His man-
sions were almost invariably based on Palladio's .'
rotonda motif and enriched with C reeck detail.
Tmnorotnt Fx-eriments were made in domestic s?.'
architecture in the piedmont. At Columbus, pre-
fabricated houses, already erected and waiting t nE
to be moved, went on sale the same day lots were
sold in the new town. The transition from the
delicate and attenuated Early Renublican style '
to the rich robustness of the Greek Revival
was made in the skillful hands of Daniel -ratt.
His work cossesses the restraint which has gene-
rally characterized the architecture of Georgia.
In uoner Georgia the Greek Revival, so peculiar:
ly akin to the plantation civilization of the |,
South, reached its full flower. It was handled
with a freedom and richness which was not sur-
passed even in handbooks of the period, parti-
cularly those of "innrd Lafever, Haviland and
Biddle, and '.H. Ranlett. Rooms were arranged
in .-sh.aed nlans, T-shaped plans, and cross
plans. The dream of a full temple house with
a nortico was realized here. While the Greek
Revival was thus relatively unknown in some The
of the most important areas of the state, it
represents one of its highest cultural schieve-
ments and one that still retains a powerful
hold, not only on the people of Georgia, but
unon southerners generally.
The ",lant-ti n nlsin style': was built simul-
taneously with the pioneer dog-trot or breeze-
way cabin and, developed concurrently with the
more monumental form.Pimple unpretentious de-
tail marked the style which was eminently- sui-
ted to the expanding frontier. Gothic, Romanesque,
and Italianate assumed command with the prcs-
perity of the 1340's. Tnese revivals were expressed
with an exuberance which was limited only by
the ima-ination of the desi ners.
See building #9 of Riverfront map in Historic Inventory


*rr--
2' :g ;i ~ *:~ :







N 7
i44
Z 7;
~~ .- ~
:t I' .A : s







y




Blount House-ZA.rcl- Daniel Pratt


I Ij-, HABLER 1AM ('PINK ) i-IO P A\NNAII
Breezewayr Plan


...... m



















Civil architecture clo
lopements in house archi
city halls and courthouse
were domestic in scale u
Greek Revival. Warehouse
stations, and factories
functional quality usual
tions of style. Churches
no matter what their sir
breadth of scale which i
use. Notable examples of
periods are to be foun2
architecture of Georgia.
There are still remnan
from the colonial period
There are also the splen
ficaticns of the ninetee
Although it was settle
numents of the colonial
architecture of Georgia
the astonishing richness
achievements in the brie
the Revolution and the f





Fort Pulaski
Arch.- Gen. Simon
Bernard


sely followed the deve-
tecture. except for
es, public buildings
until the advent of the
s, bridges, railroad
early adopted clean,
ly without the restric-
, on the other hand,
e, always had a certain
indicated their sacred
all but the earliest
in the ecclesiastic


Location -


ts of early forts dating "... "
in coastal Georgia.
did, but useless forti- .-:: :
nth century.
d late and physical mro- ..
period are few, the :
is distinguished for :
and variety of its '-
f span of years between
iring on Fort Sumter.* ._ .





s .-.....^ "1- -. : ... c. n

-,- ,
U" ., -.










._ .. _-.. __ =_ .


MMMHMMMM


-C -















14 O771VIED. CF GEG0RGIA 'S L EAD IK N UCITCTS


ei--
cwr --


Although Y.illiam Gerard de Brahm, one of the
first architects in Ceorgia, wrote extensively,
he left little information about his own life.
He sometimes called himself John Gerar, later
,illiam C-erard, and sometimes he used hyphens
between his names. He designed not only forts J ,
but made maps and later wrote of his odd philo-
sophical beliefs. He built himself a house ini
Savannah which not only had a piazza but also
a ventilated cellar for winemaking. 1
A "Mr. Day," was responsible for the Orphan- Orphan House "Mr. D
house at Bethesda, finished in 17422 -t was ad-
mirably oriented with cross ventilation in each
room and encircled by protecting piazzas, wlich
shows he wqs not unfamiliar with the problems
of sub-tropical architecture. .""
Adrian Boucher was an architect and builder 'A
who came from 'ew York. He assisted with recon- '
struction of some of the important buildings *.'
which had been destroyed by the devastating
fire in Savannah in 1796. Th- old city hall, .r
now demolished, was designee3 by him and was .-..,
his most important building. .. -.- -
Although Isaiah Davenport was working in Sa- .-'.
vannah in the later part of the eighteenth cen-.
tury his buildings really belong to the period --,_. .
1300-20. He was both architect and master mason. .
During the War of 1812, he built the circular, -
tabby :'artello Tower near the lighthouse on = --;---:-=
Tybee Island to bolster the defense of the coast, ...
It was demolished early in this century. .
Henry 'calpin, gifted owner, and builder of ;-- -
the Hermitage has been called an architect, ;
but actually he was a highly successful msnu-
facturer of ironwork and brick. He was also an --
ingenious inventor and in 1820 constructed a
horse car, the earliest railwagon. Many Savannah
houses were built of SavEnn-h greys from the .... -
Hermit. e, as were the station of th Central
of Ceorgia Railway asn Fort '"-ulaski..
William Jay was, unquestionably, one of the
most important architects practicing anywhere Houston-Johnston-Rcreven House
I A d r i qp r n n p 'h o p- a r al- -


ay"


.1.

.*~ \,"
'y i


N'


/7/


I
















in America in the early part of the nineteenth
century. No one else had his feeling fce plain
surfaces, the simple elegance of which was Doin-
ted up with incised lines and the finish of which
presaged the machine age; his feeling for curves
and movement, as are so beautifully expressed
in the Richardson-Owens-Thomas house; his use
of materials, in the exquisite cast-iron portico
at the same mansion; his understanding of the
power of the Doric order, in the portico at the
Scarborough house; or his conviction that archi-
tecture is based on the creative use of space,
indicated in his imaginative plans.
He was associated with Henry Mcalpin, and
designed fire-resistnat structures. Shortly
after the devastating fire of 1820 he recommen-
ded: "a plan to erect fire-proof stores...to
4se Iron instead of timber, to make the floor
joists of cnst iron,...the roof to have iron
rafters,. 1 he shutters and sash frames to be
of iron,"5
James Hamilton Couper- whose father John had
emigrated form Scotland. was born March 4, 1794.
He was a successful planter and scientific far-
mer, geologist, conchologist, and architect-
the last of the distinguished planter-architects
of the old South. When he graduated from Yale
in 181-, he went to Holland to study methods
of water control, and he later adopted these
methods at Hopeton so successfully that it be-
came the model for all the rice planters. At
one time he benevolently managed the operation
of 1,500 slaves. He experimented with the gro-
wing of cotton, sugar cane, olives, and Bermuda
grass, now the irincinal rr-ss of Georgia.
Remarkable for the clarity and serenity of
the neo-clpssical design, his first documented
work was Christ Church, :-vannah, 1838.
Charles B. Cluskey,after "W-illiam Jay, the
most significant architect of Savannah. Among
his superb Greek Revival houses are the Hermitage,
the Chamoicn-!'calpin-Fowlkes and Sorre]l-''eed
houses, end the monumental, Pnlladian-inspired
Covernor'ls mansion in illedgeville. :,am Jay
;-See building #18 of Derby '.arc- 'Jy
in Historic Inventory Architect -


DAVENPORT HOUSE, SAVANNAH



M I


R1IC"IAIJ\,()N-\\VI'.N.- I OMN.A, I I '1,F, 'AVANNAH


-


_Y_____ _I~

















The domed medical l Collefe in Augusta was also
designed by him, and he made plans for a customs
house in Savannah which was never built.
His greatest successes were in Georgia where "
he worked from about 1830 to 1847. In July,
1848, he made an important report to the Con- .
mittee for Public Buildings in Washington, dis-
cussing the Capitol, Executive Mansion, and other
buildings. q c.
The freedom and variety of his designs within i -.
the idiom of the Greek Revival are rivaled
only by the sound suggestions he made for impro-, .
ving the design, acoustics, heating, lighting-
both natural and by ras- and air-conditioning .
of the most i portent public buildings in the
Federal City. .

FGCTNOTES '-

1De Brahm, South Carolina, Georgia, and East Florida, p. 169
'hitefield, n Account...cf the Orphan House..., p.3.
rGeorgia Gazette, August o, 1798. i r' '. -
Grainger, Savannah River Plantations, p.43-.
The Daily Georgian (Savannah), January 22, 1820.
Renort No. Q0, House of Representatives, February 13, 1849, '' .
Second Sessicn, 30th Congress, p. 4.


BIBLICCRAPHY
Savannah Revisited, A Pictorial History,(2n'd edition),
Savannah, Beehive "ress, 1973.
Historic Svsnnnah, Historic Savannah Foundation, 1068.
The Early Trchitecture of Georgia, Tniversity o" North
rarolinEs ress, 1957.


Fort Barrington
Arch. W1illiam Gerard de Brahm


Ceiling detail in.
entrance hall of
Champion-McAlpin-
Fowlkes House
Arch.- Charlse B. Cluskey


EDv __________ -


PRO',


-~~ ~ ~ .. ... n ,- . .. .. .. .. ..


n~/r,,





















THE HISTORIC SAVANNAH ARCHITECT:rTAL INVENTORY


In order to systemsatic-
ally inventory all the arch-
itecturslly significant
buildings and places of
-'i toric S"vannah, a field
study under the direction
of Professor Paul S. Dula-
ney of the University of
Virginia was begun during
the sumn-er of 1962.
Inventory cards were pre-
psaed for use in the field,
a coDy of which a9oears
on this pr-e.
After completion of this
initial field survey and
the recording of the data
on the inventory cards,
each building or site was
evaluated and rated. Bared
on the criteria developed
in the Ccllele Hill tudy,
the following point values
were assi--ned to each of
the five i-ems scored.

.- HI TCRI---'- ITG'IFICAI CE
(3" '- 1 'ICc "

-' ^ - C



Such buildings as the ear-
liest surviving churches
of each denomination have
social si -nifica:-ce to the
ccm.-Tunit, y, snn*rt ror~o tr.eir
architectura"l quality, and
are sccred eccordinl`y.


BUILDING DATA SHEET HISTORIC SAVANNAH INVENTORY


Oiiguil] Use


Original Owner

Assessed Value
i-nd


N, i f Stli es Present Use
1asnmIent


,-I
ni ir ulilt


Building


niX'


:A. n.i l er iui.I.


A. nrs
:1 "'~l-s
i- !Ii- I


Hcmarks


Material


Allrrrl U
STYLE OF' AR'CHITECTU'HI
Early Repihlic 0 Virir:a'i
(;rr, Hevsial U Nit C(lI. d a


OTiHER I) DOCL MENTATION


intru;,ipe the nr nli br, r r.I No 0

EVALUATION
IIISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE
National 0
Slate -
(i Community '

ARCJIITFCTURAI. SI(IIIF(CANCF
AS AN EXAMPLE Of ITS STYLE
Exrrepional 0
Excellent ._
(;ood .
fair n -
TPoor T n


IMPORTANCE TO NEIGHBORHOOD
Great 0
Moderate U
M ini.r U
:''l.ECHATION OF ORIGINAL DESIGNS
None or little 0
ldnirr. it amount D
C,nrildir;e le Un


"HIIIC.AL CONDI iiNS
Sit iiut tires
(i marltlll a
NeIrlchll rhnd
I ulia.,i I, S rer rn


D U U
D O U
U U U
U U


S s ....... I -


K_




I t I

Ll L


Clhtkd by.


_ #,


_ I e~L


Sulel .od N itr.

















A ACHI TECTURAL SIG, XIFICA"
(25, of total score)
Three factors relati-g to the de-
sign of the building were taken
into account; together these ac-
count for 468 of the total score.
These factors are: 1) significance
as an example of architectural
style; 2) importance to the neigh-
borhood; 'n: 3- moJoifications
of the original design which have
been esthetically detrimental.

.- SICNIF'ICA '" AS TC A?: EXAMPLE
O STYLE
( 25 of total score)
Exceotional 25
Excellent 20
Good 15
Fair 5
Poor 0
Here the cuality of the architec-
ture is evaluated, apart from any
associative values or historical
inoortance.

