Title: ACASA newsletter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00103115/00046
 Material Information
Title: ACASA newsletter newsletter of the Arts Council of the African Studies Association
Alternate Title: Newsletter
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: African Studies Association -- Arts Council
Publisher: The Council
Place of Publication: S.l
S.l
Publication Date: August 1997
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Arts -- Periodicals -- Africa   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 2 (winter 1982)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. designation dropped with no. 3 (spring 1983).
General Note: Title from caption.
General Note: Vols. for Aug. 1992- include Directory of members: addendum.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: No. 34 (Aug. 1992).
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Bibliographic ID: UF00103115
Volume ID: VID00046
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09794003
lccn - sn 92017937
 Related Items
Preceded by: Newsletter of the Arts Council of the African Studies Association

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ACASA BOARD O
DIRECTORS
dele jegede, President
Bill Dewey, Past President
Kathy Curnow, Secretary-Treasurer
Daniel Avorgbedor, Editor
Kathleen Bickford,
Michael Harris
Polly Nooter Roberts
Directors Retiring at the 1998 ACASA
Triennial:Jean Borgatti
Eugenia Herbert
Chris Mullen Kreamer
Rosalinde Wilcox

Membership Information (for residents
of North America, Europe, Asia)
Kathy Cumow, Secretary-Treasurer
Dept. of Art, Cleveland State University
Cleveland, OH 44115 USA
Tel: (216) 687-2105 Fax: (216) 932-1315
E-mail: k.cumow@csuohio.edu
IN
Annual dues are $35.00, payable in
January. Checks payable to "ACASA"
and sent to: Michael Harris, Dept of Art,
Hanes Art Center, CBN 3405, University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel ill,
NC 27599-3405
Membership Information (for residents
of Africa & the Caribbean):
Janet Stanley
National Museum of African Art
Library
Smithsonian Institution MRC 708
Washington, DC 20560, USA
Tel.: (202)357-4600 Ext. 285
Fax: (202) 357-4879
E-mail: jstanley@ic.si.edu
The ACASA Newsletter is published three
times a year: April, August and December.
The newsletter seeks items of interest for
publication. You can send news about job
changes, fieldwork, travel, new publications,
etc. The next ACASA newsletter will be in
December 1997. Please send news items by
November 17. 1997 to: Daniel Avorgbedor,
110 Weigel Hall, School of Music, OSU,
Columbus, OH 43210-1170
E-mail: avorgbedor.l@osu.edu
fax 614-292-1102 tel.: 614-292-9441


ACASA NEWS

Presidential Notes eS
by
dele jpgodQ, ACASA President

As we move towards New
Orleans, I am delighted
to address myself in
particular to my colleagues in
Africa. In the last couple ofyears,
ACASA has made efforts to reach
out and inspire a more active
stance from our brothers and
sisters-artists and scholars-from
Africa. Two initiatives that I have
had occasions in the past to refer
to are the call for the constitution
of ACASA members into regional
chapters for the purpose of
facilitating dialogue and collab-
oration, and the invitation to
African artists to avail themselves
of ACASA's web project. Now, as
arrangements for ACASA's
Eleventh Triennial Symposium
have shifted to a high gear, may I
seize this opportunity to call on
mv colleagues in the Diaspora,
m
I in this issueooo
Presidential Notes
SArnold Rubin Book Award
llth Triennial & Panels
Exhibitions
Job Opportunities
Conferences
Grants/Fellowships
Art on the Internet
Noteworthy Publications
People and Places
1997 Mambership Directory Update


Africa in particular, to consider
joining us in New Orleans from
April 8 to 12, 1998.

Of course, we are aware that
funding opportunities are not as
robust as would encourage all
those who have always been with
us spiritually to make the move
for physical re-union. In part, it is
in recognition of this that ACASA
has set aside some stipend to
assist those who are so deserving.
Unfortunately, we too are limited
in the extent to which we are able
to help. Travel fellowships must
thus be competed for. My pitch,
thus, is to encourage all of our
African colleagues who are
interested in joining us to observe
our Call for Papers (published
elsewhere in this Newsletter) and
act accordingly.

Our members here at home will
have by now received our
solicitation letters. (If you have
not received yours, please give me
a holler; 'll be too glad to rush
one to your address) May I
express my appreciation as well
as that of my colleagues on the
Endowment and
Fund Raising Com-
1 mittee to all those
2 who have heark-
2 ended to our solic-
9 stations. It is grati-
10 flying to note that
11 there are several
12 members who
13 have contributed
14 in excess of the
16
17


ACI AS A ewsletter

V* ffiril Y ra of tijt A rf s (nail of t1 kfritm *bites soidtin A *


Vol. 49 August 1991






p'widelia fl9.os, contd

minimum amount that we have
solicited. As you may hayv obser-
ved in this Newsletter, arran-
gements for the Triennial are now
in top gear. This is the last chance
for members to who are interested
in presenting papers to submit
their proposals. It is important to
note, however, that ACASA's
Board has determined that all
participants at theTriennial must
be members in good financial
standing. Our next Newsletter(due
in December) will contain full
details concerning the final list of
panels and papers as well as
deadlines for Triennial r stationn





SITORIAL IWTES

This issue was held back in order to
accommodate late administrative matters
(logistics of the 1998 riennia) that must be
published in the August issue.
Thanks for your considerations.



Arts Council of the African
Studies Association announ-
ces the Arnold Rubin Out-
standing Publication Award U

eArts Council of the
African Studies Assoc-
J nation (ACASA) invites
publishers to nominate titles for
the prestigious Arnold Rubin
Outstanding Publication Award.
This important award, first
bestowed in 1989, honors
publications for excellence in
scholarship on the arts of Africa
and the African Diaspora.


The award, offered every three
years, is given to works of
original scholarship and excel-
lence in visual presentation that
make significant contributions to
our understanding of African and
African Diasporic arts and
material culture. This year the
award will be offered in two cate-
gories. Four honorable mentions
in each category will also be
named.

The award presentations will be
made at the ACASA Triennial
Symposium on African Art, to be
held April 8-12, 1998 in New
Orleans. The winning titles will
also be announced in the ACASA
Newsletter and the ASA News
and will earn the right to use the
award designation in publicity
connected with the distribution of
the publication.

Nominations for the Rubin Award
may be made directly by
publishers and should meet these
guidelines:

a* Submissions must be original
scholarly texts published from
1995 through 1997.

b. Topics may include visual arts
and material culture (including
sculpture, graphic arts, archit-
ecture, photography, textiles,
etc.), and performing arts
(including masquer-ade, music,
dance, etc.) of .Africa and the
African Diaspora.

e. Symposium proceedings, new
editions of previously published
works, bibliographies, articles,
dissertations, and books of
photog-raphs without scholarly
texts fall out of the scope of this
award,


> Awards will be given in two
categories:

1, ..Oigifalid hAy wt3s:.by one
or / 'two W s' uthi published d in
English, including books published
in-conjuncton with exhibitions.

2.Original scholarly works by three
or more authors published in
English, including books published
in conjuncdon with exhibitions;

Publishers who wish to nominate
a title or titles should send one
copy to each of the four
committee members: Dr. Kathleen
Bickford, The Art Institute of
Chicago, 111 S. Michigan Avenue,
Chicago, IL 60640; Dr. Christine
Mullin Kreamer, Hanoi/Dept. of
State, Washington DC 20521; Dr.
Kristyne Loughran, C/O Liz
Loughran, PO Box 960,
Shepherdstown, WVA 25443; Dr.
Ikem Okoye, 4642 N. Maiden, #1,
Chicago, IL 60640.

Submissions must be received by
1 OCTOBER 1997.

ELEVENTH TRIENNIAL
SYMPOSIUM ON AFRICAN
ART
New Orleans, APRIL 8-12, 1998
The Second Cal forPaper, Ttid and
Final CafrPanes

he theme for the 11th
Triennial Symposium
on African Art to be held in New
Orleans from April 8-12, 1998 is
"African Art Studies at the
Millennium." Panel topics should
reflect and explore the new
methodologies, theories, and
fields/sites of research that will
impact and expand the boundaries
of African art studies in the 21st
century.






Jriannia. contd.


Paper proposals-should be-sent
directly to the panel chairss,
whose contact numbers/addresses
are indicated in the accompanying
list of proposed panels. Proposals
should include a title and an
abstract not exceeding one page.

For those who wish to propose a
paper for an unspecified panel,
please submit to: Triennial
Program Chair, Polly Nooter
Roberts (319) 335-0653
(fax) or email Polly Roberts c/o:
allen-roberts@uiowa.edu. Panels
will be formed to accommodate
these papers, either according to
themes, or simply as "Recent
Research" or "Open Panels."

There is still room for a few more
panel proposals. Additional panel
proposals, including the panel title
and abstract, should also be
submitted to the Program Chair.
The next deadline for paper and
panel proposals is October 15,
1997.

All panel chairs who have
submitted a title but no abstract
must send a brief 1-3 paragraph
abstract, as well as the collection
of paper abstracts with presenters'
names and affiliations to Polly
Nooter Roberts by the October
15, 1997 deadline. Panel chairs
who submitted proposals early on
but have not submitted their
panelists' names and abstracts,
should contact Polly Nooter
Roberts to inform her of the
progress on the panel.

*Rules and Requirements
for Participation in Triennial

Please be advised that Triennial
participants will be allowed to
serve in one role only, with the
exception of panel organizers,


who may serve as chairs and also
present papers on their own
panels. All panels will be two
hours long. Panel organizers may
invite/accept four speakers and
one discussant, or five speakers
and no discussant. All papers
must be limited to no more than
twenty minutes, and panel
organizers may open their panels
with a five-minute introduction.
Panel organizers must enforce the
length of their participants' papers
in order to leave fifteen minutes
for discussion with the audience.

>All panel chairs and presenters
must be registered for the
Triennial, and able to show proof
of payment.

