Title: ACASA newsletter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00103115/00052
 Material Information
Title: ACASA newsletter newsletter of the Arts Council of the African Studies Association
Alternate Title: Newsletter
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: African Studies Association -- Arts Council
Publisher: The Council
Place of Publication: S.l
S.l
Publication Date: June 2000
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Subjects / Keywords: Arts -- Periodicals -- Africa   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 2 (winter 1982)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. designation dropped with no. 3 (spring 1983).
General Note: Title from caption.
General Note: Vols. for Aug. 1992- include Directory of members: addendum.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: No. 34 (Aug. 1992).
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Bibliographic ID: UF00103115
Volume ID: VID00052
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09794003
lccn - sn 92017937
 Related Items
Preceded by: Newsletter of the Arts Council of the African Studies Association

Full Text







ACASA Board of Directors
Martha G. Anderson, President
Rebecca L. Green, Secretary-Treasurer
Vicki Rovine, President Pro-tem
Daniel Avorgbedor, Editor
Mary (Polly) Nooter Roberts, Past President
Eli Bentor
Michael Conner
Emily Hanna
Babtunde Lawal


Membership Information:
Membership form is included in this issue


Residents of America, Europe, and Asia annual
dues are $35.00 payable in January. Make
checks out to ACASA and send to:
Rebecca Green
1010 Fine Arts
Bowling Green State University
Bowling Green, OH, 43403 USA
rlgreen@bgnet.bgsu.edu


Resident of African and the Caribbean contact
Janet Stanley
National Museum of African Art Library
Smithsonian Institution MRC 708
Washington, DC 20560 USA
Tel.: 202-357-4600 ext. 285
Fax: 202-357-4879
jstanley@ic.si.edu

The ACASA Newsletter is published three
times a year: April, August and December. The
next issue will be published in August 2000.
The newsletter seeks items of interest for
publication. Please send information for
publication to Daniel Avorgbedor, 110 Weigel
Hall, School of Music, OSU, Columbus, OH
43210-1170 USA avorgbedor.1 @osu.edu, fax
614-292-1102, tel. 614-292-9441
Triennial logo design by dele jegede


This special edition of the ACASA
Newsletter is devoted to the 12th Triennial
Symposium on African Art, which will take
place April 25-29th at St. Thomas, in the
U.S. Virgin Islands. Eli Bentor, our
program chair, has served as guest editor.
When Daniel Avorgbedor, the regular editor,
returns from Africa, he will publish a
combined April/August edition, including
the registration form for the Triennial, and
the usual news and announcements.

Please send Daniel any announcements you
have for the April/August edition by July
28".

address:

Daniel Avorgbedor
110 Weigel.Hall
School of Music
Ohio State University
Columbus, Ohio 43210-1170
avorgbedor. 1 @osu.edu


Presidential Notes by Martha Anderson
The board continues to work behind the
scenes to make the 12th Triennial
Symposium in the Virgin Islands a reality.
Please read Eli Bentor's call for papers in
this issue. Christine Mullen Kreamer
coordinating Museum Day for Wednesday,
April 25 and is busy organizing a series of
presentations geared to both our regular
members and museum personnel from the
Caribbean. For the first time, we will have a
separate Education / Outreach Day with the
participation of teachers from the Virgin
Islands. Veronika Jenke is coordinating this
event that will take place either on Tuesday,
April 24 or on Monday, April 30.

Earlier this year, I was bemoaning the fact
that I couldn't schedule a site visit to the








Virgin Islands until early May, when Robert
Nicholls informed me that Carnival fell
unusually late this year, and just happened to
coincide with my visit. That prompted him
to double-check the dates we've booked for
the conference next year; fortunately, they
do fall during Carnival, as we intended.

I have wonderful memories of the five days I
spent in St. Thomas last month. I met with
members of the steering committee and a
number of local sponsors, and was
interviewed for a local radio show as well as
a webzine devoted to the island. I also got
to watch the fireworks with members of the
Africa Association from the hill overlooking
the harbor. We will take a break from our
banquet to watch them from the hotel next
year, as Polly and Allen Roberts did last
year.

Of course the real highlights of my visit
were the adults' and children's parades,
which were both delightfully noisy, colorful,
and exciting. I brought back two CDs
featuring some of the most popular tunes by
local bands, and found that they come in
handy when I need to clean my office,
because it is nearly impossible to sit still
when listening to them. I also got to explore
the shopping district, visit the university,
and see a bit of the island. I decided to
spend my one free afternoon by taking a
submarine tour of a reef, and various marine
creatures cooperated by making
appearances. The only problem with having
the conference in such a beautiful setting is
that it will be difficult to entice people to
attend the fascinating
panels that have been
proposed.

I hope that imagining
the sights and sounds of
Carnival and reading
I r the panel proposals


listed here will spark your interest and
prompt you to make your hotel reservations
if you haven't done so already.

ACASA Experiences a Temporary Glitch
in its Nonprofit Status

In March of this year, the African Studies
Association informed ACASA that we could
no longer use their tax-exempt number.
According to ASA's executive director,
Loree Jones, their lawyers had advised them
that they could no longer extend this
privilege to us. Although this development
does not seriously jeopardize our
organization, it is inconvenient. We can
easily incorporate as a nonprofit
organization and acquire our own number,
but this would require cumbersome
accounting procedures and expensive audits.

After consulting with a number of past
presidents and other knowledgeable
members about what course we should take,
we appealed to ASA to reconsider its
decision. We are now waiting for its board
to explore ways of keeping us under the
ASA umbrella. Unfortunately, we will not
learn of its decision before this fall. At that
time, we will either be reinstated under ASA
in some manner, or move ahead with
incorporation.

We hope to resolve this matter as soon as
possible so we can resume fundraising for
the Triennial and our endowment. We are
determined not to let this snag stand in the
way of preparing for the triennial and our
commitment to assist both scholars residing
in Africa and the Caribbean and graduate
students with travel grants. Thus, we are
confident that when we resume our fund-
raising efforts in the fall, the ACASA
community will respond generously.







A Note from the Triennial Program
Committee by Eli Bentor, Chair

The Triennial Program Committee has
formed and is busy putting together the
panels. The response to the call for panels
was very encouraging. We have fifty panel
proposals dealing with many exciting
aspects of our field from power figures to
postal stamps. Responding to the theme and
Caribbean venue of the Triennial, many
proposals deal with the confluences of
artistic influences and with historical and
thematic links between Africa and the
Diaspora. The panels suggest that as a
group we may begin to overcome our
neglect of theoretical and comparative
issues.

The next step is to ensure that the best paper
proposals are sent to the panels' chairs.
Please read the guidelines carefully before
submitting a proposal. Note that you should
send proposals for existing panels directly to
the panel's chair. Unattached proposals
should be sent to Eli Bentor. The Program
Committee will attempt to group accepted
unattached paper proposals into open
sessions. However, the program is already
crowded and number of existing panels may
limit our ability to add open sessions.

The Program Committee maintains a web
site at http://itsdev.appstate.edu/triennial.
The site features updated information, news,
travel information, forms, and longer
versions of many panels' abstracts. Before
submitting a paper proposal, it may be a
good idea to check the fuller description of
the panel in which you are interested. Please
send comments and suggestions about the
site to Eli Bentor (bentore@appstate.edu).

The members of the Program Committee
are: Martha Anderson, Eli Bentor, Judith


Bettelheim, Robert Nicholls and Sharon
Patton.


Report from Outreach / Education Day
Committee by Veronika Jenke, Chair

The Outreach day is beginning to take shape.
Robert Nicholls has been instrumental in
establishing the contacts with appropriate
offices, administrators and other resource
people in the Virgin Islands. At this point
we expect morning sessions to focus on
museum collaborations, provide
teaching materials, and include a cultural
performance workshop, possibly with a
performance of Moko Jumbie. There will
probably be sessions focusing on music and
visual arts. The afternoon sessions will be
more technologically oriented with possible
presentations-on the Internet as resources for
African, Caribbean resources, and possible
demonstrations of CD-ROMS. Contacts
with school administrators are still being
made to assure that teachers will be able to
come to the conference.


A Note from Museum Day Coordinator
by Christine Mullen Kreamer

Wednesday, April 24, is the Triennial's
Museum Day. So plan on arriving a day
before the formal program begins to
participate in sessions devoted to current
issues and case studies in museum practice.

Museum Day will feature two sessions that
focus on cultural representation, community
outreach, and strategies for creating
innovative, audience-centered exhibitions.
Although the program is still under
development, every effort is being made to
ensure that presentations include our
Caribbean colleagues and address issues
relevant to their work of cultural








conservation, exhibitions, and
audience-building. As plans firm up, a draft
schedule will be published in H-AfrArts and
in the ACASA Newsletter.

Questions can be sent to Museum Day
coordinator, Christine Mullen Kreamer, at
the following address:

Christine Mullen Kreamer
Curator, National Museum of African Art
Smithsonian Institution
Washington, DC 20560-0708
e-mail: kreamerc@nmafa.si.edu
tel: (202) 357-4600, ext. 236
fax: (202) 357-4879


Guidelines for Paper Proposals

Please read the panel abstracts carefully to
determine if you wish to submit a paper
proposal to a panel. You can only
participate in one official capacity except for
giving a paper in a panel that you chair.
Persons submitting proposals must be
members of ACASA. Membership Form
can be found at the end of the newsletter.
Scholars and professionals resident in Africa
or the Caribbean are exempt.

Each proposal should include:

* A completed paper proposal form
* An abstract of no more than 500
words outlining the premise and
scope of your paper
* A one page CV

There are two types of proposals:

A proposal for an existing panel
Proposals for existing panels will receive a
priority. You should mail such proposals
directly to the panel's chair at the address
provided with the abstract. You are


encouraged to communicate with the chair
before submitting your proposal. The panel
chairs have the discretion of selecting or
rejecting your paper. If the panel chair
rejects your proposal, you may elect to have
it forwarded to the Program Committee to be
considered as an independent proposal (see
below)

An independent proposal
If you cannot find a suitable panel, you may
elect to submit an unattached proposal. The
Program Committee will attempt to organize
accepted unattached proposals into open
sessions. Mail unattached proposals to Eli
Bentor, Triennial 2001, Department of Art,
Appalachian State University, Boone, NC
28608, USA, e-mail: bentore@appstate.edu.

Travel Grants
The Arts Council of the African Studies
Association has a limited number of small
travel grants to help defray some of the cost
of traveling to the Triennial. Guidelines for
the grants are included with the application
form. There are two types of grants:
* Grants for Scholars residing in
Africa or the Caribbean (form
enclosed)
* Grants for full-time Graduate
Students (form available on the
Triennial web site)

Web
Complete and updated information including
electronic versions of all the
necessary forms is available on
the Triennial web site at
http://itsdev.appstate.edu/trienni -
al/. The web version includes an
extended version of most panel
abstracts.


Deadline
The deadline for paper receipt of
paper proposals is September 15, 2000.


SI
; I


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Masks: Transformations, Identities, and
Adaptability in Contemporary Society
Chair: Laurel Birch Aguilar (University of
St Andrews)
Contact: Laurel Birch Aguilar
University of St Andrews
St Salvator's College
North Street
St Andrews KY16 9AL SCOTLAND
Phone: Office 1334-462104
Home: 1334-477626
e-mail: Lbda@st-andrews.ac.uk
Fax: 1334-462030

The appeal of masks endures today, as it has
for centuries. What is it that we find so
fascinating about the mask? In this panel we
will address this question, and more
specifically discuss the adaptability of masks
in contemporary society to continue to
appeal to new audiences across the
Diaspora. Masks are transformed, renewed,
changed, re-identified and replicated in
many ways, in many contexts over various
periods of time. How masks are interpreted,
re-interpreted and presented in light of
current issues is of interest. Of particular
interest are issues of identity, anonymity,
secrecy, and transformations of forms,
significance and contexts in contemporary
society. Papers are invited which address
one or more of these issues about masks,
from Africa and the Diaspora, in
performance or outside performance. Papers
which further discussions about masks in
theoretical or comparative frames regarding
the above issues are especially welcome.

Transitions and Continuities in Cultural
Production / Art from Kwazulu-Natal
Chair: Juliet Armstrong
Contact: Juliet Armstrong


e-mail: armstrongj@fineart.unp.ac.za

A look at developments in the art of the
Kwa-Zulu Natal area in the last twenty
years.

Reconceptualizing African/African
Diasporan exhibits in the 21st century
Chair: Mary Jo Arnoldi (Smithsonian
Institution)
Contact: Mary Jo Arnoldi
Department of Anthropology
National Museum of Natural History,
NHB-MRC 112
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
20650-0112
Email Aroldi.Mary@nmnh.si.edu
Fax 202-357-2208

The new century presents exciting
opportunities for reconceptualizing exhibits
which engage African and Diasporan arts,
histories, and cultures. Papers should
address current exhibiting challenges and
strategies. For example, topics might
include opportunities presented by
expanding knowledge bases and paradigm
shifts in African and Diasporan Studies;
current exhibiting techniques and
technologies; and/or expanding and
connecting with new audiences.

Across the Oceans: the Delineation of
Black Artistic Expression from Africa
around the World
Chairs: Ramona Austin (Dallas Museum of
Art) and Robert Farris Thompson (Yale
University)
Contact: Ramona Austin
Dallas Museum of Art
1717 North Harwood
Dallas, TX 75201
Ph: 214.922.1233
FX: 214.720.0862
e-mail: raustin@dm-art.org








This panel is a continuation of one given at
the 1998 Triennial on the influence of
African traditions upon world culture and
the absorption and adaptation by African
artistic traditions of outside cultural
expressions to internal systems of thought.
It is an ongoing update on the development
of the coming exhibition Afro-Planetary Art:
Black Images Across Four Oceans presently
being organized and researched by Robert
Farris Thompson. Its objective is to show
the past and continually pervasive influence
of Africa, its cultures, arts, and systems of
thought on the dynamic flow of cultural
exchange and artistic development around
the world. Papers will be given by Robert
Farris Thompson, Grey Gundeker, and
Ramona Austin. An invitation for paper
proposals is extended to researchers who are
working on related issues and who wish to
join this panel.

The Relevance of Libraries and
Information Centers to the Acquisition,
Preservation and Promotion of Arts and
Culture in Africa
Chairs: Oyedele Ayoola (Isembaye Arts
Gallery and Cultural Troupe, Osogbo) and
Prince Olugbeja Suleman Temitope
(Isembaye Arts Gallery and Cultural Troupe,
Osogbo)
Contact: Oyedele Ayoola
52 Catholic Mission Road Osogbo
Osun State
Nigeria
e-mail: princesateoo-consult@yifan.net
phone: 234-062-238369

The Libraries and information centers in
general which have not been taken
cognizance of in the world of arts and
culture in Africa, is now a vital media
through which arts and cultural heritage of
Africa could be promoted to the apex.


Caribbean Artists Comment on Their
Culture
Chair: to be announced
Contact:
Judith Bettelheim
Art Department
San Francisco State University
h. 510 653 1769 (as of June 2000)
fax: 415 338 6537
e-mail: betheim@sfsu.edu

In this era of the transnational artist, what
constitutes an artist's home or national
identity? Many artists who now live outside
their homeland, or have double residences,
reveal in their work layered identities. And
think of all the contemporary artists who are
refugees, self-designated or otherwise.
Increasingly national designations-especially
when they portend to elucidate an artist's
style- are becoming increasingly
complicated. Even artists who remain 'at
home' often incorporate commentary on
national identity in their practice. In recent
discussions of contemporary transcultural
practice, critics and historians tend to
confront the varied ways issues of
appropriation have been debated and
incorporated into artistic practice, to the
exclusion of other topics of importance. Yet,
many Caribbean artists reflect on aspects of
their own cultures both as insiders and/or as
educated outsiders. In this panel we will
explore the multiple ways contemporary
Caribbean artists have incorporated such
commentary in their work.


Performance and Caribbean Culture
Chair: Judith Bettelheim (San Francisco
State University)
Contact: Judith Bettelheim
Art Department
San Francisco State University
h. 510 653 1769 (as of June 2000)
fax: 415 338 6537







betheim@sfsu.edu

This panel will explore how cultural values
(especially expressions of ethnicity), social
conventions, and iconographic
transformations are incorporated into
Caribbean public performances and
festivals. These performances play out
tensions between the margin and the center,
between the popular and the spiritual, and
between the esoteric and the accessible. We
will especially interrogate how visual and
verbal/musical images, used in the context
of public display, reflect the vicissitudes of
patronage structures and social conditions.
Panel participants will discuss how an
internal social text-mainly in terms of
societal hierarchies-is established and
question how this text is expressed in
character choices, choreographic formations,
musical choices, narratives, costumes, etc.

