Title: ACASA newsletter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00103115/00069
 Material Information
Title: ACASA newsletter newsletter of the Arts Council of the African Studies Association
Alternate Title: Newsletter
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: African Studies Association -- Arts Council
Publisher: The Council
Place of Publication: S.l
S.l
Publication Date: Fall 2006
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Arts -- Periodicals -- Africa   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 2 (winter 1982)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. designation dropped with no. 3 (spring 1983).
General Note: Title from caption.
General Note: Vols. for Aug. 1992- include Directory of members: addendum.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: No. 34 (Aug. 1992).
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Volume ID: VID00069
Source Institution: University of Florida
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 Related Items
Preceded by: Newsletter of the Arts Council of the African Studies Association

Full Text





The Arts Council of the African Studies Association








Presidential Notes

Message from the Editor

ACASA News

Exhibitions

Call for Papers

Research & Travel

Current Publications & Film

Media & Internet Resources

Triennial 2007: Panels

14th Triennial Symposium Information
And Conference Schedule

Triennial Travel Stipend Fund

Triennial Fundraising Form

Membership Renewal Form

Voluntary Contribution Form


Newsletter


Contents





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Volume 76


I Fall 2006 1










The Arts Council of the African Studies Association Newsletter


Volume 76, Fall 2006

ACASA Board of Directors

Kate Ezra, President
(term ends Triennial 2007)
Christraud M. Geary, Past President
(term ends Triennial 2007)
Alice Burmeister, Secretary/Treasurer
(term ends ASA 2008)
Susan Cooksey, Newsletter Editor
(term ends ASA 2008)
Christa Clarke (term ends ASA 2008)
Kim Miller (term ends ASA 2008)
Carol Thompson (term ends Triennial 2007)
Norma H.Wolff (term ends Triennial 2007)
Monica Visona (term ends Triennial 2007)
Sylvester Ogbechie (term ends ASA 2008)

All correspondence regarding membership information
and payment of dues should be directed to:

Alice Burmeister
ACASA Secretary/Treasurer
Winthrop University
140 McLaurin Hall
Rock Hill, SC 29733
Email: burmeistera@winthrop.edu

Membership information and forms are available at the
end of this Newsletter.

The ACASA Newsletter is published three times a year:
Spring/Summer, Fall, and Winter. The Newsletter seeks
items of interest for publication. You may send news
about jobs, special programs, events, travel, exhibitions,
new publications, etc. The next ACASA Newsletter will
be Winter 2007.
Please send news items by January 13th, 2007 to:

Susan Cooksey
Ham Museum of Art
P.O. Box 112700
Gainesville, FL 32611-2700

Email: secook@ufl.edu
Phone: 352-392-9826
Fax: 352-392-3892

Deadlines for Submission of News Items
for the 2007 Newsletters:

Winter 2007 January 13, 2007
Spring/Summer 2007 May 12, 2007
Fall 2007 September 15, 2007

Acknowledgement: Graphics featured in the headings
of this Newsletter were drawn by Tami Wroath, based
on designs found on artworks in the collection of the
Ham Museum of Art. The graphic of the dancer on the
fundraising form was designed by dele jegede.


Newsletter


I (6 Presidential Notes


What has ACASA done for you lately?

Even the most cursory perusal of past issues of the
ACASA Newsletter reveals that low membership
and consequently bare coffers have plagued our
organization for many years. Like other ACASA
presidents before me, I am both shocked and be-
wildered by the low numbers and by my many be-
loved and respected colleagues who choose not to
belong to ACASA or who think that it's not neces-
sary to pay their dues every year. If you are read-
ing this, you are probably not among the dilatory,
and I commend you for your loyalty to ACASA and
your sense of responsibility to the field of African
art. Even so, I'd like to remind everyone of what
ACASA does which directly benefits you and every-
one in the field of African art.

ACASA represents the interests of African art
scholars to the African Studies Association and the
College Art Association. This year ACASA was
able to convince ASA to reverse its policy, at least
provisionally, of not providing LCD projectors for
speakers at its annual conference. Those of you
who have suffered through the past few ASA meet-
ings with slide projectors that don't focus properly
and without the possibility of projecting digital im-
ages should be pleased with this new develop-
ment. As an affiliate organization of ASA and CAA,
ACASA is entitled to present panels that do not
have to go through the regular proposal process.
In this way we can be sure that African art will al-
ways be represented at these important scholarly
conferences. This year, ACASA members who at-
tended the ASA conference in San Francisco are in
for a special treat. Bob Wall and Margaret Rinke-
vitch, ACASA members who have one of the most
important private collections of African art in the
U.S., agreed to open their collection for a special
viewing by ACASA members. Only those who are
current members received invitations to this special
event.

ACASA bestows several awards for exemplary
contributions to the field of African art studies, in-
cluding the Arnold Rubin Outstanding Publication
Awards, the Roy Sieber Dissertation Awards, and
the Leadership Award. Those of you who have
received these awards know that, aside from being
1








an honor in themselves, they can help the recipi-
ents receive further benefits, such as jobs, fellow-
ships, tenure, and promotion. The ACASA awards
greatly increase the chances of your work receiving
recognition.

ACASA provides an opportunity for all those inter-
ested in African and Diasporan art, including schol-
ars, teachers, artists, and museum specialists, to
present their work at the Triennial Symposium on
African Art, that is, all those who are members of
ACASA. The fourteenth such symposium is about
to take place in March 2007 in Gainesville Florida.
These conferences provide a snapshot of the state
of our field every three years. They allow us to
share our new research and new ideas, to see
what others are doing, to meet colleagues from the
U.S., Europe, and Africa, and to gorge ourselves
on the riches of African art for four intense days.
Without ACASA it is unlikely that these symposia
on African art would have been sustained for al-
most forty-five years or maintained the quality and
quantity of presentations.

Another important benefit of ACASA is the service
we provide to our colleagues residing in Africa.
They receive complimentary memberships entitling
them to the ACASA Newsletter, an important
source of news about our field. Through the Sym-
posium Fund, ACASA enables African scholars to
receive financial support for travel to attend the
Triennial (this applies to grad students in the U.S.
as well). ACASA has facilitated donations of books
and periodicals to libraries in Africa. Greater com-
munication and collaboration with our colleagues in
Africa benefits everyone involved in African art, and
it would be much more difficult to achieve without
the help of an organization such as ACASA.
So you see, there are lots of ways in which ACASA
has helped you lately. Now all we need to do is
convince more of our friends and colleagues that
they should also help ACASA by renewing their
membership every year! Please spread the word.

- Kate Ezra


Message from the Editor


Thanks to all of you who have sent in contributions
to this issue of the Newsletter. Along with interest-
ing news of programs, events and publications, this
Fall issue and subsequent Newsletters this year
will focus on the Triennial. This issue includes the
Symposium's registration schedule, hotel and


travel information, and a list of panels to date (see
pages 10-23 ). Consult the conference website for
updates at:
http://www.doce-conference.ufl.edu/acasa

Thanks to a recent ACASA Board decision, the
Newsletter is now available in an electronic version
to members who request it. This service has been
available to African and Caribbean members since
2005 and has grown steadily since its inception.
African and Caribbean non-members should send
their membership applications to Alice Burmeister
who will forward electronic Newsletter requests to
the editorial staff. Current members who want to be
added to the electronic mailing list may write to me
directly at secook.ufl.edu.

As a new feature of the Newsletter, I encourage
those who have original photographs or graphics
that may enhance their submitted text to please
send them to me in electronic or hardcopy format.
Credit information should be provided with each
image. I look forward to getting some visuals from
you to enliven future issues!

As always, I'd like to thank Melody Record, editorial
assistant and Rebecca Nagy for their ongoing sup-
port in producing the Newsletter.

