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 Material Information
Title: ACASA newsletter newsletter of the Arts Council of the African Studies Association
Portion of title: Newsletter
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: African Studies Association -- Arts Council
Publisher: The Council
Place of Publication: S.l
S.l
Creation Date: August 2001
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Subjects / Keywords: Arts -- Periodicals -- Africa   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 2 (winter 1982)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. designation dropped with no. 3 (spring 1983).
General Note: Title from caption.
General Note: Vols. for Aug. 1992- include Directory of members: addendum.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: No. 34 (Aug. 1992).
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Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 09794003
lccn - sn 92017937
System ID: UF00103115:00075
 Related Items
Preceded by: Newsletter of the Arts Council of the African Studies Association

Full Text

ACASA Newsletter

*&- -d 4 9-o 0 P- Q5& a-


in this issue...


ACASA N ew s ................................................. 2
Minutes of Board Meetings ....................... 3
Triennial Awards Speeches........................ 5
Founders Award .............................................................. 5
Leadership Award ........................................................... 7
N ews from ASA ........................................... 10
Jobs ............................................................ 10
Exhibitions ................................................. 11
Aw ards ....................................................... 13
Conferences & Lectures ........................... 14
Fellowships & Grants ............................... 14
Call for Papers ........................................... 14
Of People and Places ................................ 15
M em bership Directory ............................. 16
2000 Africa & Carribean ............................................... 16
North America, Europe & Asia Addendum .............. 32


http://www.h-net.msu.edu/~artsweb/welcome/acasa.html


Vol. 60


August 2001














ACASA Board of Directors
Robert Soppelsa, President
Michael Conner, President Pro-Tern
Rebecca Green, Secretary/Treasurer
Elisabeth Cameron, Newsletter Editor
Martha Anderson, Past President
Joanne Eicher
Robin Poynor
Enid Schildkrout
Christopher Steiner

For residents of North America, Europe, Asia, correspon-
dence regarding membership information and payment of
dues should be directed to:
Rebecca Green,
Non-Western Art & Culture
1010 Fine Arts
Bowling Green State University
Bowling Green, OH 43403
Email: rlgreen@bgnet.bgsu.edu
419/372-8514
Annual dues are $35.00, payable in January. Checks are
payable to "ACASA" and sent to Rebecca Green (address
above). Membership form is available at end of this
Newsletter.
For residents of Africa & the Carribean, membership
information can be obtained from:
Janet Stanley
National Museum of African Art Library
Smithsonian Institution - MRC 708
Washington, DC 20560, USA
Email: jstanley@ic.si.edu
Tel.: 202/357-4600 Ext. 285
Fax: 202/357-4879
The ACASA Newsletter is published three times a year:
April, August, and December. The Newsletter seeks items
of interest for publication. You can send news about job
changes, fieldwork, travel, new publications, etc. The next
ACASA Newsletter will be in December 2001. Please send
news items by November 17,2001 to:
Elisabeth L. Cameron
Porter Faculty Services
University of California
1156 High Street
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
E-mail: ecameron@cats.ucsc.edu
Phone: 831/459-2763


ACASA News






Presidential Notes
by
Robert Soppelsa, ACASA President






August/September, 2001
First, I want to thank the membership of ACASA for
the honor of serving the organization as a board
member and president. Next, I want to thank my
three predecessors in this office: dele jegede, Polly
Nooter Roberts and Martha Anderson, for providing
such splendid models of presidential behavior. As I
prepared to write these comments, I read notes they
had written during their presidencies. I can never
hope to match dele's good humor and poetically
elegant prose, Polly's enthusiasm, or Martha's
efficiency and thoroughness. However, I promise all
of you that I will do my best for the organization
during the next year. Having survived the transfer to
status as an independent tax-free corporation, our
first meeting outside the continental U.S., and the
establishment of an endowment for ACASA, we are
ready to face the challenges of the new millennium.
Next, I want to welcome ACASA's new board
members: Elisabeth Cameron, Joanne Eicher (return-
ing to the board for a second term), Robin Poynor,
Enid Schildkrout and Christopher Steiner. I look
forward to working with all of these fine people
during the coming year, and with returning board
members Martha Anderson, Michael Connor,
Rebecca Green and Babatunde Lawal
This information was already published in the last
newsletter, but it bears repeating: the entire organiza-


ACASA Newsletter



Vol. 60 http://www.h-net.msu.edJu/artswba/welcome/acasa.html August 2001




tion owes a debt of gratitude to Rebecca Green, our
current treasurer, for her hard work in establishing
ACASA as an independent not-for-profit corporation
(aka a 501C3). Anyone familiar with government red
tape will know that Rebecca spent many hours
negotiating that labyrinth of regulations and forms,
from which we will benefit in years to come. Others
who deserve our profound thanks are the members
of the committee who organized the Twelfth Trien-
nial Symposium on African Art this past April: Eli
Bentor, the program chair; Martha Anderson, our
past president; and especially Robert Nicholls, our
person on the ground at the University of St. Tho-
mas, who worked tirelessly, organizing entertain-
ments and raising funds to guarantee the success of
the event. Without his help the event would never
have been such a success. It's good to know there are
people like Robert out there, who are little-known in
the organization but interested in improving it and
helping it grow. Though our membership and focus
have always been international, ACASA has been
dominated from the start by its members who live
and work in the continental United States. Robert's
enthusiasm and energy should be taken as evidence
of the possibilities awaiting ACASA out there in the
larger world: the meetings in St. Thomas provided all
who attended with new ideas, exciting new experi-
ences (particularly the events of St. Thomas's Carni-
val, but many also profited from the availability of
the island's beaches, aquatic sports, duty-free shop-
ping and parks). Those of us whose research doesn't
usually take us into the cultures of the African-
American diaspora were thrilled with what we saw
and experienced in St. Thomas, and I'm sure that our
teaching will reflect these experiences. I for one will
never forget the magnificent new-world Mamy Wata
wearing a hot pink, skin-tight spangled outfit and
carrying an enormous albino python, who posed so
seductively for many of our cameras. The pounding
rhythms of the tin drum bands reverberating in my
whole body were also unforgettable. The first Trien-
nial outside the continental US was a success in one
area that had been of concern, considering the
increased cost of a distant venue. We estimate that 30
graduate students attended this meeting--a good
number, considering the distance they had to travel
and the expense of travel to St. Thomas. There had
also been some worry that panels would not be well
attended, as everyone would be at the beach the
whole time. Having sat in numerous crowded
sessions myself, I can personally attest that this
feared by-product of a tropical venue never material-
ized.
The conference itself was interesting in many ways.
Outreach day, devoted to discussions with teachers
from the Virgin Islands, and Museum day, dedicated


to discussions with Virgin Islands Museum person-
nel, were both successful events, well attended and
receiving high marks from participants. The panels
were chock full of new information and exciting
visuals. I particularly remember a paper on Niger
delta masquerades, by Martha Anderson (as if she
didn't have enough to do, working as hard as she did
on organizing and raising funds for the conference
and the organization) that was accompanied by
spectacular slides. I guess the days are finally over
when it was commonly stated that masquerade arts
in Africa were dying out. They are changing, but the
changes are exciting and informative. All in all, the
Twelfth Triennial Symposium on African Arts was a
great and memorable success.
During our meetings At the ASA convention in
Houston this November, we will have several serious
issues to confront: our dues structure and member-
ship recruitment policies need study and revision.
Our bylaws are badly in need of updating. As of the
end of 2001, the Smithsonian's African Art library at
NMAfA will no longer be able to subsidize the
mailing of ACASA's newsletter to overseas members
as a pro bono service to the organization, and I think
we are all agreed that this is an important service we
provide to our colleagues, particularly in Africa. We
need to designate a venue for the Thirteenth Trien-
nial Symposium on African Art, to take place in 2004.
Fund-raising for the ACASA endowment must
continue, etc. There is much to do. I look forward to
meeting with many of you in Houston and getting
down to business.


Bob Soppelsa/ president




Minutes of ACASA Board Meeting
April 26,2001
Frenchman's Reef Marriott Hotel, St. Thomas, USVI.
submitted, 5/23/01 by Robert T. Soppelsa
The meeting was called to order at 12:45 p.m.
Treasurer's fund drive report:
The fund has increased by $300.00 since her last report. The
organization has approximately $70,000.00 in its accounts as on
Monday of this week.
Discussion: expenditures for stipends, expenses for the sympo-
sium brochure and remuneration to the designer of the brochure,
who didn't submit a bill for services. It was decided to offer
$300.00 apiece to the two Nigerians who made it to the conference,
for their extraordinary expenses. The organization's nonprofit
status has been confirmed by the US government, for a probation-
ary period of five years (this is standard IRS procedure). The
treasurer reported that fund-raising efforts this year were very
successful.





Reports on Outreach Day:
Reports of its success are apparently mixed.
Discussion: should it be continued and made a regular part of the
Triennial? General agreement that it is an important enhancement
of the event, and should be considered for future Triennials.

Museum Day:
Museum day is recommended to continue as a regular part of each
Triennial.

President's comment (M. Anderson):
All committee chairs must file reports of their committee activities
for the archives.

Book Award committee:
4 finalists have been determined; 2 awards will be given at the
banquet.

Leadership awards:
Herbert Cole and John Picton will receive the Leadership Award.
Richard Long will be given a special award as one of the founders
of the Triennial in 1968.

Book/Media Display:
Numerous books and tapes have been sent by authors and
publishers, all to be donated to the UVI library after the sympo-
sium. Display is in one of the rooms opposite the registration
tables.

Newsletter Editor.
Janet Stanley reports that after this year she will no longer be able
to mail newsletters to international addresses, subsidized by the
Smithsonian. All agreed that it is an important service and
outreach to colleagues in Africa. Possible other sources of funding
for this expense were discussed. There was also some discussion of
partial conversion of the newsletter to electronic distribution.

Archives:
There is still no definite plan for what to do about establishing an
archive for ACASA. A venue and archivist will have to be located
in the near future.

Extra Board Meeting:
We will have an extra board meeting at noon on Friday to discuss
a possible venue for the next Triennial. Cost factors will have to be
included in the discussion.

Banquet:
The cookies-and-punch reception cost more than $2,000.00. This
leaves $1,000.00 for banquet-related expenses, which will go to the
setup of a cash bar at the banquet.


Minutes of ACASA Board Meriting
April 29, 2000
St. Thomas

Martha Anderson presided.
Attending: Michael Conner, Rebecca Green, Robert Soppelsa,
Elisabeth Cameron, Joanne Eicher, Robin Poynor, Enid
Schildkrout, Polly Nooter Roberts
Absent: Chris Steiner

Airline Report:
Anderson updated the board on issues surrounding airline tickets
promised for ACASA. American Airlines had said there would be
no problem to issue free tickets prior to the conference, but they
later claimed it was impossible to issue them until after the
conference was over. British Airways also did not honor their
statement that they'd give a special price. Several suggestions
were made as to how to use the tickets that will be issued.


Election of new officers


President: Robert Soppelsa
President Pro-Tem: Michael Conner
Secretary/Treasurer: Rebecca Green
Newsletter Editor: Elisabeth Cameron

Newsletter
There was some discussion of the possibility of producing an
online electronic version of the newsletter with the possibility of a
password being provided to members on their payment of dues.

Secretary Archivist & Archive
A new position of secretary archivist has been added. Traditionally
such tasks were carried out by the president and the secretary
treasurer, but with so many added tasks for the president and the
treasurer, many tasks can be better taken care of by the new office.

There is a need for an ACASA archive. Many of the notes and
other material have been lost as the office of president has passed
from person to person. David Easterbrook has volunteered to
assist with the archiving, but it is the opinion of the board that a
position on the board should be assigned to the position and that
assistance and help can be made use of such people as
Easterbrook. The elected person should gather materials and
determine what should be included in consultation with past
presidents. Michael Conner has copies of past Newsletters. Enid
Schildkrout has much material as well. It was suggested we might
investigate the possibility of placing the archives in the
Herskovitts Archives in the Northwestern Library. Michael Conner
will work as the archivist, assuming his tasks as president pro-tern
will not take up a great deal of time.

Fundraising
The fundraising committee has a great deal of work to do. In the
past the committee was composed of many people who were not
on the board. Letters need to go out to potential donors. We
decided we would fill this position at a later time.

Green stated that she will investigate the possibility of paying
dues and making contributions via credit card.

Outreach Committee
Robin Poynor will chair the outreach committee.

CAA/ASA Coordinator
Someone who is a member of both organizations should fill the
CAA/ASA Coordinator position. Chris Steiner was suggested as a
possibility. Lawal stated that although he does not want to take on
the task alone, he will be glad to assist.

Triennial Committee
A Triennial Committee can be appointed at a later time. We do
need to appoint one by the next ASA meeting in November 2001.

Social Sciences/Humanties Committee
It was noted that the by-laws call for a Social Sciences/Humanities
committee, which has never been filled. The reason for the
committee is to build relationships with other groups and to be
aware of possibilities of interaction among various disciplines.
Steiner, Eicher, and Schildkrout are all social scientists and can
work on that end, while Lawal, Conner and Poynor are art
historians and can represent that area. One possibility if interac-
tion may be identifying another group to consider sponsoring a
joint meeting.

Graduate Program Home Page
A graduate program home page has been suggested. Eli Bentor has
volunteered to host a page of graduate programs. We need
someone to work with Bentor on the project. Schildkrout is willing
to assist.

We need to consider the various needs of ACASA and be aware of
any other committees or task forces that need to be created.
ACASA can create a committee at any time. One possible such
committee may be a "web site committee."




Membership
We need to increase the number of participating and paying
members of ACASA. There is a need to investigate the differences
between Hafrarts and ACASA. We can use the list serve for
example to suggest that one may subscribe to the Newsletter
online. The large number of courtesy memberships provided to
those in Africa and the Caribbean is a financial drain. We want to
continue to support these members, but we may need to explore
other ways of supporting them. For example, we might ask paying
members to elect to sponsor an African member at a partial rate.
We may need to raise dues for American members. Dues rates can
be determined by the Board. We need to investigate dues
structures used by comparable organizations. We also need to
increase the endowment.
Bylaws
Newly elected president Robert Soppelsa continued the meeting
and reiterated that our bylaws are in need of attention. A number
of policy changes have taken place since the bylaws were written.
Pat presidents and secretaries may be invited to attend a meeting
of the board at ASA to consider bylaws revisions. Issues that need
discussion include
E Dues structure: look at other organizations; alternative means
for paying for mailing of newsletters; investigating [possibil-
ity of USIS helping with mailing newsletter and book
dispersal; carrying of African and Caribbean memberships;
E By-laws: some boards have attorneys look over bylaws.
Perhaps Richard Faletti can be asked to look over ACASA's
bylaws.
E We need to develop a strategic plan with short range and
long-range goals.
Treasurer's report
As of Monday, April 23, we had a total of $70,000. Much for the
triennial still needs to be sorted out. We have over $20,000 in
awards for student travel and African and Caribbean travel.
We need to introduce the attendance of grad students and the
amount of travel support we provided for them in the next issue of
the Newsletter.
The meeting was adjourned.


