Title: ACASA newsletter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00103115/00021
 Material Information
Title: ACASA newsletter newsletter of the Arts Council of the African Studies Association
Alternate Title: Newsletter
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: African Studies Association -- Arts Council
Publisher: The Council
Place of Publication: S.l
S.l
Publication Date: May/June 1989
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Arts -- Periodicals -- Africa   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 2 (winter 1982)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. designation dropped with no. 3 (spring 1983).
General Note: Title from caption.
General Note: Vols. for Aug. 1992- include Directory of members: addendum.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: No. 34 (Aug. 1992).
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Bibliographic ID: UF00103115
Volume ID: VID00021
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09794003
lccn - sn 92017937
 Related Items
Preceded by: Newsletter of the Arts Council of the African Studies Association

Full Text



























NEWSLETTER OF THE ARTS COUNCIL
OF THE AFRICAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION
NUMBER 23 MAY/JUNE 1989


L












Cover design inspired by a carving on a Lunda comb.
Logo submitted by Mary Kujawski


ACASA Board of Directors

Doran Ross, President
Mary Jo Arnoldi
Lisa Aronson
Suzanne Blier
Frederick Lamp
Phil Peek
Philip Ravenhill
Christopher Roy
Fred Smith


Secretary/Treasurer


Mary Jo Arnoldi
Department of Anthropology
NHB 112
Smithsonian Institution
Washington, D.C. 20560


Lisa Aronson
Art Department
Skidmore College
Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
(for membership information)


Newsletter Editor











*


ACASA NEWSLETTER

UPDATE: EIGHTH TRIENNIAL
ON AFRICAN ART

Plans for the Triennial are nearly complete. The
program is exciting and we are looking forward to
seeing all of you in Washington.

HOTEL INFORMATION

Members planning to attend should be reminded
that the Conference Hotel is the Omni Shoreham,
2500 Calvert Street N.W. Washington, D.C. THE
DEADLINE IS/WAS MAY 14,1989 TO RECEIVE
CONFERENCE RATES. HOWEVER, I WOULD
SUGGEST CALLING THE HOTEL DIRECTLY
AND IDENTIFYING YOURSELF WITH The 1989
Triennial Symoosium on African Art AND
REQUEST THE CONFERENCE RATES.
CALL THE HOTEL DIRECTLY AT 202-234-0700
OR TELEX 710/822-0142. Single $85.00;
Double $95.00 per night.

If there are no rooms available at the Omni
Shoreham, call Capitol Reservations at 1-800-
847-4832. This new service for visitors to D.C.
will try to match you up with a hotel in the
area and price range you request.

TRIENNIAL REGISTRATION

Everyone must be registered in order to
participate in the Triennial sessions. Pre-
registration is $10.00 for ACASA members and
$20.00 for non-members. Registration at the
door will be $20.00 for both ACASA members
and non-members. In case you have lost your
pre-registration form, a copy is included with this
newsletter. We urge you to send in your pre-
registration form as soon as possible.

Make your check payable to ACASA. Send
your form directly to the Office of Conference
Services, Smithsonian Institution, S. Dillon
Ripley Center, Suite 3123, Washington, D.C.
20560. (telephone 202 357-4821)

ACASA AWARDS BANQUET

The Awards Banquet will take place on Friday
evening, June 16, 1989 and will be a gala affair.
The Life Time Achievement Awards and the Book
Awards will be given at the Banquet.
Pre-Payment of $15.00 for the Awards Banquet is
due by May 15, 1989. If you have missed the
deadline we will accept banquet payments on a


NUMBER 23 /MAY 1989



first come/first serve basis until one week prior to
the Triennial. Tickets will be given to you at the
Triennial.
Send your check payable to ACASA to the
Office of Conference Services, Smithsonian
Institution, S.Dillon Ripley Center, Suite
3123,Washington D.C. 20560 NO
RESERVATIONS FOR THE AWARDS BANQUET
CAN BE TAKEN AT THE TIME OF THE
TRIENNIAL

The following Is the preliminary program for the
panels at the 1989 Triennial:

EIGHTH TRIENNIAL SYMPOSIUM
ON AFRICAN ART

Washington D.C.
June 15 -17, 1989
(preliminary program)