- Susan Cooksey


ACASA News


ACASA Needs Board Member Nominations

ACASA will elect four new members of its Board of
Directors at the business meeting held at Triennial
in Gainesville. These new board members will
serve three-year terms ending at the Triennial in
2010. The nominating committee, which includes
Kate Ezra, Chris Geary, Martha Anderson and
Babatunde Lawal, have nominated the following
four candidates:

Allen F. Roberts,
Sallah Hassan
Monica Blackmun Visona
Jean Borgatti

Nominations of other candidates by members-at-
large may be made by submitting signatures of 10
ACASA members in good standing in support of
the candidate to the ACASA President. Send your
nominations and supporting signatures to Kate
Ezra at kate.ezra(aatt.net.


I Eft I








MExhibitions

Not an Ocean Between Us: Voices of Women
from Africa and the African Diaspora
This exhibition offers a glimpse into the global
black female identity through the work of black
women artists from around the world. The exhibit
opened on Tuesday, May 30, and will be on display
through Saturday, March 17, 2007.
While women of Africa and the African Diaspora
are separated by geographic, socio-economic and
cultural disparities, as women, they share more
similarities than differences. The works on view
explore a wide variety of issues common to black
women, such as race, gender, identity, and politics.
The artists included in the exhibit are: Camille Bil-
lops (U.S.), Zoe Charlton (U.S.), Magdalena Cam-
pos-Pons (Cuba), Chandra Cox (U.S.), Rakhi
Diankha (Senegal), Mona EI-Bayoumi (Egypt), Na-
gla Ezzat (Egypt), Leslie Hewitt (U.S.), Peju Layi-
wola (Nigeria), T. Lukhele (Tanzania), Mary Moeng
(South Africa), Alison Saar (U.S.), Lorna Simpson
(U.S.), Sira Sissoko (Mali), Shinique Smith (U.S.),
Mickalene Thomas (U.S.), Howardena Pindell
(U.S.) Eunice Wadu (Kenya), Joyce Wellman
(U.S.) and more...
The women in this exhibit have the unique ability to
intertwine the relationship between the human con-
dition, imagination, consciousness and vsion. They
strive to liberate the world of limiting conditions and
beliefs affecting women while striving to gain con-
trol over their own image. Collectively, they create
greater awareness of the issues many women face
and spark a dialogue that lends itself to increased
access to a more prosperous economic, political,
social and spiritual future for all women. Not an
Ocean Between Us examines the state of society
from the perspective of the black woman, seeking
to depict the courage and collective power that
black women, globally, have harnessed through
their art their ultimate voice in the world.
For information about this exhibition or other up-
coming events, please contact Virginia Shepley,
Diggs Gallery's interim curator of education, at 336-
750-2458, or e-mail her shepleyvi@wssu.edu or
check the WSSU Web site at www.wssu.edu.
Diggs Gallery is one of the South's leading
showcases dedicated to African and African-
American art. The gallery is a major cultural center
at Winston-Salem State University and offers one
of the largest exhibition spaces dedicated to the
arts of Africa and the African Diaspora in North
Carolina.


I









Be a Sponsor!
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TO COLLEAGUES IN AFRICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

ACASA needs your support to mail the Newsletter to our Complimentary Members.

Only $10 covers mailing the ACASA Newsletter to a member for one year.

**You may specify the name of the members) you wish to sponsor or make an open contribution.**

Please Send In Your Contribution Today !

Mail contributions with your yearly renewal or separately to:

Alice Burmeister
ACASA Secretary/Treasurer
Winthrop University
140 Mc Laurin Hall
Rock Hill, SC 29733

See the Membership Renewal Form and Voluntary Contribution Form,
in the back of this Newsletter or contact secook(aufl.edu for more information.


RESONANCE AND INSPIRATION:
New Works by Magdalene Odundo

An exhibition of 11 ceramic vessels
and 7 drawings by Magdalene Odundo
will be on view at the Harn Museum of Art,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
until December 31, 2006.

The Harn Museum is seeking venues
for this touring exhibition through 2008.

For more information
please contact Susan Cooksey
(352) 392-9826 x 141
secook@ufl.edu








PREVIEW OF
AFRICAN ART EXHIBITIONS
AT THE
ACASA 14TH TRIENNIAL SYMPOSIUM
March 28- April 1, 2007

Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art
Continuity and Change: Three Generations of Ethio-
pian Painters

Art from the Ethiopian Highlands in the
Collection

African Arts of Healing and Divination

Highlights from the African Collection

School of Art and Art History,
University of Florida
Homage in Miniature: The Art of Kofi Cole

Art from the Horn of Africa, Grinter Gallery

Thomas Center Gallery, Gainesville
From the Forge of Ogun:
The Art of Vassa Niemark and Yaw Sangofemi



Traveling Exhibition
Cross Currents in Recent Video Installation:
Water as a Metaphor for Identity

Curators: Pam Allara, Peter Probst and Amy Ingrid
Schlegel
Tufts University Art Gallery

"Cross Currents in Recent Video Installation: Water
as a Metaphor for Identity" (Moataz Nasr, Zwelethu
Mthethwa, Ingrid Mwangi, Robert H0tter, and Berni
Searle), is available for three month bookings dur-
ing 2008 and 2009. Organized by The Tufts Univer-
sity Art Gallery, Medford, MA; co-curators: Pam
Allara, Peter Probst, and Amy Ingrid Schlegel. The
exhibition explores the amorphous quality of water
as a metaphor for shifting notions of identity, migra-
tion, and memory in projects by four international
artists with ties to Africa. Water conceptually
speaks to the invisible currents that drive the disso-
lution of familiar categories of race, nation, and
identity, and to the dilution and loss of cultural heri-
tage. The four artistic positions presented comment
on this contemporary condition in ways as diverse
as the artists' backgrounds and experiences. A
minimum of 4,000 square feet is required; equip-
ment can be provided.
Inquiries:
nina.bozicnik@tufts.edu or (617) 627-3505.


16Z) Call for Papers



Contributions for Appendx

This call for papers is an invitation to participate in
the latest incarnation of the journal, Appendx. Pub-
lished in 1993, the interdisciplinary journal, Ap-
pendx: culture, theory, praxis, was the first journal
of its kind. It established foundations for an ongoing
project intended to define a legible, black aesthetic
within the discipline of architecture. It used, along
with traditional modes of critique, a strategic narra-
tive structure to renovate architectural theory and
criticism. Appendx was initiated because architec-
ture (then and now) represents blackness as a
natural absence, devoid of any meaningful relation-
ship with architectural history, theory and practice.
Appendx overcame this lack of discourse by cast-
ing itself as a "black" joumal on architecture. The
next iteration of the journal accepts the relationship
between architecture and blackness to be a
(complex) matter of fact. The work to be done,
however, is no less polemical and, in many ways,
has become more necessary.
While reluctant to reduce the journal's content to
"themes", the current thinking related to our first
issue has to do with various historical, theoretical,




AFYI







DI YO KNO THAT YOU06








and cultural connotations of being (or having been)
... SOLD OUT... The first issue will be available
Spring/Summer 2007.

Appendx, clo Darell W. Fields, 120 Vol Walker Hall,
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (or
email dfields(appendx.ora).



Interrogating African Modernity

The Interrogating African Modernity conference
interrogates the history and critical reception of
modem African art in art history and cultural stud-
ies. Art historical narratives have long subordinated
modernist developments in Africa to Eurocentric
narratives of modernity. In recent years, the turn to
studies of "alternative modemrnities" appears to pro-
vide a space for engagement with non-Western
contexts of modernity (modem African art in-
cluded). However, too often discourses of
"alternative modernities" actually continue to medi-
ate the reception of non-western contexts as sec-
ondary locations for the unfolding of the European
ethos. Dipesh Chakrabarty (Provincializing Europe,
2000) calls this the historicist model and notes that
when this model is imposed on non-Western socie-
ties through European colonial conquest, it dis-
places alternative narratives of history or modernity
in these contexts by subordinating their visual and
cultural practices/discourses to those of Europe.
This historicist model has unduly victimized modern
African art. Obviously, if our perception of moder-
nity is circumscribed by the 'first in Europe, then
elsewhere' paradigm, then it becomes practically
impossible for African artists to emerge as active
subjects/agents of modernity in art history; their
endeavors will always be considered superfluous in
relation to the hegemonic narratives of the West.