Subjectivities in African and Caribbean
Art
Chair: Suzanne Preston Blier (Harvard
University)
Contact: Suzanne Preston Blier
Departments of History of Art and
Architecture and Afro-American Studies
Arthur M. Sackler Museum
385 Broadway
Cambridge MA. 02138
phone/fax 617 497-1464
email: Blier@fas.Harvard.edu

This panel will explore both narrow and
broader concerns of subjectivity in African
art framed from the vantage of scholarly
persona, viewership concerns, artist identity,
gender, class difference etc. The panel takes
as its premise the view that the arts of Africa
(like all arts) are constructed from multiple
(often competing) perspectives, inherent in
which are various questions of subjectivity.
What are the issues at play when a male
artist is creating an image of a female for a


male audience? For a female audience?
What factors come into discussion when the
descendant of a prisoner of war from a
different ethnic group is creating much of
Dahomey or Bamum palace art? In what
ways do we need to think about the unique
viewing (and meaning) contexts inherent in
the all too frequent cases in which the
sufferer of a particular malaise confronts an
object which is intended to rectify that
problem? What questions should we ask
when foreign (and native) field researchers
write about art which is largely removed
from their everyday experiences? What
problems and potentials occur in any of
these circumstances when objectivity and
subjectivity collide? Ideally, papers should
consist of both case studies and a larger
exegesis on the salient questions of
subjectivity specific to the case.

New African Genres: Popular Art in
Public and Private Spaces
Chair: Peter J. Bloom (University of
California, San Diego)
Contact: Peter J. Bloom
507 N. Michigan Avenue
Pasadena, CA 91106
Tel. (626) 792-7182
Fax. (626) 792-7203
E-mail: peterblooml@csi.com

This panel addresses emergent genres in
African popular art and culture. From the
notion of sape (or La Soci6t6 des
Ambianceurs et Personnes ll6gantes) as an
evolving sense of Congolese fashion
consciousness to avant-garde African artistic
production, emergent African genres
question the boundaries of traditional art
forms and the social production of meaning.
The realm of excess in the African
Postcolony and its reproduction in the public
space of political power will serve as an
important point of departure in discussing
how new African genres emerge.








The Symbolic Woman
Chair: Jean M. Borgatti (Clark University)
Contact: Jean Borgatti
295 Maple Avenue
Shrewsbury, MA 01545
[508] 925-1516
[508] 793-9695
FAX [508] 752-4383
E-mail: Jborgatti@aol.com

Across many world cultures, a wide range of
phenomena derive meaning from female
biological metaphor and derived cultural
constructions. A house or a net bag, a priest
or a carved female figure may be symbolic
women. For example, in Northwest Coast
Cultures of North America, the lineage
house is conceived of as a feminine
container. Among several groups in New
Guinea, the word net bag -the only art form
made by women- is a synonym for bride and
womb. Among the Yoruba of West Africa,
Shango priests practice ritual transvestism
and the dominant image on dance wands for
Shango is the female devotee. The panel
seeks individual scholars to explore the
meaning of "the symbolic woman" in the
material culture, architecture or performance
of specific African or Diaspora culture
groups and the nuancing of this idea in
specific contexts.

"Power Objects" in the New Millennium
Chair: Elisabeth Cameron (Nelson-Atkins
Museum of Art)
Contact: Elisabeth Cameron
Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
4525 Oak St.
Kansas City, MO 64111
Office: 816/751-0427
fax: 816/931-7208
home:
235 Ward Parkway #201
Kansas City, MO 64112
816/931-1460
e-mail: ecameron @ nelson-atkins.org


Power objects situate themselves at the
intersections of worlds, religions, theories,
and discussions. While widely used, few
scholars define and discuss "power objects"
as a term and category. One definition might
suggest an object that has received transfer
of energy from a living entity. A practitioner
uses a power object to, among other things,
heal, hurt, divine, and protect. These pieces
are so important to the life and culture of the
individuals who make and use them that
when the peoples moved (voluntarily or
involuntarily) to the Americas and other
regions of the globe, they have recreated
power objects in new cultural environments.
This panel will encourage papers that
explore either theoretical issues or specific
examples of power objects. Theoretical
issues might include definitions of the
category, discussions of power objects and
agency, power, and/or performance. Specific
examples will bridge the Atlantic and show
how power objects eased the transitions into
and lives of peoples in new worlds.

Out of Africa: masquerade and
performance arts
Chair: Amanda Carlson (University of South
Florida)
Contact: Amanda Carlson
Art Department
University of South Florida
4202 E. Fowler Ave.
FAH 110
Tampa, FL 33620
Tel.: 813-974-9325
Fax: 813-974-9226
e-mail: findamanda@aol.com

African travelers, whether under
enslavement or by their own freewill, have
brought numerous performance traditions
out of Africa and into the global arena. This
panel will address a broad range of issues
relating to masquerade and performance arts
existing beyond the African continent,








exploring transformations and transitions
through a variety of methodological
approaches. This will include performances
that were transported several hundred years
ago as well as more recently. By
highlighting the diversity of performance
traditions in the African Diaspora, the panel
will attempt to expand our understanding of
African performance in general.

Public visual culture and collective
memory in Africa and the African
Diaspora
Chairs: Matthew Christensen and L. Loyd
Frates (UCLA)
Contact: Matthew Christensen
115 Alice Street
Port Jefferson, NY 11777
Tel.: 631-642-9079
e-mail: mchriste@ucle.edu

This panel will explore the relationships
between public visual culture and collective
memory in Africa and the African Diaspora.
Presentations will examine the concept of
visual culture and pay particular attention to
contemporary aesthetic structures invested
with collective memory and their role in
shaping a sense of identity. In examining
this process, panelists will investigate how
collective memory is not only stored in these
visual texts, but is also shaped by them.
Consideration will also be given to these
structures' social meanings and how past
and present is negotiated through them. The
panel organizers would like to investigate
the myriad structures that exist in pubic
spaces in Africa and the African Diaspora,
including everything from murals and
monuments, to such texts as bus art, t-shirt,
posters, architecture and urban landscape.

Multidisciplinary Study of African
Expressive Art
Chair: Barth Chukwuezi (University of
Nigeria, Nsukka)


Contact: Barth Chukwuezi
Dept. of Sociology/Anthropology
University of Nigeria
Nsukka, Nigeria
EPSEELON@aol.com

This panel explores the need for various
disciplines that study traditional African and
Caribbean social institutions to examine the
possibility and need to use various forms of
material cultural art (visual art forms) to
complement their teaching of traditional
African and Caribbean social institutions.
For example, the teaching of traditional
African political structure should make use
of the various cultural art forms that
represent symbols of power, status and
authority. This will expose the various ways
these cultural art forms validate traditional
African political structure. Other disciplines
like Economics, Religion, Philosophy,
Music, and Anthropology could equally use
relevant Cultural objects where necessary to
enrich the study of such subjects.

It is becoming quite absurd that many
students study traditional Africa and
Caribbean Social Institutions without the
privilege of learning about such important
cultural objects. As a result many of the
African and Caribbean expressive Art are
seen as anachronistic, irrelevant and
unimportant. Many of the African students
do not take pride in studying their traditional
cultural objects. Disciplinary studies of this
nature will ensure preservation, appreciation
and knowledge of cultural objects. More
importantly, many of these art forms are
disappearing due to modernization and
self-dejection by Africans in the face of
overwhelming western culture and its
appurtenances. This panel will therefore
explore how some of the disciplines that
teach African and Caribbean social
institutions could use cultural objects to
enrich such studies as well as encouraging








other related disciplines to study cultural
objects.

Reevaluating the Canon: African Art
Studies In Historical Perspective
Chairs: Christa Clarke (Neuberger Museum
Of Art) and Constantine Petridis (University
Of Ghent)
Contact: Christa Clarke
Neuberger Museum of Art
Purchase College, SUNY
Purchase, New York
USA
christa.clarke @ purchase.edu

Constantine Petridis
University Of Ghent
Fund For Scientific Research
Flanders, Belgium
costapetridis@hotmail.com

The aim of this panel is to reassess the
formative years of African art history
through close examination of select studies
published between 1900 and 1950.
Individuals such as Paul Guillaume, Alain
Locke, Emil Torday, Marcel Griaule,
Melville Herskovits, and Frans Olbrechts,
among others, produced a range of studies
on African art that varied in both scope and
depth. Published at a critical juncture in the
nascent study of African art, their writings
provided conceptual and aesthetic
frameworks that have influenced subsequent
scholarship in African art history.
Following the model provided by Daniel
Biebuyck (1983), these early publications
may be grouped in five categories:
field-based descriptive and analytical
monographs; studies on regional, local and
ethnic distributions of artworks; thematically
oriented studies; exhibition catalogues; and
picture books. Each of these five categories
includes works that significantly influenced
the development of African art studies: some
of the earliest publications introduced novel


methodological insights, other writings
yielded new information based on first-hand
research, while still others provided a
framework for the aesthetic appreciation of
African objects. Through a critical analysis
of some of these landmark publications on
the arts of sub-Saharan Africa published in
the first half of the 20th century, the
proposed panel hopes to shed new light on
the historiography of African art. Those
interested are invited to propose papers that
focus on an influential publication from one
of the above-mentioned categories.

The Woman and Child in African and
Diaspora Arts
Chair: Herbert M Cole (University of
California, Santa Barbara)
Contact: Herbert M Cole
c/o Dept. of the History of Art and
Architecture
University of California
Santa Barbara, CA 93106
Email: skipcole@humanitas.ucsb.edu

This panel is part of an effort to lay the
conceptual groundwork for a traveling
exhibition on "The Woman and Child in
African and Africa-derived Arts" Intended to
include the Diaspora, contemporary art,
popular art, and photography, as well as
earlier, better known examples of the
subject. The exhibition as currently
envisioned will engage historical
manifestations (as in Ethiopia) and the
following topoi: reporting, mythologizing,
affirming, idealizing, questioning, resisting,
and critiquing. Contemporary South Africa
is an especially fruitful source of
woman-and-child imagery and ideas; three
papers have been proposed thus far: on the
work of Penny Siopis, on Jane Alexander,
and on photographic representations. A
paper on the African-American artist John
Biggers is also anticipated. Many other
possibilities exist, of course, and papers on







Caribbean/Brazilian and other
"post-traditional" African manifestations of
woman/mother-and-child are particularly
sought for this panel.

Spirits without Boundaries
Chair: Susan Elizabeth Cooksey (University
of Florida)
Contact: Susan Elizabeth Cooksey
1705 NW 34th Place
Gainesville, FL 32605
(352) 379-4803
email: susancooksey@uiowa.edu
email: susancooksey@hotmail.com

This panel will explore the processes of
aesthetic transformation of spirit beings as
they cross cultural, political, social,
geographic, and religious boundaries. The
panel, "Spirits Without Boundaries," will
focus on the connections between aesthetic
choices, spiritual characteristics, and
reproductionn of meaning within changing
contexts. It will examine the mediation of
these processes through human and spiritual
agency. The impact on individual and
communal identity from assimilation or
displacement of spirit beings will be
investigated. It will also consider how the
redefinition of spirit forces effects practices,
contexts and notions of healing, divination,
sorcery and witchcraft, religious importation
and exportation, ritual transgenderism and
transvestism, among others, and how these
transforming/transformative contexts
manifest themselves in the visual and
performing arts.

Creating with Breath and Tongue: Art as
Language/Language as Art
Chair: Vincent O. Cooper (University of the
Virgin Islands)
Contact: Vincent O. Cooper
P.O. Box 9130
St. Thomas, USVI 00801
Telephone: (340)-693-1351


Email: vcooper@uvi.edu

This panel focuses on language as a
performance art which characterizes the
resonance of Caribbean and Diasporan
expressive culture. Expressive use of verbal
language includes oratory, poetry, song
texts, incantations, eulogies, and so forth.
The geography of the topic extends to
textual images in calypso; sounds and power
in the orature of Rastafari; images of Africa
and Africans in Afro-Cuban Poetry,
Caribbean immigration narratives as
dramatic performance; poetry of the middle
passage; and how the language used by
carnival characters has influenced
Trinidadian poets. The panel explores the
linkages which comprises the Pan-Caribbean
Oral Heritage.

They DO Go Bump in the Night
Chairs: Donald Cosentino and Allen F.
Roberts (UCLA)
Contact: Donald Cosentino
email: cosentin@humnet.ucla.edu
Allen F. Reoberts
email: allenr@arts.ucla.edu

David Freedberg (The Power of Images,
1989:135) has noted that in the literature of
representation, images may be described,
"but the relation between how they look and
why they work are almost entirely passed
over." As much can be said of the study of
African arts, from visual to performative to
architectural: Most of us pull our punches
when it comes to the efficacy of art. When
we write about what we have been told
during our research, we resort to qualifiers
and distancing terms. How often does one
read something like "X BELIEVES that the
figure runs about at the periphery of human
vision, stealing and raising havoc, although
[WE know that] any such attributed activity
is due to human agency"? Understanding
human agency (a.k.a. politics) is essential to







contextual study of African arts, to be sure;
but so is taking that next, difficult step
beyond one's own culturally constructed
disbelief. It isn't "only a movie," after all.
Yet, it is one thing to hear Rowland
Abiodun's clarion call to put the "African"
back in "African art," and quite another to
answer it. The papers of this panel will
address Abiodun's and Freedberg's
assertions through case studies of the
relationships between how things look and
why they work.

Craft\art projects in Africa, the
Caribbean and other localities of the
African Diaspora: remedy or malady?
Chair: Antoinette du Plessis (University of
South Africa, Pretoria)
Contact: Antoinette du Plessis
Art History and Visual Art
UNISA
PO Box 392
Pretoria 0003 South Africa
Tel.: 012 4296061 (office)
012 6640456 (home)
Fax: 012 4293556

Income-generating projects have become an
established feature of contemporary art
production in Africa, the Caribbean and
other areas of the previously colonized
world. In this session, consideration is given
to social, political and economic dynamics
of craft\art projects and to their effects on
issues such as definitions\perceptions of art,
marketing, brokerage and collecting, as well
as their social, political and economic
effects, locally as well as internationally.

The Arts of the Rastafari
Chair: Gene Emanuel (University of the
Virgin Islands)
Contact: Gene Emanuel (Via Robert
Nicholls)


This panel explores the conceptual, physical,
and phenomenological world of Africa and
its Diaspora as expressed in Rastafarian arts.
Panelists will explore and illustrate the
Rastafarian world view through the creation
of "word art," paintings, wood carvings,
chanting, music, adornment, and the signs of
Rastafari used in the cosmology. Rastafarian
beliefs are examined in the context of the
movement's culture and expressive nature
including human's relationship with nature
and the environment. This panel also
presents the search for essential icons of
Rastafari in the global forms and
dispositions of historical arts and the Rasta's
divergence from the norms of Western arts.
Diffusion plays an important role in the
transmission of Rastafarian artistic skills and
themes, individual autonomy, insight, and
self-instruction are also demonstrably
important. Panelists will explore the beliefs
and communal forms of culture that have
been incorporated into Rastafarian customs
and the mor6s of its global community.

Self and Other: Portraiture in
Contemporary African and Caribbean
Art
Chair: Barbara E. Frank (State University of
New York at Stony Brook)
Contact: Barbara E. Frank
Department of Art
State University of New York at Stony
Brook
Stony Brook, New York 11794-5400
516-632-7264 office
516-474-2986 home
bfrank@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

African art is often characterized as a
collective enterprise in which "tribe" or
"ethnicity" serves as the primary marker of
artist identity and the creation of cultural
archetypes as the primary result. While
useful in some contexts, this kind of framing
has tended to limit our perceptions of much








of contemporary African and Diaspora
artistic production. By focusing on
representations of the individual in
contemporary African art, this panel seeks to
challenge such stereotypes held in the public
imagination. Contemporary artists from
Africa, like those elsewhere in the world,
think of themselves first and foremost as
artists and individuals. Ethnic and national
concerns are just part of the life experiences
that inform their work and identity.
Speakers will be asked to address the extent
to which African and Caribbean artists have
represented the individual in their work,
from conscious presentations of self, to more
enigmatic representations that reflect the
artists' interactions with and interpretations
of others. The panel will explore how artists
have used this particular genre to
communicate both the personal and the
political. This panel is an extension of a
symposium held in conjunction with an
exhibition entitled Distinguished Identities:
Contemporary African Portraiture at Stony
Brook in February of 2000.

Crosstalk: Cultural and Artistic
Influences across the Atlantic
Chair: Michael D. Harris (University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Contact: Michael D. Harris
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Department of Art
Hanes Art Center, CB# 3405
Chapel Hill, N.C. 27599
(919) 962-6853, (919) 962-2015
email: Olonamdh@aol.com

This panel intends to explore the artistic and
cultural exchanges and influences among
artists born in Africa and those from the
African Diaspora during the twentieth
century. These exchanges and influences
might run in either direction and be affected
by travel to or from Africa by the artists.


