Title: ACASA newsletter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00103115/00019
 Material Information
Title: ACASA newsletter newsletter of the Arts Council of the African Studies Association
Alternate Title: Newsletter
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: African Studies Association -- Arts Council
Publisher: The Council
Place of Publication: S.l
S.l
Publication Date: December 1988
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Arts -- Periodicals -- Africa   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 2 (winter 1982)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. designation dropped with no. 3 (spring 1983).
General Note: Title from caption.
General Note: Vols. for Aug. 1992- include Directory of members: addendum.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: No. 34 (Aug. 1992).
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Bibliographic ID: UF00103115
Volume ID: VID00019
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 Related Items
Preceded by: Newsletter of the Arts Council of the African Studies Association

Full Text



































NEWSLETTER OF THE ARTS COUNCIL
OF THE AFRICAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION
NUMBER 21 DECEMBER 1988


III


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ACASA Board of Directors

Doran Ross President
Mary Jo Arnoldi
Lisa Aronson
Suzanne Blier
Frederick Lamp
Phil Peek
Philip Ravenhill
Christopher Roy
Fred Smith

Newsletter Editor

Mary Jo Arnoldi
Department of Anthropology
NHB 112
Smithsonian Institution
Washington, D.C. 20560


Cover design inspired by carving
on a Lunda comb. Logo submitted
by Mary Kujawski.


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BYLAWS REVISION RE. INCLUSION
OF 'DIASPORA'

At the ACASA Board Meeting
held in Chicago the Board
voted to add the word
"diaspora" to the first
paragraph of Article I of the
ACASA By Laws. A formal vote
on thip issue will be taken at
the Business Meeting during
the Triennial.

ACASA ANNUAL BUSINESS MEETING

October 29, 1988
ASA Meetings
Chicago,- Illinois

The Annual Business meeting
was held during the African
Studies Association Meetings
in Chicago. The current
Secretary/Treasurer, Lisa
Aronson gave the following
financial report:

FINANCIAL REPORT -1988

ACASA account has $6134.65
with 148 paid members (Four
more members and another $60
were added by October 30)

Apologies were extended to
those who claimed with proof
that they paid their 1988 dues
when our records indicated
otherwise.

Information about Membership
renewal, the 1989 Triennial
and various other
announcements about projects
and upcoming events were on
the agenda at the meeting and
are listed under the
appropriate headings in this.
Newsletter.

With our bank account ever
increasing, ACASA has
requested non-profit status


through ASA. (Editor's note:
The ASA has now approved
extending non-profit status to
ACASA under the umbrella of
ASA for one year)

ACASA MEMBERSHIP RENEWAL

At the Business Meeting, the
Secretary/Treasurer clarified
that Annual ACASA membership
extends from January 1 to
December 31.

You will find the membership
renewal form at the end of
this newsletter. We encourage
people to send in their
membership dues promptly.
Only paid members will receive
copies of the 1989 News-
letters. These newsletters
will contain information about
the Triennial program,- hotel
and banquet registration, etc.

To avoid any confusion over
dues payment in the future the
Secretary/Treasurer will xerox
each incoming check (as an
official record) and all
checks will be deposited at
the end of the month they are
received.

In 1989, home and work phone
numbers will be included on
the membership roster unless
you indicate otherwise on the
renewal form. The 1989
Membership roster will be
published-in the first
newsletter of 1989.

TRIENNIAL UPDATE

The Eighth Triennial Symposium
of African Art will be hosted
by the National Museum of
African Art, Smithsonian
Institution, in Washington,
D.C. from June 15 through June
17, 1989.


*








CALf FOR PAPERS AND PANELS

There will be 6 plenary
sessions (one of which is
reserved for the Business
Meeting); 12 paper panels (4
papers per panel), and 6 10/10
Current Research sessions (10
minutes/10 slides).

Members are encouraged to
organize panels or submit
individual paper abstracts.
Preference will be given to
panels with cross-cultural,
and/or thematic foci.

The following members have
proposed panels for the
Triennial. If you are
interested in participating on
one of these panels please
contact the panel organizer
directly.

1. Caribbean Festival Arts and
the Future (John Nunley)

2. African Funerary Textiles
(Rachel Hoffman)

This panel will consider the
motivations, processes, and
ancillary activities involved
in funerary textile produc-
tion, and the textiles'
subsequent presentation,
interment, or conservation.
Individual papers may address
any geographic region or
cross-cultural affinities, and
examine questions of
historical, social, or ritual
significance.