*Registration and Membership:

Final acceptance of panel and
paper proposals is dependent
upon registration. All Triennial
participants must be registered
and be in good financial standing.
It pays to register early, and to
become an ACASA member.
Please send in your registration/
membership payments as soon as
possible if you wish to assure
your place in the Triennial
program. See the payment
schedule elsewhere in this
Newsletter to learn the benefits of
registering for the "Early Bird"
special category. All payments
should be made to the following
address as soon as possible:
*
MICHAEL HARRIS
DEPARTMENT OF ART
HANES ART CENTER CB# 3405
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA
AT CHAPEL HILL, CHAPEL HILL
NC 27599-3405
*


Travel Fellowships for
Visiting Scholars and Graduate
Students O

A stipend is being set aside in
the ACASA budget for
visiting scholars and artists from
Africa and the Caribbean, as well
as for graduate students from US
institutions. A peer review comm-
ittee will assess requests for travel
assistance and paper proposals.
The stipend is very limited, and
selections will be made on a
highly competitive basis. If you
require travel assistance, please
send your request, as well as a
copy of your paper proposal to the
Selection Committee, c/o Polly
Nooter Roberts, Program Chair
for the Triennial, 1510
Muscatine Avenue, Iowa City,
IA 52240.

Museum Day
W e hope to organize
Wednesday, April 8th, as a
Museum Day for panels and
round-tables dedicated specifically
to issues of museums, collecting,
and exhibiting African art. The
programming for Museum Day
has been extremely successful for
previous Triennials at UCLA, The
University of Iowa, and the
Smithsonian Institution, and we
would like to continue the
tradition for those who take
special interest in these issues.
Please submit proposals for panels
and round-tables to Program
Chair Polly Nooter Roberts, as
well as names of potential
colleagues who might be asked to
participate in this special day-long
colloquium.


171








U *PIANE OFS
d. .........udin ab.tracta received to date)

Some of these panels are almost fhll, while
others are not. If you are interested in
joining a panel, please contact the panel
chair directly. (Somre abstracts have been
slightly edited to conform to desired legths)


AFRO-ATLANTIS EMERGENT: Creolization and Beyond
in the Study of a Major World Current of Philosophy
and Art
Co-Chairs: RAMONA AUSTIN, DALLAS Ar MUSEUM AND
ROBET FARRIS THOMPSON, YALE UNIVERSITY CONTACT RFT AT
TEL: (203) 432-0770 ORFAX (203) 432-7170
This panel both continues and critiques facts and
methodologies involved in examining "the greatest piece
of cultural machinery on earth," bypassing the cliche,
diaspora, with its one-way implications, for something
more embracing and three-dimensional. We intend to go
beyond all past examinations, even the Black Atlantic,
with new evidence from the Black Pacific, giving balance
to the over-determined role of the US, Cuba, Haiti, and
Brazil.

The panel would be the opening gun statement for a
massive Afro-Oceanic exhibition-cum-catalog doc-
umenting every island in the Caribbean, in addition to the
already heavily covered ones, like Cuba and Hispaniola,
as well as other areas of Latin America and Canada where
there are mini-provinces packed with African-influenced
aesthetic (in the hemispheric sense).

PASTORALISTS AS PERFORMERS AND MEDIATED
SIGNS OF IDENTITY (working title -wording not final)
Co-Chairs: SIDNEY L. KASFR AND CORINNE A. KRATZ, EMORY U
CONTACT SIDNEY KASFIR AT TEL: (404) 727-0808 OR EMAIL:
HARTSK@EMORY.EDU
Pastoralists and hunters in Africa have often figured in
images and other inscriptions that portray them as
idealized types whether as inherently aristocratic, the
last vestiges of a dying Africa, as mystically close to
nature or alternatively, as degraded and recalcitrantly
backward and primitive. Such images are created by
Europeans and other Africans alike in relation to their
own self-representations.

In this panel, we invite papers that consider the latest
chapters of this history by looking at specific case studies
of recent films, tourist performances, exhibitions, and
other mediated representations of African pastoralists
created for international audiences. Papers might look at
the politics of representation and pastoralists' engagement
in the production of these images, new twists and
transformations as they are incorporated into different
media and taken up in other national and international


debates and imagery, or how contrasting images of
particular pastoralist peoples play out in different settings,
media, and international arenas.

ATLANTIC RIM PERFORMANCE ARTS: Links and
Missing Links in the Development of Caribbean and West
African Masquerades
Chair: JoHN W. NUNLEY, THE SAINT Louis ART MUSEUM
TEL: (314) 721-0072 ORFAX: (314) 721-6172
Social mobility along the Atlantic Rim has scarcely been
recognized with respect to the development of
masquerades. The cobbling of ethnicities, including the
Kru, Akan, Mandinka, Igbo, Mande, Yoruba, Irish,
British, Spanish, French, and Native Americans have
effected masquerade performance arts. These artistic
events have similar forms and structures which have been
shared historically and currently in such places as the
Virgin Islands, St. Kitts, Ghana, Senegambia, Trinidad
and Tobago, Barbados, Guyana, Jamaica, Belize, Sierra
Leone, Nigeria, the Ivory Coast, and Louisiana.

THE FULANI WOMAN
Chair: FREDmEICK LAM, THE BALTIMORE MUSEUM OF ART
TEL: (410) 396-7056 OR FAX: (410) 396-6562
From Mauritania in the Northwest to Cameroon in the
heart of Africa, probably no other African ethnic group
has captured the aesthetic and ritual imagination of the
indigenous peoples than the Fulani (known also as the
Fula, Peul, Fulbe, and Pular-speakers). In particular, the
Fulani woman appears prominently in the body of
masquerades of such groups as the Bamana, Baga, Mossi,
and Yoruba. What does she represent for the groups who
use her image and why is she singled out? How does the
Fulani woman see herself, how is she seen as "the other,"
and what relationship is there between the Fulani woman
as fantasy and the Fulani woman as fact? Perhaps the
study of this phenomenon can tell us something about
men's views of women throughout West Africa,
particularly when the Fulbe woman stands as woman, per
se. Perhaps it can reveal something about the myths men
create about power and status.

THE INTERNATIONAL MUKANDA
Chair: Z. S. STROTHER, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY
TEL: (212) 854-4505 ORFAX: (212) 854-7329
For quite some time, scholars have been challenged to
expand their research beyond artificially fixed ethnic
boundaries to include regional and institutional patronage
of the arts. The Central African Mukanda (or men's
fraternity) offers an exceptional opportunity to do just that,
as its frontiers continue to expand, incorporating
numerous ethnic groups, in Zaire, Angola, and Zambia.
This panel offers the opportunity for scholars to share the
new research of the 1980s and early 1990s on this
enduring institution and its repeated reinvention across
space and time. Papers would also be welcome on
associated women's sororities or initiations,
where they exist.





riannia-/aneL COntd.


'AFRICANNESS' IN CONTEMPORARY SOUTH
AFRICAN ART
Co-Chairs: SANDRA KLOPPER & MICHAE GODBY, U. OF CAPE
TOWN TEL: (021)650-2685 ORFAX: (021) 650-3726
Following the unbanning "of the African National
Congress in 1990, and the return of political exiles from
elsewhere in Africa and abroad, there has been a
tremendous resurgence of interest in South Africa's
African identity. This resurgence should be seen against
the background of the rise of the black consciousness
movement in the late 1970s and the increasingly militant
politics of resistance against the apartheid state in the
1980s.

This panel seeks to explore the varied and complex ways
in which South Africans artists, institutions, individuals
and communities have sought to come to terms with the
brutal realities of the past by laying claim to and taking
pride in their identity as Africans.

THE NON-SPECIALIST TEACHER AND THE AFRICAN
ARTS COURSE
Chair: BETSY COGERREZELMAN, ST. LAWRENCE UNIVERSirY
TEL: (315)379-5192 OREMAIL: BREZ@MUSIC.STLAWU.EDU
African art courses are frequently taught by faculty
members whose primary area of expertise is in another art
historical field and who lack the personal experience,
academic background and/or university support of their
specialist peers. This situation poses particular challenges
for the instructor, the students and the institution in terms
of course content, visual materials, library resources,
museum holdings, professional and pedagogical support.
This panel invites papers which address both the
challenges posed by this situation and creative and doable
responses to them.

THE BANTU IDENTITY PROBLEM: What Role Can Art
History Play?
Chair: EKPo EYO, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND
TEL: (301) 405-1479 ORFAx: (301) 314-8591
Some disciplines such as historical linguistics and
archaeology have long been involved in studies concerned
with the Bantu identity problem. These studies are
centered around the identification of the
Nigeria/Cameroon border or Zaire as the core area or
homeland of the Bantu by the linguists Greenberg and
Guthrie respectively. Archaeologists based on their study
of the distribution of iron age cultures, which are
seemingly defined by common ceramic forms and
decorative patterns have broadly agreed with the linguists.
Scholars from both disciplines also seem to have agreed
that the Bantu people moved from either nuclear area
southward into central and then eastern and southern
Africa. However, within both disciplines there are areas of
disagreement. The Bantu identity is a complex problem
that requires the cooperation and contribution of many
disciplines (art history, which deals with the most visible


cultural item, the plastic arts of the Bantu peoples,
appears to stand by idly and remain oblivious to the
problem).

The panel will comprise the linguistic historian Jan
Vansina, the archaeologist Merrick Posnansky, the
anthropologist Wyatt MacGaffey, the historian Peter
Mark; Ekpo Eyo will present the newly discovered
evidence for the migration of the Bantu people northwest
into south eastern Nigeria.

AFRICAN STUDIO PHOTOGRAPHY
Chair: CmuHTRAUD M. GEARY, NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN
AR TEL: (202) 357-4600
In recent years, the interest in the work of African studio
photographers has increased dramatically. Several
developments led to this scenario: (1) the importance of
examining African photography as part of the discourse
has finally been recognized (2) the work of several
photographers has been highlighted in recent art
exhibitions and publications (Seydou Keita, Cornelius
Augustt, Salla and Mama Casset, etc.) (3) photographic
studios in most African countries are rapidly going out of
business, and their negative holdings are endangered
(4) studio photographs, as well as entire studio holdings,
have become a commodity on the art market; materials
are often taken out of context without proper
documentation and assigned "art status."