Trauma and representation: Issues in the
imaging of violence
Chairs: Shannen Hill (University of Denver)
and Kimberly Miller (University of
Wisconsin, Madison)
Contact: Kim Miller
Transylvania University
Dept. of Art
300 N. Broadway
Lexington, KY 40508
e-mail: kamille3@students.wisc.edu

Shannen Hill
University of Denver
School of Art and Art History
2121 East Asbury Avenue
Denver, CO 80208
phone 303-871-2846; 800-876-3323
e-mail: shill@du.edu

This panel considers ways in which African
experiences of trauma and violence are
addressed in visual culture. Research either
in Africa or within its Diaspora is
encouraged. Our intention is to facilitate a
clearer understanding of the complex
relationships between past or present
traumatic experiences and visual
representation. We are interested in the
multiple ways individuals address or process
violent experiences through art making and
how these visual products inform others.
Papers should analyze important issues
embedded in traumatic images or those that
attend images which address traumatic
experiences. Examples can include (but are
not limited to): ethical considerations artists
face when addressing traumatic histories; the
roles of collective or personal memory in
visually recounting and/or recovering from
such histories; commemorating traumatic
experiences through performance or
monument; creation as a means of revisiting
and/or healing from traumatic experience;
problematic questions about the very
imaging of violence and trauma. Papers that








address such issues as they attend images of
people or places in Africa or its Diaspora are
encouraged. In all cases, we ask authors to
engage in the problematic of violent
representation in order to enhance
understandings of trauma in African lives.

Aspects of Carnival and Caribbean
Festivals Pageantry
Chair: Ededet Iniama (University of the
Virgin Islands)
Contact: Ededet Iniama
University of the Virgin Islands
Social Sciences Division
St. Thomas, USVI 00802-9990
340-693-1621
340-776-2337
e-mail: einiama@uvi.edu

The panel aim to redefine Caribbean
carnivals in the light of actual practices and
according to current conceptualizations
rather than to outworn scholarly models.
Carnivals are no longer simply regarded as
rites of reversal, where class struggles and
repression can find a public forum, nor as
mere sociopolitical affirmations. The panel
will explore the commodification of carnival
as a socio-economic entity, as a catalyst to
Caribbean development, and the promotion
of tourism.

Aspects of African and Diasporan Dance
Chair: Irene V. Jackson-Brown (Independent
Scholar, Senior Fellow Phelps-Stokes Fund)
Contact: Irene V. Jackson-Brown
5248 Colorado Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20011
202-722-4205 (office and fax)
e-mail Ivjb@aol.com

Although common to all societies, dance has
been Africa's superlative art form and is
characterized by a rhythmic complexity that
is unparalleled elsewhere. For the traditional
African, dance is often a means of bringing


the sacred into the mundane affairs of
humans. During funerals in many West
African traditional settings, communal
dances are held and masquerades dance to
signify the acceptance of the deceased's
spirit into the ancestral realms. In the
pre-emancipation New World, however,
dance as a form of worship was actively
circumscribed by the planters. This panel
will explore the process of change from
African to African-American dance. Some
Caribbean Afro-Creole dances such as the
Bomba, Gombay, and Bamboula cannot be
identified with any particular African group
instead they are generically "West African."
In contrast, among some later arriving
African groups, such as Yoruba indentured
servants in Trinidad, cultural traits have
been more directly transferred. Among the
North American enslaved population,
African religious elements were retained in
the form of the Shout. Much of African
religious style, fervor, format and
predisposition in worship has persisted in
African American culture in both sacred and
secular vestment.

Boundaries
Chair: delejegede
Contact: delejegede
Department of Art
Indiana State University
Terre Haute IN. 47809
Telephone: (812) 237-3722
(812) 232-0038
Fax: 812.237.4369
E-mail: arjeged@ruby.indstate.edu
tolulop@aol.com

This panel will entertain serious papers
dealing with problems pertaining to
confluences and boundaries, paradoxes,
contradictions and hegemonic canons in
African, Caribbean, and Diaspora expressive
cultures. In recent times, there have been
discussions regarding the context within







which we frame the discipline: either
through an uncritical acceptance and
application of colonial epistemology, or the
unguarded embracement of postmodernist
fads. Issues have been raised pertaining to
terminologies and taxonomies appropriate
within the field. Terms like "tribe,"
"nonwestem," "traditional," "classical,"
"contemporary," "modem," "postcolonial,"
and "postmodern" are used in ways that
seem to deny, confuse or obscure any
distinctly African thesis. What are the
theoretical directions for relativizing African
art history in the twenty-first century? What
are the distinctions between high art and
popular culture in relation to the African
Diaspora? In economies where the
production of art follows a path that
trivializes the art historian's penchant for
compartmentalization, how do we account
for "cross-over" artists: those whose
performances do not easily fall within one
boundary? To what extent have we been
slow, or even reluctant, in coming up with
new perspectives and theoretical framework
that are applicable to the context of the
production of art in Africa and the African
Diaspora? This panel will consider papers
that present new data in ways that offer fresh
insights into the artificiality of boundaries as
this pertains to art and performance in the
African Diaspora. We are interested in
papers that confront the arbitrariness of
boundaries physical, metaphorical, political,
creative, methodological and scholarly
among these. What is contemporary about
contemporary African art? And what is
traditional about it? In what ways have
Africanist scholars failed to keep up with, or
appropriately acknowledge, the
inventiveness and independence of African
artists? To what extent have Africanist
scholars become too comfortable with the
past at the expense of the present? What are
the parameters responsible for the benign
neglect of practicing African artists not only


abroad, but at home? And how do African
artists working outside of their home
countries exemplify the issue of boundaries?

Over Here and Back There: Applying
Current Theory to Practice in Africa
Chair: Sidney Littlefield Kasfir (Emory
University)
Contact: Sidney L. Kasfir
Associate Professor
Department of Art History
Carlos Hall Faculty Curator of African Art
Michael C. Carlos Museum
Emory University
Atlanta Georgia 30322
Tel.: 404-727 0808
fax 404 727 2358
e-mail: hartsk@emory.edu

During the past decade, groundbreaking new
work has been carried out in relation to
transnational African artists who are as
much at home in New York, London and
Miami as in Lagos, Abidjan and
Johannesburg. This writing, much of it by
transnational African artists and curators
themselves, has produced valuable insights
into post-coloniality, cultural nomadism,
globalization, modernity, imagined identities
and not least, the complex cultural politics
of the institutionalized artworld. A second
and seemingly quite different line of inquiry
has concerned the cultural brokerage which
has propelled both old and new genres of
African art into the museums and living
rooms of Europe, America and further
afield, linking art to other commodities in a
global market. And a third has focused on
African art as an aspect of popular culture
and its thematic construction of modernity
and colonialism. What has not yet happened
to any significant degree is the coalescence
of these separate streams of analysis, or the
application of the theoretical insights from
one stream to another. This panel therefore
seeks papers which address any of these







cross-over issues and situations: for
example, how have colonialism and
modernity reconfigured old-style kin-based
workshops, or traditional genres such as
masquerading? What can be said of
artist-intellectuals working in
less-"connected" African localities and their
relation to the global artworld? Conversely,
how might postcolonial or globalization
theory be applied usefully in places where it
usually isn't, say, to government-sponsored
cultural festivals? The twofold aim of the
panel is to stimulate the integration of these
separate streams of inquiry and to test the
usefulness of popular theoretical constructs
within current artistic practice in Africa
itself.

Inside-Outside: Africa as Interpreted by
Contemporary Artists
Chair: Betty LaDuke
Contact: Betty LaDuke
610 Long Way
Ashland, OR 97520
Tel.: 541-482-4562

Almost a century has passed since the
"discovery" of African art and the
absorption and utilization of African
aesthetic principles by contemporary
Western painters and sculptors. How has the
tide of cross-cultural exchange continued to
evolve and reflect in the work of African
artists living within the continent and the
Diaspora? How have international artists of
non-African heritage experienced and
portrayed Africa? The goal of this panel is
to consider, compare, and contrast visual
expressions related to or inspired by African
traditions and culture from the following
perspectives: (1) The artist's geographical
identity, inside or outside Africa (2) Ethnic
multiplicity and diversity (3) Thematic
content inspired by myth, traditions, social
issues and politics or contemporary African
life (4) Stylistic influences amalgamating


past and present, including cross-cultural
interchange (5) The growing visibility and
contribution of women artists (6) The
significance of cross-cultural exchange and
interchange for artists such as workshops,
galleries, publications, etc. (7) Transcending
borders: what is gained as well as lost

New Developments in the Arts of Male
Initiation in Africa and the Diaspora
Chair: Frederick Lamp (The Baltimore
Museum of Art)
Contact: Frederick Lamp
Curatorial Department
The Baltimore Museum of Art
Art Museum Drive
Baltimore, MD 21218
410-396-7056 (office)
410-396-6562 (Fax)
e-mail: FJLamp@aol.com

Ritual initiation into adulthood has been a
powerful feature for men in many parts of
Africa for centuries. Initiation procedure
often employs the arts of sculpture, masking,
costuming, dance, theater, music, oral
narrative, and poetry as an educational tool.
In the new Africa and in the African
Diaspora, new initiations are taking place in
new contexts: the military, youth projects,
fraternities, syncretic religions, and politics.
The continuing interest within gender
studies on masculinity as a social,
philosophical, and aesthetic construct would
benefit from an examination of African
initiation into manhood and its transition
into contemporary milieux. The panel will
examine multiple views of masculinity and
how a society proceeds to engender them
through the use of the arts.

Yoruba Influences in African Diaspora
Art
Chair: Babatunde Lawal (Virginia
Commonwealth University)
Contact: Babatunde Lawal







Department of Art History
Virginia Commonwealth University
922 W. Franklin Street
Richmond, VA 23284-3046
Fax: (804) 828-7468
e-mail: ILawal@aol.com

A survey of African Diaspora art reveals an
extensive use of Yoruba cultural and artistic
motifs in a variety of contexts. In some
cases, the motifs retain much of their
original forms and meanings; in others, they
have been modified, hybridized and/or
recontextualized. This panel will examine
different aspects of this phenomenon in
terms of theory and practice, focusing on the
historical, geographical, social, ideological
and aesthetic processes that have shaped and
continue to reshape it in the African
Diaspora. Overviews, case studies,
comparative analyses and new
methodological perspectives are welcome.

The Role of HBCU's and Black Museums
in Affirming Trans-African Artistic and
Cultural Connections
Chair: Conchita Ndege (NCA&T State
University)
Contact: Conchita Ndege
Director, the Mattye Reed African Heritage
Center
NC A&T State University
Greensboro, NC
Phone # 336-334-3209
Fax 336-334-4378

Within their educational role, museums in
America and the Caribbean have a
responsibility to demonstrate the
interconnections between contemporary
African and African American art and
traditional African art forms. However, for
most of the 20th century and before,
established museums in the United States
and the Caribbean served rather as bastions
for scholarship that focused almost


exclusively on European artistic
contributions. It was left instead to the
museums and art galleries connected to
Historically Black Colleges and Universities
(HBCU's) in the U.S.A. and other newly
emerging black museums to collect and
exhibit black art. These institutions played
an instrumental role in documenting this art
and in demonstrating the links that connect
African, African American and Caribbean
art and culture. The panel will discuss these
contributions and provide a retrospective of
some Trans-African art and cultural
exhibitions that have been in the United
States particularly at black museums and art
galleries connected to HBCU's.

Contemporary Virgin Islands Arts
Chair: to be announced
Contact: Robert Nicholls
University of the Virgin Islands
Division of Education
St. Thomas, VI 00802, USA
Phone: (340) 693-1184
Fax: (340) 693-1335
E-Mail: micholl@uvi.edu

The U.S. Virgin Islands inherits rich and
viable indigenous art traditions which
overlaps with the cultures of other islands in
the Eastern Caribbean and continues to
appear in the folk art and folkways of today's
Virgin Islands. Artists of the 20th century
and today have been challenged with
interpreting the historical culture on canvas
or representing it on the conventional stage.
With fine art in particular the lure of tourist
trade has inveigled many painters to chum
out hackneyed scenes of beaches and palm
trees. Other artists, however, have been able
to successfully combine fine art conventions
with their African and Caribbean heritage
and produce work which successfully
incorporates themes from the local culture.
This panel will explore the evolution of
Virgin Island art and drama as it developed







in the twentieth century, and provide an
introduction to the exhibition of Virgin
Island art that will be concurrent with the
Triennial
Symposium.


Techniques, Convergences and
Divergences: the State of Printmaking in
Africa and the Diaspora
Chair: Barthosa Nkurumeh (Clarion
University of Pennsylvania)
Contact: Barthosa Nkurumeh
6714 Guyer Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19142-2611
e-mail: nkurumeh@altavista.com

Printmaking as an artistic tradition in Africa
has received insufficient attention by art
scholars. In association with the formal and
informal art schools, there exist a group of
informally trained artist, usually addressed
as 'sign writers', who produce screen prints
on vests and badges, and blocks for
letterpress and office uses. The traditional
artists stipple patterns in some of their
creations with hard tools or fingers using
local paints. Surprisingly, Kampala style
(block printing) and cassava-resist
(stenciling) of fabric production are
widespread in traditional Africa. Paper
proposals should address African, African
American, and Caribbean printmaking and
their diverse approaches to the art of
printmaking. Techniques in this context is
also defined broadly to include all
approaches involved in the manipulation of
the printmaking medium tools, materials,
and peculiar ways of sources images and
communicating meanings. Hence, paper
proposals should focus on how
contemporary printmaking has responded to
these pertinent issues.


Femmes Fatales: The Politics of Seduction
in African and Afro Caribbean Art and
Performance
Chair: Mary (Polly) Nooter Roberts (UCLA)
Contact: Mary (Polly) Nooter Roberts
UCLA Fowler Museum of Cultural History
Box 951549
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1549
phone: 310-825-7007
fax: 310-206-7007
proberts @ arts.ucla.edu

Imaging women has been a topic of
considerable interest to Art History in recent
years, yet most studies have focused on the
representation of women in Western art.
This panel invites papers that bring new and
innovative perspectives to bear on issues of
positioning women, depicting desire, and
exploring the politics of the feminine body
in contexts of artistic performance in Africa
and the African Americas. The panel is
inclusive of media ranging from sculpture
and photography to Carnival and other
masquerades invoking the "femme fatale,"
and will give special consideration to
proposals that bring lucid theoretical
understandings to this rich domain of artistic
expression and experience.

Panel Series: Atlantic Rim Performance
Art
Contact: John W. Nunley
The Saint Louis Art Museum
1 Fine Arts Drive
Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63110-1380

The purpose of these panels is to explore the
arts of music, performance, costume, and
masking as they have appeared around the
Atlantic Rim as a result of the Diaspora
migrations from Africa, Europe (and India)
to the New World; and the movements of
Creole Settlers, slaves and soldiers back to
Africa. Most discussions of Africa and the







Diaspora have been too simplistic,
considering an African Diaspora only as a
western movement across the Atlantic. This
new approach (although Nunley organized
one panel on this subject for the New
Orleans Triennial) considers movement in
both directions and, as well, the European
Diaspora. One of the suppositions
underlying this series of papers and panels is
that the mobility of people from the age of
colonization has been highly underrated.
Given the fluidity of transportation and
communication it is not surprising that a rich
variety of performance arts emerged within
the framework of the colonial world and the
new and powerful global economy.

Panel I Diaspora Carnival and Other
Festivals
Chair: to be announced
Contact: John Nunley (see above)

Here panelists will explore the cultural
convergences of European and African
populations in the West Indies and the
carnival that resulted in the new social
settings. Papers will demonstrate, in some
instances, how Old World carnival structure,
dating from the ancient Roman Kalends and
Saturnalia were reconstructed in the Western
Hemisphere in concert with the introduction
of African concepts of festival, renewal, and
performance.

Panel II Jonkonnu and Related
Performing Arts
Chair: Robert Nicholls (University of the
Virgin Islands)
Contact: Robert Nicholls
University of the Virgin Islands
Division of Education
St. Thomas, VI 00802, USA
Phone: (340) 693-1184
Fax: (340) 693-1335
E-Mail: rnicholl@uvi.edu


This panel considers the broad-ranging
Jonkonnu performance complex throughout
the British West Indies. Papers will examine
African elements in masquerading and how
they incorporate European performance
characters and elements of folk theater.
Cultural parallels in the performances result
from the particular nature of British
colonization and specific settling of West
African populations. Papers:

Panel II African and Caribbean
Symbols and Icons in Performance
Elsewhere
Chair: to be announced

Contact: John Nunley (see above)

This group of papers focuses on music and
the format of European plays in African and
the Caribbean. Creole music developed in
the West Indies as part of the Diaspora, has
had a profound influence on West African
urban music, even before the abolishment of
slavery. These "reintroduced" musical
elements have influenced Atlantic Rim
performances on both sides of the Atlantic.
Likewise, European plays introduced into
Africa have contributed to the development
of masquerades, particularly in the Congo
region.