Si?-~GRuA::CE TC NEIGHBCRHOCCD
(15< of tot.l score)
Great 15
moderate e 13
"inor 0
In addition to the architectural
merit of an individual buildin;-
or site, eoch building was eval-
uated as to its relationship, to
its environment. A building which
may be rated as only fair in terms
of its architectural style may,
by virtue of its scale, m-.terial
and nlace in the immedi-t-" rea,
receive n= to an addition'1 1 15
points in this category.


T- DESE'T.ATC.: OF CRIGINAL DESIGN
(86 of total score)
None or little 8
moderatee amount 4
Considerable 0
o n sTe r b 1 e T

PHYSICAL CCD ITICS
(22_ of total score)
Structures 10-5-0
Grounds 4-2-0
Neighborhood 1-2-0
Relation to Green L-2-0
A maximum of 10 points is allowed to
the structure itself, with the remainder
of the score being divided between the
anpi'aisal of the grounds, the neighbor-
hood, and the relation of the building
to public open space, scun-e or landscap-
ed street. The structural evaluation
is based solely on external evidence
of building condition.

RATING THE SCORED 3BTLDINGS
After each building and site was scored,
it was olced in one of five broad cate-
gories. The categories, based on a total
point score, are as follows:
Exceptional 70-100 points
Excellent 55-69 points
Good 40-54 points
T'air 2-39 points
Sor 0-19 points
It is important to note that in order
for a building or site to be rated ex-
ce:tional, it must have received at least
15 points in the historic Significance
category. For the sake of clarity and
simplicity, all buildings originally
rated as fair or good under Architectu-
ral Significance were combined and lis-
ted as Notable.The two higher categories,
Exceptional and Excellent, remained
unchanged.


- 1 9 ii















DERBY WARD


Derby Ward is that area of land
directly south of the riverfront site
and includes the properties shown
on the illustration to the right.
Named for the Rt. Honorable James,
Tenth Earl of Derby and Trustee for
the Establishment of the Colony of
Ceorgia in America,Derby W'rd was the
first of the wards laid out in 1733.
pronounced Darby and spelled that way
in some historical records, its lots,
numbered 1 through LO, have often
been referred to as "the First Forty".

JOHNSON SQUARE

Johnson square, in the center of
Derby Ward, was named in 1733 for
Robert Johnson (1682-1735), Royal
Governor of South Carolina and COle-
thorpe's friend and helper. This was
the site for public gatherings, the
sundial, standard for public notices-
the town's informal newspaper-and
for the first large conference of
COlethorpe with the TTpper and Lower
Creeks held on June 1, 1735. On Au-
gust 10, 1776, the Declaration of In-
dependence, circulated among the co-
lonies with its covering letter from
John Hancock, received its third read-
ing at the Liberty Pole here.
The cornerstone for the Nathanael
Creene monumentt was laid on March
31, 1825, by the "'rquis de Lafayette.
Designed by 'illiam Strickland of
Philadelphia, the monument was unveil-
ed in 1830.
Those buildings numbered on the
map are illustrated on the following
pa.es along with their approximate


SLIII IEU
{jAJ13

t. lMlinn street


-011 1
S---14
Pf~1 F-l

I-i


[H i


SIloi,0L htonll Street
'----------


dates of construction and ratings accor-
ding to the process outlined in the
proceeding pages.*
Other buildings in this ward which are
considered to be Worthy of Mention are:
22-24 W. Bryan St.
2-6 E. Bryan St.
36-j0 E. Bryan St.
22 Bull St.
27 Bull St.
12-16 ',. Broughton St.


(Numbers of buildings on following pages correspond to numbers on map)


I _
















(1)
27-29 '.est Bay St.
c. 1820
NOTABLE


(4)
ij 5-11 est Bay St.
Early 19th C.
I NOTABLE


(2)
21-23 West Bay St.
c. 1820
EXCELLENT


(3)
13-15 '/est Bay St.
c. 185
NOTA BLE


- W


(5)
1-3 west Bay St.
MOREL BUILDING
c. 1L21
EXCELLENT


(6)
1-5 East Bay St.
Architect,J.S.'orris
c. 1852
EXCEPTIONAL
















S(7)
S7- East Bay St.
iid 19th C.
w NOTABLEE




o i



(8)
15-21 East Bay St.
Early 19th C.
NOTABLE


(10)
24-26 East Bryan St.
Attributed to Scudder
c. 1824
EXCELLLENT


~,-

M
Ipm


(11)


t Bryan St.
C.


(9)
r. r *.* EB \ 9-11 Drayton St.
S- \'c. 1820
NOTABLE







r** .~ -" '
i ^ -^^ ;ii


i|.-* i


ow
K k7





iV T I
L-4 If
J.2 I--- HL


(12)
10-12 East Bryan St.
Late 19th C.
NOTABLE















(13)
19-23 Bull St.
. 1880
NOTABLE


71(16)
F; -- Congress
iII ___. U I~ id19thC
i0i- C.
"NOT;TABLE
! NRYNI:


r FlV



rRBL$h~ieNij~I
Pm W-'jlill


(14)
29-33 West Congress St.
Mid 19th C.
EXCELLENT


--- FM


FAMO
At&* BRAN

~~t~ '
:r~~ .21


(17)
26 W. Broughton St.
c. 1875
NOTABLE


(15)
30-36 W. Broughton St.
c. 1875
EXCELLENT


(18)
-28 Bull St.
CHRIST- CHURCH
Architect-
James H. Couper
lc. 1838
. EXCEPTIONAL


W O~a~L
,~ -i ~
a_ .--- ---1------'
I!
















NEW FRANKLIN WARD
AND THE BAY FRONT


The Bay Front, referred
to in this survey as
the wharf lots, extends
from West Broad to East
Broad Streets. The site
of the landing of Ogle-
thorpe in 1733, the
area was originally
dotted with low merchant
buildings built on the
river's edge. With the
increase in shipping
brought about by the
invention of the cotton
gin in 1793, the area
was rebuilt, and substan-
tial buildings were
erected inland, slight-
ly away from the river.
Ballast stones, left
by departing sailing
ships across the river
were used to pave the
sandy streets, and in
the 1840's the city
faced the bluff with
masonry.
Cluskey built his
"Embankment Stores"
along the stone ramps
that led from the ri-
vers edge tc the level
of the town, and Stod-
dard's Upper Range,
a row of merchant buil-
dings facing Ea.st Bay
and the river was erec-
ted between 185L and
1358


/







-t Bay Siret


'rCfT y HALL
= ==== = ===


Factors Row, a row of four to six story buil-
dings housing the cotton factors, was also built
at this time. (1354-1858)


















The Savannah Cotton Exchange, cen-
ter of the cotton trade, was built
in 1886. The present City Hall, com-
pleted in 1905, replaced an earlier
structure of 1799.
Emmet Park, extending along East
Bay Street from Lincoln to East Broad
Streets, was constructed on the site
of a large Indian burial mound, called
Indian Hill by the original settlers.
President James ,'onroe was feted
here in May of 1819, on his visit
to Savannah to witness the sailing
of the S.S. Savannah, the first steam
ship ever to cross the Atlantic Ocean.
The Old Harbor Light, in the north-
east corner of Ermmet Park, was erec-
ted in 1852.


New Franklin Ward was laid off in
June 1803, as: "All that space of ground
situate and being on the Bay, bounded
to the eastward by lots of Edward Tel-
fair and Joseph Clay, Esq.'s, to the
southward by Bay Street, to the west-
ward by West Broad Street and to the
northward by the Strand..." with addi-
tions of some lots in 1819..." and the
back line of the wharf lots Number
10, 11, 12, owned by the Steamboat
Comoany..."
The naming of this ward was an addi-
tional honor to Benjamin Franklin, since
the ward immediately to south was already
named for him.
Those buildings numbered on the map
follow with their brief descriptions.


Other buildings in this ward
which are considered to be Worthy
of 'Kention are:

2-10 W. Bay St.
10, 38, 20 W. Bay St.
102 7. Bay St.


(1)
312 River Street
c. IC)00
HCTY' BL r


(2)
318-320 Williamson
St r e e t
Late 19th C.
1TAL -E


I _


I



















-- +. NI
- -~


(3)
302-310 Willipmscn
Street
Ei.rly-'"id 19th C.
N CTAB LE


(6)
202-206 West Bay St.
TILLIA TAYLOR
AREHOUSES
1816 and 1841
EXCEPTIONAL


(4)
-? 214 W. Bay St.
c. 1909
S NOTABLE
' -_








(5)
:224 W. Bay St.
Mid 19th C.
NO TABLE


(7)
112-130 W. Bay St.
Architect Shol & Fay
^ c. 1852-1854
EXCELLENT








(8)
Bay Street foot of Bull St.
CITY HALL
Architect, Witcover
c. 1905
EXCELLENT


I


_ IIII I I I
















L ( (9)
7-71 Bay Street
"'- CLUSKEY E"VBATNKMENT STORES
t-1 Architect, Charles B.
S Cluskey
Sc. 1810
E- X EXCEPTICNAL







(10)
Bull St. to E. Broad St.
T FACTORS W,,ALK
: EXCEPTIC:TAL









(11)
2-L-6-10 East Boy St.
c. 1880
EXCEPT CNAL


(12)
12-1c East Bay St.
c. 1859
EXCEPTICNAL












(13)
20 East Bay St.
c. 1259
EXCEPTIONAL


(14 )
112-130 E. bay St.
Mid 19th C.
EXCEPTION NAL


I

















32-34 East Bay St.
TMid-Latc l1th C.
EXCEPTIr"AL


(18)
102-110 East Bay .t.
"id-19cth C.
EXCEPT TC NAL


(16)
36-L2 East Bay Street
STODDTARD'S STORES
c. 1859
S- EXCEPTIONAL










:' (17)
10.0 "ast Bay St.
SAVA`fl"AH COTTON
-X. C- i EXCHANGE
A r architect, Willi2m

c. 1386
,EXCTI NAL
-.# $ ,- .- 9 ~ "
d, : -
.! I .v-- .,- 4 lj, I Pr s o


1* -
O
. r *.I~ 4


(19)
112-130 East Bay St.
Mid 19th C.
EXCEPTIONAL








(20)
112-130 East Bay St.
'i.d 19th C.
EXCEPTIONAL















(21)
216-222 East Bay St.
'Mid 19th C.
EXCEPTICNAL






-d



(22)
Drayton and E. Bay St.
SEXCEPTICNAL












S(23)
-rQ202-206 E. Bay St.
"lid-Early 19th C.
- EXC EPTICNAL


208-214 East Bay St.
1'-. .. Mid 19th C.


( LZEXCEPTIONAL

aS-B t Icai '
I1 ial a lt a





(25)
7T.. 22,-230 E. Bay St.
3- Mid 19th C.
S/-I EXCEPTIONAL











(26)
S-'~-3:a -02 -410 Bay St.
Fr Ii Y;'id 19th C.
s\ C a ENC.IABLE


40


I

















(27)
508-516 East Bay St.
Lete 19th C.
NCTABLE


(28)
East Bay at Houston St.
HARBOR LIGHT
EXCE OPTIONAL


S(30)
East Bay St.
CHATHAM ARTILLERY
i MONUMENT
EXCEPT IONAL


(31)
East Bay Street
CITY EXCHANGE BELL
EXCE PICNAL


>t~. -


S(29)
E ast Bay St.

i -' . . ONAL


(32)
220 Williamson St.
S. 1350
NOTABLE










4,


000






LA1N -CL5|T AT T-ED r0NAL L \V L AND AT T--IC
0iTC6 J AKEA LUV1L. ANNKAT1CNS EFFC.TVE 1N 97&
4AK4 5CPL< ccveE AND GHOWH A THe KS31CNAL
DCALE. FAKt APD tEC7EAT10NAL F\ lLI TES3 A eJ COV&ERD |I
AT R~:'NALt AND CITY S`CATL. TAANSfCiRTATICN SYSTEMS
L'CH A. LGCAL THOROL 7-HFRAStOEiCNAL HIR3c^A,AIl f
ThNS-oRTATIN A'I -D RILCADS5,S WE 'LL AS SHUTTLE-
Us -~V!C AR^ DISCLSSED. THE LKAJC-K` HiOHWAY
Y'ST-M Ac IT PfELATE T T4TE fC-~T C SAVANNAH 1.%
-AWN. THe NETWC'CK c" -EELT CONV E-,rIN CN
THE iTRl CCIJWCTC>N AtrA 71C OWWC,ESOiNAT0lK Ue
VEHIICILA (OCLeVAD AD cOE WAY) AND f~~EV4CMiMAN TLY
-EDeSTKIAN TCctlGHfAKS. FAKlNt tCTH CN A4ND -
cOr-7TKhEET V5 GLv AKCCPND ThE VCii N TY FC TH- I
V$CJECT SiTE. WACC-tNDAAVkia S TfK TE KESTCN ARE
tSH i KELAThN F TC icCH CTHER CN A E
ACHC -CHAACTE-, 4vm r-N EAL STATISTCG AE iNLUDCD
\'WHICH Ci-AL iT\ CeuLATCNl ,CLiMAT-, AND rCCVCMY.