Participants in this panel should examine past and present
studio photography in the form of case studies or regional
histories, addressing methodological, theoret-ical, and/or
ethical concerns. Contributions on photographers whose
work has not been discussed or developments in regions
not yet explored (such as East Africa) are encouraged.

CROSS-CURRENTS IN THE NIGER DELTA
Co-Chairs: MATHA ANDERSON, ALFRED UNIVERrrY AND
PHLIP M. PEEK, DREW U. CONTACT PHImP PEEK AT TEL: (201)
408-3383 oREMAIL: PPEEK@DREW.EDU
Numerous ethnic groups inhabit the vast delta of the
Niger River and many more have passed through its
waters. Cultural identity, whether stressing diversity from
or affiliation with others has proven a critical dynamic in
an area of extraordinarily similar swamps and streams.
This panel will investigate how these Delta peoples have
used the arts to distinguish themselves while sharing the
common experience of living in this watery environment.

WRITTEN CULTURE: Script and Inscription in African
Art
Chair: MARY (POLLY) NOOTER ROBERTS, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
TEL: (319) 351-1885 ORFA (319) 335-0653 OREMAIL:
ALLEN-ROBERTS@UOWA.EDU
This panel explores alternative literacies and the role of
inscription in African and African-American art. Topics
will cover secret writing systems, indigenous scripts,
calligraphic traditions, and unknown tongues. Writing






.Jrinneiapaw, contd.


will be apprehended through culturally-specific concepts
and epistemologies.. Attention will be given to visual
media (architecture, altars, books, textiles, scarification,
sculpture, and painting) and performative modes
(masquerade, royal ritual, divination, healing, and
devotional worship) that incorporate writing, script, and
letters as mechanisms of political legitimation, economic
sanction, apotropaic efficacy, and mnemonic intention.
The panel will address issues of sign and meaning,
"literacy" and orality, textuality and power from the
perspectives of linguistics, philosophy, art history, and
anthropology.

REVISITING THE ART/CRAFT DICHOTOMY: Looking
for New Answers
Chair: ROBERT T. SOPPELSA, WASHBURN STATE UNIVERSrY
TEL: (913) 231-1010 x 1324 OREMAIL: ZZSOPP@ACC.WUACC.EDU
In 1971-2, Roy Sieber challenged the academic notion of
a dichotomy between Art and Craft with the "Textiles and
Decorative Arts" show at MOMA. Many of us picked up
on that note as students of his during the 70s and 80s, and
even into the 90s. Now we are faced with something new:
what to do about traditional vs. "modern," "craft" vs.
"Art," or even "African" vs."Euro-derived," and their
various sub-categories. My contention is that we need to
develop either new categories, or make the parameters of
our categories more flexible in order to properly
understand contemporary African arts. Papers are
welcome on any aspect of the issues raised.

THE CONVERGENCE OF PUBLIC, MASS, AND
POPULAR ARTS IN URBAN AFRICA
Chair: MARY Jo ARNOLDI, NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL
HISTORY TEL: (202) 357-1396; FAX (202 357-2208;
E-MAIL: MNHAN033@SIVM.sLEDU
The African urban visual landscape is not only
compelling because of its immediacy, vibrancy and its
tempo, but because of its global reach. This panel will
explore recent research on Africa's urban visual landscape
in light of new methodologies and theories about public,
mass, and popular arts. Papers will describe and analyze
the convergence and mutual impact of local and
international visual forms upon one another in
contemporary African urban settings and beyond These
forms are produced and displayed not only in art galleries
and cultural centers, but are disseminated on television
and in the news media, and on the street in the form of
advertising, public sculpture and fashion. Panelists will
address how visual imagery contributes in critical ways to
the construction and maintenance of post colonial national
identities and to the ongoing, and sometimes contested
dialogues about authenticity and identity in Africa.

AFRICAN AESTHETICS
Chair: JEAN BORGATI, CLARK U. TEL: (508) 799-2570; FAX:
(508)752-4383; EMAIL: JBOROATr@AOL.COM
Aesthetics is a branch of philosophy concerned with the
nature of beauty and taste, necessarily a part of


appreciating quality in works of art (connoisseurship). In
the study of African art, aesthetics has involved less
debate about the nature of beauty and taste than definition
of quality in terms of the consensus of a community (as
exemplars of a culture) about preference in order to
determine a baseline for appreciation within a particular
culture. Work in African aesthetics ranges from work that
addresses issues of beauty in a more philosophical vein to
that which addresses the criteria for evaluating beauty -
work that falls more within the range of applied
psychology than philosophy. Papers may address of
African aesthetics from any of a range of vantage points
between Philosophy and Psychology not precluding Art
History.

ARCHITECTURE: Power and Counter-Power
Chair: DOMINIQUE MALAQUAIS
TEL: (212) 628-8064; E-MAIL: EMALAQUAIS@UNOG.CH
Architecture constructs power. Throughout the world and
throughout history, it has served as a tool in the hands of
political, economic, and religious elites, as a means for
those who control the social order to ensure and enhance
their hold on power.

This statement like all generalizations begs a
question: If architecture can construct power, can it also
de-construct it? Can it be used to oppose, to weaken, or
even to attack centers of power? In the hands of persons or
groups displaced or marginalized by the social order, can
it become a tool of revolt? Can architecture be
revolutionary?

For the purposes of this panel -- and in an attempt to offer
as rich andvaried an answer to the questions it seeks to
pose -- the term "architecture" is construed in its broadest
sense. It refers to buildings, permanent or transitory, and
to building techniques, to perceptions, uses, and
transformations of space, to alterations effected upon pre-
existing structures, and to practices often left out of
discussions pertaining to architecture -- practices
commonly defined as "destructive," such as defacement,
arson, the willful misappropriation of structures and
spaces, processes of re-naming, uses of graffiti, posters,
flyers, and murals as means of re-orienting the functions
and/or meanings of a building or site...

AFRICAN ART UNDER AND BEYOND EUROPEAN
MODERNISM
Chairs: BENNETTA JULES-ROSETTE AND PETER BLOOM
CONTACT PETER BLOOM AT TEL/FAX (310) 392-0326
This panel addresses the reception of diasporic African
artistic forms in France. The proposed papers will address
the European institutional transmutations of the African
performative arts, traditional statuary, and popular
painting traditions. A central object of analysis for this
panel is the function of the Western art museum as the
symbol of cultural prestige, where a tour of the Western
museum is a descent into the complex world of tourism,





7rionnial, awt, cotd.


cultural domination, as well as the politics of artistic
translation and collaboration. In this panel, France serves
as the symbol of Europe high-modernism,-which at once
reduces and transforms the origin and signification of
artistic production as a cultural form.

Bennetta Jules-Rosette addresses the politics of exhibition
in France, focusing on a recent exhibition of Cheri
Samba's popular paintings at the Musee de l'Afrique et de
l'Oceanie in Paris and other contemporary African
painters in France. Yamba Bidma focuses on the reception
of Lobi statuary within the ideology of the French
museum complex. Ann Doquet's paper concerns the
transformation of Dogon ritual, theatrical, and artistic
tradition within the terms of French tourism and
European museum culture. Finally, Peter Bloom addresses
the diasporic and aesthetic transformations of Black
American boxing figures in France during the interwar
period as a symbol of resistance to European classical
aesthetic forms.

CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN ART PRACTICE AND STUDIES AT
THE TURN OF THE MILLENNIUM!
Chairs: SYLVESTER OoBECHIE, NORTHWESTERN U. AND JOHN
PEFFER, COLUMBIA U.; CONTACT JOHN PEFFER A (718) 638-8843
AND E-MAIL: MPl2@COLUMBIA.EDU
The intention of this panel is to present critical
perspectives on the direction of art production,
exhibitions, research and interpretation in the light of
issues facing students of Moder African art, particularly
where they intersect with recent developments in the field
of Art History. The following questions will be addressed:

Contemporary African Art and "internationalism": what
are the uses and abuses of discarding issues important in
Africa for those of the European metropole? How has this
invasion of the center affected global international modern
art practice, if at all? How has the recent rise of the
global, nonwestern exhibitions circuit affected the
production of Art in Africa? Is "Africa" a legitimate
terrain of practice in this era of globalization, how? How
are colonial stereotypes sustained even nurtured by
modern African and diasporan artists? What is at stake in
the current trend of adopting those artists who are
"performing" Africa in the diaspora as representative of
contemporary art trends on the continent itself? What are
the implications for the study of modern art and visual
culture in Africa given the current move away from older
Anthropological and Art Historical models regarding the
relations between visuality and society, to a culture studies
frame? Together the papers will survey current problems
facing contemporary African art practice and research.

MUSIC OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA
Chair. CYNTHIA SCHMDT, UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON
TEL: (712) 487-3735; FAX: (712)487-3475
As scholars continue to examine the relationships between
the arts of Africa, the Caribbean and the Southern United


States, they have refined their goals and more clearly
defined the important issues related to specific events,
styles, and even discrete songs performed in different
areas. These panelists will examine the role of the
individual and the process of him/her reacting creatively
to the new realities of a situation as well as the culture
group responding to various levels of change. Both
contemporary performance and historical reconstruction
of events will be part of the analysis.

The papers presented will include case studies of Afro-
Brazilian culture, the Gullah of coastal Georgia, parts of
the Caribbean and West Africa. Presenters will illustrate
their ideas with the aid of audio- and videotaped examples
of performance.