Thursday, June 15, 1989
9:00 10:00 am

WELCOMING REMARKS
(Lecture Hall)
Doran Ross, President of ACASA
Richard Long, Founder, Triennial Symposium
Sylvia Williams, Director, National Museum of
African Art

10:00 10:30 am BREAK
(Coffee available In Hospitality Suite)

10:30 am -12:30 pm
PLENARY SESSION: What's in a Mask?
(Lecture Hall)
Chair: John Picton (SOAS)
Papers:
John Picton (SOAS)
What's in a Mask?
Christopher Roy (U. of Iowa)
Masking as Communication between Spirits
and Men in the Valley of the Volta Rivers.
Herbert M. Cole (UC-Santa Barbara)
Continuity and Ambiguity in Masquerades,
Especially Okoroshi among the lbo.
TBA
Discussants:
Sidney Kasfir (Dartmouth College); Mary Jo -











Arnoldi (National Museum of Natural History)
Margaret Thompson Drewal(Northwestem
University)
12:30 2:00 pm LUNCH BREAK
2:00 3:30 pm PANELS
Ambiguity in African Sexual Metaphor
(Lecture Hall)
Chair: Frederick Lamp (Baltimore Museum of
Art)
Papers:
Frederick Lamp (Baltimore Museum of Art)
Is Increase Sexy?: Sexual Ambiguity and the
Fertile Image.
Rachel I. Fretz (UCLA)
Fecund, Erotic, or Powerful: Ambiguous
Sexuality in Chokwe Storytelling and
Interpretation.
Margaret Thompson Drewal (Northwestern U.)
Gender Play in Yoruba Performances.
Philip M. Peek (Drew University)
Ambiguous Sexuality of Isoko Deities:
Androgyny or Asexuality?

Discussant: TBA

Art, Technology, and Socio-Political
Change: The Luba Case
(Room 3037)
Chair: William J. Dewey (CRRAE of MIT)
Papers:
Terry Childs (CRRAE of MIT)
The Archaeology of Luba Technology and Art.
Mary Nooter (Columbia U.)
Bankishi: The Transformation of Instruments
of Spiritual Power into Symbols of Spiritual
Authority.
William J. Dewey (CRRAE of MIT)
Luba Metal Arts and the Embodiment of
Cultural Values.

Discussant: Allen F. Roberts (University of
Iowa)
3:30 -4:00 BREAK
4:00 5:30 pm PANELS
African Portraiture
(Lecture Hall)
Chair: Jean Borgatti (Clark University)
Papers:
Walter E. A. Van Beek (Rijkuniversiteit, Utrecht)
Shape, Message, and Function in Dogon
Figurative Representation.
Barbara Blackmun (San Diego Mesa College)
The Trunk and Hand as Emblematic Portrait in
Benin.


George Preston (City College of New
York, CUNY)
The Akan: People Making Portraits Making
People.
Tom and Pam Blakely (Brigham Young
University)
Hemba Portrait Sculpture.

Discussants: Monica Blackmun Visona (Notre
Dame); Enid Schildkrout (American Museum of
Natural History)

Manipulating the Sacred: Art in Africa and
the Diaspora
(Room 3037)
Chair: Mikelle Smith Omarl (California State
University Long Beach)
Papers:
Dan Crowley (University of California -Davis)
Sacred and Profane in African and African
derived Carnival.
Barbara Paxson (St. Joseph, Michigan)
Exu and Sacd: Tricksters In Brazil
Mikelle Smith Omarl (California State University
Long Beach)
Manipulating the Sacred: Art, Gods, and
Ancestors in Bahia, Brazil.
Eve Crowley (Yale University)
Model Ships as Soul Oracles in Guinea-
Bissau.

Discussant: Roland Abiodun (Amherst College)

5:30 5:45 BREAK
5:45 -7:15 pm PANEL
PLENARY SESSION: Roundtable: Ethics and
Objects

Moderator: Mary Jo Arnoldi (National
Museum of Natural History)
Panelists:
Kris Hardin (University of Pennsylvania)
Ethics and Field Research.
John Mack (Museum of Mankind)
Ethical Considerations in Field Collecting.
Philip Peek (Drew University)
Ethics and Publishing.
Christopher Roy (University of Iowa)
The Relationships between scholars/dealers/
and collectors.
Thomas Seligman (De Young Memorial
Museum)
Reconstructing Provenance.
Frederick Lamp (Baltimore Museum of Art)
Vetting Objects.