The Interrogating African Modernity conference
counters the historicist narrative by positing a fun-
damental question: When was (or is) African mod-
ernity? What are its specific subject positions, and
its discourses of visual and cultural representation?
We seek papers that subject these issues to an
interdisciplinary analysis to elicit new critical frame-
works for interpreting modem African art's intersec-
tion with local and global discourses of modernity.
Papers that analyze the invention of specific visual
languages of African modernist expressions are
welcome as long as they evaluate how African art-
ists engaged principal questions about the mean-
ings of African culture within the matrix of modern
art, and the meanings of their location as Africans/
modem artists within nationalist and internationalist
discourses. Through this focus, the conference
hopes to examine changing conditions of modernist
practice in African art and the ideologies of formal


and conceptual representations that underpinned
such changes.

Papers are invited from scholars in art history, cul-
tural studies, visual culture, literary theory and
other related disciplines, from different geographi-
cal locations. The deadline for submitting paper
proposal/abstracts is December 20, 2007. Invited
speakers will be required to submit a draft of their
papers by April 4, 2007, for discussion by confer-
ence members and for potential inclusion in a pub-
lished anthology. Speakers will receive some assis-
tance with travel costs and be paid a small hono-
rarium.

Proposals should include a 300-word abstract with
the following clearly delineated: author's name,
email address, title of paper, telephone number,
and institutional affiliation.

Please submit all abstracts to:

Dr. Sylvester Okwunodu Ogbechie
(ogbechie@arthistory.ucsb.edu)
History of Art and Architecture
1234 Arts Building
University of California
Santa Barbara, CA 93030 U.S.A.


Almighty God Artworks, Kumasi, Ghana.
2006. Photograph by Susan Cooksey









SResearch and Travel



Foundation T6r6ba Togola Created in Mali

To honor the late Malian archaeologist, the T6r6ba
Togola Foundation will soon be created under the
aegis of Dr. Ousmane Ciss6, former Director of the
Institute des Sciences Humaines, and with Mr. Ab-
doulaye Sylla, Associate Director of the Mus6e Na-
tional du Mali, as its principal animator. The Foun-
dation itself will be based in Bamako and the
T6r6ba Togola Research Institute will be located in
Jenne. The two institutions will serve all scholarly
researchers, local and foreign, who have done re-
search in Mali or who are interested in undertaking
research in Mali, especially in the region between
Jenne and Gao. Thus, archaeologists and cultural
anthropologists will facilitate the collection, conser-
vation, and communication of existing and future
documents. We are counting especially on the
members of ACASA to ensure the full success of
the Foundation and its activities. For more infor-
mation, please contact Mr. Abdoulaye Sylla, Mus6e
National du Mali, B.P. 159, Bamako, Mali or bad-
layeml(vahoo.fr.


Drew in West Africa 2007: Mali

Drew in West Africa returns to Mali this coming
summer. Jerry Vogel will continue to bring his ex-
pertise to our trip which will run from July 10 to
August 5, 2007.

Program highlights include the extraordinary arts
and architecture of the ancient centers of Jenne
and Timbuctu with their spectacular mosques and
historical buildings, the exceptional Dogon villages,
Niger River towns such as Mopti, the Bamana cen-
ters of Segou and San, and the exciting capital of
Bamako. Students will hear lectures from Malian
experts, talk with local elders and artists, and ob-
serve masqueraders and musicians, textile weav-
ers and dyers, carvers, potters, metal smiths and
casters.

Program cost: $5250 which includes roundtrip
airfare New York Bamako, lodging, in-country
transportation by Land Rovers, and 8 credit hours
tuition. Application deadline: April 1, 2006. For
further information and application forms, please
contact Drew in West Africa, Office of International
and Off-Campus Programs, Drew University, Madi-
son, NJ 07940; intlprog@drew.edu ; or contact
Phil Peek, (973) 408-3383; ppeek@drew.edu.


1I1 Current Publications Et Films

African Films and Criticism Editions
L'Harmattan, collection Images plurielles, 2007

The objective of this publication is not to account
for the various discourses that have been elabo-
rated concerning African cinema or audio-visual
media, but to concentrate on the role of criticism in
relation to films and to the cinematic or audio-visual
practices in Africa necessarily favoring the point
of view of the recipient. In this perspective, the role
of criticism can neither be considered independ-
ently of African film and cinematic or audio-visual
practices nor be anchored within an ideological
framework in which it would only play a secondary
role; it remains bound to a cognitive relationship
with African film. Contributions could be formed
according to the following four frameworks: from an
'empirical' point of view, it would be a question of
describing a critical activity specialized in African
film; from a 'historical' point of view, it would also
be a question of reconsidering more completed
attempts of critical discourse, which have followed
the development of African cinema or audio-visual
media; from a 'sociological' or 'anthropological'
perspective, it would be a question of specifying
the relationships between critical discourse and
socio-cultural practices as one speaks about Afri-
can film and cinematic or audio-visual practices;
finally, on a 'theoretical' level, it would be a ques-
tion of setting up a thought simultaneously holding
into account the situation of the African cinema or
audio-visual media and the analysis of the question
of the critique as worked out by the aesthetics or
the philosophy of art. In another aspect, while
speaking about the "African cinema or audio-visual
media", one should also include those from North
Africa.

The submissions must be original articles not yet
published, to be carefully evaluated before being
accepted. The work will be published in 2007 by
the Editions L'Harmattan. For more information,
contact Samuel Lelievre, Editor, at:
samlelievre@wanadoo.fr
-or -
samuel.lelievre@film-art-culture.org








Media & Internet Resources


Two New Videos on Art from Burkina Faso

Speaking with God: A Mossi Diviner in Burkina
Faso" shows an elderly diviner named Sawadogo
Tinguyamba who wears a complex and very beau-
tiful costume of leather, bogolan, cowries and brass
as he dances his divination ceremony. The Ger-
man artist Carl Ariens (who accompanied
Frobenius) painted one of these diviners, whose
costume is identical, in 1907 in northern Burkina.
The water-color painting is illustrated and dis-
cussed on the DVD. Chris Ray interviews the di-
viner about his work, his dance, his life, and his
clients.
The URL is http:www.customflix.com/212580

Masks of Leaves and Wood: The Bwa People of
Burkina Faso. http://www.customflix.com/212583
This video shows the manufacture of leaf masks for
Do and their performance in the village of Bansie,
as well as the dressing of the masks, repainting,
dyeing of the fiber costumes and performance of
wooden masks in Dossi and Boni.

I doubt there are videos available anywhere that
show traditional masks being made, repaired, and
worn in performance. These DVDs are $24.95
each.
For a full list go to: http://www.uiowa.edu/l~africart/
Listof DVDs/Index.html

Christopher Roy christopher-roy(auiowa.edu





LES ARTS PREMIERS. Bibliography

A new bibliography drawn up by the national
Library of France is now available online. It can be
downloaded at the very bottom of the page from
the following address:

LES ARTS PREMIERS.
Bibliographie selective:

http://www.bnf.fr/PAGES/COLLECTIONS/
COLL_D4.HTM#ARTS


10 TRIENNIAL PANELS


ACASA 14th Triennial Symposium
PRELIMINARY LIST OF PANELS


MUSEUM DAY-March 28, 2007
Harn Museum Auditorium

Constructing the Future of African Art:
New Museum Spaces for African Art

Co-chairs: Carol Thompson, Curator, High Mu-
seum ; Susan Cooksey, Curator, Harn Museum,
University of Florida

The recent surge of growth in art museums has
included the construction of an extraordinary num-
ber of new spaces devoted to African art. Exam-
ples include: De Young Museum; Detroit Institute of
Art; Museum for African Art; High Museum; Denver
Museum of Art. Additionally, other museums have
now reconfigured existing space, dedicating it ex-
clusively to African art exhibitions. What do these
new developments reveal about the interest in Afri-
can art by collectors, audiences and museum cura-
tors, educators, and other staff? To what extent
were these constituents or others involved in the
planning and implementation of the space? What
were their agendas and how were they realized or
transformed (negotiated) throughout the planning,
construction, and installation of these spaces? Can
we prognosticate about the future direction of mu-
seum collections and presentations of African art
(didactic strategies, visitor response/ interactivity;
acquisition strategies and direction of collection
growth), and, what if any effect will this have on
African art history and other related disciplines?
Finally, how can we use the experience of those
directly involved in the configuration of these
spaces to help those planning projects in the fu-
ture?