The View from Africa: Internal Evolution
of Contemporary African Art in Selected
Countries
Chair: Simon Ottenberg (University of
Washington)
Contact: Simon Ottenberg
2317 22nd Avenue East
Seattle, WA 98112-2604
Tel.: 206-720-7150
Fax: 206-720-0332
e-mail: otten@u.washington.edu

The emphasis in recent exhibitions,
publications, and other activities in








contemporary African art has been on what
is occurring in Europe and America, and
how African art relates to the current
Western art market, with its own particular
art and aesthetic concerns. This panel will
look at contemporary art activities without
for or five African countries, to show the
nature of the art activities there and the
historical evolution of the art forms within
countries over time. It aims to create a
balance by stressing the importance of
internal developments over time is select
African countries, always recognizing that
the influence of the West is a factor as well.
Comparison of cases may lead to some
hypothesis or possible generalizations.

Postal Images of Africa: a last frontier
Chair: Merrick Posnansky (UCLA)
Contact: Merrick Posnansky
5107 Rubio Ave,
Encino, CA 91436-1124
Tel.: (818) 986-1381
Fax: (818) 986-2014
email: merrick@history.ucla.edu

Postage stamps have been overlooked as
conveyers of images of Africa and yet they
have been produced in 100's of millions for
over a century and have had an impact on
their recipients in both Africa and abroad.
Philatelists have been introduced to the
monuments, masks, and past of Africa from
stamps whose subliminal messages are as
yet unstudied. Stamps are reflective of the
history, current attitudes, global politics and
economic policies and project prevailing
ideologies. These reflections have changed
over time from the imperial themes of the
colonial period to the issues of Independent
Africa which celebrate their cultural
legacies, artistic achievements and national
identities. Archaeology, rock art, crafts,
dress, musical instruments, chiefly regalia
and treasures in metals and ceramics have all
been depicted, This panel seeks to explore


the potential of African stamps and will
focus in particular on the selection and use
of motifs of interest to art historians. Though
philatelists have studied stamp design,
production and circulation, the emphasis of
their study has been on aspects of interest to
western collectors. It is hoped that art
historians will be able to highlight the
messages of stamps both within and without
Africa.

Wearable Tradition: Africa and the Idea
of Africa in Contemporary Fashion
Chairs: Victoria Rovine (The University of
Iowa) and Tina Loughran (Independent
Scholar, Florence)
Contact: Victoria Rovine
The University of Iowa Museum of Art
Tel: (319) 335-1727
Fax: (319) 335-3677
email: victoria-rovine@uiowa.edu

Tina Loughran
Independent Scholar, Florence
Tel: 39 055 234 1076
Fax: 39 055 234 6732
email: ME3059@mclink.it

Contemporary African fashion vividly
illustrates the transnational exchange of
forms and meanings. African textiles and
adornments have been adapted, modified
and transformed to dramatic effect in both
Western and African markets. This panel
will explore how Africa, and the idea of
Africa, offer a wealth of sartorial inspiration
for designers and consumers both in Africa
and beyond. In Africa, designers are making
use of' traditional' forms to create modern
attire. These offer insight into the
interpretation of tradition in contemporary
African contexts, where current fashions
celebrated as traditional often come to
represent national identities in multi-ethnic
modern African nations. Simultaneously,
Western markets transform (stylistically and








conceptually) aspects of African material
culture to serve new markets. African and
African-style garments become broad
referents to non-Western cultures, their
primary appeal lying in their difference from
the familiar. The relationship between local
fashion styles, national symbols, and global
variations may reflect complex political,
economic, social and religious movements,
with fashion serving as a potent visual
expression of both individual identities and
broad cultural shifts.

Aspects of Kaiso (Calypso)
Chair: Ian I. Smart (Howard University)
Contact: Ian I. Smart
10101 Green Forest Dr.
Adelphi, MD 20783
Tel.: 301-439-1666
204-463-1927
Fax: 301-439-5005
e-mail: smartl@idsonline.com

Kaiso (Calypso) is but one of the many
literary forms developed by Africans of the
Western Hemisphere in the difficult
circumstances of enslavement, colonization,
and neocolonization. It has its roots in
Africa and similar literary forms are known
throughout the African Diaspora. The panel
will focus on the Calypso of Trinidad and
elsewhere as an expression of nationalism
and opposition to colonial and post-colonial
governments.

Routes/Roots: Art, Identity, and Agency
in Africa and the Diaspora
Chair: Mikelle Smith Omari-Tunkara (The
University of Arizona)
Contact: Mikelle S. Omari
Art History Program
The University of Arizona
P.O.B, 210002
Tucson, Arizona 85721
Fax: 520-621-2955
Tel: 520-621-9330


e-mail: aasp@U.Arizona.EDU

In the last two decades, many artists in
Africa and the African Diaspora have been
increasingly concerned with the politics of
identity formation and what Dipert (1993)
has coined the "action-theoretics" of agency.
A pivotal site of contestation has been the
definition of "African" itself and an
interrogation of who merits the "privilege"
of that identity. This panel aims to examine
the constituent elements of identity and
agency in representative contemporary
African and African Diaspora societies, as
these operate in post-colonial politics and
ideologies, and as they are expressed or
resolved in art/visual culture declarations.

Summer Study Programs in Africa
Chair: Robert T. Soppelsa (Mulvane Art
Museum/Washburn University)
Contact: Robert T. Soppelsa
Mulvane Art Museum
Washburn University
17th and Jewell
Topeka, KS 66621
phone: (785) 231-1124
fax: (785) 234-2703
e-mail: soppelsa@washburn.edu

Summer Study Programs in Africa and their
Effects on Scholarship will explore the
recent growth of short-term (usually
summer) courses in African studies,
particularly of courses in Art, Craft, Art
History and Anthropology, and their effects
on the scholarship in African Art.

Erotics, Exotics and Deviant Beings in
African Art: Old Dilemmas/New
Perspectives
Chair: Barbara Thompson (University of
Northern Iowa)
Contact: Barbara Thompson
2518 Putnam St. NE
Iowa City, IA 52240







tel: (319) 643-4278
fax: (319) 643-4278
e-mail: makinyashi@hotmail.com

This panel will explore the intentional
representation, (de)construction and
conceptualization of exotic, erotic and
deviant behavior and beings in images of the
self and the other in African and Caribbean
visual and performing arts. Papers will
address the discipline's past and present
positions and/or frameworks in the study of
these topics in African and Caribbean art,
including an examination of (changing)
definitions of the erotic, exotic and deviant
within the context of transforming cultural
and societal experiences. Papers may also
address the use and significance of real and
perceived images of human, spiritual or
mythical beings as erotic, exotic or deviant
beings; practices, beliefs, representations
and significance of sexuality as expressed in
African art, including but not limited to
heterosexuality, polygamy, circumcision,
homosexuality, cross-sexuality, and
cross-dressing; and discussions of past and
present culture heroes, kings and/or
transgressing humans, spirits, and deities
whose eroticism, exoticism and/or deviance
contribute to the transformation of African
culture and society.

'Travelers to the Stream':
African-American Artist-Travelers to the
Caribbean, 1930-1960
Chairs: Krista Thompson (Emory
University) and Jackie Francis (Emory
University)
Contact: Krista Thompson
P.O. Box N-7843
Nassau, Bahamas.
Tel. 242 327-8051
FAX 242 322-3919
e-mail kthoml3@emory.edu

Jacqueline Francis


Kenyon College
Art History Department
Gambier, Ohio 43022
Tel. (740) 427-5349
FAX (740) 427-5673
jfranci@emory.edu

A century after the black Philadelphian
Robert H. Douglass (1801-1887) travelled to
the Caribbean to paint and photograph
people and scenes, a number of his
African-American artistic successors
journeyed to the region for inspiration and
study of black Diasporic visual culture,
history, and religion. Considering the
creative accomplishments of these
twentieth-century artist-travelers among
them William E. Scott, Richmond Barthe,
James A. Porter, Eldzier Cortor, and Lois
Mailou Jones this panel will explore the
central and recurring role of the Caribbean
in African-American art and culture. The
question for this panel is "What was the
Caribbean to them?" (to paraphrase Countee
Cullen's celebrated query, "What is Africa to
me?"). This panel examines
African-American artist-travellers who
travelled to the Caribbean, both literally and
figuratively, in search of African diasporic
connections, origins, "the folk," or to escape
racial hostility in the US. Our goals are to
detail the facts of their individual journeys,
discuss their ensuing artistic production,
examine the artists' relationships to art and
cultural movements in the Caribbean and to
historicize the African-American outlook on
the Caribbean.

"Can We Cover the Continent? Issues
Raised when Regarding (all) the Art of
(all) Africa"
Chair: Monica Blackmun Visona
(Metropolitan State College of Denver)
Contact: Monica Blackmun Visona
Department of Art (Box 59)
Metropolitan State College of Denver







Denver, CO 80217-3362
o: (303) 556-3090
h: (303) 989-7748
e-mail: visonam@mscd.edu

The new textbook, 'A History of Art in
Africa', presents pedagogical challenges to
professors whose syllabi now focus on the
arts of western and central Africa. It also
asks us to confront our assumptions that the
term "African art" applies only to
sub-Saharan African cultures, or only to the
art of peoples who speak languages of the
Niger-Congo family. Papers submitted to
this panel will examine the implications of
defining "African art" as art made by
Africans (even when those Africans are also
identified as Egyptian, Tunisian, Swahili, or
Khoisan). Papers may report upon new
methodologies and forms of inquiry
necessitated by fieldwork in geographical
regions or chronological periods of African
art which have previously been omitted from
surveys of the continent. They may also
address general questions raised by the
forays of africanists into the fields of
Islamic, or Asian, or Medieval European art,
or into disciplines such as Egyptology, or
contemporary art criticism.

Imagining Africa: What is at stake and
for whom?
Chairs: Moira West (The University of
California at Santa Barbara) and Carol
Magee (Dickinson College)
Contact: Moira West
3950 Via Real #99
Carpinteria CA 93013
805-684-6729
e-mail: moiraw00@umail.ucsb.edu

Carol Magee
e-mail: clmagee@ix.netcom.com
before August 1
3707 Roland Avenue
1st Floor


Baltimore, MD 21211
410-662-7070

after August 1
Dickinson College
Fine Arts Department
P.O. Box 1773
Carlisle, PA 17013-2896

The recent fervor around Henry Louis Gates,
Jr.'s "Wonders of the African World"
suggests to us that the time has more than
come to seriously examine the many ways
African cultures are engaged by peoples
from outside those cultures. The ideas of
Africans that Gates presented did not ring
true to many. How are we to understand
such disjunctions? Where else do they
occur? What are some of the ways that
Africa is represented? Who is involved in
this representation? What are the
implications of these representations? What
is at stake and for whom? We welcome
papers that analyze such imaginings from
any region of the globe. How for example is
Yoruba culture imagined differently in
Nigeria, the Caribbean, Europe and/or the
Americas? Areas that might prompt such
pondering include: the academic treatment
of African art and culture; artist's
appropriation of African visual motifs;
representations of Africa in literature or
film; the international mass marketing of
Africa-inspired objects; museum studies;
and popular culture. The above topics and
questions are offered to start the discussion;
please feel free to ask your own relevant
questions or suggest topics that we failed to
mention.

Performing Cosmopolitanism: History
and the Politics of Being from Somewhere
Else
Chair: Bob W. White (University of
California, Santa Cruz)
Contact: Bob W. White







Assistant Professor
Department of Anthropology
University of California, Santa Cruz
Email: bwhitel@po-box.mcgill.ca
Tel: 202.554.3820
Fax: 450.674.2064

As Ulf Hannerz has argued,
cosmopolitanism can be seen as a social
dialogue with the other. At the same time,
cosmopolitanism must also be understood as
a "way of managing meaning" and is just as
often directed toward local audiences, from
whom the performance of cosmopolitan
gestures and behavior is intended to mark I
some form of social or cultural distance. I
What is it that urges certain individuals to
associate themselves with new and 'far
away' identities while others prefer all that
is 'local'? Why is it that some make every
effort to get on modernity's train while
others do not? And how do we explain
these trends and gestures? In terms of deep
social structures and cultural rifts or, as
James Ferguson has recently argued, as
"modes of practical action"? For the .
purposes of this panel, questions of personal
style are important, but performative
moments (not only in the linguistic sense) |
show the way that cosmopolitanism
manifests itself as a set of hopes and
aspirations of social groups as well. Papers
in this session will look at (1)
cosmopolitanism as a social phenomenon
which cannot be understood without an eye
to historical context and (2) examine how
people in Africa and the African diaspora
manage the already polluted and potentially
dangerous spaces in between city and
country, friends and kinship, and the world
of humans and spirits.

Theillustration Used in this newsletter is the Tennal logo designed by dele jeged. It
represents the Mocko Jumbi a stilt-dancing masquerader and one of the favorite characters of
the Carnival in the Virgin Islands.







Individual Paper Proposal
Arts Council of the African Studies Association
12th Triennial Symposium on African Art
April 25-29, 2001, St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands

PLEASE READ THE INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY BEFORE COMPLETING THIS FORM

Please read the panel abstracts carefully to determine if you wish to submit a paper
proposal to one of the panels. Proposals for existing panels will receive a priority. Mail
proposals for existing panels directly to the panel's chair at the address provided with the
abstract. You are encouraged to communicate with the chair before submitting your
proposal. The panel chairs have the sole discretion in selecting or rejecting your paper.
If you cannot find a suitable panel, you may elect to submit an unattached proposal. The
Program Committee will attempt to organize accepted unattached proposals into open
sessions. If the panel chair rejects your proposal, you may elect to have it forwarded to
the Program Committee to be considered as a proposal for an open session. You may
only submit one proposal. Persons submitting proposals must be members of ACASA
(See enclosed Membership Form.) Sch61ars and professionals resident in Africa or the
Caribbean are exempt. Enclose an abstract of no more than 500 words outlining the
basic premise and scope of your paper and a one page CV. The deadline for paper
proposals is September 15, 2000.


Name: Affiliation:

Paper Title:


Address:


e-mail: Tel.: Fax:


Check one
SThis is a proposal for an existing panel (mall directly to panel's chair)
If your paper is not accepted, would you like for it to be
considered for an Open Session ? Yes II No |

SThis is a proposal for an Open Session (mail to Eli Bentor, Triennial 2001,
Department of Art, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC 28608, USA)

Audio-visual equipment: All meeting rooms will have two slide projectors.
Do you need a VCR & Monitor Overhead projector Other
Please note that we may not be able to provide special equipment.







The Arts Council of the African Studies Association


Application for African and Caribbean Scholars Travel Grants to Attend the Twelfth
Triennial Symposium on African Art

The Arts Council of the African Studies Association has limited funds to support African and
Caribbean Scholars' participation in the Triennial Symposium on African Art. To be eligible you
must reside regularly in Africa or the Caribbean and be engaged full-time in studying,
administering, or being creatively involved with visual art, music, performance or a related field.
You must present a paper or participate in another official part of the symposium. You can only
apply if you travel to the symposium from Africa or the Caribbean. Please be aware that even if
you receive an award, it will not cover the full expense of attending the symposium.

Name:
Address:


email:
Academic or Professional Affiliation:
Focus of Research / Creative Work:

I will be traveling from:


Describe your contribution to the symposium (delivering a paper, chairing a panel, etc.)








Enclose a CV and any other supporting material.

If you are proposing a paper to an existing panel, enclose your application with your paper
proposal and mail it to the panel's chair. If you are a panel chair or you are proposing a paper to
an open session, please forward your application to Eli Bentor, Department of Art, Appalachian
State University, Boone, NC 28607, USA. (bentore@appstate.edu). The deadline for the
complete application is September 15, 2000.

Panel Chair: The African / Caribbean scholar proposing a paper for your panel is requesting an
ACASA travel grant. Please consider it carefully and provide a short and candid evaluation of
the contribution of the proposed paper to your panel. Should you decide not to accept the paper
proposal, please forward this application with the proposal to Eli Bentor.








The Arts Council of the African Studies Association


Application for Graduate Students Travel Grants to Attend the Twelfth Triennial
Symposium on African Art

The Arts Council of the African Studies Association has limited funds to support graduate
students participating in the Triennial Symposium on African Art. To be eligible you must be
enrolled as a full-time student in a graduate program focusing on African (including African-
American and Caribbean) visual art, music, performance or a related field. You must present a
paper or participate in another official aspect of the symposium. You should be aware that even
if you receive an award, it will not cover the full expense of attending the symposium.

Name:

Address:


email:
Academic Institution:
Focus of Research:

I will be traveling from:


Describe your contribution to the symposium (delivering a paper, chairing a panel, etc.)