ACASA Awards Speeches



Founders Award

Presentation by Roland Abiodun
It is a great honor to be asked to present Richard A.
Long, the Atticus Haygood Professor of Interdiscipli-
nary Studies at Emory University in Atlanta for the
distinguished Founder's Award.
Today, The Arts Council of the African Studies
Association wishes to acknowledge your contribu-
tions as a leading humanities scholar, a dedicated
teacher, a strong patron of the arts, and most impor-
tantly, for your unique vision and role in founding
the Triennial Symposium on African Art-a forum
which has served us extremely well for the discus-
sion, dissemination and exchange of research find-
ings on the arts of Africa and the African Diaspora
since 1967.
Recognizing your role in our organization is akin to
acknowledging the presence and influence of elders


and ancestors in African culture. To acknowledge
elders and ancestors and to seek their support are not
only indicative of true wisdom but also insurance
against catastrophe. As the Yoruba say, "If the
earthworm pays homage to the dry and solid earth,
the earth opens its doors for the boneless earthworm.
Similarly, when youths pay due respect to their
elders, they live to a ripe old age."
Born 74 years ago in Philadelphia, Professor Long,
even as a youth seemed to share something with his
father, a skilled blacksmith whose patron orisa in
Yoruba culture would have been Ogun, the discov-
erer who cuts new paths and opens the way for
others. For, almost as soon as he could walk and
venture out by himself, Professor Long began
exploring the world around him-visiting museums,
galleries, and talking great interest in cultural
activities in his native Philadelphia. He read avidly
and was well informed on American history, litera-
ture, and the arts. At 16, he was admitted to Temple
University to major in English. By the time he turned
23, he had already been to London and Paris in his
eagerness to learn more about other peoples and
cultures.
Upon completion of his doctorate in linguistics in the
University of Portiers in 1965, Professor Long taught
at Morgan State University and later at Hampton
Institute (now Hampton University) in Virginia,
where he became Professor of English and French
and also the Director of the College's Museum.
There, Professor Long's strong and abiding interest in
contemporary and traditional African art were
manifested in his exhibitions for Hampton College's
Centennial and at the Union Carbide Building in
New York in 1967.
Professor Long's talent for innovative approaches to,
and strategies in, African and African-American
studies was soon recognized by many educational
institutions in the United States. He was actively
sought after by Harvard University and Atlanta
University. For a few years, he shuttled between
Cambridge and Atlanta before he decided to settle in
Atlanta because of its more hospitable climate. In
1988, Professor Long accepted an offer from Emory
University to become the Atticus Haygood Professor
of Interdisciplinary Studies in the Graduate Institute
of Liberal Arts where he had served as adjunct since
1973.
Professor Long recognized the need for a symposium
on African art and established the first official
Triennial Symposium which was hosted by the
Hampton Institute in 1968. Since that time, other
Triennial Symposia have been held at Harvard
University (1971); Columbia University (1974); the
Museum of African Art (1977); the High Museum/
5





Atlanta University (1980); University of Oklahoma
(1983); UCLA (1986); the Smithsonian National
Museum of African Art (1989); the University of Iowa
(1992); New York University (1995); New Orleans
(1998); and now St. Thomas. Professor Long also
founded other professional organizations, notably
the Center for African and African-American Studies
in 1968 and the New World Festivals of the Africa
Diaspora in 1978.
Yet, in the midst of these cultural activities, Professor
Long made time to support young scholars and to do
his own scholarly writing. To date, he has supervised
28 doctoral dissertations and published more than 10
books and articles. Long's academic and research
interests are very wide-they range from dance,
music, and literature to the visual arts in Africa and
the African Diaspora. Although Professor Long
describes himself as "cultural historian," after
reading some of his works, we can safely add that he
is also an accomplished art critic and aesthetician.
The following is an example of the thought he shares
with his students:
There are many unexamined cliches about what the
visual arts are or are supposed to be as there are
about literature, music, theater, and other areas of
human expressivity. Thinkers of virtually every bent
engage in reflection of the relation between the arts
and the various groups who produce them and for
whom they are produced, and the result of their
reflection is often a prescription of what the arts
should be or should do. The matter becomes, poten-
tially at least, highly sensitive when we move to a
consideration of what is taught about the arts. What
are the obligations of the teacher? What are the limits
he should observe?" (Richard A. Long, n.d. Visual
Arts Syllabus)
In conclusion, Professor Long, permit me to liken
you to the proverbial elephant who is not a creature
which one can say he sees faintly. When one sees an
elephant, he must say so.
On behalf of all the members of ACASA, I thank you
for your foresight in founding the Triennial Sympo-
sium on African Art. Please accept this inscribed
plaque as a token and permanent record of our
appreciation.

At the Trienniah
Contrasting Realities of 2001
In February I went to Chad and Mali on a State
Department mission. My schedule in Chad was a
very full one: I lectured on artists of the Harlem
Renaissance, on jazz, and on African American
concert-theatrical dance, all topics on which I have
lectured and written recently. My stay in N'Djamena


also included cultural visits-to an art gallery, to the
ruins of a cinema under restoration to become an art
center, and to the National Museum, which is billed
as an inclusive Cultural Center.
The reality was more bleak. I had been warned that it
was open only on appointment and that an attempt
to make an appointment for me had not succeeded.
Once we were there, my embassy guide negotiated
with functionaries who were on site. One of them
produced a huge ring full of keys and one by one the
rooms of he colonial era mansion which houses the
museum were unlocked.
The display of Chadian ethnography was somewhat
faded and lifeless. A special exhibition in a new
adjacent building, built by funds from the European
Union, was devoted to musical instruments. The
concept was a good one, but the objects were badly
conserved and the entire exhibit dust-laden.
I was also taken to a small museum in the dust-
choked village of Gaori where objects of local excava-
tion and provenance are displayed in an especially
constructed traditional dwelling. This had charm, but
little outreach.
Where should a museum fit in the priorities of Chad,
so recently ravaged by civil war and ethnolingistic
tensions? This is clearly a subject for reflection, as is
the grotesque fact that to go from N'Djamena to
Bamako, a distance of 1800 miles, I had to fly first to
Paris and then back to Mali, a distance of 5,000 miles.
In comparison with lethargic N'Djamena, Bameko is
teeming with life and traffic, perhaps pre-figuring a
Lagos-like go-slow. The National Museum in
Bamako, which has enjoyed a subsidy both architec-
tural and financial from France, is a model small
museum. It featured a special exhibition devoted to
hunting, its costumes, its regalia, its implements, all
of which was of considerable ethnographic, esthetic
and pedagogic interest.
Leaving Mali where I had spoken to a number of
dance groups about African American dancers and
where my remarks in French had to be translated
into Bambara, I flew once more to Paris, for a few
days of purposeful activity.
I visited the Louvre, but not the exhibition which is a
subject of controversy. The decision by the directorate
to exhibit works of African and Oceanic Art there
within the sacred precincts had been greeted with
horror by some. Did this compromise the Museum's
mission as a repository of great art? Was the Mona
Lisa in danger of contamination? Probably not since
it has also been announced that she is to have a
separate room soon. My visit was focused on the




palace itself, but that is another story.
My most intriguing visit was to he mysteriously
financed Mus6e Dapper, now re-located and re-
opened in opulent splendor in the Rue Paul Valkry.
Its inaugural exposition consists of a large number of
historicized, almost mythical, works of African art,
some of which have ended up in the museum's
possession, others of which have been borrowed
from collections, public and private. An extraordi-
nary number of middle-aged ladies were in the
galleries sketching the works. Two or three docent-
led groups were oozing through the penumbral
gloom.
The filtered art, the manipulated light, the muted
textual commentary all seemed light years away
from the dust of Djamena, the cacophony of Bamako,
and even the polemics of the Louvre.
In sifting through the questions posed by these recent
experiences, I ask myself and I ask you, how do we
respond to the challenge posed by these contrasting
realities? Is the response itself a question? What is the
challenge?
Richard A. Long
Emory University


/ACUlS Leadership Award to John Picton



Presentation to John Picton by Sidney L. Kasfir, Ph.D.

There was a time in the early eighties when, just back
in the USA from completing my degree at SOAS,
people were apt to say to me, "You worked with John
Picton? Who's that?" It therefore gives me the
greatest possible feeling of pleasure-and vindica-
tion!-to introduce him to you as a recipient of this
year's ACASA Leadership award.
To anyone who has had the good fortune to be his
student, friend or colleague (and I am trying to speak
here for all three), John possesses three extraordinary
qualities to a degree it is unfair to expect in ordinary
humans: enormous erudition in his chosen field, a
healthy skepticism toward received wisdom of all
kinds, and a wicked sense of humor only barely held
in check by British reserve.
I'll also mention briefly the three interlocking seg-
ments of his highly integrated career, and his major
intellectual interests over the past forty years. But
first, the person: I felt I was prepared for academic
rigor by my previous time at Harvard, but there a
single sentence written at the end of a student's
seminar paper was considered sufficient rebuke. John


Picton covered the margins of one's papers with
dozens of assaults on one's competence and judg-
ment, the text peppered in red ink in his microscopic
handwriting. It was not until I worked in the Nige-
rian National Archives a few years later that I
suddenly recognized both the style and content of
the marginal "minute" of the British colonial docu-
ment, inscribed by a higher-up to put a young
district officer in his place and adopted, consciously
or unconsciously, by John as a way of reining in his
students' aberrations.
As to the healthy skepticism, let me illustrate it with
his relationship to theory of any kind. John's in-
stincts, early in his career, were strongly empirical,
reflecting his solid training in British social anthro-
pology at University College. But as graduate
students in the seventies, we were all smitten by
Levi-Strauss and structuralism. Having to deal with
this as a teacher, he validated it strictly through his
Yoruba or his Ebira fieldwork, thus the structuralist
mantra from an Ebira informant which every student
of his could recite: "God made all things double:
masquerading for men and witchcraft for women.
Over the years he has mellowed and even ripened on
the theory issue, which he now integrates seamlessly
into his teaching and writing, but he still prefers his
observations to be very empirically grounded, and
still places a great premium on what Africans have to
say about their own art and its place in the scheme of
things.
Regarding the wicked humor, all of our colleagues
who got their start as Peace Corps Volunteers in
Nigeria or by working for the Dept of Antiquities
have John Picton tales to tell, but these are not
properly repeated at a dignified awards ceremony, so
you will have to ask Perk Foss, Anita Glaze, Anna
Craven, Jehanne Teilhet-Fisk and others in person. I
do have one note from a very recent student, Yemi
Onafuwa, which is admissible evidence here:
He is a scathingly funny mimic. Two instances come
to mind from last year: the 'Auntie BBC' with whom
he traveled to Ghana a few years ago...he raised his
voice an octave, adopted a posh English accent, and
it was as if Monty Python had somehow wandered
into our 'African Art and Society' class. The second
instance was when he did the 'Whiny American
graduate student': he is one of those Englishmen
who can imitate an American accent much better
than one has any right to expect. Yet, in the final
analysis, what one does come away with is that he is
indeed a most gentle and kind person, as exemplified
by his repeated statement that the Ebira communities
which he studied contain people he feels far greater
kinship with than with Englishmen.




John has had three careers, each preparing him for
the next. First there was his decade from 1961 to 1970
with the Dept of Antiquities. While based in Lagos,
he carried out a program of extensive research and
documentation of both Yoruba and Ebira art and
artists (much of the Ebira material is still stuffed in a
filing cabinet and he says it is the big project for his
retirement in two years). After this, he returned to
England and for the decade of the seventies worked
under Bill Fagg until Fagg's retirement, and then
under Malcolm McLeod in the Department of
Ethnography of the British Museum, creating several
memorable exhibitions with Fagg including the
Yoruba show and the Benin permanent installation
and with John Mack, the African Textiles show. These
exhibitions based on the extraordinary holdings of
the British Museum set a standard of scholarship
which has rarely been equaled anywhere. But
beginning in thel973-74 academic session, he did
these things while also teaching the weekly Nigerian
art seminar at SOAS. As a civil servant, he wasn't
allowed any official time off to do this, so to talk with
him, I or any other student had to meet him at the
Museum and half-run alongside him as he strided on
exceptionally long legs from Burlington Gardens to
SOAS, while downing his lunchtime sandwich and
arguing points. In 1979 he moved to SOAS fulltime
and since his acceptance speech gives details of this
third period, I won't repeat them here except to say
that he has overseen a grand project of consolidation
and growth in African art studies at SOAS in his
twenty-plus years there.
I will end with his major teaching preoccupations
over the years: Yoruba, Benin, Akoko-Edo and Ebira
art, and since the early 90s, African contemporary
genres. In Yoruba studies he taught us a perspective
which is subtly different from the American one. Our
points of reference were not exhibition catalogues but
very rigorous articles in anthropological journals
beginning with Peter Morton- Williams, Joan
Wescott, Denis Williams, Justine Cordwell and of
course the Yoruba scholars themselves. And because
he had accompanied both William Fagg and Frank
Willett in the field, he was expert at interpreting their
findings as well as filling in between the lines in their
publications.
Regarding the contemporary, we are all encapsulated
in the time we live in. For example, while I had
actually acquired a background in contemporary
African art in Uganda before arriving at SOAS, it was
understood, back in the 70s, that such an interest
couldn't be considered "serious." Some of us didn't
even include such experiences on our c.v.'s for fear
that it might be held against us by someone looking
us over for a teaching position. In like fashion, John's


decade in Lagos was the same 60s decade in which
postcolonial Nigerian art was suddenly popping up
everywhere, as he mentions in his own remarks, yet
when he and I began as teacher and student at SOAS,
it would not have occurred to anyone that this new
art should be included in the formal syllabus at such
an august, but still neocolonial, institution. The
serious business at hand then was salvage ethnogra-
phy, and given that several departments at SOAS and
University College up the street were peopled almost
exclusively by Nigerianists, many students were
encouraged to go there for fieldwork. John was
especially interested in getting people to work in the
Niger-Benue confluence where the Ebira lived, so he
sent me to do fieldwork in Idoma following up Roy
Sieber's initial visit twenty years earlier, and kept in
close touch with Arnold Rubin further east among
the Jukun. He also advised Marilyn Houlberg during
her Yoruba fieldwork and Jean Borgatti in northern
Edo, though neither was his student.
John's move toward the contemporary during the
past decade after years of very thorough grounding
in the older genres of southern and central Nigeria
reflects a now-common pattern in our field, driven
partly by student interest in the art of our time and
partly by the new developments which have opened
up in the field through curatorial efforts of Africans
themselves to propel this art onto the world stage. As
a trainer of graduate students, as a curator and as an
encyclopedic source of knowledge on Nigerian art he
has always been the best kind of role model- one who
cares very deeply about his calling but actively resists
his own promotion to the status of living legend.





On receiving an ACASA Leadership Award

On Monday 4th December 2000, Sue and I found
ourselves talking to a surgeon about my needing a
hole drilled in my head (to remove a benign tumor);
and we returned home to find Martha Anderson's
letter offering me an ACASA Leadership Award.
Clearly, a hole in the head would not be the end of
the world as we knew it; and yet, as I read Martha's
letter my first thought was: what have I done to
deserve a leadership award? Still, ACASA is the most
comprehensive and authoritative body of scholars in
the fields of African art studies, and its Leadership
Award is truly the greatest honour I could possibly
expect to receive. I am all the more sad, therefore,
that in my current post-operative condition of acute
debilitation I do not have the stamina necessary for
transatlantic flying and a busy conference. Such is the




effect of seven hours of open brain surgery and
another four or five hours of nerve transplant
surgery (to 'rewire' my face!).
I have been extremely fortunate in my professional
life on two counts. Firstly, I arrived in Lagos to take
up my appointment as curator of the Lagos Museum
in June 1961, within the first twelve months of
Nigerian Independence. I encountered an enthusi-
asm for 'One Nigeria' (an enthusiasm that is still
there in spite of military coups, the bloody persecu-
tion of Igbo people, the civil war, the alternation
between military rule and civilian government, and
current incipient fascisms: I think most especially of
the Odua Peoples Congress). Lagos in 1961 was an
exciting city. There were at least three different and
active masquerading institutions on Lagos Island,
Brazillian architecture was everywhere (many of the
key monuments have tragically disappeared since
then, or are at best, utterly neglected). Ben Enwonwu
was 'on seat' as Government Art Adviser, and Felix
Idubor ran his own gallery. Over the next couple of
years Bruce Onobrakpeya became the art teacher at
St Gregory's College, Yusuf Grillo took over the Fine
Art Department at the Yaba College of Technology,
Erhabor Emokpae was active in the field of graphic
design, and the exhibition centre of Nigeria magazine
had a lively series of shows including artists such as
Malangatana and El Salahi brought to Nigeria by Ulli
Beier. I was glad of the prior training I received from
William Fagg at the British Museum; and yet in
Lagos the corpus of ethnographic certainties that I
had imbibed was about as representative of Nigeria,
as the pith helmet was representative of Europe. In
due course, I discovered that the real catalyst for
thinking through what I had experienced during the
nine years that followed, working for the Nigerian
government, was only to be found in face-to-face
engagement with students, and the need to clarify for
them the terms within which one deals with ques-
tions of description and translation, and especially
the need to identify the limited metaphoricity of so
many of those terms. It was, moreover, the experi-
ence of Lagos that motivated my insistence on the
irrelevance of ethnicity as THE defining category (in
contrast to its negotiable usefulness in practice, from
time to time); and it was Lagos that brought home to
me the need to abandon the simplistic (at best)
distinction between "traditional" and "contempo-
rary" in favour of a recognition that artists within
one tradition of practice inevitably draw upon the
work of artists in other traditions, whether those
traditions are of the past or still current. Art makers,
in other words, invariably supply their own ethnog-
raphy. (I realize of course that I am not alone in all
this; which brings me to my next point that...)