ART OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA: Issues of Voice,
Definition, and Transformation
Co-Chairs: MICHAEL HARRIS, MOREHOUSE COLLEGE AND DELE
JEGEDE, INDIANA STATE U.; CONTACT DELE JEGEDE AT E-MAIL:
OLONAMDH@AOL.COM OR ARJEGED@RUBY.INDSTATE.EDU
As we move toward the end of the Millennium, the
dichotomies of presentation and mis-representation have
been brought to the fore, perhaps much more graphically
than at any time since the study of African art began.
Museum authorities have usurped the right to present the
arts of so-called "non-Western" cultures even when such
presentations reinscribe the decapitation of "Others."
Several African countries have fallen prey to the rapacious
foray of the unconscionable art dealer: shrines and
museums are being stripped of their material culture with
impunity while we at this end ogle and fawn with
disarming coquetries over those "precious" and "cute"
additions to a museum's collection. Curators have
transformed themselves to a powerful but silent army,
becoming the Osanyin of African art, speaking through
both sides of their mouth while their unsuspecting publics
take them at the face value. With the incursion of
collectors of the exotic into the modern art valley, we are
witnessing the transformation of the field into an arena in
which outlandish dealers fund "critics" who in turn are
only too pleased to impose the view of the "new primitive"
on contemporary African artists.

These are some of the issues that this panel will focus on.,
and we are interested in a new scholarship, one that
attempts to catalyze issues that are presumed to be too hot
to handle by others. If you feel that you fit the bill, send us
your abstract.


TEACHING AND STUDYING AFRICAN ART WITH
COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY
Chair: CmuSTOPHER ROY, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
TEL: (319) 335-1777 OREMAIL: CHRISTOPHER-ROY@UIOWA.EDU


MI






Triennialpan4e, contd.


MODERNISM AND THE CARIBBEAN: Its Connection to
North American Art History
Chair: RICHARD POWELL, DUKE UNIVERSrY
TEL: (919) 684-2473

NEW ORLEANS: America's Most African City
Chair: WILIAM FAGALY, NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF AR
TEL: (504) 483-2630

ROCK ART STUDIES: New Vistas for a New Millennium
Chair: NANCY INGRAMNOOTER, WASmINGON, D.C.
TEL AND FAX. (202) 966-0306

MOZAMBIQUE UPDATE: New Opportunities for Artistic
Exchanges
Co-Chairs: GILBEETO COSSA, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA AND HARRIET
McGURE, USIA
CONTACT GILBERT COSSA ATTEL: (319) 353-4407

TEACHING STUDIO ART IN AFRICA
Chair: BETrY LADUKE, SOHERN OREGON STAmE COLLEGE
TEL: (541) 482-4562

PHILOSOPHICAL PERSPECTIVES ON AFRICAN ART
Chair: W. A. HART, UNIVERSITY OFULSTER
TEL: (01265) 324391 ORFAX: (01265) 324925

CONTEMPORARY YORUBA TEXTILES AND
CLOTHING
Chair: NORMA WOLFF, IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY EMAIL:
NHWOLFF@IASTATE.EDU

DIVINERS AND SPIRIT MEDIUMS AS FOCI OF ART
PRODUCTION IN SOUTHERN AFRICA
Chair: WILLIAM DEWEY, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
TEL: (319) 335-1784 OREMAIL: WILLIAM-DEWEY@UIOWA.EDU

VISUAL DIPLOMACY: COMICAL REPRESENTATIONS
IN AFRICAN ART
Chair: BABATUNDE LAWAL, VRGINIA COMMONWEALTHU.
TEL: (804) 346-4450 ORFAX: (804) 828-7468

WORD AS/OR IMAGE: Artistic Expression in Africa's New
Religious Movements
Chair: ROSALND I.J. HACKETT, UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE
TEL: (423) 588-1562 OREMAIL: RHACKETT@UTK.EDU

ART, AFRICA, AND CHILDREN: Teaching Creativity and
Culture
Chair: KINSEY KATCHKA, INDIANA UNIVERSITY
FAX: (812) 855-4358 OREMAIL: KKATCHKA@INDIANA.EDU

WOMEN'S ART/WOMEN'S MASQUERADE: The Caribb-
ean and Africa
Chair: JUDriH BETTEuEIM, SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY
TEL: (415)338-2176 ORFAX: (415) 338-6537 OREMAIL:
BETHEIM@SFSU.EDU


ACASA
vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv
The Triennial Symposium on African Art
April 8-12, 1998


CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FORM
Name
Affiliation
Address
City State Zip_
Country Phone Fax

Early Bird (Pre)Registration (postmarked by February 1)
[ ] Member $50
[ ] Non-Member (Regular) $80
[] Special (student/retired/unempl.) $25
[ ] Students (ID no.) $40
[ ] One-Day Participation $40


Late and On-site Registration (from February 2)
[ ] Member $80 [ ] Non-Member
[ ] Student $40 [ ] Daily Rate


$120
$40


1998 ACASA Membership (Calendar year, Jan. Dec.)
[ ] Regular & Institutional $35
[ ] Students/Retired/Unemployed $15
Special Events
Opening Reception at the Marriott Hotel (Wednesday)
[ ] I plan to attend this complementary event
Reception at the New Orleans Museum of Art (Thursday)
[] $10 x Total $
Reception at local universities (Friday). Please specify:
[]$10 x_ Total $
[ Dillard and Southern OR [ ] Loyola andTulane
Visits to Private Collections (Saturday)
[ ] $10 x Total $
Awards Banquet at Mulate's (Saturday)
[ ] $45
Total Amount Enclosed $
Method of Payment: [ ]Check [ ]Visa [ ]MC [ ]Am. Exp.
Credit Card no. Exp. Date

oChecks must be in US dollars and drawn on a US bank,
payable to: MICHAEL HARRIS, DEPARTMENT OF ART, HANES
ART CENTER CB# 3405, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA
AT CHAPEL HILL, CHAPEL HILL, NC 27599-3405

[ ] I will have special needs for th econference (please specify:
sign interpreter, braille program, large print, mobility/
accessibility, dietary)


Ml








*EXHIBITIONS

**Klags of Africa" (Photog-
raphs by Daniel Laine) is the
title of an internet exhibit
mounted by Tamarin. ...[T]he
African continent is often the theatre
of such contrasts, where parallel
worlds overlap in permanence,
making it difficultfor an outsider to
analyze. There are still several
hundred monarchs on this continent.
While some amongst them have been
relegated to the level of touristic
curiousities, others still maintain
significant traditional and spiritual
power Born of dynasties which
marked the history ofAfrica until the
twentieth century, these kings are the
source of underground power with
which "modern governments" have
to exist. It took Daniel Laine three
years of effort and intense
diplomatic steps to realize this
fantastic work. During this period,
he was able to photograph 70
sovereigns, descendants of the
great African dynasties. Welcome
to the world of "crowned heads."

Daniel Laine's work on the Kings
of Africa, has been captured in a
book and a magnificent exposition
in a well-known museum of Paris.
Museums and interested institut-
ions can visit the web site
http://www.tamarin.com for
more information as well as the
documents of the exposition.

a AFRICAN ART: AESTHETICS
AND MEANING
An Electronic Exhibition Catalog
Bayly Art Museum, U. of Virginia
Charlottesville, VA. Benjamin C. Ray,
Department of Religious Studies
Guest Curator

Contents
Introduction; Elements of the
African Aesthetic; The Exhibition;
Bibliography


About the Electronic Exhibition
Catalog; Credits...
http://www.lib.virginia.edu/dic/
exhib/93.ray.aa/African.html

EThe Poetics of Une: Seven
Artists of the Nsukka Group
Leading scholars from Africa,
Europe, and the United States will
participate in a two-day Symp-
osium on contemporary Nigeri-
an art at the Smithsonian's
National Museum of African
Art (950 Independence Ave.
S.W.). The Oct. 19-20 sympos-
ium-titled "The Nsukka Group
and the State of Nigerian
Contemporary Art"-is being
organized in conjunction with the
exhibition "The Poetics of Line:
Seven Artists of the Nsukka
Group," which will be on view at
the museum Oct. 22-April 26,
1998. Simon Ottenberg is Guest
Curator of the exhibition. The
seven artists whose work is
featured in the exhibition will
participate in the symposium,
which will explore Nsukka art and
will relate the artists' work to the
larger contemporary art scene in
Nigeria and to art throughout the
world.

The exhibition includes 64
paintings, drawings, prints,
sculptures and mixed-media works
by leading members of a group of
artists who have studied or taught
in the Department of Fine and
Applied Arts at the University of
Nigeria, Nsukka. These artists,
whose works share many formal
stylistic features, bridge the past
and the present, revealing a
contemporary artistic sensibility
through their selective use of
traditional aesthetics.


Symposium schedule
Oct. 19: "Igbo and African Art
Traditions" (9:30 a.m.-noon), "Four
Nsukka Artists Speak of Their Work"
(1:30 to 3:30 p.m.) and
"Interrelationships of Poetry and
Art" (4-5:30 p.m.). Oct. 20
"Contemporary Nigerian Art and Its
Relationship to Nsukka Art" (9:30
a.m.-noon), "Nigerian Art in the
Context of African, Third World and
Western Art" (1:30-3:30 p.m.) and
"The Future of Nsukka and Nigerian
Art" (4-5:30 p.m.).

The symposium is free and open
to the public; box lunches will be
available for $12, each day.
Advance registration is advised;
call (202) 357-4600 ext. 221.
The Nsukka exhibition inaug-
urates a new gallery that will be
devoted to the exhibition of
modem African art. Named the
Sylvia H. Williams Gallery, it
honors the museum's late director.
(Mrs. Williams died in 1996.)
Admission to the National
Museum of African Art is free.
The museum's TTY number is
(202) 357-4814. http://www.si.edu.

* Trade Routes: History and
Geography is the theme of the
2nd Johannesburg Biennale,
October 12, 1997 January 18,
1998, hosted by the Africus
Institute for Contemporary Art.
Trade Routes metaphorically
uses the confluence of the Atlantic
and Indian Oceans in the Cape of
Good Hope and the occasion of
the opening of the sea route to
India in 1498 by the Portuguese
explorer Vasco Da Gama, to
explore the question of global
traffic in culture. The exhibitions
of the 2nd Biennale will
investigate some of these issues in
an effort "to articulate the way we
encounter, assimilate, disseminate,
translate, locate, context, revise,


F





Chdi orlod, contd.

and write culture within the
dialectic of the history-- of
modernity."