I. Roundtable:
New Spaces for African Art in the US
and Europe

II. Roundtable:
New Spaces for Art and Artists in Africa

III. Roundtable: Quai Branly








(Re)CLAIMING AFRICA IN THE AFRICAN
DIASPORA

Chair: Heather Shirey, University of St. Thomas

This panel investigates the ways in which Africa is
conceptualized, claimed, or reclaimed in the art of
the African Diaspora, especially in the context of
the dominant culture's historical rejection of African
culture and identity. While earlier generations of
scholars sought to examine survivalss" and
"retentions" using an essentialist or structuralist
construct, this panel focuses on the nuanced roles
that people play in the articulation of a Diasporic
identity. This panel also explores the deliberate
claiming of Africa by artists and scholars as well as
the reclamation of African spirituality in the context
of religious practice.


(re)VISITING FLORIDA: Africa in our
Midst

Chair: Amanda Carlson, University of Hartford

Africa's global presence is significantly entrenched
in Florida, the site of our conference. With over 500
years of black bodies, traditions, and beliefs flowing
from Africa and the Caribbean onto the shores of
Florida, this peninsula is the ideal destination to
observe overlapping Diasporas. Scholars may
choose to (re)visit a variety of issues relating to
"African Studies" and "Diaspora Studies" in light of
the Sunshine State. This panel will explore how this
diversity has or has not contributed to the identity
of the present entity known as Florida.


A GLOBAL CROSSROADS: Contemporary
Artistic Production in the Horn of Africa

Chair: Leah Niederstadt, University of Oxford

The Horn of Africa has long been a crossroads
where people from throughout the world have en-
countered one another. Such contemporary en-
counters have resulted in thriving artistic practices
across a range of genres and in new interpretations
of and uses for existing objects and traditions. This
panel explores how expressions of creativity from
the Horn draw on tradition in responding to pre-
sent-day audiences. Although considering varied
locations and art forms, each paper explores how
art producers and consumers engage with local
practices and materials while accessing new re-
sources for making a living and creating identity
through artistic production and consumption. The
results of these encounters often challenge notions
of what is an "African" or "traditional" expressive
tradition.


AFRICAN AND AFRICAN DIASPORA ART:
Current Developments and Future
Prospects

Chair: Babatunde Lawal, Virginia Commonwealth
University, Richmond

The papers in this session focus on the evolution of
African and African Diaspora art since the 1960s.
What are the consequences of post colonialism,
the quest for individual or national identity, personal
or group ideology, multiculturalism, transnational-
ism, digital media, globalization, patronage and the
like on form, style, technique, content, message or
meaning? Presenters explore different aspects of
the subject with a view to shedding more light on
current developments and future prospects.

CHRISTIAN ART IN AFRICA AND THE
AFRICAN DIASPORA
Chair: Elisha P. Renne

African Christians use art and dress in a variety of
religious experiences. The proposed panel focuses
on the histories as well as aesthetic, spiritual, and
moral meanings associated with these objects, in
Africa, Europe, and the US. While Ethiopian church
art emerged after the 4th century, early Christian
missionary activities elsewhere in Africa often en-
tailed the use of European religious art and dress
as part of the conversion process. However, Afri-
can Christian art was subsequently produced in
several parts of Africa. The movement of Africans
to Europe and the Americas has also led to an ex-
pansion of the forms of African-Christian artistic
expression, underscoring the oscillating dynamics
of African Christian art and its expression in a
global context.


AKAN AFFINITIES

Chair: Monica Blackmun Visona, University of
Kentucky

The peoples who speak Akan languages are di-
vided by a colonial border which still shapes the
ways these populations are studied. Analyses of
Akan arts in Ghana rarely refer to related Anyi or
Baule arts in Cote d'lvoire, just as francophone
publications on the Anyi rarely draw upon Anglo-
phone studies of the Aowin and Fanti. While ar-
chaeological data, oral histories, and archival mate-
rial have been used by art historians to trace the
historical depth of specific cultural practices within
a region, few art historical studies survey the prac-
tices of neighboring Akan and non-Akan groups to
establish their geographical breadth.








This panel aims to stimulate discussion among re-
searchers who have conducted fieldwork on the
arts of an Akan region, or 5n the arts of neighbor-
ing populations. Because so few comparative stud-
ies seem to have been done by single individuals,
participants will be asked to present their research
in an unusual format; each speaker will give one,
two, three, or four short presentations of less than
five minutes apiece on a single topic. Some may
be a concise summation of published results, but
others may be brief presentations of unpublished
field notes. This format will allow the moderator to
cluster short contributions around several themes.
Such themes might include: masquerades, celebra-
tions of female fertility, military displays, funeral
practices, shrines and sacred spaces, perform-
ances of healing power, art and leadership, art and
the "other world".


ART ACROSS BORDERS: Diasporas of
Objects and Meanings
(independent panel)

Participants:
Simon Clarke
Jessica Levin Martinez
Andrew Finegold
Dominique Fontaine


ART AND CONSEQUENCE: Efficacy and
Aesthetics in Contemporary Perspective

Co-chairs: (Polly) Nooter Roberts, Fowler Museum
at UCLA; Manuel Jordan, Iris and B. Gerald Can-
tor Center for Visual Arts, Stanford University

African arts have always served as more than art,
just as W.J.T. Mitchell asserts that "objects...are
never merely material things" (2005:125). Tradi-
tional arts often re-emerge in new paradigms,
translating deep-rooted ideas of efficacy to contem-
porary contexts of modernity, diaspora, and
transcultural encounters. This panel explores sev-
eral cases in which the arts of Africa and the Afri-
can Americas have played profound and active
roles by responding to, predicting, or coping with
urgent global issues, such as migration, war, and
pandemic. It presents the viewpoints of several
artists whose works are based on longstanding
traditions, but have produced direct consequences
for contemporary culture.


ART AND IDENTITY IN THE HINTERLANDS

Chair: Barbara E. Frank, Stony Brook University


Over the last decade, African art scholarship has
come to grips with the complexities of artistry in
urban Africa, of transnational identities, and the
impact of global forces on contemporary art. Rural
Africa, however, continues to be understood as a
place where the one tribe=one style paradigm re-
mains a viable framework for categorizing artistic
production. This panel seeks to challenge this false
dichotomy by focusing on the complexity of art and
artist identity in the hinterlands. Issues include: the
complicated nature of artists' relationships with cli-
ents as a result of warfare, intermarriage, migra-
tion, nation building and tourism; the transformation
of rural art forms into national icons; and concep-
tions of art in rural settings that challenge the
canon of "traditional" African art.


ART IN SOUTHEASTERN NIGERIA:
A Tribute to G. I. Jones, Part 1
Chair: Martha G. Anderson, Alfred University


ART IN SOUTHEASTERN NIGERIA:
A Tribute to G. I. Jones, Part 2
Chair: Martha G. Anderson, Alfred University

The late G.I. Jones viewed Southeastern Nigeria
as a region of varied, but interacting, peoples
whose art traditions do not necessarily accord with
linguistic or "tribal" borders. In his honor, we have
gathered papers that deal with cross-cultural or
multicultural issues. The papers that have been
selected grapple with themes, styles, history, object
types, or problems rather than focusing on a single
ethnic group. Several deal with global contexts
and/or new technologies and art forms, and one
examines the vast archive of photographs that
Jones created during the many years he spent
studying the arts of this region.