LANP USE


INDUSTRIAL

SECONDARY IN05TRIAL.
1COMMEr IrAL,


',3


X /I ,J -( -



I. VEIRNON- -
BURG ,
S- -. SCALE IN MILES
/7 __o I u
/. 0 2 3 4
", -' F ,


COMMERCIAL LAND USE cSEwVOPIeNr
Wholesale -trade is still located -for -the most part In the ci+y.
Retail and Service trade has decenTtrli.zed -o a Micwh greater" cegce.
Coraentrations of Commercl&l ( :
-CBO
-Major arn rinor shopping centersdomi rinet -factor in expansion of
Cownerc ial develoepent i. county.
-strip developarn+s along Major artertals such as Abercorn St.
Extension across Forest River to 1-3A ahd opening of I-95" From I-1.6
sou-thwar has opened up previously tseLa-ted areas o- county.
"!Gateway Savannah" will be located at 1-35 and Abercorn St. Ex'eension.
It Will be the largest service-ori.anted development.


*;i


Cr
17
1
i












LAND USE


PUBLIC*SEMI- POBL1C
MULTI R PILY4 MOBILE H3OM PARK

S V4n-L "wrLY


SCALE IN
0 I 2


MILES
3 4


~. -A r
Lw~


I~ N


-4-K


V-


\1


I-,


DWELLING UNITS
1974 Census
Total D.U.
64,494


Occ.D.U.
61,243

68,438


Vac.rate
5.0%


Total acreage
154,760.14


1985


154,760,14


-I


~:;


71,743

























-z


9 i L




\ ,T.,' -i "i '
.: ,1 r' -


11


/ '.SAVNNAH
,' H I


I ; '

} -* ^ *' I jf I



* ; . v-



/ '
1 .1


* ; i *2 ** "

\, ,' '!, -i i
/

'II
\(`-t


'3~ N
*,i-3 W' K-.-z' jQ'.-
'00v6 ; ,^ ,-\'

rg. ^^ ^
s^ -, -
24


S ->i : .
-, '


.4 .I


SCALE IN MILES
0 1 2 3 4 P


'4 40~.



I.I


/ -


/"
/"


E VERNON-
BURG



, *2'- -


l,, ,


F, 3 3..


-* -.--- -

The annexation would be effective Jan. 1, 1978. It wouLd increase -he
clt poupltion by approx. 7 000 residents.

he 5ouethside area is eunrde & Skidawea Rd., Montgomery Crossroads,
ar,4 Tibet Ave.
The westside area is bounded S 2nd St. Extension arnd lnes P)hty.
Some of tKe re sit4ential areas o be annewed voud lbe rfaitr, 4ighland
Park, Leeds Qa+e, Feiler terrace, O~eetkceenfo Tr~emit Park, ar4
Constitution Hi. Subdivisions.
Covwrcial areas would include Os.e1thorpp iall and Savannah Tndus+rial
Park.


ANNEXATION


/ I





Vot


-\ *I


'"3;


I II - -u----aar -IIII~C~C~ -~


i


;i '
I


1'


I









LAAD 03E 0A1i
A.,33umpticn3 ranld Pectrairnt3:0tCG
-UrbiL( 71 Q'00 Of Tetropolitan area '-ill increase at incre~a'inj rate.
-As land development increase v, and i evelopabie land becomes sca.rcor,
Ave1oV) W'j;'] Prollur MT vinj 10': W3 will be Ovelopod 7ore
intensely.
~O'st of ft iMurr larLP-10o. "Is! -10 -01 .i 1 i i't '4op'nt wiill
take p1 ~ce :in 'he- s-n'vL1 unbai ain P Yq, 1 M-i -'Vi ' o7~ Aberro ci streett
extension to 'Thitp Blufr d; arouYn major interchanges 3unh niTU.S.
Him '~t 17 wtfl Ab'irro Qi TExt'nnin n ; &9 uZ 1-. ?5 ..n 7 -16 ; 9i 1 % i 1 31aniA
sbt Wlmington Nver; an" '. "new town" ae;-elori rati sunh a3 S
awposed for Mkilaw;ay TslaYn'.
a~vnn~ah
-Future Muut 4.1 rowt will ro11 ~ntinq nile n both 0 { 0i~ -1 a v super
Rivcr. Areaen~t aC'~2 70y 'T p w nocls rot Vvir11i)nt of "super-
part", area west of city pravid~e'; exi t 003* ;t"A
-.~~i~iT~t~il_, -. 1',r- *.li i,- &"'a''. 'h ~V( 6CU~ Ct~ CSLana ,-i-K ~~
Touri s will beco c aa:;inZj i or tnt :.3 :no eleisent ii Chathasi


0 isibl, trol.h ont--bli lignt of :a county-'wide water and sewr -agencY.
-Chatlhan ~ountfty will Pontinuo to bn On re gional shopping center for
Mo1: area; iteinn'-pir m'ivaynnl 3hoip f'acili-ty de-m lopion:t ill~ take
place inthe so: th urbhn area along the axis of; Abercorn'; it. Extension.
Creuctlon o" 70os1jn g' har'Jo and opening up of land car Vvelopilenlt
which is pre-sently "i a on un 1"1vab1e.


The -oupercot" ~'oou m poablr be locat >-'oqninver fro'I wiavnnhn
no'. the ooenA. In thi encrir, jan~ai jrywQ in port-relate 1 inl utO s
has contV;i; "11 is expects tob 0rinin -me- the 701 t0V1
L'vte;G 7J:2h :'.znlonsr 'LP 1- MYgi;'<-A&WoVL Min' PnoCit:1-
L'. ~ Ovi 0'. 'no c1 -- :u 7MVT- !on l'jl ar 'anTh IQ 1; V1 r thorn
ql a urajotX9 e r ii i'(iAti o7' Wh -'r 0,01 M 3Ea. 1
Thc-, -#Vwc n0 -1Jrial nucdcv, wojli be moDvinc. 5o,-+warcdr--rmb-ie yn ( cdhf SQiVrnnah-
11qwu/ex, aS Ke +hdsncuaiI nUcdue -u-, Mec6- f in Gcnle, he pcd _ltU 6eccrre- \ol-
uzxCY-Ctaty t nlv YPr iWI i5Yib wciAAd producCe Cmaftlr (fcccrcmieQ
c4f L~CcIC ,-~n ~rn~c ri~;y,~oe42-iv bcch' rt~w ,z~n6 er~~lL Inld ry.1-~hc 'fjc~l
ComrlTc ffl wruld burden -n)d V ri*Ad Fa Rxyri-k csvcnah"S rc4e i 3
The CWopirg Ce3ocx"' aov c vitch'cArvci hvd Vacnugnqt
Hunter Armay Airfield .military popuiln.n and expenji~tures3 hae hI
3oin'blC impl:act on l'e '1 w V"I 1- 6", nillt'U pr 0i21l'' Ml-
13CI in% of Cha't'he CounQt In i on; n IM Hunte Airf iei.l was
MV .'if~le~ 1vE '721tn710v '.'essti01 a 'rL' Titir achyi Pw IL L '
awily a vt *:>'n n Apr *. n*tn '1 1n1 17 A.nsn ip on Savannah, provil-
1 'I;Tlc hl:-r 'is no.t K 'itt 3 "m'.'e"' A; :"' cj3e acw
la~ \er










PARKS 4; OPEN spAcz
PLAN


I'I1


o nI I -ie o ex )" i' .
.--lfi t i.e- ,. c -


e e pe -a, 4kw y e re /










J,.
i' Op ron ,e Pa: P e] Iprove ~m ot l
















Short ?ang/e: -ipNe ment tolini ci n o aaiks ty
-r ional c c tion wit h r i i. .
oi ne )*nd xpn-s'o s 3for t'h.u
'0 -' i l" ; i.-: O. ..v. :,

















-develop newwh onna eibrhdar
i l -ie
S-rcetoa centers in con,, uncti, on wit'h n'o improve"ent
,' *''^ ^ *' j' "
Iw- \'" -^ "
,, ,, ./( .' :'., > ,,<

& i i, ' " . .. *. i -"










-develop Ca .,y ^anal ,'kwy. a", a peanent greenbelt
eAirfieli, with golf couri es.



-provi3e new regtoiae sacilitis i 3ki*>.ai Tslan.
-provide new and ixpande sce-ic tours ior both auto and .boat
-prvze new an xad cni or o ot uoadb


_ _

















n /



O -



WEST-



0-. _

*T


7


7 )


J- -;


* S S@.*
50 ses

'See.i
0@@O


/


I


0


S


DOWNTOWN
. -- :


Si 0
*i


K 0R


0i


'S,








F. ~


0


S
0


* 0 *


SOUTH -


:


* 0.
:_ S


4.:., i~


g j

EAST


So0


ij ,

I 0




O 0
C 1



/- \ *


I0;


LEGEND
EXISTING RECREATION
FACILITIES


NEIGHBORHOOD PARK
COMMUNITY PARK
METROPOLITAN PARK
PLAYFIELD
GOLF COURSE
STADIUM
SWIMMING POOL
BOAT RAMP
MUNICIPAL DOCK
FISHING PIER
BEACH
MARINA
HISTORIC FORT
HISTORIC CEMETERY
CEMETERIES &
CONSERVATION AREAS


PROPOSED
RECREATION FACILITIES
0 COMIX UNITY PAI


El


Mi ETROPO ITTAN A '.R KS


REGIONAL ARKS'

--- DRIVING TOi1R

-- BOAT TOIR


77


S


ffI XL


-- -


I


'


i]


I


L1~


- 1


o


L














V/
'- "


.jk.. y / " I'
































CHATHAM URBAN TRANSPORTATION PLAN (CUTS )



4. DeRenne 14. U. S. 17 South 24. Northwest
5. McAlpin-Skidaway 15. Whitfield 25. Southwest
6. Waters 16. Habersham 26. Abercorn
7. Wheaton 17. Inte nermediate Extension 27. Dean Forest Expressway
8. Gwinnett 18. Dean Forest straighten
U. S. 17 North 19. Ilarm n to Waters : U --. S 'T
10. Montgonery Cross Road 20. Gaston _____p- ORT
.' i "'-] ---t









., d .' I...` ,, ,I .
t: ,- " ,1{' L ""
-' : '. \ .. ." ,"''
,../ ,



2. U S 1 2 I S 02. WetBod onco


8.~ Gw net 18.: Dea Forest taihe
9. U 7N rh 9 [a m nt Waer , ::,e' ,: ar i iI
I0.i Mottom r Cros Rod 2. Gatn I- ,o r
II Il


























































REGIONAL HWY SYSTEM
C EXISTING
*........ UNDER CONSTRUCTION
OR PROPOSED IMPROVEMENT
LOCAL HWY SYSTEM
EXISTING
UNDER CONSTRUCTION
OR PROPOSED IMPROVEMENT


^< i. I .' '
I ""


--~


_* /.: "' -* *.*
d




- -, ,-I ..:.
If


o " L i-- ,* '** *. .. \ v "
.~ "--- T- I
tf- ---1 7-






MAJOR HIGHWAY
ACCESS TO
PORT OF
SAVANNAH









Local Thoroughfares

A major constraint in landside access to the Port of Savannah is the
local highway network. The local system is important because it con-
nects the port with the regional highway network. In many instances
port generated traffic is in conflict with local traffic needs. The
mix of heavy traffic destined for the port greatly reduces the capa-
city of city streets and is disruptive of the urban fabric. For these
reasons it is important, where possible, to provide high type facilities
which bypass established residential areas. Since 1963 the Savannah
metropolitan Area has engaged in urban transportation planning as re-
quired hy the Federal Highway Administration. The Chatham Urban
Transportation Study identified an initial list of twenty-five improve-
mienlt to the local higqhw.y network which would give acceptable service
through 1985. FIGURE 6 shows the suggested CUTS improvements which
would be i:ost beneficial to the Port of Savannah.