*











0


7:15 9:15 pm
RECEPTION
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART

Friday, June 16, 1989
9:00 -10:30 am PANELS
The Sacred Arts of Vodoun
(Lecture Hall)
Chair: Donald Cosentino (UCLA)
Papers:
Karen McCarthy Brown (Drew University)
Possesion-Performance: the Lwa in Brooklyn.
Marilyn Houlberg (Chicago Art Institute)
Reconsidering 2 = 3: The Twins and the
Trickster in Vodoun.
Robert F. Thompson (Yale University)
The World in 2029: The Arts of Haitian
Rediasporization.
Suzanne Preston Blier (Columbia University)
TBA

Discussant: Donald Cosentino (UCLA)

ROUNDTABLE: Dilemmas of Archaeology in
West Africa
(Room 3037)
Chair: Roderick J. McIntosh (Rice University)
Panelists:
Alexis Adande (Universite Nationale du Benin)
Jean-Baptiste Kiethega (Universite de
Ouagadougou)
Boube Gado (Universite de Niamey)
Claude Ardouin (West African Museums Project)
Henry Drewal (Cleveland State University)
Philip Ravenhill (National Museum of African Art)
--Other panelists to be announced -
10:30 11:00 BREAK
(Coffee available in Hospitality Suite)
11:00 12:30 PANEL
PLENARY SESSION: Art and Gender
(Lecture Hall)
Chairs: Maria Berns (University of Minnesota)
Lisa Aronson (Skidmore College)
Papers:
Lisa Aronson (Skidmore College)
The Economics of Gender in African Art.
Elisha P. Renne (New York University)
Why Bunu Yoruba Men Weave.
Eugenia W. Herbert (Mount Holyoke College)
Paradigms of Procreation: Technology and
Gender In African Iron Making.
Christine Mullen Kreamer (National Museum of
Natural History)
Social and Economic Implications of Moba
Male and Female Pottery Traditions (northern


-3-


Togo).

Discussants: Labelle Prussin (City College of
New York, CUNY); Kris Hardin (University of
Pennsylvania)
12:30 2:00 pm LUNCH BREAK
2:00 3:30 pm PANELS


Caribbean Festival Arts and the Future
(Lecture Hall)
Chair: John W. Nunley (St. Louis Art Museum)
Papers:
Sylvia Winters (Stanford University)
Jonkunnu and 'National' Identity Towards a
New Unifying Principle.
Judith Bettelheim (San Francisco State
University)
Carnival Themes and Costumes in Post-
Revolutionary Cuba.
Eroll Hill (Dartmouth College)
Carnival Drama and Contemporary Western
Indian Theatre.
Dolores Yonker (California State University
Northridge)
Rara Aesthetic Responses to Contemporary
Haitian Politics.

Discussant: TBA


Beyond the Fringe: The Dynamics of
Leatherworking in West Africa
(Room 3037)
Chair: Fred T. Smith (Kent State University)

Papers:
Norma H. Wolff (Iowa State University)
Changing Patronage and the Future of
Indigenous Leatherworking Industries
in Northern Nigeria.
Judith Perani (Ohio University)
The Development of Decorative Iconography
in Hausa and Nupe Leatherworking and
Embroidery.
Ann O'Hear (Niagra University)
Leatherworking in Ilorin
Fred T. Smith (Kent State University)
Trade and Politics in the Development of
Northeastern Ghanaian Leatherworking
Traditions.
Barbara Frank (University of Tulsa)
Mande Leatherworking

3:30 4:00 pm BREAK













4:00 5:30 PANEL
PLENARY SESSION: Roundtable: The Nature
of Evidence in Research on African Art
(Lecture Hall)

Chair: Philip Ravenhill (National Museum of
African Art)
Panelists:
Simon Ottenberg (University of Washington)
Field data: artists and others as sources.
Christraud Geary (Boston University)
Pictorial "data' In archival materials.
Kathy Cumow (Springfield, PA)
The nature of the corpus in research on
African art.
Suzanne Preston Blier (Columbia University)
The re-interpretation of other people's data.
Ivan Karp (National Museum of Natural
History)
Problems of Interpretation.