ATLANTIC RIM PERFORMANCE ARTS
Chair: Dr. Robert Nicholls, UVI, "Atlantic Diffusion
and the Development of Masquerade Types in the
Caribbean"


ROUNDTABLE

Co-Chairs: Kim Miller, Wheaton College
Henry Drewal, University of Wisconsin-Madison

This roundtable will bring together scholars of Afri-
can art for a discussion on the relationship between
teaching African visual culture together alongside
larger social, political, and cultural issues that are
of paramount importance in Africa today. African








artists have long engaged with issues such as po-
litical power, gender relations, imperialism, poverty,
ecology, genocide, and human rights. Many schol-
ars of African art have also dealt with many of
these same issues. As academics with the ability
to transfer knowledge to our students, do we have
a larger responsibility to incorporate larger political
issues into our art history teaching? Panelists will
speak theoretically and practically to their experi-
ences with this type of teaching, and active audi-
ence participation is strongly encouraged.


CHANGING PRISMS: Reinterpreting
Objects and Landscapes (Independent
Panel)
Chair: Victoria Rovine, University of Florida


THE USES OF TRADITION
(or Constructing African Traditions:
visual Symbols of Changing Identities)

Chair: Victoria Rovine, University of Florida

This panel addresses the paradoxical role of move-
ment and change in the production and preserva-
tion of visual forms associated with "traditional" Af-
rica. Recognition as "traditional" may propel these
forms into new markets where they often gain new
associations and serve new functions. This panel
solicits presentations that address diverse aspects
of the production and circulation of "traditional" Afri-
can forms both in Africa and elsewhere, past and
present. Papers that address the processes by
which particular genres have come to represent
"tradition" and the ways in which that designation
has affected the reception of these forms in local
and global markets are particularly welcome.


CONTEMPORARY PRACTICES IN
TRADITIONAL SPACES: Creating or Chal-
lenging the Canon

Co-Chairs:
Elizabeth Hamey, University of Toronto
Christa Clarke, The Newark Museum

This panel seeks to investigate the challenges and
consequences of collecting, interpreting and exhib-
iting contemporary and modem African and Dias-
poric artworks in museum spaces previously de-
voted to "traditional" or "classic" African collections.
Much attention has focused upon the scholarship,
criticism, and interventions occasioned by itinerant
exhibitions over the last 15 years. Few have com-
mented on the slow but steady transformation tak-


ing place within permanent collections of African
arts across North America, Europe and in Africa
proper, as existing holdings are re-installed, collec-
tion policies and mandates are expanded, interpre-
tative frameworks shifted, audiences re-imagined
and the role of public trust re-thought.


Roundtable

CURRENT ISSUES IN MUSEUM PRACTICE:
Reshaping Permanent Installations

Co-chairs: Kathleen Bickford Berzock,
The Art Institute of Chicago; Christine Mullen
Kreamer, Smithsonian Institution National Museum
of African Art

Through perspectives shared with colleagues in-
volved in the reinstallation of permanent museum
collections, this roundtable seeks to stimulate dis-
cussion, share information, and identify key
sources and strategies to guide best museum prac-
tices and to promote responsible scholarship in our
field. Among the questions we will address are:
How can a permanent installation of African art be
made relevant to contemporary Africa? How do
institutions differ in their expectations for perma-
nent installations? When and how does the history
or the content of a collection impact its installation?
What innovative processes are museums using to
develop permanent installations? How are muse-
ums using new technologies in permanent installa-
tions?


Double-Panel Session

EPHEMERAL ART: Impermanent by
Design, Part 1

Co-chairs: Allyson Purpura, Consulting Curator
University of Michigan Museum
Christine Mullen Kreamer, Curator
National Museum

Ephemeral art is defined here as works in which
materials are chosen by the artist for their inher-
ently unstable characteristics or works which are
created with the intention of having a finite "life".
Applying equally to "tradition-based" and
"contemporary" art practices, the concept allows us
to break down such categorical distinctions and
offers an opportunity to consider the material, con-
ceptual, ethical and practical challenges posed by
works of art that are impermanent by design. The
papers raise issues that engage objects in situ as
well as those in exhibitions, and address broader
concerns about art and the politics of value.








EPHEMERAL ART: Impermanent by
Design, Part 2
Co-chairs: Allyson Purpura, Consulting Curator
University-of Michigan Museum of Art;
Christine Mullen Kreamer, Curator, National
Museum of African Art

Ephemeral art is defined here as works in which
materials are chosen by the artist for their inher-
ently unstable characteristics or works which are
created with the intention of having a finite "life".
Applying equally to "tradition-based" and
"contemporary" art practices, the concept allows us
to break down such categorical distinctions and
offers an opportunity to consider the material, con-
ceptual, ethical and practical challenges posed by
works of art that are impermanent by design. The
papers raise issues that engage objects in situ as
well as those in exhibitions, and address broader
concerns about art and the politics of value.


GLOBAL MADE

Chair: Stephen Wooten, University of Oregon

This panel foregrounds the global reach and effect
of Mande expressive culture. Contributors probe
the dynamics of changing meanings in new spatial,
social and temporal contexts. The papers explore
the politics of decontextualization as new viewers
and consumers appropriate Mande cultural prod-
ucts often with limited awareness of their origins
and histories. In these diasporic settings, contribu-
tors consider processes of recontextualization in
which imported objects and images acquire new
uses and meanings. In doing so, panelists map the
interventions Mande expressive culture has made
on the global landscape as well as those that the
global landscape has made on Mande culture.


Roundtable

IN THE HERE &t NOW: Research method-
ologies for contemporary African
artists

Co-chairs: Kinsey Katchka, North Carolina Mu-
seum of Art; Lisa Binder, University of East Anglia

International exhibitions and research have in-
creasingly highlighted modem and contemporary
'beaux arts' from Africa, commanding attention
from emerging and established scholars alike. This
panel addresses methodologies for working with
living artists who share common international dis-
cursive spaces and engage primarily global audi-
ences-i.e., as opposed to those who are less mo-


bile and more 'remotely global' than immediately
so. How does the immediacy of artists' presence
shape research and exhibition practice? What pos-
sibilities exist for incorporating voices conversant in
our own vernacular? We organize this panel with
the intention that discussion will take place among
panelists as well as audience members engaged in
like research.



in/CUBATIONS: Visuality in African -
German &t European-Brazilian
Communities

Chair:
Mikelle Smith Omari-Tunkara, University of Arizona

Recent diaspora studies have tended to foreground
the experiences, reflections, and creative produc-
tion of African nationals or African descendents in
their global sites of forced exile or voluntary re-
locations. This combined studio and art history
panel is based on field research from 2000 -2006
and seeks to expand this body of scholarship by
presenting new research in previous unexplored or
under-explored terrains. Through the disparate
lenses of film, interactive DVD, and traditional art
history, we aim to consider African visual produc-
tion in Berlin, Germany and Sao Paulo, Brazil.

ISLAM AND THE ARTS OF AFRICA: New
Perspectives
Co-chairs: Cynthia Becker, Boston University
Prita Meier, Harvard

Studies of African Islam have highlighted the
long processes of intercultural accommodation and
reinterpretation shaping Africa's global presence
and reach. This panel will present new case stud-
ies and perspectives regarding the interface be-
tween Islam and the arts of Africa. The papers will
focus on the common histories of marginalized
peoples who have accessed Islamic institutions,
identities or practices as a mode of self-realization.
Participants will address key conceptual questions
as well. For example, as a subject matter, are we
framing Islam as an official monolithic religion, a
personal spiritual path, a system of literacy, a poli-
tico-economic mode of government, or a form of
cultural expression?