Okwui Enwezor, the New York-
based curator, art critic, and
publisher and Artistic Director of
the 2nd Biennale will work in
conjunction with six international
curators: Hou Hanru, Kellie
Jones, Yu Yeon Kim, Gerardo
Mosquera, Colin Richards, and
Octavio Zaya.

The event comprises six
exhibitions, an international
conference (convened by Olu
Oguibe) on the same theme, and a
film program. Papers and
discussions from the conference
will be published by a major
British/American cultural studies
publisher. For details, contact:
Co-ordinator, Media and
Promotion. tel. 27 11 838 6407;
email: prees@icon.co.za

CROSS/ING: Time*Space*
Movement is an exhibition of
African contemporaries to premier
at the Contemporary Art
Museum,University of South
Florida, September 4 October
18, 1997. The show is being
guest-curated by Olu Oguibe,
Visiting Associate Scholar, Stuart
Golding Chair in African Art,
College of Fine Arts, at the
University of South Florida,
Tampa.

The exhibition comprises works
(painting, sculpture, video,
installation and photography) by
ten artists: Olad616 Bamboy6
(U.K.), Bili Bidjocka (France),
Gordon Bleach (U.S.), Marcia
Kure (Nigeria), Kendell Geers
(South Africa), Lubaina Himid
(U.K.), Ant6nio Ole (S.A.),


Tracey Rose (S.A.), Folake
Shoga and Olu Oguibe. Three of
the ten artists will travel to Tampa
from Africa/Europe/U.S. to
develop new works specifically for
the exihibition and for a short
residency in which they will
participate in a symposium and
interact with students and
community members through
workshops and lectures.

Okwui Enwezor and Carl
Hazelwood will put together a
scholarly catalogue of the exhibit.
A symposium with participating
artists and scholars will take place
Friday, September 5 from 10
a.m. to noon in the Fine Arts
Recital Hall (FAH 101). There are
plans to travel the exhibition
nationally. For space reservation
(symposium) call 813-974-2849.

Participation fee: $8,000 USD +
shipping. Contact: Alexa Favata,
Assistant Director, USF Contemp-
orary Art Museum,Tel. 813-974-
4133; Email: favata@ satiearts.
usf.edu
4202 East Fowler Avenue
CAM 101, Tampa, FL 33620-7360

* Colours of Culture A Pre-
PANAFEST '97 painting exhib-
ition at the National Art Gallery,
Accra, Ghana, June 4 July 31,
1997. "The Re-Emergence of
African Civilization" is the theme
of PANAFEST, which runs
August 29 through September 7,
1997.

The exhibit includes works Kofi
Dawson, Albert Wuddah-
Martey, Tetteh Mpata, and
Glover Darlington.

* African Influences in
Contemporary Art: Artists of
the Kwanzaa Playground.


Columbus Museum of Art, 480 E.
Broad St., Art Education, 614-
221-6801. The exhibit focuses on
local artists who contributed to
Ohio's first Africentric play-
ground, the Kwanzaa Playground
on Bryden road. Includes works
by Pheoris West, Bill Agnew,
Queen Brooks, Andrew Scott,
LaVerne Brown, Barbara
Chavous, and Larry Winston
Collins. The Kwanzaa Playground
was conceived in 1995 to provide
a sense of cultural identity and a
safe haven for children of Olde
Town East, Columbus. Exhibit
runs till Aug. 31.

* Yet Still We Rise: African-
American Art in Cleveland
and Columbus, 1920-1970 is the
first comprehensive exhibition
organized to showcase the
development in Ohio of a regional
black presence in the visual arts in
the 20th century. The show,
features some 60 works by 36
artists, was organized by the
Cleveland Artists Foundation and
later enlarged under David
Barker's curatorial care to include
Columbus artists.



* JOBS & INTER NS

EThe National Museum of
African Art, Smithsonian
Institution, is seeking qualified
individ-uals for two Curatorial
positions (Federal service).
Assistant/Associate Curator
(Modem African Art), GS-1015-
11/12/13, salary: $38,330 to
$54,629 depending on experience.
This position has primary
responsibility for the on-going
exhibition program in the museum's
gallery devoted to modem African
art as well as research and collection





)obs, contd.

development. The position requires
knowledge of and experience in the
field of African art history and
special competence in the area of
modern African art. Vacancy
announcement number: 97RR-1123.
Associate Curator (Classical
African Art), GS-1015-12/13,
salary: $45,939 to $54,629
depending on experience. This
position has responsibility for
research, publication, exhibition and
collection development and public
programming related to exhibitions.
The position requires knowledge of
and experience in African art history
and museum policies and practices.
Vacancy announcement number:
97RR-1124.

For an application package, call
the Smithsonian Institution Jobline
(202) 287-3102 or the National
Museum of African Art (202)
357-4600 ext. 205. Applications
must be postmarked or received no
later than October 24, 1997.

*The UCLA Fowler Museum
of Cultural History seeks a
Chief Curator to supervise the
curatorial and collections staff and
to oversee the museum's African
holdings. The Chief Curator
develops and presents exhibitions
relating to the collections;
researches and writes text for
funding proposals, publications
and labels; and organizes and
presents public lectures and
seminars. Additional responsibil-
ities include documenting and
maintaining the African collect-
ions; developing plans for African
acquisitions; and creating and
nurturing relat-ionships with
potential donors. The Chief
Curator also supervises the
museum's Curator of Southeast
Asian and Oceanic Collections,
Curator of Archaeology, Regist-
rar, Collections Man-ager and


Conservator. The successful
candidate will part-icipate in the
museum's operating committee
which advises museum's
management on policy issues and
oversees developing projects. The
Chief Curator reports to the
Director of the Museum but
operates with a high degree of
independence. A Ph.D. in art
history or anthropology with a
focus on francophone Africa is
preferred. Salary range is
$40,300-$60,300 with excellent
benefits. Please send letter of
application and r6sum6 b2
October 31, 1997 to Doran H. Ross,
Director, UCLA Fowler Museum of
Cultural History, Box 951549, Los
Angeles, CA 90095-1549.


'r Ie following abbreviated
1 listings appeared on H-Net.
[To order the actual Job Guide send
the following message to
ULSTSERV@B-NET.MSU.EDU

GET H-NET JOBGUIDE
or view it at
http://h-net.msu.edu/jobs
On some mail systems, you will have
to send the command

get h-net jobguide f=mail

to receive the Guide. If you still
have trouble, please contact
belp(-j-netmsu.edu.

When applying for a job. please
mention you saw it on H-Net.
Please submit jobs to
hjobsitib-net.msu.edu.
Jobs must be submitted by Noon on
Friday for inclusion in the following
Monday's Guide]

*Archivist/Manuscript Cataloger.
Duke University (North Carolina)
*University Records Archivist.
Michigan State University
*Project Archi ist. Central
Michigan Uni\ crsit)


*Archivist (2 Positions), Wright
State University (Ohio)
*Curators (2 Positions), University
of Missouri at St Louis (Missouri)
Director Miami University Art
Museum (Search Reopened), Miami
University (Ohio)
eCultural Resources Specialist,
Michael Baker Jr. Inc. (W. Virginia)
*Curriculum Development, EDC
(Guinea)
*Women's Studies, University of
California Riverside (California)
*Museum Training Supervisor,
Bletchley Park Museum (UK)



* CON FERENCES

* African Studies Associat-
Ion (USA) regrets to announce a
CHANGE OF DATES for the
40th Annual Meeting in
Columbus, Ohio. NEW DATES :
13 (Thursday) to 16 (Sunday)
November 1997.

Africana Librarians Council of
the ASA 40th Anniversary
International Symposium new date
is 13 (Thursday) November 1997.

Information concerning ASA and
the Annual Meeting may be found
on the ASA web page:
http://www.sas.upenn.edulAfrica
Studies/Home Page/ASA_Menm
html

* International Black Rues
and Manufacturers Expo ad
Conference October 3 6, 1997
University of the District of
Columbia. WVashington, DC The
theme of the conference is,
"Building Wealh! ....Our
Future Depends on it.'Con and
see the thousands of pikhiets
firon black manulfctitwr artists,
clthiers, irmpsits. trafhtis ple?
and publishesN ftma dio iMd


m





(_Onfrences, contd.

States and abroad.You can get
further information and register
on-line at http://www.IBBMEC.com

The American Society for
Aesthetcs 55th Annua Conf-
erence, October 29-November
1, 1997, Santa Fe, New Mexico.
For further information, contact:
American Society for Aesthetics,
Marquett University, Cudahy
Hall Rm 404, P.O. Box 1881,
Milwaukee, MI WI 53201 1414-
288-7831; numtcarvms.csL.mu.e4

The Cener for Africn
Sthes (CSA) of the lWnhv ty
of Torm, Itly is organizing in
October a round table on the
music of Zaire during a national
music convention and exposition
called "Salone dells Musica",
which focuses on contemporary
music and social crisis in Zaire.
The CSA will be pleased to invite
a scholar of traditional and/or
urban Zaire music. For more
information write to:
graello@liuc.it or
ramelloogaia.cisiunito.it

I The Institute of Early American
History and Culture and the Haifa
University American Studies
Program is holding a conference
on the theme, "More than Cool
Reason: Black Responses to
Enslavement, Exile, and Reset-
tlement" in 1998. For details,
contact: Ronald Hoffman,
Institute of Early American
History and Culture, P.O. Box
8781, Williamsburg, VA 23187-
8781 (tel. 804-221-1133;
ieahc@factsaff.wm.edu).

"RE-IMAGING AFRICA: Re-
Interpretiln the Past, ReFoc-
using the Present, Re-Projeclng
the Future" The Third Annual
Mid-America Alliance for African


Studies (MAAAS) conference will
be held at the University of
Oklahoma in Norman, September
27-28, 1997. We invite
Africanists-including faculty
(professors and teachers), staff,
students and interested members
of the community-from the region
and beyond- to submit paper and
panel proposals on the
interdisciplinary aspects of "RE-
IMAGING AFRICA" from past,
present, and future perspectives.
These are but a few questions that
one might consider in developing a
paper or panel proposal for
MAAAS '97.