Secondly, I have also been fortunate in finding myself
able to work in collaboration productively with
colleagues in the School of Oriental and African
Studies of the University of London, to transform the
teaching not just of African art, but the full range of
Islamic, South, South-East and East Asian arts. Soon
after I joined SOAS in 1979 it was clear that art
history and archaeology were little better than 'lame
ducks' fit only for killing off in the sacrificial context
of the odious Mrs. Thatcher's attack on British
universities. There was no department, just a small
number of faculty scattered across five regional
language/literature departments and an even
smaller number of students; but there was a cross-
departmental committee to co-ordinate our activities,
which I took over as chair on April Fool's Day 1986.
Through the next six years we worked together to re-
order our intellectual coherence, increase student
intake, and secure funding for new posts, and we
were able to turn things around. Now we have
thirteen permanent faculty in a department that has
consistently gained high gradings in national teach-
ing and research assessments, and we are fully self-
funded in terms of student fee income and research
grants. When I arrived at SOAS there was no BA
teaching in African art, whereas now it is possible for
students to take at least one third of their courses in
African art (and MA students at least half). My
predecessor, Guy Atkins, appointed in fact for Bantu
language teaching had had three Ph.D. students, all
well known to ACASA: Ruth Phillips, Sidney Kasfir
and Dunja Hersak. Ten or so of my students have
completed the Ph.D. in African art history, and by the
time I retire in September 2003 I1 should have pre-
pared a further ten for the pH; and all this at a time
of minimal graduate research funding. Moreover, I
am no longer all alone here. My colleague Tania
Costa Tribe is a specialist in the various diasporic
Africas as well as Egypt, Nubia and Ethiopia, and we
currently have a post-doctoral fellow in Africanist
archaeology. We can also call on the help of col-
leagues elsewhere in SOAS: Elsbeth Court, Frances
Harding and Jennifer Law (respectively east and
southern Africa, film and performance, and current
South African art).
I may, in due course, expand on these and other
issues in the published version of this address; but
before I conclude, there are two people who deserve
my particular thanks on this occasion. The first is
Sue, whom I met as she arrived in Lagos on a boat
from Liverpool on 25th July 1968. We are still to-
gether, and without her I could barely have survived.
The other is Sidney Kasfir. Sidney was in the first
class I ever taught at SOAS (Guy Atkins established
an MA course and had persuaded me to teach part of
it while I was still at the British Museum; and the





following year, Dunja was in the class). Sidney
helped me arrange the furniture in my room when I
arrived in SOAS. Sidney got me to the ASA meeting
in Madison 1986, where I was able to renew my
friendship with Arnold Rubin. This led to my teach-
ing for him at UCLA during the Fall Quarter the
following year, this in turn providing me with the
ideas that I needed to help turn things around in
SOAS.
I also want to thank everyone involved in institu-
tional support for the study of African art, for the
manner in which they have promoted the ever-
expanding enthusiasm for and scope of our fields of
study, most especially African Arts, ACASA, the
National Museum of African Art, the Museum for
African Art, and the Fowler Museum of Cultural
History. Without them, none of us could have done
very much. I now conclude, as I began; for me the
receipt of an ACASA Leadership Award is a greater
honour than I could ever have expected to have the
good fortune to receive.
Thank you.
John Picton
20th April 2001

Look for the second installment of award speeches in the next issue.

News From ASA
African Studies Association Annual Meeting 2001
November 15-18, 2001
Houston, Texas

2001 THEME: Africa and the African Diaspora: Past,
Present, Future
African studies has for too long remained captive to
the area studies paradigm that first shaped the
academic construction of our field in the 1950s. One
of the several consequences of this situation has been
the artificial separation of African Studies from
studies of the African Diaspora. To be sure, not all
scholars of Africa have abided by these distinctions,
but by and large these divisions have held center
stage with the exception of those programs that
specifically defined themselves as either Black
Studies or Pan-African Studies. Renewed popular
and scholarly interest in the African Diaspora makes
this an opportune moment for members of the
African Studies Association to re-examine its place in
the study of Africa. At the same time, we believe this
also to be an occasion to emphasize the issue of
Africa's significance for the study of the African
Diaspora. By focusing on this theme we do not,
however, intend to ignore specifically African topics.
Indeed, we see Diaspora studies as complementing
10


what Africanists who focus on processes and issues
in Africa do and have done historically. In short, our
goal is to encourage dialogue.
HOTEL: The headquarters hotel is the Houston
Hyatt Regency Hotel.
You may contact the hotel directly to make reserva-
tions: Houston Hyatt Regency Hotel, 1200 Louisiana
Street, Houston, Texas 77002; Telephone: 713-654-
1234; Telephone: 800-233-1234; Fax: 713-951-0934.
Mention the African Studies Association to receive
the following discount rates: Single: $99; Double
$109; Triple $119; Quadruple: $129.
TRAVEL: Please use the African Studies Association
travel agency, Association Travel Concepts (ATC).
For reservations, please contact ATC: Association
Travel Concepts, Telephone: 800-458-9383; Email:
reservations@assntravel.com.
This year Continental and United are our preferred
airlines. ASA participants earn the following dis-
counts on United and Continental:
E 10% to 15% off Published Fare prices 60 + days
prior to departure.
E 5% to 10% off Published Fare prices 0 to 59 days
prior to departure.
Please mention the African Studies Association, and
please call early to ensure low fares.
For general information, please contact the African
Studies Association staff at callasa@rci.rutgers.edu,
or Michelle Peterson, the ASA Annual Meeting
Coordinator, at michpete@rci.rutgers.edu.



Jobs
CURATOR OF AFRICAN ART
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City,
MO seeks an experienced Curator of African Art. In
addition to holding primary responsibility for the
growth of the collection through acquisition, the
Curator will direct all aspects of the department
including display, interpretation, research, and care
of the permanent collection as well as organizing and
overseeing innovative exhibitions of African Art.
The Curator will work with the Education division to
develop and support major directions for the
museum's mission of strengthening the African
collection. The successful candidate will also serve
as an enthusiastic advocate and promoter of African
Art, developing and maintaining productive relation-
ships with patrons and colleagues locally and




nationally.
Candidates should have an in-depth knowledge of
African Art and an advanced degree, preferably a
Ph.D. A keen interest in making African material
culture accessible to a broad audience is highly
desirable. To apply, submit a cover letter and resume
to:
Debra Craig, Director of Human Resources
Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
4525 Oak Street
Kansas City, MO 64111

INSTRUCTOR, ART HISTORY
Bloomsburg University, a teaching institution with
B.A. and M.A. programs in Art History and Art
Studio, seeks a full-time, temporary replacement in
Art History for the 2002-2003 academic year. Respon-
sibilities include one large survey course (400 stu-
dents) and two small upper-level courses per semes-
ter. Applicants should propose four upper-level
courses, preferably in fields other than History of
Photography, Architecture, Italian Renaissance,
Asian, Islamic, and American Art. Desire to teach a
museum/ gallery course and participate in student
mentoring activities outside of the classroom a plus.
ABD required, PhD preferred. Must have teaching
experience beyond the TA. Recommendation for
hiring is needed by the majority of the regular, full-
time department faculty. Finalists for the position
must communicate well and successfully complete
an interview and/ or teaching demonstration as
judged by the department faculty. Term of appoint-
ment: temporary, full-time, beginning fall 2002 for
the academic year. Send cover letter listing proposed
courses and describing teaching philosophy for large
and small classes, a CV, and names and phone
numbers of three references to: Andrea Pearson,
chair, Art History Search Committee (AA # 30-1-243),
Department of Art and Art History, Old Science Hall
213, Bloomsburg University, 400 East 2nd St.,
Bloomsburg, PA 17815. Review of applications will
begin immediately. Materials must be postmarked
by Nov. 15, 2001, to receive full consideration.

INSTRUCTOR/ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, FIBERS
Bloomsburg University, a teaching institution with
B.A. and M.A. programs in Art History and Art
Studio, seeks a full time, temporary replacement in
Art Studio for the 2002-2003 academic year. Respon-
sibilities include teaching Fabric Design or course in
area of specialty, Three-dimensional Design, and
Crafts. Participation in student mentoring activities
outside of the classroom a plus. MFA required,
specialty in Fibers preferred. Must have teaching
experience beyond the TA. Recommendation for


hiring is needed by the majority of the regular, full-
time department faculty. Finalists for the position
must communicate well and successfully complete
an interview and/ or teaching demonstration as
judged by the department faculty. Term of appoint-
ment: temporary, full-time, beginning fall 2002 for
the academic year. Send cover letter listing proposed
courses and describing teaching philosophy for art
studio majors and non-art majors, a CV, 20 slides of
personal work, and names and phone numbers of
three references to: Carol Burns, chair, Art Studio
Search Committee (AA # 30-1-238), Department of
Art and Art History, Old Science Hall 213,
Bloomsburg University, 400 East 2nd St., Bloomsburg,
PA 17815. Review of applications will begin immedi-
ately. Materials must be postmarked by Nov. 15,
2001, to receive full consideration.

Please submit any job listing for December 2001 Newsletter by
November 15, 2001.



Exhibitions
Art of the Lega: Meaning and Metaphor in Central
Africa
This major exhibition presents Lega art of the Bwami
Society, including exquisite masks, spoons, baskets,
and abstracted figures made from wood, ivory, and
found objects. The men and women in Lega culture
enter Bwami to learn skills and wisdom for life that
are taught to initiates through the art. From the
insignia of membership and found objects used in
the early stages of initiation, to zoomorphic figures
and figural sculptures that belong to age and wis-
dom, Bwami is a life-long path. It teaches members
of Lega society that moral goodness begets beauty
and that knowledge is power.
As one moves through the levels of Bwami, he or she
is given fewer verbal lessons by which to interpret
the art. The exhibition is organized in much the same
way. Mirroring the sequence of Bwami teachings, the
art is presented in context with proverbs, music, and
photos of Bwami ritual. As the viewer navigates the
galleries, he or she encounters fewer and fewer
didactic materials so as to begin to perceive the work
in a more visceral way.
Art of the Lega: Meaning and Metaphor in Central Africa has been
developed by the UCLA Fowler Museum of Cultural History, in
collaboration with The Nelson- Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas
City, Missouri. All works presented are either in the permanent
holdings of the Fowler Museum or the collection of Jay T. Last as
promised gifts to the Fowler. After dosing at the Fowler, the
exhibition will travel to The Nelson (October 6,2002-May 4,2003)





A Personal Journey:
Central African Art from the Lawrence Gussman
Collection
The Neuberger Museum of Art (Purchase, New
York), The National Museum of African Art,
Smithsonian, (Washington, D.C.), and the Israel
Museum in Jerusalem were recent recipients of gifts
of outstanding Central African artworks from the
collection of Lawrence Gussman. Seventy-five pieces
drawn from the three museums' collections make up
the traveling exhibition. Following the tour, the
Newberger Museum's holdings from the Gussman
gift will be integrated into the Neuberger's existing
collection of African Art as part of a planned major
reinstallation of its permanent collection. An illus-
trated catalog accompanies the exhibition, which
includes an essay by Christa Clarke, Ph.D.,
Neuberger Museum of Art Curator of African Art.
Schedule:
Neuberger Museum, September 30, 2001-January 13, 2002
The Philbrook Museum of Art, Tulsa, Oklahoma, February 10-
April 7, 2002
The National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institute,
Washington, D.C., June 9,2002-August 14,2002
The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, October 17, 2002-February 14, 2003
Symposium:
Reconsidering the Arts and Cultures of Central
Africa
Saturday, October 20, 2001, 8:30 am to 5:00 pm
Humanities Theater
Admission: $40.00 general public, $25.00, Museum members,
$10.00, Purchase College faculty, staff, and students; optional box
lunch $15.00. To register, please call the Public Programs Office at
914-251-6112.
Reconsidering the Arts and Cultures of Central
Africa will be a one-day, interdisciplinary sympo-
sium held in conjunction with the exhibition, A
Personal Journey: Central African Art from the Lawrence
Gussman Collection at the Neuberger Museum of Art,
Purchase College, State University of New York, in
Purchase, New York. This exhibition, organized by
the Neuberger Museum of Art in collaboration with
the National Museum of African Art in Washington,
DC and The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, features
approximately seventy-five works of central African
art formerly in the collection of Lawrence Gussman,
now dispersed among the three organizing institu-
tions. The exhibition presents a broad portrait of
central African art through its inclusion of both well -
known object types as well as less familiar artistic
forms. Its thematic organization explores a number
of wide-ranging cultural traditions, demonstrating
the dynamic nature of artistic exchange in central
Africa.
With its regional focus and breadth of representation,
the exhibition invites reflection and reconsideration
of the artistic traditions of central Africa. The
symposium will provide a forum for nationally
12


recognized scholars of anthropology, art history and
archaeology to present to a diverse audience their
recent research on central African art and culture.
Symposium participants will focus on issues of
history, canon creation, hybridity and cultural
exchange and new directions for the study of central
African art. Eight scholars from the fields of art
history, archaeology, and anthropology will present
papers in two three-hour sessions. The symposium
will provide not only a broader context for viewing
works included in the museum exhibition, but will
also contribute to a greater understanding of central
African cultures.
Session One
1. "Popular Images of Central Africa and the Collecting of
African Art"
Christraud M. Geary, Ph.D.
Curator, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
2. "Background to Foreground: The History of Kuba Textiles in
20' Century Euro-American Exhibitions and Visual Culture"
Patricia J. Darish, Ph.D.,
Independent Scholar
3. "Bleachers, Tuxedos and Chokwe Art"
Manuel JordAn, Ph.D.
Phyllis Wattis Curator of the Arts of Africa, Oceania and the
Americas
Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts, Stanford
University
4. "Reconsidering the Boundaries of Central Africa Artistry: An
Archaeological Perspective"
Ekpo Eyo, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Art History and Archaeology
University of Maryland, College Park
Session Two
1. "Anticipation and Longing: Congolese Culture Heroes Past,
Present, and Future"
Mary Nooter Roberts, Ph.D.
Deputy Director and Chief Curator
Fowler Museum of Cultural History
2. "Power and Identity in 20d, Century Equatorial Africa"
Alisa LaGamma, Ph.D.
Associate Curator of African Art
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
3. 'Tower to the People: Sculptural Performance in Southeast-
ern Congo/Kinshasa"
Allen F. Roberts, Ph.D.
Professor, UCLA department of World Arts and Cultures
4. "Women's Artistic Journeys in Central Africa"
Elisabeth Cameron, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Art History Department
University of California, Santa Cruz


Renewing Tradition: The Revitalization of Bogolan in
Mali and Abroad
This exhibition explores a contemporary West
African art movement that has emerged in response
to a traditional Malian textile called bogolan, or
"mudcloth." "Renewing Tradition" illustrates the
richness and dynamism of African culture by tracing
the evolution of bogolan from its rural roots among
the Bamana in Mali to its present day global adapta-
tion.