LOCAL AESTHETICS AND INDIVIDUAL
ARTISTS: Negotiating the Global

Co-Chairs: (all Indiana University) Kitty Johnson
Elizabeth Perrill ;Candace Keller; Paul Davis








Today, scholars working even in the most rural,
seemingly isolated, communities recognize that
they must take into account global flows of ex-
change-both into and out of the local sphere-
within their analyses of particular community's art,
culture and social life. Operating on economic, aes-
thetic, and social levels these flows are part of art-
ist's lives, whether they reside in urban, peri-urban,
suburban or rural environments. This panel seeks
to foreground the ways that artists incorporate and
modify localized aesthetics within this "global" real-
ity to give their creations specific relevance and
meaning, both at home and in international art con-
texts.


Roundtable

MUD AND WHITE VINYL: "Truth" and
Fiction. Portraying Djenne Architecture,
Masons, and Pressures for Change

Co-chairs: Samuel Sidib6, Musee National du Mali
Trevor Marchand, SOAS; Susan Vogel, Columbia
University

The roundtable begins with the film Mud and White
Vinyl: A Mason's Story on the contemporary situa-
tion of architecture in Djenne, co-produced by the
panel chairs. The documentary's intellectual con-
tent centers on new affluence, Djenne's connection
to a global world, and the future of the mason's
craft, and is firmly grounded in co-writer and co-
producer Trevor Marchand's long research in
Djenne. The film, however, takes an unusual ap-
proach, casting individuals in roles a mason, his
assistant, and his family and using staged scenes
to tell a narrative story. We have filmed our charac-
ters in their daily activities and have intercut the
staged scenes seamlessly with the observational
documentary footage and interviews. The tech-
nique of blending fact and fiction in the service of
"truth" raises a number of compelling issues. The
roundtable discussion will address both the film's
documentary approach and the substance of the
research on masons and architectural change.


READING THE VISUAL CITY I

Chair: Joanna Grabski, Denison University

This panel focuses on the centrality of visual ex-
perience to urban experience in Africa. Rather than
positioning the city as a backdrop for visual expres-
sion, we consider both how the urban terrain is cru-
cial to experiencing the visual and how urban ex-
perience is predicated on and contoured by visual
propositions. For instance, how is urban belonging
articulated by the visual? How do individuals en-


gage visual forms to construct, evaluate, or contest
contemporary urban realities? And, how do urban
visual projects entangle and interface with other
creative or political expressions, including inter-
textual propositions from other urban sites?


READING THE VISUAL CITY II

Chair: Joanna Grabski, Denison University

This panel focuses on the centrality of visual ex-
perience to urban experience in Africa. Rather than
positioning the city as a backdrop for visual expres-
sion, we consider both how the urban terrain is cru-
cial to experiencing the visual and how urban ex-
perience is predicated on and contoured by visual
propositions. For instance, how is urban belonging
articulated by the visual? How do individuals en-
gage visual forms to construct, evaluate, or contest
contemporary urban realities? And, how do urban
visual projects entangle and interface with other
creative or political expressions, including inter-
textual propositions from other urban sites?


RETHINKING THE WORKSHOP: invention,
revision and rupture in the organization
of art production: Part 1 Et Part 2

Co-Chairs: Sidney Kasfir, Emory University (Part 1)
Till Foerster, University of Basel (Part 2)

The workshop as a concept has persisted over
time and space as a viable means for the organiza-
tion of African artisanal practice, whether based in
kinship groups, dues-paying cooperatives or infor-
mally shared studios. We wish to examine its dura-
bility as a locale for group and individual aesthetic
practices and outcomes, and to uncover patterns of
work, learning, and exchange, as well as appro-
priation, revision and rupture. In doing so, we hope
to clarify the links between particular modes of art
production, patronage systems, and the continuity
and change of style and genre over the past cen-
tury.


HISTORICAL VARIANTS OF WORKSHOPS:
Part 1
Chair: Sidney Kasfir, Emory University


THE SOCIAL RELATIONS OF WORKSHOP
PRODUCTION: Part 2
Chair: Till Foerster, University of Basel

The workshop as a concept has persisted over
time and space as a viable means for the organiza-








tion of African artisanal practice, whether based in
kinshTp groups, dues-paying cooperatives or infor-
mally shared studios. We wish to examine its dura-
bility as a locale for group and individual aesthetic
practices and outcomes, and to uncover patterns of
work, learning, and exchange, as well as appro-
priation, revision and rupture. In doing so, we hope
to clarify the links between particular modes of art
production, patronage systems, and the continuity
and change of style and genre over the past cen-
tury.


Roundtable

TEXTBOOK FOR MODERN AND
CONTEMPORARY ART OF AFRICA

Chair: Sylvester Okwunodu Ogbechie

This roundtable will construct a structure for writing
a textbook for teaching modem and Contemporary
African art at the college level. Participants will de-
liberate on models, create appropriate committees
to handle aspects of the research and production of
the textbook, and make preliminary assignments
for writers.


Roundtable

SHAPING ART EDUCATION IN AFRICA:
Face-to-Face Dialogues on Curriculum,
Teaching-Learning and Assessment

Chair: Barthosa Nkurumeh, University of North
Texas

It is a platform for in-depth conversations on South
Africa's Outcomes-Based and Finland-Uganda e-
learning model for art teacher education, as an at-
tempt to create a synergy for fresh vistas for re-
search and capacity building in Anglophone, Fran-
cophone Africa, and Portuguese speaking African
settings. There are obvious needs for initiatives to
redefine shortage of adequately trained school art
teachers, reliance on imported art materials, and
involvement of stakeholders of public and private
schools in school art education. Advocacy forums,
programs development, project initiative and imple-
mentation to improve art education in some coun-
tries in Africa may therefore be in order.



THE ART OF BENIN IN THE TWENTIETH
AND TWENTY-FIRST CENTURIES Part 1

Chair: Kate Ezra, Columbia College/Chicago
14


This panel will examine the art of Benin following
the kingdom's conquest in 1897 and revival in
1914. Papers examining transformations in the
palace arts as well as new directions taken by aca-
demically trained artists will reveal the vitality and
creativity of Benin art in the past century and relate
it to global art movements, markets, and ideas.
The goal of this panel is to consider to what extent
artists in Benin view its ancient art as inspiration,
challenge, or burden, and how they have negoti-
ated the often conflicting demands of tradition, con-
temporary art practice, the international art market,
and personal vision.


THE ART OF BENIN IN THE TWENTIETH
AND TWENTY-FIRST CENTURIES part 2

Chair: Kate Ezra, Columbia College/Chicago

This panel will examine the art of Benin following
the kingdom's conquest in 1897 and revival in
1914. Papers examining transformations in the
palace arts as well as new directions taken by aca-
demically trained artists will reveal the vitality and
creativity of Benin art in the past century and relate
it to global art movements, markets, and ideas.
The goal of this panel is to consider to what extent
artists in Benin view its ancient art as inspiration,
challenge, or burden, and how they have negoti-
ated the often conflicting demands of tradition, con-
temporary art practice, the international art market,
and personal vision.


CONTROLLED ENTRANCES:
Contemporary Benin Gates and their
Place in History

Chair:
Dr. Kathy Curnow, Cleveland State University

Since the 1980s, an emergent art form has enabled
some academically-trained sculptors to make a
decent living in Benin City through private commis-
sions: the sculpted gate, a steel and auto putty
creation which was promoted by Auchi Polytechnic
art teachers, and is the particular strength of Benin
artists working in Benin City, Lagos or elsewhere.

These gates form showpiece entrances for the Be-
nin upper classes and follow a centuries-old pattern
of controlling access and protecting those within.
Their expanded iconography incorporates both pal-
ace and personal references, reflecting a growing
individualism and continued preoccupation with
status.








TWO EXTREMES OF ONE CONTINUUM:
The Politics of Patronage and the Igun
Artworker

Chair: John Ogene, University of Benin

The contrast between Kings of the old empire and
politics of patronage in modern Benin City had its
effects on the guild contract traditions of Igun. How-
ever, the shift caused by the fall of Oba Ovonram-
wen and the subsequent renaissance by Akenzua,
is as yet to play out with the incursion of the new
democratic disposition and the nouveau-rich that
removes loyalty from royalty and places it before
the highest bidder. To the twenty-first century Igun
artist, portraits of governors are no less historical a
document than those of Queen Idia and Oba
Esigie. These are the two extremes of one contin-
uum.