Enclose a Short CV and a letter of support from your academic advisor.

If you are proposing a paper to an existing panel, enclose your application with your paper
proposal and mail it to the panel's chair. If you are a panel chair or you are proposing a paper to
an open session, please forward your application to Eli Bentor, Department of Art, Appalachian
State University, Boone, NC 28607, USA. The deadline is September 15, 2000.

Panel Chair: The graduate student proposing a paper for your panel is requesting an ACASA
travel grant. Please consider it carefully and provide a short and candid evaluation of the
contribution of the proposed paper to your panel. Should you decide not to accept the paper
proposal, please forward this application with the proposal to Eli Bentor.







Hotel Reservation Form
Twelfth Triennial Symposium on African Art
St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands April 25 29, 2001

SINGLE OCCUPANCY: $170.00 Daily, plus Service Charge & Tax
DOUBLE OCCUPANCY: $170.00 Daily, plus Service Charge & Tax
SPECIAL: Palm Court Rooms $150.00 Daily, plus Service Charge & Tax (Single or Double Occupancy)
(All Rooms $40.00 extra person charge for persons 19 years or older. Children 18 years and under stay for free
in the parents' room)

Rates quoted are per room, per night based on European Plan (no meals included). Rates are for Run of House
accommodations at Marriott Frenchman's Reef Beach Resort. Room rates are subject to 5% Service Charge
covering gratuities to bellmen, maids and housemen, and 8% Government Room Tax.

Special ACASA group rates will be in effect for the dates of April 23 May 1 (subject to availability at the time
of booking).

A deposit amount of $340.00 is required for guaranteed reservations. Cancellation of any individual reservation
within 30 days prior to arrival will be subject to forfeiture of advance deposit.

Please note that you have been provided a special group rate that includes meeting facilities, other services and
amenities. Should you reserve accommodations at other than the contracted group rate, you will be subject to a
surcharge for the use of our facilities.

For final payment of account, Marriott Frenchman's Reef accepts all major credit cards, traveler's checks and
cash (USD).

Please guarantee my room deposit to my Credit Card: AMEX, VISA, DISC, DC, CB
Card #: Exp. Date:
Signature:
NAME: (As it appears on credit card):
(Charge will be posted against credit card, once reservation is received)
Reservation to be reserved under the name:
Company/Organization:
Address:_
City: State: Zip:
Phone (day): (evening):
Arrival date: Departure date:
Arrival Flight: Departure flight:
Number of rooms: Number of adults:
Number of Children: Ages of Children:
Marriott Reward #
Regular Room: Palm Court Room:

TO MAKE RESERVATION BY MAIL:
Make checks payable to FRENCHMAN'S REEF. Please allow ten (10) days for mail to reach St. Thomas. Mail
this form along with check or credit card guarantee to:
Marriott Frenchman's Reef
Attn: Group Reservations
P.O. Box 7100
St. Thomas, USVI 00801-0100

TO MAKE RESERVATION BY FAX:
Please fax this form with credit card guarantee information to:
Attn: Group Reservations
FAX: 340-715-6191
*These rates are competitive and reflect significant discounting, based on anticipated 2001 hotel rates







The Arts Council of the African Studies Association
Membership Form


Regular member $35.00
Special member (student, unemployed, retired) $15.00
Institutional member $35.00_

Additional Voluntary Contribution (please check an option below):
I Contribution to the ACASA endowment: $___
STriennial travel assistance for African scholars and graduate students: $_

Mailing address and phone numbers for Directory and receipt of the newsletter
(PLEASE PRINT)

Name: Affiliation:
Address:

City: State: Zip:
Country:
Home Phone: Work Phone:
Fax: Email:

Additional information please circle or complete

Specialization:. Art History Anthropology Ethnomusicology Other

Current Memberships: ASA CAA AAA Other

Primary Profession: University Teaching Other Teaching Museology

Research Student Other

Primary Regional Focus: W. Africa C. Africa E. Africa N. Africa

Southern Africa Diaspora Other

Ethnic or Country Focus:

Education (highest degree): PhD MA MFA BA Other

Please send your completed membership form and dues to:

Rebecca L. Green
1010 Fine Arts
Bowling Green State University
Bowling Green, OH 43403

Questions regarding membership in ACASA may be directed to Rebecca L. Green at
rlgreen@bgnet.bgsu.edu
This form is available online at http://www2.h-net.msu.edu/-artsweb/welcome/acasa.html







ACASA 2000 Directory of Members
North America, Europe, & Asia


Institutional Members:

African Arts
James S. Coleman African
Studies Ctr, UCLA
Box 951310
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1310
USA
work: 310-825-1310
fax: 310-206-2250
email: afriarts@uola.edu

African Studies Association
Rutgers University, Douglas
Campus
132 George St.
New Brunswick, NJ 08901-1400
USA
fax: 732-932-3394

The Anderson Gallery, INC.
Donna B. Anderson
135 Pierce Street
Birmingham, MI 48009 USA
work: 248-593-6892
fax: 248-593-6932
email: andegall@rust.net
http://www.andersongallery.com

Art Institute of Chicago
Ryerson and Burnham Libraries
111 South Michigan Ave.
Chicago, IL 60603-6492 USA

Arts Edge
Lynne Clement
John F. Kennedy Center
Performing Arts
Washington, DC USA

University Libraries
Periodicals Receiving
Ball State University
Muncie, IN 47306 USA

Ethnography Dept.
Library--Serials Office
British Museum
6 Burlington Gardens
London W1X 2EX
UNITED KINGDOM
fax: 0171-323-8013


e-mail:
pbowman@british-museum.ac.uk

College Art Association
275 Seventh Avenue
New York, NY 10001 USA
work: 212-691-1051

Davis Gallery
Charles and Kent Davis
3964 Magazine Street
New Orleans, LA 70115 USA

Library--Serials Dept.
Getty Research Institute
1200 Getty Center Drive, Suite
1100
Los Angeles, CA 90040-1688
USA

Institute of International Visual
Arts
Kirkman House
6-8 Standard Place, Rivington St.
London, EC2A 3BE
UNITED KINGDOM
work: 44-20-7729-9616
fax: 44-20-7729-9509
email: institute@iniva.org
http://www.iniva.org

Museum of Mankind
Ethnographic Library
British Museum
6 Burlington Gardens
London W1X 2EX
UNITED KINGDOM
work: 0171-323-8032
fax: 0171-323-8013

Neuberger Museum of Art
Purchase College, SUNY
735 Anderson Hill Rd
Purchase, NY 10577 USA
work: 914-251-6100
fax: 914-251-6101
email: gedeon@purchase.edu

Ohio State University
Library, Serial Division
1858 Neil Ave Mall
Columbus, OH 43210-1286
USA


School of Oriental and African
Studies
The Library Serials Office
Thornhaugh St, Russell Square
London, WC1H OX G
UNITED KINGDOM
work: 0171-323-6102
fax: 0171-636-2834
email: mw3@soas.ac.uk

National Museum of African Art
Library
Smithsonian Institution
950 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20560-0708
USA
work: 202-357-4600 x286
email: libmail@sil.si.edu
http://www.sil.si.edu/Branches/n
mafa-hp.htm (library),
www.siris.si.edu (library catalog)

Tribal Arts
20 Avenue Marie Clotilde
1170 Brussels
BELGIUM
home: 00-322-672-7054
work: 00-322-672-7054
fax: 00-322-672-6176

University of East Anglia
Arts of Africa, Oceania,
Americas
Sainsbury Research Unit,
Sainsbury Centre
Norwich, NR4 7TJ
UNITED KINGDOM
work: 1-603-592-498
fax: 1-603-259-401
email: sru.library@uea.ac.uk

University of Illinois
Serials Library
1408 W. Gregory Dr.
Urbana, IL 61801-3807 USA







McKeldin
Library--Acquisitions/Serials
University of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742-7011
USA
work: 301-405-9307
fax: 301-314-9971
http://www.lib.umd.edu/UMCP/

Odum Library--Serials
Valdosta State University
Valdosta, GA 31698 USA


Individual Members:

Paul L. Abbott
4 Mail Coach Court
Wilton, CT 06897 USA
home: 203-834-1156
fax: 203-834-1096
email: plabbott@home.com

Rowland Abiodun
Department of Fine Arts
Amherst College
Amherst, MA 01002 USA
work: 413-542-5801
fax: 413-542-2133

Agbenyega Adedze
Department of History
Illinois State University
P.O. Box 4420
Normal, IL 61790 USA
home: 309-888-4791
work: 309-438-8367
fax: 309-438-5378
email: adedze@ilstu.edu

Laurel Birch Aguilar
St. Salvator's College
University of St. Andrews
North Street
St. Andrews, KY16 9AL
SCOTLAND
email: lbda@st-andrews.ac.uk

Tavy D. Aherne
James Madison University
MSC 7101
Harrisonburg, VA 22807 USA
home: 540-289-7270
work: 540-568-6372
fax: 540-568-6598
email: ahemetd@jmu.edu


Abigail Amols
3801 Morningside Dr. #23
Bloomington, IN 47408 USA
home: 812-333-8051
email: aamols@indiana.edu

Martha Anderson
Alfred University
64 W. University St.
Alfred, NY 14802 USA
home: 607-587-9550
work: 607-871-2468
fax: 607-871-2490
email: fanderson@alfred.edu

Karel Arnaut
Dept of African Languages &
Cultures
Rozier 44
Gent, 9000
BELGIUM
home: 32-7-557-75-28
work: 32-9-264-38-24
email: karel.arnaut@rug.ac.be

Mary Jo Arnoldi
Dept. of Anthropology, NHB
112
Smithsonian Institution
4600 Conn Ave. NW #220
Washington, DC 20008 USA
home: 202-244-5386
work: 202-357-1396
fax: 202-357-2208
email: aroldi.mary@nmnh.si.edu

Lisa Aronson
Department of Art and Art
History
Skidmore College
Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
USA
home: 518-458-2491
work: 518-580-5057
fax: 518-580-5028
email: laronson@skidmore.edu

Paul Austerlitz
Music Department
Brown University
Box 1924
Providence, RI 02912 USA
home: 401-863-3711
fax: 401-863-1256
email:
paul_austerlitz @ brown.edu


Ramona Austin
Dallas Museum of Art
1717 N. Harwood
Dallas, TX 75202 USA
home: 214-922-5300
work: 214-922-1233

Daniel Avorgbedor
School of Music
Ohio State University
110 Weigel Hall
Columbus, OH 43210-1170
USA
home: 614-848-6450
work: 614-292-9441
fax: 614-292-1102
email: avorgbedor. 1 @osu.edu

Joan Bacharach
11900 Coldstream Drive
Potomac, MD 20854 USA
email: Joan_Bacharach@nps.gov

Cynthia J. Becker
University of
Wisconsin--Madison
726 W. Main St., Apt. 310
Madison, WI 53715 USA
home: 608-257-9354
email:
cjbecker@students.wisc.edu

Eli Bentor
Department of Art
Appalachian State University
Boone, NC 28608 USA
home: 828-264-6173
work: 828-262-2579
fax: 828-262-6756
email: bentore@appstate.edu

Marla C. Berns
University Art Museum
UC, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106 USA
home: 805-687-1791
work: 805-893-2951
fax: 805-893-3013
email:
berns@humanitas.ucsb.edu







Kathleen E. Bickford Berzock
Dept of African & Amerindian
Art
Art Institute of Chicago
111 S. Michigan Ave.
Chicago, IL 60202-6110 USA
work: 312-857-7172
fax: 312-443-0849
email: kbickford@artic.edu

Aimee Bessire
0 Salem St.
Portland, ME 04102 USA
home: 207-772-9277
email: bessire@fas.harvard.edu

Judith Bettelheim
5308 Manila Ave.
Oakland, CA 94618 USA
home: 510-653-1769
work: 415-338-2176
fax: 415-338-6537
email: betheim@sfsu.edu

Barbara W. Blackmun
9850 Ogram Drive
La Mesa, CA 91941 USA
home: 619-461-5930
work: 619-627-2928
fax: 619-461-1013
barbara_blackmun@compuserve.
com

Suzanne Blier
Dept. of Fine Arts, Sackler
Museum
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
home: 617-497-1464
work: 617-495-0781
fax: 617-495-1769
email: blier@fas.harvard.edu

Carol Boram-Hays
Ohio State University
791 Oak Street
Columbus, OH 43205 USA
home: 614-621-2742
work: 614-621-2742
email: cboramha@osu.edu

Jean M. Borgatti
295 Maple Ave.
Shrewsbury, MA 01545 USA
home: 508-793-9695
work: 508-925-1516
fax: 508-752-4383


email: jborgatti@aol.com

Peter Brach
240 Park Street
Haworth, NJ 07641 USA
home: 201-385-2869
work: 212-677-0395
fax: 212-667-0797

Camille Brewer
18915 Ohio
Detroit, MI 48221 USA
home: 313-863-1426
work: 313-341-4278
fax: 313-833-3756
email: cabrewer@worldnet.att.net

Nicholas Bridger
1617 Brookvale Drive #1
San Jose, CA 95129 USA
home: 408-966-7854

Jerusha Brown
P.O. Box 3372, Memorial
Station
Upper Montclair, NJ 07043
USA
home: 973-509-1823

Karen H. Brown
1823 Fillmore Street
Caldwell, ID 83605 USA
home: 208-454-5649
mail: kbrown@acofi.edu

Alice Burmeister
Department of Art & Design
Winthrop University
140 McLaurin Hall
Rock Hill, SC 29733 USA
home: 803-324-9065
work: 803-323-2656
fax: 803-323-2333
email:
burmeistera@Winthrop.edu

Elisabeth L. Cameron
Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
4525 Oak Street
Kansas City, MO 64111 USA
work: 816-751-1460
fax: 816-931-7208
email:
ecameron@nelson-atkins.org

Amanda Carlson
202 East Fowler Ave., FAH 110


Tampa, FL 33620 USA
home: 813-258-9488
work: 813-974-9325
fax: 813-974-9226
email: findamand@aol.com

Theodore Celenko
Indianapolis Museum of Art
1200 West 38th Street
Indianapolis, IN 46208 USA
work: 317-923-1331
fax: 317-926-8931
email: mnisenbaum@ima-art.org

S. Terry Childs
Archaeology & Ethnography
Program
National Parks Service
1849 C St, NW (NC210)
Washington, DC 20007 USA
home: 202-333-3321
work: 202-343-1141
fax: 202-523-1547
email: terrychilds@nps.gov

Sonya Clark
University of
Wisconsin--Madison
1300 Linden Dr.
Madison, WI 53706 USA
home: 608-238-0442
work: 608-262-4519
fax: 608-265-5099
email: syclark@facstaff.wisc.edu

Christa J. Clarke
437 E. Dudley Ave.
Westfield, NJ 07090 USA
home: 908-301-9333

Elizabeth A. Clemen
574 Colonial Rd.
Riverdale, NJ 07675 USA
home: 201-666-7494
email: EAClemenl@aol.com

Susan Cooksey
University of Iowa /U. of Florida
1705 NW 34th Place
Gainesville, FL 32605 USA
home: 352-379-4803
work: 352-392-0201
email:
susancooksey @ hotmail.com







Jeremy Coote
Pitt Rivers Museum
University of Oxford
South Parks Road
Oxford, OX1 3PP
UNITED KINGDOM
home: 44-0-1865-243426
work: 44-0-1865-270930
fax: 44-0-1865-270943
email:
jeremy.coote@prm.ox.ac.uk

Donald J. Cosentino
World Arts and Cultures
Department
UCLA
107 S. Gramercy P1.
Los Angeles, CA 90004 USA
home: 323-466-3981
work: 310-206-1498
fax: 323-466-8713
email: cosentin@humnet.ucla.edu

Elsbeth Court
School of Oriental & African
Studies
University of London
24 Russell Square
London, WC 1H OXG
UNITED KINGDOM
fax: IFCOS 020-7898-4809
email: ec6@soas.ac.uk

Mark DOAmato
1435 Bedford Street, Apt. 12b
Stamford, CONN 06905 USA
home: 203-357-9518
work: 212-966-1313 xlll
fax: 212-966-1432
email: arh8@worldnet.att.net

Warren D'Azevedo
1755 Allen Street
Reno, NV 89509 USA
home: 702-786-5331
work: 702-784-6704

Louis de Strycker
Av. des Prisonniers Politique
2/12
B-1150 Brussels, 2240
BELGIUM
work: 32-2-762-9965
fax: 32-2-770-5528

William J. Dewey
2506 Princeton Rd.