Originated by the University of Iowa Museum of Art;
Curator, Victoria Rovine, Ph.D., Curator of the Arts
of Africa, Oceania and the Americas at the University
of Iowa Museum of Art.
Schedule:
July 12, 2001-September 2, 2001, University Art Museum,
University of California, Santa Barbara
February 3-May 26, 2002, Neuberger Museum, Purchase College,
State University of New York


ART EXHIBITION OPENING
Introduction: Since the 1930s, Uganda's Makerere
School of Fine Art has earned a reputation as a major
force in the development of contemporary art in East
Africa. More recently, in San Francisco, a group of
Ugandan artists has united to spearhead recognition
for their country's great art in North America. This
historic exhibition represents the first grouping of
these seven Ugandan artists, heralding a new era for
Uganda's International Art Renaissance.
Featured artists: James Kitamirike, David Kibuuka,
Dan Sekanwagi, Fred Makubuya, Augustine
Mugalula Mukiibi, Derrick Kaggwa, and Bruno
Sserunkuuma.
Dates: July 4, through December 19, 2001; Hours: Wednesdays
3PM-6PM, Saturdays 12noon-2PM. Viewing at other times by
appointment, at your convenience.
THE ART ROOM http:/ / www.theartroom-sf.com/
Fine Arts Center for East Africa
1072 Geneva Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94112
www.theartroom-sf.com
gadart@aol.com; 415-333-9363


Cloth is the Center of the World: Nigerian Textiles, Global
Perspectives
The Goldstein: A Museum of Design
September 16, 2001 to November 11, 2001
This exhibition focuses on four specific types of
contemporary textiles made and used in Nigeria-
adire, akwete, wax prints, and pelete bite-linking
these Nigerian textiles to current research examining
global, cultural, and historical contexts of West
African cloth. Thematic interpretation in the exhibi-
tion will discuss the cloth as material culture-how it
reveals and communicates aspects of ceremonial and
everyday life in Nigeria, and how it reflects and
shapes cultural and individual identity.
Opening reception: Sunday, September 16,2001; 1:30 to 4:30p.m.
Opening lecture: Panel: Dr. Lisa Aronson, Dr. Norma Wolff, Dr.
Elisha Renne, and Anne Spencer, 2:30 p.m., 33 McNeal Hall
The Symposium:
"Wrapped and Draped: Alternative Fashions"
iA one-credit Fall Semester 2001 course (DHA 5170) paralleling the
exhibition, September 14-16, 2001. (see courses.che.umn.edu/
01dha5170-1f/intro.htm)
This international symposium will feature speakers


from all over the world, with a wide range of topics
about wrapped or draped fashions in Asia, India,
Africa, Indonesia, classical Greece and Rome, and the
United States. Also, at the symposium, the four
African textile scholars who worked on the exhibi-
tion will present new interpretations of the Nigerian
textiles. Jasleen Damija, an internationally renowned
scholar of crafts and textiles in India, will present the
keynote for the symposium.
Exhibition catalog:
Cloth is the Center of the World: Nigerian Textiles,
Global Perspectives. Essays by Dr. Lisa Aronson, Dr
Norma Wolff, Dr. Elisha Renne, and Anne Spencer.
ISBN: 0-939719-12-6; $20



Awards

African Studies Association Announces Children's
Africana Book Award Winners
New Brunswick, NJ- August 9, 2001-The African
Studies Association (ASA)is pleased to announce the
winners for the 2001 Children's Africana Book
Award. The 2001 Children's Africana Book Award
winners are: Young Children Category: Margy Burns
Knight, Mark Melnicove, Anne Sibley O'Brien (illus.),
Africa is Not a Country (Brookfield, CT: The
Millbrook Press, Inc., 2000). Older Readers Category:
Sylviane Anna Diouf, Kings and Oueens of West
Africa (New York: Franklin Watts/ Grolier Publish-
ing, 2000).
The honor books are: Cristina Kessler and Walter
Lyon Krudop (illus.). My Great-Grandmother's
Gourd. (New York: Orchard Books/ Grolier, 2000).
Tololwa Mollel and Linda Saport (illus.) Subira
Surbira. New York: Clarion (New York: Houghton
Mifflin, 2000).
A distinguished award committee, chaired by Brenda
Randolph of Africa Access, selected the winning
books and honor books from dozens of entries.
Speaking for the committee, Randolph praised Kings
and Queens of West Africa stating, "In Kings and
Queens of West Africa, author Sylviane Diouf
highlights the goals and strategies of West African
monarchs who were a cut above the ordinary. As she
ably shows, these leaders were concerned not only
with power and expansion but also with the gover-
nance, protection and cultural strength of their
communities. This book and the other biographies in
the Kings and Queens of Africa series fill an impor-
tant void in school libraries." About the winner in the
Young Readers Category, Randolph noted, "Africa
has over fifty nations but most Americans see it as a
single entity. Africa is Not a Country corrects this




error by highlighting unique characteristics of
various African nations. This book is an excellent
way to show the diversity and complexity of the
world's second largest continent."
The Children's Africana Book Awards were estab-
lished in 1991 by the African Studies Association to
encourage the publication and use of accurate,
balanced children's materials on Africa. The awards
focus specifically on books published in the United
States about Africa. Since 1991, more than 18 awards
have been presented to outstanding authors and
illustrators. The African Studies Association is a non-
profit corporation founded in 1957 and open to all
persons and institutions interested in African affairs.
The goals of the organization are to bring together
persons with scholarly and professional interest in
Africa, to provide useful services to schools, busi-
nesses, media, and communities at large, to publish
and distribute scholarly materials on Africa and to
promote the study of Africa.



ConFerences & Lectures

Laying Claim: (Re)Considering Artists of African Descent
in the Americas
Colgate University, Thursday-Saturday, October 25-
27, 2001
For further information please contact Mary Ann
Calo (mcalo@mail.colgate.edu) or visit the conference
website at http:/ /merz.colgate.edu/
layingclaimconference

4th CHIEF DR JACOB EGHAREVBA MEMORIAL
LECTURE,
December 2001 IN BENIN CITY
This annual lecture organized by the Institute for
Benin Studies since 1997 in honor of late chief Dr
Jacob U. Egharevba (1891-1980) for his great contri-
bution, through research, documentation, writing
and publication on Edo history and culture. This
year's 4th lecture will be delivered by Professor Peter
P. Ekeh of Department of African America Studies,
The University of New York, Buffalo. U.SA in
December 2001 in Benin City, Nigeria.

Fellowships & Grants


The American Council of Learned Societies (http:/ /
www.acls.org) announces the following Fellowship
and Grant Competitions. Please see their web site for
further details and application materials and dead-


lines. (www.acls.org/fel-comp.htm;)
CHARLES A. RYSKAMP RESEARCH FELLOW-
SHIPS. Available to tenure-track Assistant Professors
in the humanities and related social scientists who
have successfully completed their institution's review
for reappointment but have not yet been reviewed
for tenure and who have made scholarly contribu-
tions that have advanced their fields, and who have
well designed and carefully developed plans for new
research.
ACLS/ANDREW W. MELLON FOUNDATION
FELLOWSHIPS FOR JUNIOR FACULTY Available to
Assistant Professors with at least 2 years' teaching
experience.
FREDERICK BURKHARDT RESIDENTIAL FEL-
LOWSHIPS FOR RECENTLY TENURED SCHOL-
ARS. Available to scholars tenured since October 1,
1997, who are engaged in long-term, unusually
ambitious projects in the humanities and related
social sciences
The central ACLS FELLOWSHIPS are being offered
for tenure beginning in 2002-2003. NEW THIS YEAR,
scholars may apply with a doctorate conferred by
October 1, 2001.
The ACLS/ SSRC / NEH INTERNATIONAL AND
AREA STUDIES FELLOWSHIPS encourage human-
istic research on the societies and cultures of Asia,
Africa, Near and Middle East, Latin America and the
Caribbean, East Europe, and the former Soviet
Union.
ACLS/NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY FELLOW-
SHIPS. This cooperative program provides residen-
tial fellowships at the Library's Center for Scholars
and Writers to applicants whose research would be
enhanced by such an affiliation.
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS FELLOWSHIPS IN
INTERNATIONAL STUDIES. Available to scholars
who have completed Ph.D. with preference given to
scholars at an early stage of the career



Call for Papers

JOURNAL OF BENIN STUDIES CALL FOR PAPERS.
The Institute for Benin Studies have launched the
Journal of Benin Studies to assist it's research and
documentation work on Benin Empire (of Nigeria)
and the culture area influenced by Benin in Africa
and the world. The journal is a referred journal. Well
research articles, notes and reviews from scholars are
invited for the second issue and must be received




not later than 30th April 2002.
For more information contact the managing editor, Uyilawa
Usuanlele, Institute for Benin Studies, P.O.Box 1278, Benin City,
Nigeria. E-mail: insbenst@hotmail.com

TRADITIONS CALL FOR PAPERS
We are contemplating doing an issue of Traditions
journal that features multiple drums for the single
player. The Pan African Performing Arts Preservation
Association, Inc. needs your help. We need writers
who can write scholarly articles on the following
drums: Atumpan, Attumplan, Fontom from, Double
Sangba (Sierra Leone), the Kissi Triple Djimbes,
Magomba, Likuti, and circular Dibah drums.
If this interest you, please contact PaPaPa70@aol.com
You can see samples of _Traditions_ Journal at:
www.brooklynx.org/neighborhoods/panafrican

ASSOCIATION FOR ART HISTORIANS (UK) CALL
FOR PAPERS
"Collecting the Colony: Contemporary thoughts on
imperial histories"
A session to be held at-
Culture: Capital: Colony, 28th Association of Art
Historians Annual Conference; 4 - 7 April 2002;
University of Liverpool. For more information about
the conference and other sessions
visitwww.aah.org.uk
Session convenors: Professor Partha Mitter, History
of Art, School of English and American Studies, Arts
B, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton & Judith
Green, History of Art, Graduate Research Centre in
Humanities, Arts B, University of Sussex, Falmer,
Brighton, England;
Collecting has been a central practice of colonialism:
objects have been captured along with territory,
works of art acquired along with information.
Fragments of empire have been brought together in
collections embodying colonial and imperial projects.
This session seeks to expand understanding of the
intersection of collecting and colonialism by bringing
together scholars working on the many different
aspects of this issue. Proposals are invited for papers
addressing any aspect of collecting within a colonial
context. Any kind of collecting may be examined:
whether public or private; consisting of souvenirs or
systematically ordered objects. Collecting of any
variety of visual and material culture (whether
designated 'fine art,' 'decorative art' or artefactt') can
be addressed. Discussions of collecting in all colonial
situations, ranging from settler colonies to imperial
enclaves, and in all historical periods including the
present, are welcome. All papers should have in
common the aim not only of tracing the history of
collecting within a specific colonial context, but also a
desire to engage with wider historical and theoretical
questions concerning the comparative study of
colonialism and collecting.


OF People & Places


Ramona Austin has been named director of the
Hampton University Museum, Hampton, Virginia.
Marla C. Berns has been named to succeed Doran H.
Ross as director of the UCLA Fowler Museum
beginning this November.
Elisabeth L. Cameron has accepted the position of
assistant professor, Art History Department, Univer-
sity of California, Santa Cruz.
Dominique Malaquais has accepted the position of
assistant professor, Art History Department, Sarah
Lawrence College.


Karen Milbourne has accepted the position of
assistant professor, Art History, the University of
Kentucky.
Steve Nelson and Zoe Strother joined the UCLA Art
History Department in last year. Professor Strother
begins teaching this fall after a year in residence at
CASVA, National Gallery, Washington, D.C. Steve
Nelson beings teaching after a year spent writing
with a Getty Fellowship.
Sylvester 0. Ogbechie has accepted the position of
assistant professor, Art History Department, Univer-
sity of California, Santa Barbara.
Allen Roberts has been named director of the James
S. Coleman African Studies Center (JSCASC), UCLA.
Polly Nooter Roberts has been named deputy
director of the UCLA Fowler Museum of Cultural
History while still serving as chief curator.
This past spring, Doran H. Ross retired from the
directorship of the UCLA Fowler Museum of Cul-
tural History to pursue his own research, writing,
and freelance exhibition work..


Please submit any announcements or news items by November 15"' for
the December 2001 Newsletter.






LICLISL 2000 Directorg of Memkers


0 A~rica adJ the Carriblhean 0


Mr. Abddullateef Tunde Abdulsalam
Department of Industrial Relations
and Personel Management
University of Lagos
Lagos, NIGERIA

Bibliothbque Municipal
Avenue Crosson duPlessis, B.P. V254
Abidjan
COTE D'IVOIRE

Mr. J. Abodunrin
Department of Fine & Applied Arts
Ladoke Akintola University of
Technology, P.M.B. 4000
Ogbomosho, NIGERIA

Dr. Arthur Abraham
Institute of African Studies
Fourah Bay College
Freetown, SIERRA LEONE

Mr. Usman Abudah
Estate Woods, 56th Street
Federal Housing Estate, Ikpoba Hill,
P. O. Box 5537, Benin City, NIGERIA

University of Abuja Library
P.M.B. 117
Abuja, Federal Capital Territory
NIGERIA

Research Library on African Affairs
P.O.B. 2970
Accra
GHANA

Dr. Nurudeen Abubakar
Center for Nigerian Cultural Studies
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaria, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

Mr. Samuel Aco
Inst. National du Patrimoine Culturel
C.P. 1267
Luanda, R.R. ANGOLA

Dr. Alexis Adande
B.P. 1057
Porto Novo
REPUBLIQUE POPULAIRE DU
BENIN

Dr. Codjovi Joseph Adand6
B.P. 06-1275
PK3 - Cotonou
REPUBLIQUE POPULAIRE DU
BENIN


Addis Ababa University Library
P.O.B. 1176
Addis Ababa
ETHIOPIA

Mr. Bayo Adebowale
African Heritage Research Library
P.O. Box 121
Ila Orangun, Oshun State, NIGERIA

Mr. Nath Mayo Adediran
Gidan Makama Museum
P.O. Box 2030
Kano, Kano State, NIGERIA

Mr. Oluremi F. Adedayo
National Museum
P.M.B. 54
Minna, Niger State, NIGERIA

Mr. Kazeem Adeleke
21 Moaasalashi Street Obalende
Lagos
NIGERIA

Ms. Adetokumbo Adekeye-Abimbola
4A, Igbore Street, Iwaya Road
Onike Yaba, Lagos
NIGERIA

Mr. Coffi Guillaume Adjaho
Conseiller Technique A la Culture
B.P. 120
Cotonou, REPUBLIQUE POPULAIRE
DU BENIN

Deacon R. 0. Adebayo
Olorunsogo Baptist Church
P. O. Box 109, Mushin, Lagso
NIGERIA

Dr. Cornelius 0. Adepegba
Institute of African Studies
University of Ibadan
Ibadan, Oyo State, NIGERIA

Mr. Kehinde Ken Adewuyi
No. 40B Ijoko Road Sango
P. O. Box 191
Ota, Ogun State, NIGERIA

Dr. Adimado Aduayom
D6partement d'Histoire
University du Benin, B.P. 1515
Lome, TOGO


Aequatoria
Centre de Recherches Culturelles
B.P. 276
Mbandaka, DEMOCRATIC REPUB-
LIC OF CONGO

Mr. George B. Affia
University of Port Harcourt Library
P.M.B. 5323
Port Harcourt, NIGERIA

Ms. B. M. Pfukani
Africa University Library
P. O. Box 1320
Mutare, ZIMBABWE

Mr. John-Tokpabere Agberia
Department of Creative Arts
University of Port Harcourt, P. O. Box
41, Uniport P. O.
Choba, Port Harcourt, NIGERIA

Dr. Kokie Agboutaen-Eghafona
Dept. of Sociology and Anthropology
University of Benin
Benin City, Edo State, NIGERIA

Ms. Ngozi Agujiobi
School of General Studies
University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus
Enugu, NIGERIA

Mr. Hassaan Ali Ahmed
28, Gameat El-Dowal El-Arabia Street
Ground Floor, Apt. #2
El-Mohandissien, Guiza, Cairo,
EGYPT

Ms. Maryam Ahmed
c/o Abububakar Ahmed
National Eye Centre, P.M.B. 2267
Kaduna, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

Mr. L6onard Ahonon
Musde Historique d'Abomey
B.P. 25
Abomey, REPUBLIQUE POPULAIRE
DU BENIN

Mr. A. M. Ahuwan
Department of Industrial Design
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaria, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

Mr. Paul Ahyi
B. P. 1650
Lome
TOGO






Dr. Sheri Ajasin
Department of Creative Arts
University of Lagos, P.O.Box 145
Unilag
Akoka, Lagos, NIGERIA

Mr. Frank Olusanya Ajayi
Department of Fine Arts
College of Education
Ikere-Ekiti, Ondo State, NIGERIA

Mr. Martins 0. Akanbiemu
National Museum
P.M.B. 12556
Onikan, Lagos, NIGERIA

Ms. Justina E. Akata
National Museum of Colonial History
P.M.B. 7116
Aba, Imo State, NIGERIA

Mr. Donatus M. Akatakpo
Department of Architecture
University of Lagos
Akoka, Yaba, Lagos, NIGERIA

Mr. Toyin Akinosho
Festac News
Plot 43B, First Avenue
Festac Town, Lagos, NIGERIA

Mr. Akintonde
Department of Fine & Applied Arts
Ladoke Akintola University of
Technology, P.M.B. 4000
Ogbomosho, NIGERIA