Completion of rneRenne Avenue and the Casey Canal facility along the
( ist. i Lr .ynrq, I ,'1pre ,s way would provide a c i rculimforr ntial hiqhwav
which woula greatly improve access to areas east of Savannah. Improve-
ments to the Bay Street Viaduct coupled with the upgrading of Georgia
Route 21 from the present northern terninum of the Lynes Expressway to
1-95 and the upgrading of U. S. 17 north would reduce traffic delays from
the port facilities to the regional highway network. By improving Dean
Forest Road and extending it from Georgia Route 21 to the Georgia Ports
Authority Garden City Terminal (a high priority project which will be
constructed with Urban Bond.money), container traffic will be provided
a link to all of the major highway corridors. This construction will
also closely tie the airport with the seaport.

With the completion of 1-95 much of the long distance travel will be
removed from U. S 17A. Revenue bonds used for the construction of the
Eugene Talmadge Bridge should be retired by 1975. To make Hutchinson
Island more attractive for port related activities the toll on the
bridge should be removed. With the combination of less traffic and no
tolls the Talmadge Bridge would provide adequate highway access for the
industrial facilities on Hutchinson Island.
Regional Highways

A serious deficiency which presently exists in highway access to the
Port of Savannah is the lack of interstate highway connections. Al-
though Savannah is included in the Interstate Highway System with
both an east-west (1-16) and north-south (1-95) link, neither of
these routes have received high priority consideration in the past.
Both of these facilities are scheduled for completion by 1980.

At the present time Interstate 16, which will link Savannah to Atlanta,
is of particular importance. This route will connect the Port of
Savannah to the heart of its trade area, reducing transport times and
costs for shippers. Some cargo is lost to the Port of Savannah because
shippers in North Georgia and Tennessee may select the Port of Charleston
to take advantage of the superior access to Charleston provided by 1-26.
A representative of the Georgia Motor Truckers Association in Atlanta
stated that carriers serving the Port of Savannah have indicated that
highway access between Atlanta and Savannah does not pose a major service
problem; however, businessmen'may choose another port with superior
interstate connections under the assumption that motor service advantages
would be significant.








The completion of 1-16 w.111 be a boost to the container trade at the
Port of Savannah. The new container facility at the port should
establish a container identity for Savannah, and truck traffic to the
port will increase tremendously. Interstate 16 will be the major access
route to the port for this new traffic.
The importance of 1-95 to the Port of Savannah ,ill increase as contained
trade at the port increase or as regional port concepts develop. At the
present time,most truck traffic to the ptI, 1 ast-vwept traffic because
neighboring ports to the north and south intercept most coastal traffic.
Air Transportation

Travis Field, the municipal airport, is located between Georgia State
Highways 21 and 80, approximately 8 miles northwest of the central
business district, The airport has three runways, two of which are
7,000 feet in length and the third 9,400 feet. All-weather navigational
aids are used on the longest runway. The two air lines serving Savannah
are Delta and National. Two certified operators are also located at
Travis Field. A more efficient road system between the port and the air-
port would improve Savannah's position as a regional distribution center.
Rai 1 roads -ReA-no ToN Toou~ sere-, -re -r-Ait MAKAe3 aoje' 7ric/P 'q (
P4zr oU/C Se er.e- e vE/e-i *sr f -err 4Ao 7n-r- rIUVFrZ. 7,-reR 4X,,- r A,/oV i7- /CA/57 Jr.
Two major railroads serve the Port of Savannah; these are Seaboard Coast
Line and Central of Georgia (Southeastern Railway System). Each operates
primarily in the southeastern United States, but provides connections to
all parts of the country. The railroad lines afford shippers the best
possible service and rates due to competitive operation.







I- -- I l,, II I I I II III t -]
= ", 'Z 3 I I II UII I II I 1 -- I I T













E i SHUDWEBUS ROUTE
B s us s s





1 == =


S ,,,,,,i,,,,,,,,,,,, 111111111 1 1 1 E1 B S 1T E
EPr U TP









VEHICULAr- f PEDMSTP/AN lEY
PCIIWCLATIONN21 r WC -Abe
I RCULA-rio Prcwvrot#Ak#
l I oR- Ic NAcS

A CITYA HALL. S015 vV/ Sua dftorsr.
SAVA tL N Nfl p elp 010ob Ch J % trl r Cw c ~











SLL4~ I
Ll, A I




Ilk L lvmT P





4 ]iI Ib
:C1~I I H _


4






i.
.7

*:



iiix;-


Lii LE] L iIhZ







PAR K
I ng l luy N1,11



I m/
:L177'r j_** g )I''~ ,\ Ta


v

1; 1--
A,,~i'\fl)& I *' in Uih


I-


m


6












' SAVANNAH RIVER.




Jfs cmrn r amt[L 4 e rLan n



= 1 _-E:1:71EE-l I--- -=1
RM E El [ _] 6 1]- Ei E CZJ e-) l -



C F7]E8]fl FRED F a
_]_r [ L.L -,L4i--r -r.. _,. ir l ----1I__
f N] mr( = 13] i

.1 ) L Z c i gr-I i- I- i r- II 1



8a[ZFL I[' -F- I L II




D f L[ ]___I I L]----I [I JlI Iz
C 17] wL w __
s ^j UUI _: Wr .L o--_ii L _JWIW7LZF
__ 1 1 aLJLJLJL2c^;r f^ IIjIj i L
I in m I-n rr-i m r- ii i r--




* ^ 1T ^ T '" T 1 F 1 ----


HISToRIC AREA LAND-USE MAP


/ inu('- 4 Ifiloric American Pluild-
ii,:s S lm ('y ,\llp


_Ir~--~----- II
















Since 1933, 56 buildings, olbjcts
and groups of buildings in the Sa-
vannah area have been recorded in
Ihe Hlistoric American Buildings Sur-
vey. The list below is the result
ot the original suICve, conducted
through 1962, and a resurvev carried
out by the National Park Service he-
tween 1962 and 1965. Each of the
buildings no\W standing i< identified
by number on the accompanying nmap,
THE HISTORIC AMERICAN

BUILDINGS SURVEY


1. Arnold I louse, 128 E. State Street,
late 18th c. (demolished Oct.
1930)
2. Bank, 19) Ba; Street, ca. 1815
demolished 1' G6)
3. Battershv-Anderson Hlouse, 119
E. Charlton Street, mid l19th C.
4. Timrith v B 1nticou Double
HouLes, 419-421 E. Brouighton
Lane
5. Branch of United States Bank,
Dravton and St. I.ulian Streets,
1818 (demolished -1924)
6. Central ol Georgia Adminiistra-
lion Building, \V. Broad Street
7. Central of Georgia Railroad
Bridges, mid 19th C.
8. Central of Georgia Railroad Sta-
tion, W. Broad Street
9. Christ Church, predecessor of
existing building, 1811 (dlemol-
ished 1837)
10. Christ Church, Johnson Square,
mid 19th C.
11. Clark Houise. 107 E. ()glethorpe,
Ave., mid 19th C.
12. Cluskey\s rmliankment Stores,
ion Ramp of Bay St.), ca. 1840)
13. Ctunninghlajl I o ius e, 1(1 E. (Ogle-
thorpe \Ae., mid n 19h C.
14. Cust m House. Bay and Bull


Streets, mid 19th C.
15. Davenport House, 324 E. State
Street, ca. 1812
1i. Demns I mouses, 25-27 lincoln
Street, ca. 1835 (demolished)
17. Dr. Charl on House, 22(1 E. gle-
thurpe Ave., mid 19th C.
18. Factors Row, River Streel, late
18th C.
19. First A\frican Baptist Church, Bry-
ant, .Monlgomery and St. Julian
Streets, mitd 19th C.
20. Fort W\,avne beyondd E. Bay
Street, mid 18th C.
21. Gibbons Range, W. Congress
Street, early 19th C.
22. Gordon Row, 101-129 W. Gor-
don Street, mid 19th C.
23. (reen-Meldrim Iouse, Bull
Street, mid i 19th C.
24. Habersham (Pink) House, Rey-
nolds Square, ca. 1775
25. 1Hampton-Lillibridge Hlouse #1,
310 E. Biran Street, (moved to
St. Julian Street)
26. Hampton-l-illibridge House 4,2,
312 E. Bryant Street, (cemol-
ished)
27. Harbor Beacon, (Light), the
strand, mid 19th C.
28. I louse at 203 E. York, mid 19th
C.
"2 Iouse at 1 15 (glelhorpe Street,
earl\ -lth C
30. Houses at '312 and 314 E. Brotugh-
ton Street, mid l19th C. (delmol-
ished)
3-1. houses at 118 and 124 E. Harris
mid l19th C.
32. Houston-Screven House, Aber-
corn and Congress Streets, late
18th C. (demolished 1920)
33. In dependent Presbyterian
Chlur(h, Bull and Oglethorpe
Streets, relbuilt in 1900
34. Le Page House, 112 W. Hull
Street, early 19th C. (demolished)


I I I --


-3. Low t louse, 329 Abercorn Street,
mid 19th C.
36. Mclntosh House, 110 E. Ogle-
thorpe Avenue, late 18th C.
37. Mackay House, 125 E. Congress
Street, mid 18th C. (demolished)
38. McAlpin I house, Orleans Square,
1835
39. Minis House, Habersham Street,
ca. 1835 (demolished)
40. Old Newspaper Offices, 17 E.
Bay Street, early 19th C.
41. Ravanel House, Mac Donough
and Floyd Streets, early 19th C.
42. Reid Servants and Carriage
House, 118 E. State Street, early
19th C. demolishedd)
43. Remshart Row Houses, 108 W.
Jones Street
44. Richardson Owens Thomas
House, Oglethorpe Square, 1817-
19
45. Roberts House, 27 Abercorn
mid 19th C.
46. Scarbrough House, 41W. Broad
Street, 1818
47. Smets H house, Jones and Bull
Streets, mid 19th C.
48. Sorrel-\eed House, 6 W. Harris,
mid 19th C.
49. Spencer-Woodbridge House, 22
Habersham Street, late 18th C.
50. Taylor Store, 204 W. Bay Street,
ca. 1817
51. Tenement Houses, 421-423 E.
York Street, early 19th C.
52. Tobias House, 18 W. Harris
Street, mid 19th C.
53. Trinity Churchl, W'est Side of Tel-
fair Square, mid 19th C.
54. Waring H house, 127 W. Ogle-
Tiorp)e ,Avenue, ca. lo O ut.- 110-
ished)
55. 'Wa\ne-Gordon House, 10 E.
Oglethorpe Ave., 1819-21
56. Wetter I louse, 425 W. Ogle-
thorpe Ave., ca. 1856 (demol-
ished)


I -
















AN N A H


ON STREET


...... LOCADINS ZC.,E RE!G-T A, D SPECIAL USE)
TAXI AND Z-SSENGER LOAD'NG ZONE
S UNMETEzED A- RESTRICTED
-- METERED C 3- MiN
D- I HOUR
E- 2 HOUR
F- 3 HOUR
G- 5 HOUR


'R v6 rt


BUS STOPS
- AREA BOUNDARY
PRIVATE GARAGE
:..::. P TE LOT
COMMERCIAL GARAGE
COMMERCIAL LOT
FREE PUBLIC LOT


OFF STREET


5AYAuLJAN ReY6FL

S T-


C',
0 E
z 39 OC MME T P4RK


--- -_ IF ,I-

10-min. Unmetered
Type Space 30 min. 1-hour 2-hour 3-hour 5-hour Unmetered Limit Restricted Use TOTAL



Number of Spaces 8 36 137 9 48 281 0 31 550

~ m ___















7: [3- -i .