Iowa City, IA 52245 USA
home: 319-351-3721
work: 319-335-1784
fax: 319-335-1774
email:
william-dewey @ uiowa.edu

Anne Doquet
Prusines
Lugaignac, 33620
FRANCE
work: 05-57-84-68-08

David Doris
Center for Advanced Study of the
Visual Arts
Yale University
P.O. Box 208272
New Haven, CT 06520 USA
email: david.doris@yale.edu

Henry Drewal
Dept. of Art History--Elvehjem
Museum of Art
University of
Wisconsin--Madison
800 University Ave.
Madison, WI 53706 USA
home: 608-233-2348
work: 608-263-9362
fax: 608-265-6425
email:
HJDREWAL@facstaff.wisc.edu

Roberta Ann Dumbar
CB #3395
University of North Carolina, CH
401 Alumni
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3395
USA
work: 919-966-2942
fax: 919-962-2694
email: radumbar@email.unc.edu

Martha J. Ehrlich
338 N. Fillmore Street
Edwardsville, IL 62025-1758
USA
home: 618-692-6262
work: 618-650-3183


email: jeicher@che2.che.umn.edu

Kate Ezra
Columbia College, Chicago
5483 Hyde Park Blvd.
Chicago, IL 60615 USA
home: 773-955-0413
work: 312-344-7749
fax: 312-344-8008
email: kezra@popmail.colum.edu

William A. Fagaly
New Orleans Museum of Art
915 Saint Philip St.
New Orleans, LA 70116-2407
USA
home: 504-522-9142
work: 504-483-2630
fax: 504-484-6662
email: bfagaly@noma.org

Richard J. Faletti
3165 E. Stella Lane
Phoenix, AZ 85016-2345 USA
home: 602-224-9297(winter);
630-323-6589 (summer)
email: rfaletti@aol.com

D. Francine Farr
1435 4th St. SW,#B-102
Washington, DC 20024 USA
home: 202-488-7401

Laurie Farrell
21-80 38th Street #D-7
Astoria, NY 11105 USA
home: 718-545-5608
work: 212-966-1313 xlll
fax: 212-966-1432
email: lfarrell@u.arizona.edu

Marc Leo Felix
20 Avenue Marie-Clotilde
B-1170 Brussels,
BELGIUM
home: 32-2-672-7054
work: 32-2-672-7054
fax: 32-2-672-6176


Joanne B. Eicher
2179 Folwell Ave.
St. Paul, MN 55108 USA
home: 612-645-2914
work: 612-624-7710
fax: 612-624-2750








Barbara Frank
Department of Art
The University at Stony Brook
SUNY
Stony Brook, NY 11794-5400
USA
home: 516-474-2986
work: 516-632-7264
fax: 516-632-7261
email:
bfrank@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

Ruth K. Franklin
Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Center
for the Visual Arts
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-5060 USA
home: 415-567-4338
work: 650-725-0465
fax: 650-725-1652
email: ruthf@leland.stanford.edu

Andrea Frohne
P. O. Box 780
Vestal, NY 13851 USA
home: 607-724-3761
email: bf20415@binghamton.edu

Phyllis Galembo
125 W. 16th St., apt. 140
New York, NY 10011 USA
home: 212-645-2378
fax: 212-645-2378

Mona Gavigan
Gallery Affrica, Inc.
2010 1/2 R Street, NW
Washington, DC 20009 USA
work: 202-745-7272

Christraud M. Geary
MRC 708
National Museum of African Art
950 Independence Ave. SW
Washington, DC 20560 USA
home: 202-863-9468
work: 202-357-4600 x280
fax: 202-357-4879
email: afaem016@sivm.si.edu

Linda Giles
Anthropology Department
Illinois State University
Campus Box 4660
Normal, IL 61790-4660 USA
home: 309-452-8821
work: 309-438-5713


email: LLGILES@mail.ilstu.edu

Suzanne Gott
until 8/15/00
Art History Dept
Indiana University
1300 S. Palmer
Bloomington, IN 47401 USA
home: 812-339-4229
work: 812-855-5445
fax: 812-855-1023
email: sgott@indiana.edu

Suzanne Gott
after 8/15/00
Liberal Arts Dept
Kansas City Art Inst
4415 Warwick Blvd
Kansas City, MO 64111-1874
USA
work: 816-802-3387
fax: 816-802-3383

Candice Goucher
Chair, Black Studies Department
Portland State University
Portland, OR 97207-0751 USA
work: 503-725-3052
fax: 503-725-4882
email: goucherc@pdx.edu

Joanna Grabski
National Museum of African Art
Smithsonian Institution
950 Independence Ave. SW
Washington, DC 20560-0708
USA
home: 219-924-3179
work: 202-357-4600 x238
fax: 202-357-4879
email: jgrabski@nmafa.si.edu

Gilbert Graham
CW Post, Long Island University
6 Harvard Drive
Woodbury, NY 11797-3303
USA
home: 516-692-8706
fax: 516-692-4366
email: ggilgraham@cs.com

Roda Graham
Hofstra University Museum
6 Harvard Drive
Woodbury, NY 11797-3303
USA
home: 516-692-8706


fax: 516-692-4366
email: ggilgraham@cs.com

Rebecca L. Green
School of Art
Bowling Green State University
1000 Fine Arts
Bowling Green, OH 43403 USA
home: 419-354-1068
work: 419-372-8514
fax: 419-372-2544
email: rlgreen@bgnet.bgsu.edu

Grey Gundaker
American Studies Program
College of William And Mary
PO Box 8795
Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795
USA
home: 804-843-4178
work: 757-221-1273
fax: 757-221-1287
email: gxgund@facstaff.wm.edu

Lawrence Gussman
14 Cooper Road
Scarsdale, NY 10583 USA

Rosalind I. J. Hackett
Department of Religious Studies
University of Tennessee
501 McClung Tower
Knoxville, TN 37966 USA
home: 423-588-1562
work: 423-974-2466
fax: 423-974-0965
email: rhackett@utk.edu

Barry Hallen
Dept. of Philosophy and Religion
Morehouse College
830 Westview Drive, S.W.
Atlanta, GA 30314 USA
home: 404-521-2758
work: 404-215-2607
fax: 404-521-2942
email: hallen@morehouse.edu;
hallen@fas.harvard.edu

Erin Haney
244 Kresge
1859 Sheridan Rd.
Evanston, IL 60201 USA
home: 847-424-9901
email: ehaney@nwu.edu







Emily Hanna
School of Art and Design
Georgia State University
Atlanta, GA 30302 USA
home: 404-651-0503
work: 404-651-2257
fax: 404-651-1779
email: ehanna@gsu.edu

Judith Lynne Hanna
8520 Thornden Terrace
Bethesda, MD 20817 USA
work: 301-365-5683
fax: 301-365-5683
email: jhanna@bss2.umd.edu

Elizabeth Harney
New York University
14 University Place
New York, NY 10003-6607
USA
work: 212-260-0790
fax: 212-998-8891
email: 212-995-4691

Michael D. Harris
2 Rhygate Court
Durham, NC 27713 USA
home: 919-962-2015
work: 919-572-0150
fax: 919-962-0722
email: mharrisl @email.unc.edu

William A. Hart
University of Ulster-Coleraine
Cromore Road
Coleraine, Co.
Londonderry BT52 1SA
N. IRELAND
home: 02820751844
work: 02870324311
email: WA.HART@ulst.ac.uk

Jan Hartman
U.S. Consolate--Barcelona
U.S. Department of State
2550 Luanda Place
Washington, DC 20521-2250
USA
home: 011-244-9-505-124
email: jhartman@usis.ebonet.net

Lisa Rappaport Hendrickson
3271 Ibis Street
San Diego, CA 92103 USA
home: 619-491-0297
work: 619-491-0297


email: Irappaport@hotmail.com

Eugenia Herbert
26 Ashfield Lane
South Hadley, MA 01075 USA
home: 413-536-3864
email: eherbert@mtholyoke.edu

Dunja Hersak
Philosophie et Lettres, d'Histoire
d'Art
University Libre de Bruxelles
C.P. 175
Avenue Franklin Roosevelt 50
Bruxelles 1050
BELGIUM
home: 322-650-4356
work: 322-658-4349
email: dhersak@ulb.ac.be

Stephen Hill
1618 Chevy Chase Dr.
Champaign, IL 61821-4955
USA

Deborah A. Hoover
29 Elm St.
Belmont, MA 02478 USA
home: 617-484-7664
email: dhoover@banet.net

Marilyn H. Houlberg
37 S. Wabash Ave.
Chicago, IL 60603 USA
home: 312-666-4420
work: 312-899-5188
fax: 312-666-6110

Tazim Jaffer
5698 Lamplighter Dr.
Girard, OH 44420 USA
home: 330 759-9742
work: 330-759-7038
fax: 330-759-7071
email: maneno@aol.co

Reinhild Janzen
Washburn University
1700 S.W. College
Topeka, KS 66621 USA
home: 316-799-2585
work: 785-231-1010 x1222
fax: 316-799-2585
email: zzjanzen@wahsburn.edu


2831 Mariposa Drive
Terre Haute, IN 47803 USA
home: 812-232-0038
work: 812-237-3722
fax: 812-237-5948;
812-237-4369
email: arjeged@ruby.indstate.edu
http://139.102.83.130/delejeged
e/index.html

Veronika Jenke
1716 N. Danville St.
Arlington, VA 22201 USA
work: 202-357-4600 x225
fax: 202-357-4879
email: jenkev@nmafa.si.edu

Earnestine Jenkins
University of Memphis
Campus Box 526545
Memphis, TN 38152-6545 USA
home: 901-398-7664
work: 901-678-2649
fax: 901-678-5118
email: eljenkins@memphis.edu

Bennetta Jules-Rosette
Department of Sociology
UC. San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA 92093-0533 USA
home: 760-436-1621
work: 760-436-5882;
858-534-4790
fax: 858-755-7590
email: bjulesro@ucsd.edu

Mory A. Kaba
Tribal Art
6139 Indigo St.
Houston, TX 77074 USA
home: 713-772-2208
email: kaba@usa.com

William Karg
Contemporary African Art
Gallery
330 W. 108th St.
New York, NY 10025 USA
home: 212-749-8848
work: 212-662-8799
fax: 212-662-8799
email: wrkarg@aol.com


dele jegede
Indiana State University









Sidney Littlefield Kasfir
Art History Department
Emory University
Carlos Hall
Atlanta, GA 30322 USA
home: 404-284-4212
work: 404-727-0808
fax: 404-727-2358
email: hartsk@emory.edu

Candace Keller
800 North Smith Rd. 1U
Bloomington, IN 47408 USA
home: 812-323-2740
email: cmkaller@indiana.edu

Carolee Kennedy
1050 N. Stuart St. #229
Arlington, VA 22201 USA
home: 703-841-5861
work: 202-694-1856
fax: 703-841-2187

Zachary Kingdon
Liverpool
Museum--EthnologySection
National Museums and Galleries
on Merseyside
William Brown Street
Liverpool, L3 8EN
UNITED KINGDOM
work: 0151-478-4300
fax: 0151-478-4390
ethnology@nmgnethl.demon.co.
uk

Christine Mullen Kreamer
National National Museum of
African Art
Smithsonian Institution
Washington, DC 20560-0708
tel: (202) 357-4600, ext. 236
fax: (202) 357-4879
e-mail: kreamerc@nmafa.si.edu

Betty LaDuke
Multi-Cultural Images
610 Long Way
Ashland, OR 97520 USA
home: 503-482-4562
fax: 541-482-2584
email: bettyladuke@earthlink.net
http://www.bettyladuke.com

Frederick Lamp
Baltimore Museum of Art
Art Museum Drive


Baltimore, MD 21218 USA
home: 410-235-6130
work: 410-396-7056
fax: 410-396-6562
email: fjlamb@aol.comp

Babatunde Lawal
Art History Department
Virginia Commonwealth
University
922 W. Franklin Street, Box
843046
Richmond, VA 23284-3046
USA
home: 804-346-4450
work: 804-828-2784
fax: 804-828-7468
email: lawal@aol.com

Edward Lifschitz
National Museum of African Art
950 Independence Ave NW
Washington, DC 20560 USA
home: 202-544-0073
work: 202-357-4600 x220
fax: 202-357-4873
email: ed@nmafa.si.edu

Carol Ann Lorenz
7097 Indian Opening Rd.
Madison, NY 13402-9778 USA
home: 315-893-7296
work: 315-228-7184
fax: 315-228-7787
email: clorenz@mail.colgate.edu

Kristyne S. Loughran
Lungarno Serristori 9
Florence, 50125
ITALY
home: 39-055-234-1076
fax: 39-055-234-6732
email: ME3059@mclink.it

Wyatt MacGaffey
Department of Anthropology
Haverford College
908 Cherokee Rd
Louisville, KY 40204 USA

Carol Magee
3707 Roland Ave. 1st fl.
Baltimore, MA 21211 USA
home: 410-662-7070
work: 410-662-7070
email: clmagee@ix.netcom.com


Sharon Maidenberg
171 Mayhew Dr.
South Orange, NJ 07079 USA
email:
smaidenb@students.wisc.edu

Carolyn P. Maitland
160 Henry Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201 USA
home: 718-858-0466
fax: 718-596-7755

James K. Makubuya
Music & Theater Arts, 14N-207
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology
77 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02139 USA
home: 617-479-0940
work: 617-253-4964
fax: 617-253-4523
email: makubuya@mit.edu;
mafumbe@aol.com

J. H. Mayer
325 Audubon Blvd.
New Orleans, LA 70125 USA
home: 504-861-1527
work: 504-861-1527

Julie McGee
Department of Art
Bowdoin College
9300 College Station
Brunswick, ME 04011 USA
home: 207-725-0680
work: 207-725-3906
fax: 207-725-3996
email: jmcgee@bowdoin.edu


Harriet C. McGuire
until 8/2000
Public Affairs Officer in
Mozambique
AmEmbassy-Maputo (PAO)
Dept. of State
Washington DC 20521-2330
USA
home: 258-1-49-19-31
fax: 258-1-49-19-18
email: hmcguire@bigfoot.com







Harriet C. McGuire
after 8/ 2000
3007 Russell Rd
Alexandria, VA 22305 USA
home: 513-821-8473 (msg)
fax: 202-647-0773 (OES/PCI)

John McKesson
880 5th Avenue, 19-E
New York, NY 10021-4951
USA

Sandy Prita Meier
223 E. Davenport St. #6
Iowa City, IA 52245 USA
home: 319 -338-1965
work: 319-353-2468
fax: 319-335-3677

Karen E. Milbourne
Art History
University of Iowa
635 S. Dodge St. #3
Iowa City, IA 52240 USA
home: 319-358-6807
work: 319-335-1440
email:kmilbour@blue.weeg.uiow
a.edu
kmilbourne@earthlink.net

Kim Miller
Art History
University of
Wisconsin--Madison
1222 Fish Hatchery Road
Madison, WI 53715 USA
home: 608-250-1798
email:
kamille3 @students.wisc.edu

Wendell Minott
242 Anelon
Highland Park, IL 48203 USA
home: 313-867-5693
fax: 313-867-5693
email: hotepl06@aol.com

Rebecca Martin Nagy
North Carolina Museum of Art
2110 Blue Ridge Rd
Raleigh, NC 27607 USA
home: 919-839-6262 x2147
work: 919-733-8034
rnagy@ncmamail.dcr.state.nc.us

Conchita P. Ndege


Mattye Reed African Heritage
Center
North Carolina Agricultural
& Technical State U.
1601 East Market St.
Greensboro, NC 27411 USA
home: 336-723-0457
work: 336-334-3204
fax: 336-334-4378
email: ndegec@aol.com

Robert W. Nicholls
Division of Education
University of the Virgin Islands
Charlotte Amalie
St. Thomas, Virgin Islands
00802-9990
USA
home: 340-776-2689
work: 340-693-1184
fax: 340-693-1185
email: micholl@uvi.edu

Nancy Ingram Nooter
5020 Linnean Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20008 USA
home: 202-966-0306
work: 202-966-0306

Robert Nooter
5020 Linnean Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20008 USA
home: 202-966-0306
work: 202-966-0306

Ann O'Hear
PO Box 235, Bridge Station
Niagara Falls, NY 14305-0235
USA
home: 716-282-5487
work: 716-282-5487
email: oheara@sprynet.com

Dubem Okafor
P.O. Box 13261
Reading, PA 19612-3261 USA

Mikelle Smith Omari-Tunkara
Department of Art History
University of Arizona
2157 South Avenida Planeta
Tuscon, AZ 85710 USA
home: 520-790-6813
work: 520-621-9330
fax: 520-621-2955
email: aasp@u.arizona.edu


Jenny L. Oram
Fairwinds, Meadow Way
West Horsley, Surrey KT24 6LL
UNITED KINGDOM
home: 14-83-284103
work: 181-699-1872
fax: 181-291-5506

Simon Ottenberg
University of Washington
2317 22nd Avenue East
Seattle, WA 98112-2604 USA
home: 206-720-7150
fax: 206-720-0332
email: otten@u.washington.edu