5:30 -6:30 CURRENT RESEARCH PANELS
Current Research: Objects and Systems of
Thought (10 minutes/10 slides)
(Room TBA)
Chair: Michael Conner
Papers:
Michael Conner (Indiana University)
From Implement to Icon: The Story of
"Papaluwafo', a Malawi Jere Ngoni
Ancestral Spear.
M.C. Dupre (CNRS, Paris)
Teke masks from Congo: Living symbolism or
stiff memory?
Magrit Smith (Maine)
The Mande Kora: Its Overt and Covert
Symbolism as a Musical Instrument and
Art Object of the "Nyamakalaw'.
Moyo Obediji (Obafemis Awolowo University)
African Colour Cognition: Yoruba and Edo
Examples.
Rene Bravmann (University of Washington)
Memory and Imagination: Black Ideas and
Images of the First Americans.
Joseph Nevedemsky (University of Benin)
The Meaning and Iconography of the Benin
Brass Rings.
Eugene Burt (Seattle, Washington)
Ritual uses of Multi-headed spears of East
Africa

Current Research: History, Evidence and
Method (10 minute/10 slides)
(Room TBA)


0


Chair: Martha J. Ehrlich (Southern Illinois
University -Edwardsville)
Papers:
Martha J. Ehrlich (Southern Illinois University -
Edwardsville)
Early Akan Gold from the Wreck of the
Pirate Ship Whydah.
Francis Duah (National Museum, Ghana)
Some Aspects of Asante Regalia and its
Significance.
Jeanne Cannizzo (Royal Ontario Museum)
Canadians in 19th Century Congo
Ekpo Eyo (University of Maryland)
In Search of Absolute Dates for Ikom
Monoliths, Eastern Nigeria.
Sally Shelboume (University of Maryland)
The Use of "Database' In the Stylistic
Analysis of Cross River Monoliths.

Current Research: Contemporary African
arts: artists, dealers, consumers
(Room TBA)
Chair: TBA
Papers:
Steven Sack (University of South Africa)
The influence of American art and particularly
Romare Bearden on contemporary South
African art.
Salah Hassan (University of Pennsylvania)
Khartoum School: The Making of a
Contemporary Sudanese Art and Aesthetics.
Donna Rey Klumpp (Nairobi, Kenya)
Wilson Mwangi: Gourd Carver.

Christopher Steiner (Harvard University)
'It's so Ugly It's Gotta be Real" Authenticity
in the West African Art Trade.
Baba Moussa Konate (UCLA)
A New Approach to Field Collecting: The
Collaborative Project between the National
Museum of Mall and UCLA, Museum of
Cultural History.
6:30 -7:30 pm
RECEPTION CONCOURSE DILLON RIPLEY
CENTER
Reception and Special Viewing of the
Exhibition, Caribbean Festival Arts.
7:30 -9:30 pm
Awards Banquet (Reservations required)












*


Saturday, June 17, 1989
9:00 10:30 am PANELS

PLENARY SESSION: Art Historical Research
in Africa: An Assessment.
(Lecture Hall)
Chair: Henry Drewal (Cleveland State University)
Papers:
Maria Bems (University of Minnesota)
Cross-Cultural Perspectives: Art History in the
Upper Benue.
Paula Girshick Ben-Amos (Indiana University)
Benin Royal Art in the 18th Century: Decline or
Renaissance?
Patrick McNaughton (Indiana University)
Layers, Areas, and Certainty: A Preliminary
Assessment of Historical Interaction in West
African Scultpure.
Roland Ablodun (Amherst College)
Owo Art: Some Mythico-Historical
Considerations.

Discussant: TBA
10:30 11:00 am BREAK
(Coffee available in Hospitality Suite)
11:00 am 12:30 pm
ACASA BUSINESS MEETING
(Lecture Hall)
12:30 2:00 pm LUNCH BREAK
2:00 3:30 pm PANELS

Art in Multi-Ethnic Contexts
(Lecture Hall)
Chair: Raymond Silverman (Michigan State
University)
Papers:
Kathy Curnow (Springfield, PA)
The 'Missing Links': Art History of the Lower
Guinea Coast from the 15th to the 16th
centuries.
Nancy Ingram Nooter (National Museum of
African Art)
Historical and Cross-Cultural Considerations in
East African Art.
Donna Rey Klumpp (Nairobi, Kenya)
Ethnic Identity and Color Coding: The Maasai
Center and Periphery.
Raymond Silverman (Michigan State University)
Masking and Ethnicity in the Departement de
Bondoukou, Cote d'lvoire.