Paper proposals should not exceed
one single-spaced page. Panel
proposals of 3-4 papers should not
exceed one page for each paper
included in the panel. The
deadline for proposal submission
is June 15, 1997.

All proposals and conference
correspondence should be sent to:
MAAAS '97 Betty J. Harris,
President, Women's Studies
Program, Physical Sciences Center
530, Norman, OK 73019. Tel:
(405) 325-3481 Fax:(405) 325-7709
E-mail: BHarris*pop.ew.edu

All conference presenters must
pay membership and registration.
Please make checks payable to
MAAAS.Membership: faculty
($20); students($15); independent
scholars($15); institutions ($30)
Pre-registration (until July 1):
faculty ($15); students/indepen-
dent scholars ($5) Registration
(after July 1): faculty ($25);
students/independent scholars ($10).


S6 R A N T 8

The Bead Sodety of Greater
Washington (BSGW) seeks
proposals for grants to fund bead
research. The open is poen to
members of any bead society, and
may be used for work in progress
or for new projects. Past grants
have ranged from $500 to $2200.
For application details, contact:
The Gras Committee, Bead
Society of Greater W Bshsigtoa,
P.O. Box 7036, Chevy Chase,
MD 20S13-4036. Application
deadline is September 15 1997.

The American Academy In
leo announces the 1998/99
Rome Prize fellowship
competition in the fields) of
architecture, visual arts, historic
preservation, set design, urban
design, musical composition,
graphic design, history of art, etc.
Deadline for competition is
November 15, 1997. For
application materials, write to:
Programs Department, American
Academy in Rome, 7 East 60
Street, New York, NY 10022-
1001 [tel.: 212-751-7200.

During the spring quarter of
1997-98 at Nortmlwetern
t er lty the hns ilute for
AVanced Stuiy mai Research
i Africn HuImanies will
examine how the peoples of the
African diaspora theorized identity
or identities through emobodied
practices and written forms. The
1997-98 Seminar is titled,
Identity Constructions:
Performing and Writing the
African Diaspora, 1880-2000.
Send a cv, two sealed reference
letters, a written statement
indicating organizational affiliat-
ion and a proposal of no more
than 1,200 words by October 1,





Aioo, contd.

1997 to CODESRIA African
Humanities Institute, B.P. 3304,
Dakar, Senegal [teL 221-25-98-22;
CODESRIAsonatel.senet.net

mThe Woodrow Wilson Intern-
atlonal Center Humanities
Fellowships-Fellowships are
available in the Humanities and
Social Sciences for 1998-99.
Fellows are associated with one of
the Center's seven programs:
Asian; East and West European;
Historical, Cultural, and Literary
Studies; International Studies;
Kennan Institute for Advanced
Russian Studies; Latin American;
and United States Studies.
Deadline for receipt of
applications for the is October 1,
1997. Decisions on appointment
will be made by March 1, 1998.
The Fellowships Office,The
Woodrow Wilson Center 1000
Jefferson Drive S.W. SI MRC 022
Washington, D.C. 20560 email:
wcfellow@sivm.si.edu
Fax: (202) 357-4439 Tel: (202) 357-
2841 http://wwics.si.edu
91

ART ON THE INTERNET

Sdate: Sat, 26 Apr 1997
from: Eric Charry

I've just discovered a web site that
is an important source for the
activities of African artists world
wide. It lists performances
(primarily in Europe, but also in
the US) of African music, dance,
and theater. You can search by
date, country of the African artist,
or name. There are also
informative articles. It is run by
Afrique en Creations, which was
"co-founded by the French
Ministry for Overseas Develop-
ment (on its initiative) and the


Ministry for the Arts, following
the Afrique en Creation
convention held in January 1990
in Paris." http://www.a.fr/frlricart

n Date: Wed, 14 May 1997
X-Posted From: H-AFRICA-Mel
Page

The African Odyssey Interactive
(AOI) website, sponsored by the
Kennedy Center for the
Performing Arts in Washington,
DC, is aimed towards promoting
the interactive exchange of ideas,
information, and resources
between artists, teachers, and
students of African art and
culture. http://artsedge.kennedy-
center. org/odyssey.html

date: Fri, 25 Apr 1997
from: Gerhard Haupt=20

"Universes in Universe Worlds
of Art" is an extensive art
information and communication
system in 5 sections: 1.
IntArtData: Art directories -
Africa, Asia/Pacific, the Americas
2. Caravan: Biennials worldwide
3. Special documents 4. Forum:
intercultural debate. 5. Art Action:
Calls for submission worldwide.
In English, German, Spanish.
http://www.kulturbox.de/ universe
A non-profit project from
Berlin/Germany, presented by an
international team. Contact: Dr.
Gerhard Haupt Bornholmer Str.
11 D- 10439 Berlin Tel/Fax:
+4930 445 78 23; Email:
haupt@bln.de or
univers@kulturbox.de For more
information see: http://www.
kulturbox. de/onivers/e abouthtm

8 X-Posted: H-AFRICA-Mel Page

From: Carole Holden, British
Library
Date: Tues, 20 May 1997


The British Ubrary is finally
providing free access on the web
to its automated catalogues:
httD://oDac97.bluk
General information on theAfricana
collections is available at:
htt://lortico.bLuk/africa

SDate: Tue, 20 May 1997
From: Peter Limb, University of
Western Australia

Tamazgha, a Collection of
Resources on North Africa, the
Amazigh (Berber) People, their
Language and Culture URL:
http://home.worldcom.ch/~babden
on



SB I T U A R

NDar Aklilu Lema, a leading
Ethiopian scientist, died at the age
of 63 in Baltimore, U.S.A on
April 5; he was later buried in
Adis Ababa, Ethiopia.

The late Dr. Aklilu is credited with
the discovery, research, and
development and application of an
Ethiopian soapberry plant (endod)
into a drug for the control of
schistosomiasis or bilharzia.
His perseverance and scientific
career over a period of 30 years
won him numerous awards and
international recognition.

During his lifetime, Dr Aklilu
received the Haile Selassie I gold
medal award, the 1988 Right
Livelihood Award (sometimes
referred to as Alternative Nobel
Prize) which was given by the
Swedish parliament, and an
honorary doctorate of science
from the University of Toledo.

Since 1993, Dr. Aklilu has been at
the Johns Hopkins University, as





Oliarj, coatd.

UNESCO chair and professor in
the department of international
health. Prior to his death, the
scientist was engaged in creating
linkages between the Johns
Hopkins University and the Addis
Ababa and Uganda's Makerere
universities. His task was to
promote indigenous capacity
building for scientific research and
youth focused HIV/AIDS control
in Ethiopia and Uganda.

The late scientist has established
the Aklilu Lemma Foundation
through a donation of one million
birr (about 160,000 U.S. dollars)
from him and members of his
family. The foundation's objective
will be to provide scholarships,
research grants fellowships and
achievement awards to outst-
anding students.

Dr. Aklilu is survived by his wife
and three sons.


111


K-


Noteworthy Publitions
VOGEl, Joseph O. ed. The Encyclopedia of Precolonial
Africa: Archaeology, History, Languages, Cultures,
and Environments. Spring 1997. $125. Order from:
Alta Mira Press, c/o Sage Publications, 2455 Teller
Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320 [805499-0871].
Approx. 640pp., over 100 entries by leading
Africanists
PERANI, Judith and Fred T. Smith. Visual Arts of
Africa: Gender, Power and Life Cycle Rituals
Prentice Hall, fall 1997
LEIBHAMMER, Nessa. Making Links: A Resource Book on
the Traditional Southern African Collection at the
Johannesburg Gallery. Johannesburg: Johannesburg
Art Gallery, 1996. 50pp. ISBN 1-874836-30-2 The
book is linked to two displays at the Johannesburg Art
Gallery, "Secular and Spiritual: Objects of
Mediation and Views from Within"
Arnold, Marion L Women and Art in South Africa. New York:
St. Martin's, 1997
WILDUNG, Dietrich ed, Ancient Kingdoms of the Nile
10003[212-777-6888]26, rue Racine 75006 Paris [33-
1-40-51-31-06 Illustrates and discusses ceramics,
jewelry, sculpture, temple, and funerary artifacts from
the Stone Age to the early Christianity.


FAIK-NZUJI MADIYA, CLEMENTINE. Tracing Memory: A
Glossary of Graphic Signs and Symbols in African
Art and Culture. Hull, Quebec: Canadian Museum
of Civilization, 1996
OTTENBERG, Simon. New Traditions from Nigeria: Seven
Artists of the Nsukka Group. Hemon, VA:
Smithsonian Institution, November 1997. 320pp.,
$49.95
RYCHNER, Rose-Marie ed. Contemporary Art in Uganda.
Neuchatel; Bonn: Ugandan Artist Promotion
Committee, 1996. $20. [Rose-Marie Rychner, Beaux
Art 14, NeuchAtel
Redemption Songs: The Self-Taught Artists of Jamaica. 56-
page exhibition catalog of the Diggs Gallery, Winston-
Salem State University, 1997; includes an essay by
guest curator Randall Morris. $17 (includes shipping
& handling)
Forget-Me-Not: The Art and Mystery of Memory Jugs. 40-
page exhibition catalog featuring over 60 memory
objects; includes an introduction by RobetFarris
Thompson, essays by Brooke DavisAndeison and
Linda Brown. $12. Diggs Gallery
DAGAN, Esther A., ed. The Spirit's Dance in Africa:
Evolution, Transformation and Continuity.
Westmount, Montr6al: GAAAP/Galerie
AMRAD/African Arts Publications, 1997. 352pp.,
$100; $11.50 (s/h)
VAN HOOK, Baily. Women and Art in American Society,
1876-1914. University Park: Pennsylvania State
University, 1996
BLANDINO, Betty Coiled Pottery: Traditional and
Contemporary Ways. London: A & C Black, 1997
REED, Eli. Black in America. New York: Norton, 1997
TUFTE, Edward R. Images and Quantities, Evidence and
Narrative. Cheshire, Conn.: Graphic Press, 1997
coll. The Cultural Life of Images: Visual Representation in
Archaeology. London; New York: Routledge, 1997
FOPP, Michael. Managing Museums and Galleries. London;
New York: Routledge, 1997
HUBBARD, Ethan. The Face of Man: Images from around
the World. Cleveland, Ohio: Pilgrim Press, 1997
SANJURO, Annick ed. Contemporary Latin American
Artists: Exhibitions at the Organization of
American States, 1941-1964. Lanham, MD:
Scarecrow, 1997

B


E





PuILcaliono, contd.