Mr. David A. Akinpelu
National Museum
P.M.B. 12556
Onikan, Lagos, NIGERIA

Mr. Kola Akintola
Gallery 365, c/o Tunakin Group of
Photographers
18 U. Ibadan Bodija Express Road, P.
0. Box 7141 Secretariat
Ibadan, Oyo State, NIGERIA

Dr. Tunde Akinwumi
Department of Industrial Design
Yaba College of Technology
Lagos, NIGERIA

Akbdi Afrika
P.M.B. 1004
Iffe-Ijimu, Kogi State
NIGERIA

Mr. Tunde Akomolafe
Isenbaye Art Gallery and Cultural
Troupe
52 Catholic Mission Road
Oshogbo, Oshun State, NIGERIA


Mr. Solomon Akpofure
9, Alhaji Bashorun Street
South/West, Ikoyi, Lagos
NIGERIA

Dr. Ofori Akyea
P. 0. Box DS 2249
Dansoman, Accra
GHANA

Professor E. J. Alagoa
P.O. Box 125
University of Port Harcourt
Port Harcourt, NIGERIA

Ms. Sanaa Ali
Curator, Luxor Museum
Luxor
EGYPT

Mr. Zaccheus Sunday Ali
Centre for Black and African Arts and
Civilisation
National Theatre, P.M.B.12794
Lagos, NIGERIA

Dr. Idris 0. 0. Amali
Department of English
University of Maiduguri, P.M.B. 1069
Maiduguri, NIGERIA

Mr. Gilbert Amegatcher
College of Art
University of Science and Technology
Kumase, GHANA

Mr. El Anatsui
Department of Fine & Applied Arts
University of Nigeria
Nsukka, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Ms. Michelina Andreucci
Springstone, The Garden Gallery
5 Idlehurst Way, Avondale
Harare, ZIMBABWE

Dr. Chike C. Aniakor
Institute of African Studies
University of Nigeria
Nsukka, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Mr. Chidi Anicho
Ogbete Congregation
30 Port Harcourt Street
Enugu, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Dr. F. N. Anozie
Department of Archaeology
University of Nigeria
Nsukka, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Dr. James Anquandah
Department of Archaeology
University of Ghana, P.O. Box 3
Legon, GHANA


Ms. Chinwe F. Anyaegbuna
National Museum
P.M.B. 1285
Enugu, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Ms. Peggy Appiah
P.O. Box 829
Kumase
GHANA

Dr. Starling E. N. Anyanwu
National Museum
P.M.B. 036
Bauchi, NIGERIA

Professor David Aradeon
Faculty of Environment Design
University of Lagos, P.M.B. 12003
Lagos, NIGERIA

Dr. David A. Aremu
Dept. of Archaeology & Anthropology
University of Ibadan
Ibadan, Oyo State, NIGERIA

Dr. P. S. 0. Aremu
Department of Fine Arts
Obafemi Awolowo University
Ile-Ife, Oshun State, NIGERIA

Mr. A. A. Areo
Department of Fine and Applied Arts
St. Andrew's College of Education,
P.M.B. 1010
Oyo, Oyo State, NIGERIA

Mr. Adebowale B. Areo
National Museum
P.M.B. 5515, Enuwa Square
Ile-Ife, Oshun State, NIGERIA

AREWA House Library
Ahmadu Bello University
P. O. Box 2006
Kaduna, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

Dr. Kwame Arhin
Institute of African Studies
University of Ghana
Legon, Accra, GHANA

Mr. James E. Arhuidese
Institute of Archaeology/Museum
Studies
Jos, Plateau State
NIGERIA

Arquivo do Patrimonio Cultural
(Projecto ARPAC)
C.P. 2702
Maputo, MOZAMBIQUE

Ms. Ibironke P. Ashaye
National Museum
P.M.B. 1469
Ilorin, Kwara State, NIGERIA






Dr. Raymond N. Asombang
Centre for Anthropological Studies
and Research
B.P. 1844
Yaoundd, CAMEROON

Mr. Romain-Philippe Assogba
Mus6e d'Ethnographie
B.P. 299
Porto Novo, REPUBLIQUE
POPULAIRE DU BENIN

Mr. Tsenum Awua
N5/808H Academy, Iwo Road
University of Ibadan P. O. Box 19381
Ibadan, Oyo State, NIGERIA

Mr. Adebayo Simon Ayodele
College of Education, P. O. Box 5886
Ilorin, Kwara State
NIGERIA

Mr. Bernard Ayuk
Ministry of Information and Culture
National Museum
Yaounde, CAMEROON

Mr. Osuji George Azuka
Department of Creative Arts
University of Lagos
Lagos, NIGERIA

Dr. Daniel Ola Babalola
Department of Fine Arts
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaria, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

Mr. Obard B. Bagodo
B.P. 82
Porto Novo
REPUBLIQUE POPULAIRE DU
BENIN

Mr. Peta Bain
FIACT, 3 Pomme Rose Avenue
Cascade, Trinidad
TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

University de Bangui
Bibliotheque
B.P. 1450
Bangui, CENTRAL AFRICAN
REPUBLIC

National Cultural Foundation
West Terrace
St. James
BARBADOS, WEST INDIES

Musee National de Prdhistoire et
d'Ethnographie du Bardo
3 rue Franklin Roosevelt
Algiers
ALGERIA


Bayero University Library
Nigeriana Section
P.M.B. 3011
Kano, Kano State, NIGERIA

Dr. Rayda Becker
University Art Galleries
University of the Witwatersrand
Private Bag 3, Wits 2050, SOUTH
AFRICA

Ms. Emma Bedford
South African National Gallery
Government Avenue, P.O.B. 2420
Cape Town 8001, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. Henry Bell-Gam
Department of Creative Arts
University of Port Harcourt
Port Harcourt, NIGERIA

Ms. Rasidat
Isenbaye Art Gallery and Cultural
Troupe
52 Catholic Mission Road
Oshogbo, Oshun State, NIGERIA

Dr. Sule Bello
National Council for Arts & Culture
Iganmu, National Theatre, P. O. Box
2959
Surulere, Lagos, NIGERIA

University Library
University of Benin
Benin City, Edo State
NIGERIA

University Nationale du Benin
Bibliotheque, B.P. 526
Cotonou
REPUBLIQUE POPULAIRE DU
BENIN

University du B4nin Bibliotheque
B.P. 1515
Lome
TOGO

Mr. Rory M. Bester
P. 0. Box 91203
Auckland Park, 2006
SOUTH AFRICA

Kentse Bogatsu
Private Bag 114
Gaborone
BOTSWANA

Borno Museum Society
c/o Centre for Trans-Saharan Studies
University P. M. B. 1069
Maiduguri, Borno State, NIGERIA


Botswana Society
P. O. Box 71
Gaborone
BOTSWANA

National Museum and Art Gallery
Independence Avenue
P.O. Box 114
Gaborone, BOTSWANA

University of Botswana Library
Private Bag 0022
Gaborone
BOTSWANA

Ms. Barbara Buntman
History of Art
University of the Witwatersrand
WITS 2050, Johannesburg, SOUTH
AFRICA

Mr. M. I. Umar Buratai
Department of English and Drama
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaria, NIGERIA

Periodicals Department
J. W. Jagger Library
University of Cape Town
Rondebosch 7700, SOUTH AFRICA

Musde National du Congo
B.P. 459
Brazzaville
REPUBLIQUE POPULAIRE DU
CONGO

British Institute in Eastern Africa
P.O. Box 30710
Nairobi
KENYA

Mr. Jerry Buhari
Department of Fine Arts
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaria, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

University Officielle de Bujumbura
Bibliothbque
B.P. 1320
Bujumbura, BURUNDI

Dr. George H. 0. Abungu
National Museums of Kenya
P. 0. Box 40658
Nairobi, KENYA

Ms. Sibonisiwe Cala
11 Bolton Avenue
Kenilworth
Bulawayo, ZIMBABWE

University of Calabar Library
P.M.B. 1115
Calabar, Cross River State
NIGERIA





Abdourman Bignd Camara
Direction Nationale de la Culture
B.P. 617
Conakry, REPUBLIQUE DU GUINEE
Mr. Mamadou Camara
C. N. Gunes Co., B.P. 964
Conakry
REPUBLIQUE DU GUINEE
Mr. Leonard Cardoso
B.P. 338
Bissau
GUINE-BISSAU
Dr. Charles V. Carnegie
African-Caribbean Institute of Jamaica
12 Ocean Boulevard, Kingston Mall
Kingston, JAMAICA
Mr. Ayodele and Ms. Tokunbo
Caxton-Martins
35 Maye Street
P.O. Box 2584
Yaba, Lagos, NIGERIA

Centre Amadou Hampat6 Ba
B.P. 1511, Missira Rue 20x35
Bamako
MALI
Centre Culturel Africain
Rue Victor Hugo
Bell Village - Port-Louis
MAURITIUS, INDIAN OCEAN

Centre de Documentation et de
Recherches Historiques "Ahmed
Baba"
B.P. 14
Tombouctou, MALI

Centre for Cultural Studies Library
University of Lagos
Akoko-Yaba, Lagos
NIGERIA

CICIBA
B.P. 770
Libreville
GABON

Centro Estudios Africa Medio Oriente
Ave 3ra 1805 e/18 7 20
Miramar, Havana
CUBA

Dr. J. C. Chakanza
Department of Religious Studies
Chancellor College, P. 0. Box 280
Zomba, MALAWI

Mr. Martin Chembere
5 Chatima Road
P. O. Box Mbare
Harare, ZIMBABWE


Mr. C. T. Chimimba
Museums of Malawi
P. O. Box 30360
Blantyre 3, MALAWI

Ms. Gloria Chianu Chuma-Ibe
Centre for Black and African Arts and
Civilisation
National Theatre, P.M.B. 12794
Lagos, NIGERIA

Dr. Vincent E. Chikwendu
Department of Archaeology
University of Nigeria
Nsukka, Enugu State, NIGERIA
Mr. Patrick Mweemba
Choma Museum
P. O. Box 630189
Choma, ZAMBIA

Mr. Chinedu Chukueggu
Department of Creative Arts
University of Port Harcourt, P.M.B.
5323
Port Harcourt, Rivers State, NIGERIA

Mr. Barth K. Chukwuezi
Department of Sociology/Anthropol-
ogy
University of Nigeria
Nsukka, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Mr. LeRoy Clarke
28 West Hill, Cascade
Port of Spain
TRINIDAD
Coastal Museums Programme/'
Coastal Archaeology
Fort Jesus Museum, PO Box 82412
Mombasa
KENYA

Mr. C. Bellarmia Codo
B.P. 03-2891
Cotonou
REPUBLIQUE POPULAIRE DU
BENIN

Ms. Mary 0. Coker
Old Residency Museum
P.M.B. 1180
Calabar, Cross River State, NIGERIA

Community Arts Project (CAP)
Sir Lowry Road, P.O. Box 13140
Cape Town 7900
SOUTH AFRICA

Bibliotheque Universitaire
B.P. 2025
Brazzaville
REPUBLIQUE POPULAIRE DU
CONGO


Mr. Roy Cook
Matombo Gallery
6 Zimre Centre, 114 Moffatt Street
Harare, ZIMBABWE

Dr. Vincent 0. Cooper
University of the Virgin Islands
Charlotte Amalie
St. Thomas, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS
00801

Mr. Dmitri Copeman
P. O. Bo 1542
Christiansted
St. Croix, U.S.VIRGIN ISLANDS
00822
Mr. Alda Costa, Director
Departamento de Museus
Ministdrio da Cultura, Casa de Terro,
C.P. 2702
Maputo, MOZAMBIQUE

Mus4e Nationale d'Abidjan
B.P. 1600
Abidjan 225
COTE D'IVOIRE
Africana Museum
Cuttington University College
Box 277
Monrovia, LIBERIA

Mr. Themba Dakamela
15 Dunblane Road
River-Side
Bulawayo, ZIMBABWE

Musde d'Art Africain de Dakar
B.P. 6167
Dakar-Etoile
SENEGAL
Ms. Elizabeth Dalotta
Tanzania Library Service
PO Box 9283
Dar es Salaam, TANZANIA
University of Dar es Salaam Library
P.O.B. 35092
Dar es Salaam
TANZANIA
Mr. Glenn Davis
Virgin Islands Carnival Committee
P. O. Box 307947
St. Thomas, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS
00803-7947
Ms. Patricia Davison
Department of Ethnography
South African Museum, P.O. Box 61
Cape Town 8000, SOUTH AFRICA






Mr. Ahmed Dawalbeit
Project Ecomusde Urbain de Dakar
ENDA Tiers-Monde, B.P. 3370
Dakar, SENEGAL

Mr. G. W. K. Dawson
Dawson Art Centre
P. O. Box 2
Nima, Accra, GHANA
Ms. Henrietta Dax
Clarke's Bookshop
211 Long Street
Cape Town 8001, SOUTH AFRICA

Mr. Frangois de Necker
Department of Visual Arts
University of Namibia, Private Bag
13301
Windhoek 9000, NAMIBIA
Mr. Abi A. Derefaka
University of Port Harcourt Museum
Choba, P.M.B. 5323
Port Harcourt, NIGERIA

Mme. Rachida De Souza
Musde Ethnographique de Porto
Novo
B.P. 299, Porto Novo
REPUBLIQUE POPULAIRE DU
BENIN
Dr. Victor Diabete
Institute d'Histoire, d'Art et
d'Archdologie Africains
University d'Abidjan
08 B.P. 945, Abidjan, COTE D'IVOIRE

Mr. M. Diaby
B.P. 25
Djennd
MALI
Mr. Ibnou Diagne
B.P. 5303
Dakar-Fann
SENEGAL

Mr. Tiohona Moussa Diarrassouba
Institute d'Histoire, d'Art et
d'Archdologie Africains
University d'Abidjan, 08 B.P. 945
Abidjan, COTE D'IVOIRE

Dr. J. I. Dibua
Department of History
University of Benin
Benin City, Edo State, NIGERIA

Dr. Chike Dike
National Gallery of Modem Art
P.M.B. 3001, National Theatre
Lagos, NIGERIA


Mr. Ifedioramma Dike
Department of Fine & Applied Arts
Nnamdi Azikiwe University
Awka, Anambra State, NIGERIA

Mr. Denis C. Dohou
Musde Historique
B.P. 25
Abomey, RIPUBLIQUE POPULAIRE
DU BENIN

Mr. Eddie Donoghue
Virgin Islands Legislature
P. O. Box 4980
St. Thomas, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS
00803

Dr. Francis Duah
Ghana National Museum
P.O. Box 3343
Accra, GHANA

Mr. Neville Dubow
Michaelis School of Fine Art
University of Cape Town,
Rondebosch 7700
Cape Town, SOUTH AFRICA

Director, Durban Art Gallery
Box 4085
Durban 4000
SOUTH AFRICA

Ms. Abgail & Mr. Isaac Dzingire
5696 Juluka Road
Nkulumane
Bulawayo, ZIMBABWE

Mr. Christopher Ebigbo
Department of Fine Arts
University of Benin, P.M.B. 1154
Benin City, Edo State, NIGERIA

Mr. Joe Eboreime
National Museum
P.M.B. 1115
Benin City, Edo State, NIGERIA

Department de Arqueologia e
Antropologia
Universidade Eduardo Mondlane
C.P. 257
Maputo, MOZAMBIQUE

Mr. Osa D. Egonwa
Department of Fine, Applied and
Performing Arts
Delta State University, Abraka
Campus
Abraka, Delta State, NIGERIA

Ms. Annaleen Eins
National Art Gallery of Namibia
P. 0. Box 994
Windhoek, NAMIBIA


Dr. L. C. Ekechukwu
Department of Archaeology
University of Nigeria
Nsukka, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Mr. Domoseh Ekong
Department of Fine and Industrial
Arts
University of Uyo
Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, NIGERIA

Ms. Violetta I. Ekpo
National Museum
P.M.B. 1109
Uyo, Cross River State, NIGERIA

Mr. Gene Emanuel
Box 159A
University of the Virgin Islands
St. Thomas, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS
00820

Mr. Austine Emifoniye
Department of Creative Arts
University of Lagos
Akoka-Lagos, NIGERIA

Mr. Rod Adoh Emi-Oliseyenum
Department of Fine Arts
Ogun State College of Education,
P.M.B. 2118
Ijebu-Ode, Ogun State, NIGERIA

Mr. Hiamey Emmanuel
53M University Hall
University of Science and Technology
Kumase, GHANA