3. Photography and Africa
(Christraud Geary)

4. What is in a mask? (John
Picton)

5. Ritual Weapons (Michael
Conner)


6. Female and Male: Cross-
Sexuality, Asexuality or
Androgyny in African Arts?
(Phil Peek)

Explicit sexual identification
of the expressive manifesta-
tions of non-human entities is
not universal in African arts.
While there are frequent and
often dramatic sexual meta-
phors utilized (especially
where there is cross sexual
identity of priests and
masqueraders), there are as
well numerous instances where
sexuality is ambiguous or even
denied. Our own cultural bias
for clear distinctions of
maleness or femaleness may
prevent proper recognition at
the spiritual or suprahuman
level of the merging of these
human categories in androgy-
nous representations or the
affirmation of asexual
identities.

Papers on aspects of this
topic in all art forms are
welcome. Send abstracts to
Phil Peek, Dept. of
Anthropology, Drew University,
Madison, N.J. 07940

7. Art and Ethnic Identity in
Multi-ethnic Communities (Ray
Silverman)

8. African Response to the
Western Presence (Ray
Silverman and Simon Ottenberg)

9. Early Collections in
Relation to the Congo Free
State (Enid Schildkrout)

10. Contemporary African Art
Collection and Dissemination
(Acha Dibala)

11. Psychology and Art
(Suzanne Blier)


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12. -Nationalization of
Culture: Post Independent Art
(Judith Bettleheim)

13. Penis Caps (Michael
Conner)

14. Art History in Africa: An
Assessment. (Henry Drewal).

SeveraL years have passed
since jan Vansina challenged
our field in saying "too many
scholars in the field of
African art have been allergic
to historical pursuits". It
is time to assess our situa-
tion and to share thoughts on
our efforts to engage in art
historical research in Africa.
Participants should summarize
the results of a specific
research project and
critically assess the limits
and potentials of their
theories and methods.
Abstracts should be sent to
Henry Drewal, Art Dept.
Cleveland State University,
1983 Euclid Ave. Cleveland, OH
44115. Final Papers should be
no longer than 15 minutes (7
pages)


15. Gender and Technology in
Africa
(Lisa Aronson and Marla Berns)

A plenary session is being
organized around the issues of
gender and technology in
African art. In Africa, it is
almost invariably the case
that boundaries separate men's
arts from women's, both in the
technologies employed and the
materials used. To cite some
examples, both men and women
use fire in transforming
materials of the earth into
cultural products, but the
materials they transform are
gender-specific -- clay being


used by women and iron by men.
In the case of weaving, it is
the technology itself that
distinguishes men's work from
women's. This panel wishes to
explore how, why, and to what
extent these boundaries exist.
I what ways are gender rules
transmitted through the
apprenticeship process itself?
How are the boudnaries then
maintained and reinforced? To
what extent do boundaries
dividing the arts reflect or
grow out of other cultural
patterns such as social
context, patronage, areas of
power, gender relationships,
or language; or, can it be
said that materials, media and
resulting designs are by their
very nature gender-specific?
Also, how flexible are gender
boundaries in the arts, and
what are the factors (related
to changes in social struc-
ture, economics, or the impact
of modernization) that cause
boundaries to change? What do
the dynamics of gender and
technology teach us about the
meaning of African art and its
historical evolution? Papers
that deal critically with
these issues will be favored
over those that simply
describe male and female
occupations in an African
context.

Direct abstracts and questions
to:
Lisa Aronson
Art Department
Skidmore College
Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
(518) 584-5000 ext. 2741 or
Marla Berns
Goldstein Gallery
250 McNeal Hall
1985 Buford Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55108
(612) 624-3292


V







16. The Politics of Museum
Presentations (Jean Cannizzo)

17. Realism in African Popular
Arts (Monica Visona)


DEADLINE FDOR-ABSTRACTS FOR
TRIENNIAL PANELS AND
INDIVIDUAL PAPERS IS JANUARY
15, 1989.

Please submit abstracts to:

Dr. Philip Ravenhill
Chief Curator
National Museum of African Art
950 Independence Ave. S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20560


ACASA LEADERSHIP AWARD

The- Leadership Award committee
consists of Phil Peek (Chair),
Roy..Sieber, Chris Geary, and
Ray Silverman. The recipient
of the award will be announced
at the Triennials.

ACASA BOOK AWARD

The first ACASA Book Award
will be granted to the best
book or exhibition catalogue
in English of either single or
dual authorship at the 1989
Triennials. The awards
committee (Janet Stanley, Fred
Lamp and Jean Borgatti) will
receive nominations from
publishers. The the award is
named in honor of Arnold
Rubin, a founder of ACASA
organization and who died
earlier this year.