Multimedia Resources

*"The African Collection", a user-oriented CD-
ROM, not only serves as a guide to the large holdings
of African art and artifacts at Illinois State University,
but also as a many faceted, multi-tiered introduction
to traditional African culture, as illustrated by its arts
and handicrafts. Designed for individual as well as
group usage, this cross-platformed MAC/PC resource
is divided into inter-linked sections on 'Ways of
Seeing African Art", "Types of African Art", "Terms
Relating to African Art", "Locations of African Art",
and "Brief Essays on African Art." Some 200
examples, many in 360-degree manipulable virtual
reality, are selected from the Collection to accompany
the informative text passages, which are also enhanced
with appropriate video and music clips, maps and
contextual photos. Users of any age and learning
level, from school children to scholarly researchers,
can find something to relate to in this diverse,
attractively presented, and highly instructional work,
which adapts readily to home, library, museum or
classroom purposes. The essays, on such topics as
textiles, musical instruments, masquerades, memorial
markers and household items are carefully researched
and pictorially well-documented, and contain
bibliographies to encourage further study. "The
African Collection" offers an affordable, enriching
opportunity to immerse oneself in an artistic and
cultural tradition that is not only one of the oldest but
also one of the most creative and influential on earth.
The cost of "The African Collection" CD is $39.95 and
may be purchased by contacting Shell Gilfillan at
Instructional Technology Services, Illinois State
University, Campus Box 6370, Normal, IL 61790-6370
or b) phone at 309-438-2542.


* Videos on Priesthood In Ghana An engaging
documentary of rituals celebrated at the Abidjan
Mamiwater Shrine at Abidjan Mamiwater Village in
the Eastern Region, Ghana, and the Tsigaa No. 1
Shrine in Moree, Central Region, Ghana.

>Priesthood and Ritual in Ghana: Abidjan
Mamiwater Shrine This video was photographed at
the Abidjan Mamiwater Village Shrine located on the
banks of the Volta River in the Eastern Region,
Ghana. It documents the "Fetatotro," the annual
Festival of the Divinities, celebrated at the Village in
1994, which includes pouring, rituals of Ade,


festivities for Tohono, the sacrifice of a bull to Mami
Water, and the purification of the stools of Ablo. The
"Nutikloklo Kpe Konu," a purification ritual, was
conducted on the occasion of the death of Togbi
Abidjan, Mamiwater's wife in 1993.
Color/1 Hour 2 Mins./Ewe and English
U.S.A. (VHS-NTSC) $95.00 (VHS- HI-8) $145.00

>Priesthood and Ritual in Ghana: Moree Maame
Water Taped at Moree in the Central Region, Ghana,
this video documents the Afahye (including Maame
Water), which was celebrated at the Tsigaa No. 1
Shrine by its priest, Bosomfo Kow Tawiah, in 1995.
The ritual Closing and Opening of the "Emfa" Lagoon
in Moree in 1995 and 1996; Aba Yaba's work as a
Maame Water priestess; and an interview with Kwesi
Kaya, a Moree fisherman who is a devotee of Maame
Water.
Color/1 Hour 1 Min./Fante and English
U.S.A. (VHS-NTSC) $95.00 (VHS-HI-8) $145.00

Make check or money order payable to Scripps
College.(lntemational orders $195.00 per video. Pay by
international money order. Specify format. Shipping and
handling included). Send completed order form and payment
tc. GerberMedia Industries, RO. Box 1873, Upland, CA
9 1785-1873, U.S.A.


* ACASA BOOK Distribution Program

The following publications were sent under the
auspices of the ACASA Book Distribution Program
in March and July, 1997:

Sacred Arts of Haitian Vodun. Donald J. Cosentino. ed..
1995. Courtesy of the Fowler Museum of Cultural History
and Doran H. Ross
is i S/he a Doll: Play and Ritual in African Sculpture.
S.habelh Cameron, 1996. Courtesy of the Fowler
Museum of Cultural History and Doran H. Ross
Adinkra: The Cloth that Speaks. Leasa Farrar Fortune,
ed., 1997. Courtesy of the National Museum of African
Art
African Arts 30/2 1997. Courtesy of the Fowler Museum
of Cultural History and Doran Ross
Representing Woman: Sande Masquerades of the
Mende of Sierra Leone. Ruth B. Phillips, ed., 1995.
Courtesy of the Fowler Museum of Cultural History and
Doran Ross.

5B


Iw






I...Of People and Places


I


* African Vodun: Art, Psychology, and Power (U.
Chicago) by Suzanne Preston Blier is the recipient of
the Charles Rufus Morey Award for the most
distinguished book published in the history of art last
year by the College Art Association. The award was
presented at the annual association meeting in New
York, February 1997. 0

* Major theft from African Museum-The Art Newspaper,
no. 68 (March 1997) reports the theft of 23 masks and
other ritual objects in January from the Zambian
National Museum in Livingstone. The items are
valued at $1.3 million.

* The Art Newspaper, no, 69 (April 1997)-The Italian
government announced in March that by the end of the
year it would be returning the third-century AD
obelisk taken from Axum by Benito Mussolini after
Italy's conquest of Ethiopia in 1935. The 80- foot
monolith stands at present outside the headquarters of
the UN Food & Agric. Org. near the Circus Maximus.

* Dr. Babatunde Lawal, Department of Art History,
School of the Arts, Virginia Commonwealth
University, Richmond, Virginia has been appointed to
the editorial board of the Art Bulletin for the term
1997-2000. The Art Bulletin is published by the
College Art Association, New York.

* Kojo Fosu, a Fulbright fellow from the University
of Science and Technology, Ghana, will teach a course
on African art and History, as well as develop an
exhibition relating to the contemporary art and artists
of Ghana on the campus of North Carolina A & T
State University (Mattye Reed African Heritage
Center, 910-334-7874).

* Henry Drewal will be in Salvador, Brazil for the
academic year 1997-8 under NEH and Fulbright
grants researching aspects of African-Brazilian arts
histories. He can be reached c/o Professor Joao Reis,
Mestrado em Historia, UFBA, Salvador, Bahia,
Brazil after September 30, 1997. Persons still
wishing to contribute to the edited volume on the arts
of Mami Wata and her Spirit Sisters in the Americas
should contact him there.


The Nigerian artist and poet, Emmanuel Taiwo
Jegede, will visit the United States from 12th October
to 3rd November, 1997. He will be available to
conduct workshops, lectures and poetry peformnnance in
schools, colleges, universities and art centers.

Jegede lives and works in London, England. He has
had several one-man shows and mixed exhibitions in
several countries. He has appeared in several
television programmes, radio interviews, news papers,
and videos; for instance, BBC TV (London), Channel
4 (London), Smithsonian Institution, German TV, and
Nigerian TV. Jegede also has been an artist in
residence at several colleges and institutions, e.g.
Muffed University Leicester, Keskidee Arts Centre
(London), National Council for Arts and Culture
(Lagos), Tate Gallery (Liverpool, England), Conway
Hall (Wales), Emaca Arts (Nottingham), Royal
Festival Hall (London), Calgary Stampede (Calgary),
Commonwealth Games (Edmonton), Cubus Kuns-
sthalle (Duisburg, Germany), Westbome Gallery
(London), Woodford Professional Centre (Winsford.
Cheshire), and the Museum of Mankind (London)

For more information, please contact:
The October Gallery, 24 Old Gloucester Street, London
WC1 N3 AL; Fax: 0171-405-1851Tel: 0171-916-
4019 In the US, please contact Jegede at: c/o Mora J.
Beauchamp-Byrd (tel.212-307-7420 Fax:212-315-1086)

SMailing isHt Africus Institute for Contemporary Art
(see also under "Exhibitions") is updating its mailing
list. To receive current information on Johannesburg
Biennale and other relevant projects, please forward
your personal mailing and contact details to AICA,
Newtown, P.O. Box 1049, Johannesburg, 2000,
South Africa; Email: press@icon.co.za; fax: 27 11
833 5639.

Laurel Birch de Aguilar (Dept of Social
Anthropology, U. of St. Andrews, Scotland)
participated in the Malawi Literary and Arts
Festival last summer, 1996 in Blantyre. The festival
was organized to renew the arts in Malawi, and re-
unite writers and artists in Malawi with those who had
been exiled in the past. Contemporary arts on exhibit
during the festival included work by well-known
Malawian artists and sculptors Cuthy Mede,
Berlings Kaunda and De Moya.