BENIN-EDO ART AFTER THE END OF
(Indigenous) HISTORY

Chair: Dr. Sylvester Ogbechie, University of Califor-
nia Santa Barbara

The paper will investigate the meaning of sculptural
production in the Edo Kingdom of Benin after the
fall of the kingdom in 1897, and the process
whereby norms and value of Edo art were invested
in the looted artifacts whose veneration in Western
historiography consigns all subsequent products of
Benin art to the realm of lesser objects (usually
defined as fakes). It raises the issue of how to
theorize Edo-Benin art in the era after the end of its
"history."


THE MUSE OF HISTORY: The Problem
with the Visual in Anglo Caribbean
Culture

Chair: Krista Thompson, Northwestern University

Britain's Caribbean colonies were historically with-
out art academies and salons and the region's new
inhabitants had no indigenous artistic traditions to
claim as their own. Papers on the panel consider
how the particular history of the islands influenced
artistic expression in the region. How has art been
defined and reinvented in the Anglophone Carib-
bean? What role did art assume in a region lacking
the institutions and traditions typically responsible
for defining, teaching, and reifying art, culture, and
taste generally? What are the wider implications
of Anglo Caribbean art history on canonical defini-
tions of art more generally?


Triple Panel

TOWARDS A HISTORY OF WORLD
PHOTOGRAPHIES

Co-chairs: Christraud Geary, Museum of Fine Arts,
Boston ;Erin Haney, National Museum of African
Art; Erika Nimis, Universit6 Laval

The history and diversity of "African photographic
practice" brings to light, perhaps more than any
other creative medium, the irrelevance of continen-
tal boundaries. It is becoming increasingly clearer
that the first photographers working in Africa were
cosmopolitan figures whose images comprise an
integral part of the world's photographic heritage.
In that sense, they are not so different from the
wealth of professional photographers working to-
day, whose imagery and flow of ideas and materi-
als feeds from and contributes to the expanse of
global networks. Photography's processes and
materials are also situated within local understand-
ings and visual worlds, and it is these specific and
complicated contexts that anchor the diversity of
imagery subsumed under this rubric.



UNTOLD STORIES: Recovering Women's
Art Cooperatives in Contemporary Afri-
can Art Studies

Co-chairs: Sarah Adams, University of Iowa
Kim Miller, Wheaton College




UF GWENDOLYN CARTER
CONFERENCE PANELS:
to be scheduled as last panel
(simultaneous with others) of each day


















Thal Registrtio

Dealin fo th Trenia

is Deeme 31, 2006








Is yu AAMmesi







Visit-thel4th ACASA Triennial Symposium website:
www.doce-conferences.ufl.edu/acasa


ARTS COUNCIL or THE AFRICAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION


AFRICAN ART


March 28-April 1.2007
Gainesville. Florida


I0-


TRIENNIAL CONFERENCE SCHEDULE (tentative)

Wednesday (March 28)

Museum Day Harn Museum Auditorium
Outreach Day Harn Museum Classrooms
Reception Harn Galleria and Promenade at end of day
Dinner on your own
Thursday (March 29)
8:30am 4:15pm Panels Harn and FLMNH
5:00 6:30pm Reception TBD
Exhibition Grinter
7:00pm Okwui Enwezor University of Florida Auditorium
Reception Friends of Music Room
Friday (March 30)
8:30am 4:15pm Panels Harn and FLMNH
5:00pm Reception/exhibition/African Music Thomas Center-DowntownGainesville

Evening Downtown Plaza for dinner on your own (list of restaurants provided)

Saturday (March/31)
10:30am 6pm Panels Harn and FLMNH
7:00pm Awards ceremony Harn Auditorium
After Party Ham Museum















Conference Organizers

Co-Chairs: Outreach Day Organizers:
Robin Poynor rpoynor(ufl.edu Bonnie Bernau bernaub(ufl.edu
Rebecca Nagy rnaqgv(ufi.edu Agnes Leslie aleslie@africa.ufl.edu

Museum Day Organizers:
Program Chair:
Susan Cooksey secook@ufl.edu
Victoria Rovine vrovine(africa.ufl.edu Carol Thompson
Carol Thompson
carol.thompson(@woodruffcenter.org
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conferences@doce.ufl.edu, or mailed to UF Dept. of Conferences, 2209 N W 13th St.,
Gainesville, FL 32609-3498.

Cancellations The University of Florida and the conference sponsor reserve the right to revise
program content and presentations, or to cancel the program if registration criteria are not met or
when conditions beyond their control prevail. If the program is cancelled, the University's
liability is limited to refund of the conference fees paid by each registrant.


ACASA
14th Triennial Symposium
Information








Accommodations: The University of Florida provides reasonable access for persons with
disabilities to all programs, services and activities. Please contact the Conference Department by
phone (352) 392-1701 or email conferences@doce.ufl.edu at least ten days prior to the event
starting date if special accommodations are required.

Contact Information If you have questions, please call UF Department of Conferences at
352-392-1701 or email us at conferences(adoce.ufl.edu.


Registration Fee Schedule

Register by December 31, 2006 by February 28, 2007 after February 29, 2007

Member $100 $125 $150
Non-Member 125 150 175
Student or Senior 75 85 100

One Day Registration, March 29-31- $50 Closing Party (March 31) $25-includes dinner and 2 drinks

*** Please contact Ann Ooton for further information about Registration (352) 392-1701 x 243 ***


Hotel & Local Information

Hilton University of Florida Conference Center
1714 SW 34th St.
Gainesville, FL 32607
(352) 371-3600
www.ufhotel.com

A block of rooms is reserved at the Hilton University of Florida Conference Center for the 14th Triennial par-
ticipants. To register visit www.ufhotel.com or contact the hotel directly by phone at (800) 445-8667 or (352) 371-
3600 by February 25, 2007. Be sure to mention the ACASA group to receive the rate of $119 per night!

Reitz Union Hotel
University of Florida Campus Gainesville, FL (352) 392-2151
www.union.ufl.edu/hotel/

A block of rooms is reserved at the Reitz Union Hotel for the 14th Triennial participants.
To register contact the hotel directly by phone at (352) 392-2151 by March 28, 2007.
Be sure to mention the ACASA group to receive the rate of $70-$100 per night.


Gainesville Tourism Info


State of Florida's Official Travel Planning Website: http://www.visitflorida.com/
Alachua County Convention and Visitors' Bureau : http://www.visitgainesville.net/

I UF Information Websites:
The Ham: http://www.ham.ufl.edul
The College of Fine Arts: http://www.arts.ufl.edu/
The Center for African Studies: http://web.africa.ufl.edul
The Center for Latin American Studies: http://www.latam.ufl.ed
School of Art and Art History: http://www.arts.ufl.edu/art/homeFlash.htm










Triennial Travel Stipend Fund





The Arts Council of the African Studies Association
The Fourteenth Triennial Symposium on African Art
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
March 28-April 1, 2007


Greetings, members and friends of ACASA,


Next year ACASA will celebrate its twenty fifth anniversary! We hope you have already decided to attend
ACASA's 14th Triennial Symposium hosted by the University of Florida's College of Fine Arts, School of Art and
Art History, Center for African Studies, and the Samuel P. Ham Museum of Art from March 28-April 1, 2007.
Gainesville is the site for the meeting, and the theme will be Global Africa. Robin Poynor and Rebecca Nagy are
the Co-Chairs of the conference, and Victoria Rovine serves as the Program Chair. Susan Cooksey and Carol
Thompson will organize Museum Day. Bonnie Bemau, Director of Education at the Ham, and Agnes Leslie, Out-
reach Director for the Center for African Studies, are in charge of Outreach Day. The conference will allow partici-
pants to meet many colleagues and Friends of African art and explore the African art collections and resources in
the Gainesville area. If you haven't yet, please make plans to participate in this opportunity to engage in the dis-
course on the expressive arts of Africa and the Diaspora.