Discussant: Simon Ottenberg (University of
Washington)


-5-


Contemporary African Art: Collection,
Exhibition, and Documentation
(Room 3037)
Chair: Achameleh Debela (Ohio State University)
Papers:
Jean Kennedy (San Francisco, CA)
Access: Exhibition and Recognition -
Responses to Africa's New Artists.
Janet Stanley (National Museum of African Art)
High Art, Low Art, Middle Art: Documenting
Contemporary African Art.
Bing Davis (Central State University)
African, African-American Art: An Afro-
centric Perspective.
Achameleh Debela (Ohio State University)
Contemporary African Art: Mainstream and
African.

Discussant: Henry Drewal (Cleveland State
University)
3:30 4:00 pm BREAK
4:00 5:30 pm PANELS
Through the Photographer's Lens: Historical
Images from Africa
(Lecture Hall)
Chair: Christraud Geary (Boston University)
Papers:
Christraud Geary (Boston University)
On the Savannah: Marie-Pauline Thorbecke's
Cameroon Photographs.
John Mack (British Museum)
Documenting the Cultures of the Southern
Congo (Zaire) Photographs from the Torday
Expeditions (1900-1909)
David Prochaska (University of Illinois, Urbana)
Therese Riviere's Photographs of Colonial
Algeria.
Virginia Lee-Webb (Metropolitan Museum of Art)
Fact and Fiction: Photographs from eastern
South Africa.

Discussant: Joanna C. Scherer (National
Museum of Natural History)

African Funerary Textiles: Production and
Presentation
(Room 3037)
Chair: Rachel Hoffman (UCLA)
Papers:
Rachel Hoffman (UCLA)
When a Big Man Dies: Dogon Shrouds for the
Long Night.
Sarah Brett-Smith (Rutgers University)
Fruitful Death: Minianka Women's Shrouds.












Elisha Renne (New York Llhiversity)
Aso Ipo: Red Funeral Cloth of the Bunu
Yoruba.
Joanne Eicher and Tonye V. Erekosima
(University of Minnesota)
Indian Textiles on Kalilbari Funeral Beds.

Discussant: John Picton (SOAS)

5:30 pm TRIENNIAL ENDS


MUSEUM SYMPOSIUM JUNE 14, 1989
DILLON RIPLEY CENTER ROOM 3037
SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION

In conjunction with the Eighth Triennial on
African Art, ACASA has organized a special
symposium on Museum practice which will take
place on Wednesday June 14, 1989 at the
Smithsonian Institution. No special registration
fee is required. The following is a preliminary
program for the day's events.

MORNING SESSION 9:00 am 12:00 pm

Museum Acquisitions: From Whom, By
Whom, For Whom ...and For How Long?

Chair: Philip Ravenhill (National Museum of
African Art)

SESSION ONE 9:00 10:15 am

Mary Jo Arnoldi (National Museum of Natural
History)
The Age of Museums and the Blanche du Bois
approach to acquisitions '
Susan Vogel (Center for African Art)
Building on existing collections.
Roy Sieber (National Museum of African Art
and Indiana University)
Acquisitions in a University Art Museum.
(To Be Confirmed)
Focused collections
(To Be Confirmed)
Building a collection from scratch in the
80's
BREAK 10:15 -10-30 am
SESSION TWO 10:30 11:00 am

(To Be Ccnfirmed)
The Quest for the Masterpiece
(To Be Confirmed)
The Commissioned Object


John Mack (Museum of Mankind)
Field collecting today.
Tom Seligman (de Young Memorial Museum)
Case Study in Repatriation.


OPEN DISCUSSION 11:00 am 12:00 pm

LUNCH BREAK 12:00 2.00 pm

AFTERNOON SESSION 2:00 5:00 pm

Exhibiting Africa: Concepts and Objectives
Chair: Doran Ross

SESSION ONE 2:00 2:30

Tom Wilson (National Endowment for the
Humanities) The NEH exhibition model

SESSION TWO 2:30 3:00 pm

THREE NEH CASE STUDIES

John Nunley (St. Louis Art Museum)
Caribbean Festival Arts: Each and Every Bit of
Difference
Maria Bems (University of Minnesota)
The Essential Gourd: Art and History in
Northeastern Nigeria
Enid Schildkrout (American Museum of Natural
History)
African Reflections: Art from Northeastern
Zaire
BREAK 3:00 3:15
SESSION THREE : 3:15 3:45 pm