1997 MA AME MBISIP DIECFITY AWDIM


Norbert Aas
aht/ahc
Aelolf-von-Gloss Str. 8
95445 Bayreuth
GERMAN f
Home: 001-921-22781
Office: 001-921-22781
Fax: 001-921-852506

Rowland Abiodun
Amherst College
Department of Fine Arts
Amherst, MA 01002
Home: 413-253-4069
Office: 413-542-5801
Fax: 413-542-2133

African Arts
James S. Coleman African
Studies Center
Box 951310
University of California
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1310
Office: 310-825-1218
Fax: 310-206-2250
email: afriarts@ucla.edu

Kelly Askew
20 Exeter St.
Arlington, MA 02174
Home: 617-641-4541
Fax: 617-496-8041
email: kaskew@fas.harvard.edu

Joan Bacharach
1435 4th Street, SW
Washington, DC 20024
Home: 202-484-8944
Fax: 202-484-8944
email: joanbacharach@nps.gov

Kathleen E. Bickford
Asst. Curator for African Art
The Art Institute of Chicago
111 S. Michigan Ave.
Chicago, IL 60603-6110
Home: 773-728-9511
Office: 312-857-7172
Fax: 312-443-0849
email: kbickford@artic.edu

Gregory Bishopp
Div of Fine Arts
Saddleback College,
28000 Marguerite Pkwy.
Mission Viejo, CA 92692


Home: 714-454-9677
Office: 714-582-4747
Fax: 714-347-0580
email:
bishopp_g@saddleback.cc.ca.us

Suzanne P.Blier
Dept. of Fine Arts
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA 02138
Home: 617-497-1464
Office: 617-495-0781
Fax: 617-495-1769

Peter Bloom
3675 17th Street
San Francisco, CA 94114
Home: 415-864-2247
Fax: 415-2247
email:
Internet.75014.3646@compuserve.com

Letty Bonnell
2 Lakeside Drive
Greenbelt, MD 20770
Home: 301-220-1752

David Brown
Art History Department
Carlos Hall
Emory University
Atlanta, GA 30322
Office: 404-727-6282
Fax: 404-727-2358

Eugene C.Burt
P.O. Box 30789
Seattle, WA, 98103
Home: 206-783-9580

Justine M. Cordwell
437 W. Belden Ave.
Chicago, IL 60614-3815
Home: 312-528-2128
Office: 312-348-2695
Fax: 312-348-9952

Donald J. Cosentino
107 S. Gramercy PI.
Los Angeles, CA 90004
Home: 213-466-3981
Office: 310-206-1498
Fax: 310-206-1498
email:
cosentin@humnet.ucla.edu


Esther A. Dagan
42 Anwoth
Westmount
Quebec H3Y 2E7
CANADA
Office: 514-931-4747
Fax: 514-931-4747

James B. Dealy
52 Larch Street
Providence, RI 02906
Home: 401-861-0472
Office: 401-457-4560
Fax: 401-457-5388

William J. Dewey
2506 Princeton Rd.
Iowa City, IA 52245
Home: 319-351-3721
Office: 319-335-1784
Fax: 319-335-1774
email: william-
dewey@uiowa.edu

Brooke Davis Anderson
Diggs Gallery
Winston Salem State University
601 Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive
Winston-Salem, NC 27110
Home: 910-777-8313
Office: 910-750-2458
Fax: 910-750-2459

Dilomprizulike
Roman Str. 10B
95444 Bayreuth
GERMANY
Home: 0921-515790

Perkins Foss
61 East Wheelock Street
Hanover, NH 03755
Office: 603-643-4282
Fax: 603-643-4643
email: perk.foss@dartmouth.edu

Monique Fowler-Paul
844 E. Lee St.
Tuscon, AZ 85719
email: monique@uarizona.edu

Andrea Frohne
Dept. of Art History
Binghamton University
Bimghamton, NY 13902
Office: 309-833-1080


U






W (Addedum), contd.


e-mail: bf20415@binghamton.edu

Linda L. Giles
Anthropology Program
Campus Box 4640
Illinois State University
Normal, IL 61761-4640.
Home: 309-452-8821
Office: 309-438-5713
Fax: 309-438-7177
email:
LLGILES@RS6000.cmp.ilstu.edu

Janine Gugler
53 Monticello Lane
Storrs, CT 06268
Home: 203-429-3417

Rosalind I.J. Hackett
University of Tennessee
Department of Religious Studies
501 McClung Tower
Knoxville, TN 37966
Home: 423-588-1562
Office: 615-974-2466
Fax: 615-974-0965
email: rhackett@utk.edu

Barry Hallen
W.E.B. Dubois Institute
Harvard University
26 Church St.
Cambridge, MA 02138
Home: 617-876-4534
Office: 617-496-5760
Fax: 617-496-8547
email: hallen@fas.harvard.edu

Kris Hardin
Dept. of Anthropology
Beloit College
700 College St.
Beloit, WI 53511
Office: 608-363-2618
email: hardink@beloit.edu

Salah Hassan
Africana Studies And Research
Ctr
Comell University
310 Triphammer Rd.
Ithaca, NY 14850
Office: 607-255-0528
Fax: 607-255-0784
email: sh40@cornell.edu


Jurgen Heinrichs
Art Department Swarthmore
College
500 College Avenue
Swarthmore, PA 19081-1397
Office: 610-328-7795
Fax: 610-328-7793
email: jheinril@swarthmore.edu

Shannen Hill
2208 NE 160th Avenue
Vancouver, WA 98684

Sara Hollis
3443 Esplanade Av., #559
New Orleans, LA 70119
Home: 504-822-6946

Inst. of International Visual Arts
Kirkman House
12-14 Whitfield Street
London W1P 5RD
UNITED KINGDOM
Office: 171-636-1930
Fax: 171-636-1931
email: institute@iniva.org

Reinhild Kauenhoven Janzen
17610 NW Prairie Creek Road
Newton, KS 67114-8004
Home: 316-799-2585
Office: 913-231-1010 ext 1222
Fax: 316-799-2585
email: zzjanzen@acc.wuacc.edu

Paul Jenkins
Largitzenstr. 19
CH 4056 Basel
SWITZERLAND
Home: 41-61-3815219
Office: 41-61-2688245
Fax: 41-61-2688268

Bennetta Jules-Rosette
UC-San Diego 0533
Department of Sociology
9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA 92093 0533
Home: 619-436-1621
Office: 619-436-5882
Fax: 619-755-7590
email: bjulesro@weber.ucsd.edu

Christine Mullen Kreamer
Hanoi/Dept. of State
Washington, DC 20521


Home: 84-4-9430422
Office: 84-4-9430422
Fax: 84-4-8438932
email:
kreamer.cm@bdvn.vnmail.vnd.net

A.H. Kofi Lemaire
8 Cambridge Circle
Longmeadow, MA 01106
email: mensimale@aol.com

Dominique Malaquais
501 East 87th St., Apt. 7J
New York, NY 10128
Home: 212-628-8064
Office: 212-628-8064
Fax: 212-628-8054

Peter Mark
Wesleyan University
Art Department
Middletown, CT 06457
Office: 203-347-9698
Fax: 203-347-9411
email: pmark@eagle.wesleyan.edu

Rebecca Martin Nagy
North Carolina Museum of Art
2110 Blue Ridge Road
Raleigh, NC 17607
Office: 919-839-6262, ext 2147
Fax: 919-733-8034
email:
rnagy@ncmamail. dcr. state. nc. us

Steven A. Morris
Donald Morris Gallery Inc.
P.O. Box 1508
Birmingham, MI 48012-1508
Office: 810-584-3445
Fax: 810-584-3447

Joseph Nevadomsky
California State University
Dept. of Anthropology
Fullerton, CA 92834-6846
Home: 714-278-4145
Office: 714-278-5335/714-278-
3626
Fax: 714278-2209
email:
jnevadomsky@fullerton.edu

Mikelle Smith Omari
University of Arizona
Tuscon, AZ 85721





Peaec6> (Addmdum), contd.


Home: 520-621-9330
Work: 602-621-5665
Fax: 520-621-2955
email: msomaoba@ccitarizona.edu

Philip M. Peek
Drew University
Department of Anthropology
Madison, NJ 07940
Home: 201-822-3425
Office: 201-408-3383
Fax: 201-408-3768
email: ppeek@drew.drew.edu

Allen F. Roberts
Anthropolgy 114 MH
University of Iowa
Iowa City, IA 52242
Home: 319-351-1885
Office: 319-335-0522
Fax: 319-335-0653
email: allen-roberts@uiowa.edu

Mary "Polly" Nooter Roberts
1510 Muscatine Ave.
Iowa City, IA 52240
Home: 319-351-1885

Rhoda Rosen
7255 N. Bell #2
Chicago, IL 60645
Home: 773-381-0329
Office: 847-467-2186
Fax: 847-467-4283
email: rro422@lulu.acns.nwu.edu

Enid Schildkrout
Dept. of Anthropology
American Museum of Natural
History
Central Park West & 79th St.
New York, NY 10024
Home: 212-362-0491
Office: 212-769-5432
email: eschild@amnh.org

Gary Schulze
315 West 100 St. Apt 1A
New York, NY 10025
Home: 212-666-6493
Office: 212-878-7114

Victoria Scott
Black Arts Studio
1811 New Mexico Avenue
Las Vegas, NM 87701


Office: 505-454-9076
emalL.vscott@nmhu.campus.mcI.net

Timna Seligman
Israel Museum
P.O. Box 7117
Jerusalem 91710
ISRAEL
Home: 972-2-6716159
Office: 972-2-6708955
Fax: 972-26708094
email: tlmna@netvision.net.il

Helen M. Shannon
300 Cathedral Parkway #5H
New York, NY 10026

William Siegmann
The Brooklyn Museum of Art
200 Eastern Parkway
Brooklyn, NY 11238
Home: 718-499-7841
Office: 718-638-5000x280
Fax: 718-398-6930
email: wsiegm7172@aol.com

Raymond A. Silverman
Michigan State University
Art Department
East Lansing, MI 48824
Home: 517-336-9230
Office: 517-353-9114
Fax: 517-432-3938
email: bonduku@msu.edu

Serials Office, Library
SOAS
Thomhaugh Street
Russell Square
London WC1H OXG
UNITED KINGDOM

Christine Stelzig
Droysenstr. 17
Berlin 10629
GERMANY
Home: 30-3249613
Work: 30-8301268
Fax: 30-8315972

Sasha Stollman
Canterbury Museum
Rolleston Ave.
Christchurch
NEW ZEALAND
Home: 64-33288231


Office: 64-33665000
Fax: 64-33665622
email: sstollma@cantmus.govt.nz

Betty Wass
1010 Edgehill Drive
Madison, WI 53705
Home: 608-233-9259
email: wass@facstaff.wisc.edu

Jonathan Zilberg
6609 Hillside Dr.
Fort Worth, TX 76132
Home: 817-763-0130









Editor, AC4I Newsletter
(Attn: Avorgbedor)
110 Weigel Hall
School of Music, OSU
Columbus, OH 43210-1170


NCN-~COIT ORGANIZATION
U.S. POSTAGE VAI I
COLUMBIUS, OH
VELMIT NO. 7107




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