Meredith Palumbo
Indiana University
4323 Cherry Orchard Court
Bloomington, IN 47403 USA
home: 812-330-1224
email: mpalumbo@indiana.edu

Philip M. Peek
Department of Anthropology
Drew University
Madison, NJ 07940 USA
home: 973-822-3425
work: 973-408-3383
fax: 973-408-376&
email: ppeek@drew.edu

John Peffer-Engels
Columbia University
355 Douglass St. #2
Brooklyn, NY 11217 USA
email: jmpl2@columbia.edu

Judith Perani
Ohio University
3031 Hartman Terrace
Hayward, CA 94541 USA
home: 510-247-1939
email: perani@ohiou.edu;
perani@earthlink.net

Constantine Petridis
245 East 58th Street, Apt.23B
New York, NY 10022 USA
home: 212-583-1237
work: 212-650-2155

Jerry Philogene
280 Carlton Ave. #2
Brooklyn, NY 11205 USA
home: 718-243-2984
email: JQP7197@is.nyu.edu







Howardena Pindell
Art Department
State University of NY at Stony
Brook
Staller Fine Arts Center-2nd fl.
Stony Brook, NY 11794-5400
USA
home: 212-560-5663
work: 631-632-7266
fax: 631-632-7261

Barbara Plankensteiner
Neue Burg
1014 Wien,
AUSTRIA
home: 43 1-40-22-822
work: 43 1-53430-519
email:
barbara.plankensteiner@ethno-m
usuem.ac.at

Merrick Posnansky
5107 Rubio Avenue
Encino, CA 91436-1124 USA
home: 818-986-1381
fax: 818-986-2014
email: merrick@history.ucla.edu

Robin Poynor
University of Florida
102 FAA, P.O. Box 115801
Gainesville, FL 32611-5801
USA
home: 352-392-0201
work: 352-372-2499
fax: 352-392-3802
email: rpoynor@ufl.edu

Roger H. Prager
139 Sand Dollar Lane
Sarasota, FL 34242 USA
home: 941-346-5235
work: 941-346-7147
email: rogerprager@homes.com

Labelle Prussin
3 Anders Lane
Pomona, NY 10970 USA
home: 914-354-8964
fax: 914-354-0625
email: lprussin@aol.com

Bess (Dorothy) Reed
1851 Woodfill Way
Louisville, KY 40205 USA
home: 502-456-0631
email: benbess@aol.com


Elisha Renne
University of Michigan
1020 L.S.A. Building
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382
USA
home: 734-764-7274
fax: 734-763-6077

Allen F. Roberts
Dept of World Arts & Cultures,
124 Dance Bldg
UCLA
Box 951608
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1608
USA
home: 310-470-7705
email: allenr@ucla.edu

Mary "Polly" Nooter Roberts
Fowler Museum of Cultural
History
UCLA
Box 951549
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1549
USA
home: 310-470-7705
work: 310-825-9025
fax: 310-206-7007
email: proberts@fmch.ucla.edu

Meredith Rode
5114 Battery Lane
Bethesda, MD 20814 USA
home: 301-654-1378
work: 202-274-5548
fax: 301-656-1322

Doran H. Ross
Fowler Museum
UCLA
Box 951549
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1549
USA
work: 310-825-4259
fax: 310-206-7007
e-mail: dross@fmch.ucla.edu

James J. Ross
317 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10017-5372
USA

Victoria Rovine
University of Iowa Museum of
Art
150 N. Riverside Dr.
Iowa City, IA 52242-1789 USA


home: 319-354-7439
work: 319-353-2468
fax: 319-335-3677
email: -
victoria-rovine @ uiowa.edu

Christopher Roy
School of Art and Art History
University of Iowa
Iowa City, IA 52242 USA
work: 319-335-1777 / 4098
fax: 319-335-4098
email:
christopher-roy@uiowa.edu

Dana Rush
119 N. Thayer St. #1
Ann Arbor, MI 48104 USA
home: 734-994-9709
fax: 734-6474121
email: danarush@unich.edu

Enid Schildkrout
Anthropology Department
American Museum of Natural
History
Central Park West & 79th St.
New York, NY 10024-5192
USA
work: 212-769-5432
fax: 212-769-5334
email: enid@amnh.org
http//www.amnh.org

Elizabeth Ann (Betty) Schneider
876 Melville Ave
Palo Alto, CA 94301 USA
home: 650-328-3448
fax: 650- 328-3448
schneider@leland.standford.edu

Trevor Schoonmaker
134 E. 22nd Street #104
New York, NY 10010 USA
home: 212-979-6147
email: tschoon@earthlink.net

Laura Gleason Schultz
6115 Springford Dr. Apt G3
Harrisburg, PA 17111 USA
home: 703-960-1974
work: 202-994-0298
fax: 202-994-6683
email: lgsl098@gwu.edu







Hilary Scothorn
4821 Bakman Ave.
North Hollywood, CA 91601
USA

Thomas K. Seligman
Stanford University Museum of
Art
Stanford, CA 94305-5060 USA
home: 415-661-3654
work: 650-725-0462
fax: 650-725-0464
email: seligman@stanford.edu

Roy Sieber
114 Glenwood East
Bloomington, IN 47401 USA
home: 812-332-6945
work: 812-855-1098
fax: 812-855-9556

William Siegmann
The Brooklyn Museum of Art
200 Eastern Parkway
Brooklyn, NY 11238 USA
home: 718-499-7841
work: 718-638-5000 x281
fax: 718-398-6930
email: wsiegm7172@aol.com

Edwin Silver
111 W. Ocean Blvd, 19th Floor
Long Beach, CA 90802 USA

Raymond A. Silverman
Department of Art
Michigan State University
113 Kresge Art Center
East Lansing, MI 48824-1119
USA
home: 517-336-9230
work: 517-353-9114
fax: 517-432-3938
email: silveray@msu.edu
http://www.msu.edu/~silveray/

Richard Singletary
3600 Greenwood Dr.
Portsmouth, VA 23701-3341
USA
home: 757-487-7362
work: 757-465-2950
fax: 757-4887-1786
email: RASINGLE@aol.com


Christopher Slogar
University of Maryland, College
Park
4704 Calvert Road #2
College Park, MD 20740 USA
home: 301-864-2822
email: slogar@wam.umd.edu

Earl Smith
139 Marlboro Ct.
Maryville, TN 37803 USA
home: 423-977-1767
email: earlsm@eudoramail.com
smithearl @ worldnet.com

Neal Sobania
A3930 Beeline Rd.
Holland, MI 49423 USA
home: 616-335-9670
work: 616-395-7605
fax: 616-395-7937
email: sobania@hope.edu

Robert T. Soppelsa
1655 Illinois Street
Lawrence, KS 66044 USA
home: 785-841-1935
work: 785-231-1124
fax: 785 234-2703
email: soppelsa@washburn.edu
zzsopp@washburn.edu

Ter Sowell
119 Upland Drive
Vista, CA 92084-5734 USA
home: 760-631-1753
email: tsowell@mail.sdsu.edu

Anne M. Spencer
1103 Kensington Ave
Plainfield, NJ 07060 USA
home: 908-561-6385

Janet Stanley
1791 Lanier Place N.W. Apt.23
Washington, DC 20009-2138
USA
work: 202-357-4600 x285
fax: 202-357-4879
email: jstanley@ic.si.edu

Nancy Steele Hamme
Department of Art
State University of West Georgia
Carrollton, GA 30118-2240
USA
home: 770-830-7344


work: 770-836-4532
Sfax: 770-836-4392
email: nhamme@westga.edu

Christopher Steiner
Department of Art History
Connecticut College
270 Mohegan Ave.
New London, CT 06320-4196
USA
work: 860-439-2797
fax: 860-439-5339
email: cbste@conncoll.edu

Zoe Strother
23 W. 120th St, Apt 76
New York, NY 10027 USA
home: 212-864-9615
work: 212-854-4230
fax: 212-854-7329
email: zssl@columbia.edu

Ilona J. Szombati
Pres. Kennedylaan 235
1079 MG Amsterdam,
THE NETHERLANDS

Jessica Taplin
1100 Austin Avenue, NE
Atlanta, GA 30307-1918 USA
home: 404-373-9553
email: jtaplOl@emory.edu

Barbara Thompson
2518 Putman St.
Iowa City, IA 52240 USA
work: 319-335-4098
fax: 319-335-4097
email:
barbara-thompson @ uiowa.edu

Robert F. Thompson
Department of the History of Art
Yale University
New Haven, CT 06520 USA

Diala Toure Remch
3455 Girard Ave. South #3
Minneapolis, MN 55408 USA
home: 612-378-8815
work: 612-624-4500
fax: 612-378-8815
email: Africarchi@aol.com







Lillian Trager
Dept. of Sociology &
Anthropology
University of
Wisconsin--Parkside
Kenosha, WI 53141 USA
home: 414-632-4610
work: 414-595-2543
fax: 414-595-2183
email: trager@cs.uwp.edu

Obiora Udechukwu
Department of Fine Arts
St. Lawrence University
Canton, NY 13617 USA
home: 315-229-5084
work: 315-379-9075
fax: 315-229-7425
email: oudechukwu@stlawu.edu

Guy van Rijn
Van Rijn Documentation Center
Markgravelei 79
Antwerp, 2018
BELGIUM
home: 31-(0)3-238-4319
work: 32-(0)3-477-220478
fax: 31-(0)3-238-4319
email: cd00815@glo.be
http://african-art.org

Gary van Wyk
Axis Gallery
453 W. 17th Street, 4th Floor
New York, NY 10011 USA
home: 212-924-6034
work: 212-741-2582
email: lbrittan@aol.com

Jo-Ann Vaneyck
email:
Joann.Vaneyck@btinteret.com

Hein Vanhee
Blandijnberg 2
Ghent, B-9000
BELGIUM
home: 32-9-225-7393
fax: 32-9-264-4189
email: hein.vanhee@rug.ac.be

Vera Viditz-Ward
Department of Art
Old Science Hall
Bloomsburg University
Bloomsburg, PA 17815-1301
USA


home: 570-387-0967
work: 570-389-4851
fax: 570-389-4459
email:
vviditz@planetx.bloomu.edu

Susan Vogel
112 Prince Street
New York, NY 10012 USA
home: 212-966-7787
fax: 212-431-3930
email: svogel@igc.org

Kerstin Volker-Saad
Hertelstr. 7 a
12161 Berlin,
GERMANY
home: 0049-30-82709486
work: 0049-30-82708904
email: KVsaad@aol.com

Maude Southwell Wahlman
Thompson Professor of Global
Arts
Department of Art & Art History
University of Missouri--Kansas
City
5015 Holmes
Kansas City, MO 64110-2499
USA
home: 913-652-0360
work: 816-235-2986
fax: 816-235-5507
email: wahlmanm@umkc.edu
http://iml.umkc.edu/art/faculty/wa
hlman

Roslyn A. Walker
National Museum of African Art
Smithsonian Institution MRC
Washington, DC 20560 USA
home: 202-484-1358
work: 202-357-4600 x203
fax: 202-357-4629
email: rawalker@nmafa.si.edu


PO 5801
Atlanta, GA 31107 USA
home: 770-908-5348
email: djenne63 @hotmail.com

Bob White
Department of Anthropology
U.C. Santa Cruz
749 Rue Joliette, Apt. A
Longueuil, Quebec J4K 4V4
CANADA
home: 450-674-2948
fax: 450-674-2064
email: bwhitel @po-box.mcgill.ca

Rosalinde G. Wilcox
10520 Draper Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90064 USA
home: 949-248-2768
work: 949-582-4404
fax: 949-347-0580
email:
rwilcox@saddleback.cc.ca.us

Frank Willett
583 Anniesland Road
Glasgow, Scotland G13 1UX
UNITED KINGDOM
home: 41-959-3424
work: 41-959-3424
fax: 41-954-7028

Lyneise Williams
Yale University
186 Edwards St. #4
New Haven, CT 06511 USA
home: 203-624-7016
email: lyneise.williams@yale.edu

Hans Witte
Museum Kamstraat 55
6522 GB Nymegen,
THE NETHERLANDS
home: 024-3238930


Sarah Watson Parsons
UC Santa Barbara
8 Farnham Cres.
Ottawa, Ontario klkOE8
CANADA
home: 613-741-8423
fax: 613-741-0221
email: parsons@magma.ca

Jenne Watson-Aifah
Clark Atlanta University







Marcilene K. Wittmer
Department of Art/Art History
University of Miami
Coral Gables, FL 33124 USA
home: 305-661-9069
work: 305-284-5742
fax: 305-284-2115
email: mkwmiami@aol.com

Norma Wolff
Department of Anthropology
Iowa State University
324 Curtiss Hall
Ames, IA 50011 USA
home: 515-232-2857
work: 515-294-7139
fax: 515-294-1708
email: nhwolff@iastate.edu


Kenji Yoshida
Senri Expo Park
National Museum of Ethnology
Suita, Osaka 565-8511
JAPAN
home: 07-2694-3483
work: 06-6876-2151 x8288
fax: 06-6878-7503

Jonathan Zilberg
511 W. Oregon
Urbana, IL 61801 USA
home: 217-344-5635
email: zilberg@plaihenet.org


'a-


I i
s


El


S i
s I
I







2000 ACASA Membership Directory
African and Caribbean Members


Dr. Felicia Ihuoma Abaraonye
National Museum
P.M.B. 1115
Benin City, Edo State, NIGERIA

Bibliothbque Municipal
Avenue Crosson duPlessis, B.P.
V254
Abidjan, COTE D'IVOIRE

Mr. J. Abodunrin
Department of Fine & Applied
Arts
Ladoke Akintola University of
Technology P.M.B. 4000
Ogbomosho, NIGERIA

Dr. Arthur Abraham
Institute of African Studies
Fourah Bay College
Freetown, SIERRA LEONE

Mr. Usman Abudah
Estate Woods, 56th Street
Federal Housing Estate, Ikpoba
Hill
P. O. Box 5537
Benin City, NIGERIA

University of Abuja Library
P.M.B. 117.
Abuja, Federal Capital Territory
NIGERIA

Research Library on African
Affairs
P.O.B. 2970
Accra, GHANA

Dr. Nurudeen Abubakar
Center for Nigerian Cultural
Studies
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaria, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

Mr. Samuel Aco
Inst. National du Patrimoine
Culturel
C.P. 1267
Luanda, R.R. ANGOLA

Dr. Alexis Adand6
B.P. 1057


Porto Novo REPUBLIQUE
POPULAIRE DU BENIN

Dr. Codjovi Joseph Adand6
B.P. 06-1275
PK3 -- Cotonou RIEPUBLIQUE
POPULAIRE DU BENIN

Addis Ababa University Library
P.O.B. 1176
Addis Ababa ETHIOPIA

Mr. Bayo Adebowale
African Heritage Research
Library
P.O. Box 121
Ila Orangun, Oshun State,
NIGERIA

Mr. Nath Mayo Adediran
Gidan Makama Museum
P.O. Box 2030
Kano, Kano State, NIGERIA

Mr. Oluremi F. Adedayo
National Museum
P.M.B. 54
Minna, Niger State, NIGERIA

Ms. Adetokumbo
Adekeye-Abimbola
4A, Igbore Street, Iwaya Road
Onike Yaba, Lagos, NIGERIA

Mr. Ayodele Adetokumbo
35 Maye Street
P.O. Box 2584
Yaba, Lagos, NIGERIA

Mr. Coffi Guillaume Adjaho
Conseiller Technique a la Culture
B.P. 120
Cotonou REPUBLIQUE
POPULAIRE DU BENIN

Dr. Cornelius O. Adepegba
Institute of African Studies
University of Ibadan
Ibadan, Oyo State, NIGERIA

Dr. Adimado Aduayom
D6partement d'Histoire
University du B6nin, B.P. 1515


Lomd, TOGO

Aequatoria
Centre de Recherches Culturelles
B.P. 276
Mbandaka, DEMOCRATIC
REPUBLIC OF CONGO

Mr. George B. Affia
University of Port Harcourt
Library
P.M.B. 5323
Port Harcourt, NIGERIA

Ms. B. M. Pfukani
Africa University Library
P. O. Box 1320
Mutare, ZIMBABWE

Dr. Babatunde Agbaje-Williams
Institute of African Studies
University of Ibadan
Ibadan, Oyo State, NIGERIA

Mr. John-Tokpabere Agberia
Department of Creative Arts
University of Port Harcourt
P. O. Box 41, Uniport P. O.
Choba, Port Harcourt, NIGERIA

Mr. Kokie Agboutaen-Eghafona
Dept. of Sociology and
Anthropology
University of Benin
Benin City, Edo State, NIGERIA

Mr. Ngozi Agujiobi
School of General Studies
University of Nigeria, Enugu
Campus
Enugu, NIGERIA