ALTERNATIVE MODELS

Susan Vogel (Center for African ArtO
Art/artifact
Philip Ravenhill (National Museum of African
Art)
Kalabari Ancestral Screens: Levels of Meaning
John Mack (British Museum)
Madagascar

OPEN DISCUSSION 3:45 5:00 pm

MUSEUM SYMPOSIUM ENDS











NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

ACASA PANELS FOR THE 1989 ASA
MEETINGS IN ATLANTA Nov 2-5, 1989

We have received only three ACASA art panels
for the ASA meetings in Atlanta. If you are
putting together a panel or wish to do so,
please be prepared to submit a complete panel
with abstracts to Mary Jo Arnoldi at the Triennial
meetings or send the abstracts to her prior to
the Triennial. Send panel abstracts to Mary Jo
Amoldi, Dept. of Anthropology, NHB 112,
Smithsonian, Washington, D.C. 20560. ASA is
holding approximately 9 panel slots for ACASA,
but they need to be notified Immediately after
the Triennial if we Intend to submit panels.

Any Scholar planning to give a paper at the
ASA meetings is required to be both a
member in good standing of the ASA and to
be pre-registered for the Annual Meeting.
For ASA membership information contact:
Edna Bay, Executive Secretary
African Studies Association
Credit Union Building
Emory University
Atlanta, GA 30322

PANEL PROPOSAL FOR ASA

NEW DEVELOPMENT IN AND
INTERPRETATIONS OF NIGERIAN HISTORY:
ART AS EVIDENCE.
submitted by Maria C. Berns

This panel will present recent research on topics
concerning the reconstruction and
understanding of Nigerian history. Papers may
deal with any aspect of history -local, regional
or international-as long as art is used as a tool
in its elucidation. Papers dealing with
methodological issues concerning art history
also are welcome. Because of the
ethnographic, linguistic and artistic complexity
of Nigeria, and the amount of archaeological
research undertaken, it Is hoped that such a
panel will bring to light new Information about
and interpretations of the country's history.
Scholars Interested in submitting an abstract
should contact Maria C. Berns, Goldstein
Gallery 250 McNeal Hall, St. Paul, MN 55108.

Robert Soppelsa is conducting research
towards a catalogue raisonee of the Bronze .
plaques from the Kingdom of Benin and would
be grateful for information regarding plaques
which are currently in private hands or have not


been published. He is particularly interested in
pieces which are not listed In Philip Dark's
Illustrated Catalogue of Benin Art. 1982. Please
contact him at the following address: Robert
Soppelsa, 1655 Illinois St. Lawrence, KS 66044
or telephone 913-841-1935.

Monni Adams will leave at the end of May for
France, looking for archival material on the
We/Guere, and In the fall will return to the Ivory
Coast to continue research among the
We/Guere. Any inquiries about the
Peabody/Harvard collections should go to Ms.
Kathy Skelly, Peabody Museum, Cambridge, MA
02138.

Joseph Nevadomsky, associate professor of
sociology and anthropology, University of Benin,
Bendel state, Nigeria, seeks temporary or
permanent teaching or research position in
anthropology or art history. Contact at above
address and for curriculum vita, write to
Professor H. M. Cole, Art History Dept.,
University of California-Santa Barbara, Santa
Barbara, CA 93106.

Expedition Magazine is put out three times a
year by the University Museum at the University
of Pennsylvania. The magazine is committed to
communicating the entire range of ideas
represented within anthropology and
archaeology. It therefore offers scholars
involved in such research an opportunity to
publish well-illustrated accounts of their work to
an audience composed of scholars, students
and the lay public. Articles are reviewed by a
minimum of three scholars before publication,
good quality black and white or color
illustrations are an integral part of each article,
and they pay $100.00 for each article. In
addition to single articles, Expedition will
consider devoting a single Issue to a set of
related articles, such as a symposium or
conference panel. For more Information
contact: The Editors, EXPEDITION MAGAZINE,
The University Museum, 33rd and Spruce
Streets, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6324.