Ms. T. B. Eniade
No. 64 Odi-Olowo Street
Oshogbo, Oshun State
NIGERIA

Mr. Joseph I. Enuechie
Delta State Council for Arts and
Culture
P. 0. Box 71
Ogwashi-Uku, Delta State, NIGERIA

Mr. Toni Eseagwu
Department of Industrial Design
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaria, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

Mr. Nsikek Essien
Department of Fine Arts
Institute of Management & Technol-
ogy
Enugu, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Dr. J. M. Essomba
D6partmente de l'Histoire
University de Yaound6
Yaound6, CAMEROON






Mr. Patrick C. Ezeh
National Museum
P.M.B. 1585
Owerri, Imo State, NIGERIA

Mr. Nfor G. Fai
St. Rita's College, P. 0. Box 52,
Nkambe
Songa-Mantung Division
Northwest Province, CAMEROON

Mr. Kevin Farmer
Barbados Museum & Historical
Society
St. Ann's Garrison
St. Michael, BARBADOS

Ms. Anthonia K. Fatunsin
National Museum
P.M.B. 5524
Ibadan, Oyo State, NIGERIA

Dr. Joan M. Fayer
Box 23356, College of Humanities,
University Station
University of Puerto Rico
San Juan, PUERTO RICO 00931-3356

Mr. Manzambi Vivu Fernando
Museu Nacional de Antropologia
C.P. 2159
Luanda, ANGOLA

Mr. Lowell Fiet
P. O. Box 22831
UPR Station
San Juan, PUERTO RICO 00931-2831

Mr. Manuel Figueira
Centro Nacional de Artesanato
S. Vicente
REPUBLIC DE CABO VERDE

Mr. Kunle Filani
Department of Art
Federal College of Education (Techni-
cal), P.M.B. 269
Akoka-Yaba, Lagos, NIGERIA

Mr. Matt Fischer
P. O. Box BW 1252
Borrowdale, Harare
ZIMBABWE

Dr. C. A. Folorunso
Department of Archaeology
University of Ibadan
Ibadan, Oyo State, NIGERIA

Ms. Nancy Forgione
46 Melvill Road
Illovo 2196
SOUTH AFRICA


University of Fort Hare Library
Private Bag 1313
Alice 5700, Ciskei
SOUTH AFRICA

Fort Jesus Museum Library
P.O. Box 82412
Mombasa
KENYA

Mr. Kojo Fosu
Department of Art Education
University of Science and Technology
Kumase, GHANA

Institute of African Studies Library
Fourah Bay College
Freetown
SIERRA LEONE

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Department of Fine and Applied Arts
University of Benin
Benin City, Edo State, NIGERIA

Ms. Hazel Franco
Creative Arts Centre, University of the
West Indies
St. Augustine
TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO
Mr. Japhet Funwayo
853 Old Magwegwe
P. O. Magwegwe
Bulawayo, ZIMBABWE

Mr. Degife Gabre-Tsadik
Institute of Ethiopian Studies Library
P.O.B. 1176, Addis Ababa University
Addis Ababa, ETHIOPIA
Dr. Boubd Gado
Institute de Recherches en Sciences
Humaines
University de Niamey, B.P. 318
Niamey, NIGERA

Ms. Helen-Afi Gadzekpo
Ghana Film Industry Corporation
P. O. Box M83
Accra, GHANA
Mr. Nalikuleni Gama
56717 Old Lobengula
P. O. Magwegwe
Bulawayo, ZIMBABWE

Gambia National Library
Reg Pye Lane PMB
Banjul
THE GAMBIA

Mr. Abubakar Garba
Centre for Trans-Saharan Studies
P.M.B. 1069
Maiduguri, Bomo State, NIGERIA


Dr. Gary W. Garcia
Dept. of Food Production, Faculty of
Agric. & Nat. Sciences
University of the West Indies
St. Augustine, TRINIDAD AND
TOBAGO

Mr. Peter Garlake
P. O. Box BW 238, Borrowdale
Harare
ZIMBABWE
Ms. Rosalina Gauffin
Institute Nacional des Artes
Direcgao Feral da Cultura, C.P. 338
Bissau, GUINI-BISSAU

Mr. Kolawole Patrick Gbaja
National Museum, P.M.B. 12556
Onikan, Lagos
NIGERIA

Dr. Emmanuel A. Gbajavi
NW5/ 259, Idioro Ekotedo
Ibadan, Oyo State
NIGERIA

Dr. Yaro Gella
National Commission for Museums
and Monuments
P.M.B. 12556
Onikan, Lagos, NIGERIA

Balme Library
University of Ghana
P.O.Box 24
Legon, Accra, GHANA

Mr. Ablade Glover
Artists Alliance Gallery
P. 0. Box 718
Teshie Nungua. Accra, GHANA

Professor Michael Godby
Department of the History of Art
University of Cape Town, Private Bag
Rondebosch
Cape Town 7700, SOUTH AFRICA
Ms. Colette Gounou
Musee Honmd
B.P. 299
Porto Novo, REPUBLIQUE
POPULAIRE DU BENIN

Mr. Felizardo A. J. Gourgel
Museu do Dundo
C.P. 54
Dundo, ANGOLA

Musee National du Costume
B.P.
Grand Bassam 225
COTE D'IVOIRE






Mr. Sandy Grant
P. O. Box 141
Odi
BOTSWANA

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C.P. 37
Bissau
GUINE-BISSAU

Musee National du Guin6e
B.P. 561
Conakry
REPUBLIQUE DU GUINIEE

Mr. Jorge Gumbe
C. P. 5754
Luanda
ANGOLA

Mr. Roy Guthrie
Chapungu Sculpture Park
Msasa, P. O. Box 2863
Harare, ZIMBABWE

Regional Director
Zimbabwe Military Museum
P. O. Box 1300
Gweru, ZIMBABWE

Mr. Atakilti Hagege
Bureau of Culture, Tourism &
Information of Tigray
P. 0. Box 124
Mekelle, Tigray, ETHIOPIA

Ms. Beverly Hall-Alleyne
Institute of Jamaica
12-16 East Street
Kingston, JAMAICA

Mr. Magdy Sayed Kalifa Hassanein
Cairo Museum
Kasr El Nile, Tahrer Square
Cairo, EGYPT

Reverend Joseph Healey
Maryknoll Missioners
P.O. Box 867
Dar es Salaam, TANZANIA

Professor Paulin J. Hountondji
Interafrican Council for Philosophy
B.P. 1268
Cotonou, REPUBLIQUE POPULAIRE
DU BENIN

Mr. Wessel van Huyssteen
Visual Arts and Craft Academy
46 President Street

Germiston 1401, SOUTH AFRICA
Reference Librarian
University of Ibadan Library
Ibadan, Oyo State
NIGERIA


Mr. Anselm Ibeanu
Department of Archaeology
University of Nigeria
Nsukka, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Mr. Louis Ible, Jr.
Flair Magazine
Norre Gade, Charlotte Amalie
St. Thomas, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS
00802

Mr. Ba Ibrahima
Service du Patrimoine MJS/C
B.P. 215
Niamey, NIGER

Ife Forum for the Preservation of
Cultural Heritage
Institute of African Studies, Rm 216
Obafemi Awolowo University
Ile-Ife, Oyo State, NIGERIA

Mr. Ogu-Raphael Ifeanyi
Department of Theater Arts
University of Ibadan
Ibadan, Oyo State, NIGERIA

Dr. Benjo N. Igwilo
Department of Fine & Applied Arts
University of Nigeria
Nsukka, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Dr. Bashir Ikara
AREWA House, Ahmadu Bello
University
P.O. Box 2006
Kaduna, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

Mr. Okay Ikenegbu
P. O. Box 9032
Enugu, Enugu State
NIGERIA

Mr. Peter Ikechukwu 0. Ikwueme
National Museum
9 Ogui Road, P.M.B. 1285
Enugu, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Mr. Simon Odey Ikpakronyi
National Gallery of Art
P.M.B. 456
Garki-Abuja, NIGERIA

Mr. C. Krydz Ikwuemesi
Equemesy Place, P. O. Box 134
Ogidi, Anambra State
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University Librarian
Obafemi Awolowo University
Ile-Ife, Oshun State
NIGERIA

University of Ilorin Library
P.M.B. 1518
fIlorin, Kwara State
NIGERIA


Dr. Ededet Iniama
John Brewer's Ray
University of the Virgin Islands
St. Thomas, U.S. VIRGIN ISALNDS
00802

Institute des Musdes Nationaux de
Zaire
B.P. 4249
Kinshasa
DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF
CONGO

Museum, Institute of Ethiopian
Studies
Addis Ababa University
P.O.B. 1176
Addis Ababa, ETHIOPIA

Institute of Kiswahili and Foreign
Languages
Sanduku La Posta/P. 0. Box 882
Kidutani, Zanzibar
TANZANIA

Mr. Bonaventure 0. Iwu
Department of Fine Arts
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaria, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

Mr. Levi Izuakor
National Museum
P. M. B. 12256
Lagos, NIGERIA

Ms. Myron Jackson
Archaeology and Historic Preserva-
tion, DPNR
17 Kongens Gade, Charlotte Amalie
St. Thomas, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS
00802

Ms. Nancy Jacobs
Division of Fine Arts
Barbados Community College,
Howells Cross Road
St. Michael, BARBADOS

Ms. Vicky James
National Commission for Museums
and Monuments Library
P.M.B. 12556
Onikan, Lagos, NIGERIA

Mr. Jacob Jari
Department of Fine Arts
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaria, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

Dr. J. F. Jemkur
Department of History
University of Jos
Jos, NIGERIA





Professor Elias Jengo
Art, Music & Theatre Department
University of Dar es Salaam, P.O. Box
35044
Dar es Salaam, TANZANIA

Mr. B. F. Jenkins
Department of Fine Arts
Yaba College of Technology
Lagos, NIGERIA

Mr. Rashid Jogee
144 Fourth Street
Bulawayo
ZIMBABWE

Johannesburg Art Gallery Library
P. O. Box 23561
2044 Johannesburg
SOUTH AFRICA

Jos Museum
P.M.B. 2031
Jos, Plateau State
NIGERIA

Mr. Abdu Rahman Mohamed Juma
Zanzibar Museum
P.O. Box 116
Zanzibar, TANZANIA

Dr. R. 0. Rom Kalilu
P.O. Box 987
Ogbomosho, Oyo State
NIGERIA

Mr. Muhammed Kamoga
African Research Center for the
Preservation of Islamic Heritage
P.O. Box 9312
Kampala, UGANDA

Mr. Ephrim R. Kamuhangire
Department of Antiquities & Muse-
ums
P. O. Box 5718
Kampala, UGANDA

Mr. Benjamin W. Kankpeyeng
Upper East Regional Museum, P. O.
Box 86
Bolgatanga
GHANA

Ms. Carol Kaufmann
South African National Gallery
Government Avenue, P.O.B. 2420
Cape Town 8001, SOUTH AFRICA

Mr. Roy Kausa
c/o Ndeke Hotel
P. 0. Box 30815
Lusaka, ZAMBIA


Mr. Ogunsola Kayode
African Arts Global Project
P. O. Box 5093
Shomolu, NIGERIA

Ms. Rochelle Keene
Johannesburg Art Gallery
P. O. Box 23561, Joubert Park
2044 Johannesburg, SOUTH AFRICA

National Museums of Kenya Library
P.O. Box 40658
Nairobi
KENYA

Kenyatta University Library
P.O. Box 43844
Nairobi
KENYA

Mr. Abed el Rahman Abedulahi M. El
Khalifa
National Board for Antiquities and
Museums
P. 0. Box 178
Khartoum, SUDAN

University of Khartoum Library
P.O.B. 321
Khartoum
SUDAN

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B.P. 4278
Ouagadougou
BURKINA FASO

Dr. Sandra Klopper
Department of the History of Art
University of Cape Town, Private Bag
Rondebosch
Cape Town 7700, SOUTH AFRICA

Ms. Iretiola Kola-George
National Museum, P.M.B. 12556
Onikan-Lagos
NIGERIA

Mr. David Koloane
303 Fattis Mountain
66 Harrison Street
Johannesburg 2001, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. Moussa Konrouma
Mus6e Nationale
B.P. 262
Conakry, REPUBLIQUE DU GUINEE

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Association des Artistes Plasticiens du
B4nin
B.P. 04-0001
Cotonou, REPUBLIQUE POPULAIRE
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P. 0. Box 892
Houghton
204 Johannesburg, SOUTH AFRICA

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Government Teachers' College
P.M.B. 1017
Wukari, Gongola State, NIGERIA

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437 A Square, Njube Suburb
P. O. Mpopoma
Bulawayo, ZIMBABWE

Mr. M. G. Kumwenda
Museums of Malawi
P.O. Box 30360, Chichiri
Blantyre, MALAWI

University of Kwa Zulu Library
Private Bag
Kwa-Dlangezwa via Empangeni
Kwa-Zulu/Natal 3880, SOUTH
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Mr. Atta Kwami
University PO Box 723
K.N.U.S.T.
Kumasi, GHANA

Mr. Justus Kyolo
P. O. Box 73092
Nairobi
KENYA

Mr. David M. Kyule
Department of History
University of Nairobi, P.M.B. 30197
Nairobi, KENYA

Ghandi Library
University of Lagos
Akoko-Yaba, Lagos
NIGERIA

Mr. Edgar 0. Lake
P. O. Box 4657
Kingshill
St. Croix, VIRGIN ISLANDS 00851

Lamu Museum Library
P.O. Box 48
Lamu
KENYA

Ms. Lauren Larsen
2133 Hospital Street
Christiansted
St. Croix, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS
00820

Mr. Djouldd Laya
Centre d'Etudes Linguistiques et
Historiques par la Tradition Orale
B.P. 878
Niamey, NIGER






Ms. Peju Layiwola
c/oO. O. Layiwola
Institute of African Studies, University
of Ibadan
Ibadan, Oyo State, NIGERIA

Ms. J. C. Leeb-Du Toit
Department of Fine Art and Art
History
University of Natal, Private Bag X01
Scottsville 3209, SOUTH AFRICA

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P. O. Box 904
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P.O.B. Roma
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National Museum
P.M.B. 2031
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National Museum of Liberia
P.O. Box 101
Monrovia
LIBERIA

Livingstone Museum
Mosi-oa-Tunya Road
P.O.B. 60498
Livingstone, ZAMBIA

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Mahatma Gandhi Institute
Moka, MAURITIUS, INDIAN
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P. O. Box 50079
Lusaka
ZAMBIA

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Central
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Lubumbashi, DEMOCRATIC REPUB-
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Museu de Angola
C.P. 1267C
Luanda, ANGOLA


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64647/64 Tshabalala
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Dept. of English, Box 23356, Univer-
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San Juan, PUERTO RICO 00931-3356

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Nati Museums and Monuments of
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Chancellor College
P.O. Box 280
Zomba, MALAWI

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Mus6e National
B.P. 159
Bamako, MALI

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Musee National
B.P. 248
Niamey, NIGER

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Funda Centre/Funda Community"
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P. O. Box 2056
Southdale 2135, SOUTH AFRICA

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Arts
1 Arthur Wint Drive
Kingston 5
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Department of Fine Arts and History
of Art
University of Durban-Westville,
Private Bag X54001
Durban 4000, SOUTH AFRICA

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c/o A.H.R.L.
P.O. Box 121
Ila-Orangun, Oshun State, NIGERIA

Dr. Fidelis T. Masao
Archaeology Unit
University of Dar es Salaam, P.O. Box
35050
Dar es Salaam, TANZANIA

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National Museums and Monuments
of Zimbabwe
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African Window
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Regional Director
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P. O. Box 6784
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Vista University
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Benoni 1500, SOUTH AFRICA

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Association for Creative Teaching
ACT Office, KRC, P.O. Box 510
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Institute Nacional de Estudos e
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C.P. 112
Bissau, GUINE-BISSAU






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Mus6e National
B.P. 159
Bamako, MALI

Michaelis Art Library
Johannesburg Public Library
Market Square
Johannesburg 2001, SOUTH AFRICA

Ms. Elza Miles
3a Main Road East
2092 Melville, Johannesburg 2000
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Museu Nacional de Antropologia
C.P. 2159
Luanda, ANGOLA

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Mzilikazi Art and Craft Centre
P. O. Box 2034
Bulawayo, ZIMBABWE