0 o
IE 2 C F
S4E 4E 2E 2C 3C :E 2E 2C ZF 2F _R 3E IE ZEF
BRYAN rj
6 II JOHNSON REYNOLDS
SO ST JULIAN SO. 8
*|>^ **t. Bi f5 I" L -13 I ^ T
________ '_ ______ | __ ^J l____________ 1^ ___ | _____ ^ _______ 1^ ______ |______


I I U a - - U


Type Space


Unmetered
Restricted Use


Number of Spa-cs 32 39 91 34 8 17 0 58 279


30 mmr.


1 hoJur


2 hiLJr


3 hour


5 i'our


Unmetered


0


C/)
Hr



I-r / 2
U /


_ ..,__

S107




A-
"/ ---


3 :7 462:.. l r 36 20


1:': 7 .
'UJ



5Q -' 5
12 ..
4----L.-
'---- i :~i::::'IC


Commercial Commercial Private Private Public
Type of Facility Lot Garage Lot Garage Lot TOTAL


Number of Spaces


1045


a U- U i I -sPI


0
z





m,
M-I
r I


13


I''




. / / // __ .
:./..<* *. .,'1. il


TOTAL


-- --- -- I


10 min.
Limit


w


<



















0! T'-LFAJ




CO i .. ,.

1 jI 12F 12E

-r *]3A 2E1 P2E
m in4E 3E 2A 13D
I I


3E
7E 5E



:4R 5E

.
2F 4 2 F




2E 3E
i .


7R I3 7E

SI W I I W I ,
16H 5



2C 5F iF 3c 2C 6 iR



3E :
5E 3R IE 2E 9D ?i,
I lII I Ii i ..m M lmiml I I ;


IP 2E 2E -I
"- - O4LETH(Rf!


b6 3E
3"_EE| --
3F 4 I3E 6F 4F
2E


ICE IOE
+ I + I


U U U ~ -,-- --r EMuaa


1 hoiur


2 hour


3 hour


5 hour


Unmiletered


10 min
Limit


Unm.etered
Restricted Useu


TOTAL


Number of Spaces 15 10 121 51 0 3 16 53 269

I~ I - I-


..: 30






';30:. 20 ''20 .



I_ :, '. ... .: .. ..
"o ... "


.'7




S20



__ ___. __ ._.-16


-:12
- --- ----- -




.20

14

74






7
**


---I

OcfLeTTHao/ \
s9





L3



- .~ i!


Typu Sp)Je:


30 min


0



-q







-I


3


-- ..Prr~-r~-----llp~u~- iCIII~)LIIP*-~P~B~P~PL~tr~WL_~PitrY~ C----N--LIYICC-I -~-


--- -- ---


--Y --- _~i~-----I ~-~-----~- ~II~L~UIII~YI~Y-C


_ __ P- -- ~U -L _- -


-- --

















NIACI(( LAND)MARK'~
T 95 IA)CA r~ O)N


1LAO T_ I V D

-'iv n- I -.------
-i -

FmI SCREV
LW~ .8 4 uJ j ~h 'UJ' ILSCr \ u



IIIUR~M .-Jcf~3i~~=t- c
_,7 19
Lb IA I2 JL I.




19 1 C~j21 -j~
;1q 1 7 ___ 1' -+ F_
4-- -5 FD vt,, Lu 4rq

:17
Tc j L, j 7'~l j1 I~g i ;
U ij~i D 16
L 1 ~T~n l'lI~i IL I I L, /


L) T




-;G L A. C 'N.
31 A~






1 PE -



C ATEP-WA Y'
U Sr E










CHATHAM COUNTY STATISTICS ( ; : ; WfC, C ..\Ct Lj, U 1.W .V -')


Population Characteristics
Population:
Savannah: 118,349
Bloomingdale:1,741
Garden City: 5,956
Poola:r" 1,763
fort ','Int.;'ort' : 4, D37
3-.v; v:'in:h 3Beac h 1, 354
ThunilerboilTt: 2, 3?3
Vernonbu.rj : 1.10


,Chat:ha. Co. unincor-ori'.e,: G'
Chatham Co. total: 14-,957
Urban pop: 31957

Ages -4 A 94e: 5-1
1 207 .... 8.6 56,436.... 0. 1%


Ethnic Diversity:
Non-white: 67,544 or
UniteJ Kingdom;: 80
Germany; 1,225
Poland 515
U.S.S.R.: 655
Canada 51
ItP:.ly "
Irel.nd _34
Au13;ri 36
),336


8, 442.0-..52.
898,442. ..52.5


36a


Male pop: 4-7.1


oremale op: 52.7%


CLE I TE
Te --per e.iure : no .' int;e 5'
3l.n-er ; 800
Ja-.n .-ry;:500
3 :u .-si.nti 1: lo i"tl "'_ily .i; ur s oF0 sun hJi_ Jne in .1, 0' 9
in winter"6
Sky conYitio-n* nonnal a.nuaIl !:..er of clSar ."':,3 120
of cloudy d:'"ays:120
jai 2


Prec ipita oion: normal .nual:
spring!
runner:
wnll 'r
winterii


40 in.
10 in.
16 in.
13 in.
12 in.


y, O. 1k -:
1 '74 En > O .'.'e ;
:oi;;.:;1 E p.
58,2 _.4
1385
66, 40


M e5. E.p.
16,651....23.5%


1 6etai4 ..p.
12,164...20.93


Service ETp.
2 1,413.... 50.5%

34,435 .. 51. -


.1974 Per ca pita iol t 2A ,41.4.00 Income per d.'.ol
1835 4,006.00
Tah.iilie s :4G,969
T:,e_,.i:.,n i..co -:,; $3,245
Unrelated individuall s 17,201 Median income $6,441
Mean wage or salary income: 48,875
Mean non-farm self. employment income: $8,658
Major Employers:
American Cyanimid:600 Union Camps 4,500
Continental Can Co: 500 Savannah food and
Savannah Machine a
Derst Baking :500 Grumnman. Aerospace:
Great Dane Trailers: 600


l.inc unil;:;10,410
$17,551


Indus-ries :600
nd Shipyard: 00
600


16,132,... .86%


13,24 ....27.5 1 ,,606.. 20. 5%





















TTE- CITY OF ,AVAMHABt 1L A eIc-~ tIAL CE` -FcOR
INDLIUTRY WAMr Tr-ANfTSP( CO MME-^-, AND CULTURE, AND
K-AD TfMAN~PT. \TLT M-ETRiorlTAM FLAMN MI CMMI~CSl
'4A6 KThEAsV\ pLANb TR ExfCTrD rL'TYCE c65f-WTk IN
NIDGT~ PfcT ACTIVITIES, scMCE, AlF. AND CADT4N~" -D
ATiCN, CPULATIC ,PARK AMQP C-fATOiNAL fAuCILVLT-.
r9AVANMA4's UIc^e c-tHAf rT, 1!iT G UK I~1 ucr LA iW

crf- TT-E." WiCc T ~TcnCl \ / A----THI~ n A LAT 7- --r.\T
INPAUTiY -H W \E O ( T-r^y\ O lEcc E
GARLaNNA- l AL^c GLoe -TO -UCG H o 1(E LPM ANOKYA
A^ ^o o-rne As f^T P riaSK -wT JA^^CKrol jnt-T 4-cfvEM
TUINEEee^LT-, eAvANANJA &^AC ,^AND ^^ iDAWAY ILAPO.


CONC.L- I ON:

















INTRO-DUTIOJ : The purpose of this Micro Site study is to record and analyse
environmental/pnysical, psycho/social and spacial forces acting on our
building site.
000
Environmental points of interest include the ,avannah River's tides, O O
seasonal wind ano sun orientations, air pollution sources, flood lines,
hurricane/earthquake frequency and their Dower level, and seasonal
temperature ranges.


General physical data discusses the color, texture, material and
detailing/structure of surrounding buildings and elements, soil type/
stability and recommended foundation materials and metnods, site drainage,
indigenous materials, site latitude and longitude, and existing/potential
site access possibilities (identified by type: automotive, aquatic, LU
rail, pedestrian).


Psycho/social considerations focus on clusters of social activity
(existing and potential) from their origin (in a 2 block radius) ,
to their location on our site, in addition to an intuitive.
'spacial awareness study' that documents actual and 'implied' spaces/
social flows, and snacial connectivity on the site and influencing i
adjacent properties.


This report is to be ccoradnated uith 2-24"x35" documents that graphically i
connect several concepts. In particular, note tnat the snacial study title
numbers correspond to numbered arrows on the 1/50 scale plan. The X
vertical section document deliniates vertical spacial forces. z
















SITE LOCATION:

H, Latitude 32 04'
Longitude 81 05'

United States of America, Georgia, Chatham County, City of Savannah, Property (mainly) bordered
by the Savannah River,"River Street, Whitaker Street, Bull Street, and Bay Street.

AIR TEMPERATURE DATA:

Riversites mainly temperate, humid majority of year, little daily temperature fluctuations due
to stabilizing effect of water.

Summer : 72 avg., 93 High/78 wb (Eastern Seaboard Stnd.)

Fall/Spring: 57

Winter :15 design low, 32 avg.

Data Source: Captain Alexander D. Stewart, Master Mariner, Savannah River; John Nasworthy,
Ship Lineman, Savannah River; Kinzey, Environmental Technologies in Architecture.


WINDS:


General Easterly winds all year long

Summer Prevailing S.W.,

Fall S.W.-W.-N.W.,

Winter 1st S.W., 2nd N.W., 3rd N.E. (This cycle occurs all winter) S.W. Winds are warm and
moist "maritime tropical" and originate from the Gulf of Mexico low pressure areas.
N.W. & N.E. winds are cold and dry "continental polar". N.W. winds are a high
pressure cold front, followed by N.E. low pressure.

Special- Bay Street and Factor's Walk tend to funnel easterly winds, increasing their velocity.

Bull Street tends to funnel northerly & southerly breezes.

Breezes flow from river to site during day, from site to water @ night, due to varying
specific heats and albedos.
















HURRICANES:

1852, 1948,

Cause of flooding is hurricane hitting @ high tide.

Hurricane can hit from any direction, but N.E. winds are strongest, S.W. weakest. N.E. winds
have topped 200mph.

Hurricanes typically move North.

Hurricanes move counter clockwise.

Data Source: Alexander, Nasworthy

FLOOD/RIVER DATA:

0' = mean sea level

Water color Black, due to silt from Carolina farms, 4" water visibility in winter, 0" in summer,
This topsoil silt causes shoals which require regular dredging.

Savannah River is the watershed for S. Carolina.

A semi-diurnal tide based on lunar gravity exists. Tide sequence changes 1 hour each day, in
a 27 day cycle.

Currents change every 6 hours (from Atlantic Ocean in & out).

2 high tides daily

2 low tides daily

Spring tide high high 6'

Neap tide low low O'-

Water Temperature: 46 winter, 82 summer

Data Source : Captain Alexander
John Nasworthy
















Flooding: 10'-9" avg. 100 year flood el.on our site


13.4' highest recorded on our site (Authority: Savannah Georgian Sept. 16, 1824
1824 Storm)

Data Source: Blueprint "100 year Flood Plain Elevations for Chatham County,
Georgia, Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Savannah District Oct. 1973.



The ground surface water flows relatively perpendicular toward river, but this is virtually
immaterial considering that the large space program will probably roof over the majority of
the site.


Of concern is the possible flooding of 'the strand'
over the walk bordering our site to the south; some
called for to either redirect flood water to nearby
distribute to northerly River Street systems.


which may create a flow of water up and
architectural or engineering treatment is
southern storm drains or collect and


Also, note that while we roof over the site, the rain from our surfaces must be carried to
the ground and to storm drains or the river.



The riverfront is mainly fill dirt with good bearing, down to a depth of roughly 15' where
clay begins. See soil borings for preciseness.