WEST AFRICAN JOURNAL OF
ARCHEOLOGY In Volume 15 of the Journal the
editors announced a broadening of their focus
to Include not only articles on archaeology but
"all articles and contributions which treat any
aspect of the cultural and natural story of
African man .[nwslt. ed. note: woman] through
time but with special reference to the West
African aspect." Interested scholars should
contact Bassey W. Andah, Department of


0












Archaeology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan,
Nigeria.

ZAST (Zeitschrift fur Afrikastudien) a new
Journal out of Vienna is seeking articles on
African arts. ZAST comes out twice a year, its
first Issue was published in November 1987. Its
editor is the Verein zur Forderung von
Afrikastudien (The association for the
advancement of African Studies) whose political
guidelines are anti-racism, anti-imperialism, anti-
colonialism, and anti-neocolonialism. ZAST will
accept articles on African arts written in English,
but also in French and in German, with a
summary written in one of the two other
languages. Contact: The Editors, Zeitschrift fur
Afrikastudien, A-1060, Wien, Haydngasse 14/8.

UNESCO has recently published a new
handbook on laws governing the export of
cultural property. Handbook of National
Regulations Concernina the Export of Cultural
Property includes summaries of export
legislation of 162 countries as of December 31,
1987. It is designed to provide basic
information for museum curators, art and
antique dealers, customs officials, and private
collectors on the objects subject to export
control and the type of export controls in each
country. It supercedes the 1974 The Protection
of Cultural Property: Handbook of National
Legislations. which is considered out-of-date.
The new handbook is available free of charge
from the Division of Cultural Heritage, UNESCO.
1 Rue Miollis, 75015 Paris, France.

ONA is a professional organization of
contemporary African artists from the
Department of Fine Arts, Obafemi Awolowo
University in Ile-ife, Nigeria. They have an active
exhibition schedule and activities at O.A.U.
which they wish to announce to the ACASA
membership.

February 20 25, 1989
Contemporary Nigerian arts
March 6-20, 1989
First Exhibition of ONA Artists.
April 24-31, 1989
Drawings, Paintings and Prints by Moyo
Okedigi.
May 23 -30, 1989
Drawings and Paintings by Bolaji Campbell.
June 20-27, 1989
Ceramic Sculptures by Babtunde Nasiru.
July 18 -24, 1989
Symposium on Contemporary Nigerian Art.
Drawings and Prints by Kunle Filani.


August 22-29, 1989
Drawings and Paintings by Tola Wewe.
September 19-25, 1989
Prints by Ademola Adekola.
October 24-30, 1989
Drawings and Paintings by Osi Audu.
November 21-27, 1989
Symposium on Contemporary Nigerian Art.
Drawings Cartoons and Paintings by
Abayoml Ola.
December 12-18, 1989
Drawings and Paintings by Peter Coker.

Galerle Amrad African Arts. The gallery
announces two new publications:
When Art Shares Natures Gifts The Calabash in
Africa. by E.A. Dagan. 242pp, 232 B/W III, 27
color III. bilinual Fr/Eng. soft cover $40.00 plus
$4.50 postage/handling in North America ($6.50
postage overseas), hard cover $60.00 plus
$5.50 postage/handling North America ($8.50
overseas)
Spirits without Boundaries 26 Single Headed
Terracotta from Konaland. Ghana. by E.A.
Dagan. 64 pp. 30 b/w Ill., I cir ill. maps and
drawings. soft cover $20.00 + $2.50 postage
North America ($6.80 overseas).
Only prepaid money orders will be accepted (no
checks). Due to limited editions only order of
20 items or more (combined or not) will benefit
a 20% discount on retail prices and a 50%
discount on postage and handling. Send orders
to Galerie Amrad African Arts, 1522 Sherbrooke
W. No. 4, Montreal, H3G 1 L3 CANADA

ACASA MEMBERSHIP ROSTER 1989
If your telephone numbers) is not included on
the 1989 Membership Roster and you would like
it to be, you can contact Usa Aronson at the
Triennials, or write her directly: Lisa Aronson,
Secretary/Treasurer ACASA, c/o Art Dept.,
Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, N.Y.
12866.

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER NEWSLETTER
Send all news and announcements to Mary
Jo Arnoldl, Dept. of Anthropology, NHB 112,
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
20560 by AUGUST 1, 1989 for inclusion in
the newsletter. We encourage colleagues in
the United States, Africa and Europe to send
Information about exhibitions, research
projects, publications, conferences and other
activities.


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