Mr. Hassaan Ali Ahmed
28, Gameat El-Dowal El-Arabia
Street
Ground Floor, Apt. #2
El-Mohandissien, Guiza, Cairo,
EGYPT







Mr. L4onard Ahonon
Mus6e Historique d'Abomey
B.P. 25
Abomey REPUBLIQUE
POPULAIRE DU BENIN

Mr. A. M. Ahuwan
Department of Industrial Design
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaria, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

Mr. Paul Ahyi
B. P. 1650
Lom6 TOGO

Dr. Sheri Ajasin
Department of Creative Arts
University of Lagos, P.O.Box
145 Unilag Akoka, Lagos,
NIGERIA

Mr. Frank Olusanya Ajayi
Department of Fine Arts
College of Education
Ikere-Ekiti, Ondo State,
NIGERIA

Mr. Martins O. Akanbiemu
National Museum
P.M.B. 12556
Onikan, Lagos, NIGERIA

Ms. Justina E. Akata
National Museum of Colonial
History
P.M.B. 7116
Aba, Imo State, NIGERIA

Mr. Donatus M. Akatakpo
Department of Architecture
University of Lagos
Akoka, Yaba, Lagos, NIGERIA

Mr. Toyin Akinosho
Festac News
Plot 43B, First Avenue
Festac Town, Lagos, NIGERIA

Mr. Akintonde
Department of Fine & Applied
Arts
Ladoke Akintola University of
Technology P.M.B. 4000
Ogbomosho, NIGERIA

Mr. David A. Akinpelu
National Museum


P.M.B. 12556
Onikan, Lagos, NIGERIA

Mr. Kola Akintola
Gallery 365, c/o Tunakin Group
of Photographers 18 U. Ibadan
Bodija Express Road
P. O. Box 7141 Secretariat
Ibadan, Oyo State, NIGERIA

Dr. Tunde Akinwumi
Department of Industrial
DesignYaba College of
Technology Lagos, NIGERIA

Akbdi Afrika
P.M.B. 1004
Iffe-Ijimu, Kogi State NIGERIA

Mr. Tunde Akomolafe
Isenbaye Art Gallery and Cultural
Troupe 52 Catholic Mission
Road
Oshogbo, Oshun State,
NIGERIA

Mr. Solomon Akpofure
9, Alhaji Bashorun Street
South/West, Ikoyi, Lagos,
NIGERIA

Dr. Ofori Akyea
P. O. Box DS 2249
Dansoman, Accra GHANA

Professor E. J. Alagoa
P.O. Box 125
University of Port Harcourt
Port Harcourt, NIGERIA

Ms. Sanaa Ali
Curator, Luxor Museum
Luxor, EGYPT

Mr. Zaccheus Sunday Ali
Centre for Black and African
Arts and Civilisation
National Theatre, P.M.B.12794
Lagos, NIGERIA

Dr. Idris O. O. Amali
Department of English
University of Maiduguri, P.M.B.
1069
Maiduguri, NIGERIA


College of Art
University of Science and
Technology
Kumase, GHANA

Mr. El Anatsui
Department of Fine & Applied
Arts
University of Nigeria
Nsukka, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Professor Bassey Andah
Department of Archaeology
University of Ibadan
Ibadan, Oyo State, NIGERIA

Ms. Michelina Andreucci
Springstone, The Garden Gallery
5 Idlehurst Way, Avondale
Harare, ZIMBABWE

Dr. Chike C. Aniakor
Institute of African Studies
University of Nigeria
Nsukka, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Mr. Chidi Anicho
Ogbete Congregation
30 Port Harcourt Street
Enugu, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Dr. F. N. Anozie
Department of Archaeology
University of Nigeria
Nsukka, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Dr. James Anquandah
Department of Archaeology
University of Ghana
P.O. Box 3
Legon, GHANA

Ms. Chinwe F. Anyaegbuna
National Museum
P.M.B. 1285
Enugu, Enugu State, NIGERIA

Ms. Peggy Appiah
P.O. Box 829
Kumase, GHANA

Dr. Starling E. N. Anyanwu
National Museum
P.M.B. 036
Bauchi, NIGERIA


Mr. Gilbert Amegatcher







Professor David Aradeon
Faculty of Environment Design
University of Lagos
P.M.B. 12003
Lagos, NIGERIA

Dr. David A. Aremu
Dept. of Archaeology &
Anthropology
University of Ibadan
Ibadan, Oyo State, NIGERIA

Dr. P. S. O. Aremu
Department of Fine Arts
Obafemi Awolowo University
Ile-Ife, Oshun State, NIGERIA

Mr. A. A. Areo
Department of Fine and Applied
Arts
St. Andrew's College of
Education
P.M.B. 1010
Oyo, Oyo State, NIGERIA

Mr. Adebowale B. Areo
National Museum
P.M.B. 5515, Enuwa Square
Ile-Ife, Oshun State, NIGERIA

AREWA House Library
Ahmadu Bello University
P. O. Box 2006
Kaduna, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

Dr. Kwame Arhin
Institute of African Studies
University of Ghana
Legon, Accra, GHANA

Mr. James E. Arhuidese
Institute of Archaeology/Museum
Studies Jos, Plateau State,
NIGERIA

Dr. Marion Arnold
15 Polo Road, Observatory
Cape Town 7925, SOUTH
AFRICA

Arquivo do Patrimonio Cultural
(Projecto ARPAC)
C.P. 2702
Maputo, MOZAMBIQUE

Ms. Ibironke P. Ashaye
National Museum


P.M.B. 1469
Ilorin, Kwara State, NIGERIA

Dr. Raymond N. Asombang
Centre for Anthropological
Studies and Research B.P. 1844
Yaounde, CAMEROON

Mr. Romain-Philippe Assogba
Mus6e d'Ethnographie
B.P. 299
Porto Novo, REPUBLIQUE
POPULAIRE DU BENIN

Mr. Tsenum Awua
N5/808H Academy, Iwo Road
University of Ibadan P. O. Box
19381
Ibadan, Oyo State, NIGERIA

Mr. Bernard Ayuk
Ministry of Information and
Culture
National Museum
Yaounde, CAMEROON

Dr. Daniel Ola Babalola
Department of Fine Arts
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaria, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

Mr. Obar6 B. Bagodo
B.P. 82
Porto Novo, REPUBLIQUE
POPULAIRE DU BENIN

University de Bangui
Bibliothbque
B.P. 1450
Bangui, CENTRAL AFRICAN
REPUBLIC

National Cultural Foundation
West Terrace
St. James
BARBADOS, WEST INDIES

Musee National de Pr6histoire et
d'Ethnographie du Bardo 3 rue
Franklin Roosevelt
Algiers, ALGERIA

Ms. Lesley Barrow-Whatley
Barbados Museum & Historical
Society
St. Ann's Garrison
St. Michael, BARBADOS


Bayero University Library
Nigeriana Section
P.M.B. 3011
Kano, Kano State, NIGERIA

Dr. Rayda Becker
University Art Galleries
University of the Witwatersrand
Private Bag 3, Wits 2050
SOUTH AFRICA

Ms. Emma Bedford
South African National Gallery
Government Avenue, P.O.B.
2420
Cape Town 8001, SOUTH
AFRICA

Dr. Henry Bell-Gam
Department of Creative Arts
University of Port Harcourt
Port Harcourt, NIGERIA

Ms. Rasidat
Isenbaye Art Gallery and Cultural
Troupe 52 Catholic Mission
Road
Oshogbo, Oshun State,
NIGERIA

Dr. Sule Bello
National Council for Arts &
Culture
Iganmu, National Theatre
P. O. Box 2959
Surulere, Lagos, NIGERIA

University Library
University of Benin
Benin City, Edo State, NIGERIA

University Nationale du B6nin
Bibliotheque, B.P. 526
Cotonou, REPUBLIQUE
POPULAIRE DU BENIN

University du Benin Bibliotheque
B.P. 1515
Lome, TOGO

Professor Lucius Tokan Bentu
Department of Fine Arts
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaria, Kaduna State, NIGERIA







Mr. Rory M. Bester
P. O. Box 91203
Auckland Park, 2006
SOUTH AFRICA

Kentse Bogatsu
Private Bag 114
Gaborone, BOTSWANA

Borno Museum Society
c/o Centre for Trans-Saharan
Studies
University P. M. B. 1069
Maiduguri, Borno State,
NIGERIA

Botswana Society
P. O. Box 71
Gaborone, BOTSWANA

National Museum and Art
Gallery
Independence Avenue
P.O. Box 114
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University of the Witwatersrand
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Ahmadu Bello University
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University of Nigeria
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Choma Museum
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University of Port Harcourt,
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Department of
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University of Nigeria
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Matombo Gallery
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Ministerio da Cultura, Casa de
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C.P. 2702
Maputo, MOZAMBIQUE

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B.P. 1600
Abidjan 225, COTE DIVOIRE

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15 Dunblane Road
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P.O. Box 61
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Project Ecomus6e Urbain de
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Dawson Art Centre
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Nima, Accra, GHANA

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Department of Visual Arts
University of Namibia
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University of Port Harcourt
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Mus6e Ethnographique de Porto
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Department of History
University of Benin
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National Gallery of Moder Art
P.M.B. 3001, National Theatre
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Department of Fine & Applied
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Nnamdi Azikiwe University
Awka, Anambra State, NIGERIA

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230 Awolowo Road, Flat #3
P.O. Box 51866, Ikoyi Post
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Musde Historique
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Abomey, REPUBLIQUE
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Ghana National Museum
P.O. Box 3343
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Michaelis School of Fine Art
University of Cape Town
Rondebosch 7700
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Box 4085
Durban 4000, SOUTH AFRICA

Ms. Abgail & Mr. Isaac Dzingire
5696 Juluka Road
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Mr. Christopher Ebigbo
Department of Fine Arts
University of Benin, P.M.B. 1154
Benin City, Edo State, NIGERIA

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National Museum
P.M.B. 1115
Benin City, Edo State, NIGERIA

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Eduardo Mondlane
C.P. 257
Maputo, MOZAMBIQUE

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Department of Fine, Applied and
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National Art Gallery of Namibia
P. O. Box 994
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Department of Archaeology
University of Nigeria
Nsukka, Enugu State, NIGERIA

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Department of Fine and Industrial
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University of Uyo
Uyo, Akwa Ibom State,
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National Museum
P.M.B. 1109
Uyo, Cross River State,
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Department of Fine Arts
Ogun State College of Education


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Ijebu-Ode, Ogun State,
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53M University Hall
University of Science and
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No. 64 Odi-Olowo Street
Oshogbo, Oshun State
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Delta State Council for Arts and
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Department of Industrial Design
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaria, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

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Department of Fine Arts
Institute of Management &
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Enugu, Enugu State, NIGERIA

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D6partmente de 1'Histoire
University de Yaounde
Yaound6, CAMEROON

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National Museum
P.M.B. 1585
Owerri, Imo State, NIGERIA

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St. Rita's College
P. O. Box 52, Nkambe
Songa-Mantung Division
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National Museum
P.M.B. 5524
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Museu Nacional de Antropologia
C.P. 2159


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Centro Nacional de Artesanato
S. Vicente, REPUBLIC DE
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Department of Art
Federal College of Education
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P. O. Box 1375
Harare, ZIMBABWE

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Department of Archaeology
University of Ibadan
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Illovo 2196, SOUTH AFRICA

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Private Bag 1313
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Department of Art Education
University of Science and
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Fourah Bay College
Freetown, SIERRA LEONE

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Department of Fine and Applied
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University of Benin
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853 Old Magwegwe
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Bulawayo, ZIMBABWE







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P.O.B. 1176
Addis Ababa University
Addis Ababa, ETHIOPIA

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Niamey, NIGER

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Ghana Film Industry Corporation
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National Museum, P.M.B. 12556
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National Commission for
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Department of Art Education
University of Science and
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University of Cape Town
Private Bag Rondebosch
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Mus6e Honm6
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Museu do Dundo
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P. O. Box 141
Odi, BOTSWANA

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C. P. 5754
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Chapungu Sculpture Park
Msasa, P. O. Box 2863
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12-16 East Street
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Hassanein
Cairo Museum
Kasr El Nile, Tahrer Square
Cairo, EGYPT

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Maryknoll Missioners
P.O. Box 867
Dar es Salaam, TANZANIA

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Interafrican Council for
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Visual Arts and Craft Academy
46 President Street
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University of Ibadan Library
Ibadan, Oyo State, NIGERIA

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Department of Archaeology
University of Nigeria
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Service du Patrimoine MJS/C
B.P. 215
Niamey, NIGER

Ife Forum for the Preservation of
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Obafemi Awolowo University
Ile-Ife, Oyo State, NIGERIA







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Department of Fine & Applied
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University of Nigeria
Nsukka, Enugu State, NIGERIA

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AREWA House, Ahmadu Bello
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P.O. Box 2006
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P. O. Box 9032
Enugu, Enugu State, NIGERIA

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National Museum
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B.P. 4249
Kinshasa, DEMOCRATIC
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Addis Ababa University
P.O.B. 1176
Addis Ababa, ETHIOPIA

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Kidutani, Zanzibar, TANZANIA

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Department of Fine Arts
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaria, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

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P. M. B. 12256
Lagos, NIGERIA

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Division of Fine Arts
Barbados Community College
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National Commission for
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Onikan, Lagos, NIGERIA

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Department of Fine Arts
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaria, Kaduna State, NIGERIA

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Department of History
University of Jos
Jos, NIGERIA

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Art, Music & Theatre Department
University of Dar es Salaam
P.O. Box 35044
Dar es Salaam, TANZANIA

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Department of Fine Arts
Yaba College of Technology
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144 Fourth Street
Bulawayo, ZIMBABWE

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P. O. Box 23561
2044 Johannesburg, SOUTH
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P.M.B. 2031
Jos, Plateau State, NIGERIA

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Juma
Zanzibar Museum
P.O. Box 116
Zanzibar, TANZANIA

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Ogbomosho, Oyo State,
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African Research Center for the
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Kampala, UGANDA

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Department of Antiquities &
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P. O. Box 5718
Kampala, UGANDA

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Upper East Regional Museum
P. O. Box 86
Bolgatanga, GHANA

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P.O. Box 40319
Nairobi, KENYA

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South African National Gallery
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c/o Ndeke Hotel
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Lusaka, ZAMBIA

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African Arts Global Project
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Khartoum, SUDAN

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Department of the History of Art
University of Cape Town
Private Bag Rondebosch
Cape Town 7700, SOUTH
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National Museum, P.M.B. 12556
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303 Fattis Mountain
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Johannesburg 2001, SOUTH
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Mus6e Nationale
B.P. 262
Conakry, REPUBLIQUE DU
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Association des Artistes
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P. O. Box 892
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Government Teachers' College
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Wukari, Gongola State,
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Museums of Malawi
P.O. Box 30360, Chichiri
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University PO Box 723
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P. O. Box 73092
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Department of History
University of Nairobi, P.M.B.
30197
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University of Lagos
Akoko-Yaba, Lagos, NIGERIA

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Mus6e d'Art Africain de Dakar
B.P. 6167
Dakar-Etiole, SIENGAL

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Lamu, KENYA

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Centre d'Etudes Linguistiques et
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B.P. 878
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c/o O. O. Layiwola
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University of Ibadan
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Department of Fine Art and Art
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University of Natal


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Mahatma Gandhi Institute
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Museu de Angola
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Natl Museums and Monuments
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Niamey, NIGER

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Funda Centre/Funda Community
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P. O. Box 2056
Southdale 2135, SOUTH
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1 Arthur Wint Drive
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Department of Fine Arts and
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Private Bag X54001
Durban 4000, SOUTH AFRICA

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Archaeology Unit
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P.O. Box 35050
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National Museums and
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African Window
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Regional Director
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Musde National
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Johannesburg Public Library
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Mr. Gavin Younge
Michaelis School of Fine Art
University of Cape Town
Rondebosch 7700, SOUTH
AFRICA

University of Zambia Library
P.O.B. 32379
Lusaka, ZAMBIA

National Heritage Conservation
Commission Chishimba Falls
Road
P.O.B. 60124
Livingstone, ZAMBIA

Ms. Grazyna Zaucha
c/o R. H. Newman
Bergvliet Farm, Homestead
Avenue
Bergvliet
Cape Town 7945, SOUTH
AFRICA

Mr. Ahmed Zekarias
Institute of Ethiopian Studies
Museum
Addis Ababa University, P.O.B.
1176
Addis Ababa, ETHIOPIA

Zimbabwe Museum of Human
Sciences
P. O. Box CY 33 Causeway
Harare, ZIMBABWE


Zimbabwe Museum Natural
History Library Leopold
Takawira Avenue & Park Road
P.O. Box 240
Bulawayo, ZIMBABWE


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