Foundations:


Modern Single or groups of piles are driven until they stop. This is now
being used for all new water front bldgs., but does not preclude the
possibility of other systems, if stable.


- Old bldgs sit on wood rails with 4' pryamids underneath.


Percolation: Unknown & unnecessary, since our building will cover the site.


-I.


DRAINAGE:


SOIL:


- -- -~-lp






















FOUNDATION ANALYSIS:


Pilings are required (according to soil/foundation engineer).

Economics Timber: least, prestressed concrete-medium, steel-highest.

Loading Timber: 25-40 tons
Concrete: 50-60 tons
Steel: 65 tons

Standard Timber: 15" min top, 8-10" nin bottom
Sizes Concrete: 12" or 14" square
Steel: 12" x 53# "H"

Depth Pile bearing is both friction and tip.

Soil in the vicinity of our site has a layer of clay and silt at
approximately 53' that is similar to limestone, and gives good
pile tip stability. It is called marlL".

Piles should be between 55' and 60' long.

Data Mr. DeYoung, Engineer, Hussey-Gay and Bell Engineers,
Source Savannah, Georgia


L


__

















EARTHQUAKE:

A fault line is @ the bottom of the Savannah River.

An earthquake occurred Jan./1977 in Charleston of 1 on the richtor scale (unnoticable).

In 1892 a damaging earthquake hit Charleston.

Data Source: Alexander, Nasworthy

LOCAL BUILDING MATERIALS:


Brick, rubble rock (especially on our site), concrete, concrete block, granite blocks,
steel, cobblestone & brick walk pavers, wood, iron (especially Factor's Walk), grey stucco,
railroad ties, asphalt, slate.

OTHER MATERIALS & ELEMENTS

IN SITE VICINITY:

Grass, trees, water (river & concourse fountain), sky, clouds, industrial smoke, people,
automobiles, sand/dirt, train, sea gulls, large commercial ships & tugboats in-river.

Surrounding Structures: Appearance, form-geometry
Materials, texture, colors; details, mass-structure :
Savannah River: Talmadge (Alt U.S. 17) Memorial Steel-Grey-Smooth, Angular Steel Truss-airy-good


River Street


Bridge, Material Warehousing/
Shiploading, Future Industrial
Sites, Unpleasant Ruins.



: Bistros & specialty shops in
renovated old warehouses (ala
'Old Town' Chigago), Electric
plant (west of site), river Tug
office (east of site), pedestrian
concourse.


Texture, Off-White Warehouses,
Tan Brick?, Green Tree Canopy,
Black Water.


appearance, no details
visible, triangular and
rectalinear, Mass-walls of
warehouse, truss crane.


Red and tan brick, grey stucco, Old bldgs crude bearing
rough surfaces, wood-tan-grainy walls w/windows wood bean
sand-tan & grey, green trees- rough functional details-
rough texture, steel lattice antique methods, restora-
generating plant-light grey, tion is constantly improvir
very rich texture, autumn colors,looks, new concourse-
slate-dark grey. clean & modern-some inte-
gration problems, recta-
linear plans-some arches.

















1st & 2nd level shops & closed
warehouses, parking (east of
site) 3rd level public/private
offices (municipal-by City Hall)
potential future apts/condominiums.

Old powder storage archways (south
of east Factor's Walk) now used
for car parking.


Grey stucco, tan brick, tan-
grey masonry large blocks,
ark grey cobblestone, It.
grey mortar, Black iron-
lattice, med. grey concrete,
multi-colored cobblestone,
trees to south, rich surface
and spacial texture, autumn
colors & bridge system do
much to integrate the
diversity.


Triangular-diamond bridge
structure-light & airy,
heavy bldg. bearing wall-
massive-masonry, antique
details not wasteful or
prettified though very
functional & structurally
oriented details "inte-
gral texture", arches,
appealing archaic look.


: City Hall is the only dominant
structure on North side of street-
mainly mini-parks.

Southside non-commercial offices,
customs, stock exchange, real
estate, some old stores.


Tan-grey lower masonry base Details more wasteful & orna-
walls-rich texture City mental that on River St. &
Hall, Southside cream wall Factor's Walk much ado
with dark brown window about little things, tall
frames (Italian Renaissance- dome roof, massive masonry
mannerist), Some brick block base walls nice
structures tan, grey columned block reveal-detailing on
customs bldg. Grey concrete arches, rectangular blocks,
walks, rark grey streets/ archaic exterior appeal, nice
trees green grey bark interior much influenced by
Italian Renaissance church
& residential architecture

Appearance above average.


Massive round columns & block!
heavy moldings, ornateness -
Greek imitative-column capital
Heavy triangular cornice.
Not bad to look upon.

Appearance declines rapidly
on south side of street out
of City Hall vicinity.


-IQ


Factor's Walk:


Bay Street


__ __

















Bull Street

(North of
Johnson Square)




Johnson Square:


Bank, stock exchange, financial
offices, cafeteria, alleys






Financial institutions,
row houses ( periphery,
meeting hall, cafeteria


Marble-like top stories-
tan-beige-off-white-
Brick
Dark grey street




Red-Brown Brick, glass
Brick & grass cafeteria

Trees-green-grey bark

rich texture


Corner of Bull & Bay bldgs.
are fairly well kept, mediocre
appearance down Bull,
Cafeteria is horrible,
Alleys a bit enigmatic,
structures and bearing wall
masonry.

Good modern details- handsome
bank,
Cheap-Hack-like design of
cafeteria.
Rectalinear.
Triangular cornice on meeting
hall, columns
Forest-like-pleasant scale
except for tall bank.


_ ~111_


_

















EXISTING/POTENTIAL SITE ACCESS:


Automotive:


Pedestrian:


Existing-
Down ramp from Bay Street East of City Hall.
Factor's Walk, E. & W. Sides (lower level).
River Street.

Potential-
Bay Street is an obvious and logical alternative.
Day traffic is high on Bay night traffic
is high on River Street.

Existing-
Stairs East of City Rall.
River Street brick side walk by stores, pedestrian river
concourse.
Old stairs off of Bay-W. of site.

Potential-
General Note: Treat car/pedestrian interfaces sensitively,
segregate high volume areas.
Bay Street West of City Hall.
Factor's Walk all levels, with exciting opportunities for
higher levels.


Existing-
River Street. 12:3Upm,4:30om currently used for
adventuresome tourists.
Potential-
Exploit train as a people mover, or some other rail
tracks.

Existing-
Tourboat loading zone just east of site.

Potential-
Yachts in front of site (private or project owned).


moving freight &


vehicle on existing


Train:






Aquatic:


__I_ ___~_ _ __ ___ _


_ __ I
















PM





L ,- -I /A ..


AM


PA LT


C 120
W? ALT

3cufa = 2L


Z PM
IO0I-


?LAK MAR ZI
Sf-T Z4

(_-/9= / '"

Ps IZ W
<=\ P ( )
v -q


ic FV I
9:sc~tf' >


i -r
ik4L


JUr ai


-i#-Vk7/A. 2


- f~-


6>.


2_LI4c~


___ __~I _I ___ I~ __ _I _


Ci IZ~J


~NG LE
















~$7t1~4 S C1C -



cF~t~~i~`U

f.AL




1' (j fc
-r -.' : '


* -


----


" -:--I-. ,1 / I



















cr~r~ ~~f~ 4EAC7~T


'-C-


0~ c~ crUj f-7\


\4A4c-~3


PAOC--i


'-IzT -~~


i- '


--




























































































































1~


) F
"i,(
c.

~ts~ r~d
















-' 'I


k/A-i ,~-'


'NAf C -
TU^ @; A 9


- +-~ / S:S:~- ;//~3


is ; : :----~ -- '/j-f


TC
-,-,


7%)~T~-


















-rc c-rr HAU~-


-r~ i~c~-


!Kr7 i~ A E ~ 2P /-'~


Lr i


L-_frJ 'vv/ A1-1
4-is--L


1-f'


~A~-;L Or\l


\!i c ? /L/














[KTh


%t~, ~tc~A T~A c"


C3-?~EJ


Vi?-= E//


6


-ci~f:C=#~-~
C1Y4 HAlf-4


j ."


;3Te CT7


,>--7 -.--


q.2~si C4cZK -


C'- _~ LI


~' ~-~ Z


/,-


>72I~


-IS&


fc~


































crh' Cs4tLu


-e -, -


1K


ii--I--.


14 /i -,



















2:e intend t of ne ei:al Section is To etalish ui.- line set
fortn o the Jiy n Jonin; Orjinanc-s of S.vannah, EIlLoric District
Lonin OrJ finance, nnu any otnor legal constraints which we are to
use in aporoacninr the liver front Project.












2 DI^ulkGl@ at 9 T


Sec. 38-118. Established.


In order to protect the character of existing ne:i ghborhoods, to prevent
excessive density of population in areas which are not adequately served wtih
water, sewerage facilities and fire protection; to ensure that adequate and
suitable areas will be available in the city to provide housing for a growing
population, and to protect residential arens from the blighting, effects of the
traffic, noise, odors and dust generated by commercial and industrial activity;
to provide for and accommodate growth and expansion of commercial and industrial
activities; to prevent blight and slums and to promote orderly growth and devel-
opment by grouping similar and related uses together and by separating: dissimilar
and unrelated uses; and in order that the various other purposes of this chapter
may be accomplished, there are hereby established within the city zoning dis-
tricts identified as follows:


N tl MITN


















Q )M lm [DiIIIIIIIIITollllllllIIIIIlllIII IIIIIIIIIIII II[I III1

R-M-25 Multi-Farily Residential. The purDose of this district shall be
to maintain dwelling unit density to not more than twenty-five dwelling units
per net acre of residential land, except where approved by the board of appeals,
in order to-ensure a healthful living environment in urban renewal and suburban
Garden apartment areas.

R-IM-40 Multi-Family Residential. The purpose of this district shall be
to maintain dwelling unit density to not more than forty dwelling units per net
acre of residential land,.except where approved by the board of appeals, in
order to ensure a healthful living environment in central built-up areas.

R-I-P Residential-Institutional-Professional. The purpose of this dis-
trict shall be to create an area in which residential, institutional and pro-
fessional uses can be intermixed and at the same time achieve a healthful living
environment.

R-B Residential-Business. The purpose of this district shall be to
create an area in which residential uses, institutional uses, professional uses
and certain types of convenience-shopping-retail sales and service uses can be
intermixed and at the same time prevent the development of blight and slum con-
ditions. This district shall only be established in those older sections of
the community in which by custom and tradition the intermixing of such uses has
been found to be necessary and desirable, and in those areas where it is found
necessary and desirable to create a transition zone between an R-District and
a B or I-Di6trict.

B-H hIighlway-Business. The purpose of this district shall be to provide
and encourage the proper grouping of road-side service areas that will accommo-
date the need of the traveling public in a manner that prevents traffic con-
gKvotlon, traiflc lizarls, and blight on the streets and roads and hjlhways within
the city.

B-N Neighborhood-Business. The purpose of this district shall be to
provide convenient shopping facilities consisting of convenience goods and
personal services in neighborhood market areas of from three thousand to five
thousand people.

B-C Commlunitv-Business. The purpose of this district shall be to pro-
vide community shopping facilities consisting of a wide variety of sales and
_____ Iservice facilities at locations that will be accessible to a market area con-
Srtaining from thirty-five thousand to seventy thousand people.

















0I M1i 1 11 111 T llIIIIIH 111111llill8llIlllI lllllllllll

B-C-l Central-Business. The purpose of this district shall be to pro-
tect and enhance the central business district of the city which serves the
Savannah metropolitan area population

-_ --- B-G General-Business. The purpose of this district shall be to create
and protect areas in which heavy commercial and certain Industrial-like activi-
ties.are permitted.

B-B Bayfront-Business. The purpose of this district shall be to protect
the character of the commercial development along the Savannah River within the
City.