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B.P. 890
Brazzaville
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National Museum
P.M.B. 1115
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P.O.B. 420230
Mbala
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National Gallery of Zimbabwe Library
P.O. Box CY 848, Causeway
Harare, ZIMBABWE

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P. O. Box 25168
Nairobi
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Department of Arts, Music and
Theatre
P. O. Box 35044, University of Dar es
Salaam
Dar es Salaam, TANZANIA

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Nayuma Museum
P. O. Box 96
Limulunga-Mongu, ZAMBIA


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Southern Africa Federation of the
Disabled
P. O. Box 2247
Bulawayo, ZIMBABWE

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Museums of Malawi
P.O. Box 30360
Blantyre 3, MALAWI

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Kamwala Secondary School
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Gallery Delta, 110 Livingstone
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C.P. 1780
Maputo
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C.P. 1403
Maputo
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Department of Environmental
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University of Botswana, Private Bag
0022
Gaborone, BOTSWANA

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Mutare Museum
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Mutare, ZIMBABWE

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Centre for African Studies
University of Cape Town, Private Bag
Rondebosch 7700
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University of Nairobi
P.O. Box 30197
Nairobi, KENY


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School of Industrial and Fine Arts
Makerere University, P. 0. Box 7062
Kampala, UGANDA

State Museum of Namibia
P.O. Box 1203
Windhoek
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University of Namibia
Private Bag 13301
Windhoek 9000, NAMIBIA

Ms. Kirumira Rose Namubiru
School of Industrial and Fine Arts
Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062
Kampala, UGANDA

Mr. Oumarou Nao
03 B.P. 7021, Ouagadougou 03
Ouagadougou
BURKINA FASO

Natal Museum Library
Private Bag 9070
Pietermartizburg 3200
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Periodicals Librarian
University of Natal Library
Private Bag X01
Scottsville 3209, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. Alexander Nati
Department of Sociology and Anthro-
pology
University of Asmara, P.O. Box 1220
Asmara, ERITREA

National Archives of Zimbabwe
Private Bag 7729, Causeway
Harare
ZIMBABWE

National Commission for Museums
and Monuments Library
National Museum
P.M.B. 12556
Onikan, Lagos, NIGERIA

National Gallery in Bulawayo Library
75 Main Street/Leopold Takawira
Avenue
P. 0. Box 1993
Bulawayo, ZIMBABWE

National Gallery of Zimbabwe
P. O. Box CY 848, Causeway
Harare
ZIMBABWE

Mr. David T. Ndah
P. O. Box 82, Nso, Bui Division
Kumbo-Nso, North -West Province
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Mr. Charles S. Ndege
Mundema African Art Workshop
P. 0. Box 352
Musona, TANZANIA

Mr. Dumisani Ndlovu
72644 Lobengula West
P. O. Magwegwe
Bulawayo, ZIMBABWE

Dr. Karel Nel
Department of Fine Arts
University of the Witwatersrand, 1 Jan
Smuts Avenue
Johannesburg, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. Anitra Nettleton
History of Art Department
University of the Witwatersrand, 1 Jan
Smuts Avenue
Johannesburg 2001, SOUTH AFRICA

Fon Informi Nfor I
Ndu Fon's Palace
P. O. Box 68
Ndu, Donga Mantung Division, NWP.
CAMEROON

Ms. Frangoise N'Goran
Bibliotheque Centrale
University d'Abidjan, 08 B.P. 859
Abidjan, COTE D'IVOIRE

Bibliotheque de la Facultd des Lettres
University de Niamey
B.P. 418
Niamey, NIGER

University of Nigeria
Enugu Campus - Library
Enugu, Enugu State
NIGERIA

Mr. Mtombeni Niya
National Military Museum
P. O. Box 1300
Gweru, ZIMBABWE

Mr. Michel Niyibizi
Bibliotheque Nationale du Rwanda
B.P. 1044
Kigali, RWANDA
Dr. Joseph Nkrumah
Advance Afrika (Int.) Dynamics
P.O. Box 16666
Accra-North, GHANA

Mr. Billy Nkunika
Centre for the Arts
University of Zambia, P. O. Box 32379
10101 Lusaka, ZAMBIA

Nnamdi Azikiwe Library
University of Nigeria
Nsukka, Enugu State
NIGERIA


Mr. Coustant Noanti
Musde Historique d'Abomey
B.P. 25
Abomey, REPUBLIQUE POPULAIRE
DU BININ

Mr. Rukeme Noserime
Department of Fine Arts
Yaba College of Technology, P.M.B.
2011
Yaba, Lagos, NIGERIA

Dr. Jean-Paul Notud
ORSTOM
B.P. 1857
Yaounde, CAMEROON

Dr. Lubasa N'ti Nseendi
Department of English
University of Maiduguri, P.M.B. 1069
Maidiguri, NIGERIA

Mr. Shey Sylvester Baye Mbiybe
Nsaila
Tang Nso Tikari Museum
Round About Tobin Kumbo-Bui
Division
Kumbo, North West Province,
CAMEROON

Mr. Simon Ntigashira
Musee National du Rwanda

B.P. 630
Butare, RWANDA

Mr. Pitika P. Ntuli
Department of Fine Arts and History
of Art
Private Bag X54001, University of
Durban-Westville
Durban 4000, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. Felicia Ihuoma Nwalutu
National Museum
P.M.B. 1115
Benin City, Edo State, NIGERIA

Dr. Oledinma P. Nwanna-Nzewunwa
PO Box 64, University of Port
Harcourt
P.M.B. 5323
Port Harcourt, Rivers State, NIGERIA

Mr. Jonathan Chukwuemeka Obi
National Museum
P.M.B. 1285
Enugu, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Dr. Tayo Obielodan
Dept. of Curriculum Studies &
Educational Technology
University of Ilorin, P.B.M. 1515
Ilorin, Kwara State, NIGERIA


Dr. A.B.C. Ocholla-Ayayo
Kenya Archaeological & Ethnographic
Research Agency
P.O. Box 10614
Nairobi, KENYA

Ms. Naana Ocran
Ghana Tourist Board
P. 0. Box 847
Cape Coast, GHANA

Dr. Okello Oculi
Department of Political Science
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaria, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

Mr. 0. J. Odewale
Federal College of Education
P.M.B. 1089
Oyo Oyo State, NIGERIA

Mr. Law. Kester Odeyemi
National Museum
P.M.B. 1004
Oron, Akwa Ibom State, NIGERIA

Mr. Freeborn Odiboh
Department of Fine and Applied Arts
Federal College of Education, P.M.B.
1026
Okene, Kogi State, NIGERIA

Mr. Olasehinde Odimayo
Treasure House Limited
#8a, Ogundana Street, off Allen
Avenue, P.M.B. 21070, Ikeja
Lagos, NIGERIA

Dr. S. R. Ogunduyile
Department of Industrial Design
Federal University of Technology,
Akure
Akure, Ondo State, NIGERIA

Mr. Adisa Ogunfalakan
Archaeology/Anthropology, Natural
History Museum
Obafemi Awolowo University
Ile-Ife, Oshun State, NIGERIA

Mr. Idowu Ogunmefun
Department of Theatre Arts
University of Ibadan
Ibadan, Oyo State, NIGERIA

Dr. Olufemi Ogunyipe
Department of Modern European
Languages
Ogun State University, P.M.B. 2002
Ago-Iwoye, Ogun State, NIGERIA

Mr. Sylivester Ohloo
Teremi High School
P. 0. Box 203
Chwele, KENYA






Mr. Festus C. Ojieh
P. 0. Box 512
Ebute Metta
Lagos, NIGERIA

Mr. Bankole Ojo
Department of Industrial Design
Federal University of Tehcnology,
Akure
Akure, Ondo State, NIGERIA

Dr. J. R. 0. Ojo
Department of Fine Arts
Obafemi Awolowo University
Ile-Ife, Oshun State, NIGERIA

Mr. Adedapo Ojo-Ade
c/o Ms. C. O. Ojo-Ade
Obafemi Awolowo University Library
Ile-Ife, Oshun State, NIGERIA

Mr. Boniface Okafor
Department of Fine & Applied Arts
Federal Polytechnic, P.M.B. 21
Oko, Aguta, Anambra State, NIGERIA

Dr. Tunde Okanlawon
Box 583
Sabo, Lagos
Lagos, NIGERIA

Mr. A. S. Okapko
4, Buari Onikede Street
Agboroko, Iba, Ojo
Lagos, NIGERIA

Dr. C. S. Okeke
Department of Fine and Applied Arts
University of Nigeria
Nsukka, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Professor Uche Okeke
Asele Institute
P.M.B. 1001
Nimo, Anambra State, NIGERIA

Mr. Olasupo Alaba Oketunji
P. O. Box 72
Oshogbo, Oshun State
NIGERIA

Mr. Kelechi Jasper Okezie
20 Eaza Road
P. O. Box 708
Abakalili, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Mr. Silas Okita
Centre for Nigerian Cultural Studies
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaria, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

Mr. Fryde Okoh
P. O. Box 9284
Enugu, Enugu State
NIGERIA


Mr. Ken 0. Okoli
Department of Fine Arts
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaira, NIGERIA

Mr. Achuwa Simon Okorie
National Commission for Colleges of
Education
P.M.B. 2341
Kaduna, NIGERIA

Mr.Anthony Ukwuoma Okpara
Dept. of Fine and Applied Arts
Imo State University, P.M.B. 2000
Owerri, Imo State, NIGERIA

Mr. Tonie Okpe
Department of Fine Arts
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaria, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

Dr. A. Ikechukwu Okpoko
Institute of African Studies
University of Nigeria
Nsukka, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Mr. Patrick Okpoko
Department of Archaeology
University of Nigeria
Nsukka, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Mr. M. A. Okunade
P. 0. Box 17976
Dube Post Office
Ibadan, Oyo State, NIGERIA

Mr. Oyeniyi Okunoye
Department of English
Obafemi Awolowo University
Ile-Ife, Oshun State, NIGERIA

Mr. Adeyemi Jonathan Ola
c/o Emmanuel Ogbonyomi
P. 0. Box 70193
Victoria Island, Lagos, NIGERIA

Ms. Ibironke Olabode
Department of English
Obafemi Awolowo University
Ile-Ife, NIGERIA

Dr. R. A. Olaoye
Department of History
University of Ilorin
Ilorin, Kwara State, NIGERIA

Mr. Olayemi Olawale
N5/ 808H Academy Iwo Road
U.I. P. 0. Box 19381
Ibadan, NIGERIA

Dr. Morompi Ole-Ronkei
Maasai Cultural Center
P. O. Box 10749
Nairobi, KENYA


Ms. Ana Maria de Oliveira
P. O. Box 1970
Luanda
ANGOLA

Dr. Cynthia Oliver
P. O. Box 3362
Kingshill
St. Croix, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS
00850

Dr. Ola Oloidi
Department of Fine & Applied Arts
University of Nigeria
Nsukka, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Mr. Atiku Jelili Olorunfunmi
G.P.O. Box 9723
Marina, Lagos, Lagos State
NIGERIA
Mr. A. E. Olorunnipa
National Museum, P.M.B. 1115
Benin City, Edo State
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Mr. Ajayi Olufemi
124 Station Road
Oshogbo, Oshun State
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Prince S. T. 0. A. Olugbeja
Isenbaye Art Gallery and Cultural
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52 Catholic Mission Road
Oshogbo, Oshun State, NIGERIA

Mr. Aregbesola Olugbenga
Joymab Gallery, 22 Tapa Street
Ijesatedo, Surulere
Lagos, NIGERIA

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International Black Cultural Organiza-
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Whyte Street, Sauteurs
St. Patricks, GRENADA

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African Cultural Vision
No. 1 Baale Anole Street, Apata-
Ganga, GPO Box 218
Dugbe, Ibadan, NIGERIA

Mr. Sola Olukayode
Community Art Project
University of Lagos
Lagos, NIGERIA

Mr. Adeoye Ademola Oluwamuyiwa
P. 0. Box 1006
Ilorin, Kwara State
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Bibliothbque
B.P. 13131
Libreville, GABON

Mr. Ayorinde Jacob Omoniyi
College of Education, P. 0. Box 5886
Ilorin, Kwara State
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Mr. Bakare Olayinka Olumide
African Essentials
No. 73 Idimu Road, opposite Mokola
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Egbeda, Lagos, NIGERIA

Mr. Duro Oni
Centre for Cultural Studies
University of Lagos, Akoka, Yaba
Lagos, NIGERIA

Dr. Bruce Onobrakpeya
Ovuomaroro Gallery
39 Oloje Street, Papa Ajao, Mushin
Lagos, NIGERIA

Mr. Chidum F. Onuchukwu
Department of Fine and Applied Arts
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaria, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

Mr. Emmanuel C. Onwuzolum
Department of Seminars & Work-
shops
National Museum, P.M.B. 12556
Onikan, Lagos, NIGERIA

Mr. Umebe N. Onyejekwu
National Museum
P.M.B. 2004
Abeokuta, Ogun State, NIGERIA

Mr. Kelechi John Opara
P. O. Box 3424
Owerri, Imo State
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Dr. Elizabeth C. Orchardson-Mazrui
P. O. Box 40536
Nairobi
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Mr. Kolade Oshinowo
Department of Fine Arts
Yaba College of Technology
Yaba, Lagos, NIGERIA

Mr. Anthony A. Otoibhi
P. 0. Box 16571
General Post Office
Ibadan, Oyo State, NIGERIA

Bibliotheque Universitaire
University de Ouagadougou
B.P. 7021
Ouagadougou, BURKINA FASO


Mr. Tiona Ouattara
08 B.P. 945 Abidjan 08
Abidjan
COTE D'IVOIRE

Mr. Waheed Owoade
Broadcasting House, Radio Kwara
P.M.B. 1345
Ilorin, Kwara State, NIGERIA

Mr. Olalekan J. Oyebowale
P. O. Box 567
Oshogbo, OShgun State
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Mr. Ayoola Oyedele
Isenbaye Art Gallery and Cultural
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52 Catholic Mission Road
Oshogbo, Oshun State, NIGERIA

Dr. Lekan Oyegoke
Department of English
Ogun State University, P.M.B. 2002
Ago-Iwoye, Ogun State, NIGERIA

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P. O. Box 30385
Secretariat P. O.
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c/o Mr. I. 0. Adeogun
NEPA District Office, P.M.B. 4304
Oshogbo, Oshun State, NIGERIA

Ms. Carolyn Annanusa Panaki
National Museum
P.M.B. 102294
Makurdi, Benue State, NIGERIA

Dr. Richard Pankhurst
Institute of Ethiopian Studies
P.O.B. 1176, Addis Ababa University
Addis Ababa, ETHIOPIA

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LAMBA Sarl
B.P. 5188
Antananarivo 101, MADAGASCAR

Mr. Seye Peleyeju
G.P.O. 2383, Duigbe
Ibadan, Oyo State
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Mr. 0. Gushem Philip
Department of Fine Arts
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaria, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

Dr. Donna Klumpp Pido
P. O. Box 70388
Nairobi
KENYA


Dr. Guy de Plaen
Musee National de Lubumbashi
B.P. 2375
Lubumbashi, DEMOCRATIC REPUB-
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3 Worthington Ave, #7
Kingston 5
JAMAICA

Port Elizabeth Technikon Library
Private Bag X6001
Port Elizabeth 6000
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Department of Social Anthropology,
University of Natal
King George V Avenue
Durban, SOUTH AFRICA

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Anse Chaudiere
97217 Anses d'Arlet
MARTINIQUE

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East African Centre for Research on
Oral Traditions and African
National Languages
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Zanzibar, TANZANIA

Dr. Aderemi Raji-Oyelade
Department of English
Obafemi Awolowo University
Ile-Ife, Oshun State, NIGERIA

Mr. Jean Aime Rakotoarisoa
Musee d'Art et d'Archeologie
University d'Antananarivo, B.P. 564
Tananarivo, MADAGASCAR

Dr. Elizabeth Rankin
Department of Art History
University of the Witwatersrand, 1 Jan
Smuts Avenue
Johannesburg, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. David Rasamuel
Centre d'Art et d'Archdologie,
University de Madagascar
B.P. 4129,45-47 ave. du 26 juin 1960
Tananarivo 101, MADAGASCAR

Dr. Liza Van Robbroeck
Department of Fine Art & Art History
UNISA, P.O. Box 392
Pretoria, 0001, SOUTH AFRICA