Registration fees cover only a fraction of Triennial costs. Our hosts in Gainesville have been raising money for
everything from receptions to a-v services. ACASA must do its share. Most importantly, we have committed our-
selves as usual to raise funds so graduate students and colleagues from Africa and the Diaspora can join us.

In preparation for past Triennials we have always been flooded with applications for travel stipends-from gradu-
ate students and from African/Diasporan colleagues. We hope to offer at least 20 grants of $500 to graduate stu-
dents and to sponsor 7 or more African and Caribbean applicants. We have set a goal of $30,000.

Remember that ACASA is now a 501 (c) (3) tax-exempt organization. Although we always welcome contributions
to ACASA's Endowment, our focus must now be on the Triennial. Please join ACASA members and friends in
making a generous, tax-deductible contribution to the Triennial Travel Stipend Fund so we can support as many
applicants as possible. If you can afford to do so, we ask you to consider contributing $100 or more. Please fill in
the form on the next page and mail in with your contribution.

Our travel stipend recipients join us in thanking you for your support. We look forward to seeing you in Gainesville
for this exciting event.

Sincerely,

Kate Ezra Christraud M. Geary Rebecca Nagy and Robin Poynor
President Past President Conference Chairs
Co-Chair, Co-Chairs,
Fundraising Committee Fundraising Committee








I I -I


Triennial Fundraising Form


The Arts Council of the African Studies Association




The Arts Council of the African Studies Association

The Fourteenth Triennial Symposium on African Art
Gainesville, Florida 2007



I / We Pledge

$25 $50 $100_ $250 Other
for the 14th Triennial Symposium Fund for
Visiting African Scholars and Graduate Students

$25 $50 $100 $250 Other
For the ACASA Endowment Fund for Long-Range Planning and Programs

My /Our Check for a total contribution of $_
made out to ACASA is enclosed.

Name(s)


Mail FORM with payment to:


Alice Burmeister
ACASA Secretary Treasurer
Winthrop University
140 Mc Laurin Hall
Rock Hill, SC 29733
burmeistera@winthrop.edu

PAYMENT:
C heck or International Money Order (checks must be in US Dollars and drawn on a U.S. Bank, payable to ACASA)
_ Credit Card: Transactions are processed through PayPal, a secure third party credit processor.
(See Page 27 for Credit Card payment instructions using PAYPAL)


I ACASA I










Membership Renewal Form


Today's Date:
Calendar year for which membership is sought: 200_
(*Please Note: Membership runs January 1 December 31)


$20.00
$50.00
$75.00


Special Member (student, unemployed, retired)
Regular Member
Institutional Member


ACASA members living in Africa & the Caribbean
are not required to pay membership dues but MUST send
completed membership forms to the Secretary/Treasurer.


The Arts Council of the African Studies Association


Send Payment & completed Membership Form to:

Alice Burmeister
ACASA Secretary/Treasurer
Winthrop University
140 McLaurin Hall
Rock Hill, SC 29733

email: burmeistera@winthrop.edu


ADDITIONAL VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTION:
ACASA Endowment
Sieber Memorial Fund (Dissertation award presented at the Triennial Symposium)
___ Symposium Fund (Travel assistance for African scholars and graduate students)
Sponsorship to mail ACASA Newsletters to courtesy members in Africa and the
Caribbean ($10.00 per sponsorship)
PAYMENTS:

Check or International Money Order (CHECKS must be in US Dollars drawn on a U.S. Bank and made payable to ACASA)

_ Credit Card: Transactions are processed through PayPal, a secure third party credit processor.
(See Page 23 for easy payment instructions using PAYPAL.com)
MAILING ADDRESS AND PHONE NUMBERS for Directory and Receipt of Newsletter:


Has your contact information changed?


Yes No


Name:


Affiliation: D
Address:


department:


_State: Zip: Country:
Work Phone: Fax:
Web site:


Additional Information (please circle all that apply,Iv or add new option):


Education (highest degree):


BA MA MFA PhD Other:


Specialization: Anthropology Art History Ethnomusicology Other.


Primary Profession: University Teaching Other Teaching
Other:


Museology Research Student


Current Memberships: ASA CAA AAA Other:


Home Phone:.
Fmail-


Ethnic or Country Focus:
Topics of Interest (e.g.: gender studies, performance, textiles, divination.....)


MIACSM


wr---


I=EE









- Voluntary Contributions Form


The Arts Council of the African Studies Association


OPPORTUNITIES TO GIVE TO ACASA


Your contributions to ACASA special funds may be made with annual membership
renewal or at other times throughout the year. Please complete this form and send it with your
contribution to either or both of the following ACASA funds:
ACASA Endowment
Sieber Memorial Fund (Dissertation award presented at the Triennial Symposium)
____Symposium Fund (Travel assistance for African scholars and graduate students)
____ Sponsorship to mail ACASA Newsletters to courtesy members in Africa and the
Caribbean ($10.00 per sponsorship)
Individual(s) or institutions) I want to sponsor


I PAYMENT OPTIONS: I


Mail FORM with payment to:

Alice Burmeister
ACASA Secretary Treasurer
Winthrop University
140 Mc Laurin Hall
Rock Hill, SC 29733
burmeistera@winthrop.edu


___ Check or International Money Order
Payable to ACASA
(NOTE: Checks must be in US Dollars and drawn on a U.S. Bank)



__ Credit Card: Processed through P I-7 4
(a secure third party credit processor)


EASY !! HOW TO USE for ACASA Payments:
Go to www.pavpal.com
1. Sign UD for a PayPal account to use a credit card for payment.
(To send money directly from your bank account, get Verified.)
2. Loat in o your PayPal account.
3. Click the Send Money tab.
4. Enter the information for ACASA (from the form) and the amount.
5. Review your transaction, then send it.


FI


ACASA^
















About ACASA

The Arts Council of the African Studies Association (ACASA) was established in 1982 as an
independent non-profit professional association affiliated with the African Studies Association
(ASA) in the United States. The organization exists to facilitate communication among schol-
ars, teachers, artists, museum specialists and all others interested in the arts of Africa and
the African Diaspora. Its goals are to promote greater understanding of African material and
expressive culture in all its many forms, and to encourage contact and collaboration with Afri-
can and Diaspora artists and scholars.

As an ASA-sponsored association, ACASA recommends panels for inclusion in the ASA an-
nual meeting program on such wide ranging topics as the interpretation of meanings in Afri-
can art, agency and performance, connoisseurship and aesthetics, the ethics of field collect-
ing and research, the illicit trade in antiquities, museum exhibition strategies, the use of archi-
val sources, as well as issues concerning various historical and contemporary artists and ar-
tistic traditions.

ACASA's annual business meeting is held during the ASA meeting each fall. ACASA is also
an affiliated society of the College Art Association, and meets on an ad hoc basis at its an-
nual conference.

ACASA hosts a Triennial Symposium featuring a rich program of panels, cultural activities,
and workshops for museum professionals. A Leadership Award for exemplary and intellec-
tual excellence and two Arnold Rubin Outstanding Publication Awards in recognition of books
of original scholarship and excellence in visual presentation are bestowed at each sympo-
sium.

ACASA members receive three newsletters yearly featuring news about upcoming confer-
ences, exhibitions, research and opportunities for scholars. An annual directory is published
in the Newsletter. For more information, please contact:

Susan Cooksey
Newsletter Editor
Ham Museum of Art
P.O. Box 112700
Gainesville, FL 32611-2700
Email: secook@ufl.edu


ACASA Back Issues

We have received several letters asking about ordering back issues of ACASA.
Back issues are available for $5.00 and can be obtained by sending a request to:
Alice Burmeister
ACASA Secretary Treasurer
Winthrop University
140 Mc Laurin Hall
Rock Hill, SC 29733
803) 323-2656
burmeister@winthrop.edu














Editor: ACASA Newsletter
(Attn: S. Cooksey)
University of Florida
Harn Museum of Art
P.O. Box 112700
Gainesville, FL 32611-2700




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