I-L Light-Industrial, The purpose of this district shall be to create
and protect areas for those industrial uses which do not create excessive noise,
odors, smoke and dust and which do not possess other objectionable characteristics
which might be detrimental to surrounding neighborhoods or to the other uses per-
mitted in this district,

R-I-P-A Residential, Medium Density. The purpose of this district shall
be to stabilize land use intensity in R-I-P-A Zoning Districts to not more than
seventy (70) dwelling units per net acre of residential land. Further, the pur-
pose of this district shall be to assure a compatible land use pattern within the
unique physical environs of Old Savannah, This district shall only be established
within the area bounded by East Broad and West Broad Streets, between the Savannah
River and Park Avenue, where detached, semi-detached. and row houses are prevalent
and appropriate.

P- Planning District. The purpose of this district shall be to provide
areas within which comprehensive development plans shall be prepared and reviewed
by the Planning Commission in order to secure an orderly development pattern.
Such districts shall be considered "overlay" districts and the uses permitted in
such districts shall be those uses permitted in the zoning district which they
overlay.

SC-R Recreational Conservation. The purpose of this district shall be
to preserve for recreational use large open areas which because of location,
Size or topography are particularly suited for recreational use and which are
needed to serve the recreation needs of an expanding population.

Uiliii















:iz~~i ~ F~ ~hII 111111 liii Ilif II III ID DUD 1110 101 liii II


V ZT

/'i L 2


0 C-1


- r


r'j


1--_.. -" 10 ..
SI I

^- _" -- --- --------

F.. rr n ,. ,;, *
cr -- '-r .." -- r r ; I

S'. .... > 7 . .'. I" 1


I~' 1 I


I., I


R1*P~l


3.-.-'


r-


1.


il :


;-I


mgm(~~


'
;;
---1-r-, ii i i--
















z cMiwH1ic


To R-I-P-A, as far westward as practical


NORqT


f 7
"V --J - '1iZr


;I1J I



f ij




Li~ L-

Jri i
LJ3 [rl

WI~1C_

LL ,T
LIT


L TI_-1
7 ] L _.. cL -. 1 i7
1: E'


Si J
_ -lEr t .
jl


J-f- --J- I
_ 1 .- _~F i I i F
S ... . ""

J - r r c- ----Lt-- I L-
r ,i A L r ..

S TO R.IP-A
'---- rl r--- I:ii --. --- r-i-l
. _.. L... .. L_-I J L/ ..
r-i r., -,L .A \ i L [711
F 'ft7 L .I '. L ..1
yL--- -i __. 3 [-L _J I I




J LL I I -II[_



1.1 rr i lr
|1 -** A t ] TFi -1 f 11-- -7 -r-l


]f L I r I1
i h L.J I _.JL 7., L J L .... B _.1 L .i[ ._


.--t -- r : .... 1 - .. -] A2 :-r




O Ri, ip'P i /v I t 'i--- 1 I' ^ .r


RI u D
....._ ___J










-- -- -' ]
~1
J


-Et

i" i^


LEGEND
NON CL)Nflh MI NG USFS
A L Estnq
* New

'N NIN(G FiANltN)AP i ES
S*-- rt sl"q
I -- Pnpttped RIP A
I--rciposed B G



ScaO I iIi


Z

00Nf4%


-M


i


I~il ~i~S ~21~ iillllliilil i ilillillillli illi lllililllilllill




















(b) Frovisions Regarding Use in Business Districts Permitted
uses in the various Business Districts are identified by the letter
"X" in the appropriate column of the use schedule. Uses permitted subject to
the approval of the Board of Appeals in the various Business Districts
are indicated by the letter "B" in the appropriate column of the use schedule.
Such uses marked with (B2) shall be subject to Board of Appeals approval only
if the use is less than ten acres. All uses marked (B2) which contain ten or
more acres shall be permitted only within a P-U-D District. (Passed Council
4/24/75)


List of Uses


R-B B-H B-N B-C


Residential T'-es
1. One-familv dwelling
a. detached ....................................
b. semi-detached or end-row ....................
c. attached or row .............................
2. Two-familv dwelling
a. detached ....................................
b. semi-detached or end-row ....................
c. attached or row .............................
3. Multi-family dwelling
a detached ..................................
b. semi-detached or end-row ....................
c. attached or row .............................
4. Multi-family dwelling, four story or more ......
(Passed Council 4/24/75)

Lodeing Facilities
7. Hotel or apartment hotel .......................
8. Hotel or apartment hotel, four story or more ...
(Passed Council 4/24/75)
9. Motel ..........................................

10. Boarding house or rooming house.....................
Religious Facilities
11. Church or other place of worship. ....................
12. Convent or monastery.................................


BC-1 B-G


x
x
x

x
x
--- -- --

--- -- --
--- -- --
--- -- --


x
--- --- B2


_--- X


--- X


X x


x
x


II: III III


.L ELD Rt)


~ ~ ~ ~ rlsril arllrsseiilliliraiiirirsrur~



















List of Uses


14. Eleemosynary or philanthropic institution............
Community Facilities
15. Public uses..........................................
Including, but not restricted to schools, fire and
police stations, park and recreation facilities.
15a. Heliport, helistop...................................
16. Public utility.......................................
18. Telephone exchange ...................................
19. Cultural facilities..................................
Art galleries, museums, legitimate theatres,
library and other facilities of a similar nature.
20. Club or Lodge ----------------------
Education
20a. Assembly I!alls ----------------------------------------
Including union halls, conference halls, business
meetings, civic halls and activities of a similar
nature. Such use may include office soace where inci-
dental to the principal use.
Animal Care
26b. The use of public facilities or public parks for
carnivals, rodeos, horse shows, shooting or ath-
letic event, community fair or other events of
public interest......................................
Such public facilities or public parks shall
be owned and operated by either an agency of
government or a unit of government.
29. Amusement or recreational activities carried on
wholly within a building.............................
Indoor theatre, billiard parlor, dance hall and
activities of a similar nature.
Retail Sales and Services


32. Food and drugstores --------------------------------------
Drugstore, meat market, bakery products, dairy products,
confectionery shops, liquor store and stores of a
similar nature. (Passed Council 12/5/75)


R-B B-H B-N


X X X


B
X


B-C BC-1 B-G

S X X

X X X


X X X X X X

X X X X X X








X X X X X X


X


X X X


X X X X X


j


ROI L [ G2IIIIaIIIIIIIII lU 8 lililili9il


B-B

X

X


B
X
X
X

X

X








X



X



X
x-


-


















I\B l I (B U [ i IIIIIIIIIlll9lIIIllllllllll IIIIIII IIIIIIiiIJiliii


List of Uses
33. Personal Service Shops.-----------------------------------
Barber shop, beauty shop, health club, massage parlor
"as an incidental use", shoe repair, dry cleaning and
laundry pick-up station, laundromats, watch repair
and services of a similar nature.
34. Clothing stores and dry goods----------------------------
Shoe store, men's shops, women's shops, variety stores
and stores of a similar nature.
35. Home furnishing and hardware-----------------------------
Appliance store, hardware store, paint, appliance
repair, sporting goods store, furniture store and
stores of a similar nature.
36a.Specialty shops------------------------------------------
Gift shops, florist, hobby shops, camera shops, book-
stores, and stores of a similar nature.
36b.Craft Shops---------------------------
Gift shops which produce goods used for special
orders and/or for sale in specialty craft shops.
37- Banks and offices, three stories or less ----------
Banks, loan agencies, professional offices, business
offices, and facilities or a similar nature.
38 Office or commercial building, four stories or more. ---
39. Department stores-----------------------------
Unclassified Retail Sales & Services
40. Photocraphy studio-------------------------------
41. Funeral parlor----------------------------------
42. Ambulance service or rescue squad ---------
44. Telecraph or messenger service----------------
45. Taxi stand------------------------------------
46. Freezer locker service, ice storage ----------
47. Commercial schools-----------------------------
*Where three or less instructors are employed.
4/b.Fortune Telling-----------------------------------
Restaurants
48. Restaurants------------------------------------------
48a.Cocktail lounge, night club, taverns and stores of a
similar nature where such uses utilize pouring or
package license. ---------------------- ---------


R-B B-H
X X


B-N
X


B-C
X


BC-1
X


B-G
X


X X X X X


X X X X X


X X X X X X


X X X X X X


X X x X X X


------------ B B
X X X


----- X--

X X


X
- -


X


X
X
X
*X


-- X X


X X X


X X X X X X


B X B X X X


B-B
X









X
X



X


X
X






















R-B B-H B-N B-C BC-1 B-6


52. Automobile, truck or boat and non-residential trailer
sales or rentals ----------------------------------- ---
Within a B-C-1 District, automobile, truck or
boat service facilities incidental to a franchised
new automobile, truck or boat sales establishment
shall be located within the same zoning district
as such establishment, but need not be on the
same lot with such establishment; provided, however that:
52a. Motorcycle, motorscooters, and bicycle sales and
services----------------------------------------------- ---
a. Such service facilities shall not be established on
a lot which is either adjacent to or directly across
the street from an R-District when said street has a
right-of-way of less than 75 feet.
b. All service, storage or similar activities con-
nected with service facilities shall be conducted
entirely indoors and on the lot on which such
facilities are located, and no outside storage or
dismantled vehicles shall be permitted.
b4. Retail Automobile parts and tire store----------------- -----
Provided, that the following provisions shall
apply only to B-N Districts: (Correction)
a. Unless elsewhere permitted within the district, there
shall be no dismantling of vehicles on the premises
to obtain auto parts.
b. Unless elsewhere permitted within this district, the
only auto part installation that shall be permitted
in connection with such use shall be the installing
of tires and the installation of minor maintenance
or minor accessory parts.
c. Unless elsewhere permitted within this district, major
auto repair shall not be permitted in connection with
such use. Minor auto repair and maintenance may be
permitted provided such repair and maintenance shall
be incidental to the normal up-keep of an automobile.
55. Automobile parking lot or parking garage............. --- --
May include gasoline pumps.


X X X


X


x x x

x















x X X X


List of Uses


B-B


X


~Bb~~. M~il~~liililil iillllllliilllilliilllilllllillllliiiiL


--


















\\X1I1 ~ ti L~ ~ 1 1111111111 iifiiuiiiliiiuilui lijjlll.,


List of Uses

Laboratory
57. Laboratory serving professional requirements, den-
tists, medical, etc..................................


Printing
Newspaper...........................................
Printing or letter shop.............................
Newspaper and magazine distributor..................
Book cover processing...............................


R-B B-H B-N .B-C


BC-1 B-G


X X X


X


X


X


Transportation, Storage, Wholesaling
76. Cormercial charter or sightseeing water craft facilities.
77. Marina ------------------------
78. Marine supply and service facility-----------------
Sicns

86. Principal Use Sign --------------------------
88. Incidental Use Sign------------------------


Incidental Uses


89. Home Occupation---------------------------
90. Accessory Uses---------------------- --
Provided, that temporary accessory uses or
buildings shall not be permitted for more
than a twenty-four month period.
91. Incidental Water Front Uses--------------------
Such as docks, piers, refueling facilities
and pumps.


x
X X X X


69.
70.
71.
71a.


--


--- --- --- --- ---
--- --- --- -- --





















,.. =TY [ B A HIillllIIIllfll!!1iIll!lllllllllllll 11111111111111 Ill!! ill

Sec_._ 38- 14. St ru tu res Excl _uded from :le i, ht Limitations.

S"l Thee height limits of these rc:ul;ations _shall not apply to a church spire,
5 belfry, ciuola anIid comes or ornnmenta] tover not intended for human occupancy,
mron:ument, water to'..r, ohb ,;rvation Lower, transmission tower, chimney, smoke-
stack, co:imet'or, ,ole, radio or television tower, mast or aerial, parapet
wall not extended more than four feet above the roof line of the building and
necessary mechanical anniurtenances.

Sec. 3 _-120. '-,duict ion of Front Yard Sethack Reequirements.

Sn an :,-Distr ict, C-A District, C- I District, C-R l)istrict B-C-] District.
and ;'D-I') i-st rict w!' i',re the averaj e :C 'thinc: d i:tancT for ex:i:;tJin; buildings on
all lot:; located .who 1 lv or nartly within two hundred feet of any lot, and within
tlit sanme :'!i zo in', di'ts rict and fronting on thee sama side of the sam T street as such
lot, is less than the minimum setbacl: required in such zonin" district, the set-
back on stuch lot rn.v be less than the required setback, but not less than the
ex i.st in;, \'r ;a'e' stb c d i,;tanc'? for- Iall ot:; within the two hun1 drcd feet. ihen
lots within tlhe two hundred feet are vacant, such vacannt lots shall be considered
as having: the minimum required setback for the purpose of computing an average
n;etback distance.