Mr. Isamuko Rotimi
Merit Colour Laboratory, No. 26 Oyo
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Mokola, Ibadan, Oyo State
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Campus de Butari - Bibliothbque
B.P. 54
Butare, RWANDA

Mr. Steven Sack
1 Magnet Street
Kensington 2094
Johannesburg, SOUTH AFRICA

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Vice President's Office
Oral History and Antiquities, National
Museum
Banjul, THE GAMBIA

Mr. Jamiu Saka
21 Adedeji Street
Orile Oshodi, Lagos State
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Rua Leiria, 03 ap. 104
CEP 09725-140, Sao Bernardo do
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Sao Paulo, BRAZIL

Dr. Klena Sanogo
Institute des Sciences Humaines
B.P. 159
Bamako, MALI

Mr. Yaya Savan6
Mus4e National
01 B.P. 1600
Abidjan 01, COTE D'IVOIRE

Mr. Sayed Mahdi Satti Salih
Ethnographical Museum
P.O.B. 178
Khartoum, SUDAN

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History of Art Department
University of the Witswatersrand
P. O. Wits 2050, SOUTH AFRICA

Mr. Godfrey Setti
Private Bag 322X
Ridgeway 15102
Lusaka, ZAMBIA


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Department of Archaeology, Muse-
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P. 0. Box 116
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47 Duro Oyedoyin Street, Off Adesina
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P. O. Box 377
Ijeshatedo, Surulere, Lagos State,
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National Museum
P.M.B. 2127
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B. P. 63
Tombouctou
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P.O.B. 326
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Cotton Tree Building
P.O.B. 908
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National Heritage Conservation
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Heritage House, Musi-o-Tunya Road,
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Livingstone, ZAMBIA

Slave Route Committee
Ministry of Culture
B.P. 120
Cotonou, REPUBLIQUE POPULAIRE
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5-6 Kongens Gade, Corbiere Complex
Charlotte Amalie
St. Thomas, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS
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26 Calabash Boom
St. John
U.S. VIRGIN ISALND 00830

Dr. Sultan Somjee
National Museums of Kenya, Ethnog-
raphy Department
P. O. Box 40658
Nairobi, KENYA

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Dept. of History, Archaeology Section,
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P.O.B. MP 45, Mt. Pleasant
Harare, ZIMBABWE

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ADA - P. O. Box 16093
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B.P. 04 0265
Cotonou
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Ministere de la Culture et des Com-
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B.P. 04
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P. 0. Box 392
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P.O.B. 2420
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Kikombe Cha Cultural Institute
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St. Thomas, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS
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P. O. Box 53864
Ikoyi, Lagos State
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Johannesburg Art Gallery
P. O. Box 23561, Joubert Park
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Humanities Division, University of
Virgin Islands
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St. Thomas, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS
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National Heritage Library
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Port of Spain, TRINIDAD AND
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Mr. Burhan Ssebayigga
African Research Center for the
Preservation of Islamic Heritage
P.O. Box 2636
Kampala, UGANDA

Mr. Ignatius Sserulyo
School of Industrial and Fine Art
P. 0. Box 7062, Makerere University
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Mr. John Steele
Border Technikon, School of Applied
Art
34 Fitzpatrick Road, Quigney 5201
East London, SOUTH AFRICA






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Imodi-Ijebu-Ode
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Musee National du Mali
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Bamako, MALI

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Centre National de Documentation et
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Conakry, REPUBLIQUE DU GUINIEE

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College of Social Sciences
Addis Ababa University, P.O.B. 1176
Addis Ababa, ETHIOPIA

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Inst. de Arte e Communicaqao Social,
Universidade Federal Fluminense,
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University Nationale du B6nin
B.P. 526
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Alan Pittendrigh Library
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P.O. Box 82
Windhoek, NAMIBIA

Professor Edmund Tetteh
Department of Paintings and Sculp-
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University of Science and Technology
Kumase, GHANA

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Department of Anthropology
University of the Witswatersrand,
P.O. Wits
Johannesburg 2050, SOUTH AFRICA


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University of Namibia
P. 0. Box 8221
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National Museum of The Gambia
P.M.B. 151
Banjul, THE GAMBIA

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Lome
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W. E. B. Dubois Memorial Centre for
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Institute of African Studies
University of Ibadan
Ibadan, Oyo State, NIGERIA

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Department of Fine Arts
Institute of Management & Technol-
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Enugu, Enugu State, NIGERIA

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Department of Fine and Applied Arts
University of Nigeria
Nsukka, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Uganda Museum
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P.O. Box 365
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Nkpor, Idemili Local Government
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National Commission for Colleges of
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National Council for Arts & Culture
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National Cultural History Museum
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University de Nouakchott
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Maiduguri, Borno State
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MuseumAfrica
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National Museum-Onikan
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University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 30197
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Yaoundd, CAMEROON

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Michaelis School of Fine Art
University of Cape Town
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Leopold Takawira Avenue & Park
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ACASA
Addendum to the 2001 Membership Directory
* North America, Europe, and Asia *


INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERS

Museum of Mankind
Ethnography Dept. Library
British Museum
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email: pbowman@british-
museum.ac.uk

Wayne James
Homeward Bound Foundation
P.O. Box 25333
Washington, DC 20007 USA
Phone: 888-334-9229
fax: 202-362-7684
email: info@middlepassage.org
http//: www.middlepassage.org

Judy Hawes
The October Gallery
24 Old Gloucester St.
London, WC1N 3AL
UNITED KINGDOM
Phone: 44-20-7242-7367
fax: 44-20-7405-1851
email:
octobergallery@compuserve.com
http//: www.theoctobergallery.com


INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS


Lisa Aronson
Department of Art and Art History
Skidmore College
Saratoga Springs, NY 12866 USA
home: 518-458-2491
work: 518-580-5057
fax: 518-580-5028
email: laronson@skidmore.edu

Ramona Austin
Independent Scholar
1222 Commerce #906
Dallas, TX 75202 USA
home: 214-741-5300
fax: 214-741-6900
email: rmaustinarts@yahoo.com

Ann B. Baird
Highlands Center for the Visual Arts
The Bascom-Louise Gallery
P.O. Box 282
Highlands, NC 28741 USA
home: 828-526-0055
work: 828-526-4949
fax: 828-526-0732
email: bascomlouise@earthlink.net

Cynthia J. Becker
Department of Art History
University of St. Thomas
2115 Summit Ave. LOR 302
St. Paul, MN 55105-1096 USA
home: 651-225-8237
work: 651-962-5572
fax: 651-962-6410
email: cjbecker@stthomas.edu

Mark H.C. Bessire
Maine College of Art
522 Congress
Portland, ME 04102 USA
work: 207-879-5742 x240
email: mbessire@meca.edu

Nicholas Bridger
Archbishop Mitty High School
5000 Mitty Avenue
San Jose, CA 95129 USA
home: 408-966-7854


Karen Hull Brown
Art Department
Boise State University
1823 Fillmore Street
Caldwell, ID 83605 USA
home: 208-454-5649
email: kbrown@albertson.edu


Susan Cooksey
University of Iowa
719 NE 10 Place
Gainesville, FL 32601 USA
home: 352-379-2949
work: 352-392-9826
email: susan-cooksey@uiowa.edu

Donald J. Cosentino
World Arts and Cultures Department
University of California, Los Angeles
107 S. Gramercy P1.
Los Angeles, CA 90004 USA
home: 323-466-3981
work: 310-206-1498
fax: 323-466-8713
email: cosentin@humnet.ucla.edu

Petrina Dacres
Emory University
1503 East 48th St.
Brooklyn, NY 11234 USA
email: lulu dacres@hotmail.com

Edward De Carbo
National Museum of African Art
Smithsonian Institution
Box 23676
Washington, DC 20026 USA
work: 202-357-4600 x224
email: edecarbo@nmafa.si.edu

Bamidele Agbasegbe Demerson
Curatorial Department
Charles H. Wright Museum of African
American History
315 E. Warren Ave.
Detroit, MI 48201 USA
work: 313-494-5815
fax: 313-494-5855
email: bdemerson@maah-detroit.org






Jacqueline Francis
Department of the History of Art
The University of Michigan
519 South State St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA
work: 734-615-8453
email: jrfranci@umich.edu

L. Lloys Frates
Department of History
University of California, Los Angeles
146 S. Sycamore Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90036 USA
home: 323-931-1292
email: lfrates@ucla.edu

Suzanne Gott
Liberal Arts Dept
Kansas City Art Institute
4415 Warwick Blvd
Kansas City, MO 64111-1874 USA
work: 816-802-3387
fax: 816-802-3383
email: sgott@indiana.edu

Flemming B0geberg Harrev
ved Bellahoj 22, 4. D0r 1
Bronsh0j, DK-270 DENMARK
work: 45-3860-3250
email: harrev@dk2net.dk

Michael D. Harris
University of North Carolina
2 Rhygate Court
Durham, NC 27713 USA
home: 919-962-2015
work: 919-572-0150
fax: 919-962-0722
email: olonamdh@aol.com

Arthur Henning
Anthropology / Art History Depts.
Northwestern University
2616 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL 60614-1531 USA
home: 773-404-7441
work: 773-549-1854
fax: 773-549-1849

John P. Homiak
National Museum of Natural History
Smithsonian Institution
Washington, DC 20560 USA
work: 301-238-6655
fax: 202-633-8049
email: homiak.jake@nmnh.si.edu


Ededet A. Iniama
Department of Human Services
P.O. Box 306867
St. Thomas, VI 00803 USA
home: 340-776-2337
work: 340-774-0930
fax: 340-774-3466

Bennetta Jules-Rosette
Department of Sociology
University of California, San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA 92093-0533 USA
home: 760-436-5882
work: 760-436-1621
fax: 760-944-8102
email: bjulesro@ucsd.edu

Alisa LaGamma
AAOA
Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10028 USA
work: 212-570-3705
fax: 212-396-5039
email:alisa.lagamma@metmuseum.org

Jessica Levin
Harvard University
287 Harvard Street #47
Cambridge, MA 02139 USA
home: 617-441-0746
work: 617-441-0746
email: jlevin@fas.harvard.edu

Sandy Prita Meier
Department of Art History
University of Iowa
314 Mac Ave. #203
East Lansing, MI 48823 USA
home: 517-664-1620
work: 517-353-9834
email: pritasm@hotmail.com

Karen E. Milbourne
National Museum of African Art
1601 18th St. NW #515
Washington, DC 20009 USA
home: 202-483-7187
work: 202-357-4600
fax: 202-357-4879
email: milbournek@nmafa.si.edu


Mary Jane Montgomery House
Department of Design
The Surry Institute of Art & Design,
University College
Farnham Capmus, Falkner Road
Farnham, Surrey GU9 7DS
UNITED KINGDOM
home: 0044-1428-641864
work: 0044-1255-892765
fax: 0044-1252-892747
email: mjmontgomeriehouse@talk21.com
http//: www.surrart.ac.uk

Sylvester 0. Ogbechie
Art History Department
University of California, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-7080 USA
work: 805-893-2417
fax: 805-893-7117
email: sogbechie@yahoo.com

Ikem Stanley Okoye
Dept of Art History, Old College
University of Delaware
Newark, DE 19713 USA
work: 302-831-4038
email: isokoye@udel.edu
http//: www.udel.edu

Ilelabayo Olaniyi
University of Michigan
101 Nichols Dr.
Saline, MI 48176 USA
work: 734-944-8596
email: olabayo@umich.edu

Constantijn (Costa) Petridis
Fund for Scientific Research--Flanders
Ghent University
Atletenstraat 27
Antwerp, 2020
BELGIUM
home: 03-248-4727
work: 03-264-4130
email: costapetridis@hotmail.com

John Picton
School of Oriental and African Studies
University of London
17 Danvers Road
London, N87HH
UNITED KINGDOM
home: 81-340-9754
work: 71-323-6282/6259
fax: 71-436-3844
email: JP17@soas.ac.uk







Barbara Plankensteiner
Africa Department
Museum Fur Volkerkunde
Matznergasse 7/2/5
Wien, 1140
AUSTRIA
home: 1-7868310
work: 1-53430-519
fax: 1-5355320
email: barbara.plankensteiner@ethno-
musuem.ac.at

Emma Ross
Department of the History of Art
Yale University
434 Elm St.
New Haven, MA 06511 USA
home: 203-776-5464
email: emma.ross@yale.edu

Christopher Roy
School of Art and Art History
University of Iowa
Iowa City, IA 52242 USA
work: 319-335-1777 / 4098
fax: 319-335-4098
email: christopher-roy@uiowa.edu

Gitti Salami
Department of Art and Art History
University of Iowa
5837 Milton Street #D103S
Dallas, TX 75206 USA
home: 214-373-4358
work: 214-768-2380
email: gsalami@mail.smu.edu

Patricia E. Sawin
Department of Anthropology
University of North Carolina
CB #3115
Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA
home: 919-960-2603
work: 919-962-1572
email: sawin@unc.edu

Helen M. Shannon
300 Cathedral Parkway #5H
New York, NY 10026 USA
home: 212-865-7652
work: 212-865-7652
fax: 212-865-7652
email: hshannon@eudoramail.com


William Siegmann
Arts of Africa and the Pacific Islands
The Brooklyn Museum of Art
200 Eastern Parkway
Brooklyn, NY 11238 USA
home: 718-499-7841
work: 718-638-5000 x281
fax: 718-398-6930
email: wsiegm7172@aol.com

Nancy Steele Hamme
Art Department, College of Fine Arts
Midwestern State University
Fain Fine Arts Center, 3410 Taft Blvd.
Wichita Falls, TX 76308 USA

Christine Stelzig
Droysenstrasse 17
Berlin, D-10629
GERMANY
home: 49-030-324-96-13
fax: 49-030-324-96-13
email: chris.stelzig@snafu.de

William E. Teel
University Prints
21 East Street
Winchester, MA 01890 USA
work: 781-729-8000

Lillian Trager
Dept. of Sociology & Anthropology
University of Wisconsin--Parkside
Kenosha, WI 53141 USA
home: 262-632-4610
work: 262-595-2543
fax: 262-595-2183
email: trager@uwp.edu

Eleanor W. Traylor
Dept. of English
Howard University
Locke Hall
Washington, DC 20059 USA
email: etraylor@howard.edu

Carole Yawney
School of Social Sciences
York University
Atkinson College 328
Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3
CANADA
work: 416-736-2100 x33775
email: cyawney@yorku.ca





ARTS COUNCIL OF THE AFRICAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION (ACASA)
MEMBERSHIP FORM
-> Please Note: Membership runs January 1 - December 31 <-


Date:


Regular member
Special Member (student, unemployed, retired)
Institutional member


$35.00
$15.00
$35.00


Additional Voluntary Contribution (please complete an option below):
ACASA Endowment $
Symposium travel assistance for African scholars and grad students $

-4 Please Note: ACASA Members living in Africa are not required to pay membership dues and should send their
membership forms to the African membership coordinator directly (Janet Stanley at istanley@ic.si.edu until Dec. 2001).
For all others, payment can be made by check (which must be in US Dollars and Drawn on a US Bank ), payable to
ACASA, or international money order.

MAILING ADDRESS and PHONE NUMBERS for DIRECTORY and receipt of NEWSLETTER


Name:
Affiliation:
Department:
Address:
City:
Country:
Home Phone:
Fax:
Website:


State:


Work Phone:
email:


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION (please circle all that apply, or add new option):


Education (highest degree):


Specialization:


PhD


Art History


Primary Profession: University Teaching
Research Student


MFA


Anthropology


Other Teaching
Other:


Ethnomusicology


Museology


Primary Regional Focus:


Western Africa
Northern Africa
Other:


Central Africa
Southern Africa


Eastern Africa


Diaspora


Ethnic or Country Focus:


Topics of Interest (e.g. -- gender studies, performance, textiles, divination.....):


Current Memberships:


ASA


CAA


AAA


Please return form with payment to:


. Rebecca L. Green
ACASA Secretary / Treasurer
1000 Fine Arts
Bowling Green State University
Bowling Green, OH 43403 USA


Other:

Other:


Other:


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------





Editor: ACASA Newsletter
(Attn: E. Cameron)
Porter Faculty Services
1156 High Street
Santa Cruz, CA 95064


Cover Art: Kuba design titled mashuwa or hoes.
Drawing by Mildred Washburn.


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