Setback from
right-of-way for


centerline of street
front yard purposes-feet


District and Use _ o u U ._
______~c in^^ ^ ;^ < 2; U I: G; "S


B-B District
Residential:
1. Single-family.......
2. Two-family..........
3. Multi-famil y........
4. Multi-family (4 or
more stories)....
Non-Residential........


o4
as]
w^-J
o
E 4-1
aI
3 *
E
*H Ca
c k
*r- r3


Ce


E0 -)

x


cco


*r-1 > a)
3A 0 0
0
o o o


- 40
- 40
- 40


7J.~-3" -


--
























1. N>
rN

NORTH


j I
i I
.~- -IL .

'
( 1
-I (


I i


one 1 us-u .T.et tn Visu2a _o:--' tiiity J actors of tne -istoric
Li Strict loniin. Orinanc-.
-onr II- jo-- not ov~', to m-t O th 7i ual omoinatibility actors, rut
;:: u,: til ..re.erv. the historical and architctul carat
of the nei-- borhoo 2 .


c,)


L ... ~


<_rrr JLT

v -^-----


(o I M[


~il ~ ~J ~ illllliiiillilllliiliillillll1ilIililil















iWQWn ia a T


SECTION C q.


::elooiment Standards:


1) Preservation of Historic Buildings Within All Zones in the
Historic District, A building or structure, classified as Historic
or any part thereof, or any appurtenance related thereto including
but not limited to stone walls, fences, light fixtures, steps, pav-
ing and signs shall only be moved, reconstructed, altered or main-
tained in a manner that will preserve the historical and architec-
tural character of the building, structure or appurtenance thereto.

(2) Demolition of Historic Buildings, Whenever a property owner
shows that a building classified as Historic is incapable of earn-
ing an economic return on its value, as appraised by a qualified
real estate appraiser, and the Board of Review fails to approve
the issuance of a certificate of appropriateness, such building
may be demolished, provided, however, that before a demolition
permit is issued, notice of proposed demolition shall be given as
follows:

1. For buildings rated Exceptional: twelve (12) months
2. For'buildings rated Excellent: six (6) months
3. For buildings rated Notable: four (4) months
4. For buildings Of Value as part of the scene: two (2) months

Notice shall be posted on the premises of the building or structure
proposed for demolition in a location clearly visible from the street.
In addition, notice shall be published in a newspaper of general local
circulation at least three (3) times prior to demolition, the final
notice of which shall be not less than fifteen (15) days prior to the
date of the permit, and the first notice of which shall be published
not more than fifteen (15) days after the application for a permit to
demolish is filed. The purpose of this section is to further the pur-
poses of this ordinance by preserving historic buildings which are im-
portant to the education, culture, traditions and the economic values
of the City, and to afford the City, interested persons, historical
societies or organizations the opportunity to acquire or to arrange
for the preservation of such buildings. The Board of Review may at
any time during such stay approve a certificate of appropriateness
in which event a permit shall be issued without further delay.


-.0__


--
--


(oibiiiiiij Litiiiiiiiiiiii0 tiill
















p gilnJU^T o IBt .ol l illiriiliil iilil

(3) Relocation of Historic Buildings, A historic building shall not
be relocated on another site unless it is shown that the preservation
on its existing site is not consistent with the purposes of such
building on such site.

(4) Protective Maintenance of Historic Buildings. Historic buildings
shall be maintained to meet the requirements of the Minimum Housing
Code and the Building Code.

(5) Contemporary Buildings, Zone I The construction of a new
building, or structure, and the moving, reconstruction, alteration,
major maintenance or repair involving a color change materially
affecting the external appearance of any existing contemporary
building, structure, or appurtenance thereof within Zone I shall be
generally of such design, form, proportion, mass, configuration,
building material, texture, color and location on a lot as will be
compatible with other buildings in the Historic Area, and particularly
with buildings designated as Historic and with squares and places to
which it is visually related,

(6) Visual Compatibility Factors. Within said Zone I, new construc-
tion and existing buildings and structures and appurtenances thereof
which are moved, reconstructed, materially altered, repaired or changed
in color shall be visually compatible with buildings, squares and
places to which they are visually related generally in terms of the
following factors: (For a Jraohic internretaticn of the follow,.in
plea, : refer to pay3 1i6-13 of the ISTORY STION)
A, Height The height of proposed building shall be visually
compatibTe with adjacent buildings.

B, Proportion of BuiIding s Front Facade The relationship of
the widtn of building the heght of the front elevation shall
be visually compatible to buildings, squares and places to which
it is visually related

C. Proportion ot Openings Within the Facility. The relation-
s.hip of the width ot the windows to height of windows in a
building shall be visually compatible with buildings, squares
and places to which the building is visually related.


--


















D. Rhythm of Solids to Voids in Front Facades. The relation-
ship of solids to voids in the front facade of a building shall
be visually compatible with buildings, squares and places to
which it is visually.related.

E. Rhythm of Spacing of Buildings on Streets. The relationship
of building to open space between it and adjoining buildings
shall be visually compatible to the buildings, squares and places
to which it is visually related.

F. Rhythm of Entrance and/or Porch Projection. The relationship
of entrances and porch projections to sidewalks of a building
shall be visually compatible to the buildings, squares and places
to which it is visually related

G. Relationship of Materials, Texture and Color. The relation-
ship of the materiaTs, texture and color of the facade of a
building shall be visually compatible with the predominant materi-
als used in the buildings to which it is visually related.

H. Roof Shapes. The roof shape of a building shall be visually
compatible with the buildings to which it is visually related.

I. Walls of Continuity Appurtenances of a building such as
walls, wrought iron, Tences, evergreen landscape masses, build-
ing facades, shall, it necessary, form cohesive walls of enclo-
sure along a street, to insure visual compatibility of the
building to the buildings, squares and places to which it is
visually related.

J. Scale of a Building The size of a building, the building
mass of a building in relation to open spaces, the windows, door
openings, porches and balconies shall be visually compatible with
the buildings, squares and places to which it is visually related.

,, K. Directional Expression of Front Elevation. A building shall
'- be visually compatible vith the buildings, squares, and places to
which it is visually related in its directional character, whether
this be vertical character, horizontal character or non-direc-
tional character.





a:l Pl iIitIiIIII Ii ljil i Illl i i l il i lllll IttilIi ii IlH Hij

Sec. 38-130. Plan and Design Standards.

(a) Required Area for Each Parking Space. Each automobile parking space shall
be not less than one hundred sixty square feet, nor less than eight feet wide, nor
less than twenty feet deep, exclusive of passageways. In addition, there shall be
provided adequate interior driveways to connect each parking space with a public
right-of-way.

(f) Interior rirve.wavs. Interior driveways shall be at least twenty-four feet
wide where used with ninety degree angle parking, at least eighteen feet wide
where used with sixty degree angle parking and at least twelve feet wide where
used with forty-five degree angle parking. Where used with parallel parking, or
where there is no parking, interior driveways shall be at least ten feet wide
for one-way traffic movement and at least twenty feet wide for two-way traffic
movement.

(Ih) Size of iriveways. A driveway exclusive of curb return radii shall be not
less than twelve feet in width. A curb return radius for a driveway at its
entrance to a public street shall not exceed ten feet. The maximum width of a
driveway exclusive of curb return radii shall not exceed thirty-five feet.

(j) Off-Street Paking Space Within Buildings. Garage space or space within
buildings, in basements or on the roofs of buildings may be used to meet the
off-street parking requirements of this chapter; provided, that such space is
designed to serve as off-street parking space.

(k) Pavement "arkings and Signs. Each off-street parking space shall be
clearly marked, and pavement directional arrows or signs shall be provided where-
ever necessary. Markers, directional arrows and signs shall be properly main-
tained so as to ensure their maximum efficiency.

(1) Lighting for sight Use. Adequate lighting shall be provided if the off-
street parking facilities are used at night. If such parking facilities abut
residential land, the lighting shall be arranged and installed so as not to
reflect or cause glare on the abutting residential land.

(m) Required Off-Street Parking Area Shall Nnt Pe Reduced. No off-street
parking area shall be reduced in size or encroached upon by buildings, vehicle
storage, loading or unloading, or any other use where such reduction or encroach-
ment will reduce the off-street parking and loading spaces below that required
by this chapter.


















Siiii ui i iiiiiiiiiii li i ii lil i i iiii j iiilii iiii I iliiil

.(p) Requirements for Combined Uses. The number of off-street parking spaces
required by land or buildings used for two or more purposes shall be the sum of
the requirements for the various individual uses.
(v) Size of .Load ing Berth. A loading berth shall be at least twelve feet wide
with at least fifteen feet overhead clearance. The length of the loading berth
shall be at least fdrty-eight feet or shall be a length such that the horizontal
distance from the front of a dock for back-in parking to the limiting boundary of
the loading and unloading area shall be not less than twice the overall length of
the longest vehicle expected to use the facility.
A loading space need not be necessarily a full berth, but shall have a minimum
plan dimension of at least ten feet overhead clearance. The zoning administrator
siall determine the sufficiency of the off-street loading and maneuvering space
based upon the kind and amount of loading and unloading operation required by the
given use, but in no case shall the use of such space hinder the free movement of
vehicles and pedestrians over a street, sidewalk or alley.


Sec. 38-132. Minimum Space Requirements for Off-Street Parking Areas. The following
are minimum space requirements fic off-street parking areas; provided: (1) in Residen-
tial, Institutional, Prcfessional-A (R-I-P-A) zoning district, detached, semi-derached
and attached dwellings are exempt from compliance; (2) in Residential, Institutional,
Professional-B (I-I-P-B) zoning districts, no off-street parking shall be required I -


==*- for any use within the Historic District


Use
(2) Apartment Hotel At lei
(2a) Assembly Halls At lez
vantai
fcr ea
(8) Co-mmcrcia] or Perscnal At le;
Service Estab i shmcnt quar
addiL:
feet
(15) Multi-Family Dwelling At le
unit.
(16) Office Building, At le
Professional Building feet
or similar use


(Passed Council 10i/10/i4)
Minimum Space Requirements
ist one space for each sleeping room or suite
st one space for each four seats or similar
;e acrcmmodations provided, plus cne space
ich tvo employees
ast one space for each cne hundred fifty
e feet of total first floor area, plus one
ional space fcr each two hundred square
Df additional total fleer area,
ast one and one-fourth spaces per dwelling

ast one space for each five hundred square
of gross floor area.


1



















(18) Private Club

(19) Medical or Dental
Practitioners' Offices

(23) Restaurant or Similar Place
Dispensing Food, Drink or
Refreshments
(24) Shopping Center (Neighbor-
hood Business)


At least one space for each two hundred square
feet of gross floor area.
Each office shall provide at least three spaces
for each professional person occupying or using
each office.
At least one space for each four seats-provided
for patron use.

At least the sum of the parking spaces required
in this article for each of the specific uses in
the shopping center.


Sec. 38-133.


Minimum Requirements for Off-Street Loading Space. The following are


minimum requirements for off-street loading space:

(b) Office building, hotel or apartment One loading berth for every
hotel with a gross usable floor area 100,000 square feet of floor
of 100,000 square feet or more devoted area.
to such purposes.
(c) Retail operation, and all first floor One loading space in accordance
nonresidential uses, with a gross with the provisions of sub-section
floor area of more than 3,000 square (v) of Section 38-130.
feet and less than 20,000 square feet,
and all wholesale and light industrial
operations with a gross floor area of
less than 10,000 square feet.
(d) Retail operation, including restaurant One loading berth for every
and dining facilities within hotels 20,000 square feet of floor
and office buildings, with a gross area.
usable floor area of 20,000 square
feet or more devoted to such purpose.


IIri I i ii 1iiiiliiiiiiiiiijliiii/iiI iiii/i Ii ii: ij
Ililiriiiliii irlilsi Iliiil.i iii i uiill




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - Version 2.9.7 - mvs