TRIENNIAL TRAVEL AWARDS

The ACASA Board voted to award
the following travel stipend
for participants at the 1989
Triennials.


Graduate Student Travel
Stipends:

Six $250 stipends will be
awarded to graduate students
whose papers have been
accepted for presentation at
the Triennial.

African Partipants Travel
Stipends:

Two $750 travel stipends will
be awarded to African
colleagues whose papers have
been accepted for presentation
at the Triennial.

Recipients of the travel
awards will be determined by
the Program Committee and
awards will be based on the
quality of proposed presenta-
tion. Please request consid-
eration for the award when
submitting the one page
abstract of your paper. Send
abstracts to Philip Ravenhill.
The deadline for submissions
is January 15, 1989.


POSITIONS AVAILABLE

ART HISTORIAN. California
State University Hayward.
Asst. Prof. Salary comments.
/exper and qualifications.
Tenure track. Sept 1989.
Specialization in 1 or more of
the following:
Chinese/Japanese, Indian and
Southeast Asia, African, Latin
American art. Teach intro art
history and upper division
courses. PhD, teaching
experience required. Include
list of 3 references, copy of
1 publication. Deadline
January 27, 1989. James
Perrizo, Acting Chair, Art
Department, CSU-Hayward, CA
94542-3073.









0


ART HISTORIAN. University of
California Los Angeles. Rank
and salary open. Tenure
track. Sept 1989. African art
history. PhD, publications,
teaching experience preferred.
Teach undergraduate and
graduate courses. Include
letter of application, names
and addresses of three
references. Deadline February
1, 1989. Cecelia F. Klein,
Chair, African Search
Committee, Dept of Art
History, 1300 Dickson, Los
Angeles, CA 90024-1615.

ART HISTORIAN Emory
University. Asst professor.
Salary commensorate with
qualifications and experience.
Tenure track. Fall 1989.
Department of Art History with
participation in Afro-American
and African studies.
PhD/African art and
architecture or Afro-American
art specialization required.
Strong commitment to
undergraduate and graduate
teaching; demonstrated promise
in research and publication.
Include 3-5 letters of
recommendation. Deadline
January 27, 1989. John
Howett,.Search Committee, Art
History Department, Carlos
Hall, Atlanta, GA 30322.

ART HISTORIAN, SEMESTER
SABBATICAL REPLACEMENT. San
Francisco State University.
Rank open. Salary appropriate
to level. September 1.
Sabbatical replacement. Teach
one lovwer division survey of
A-O-A; one upper division
course in either Africa,
Oceania or Native America; and
one western art survey
dependent on qualifications.
PhD perferred, ABD acceptable.
Include letter of interest,
names of 3 references.


Deadline. February 1, 1989.
Judith Bettleheim, Art
Department, 1600 Holloway, San
Francisco, CA 94132.


FELLOWSHIPS

Rockefeller Foundation
Fellowships in the Humanities
Johns Hopkins University

The Art History and Anthro-
pology Program at the Johns
Hopkins University offers two
ten-month residencies for
advanced scholars in academic
or museum institutions whose
research on visual represen-
tation falls within the fields
of art history, anthropology,
history, philosophy, or
psychology.

The Rockefeller Fellows must
be resident in Baltimore
during the fellowship period
(normally one academic year)
and are expected to devote
full time to the proposed
project. The physical
resources of Hopkins are made
available to the fellows, who
have full access to the
libraries of the Johns Hopkins
University, to classes and
seminars, and to the recrea-
tional facilities. Fellows
are given studies in the
Milton S. Eisenhower Library
and shared office space for
the period of their appoint-
ment. In addition they will be
granted access to libraries
such as the Dumbarton Oaks,
the Library of Congress, and
Welsh Library. The program
emphasizes the linkage between
museums and universities; thus
an extra travel allowance is
provided to enable fellows to
take advantage of Hopkins'
well situated location on the
East Coast.
F








Fellowship awards of up to
$30,000 are made for a ten-
month residency. A fellow may
not hold another major
fellowship or grant con-
currently, though it is
assumed that fellows will
augment the program awards
with sabbatical salaries or
small stipends from other
sources.

Application procedure:
Applicants must sumbit a 1,000
word proposal, a curriculum
vitae, and the names and
addresses of three referees
familiar with the applicant's
previous and proposed
research. The deadline for
applications is January 15 of
the year of the appointment,
with notification by mid-March
of the same year.

Applications should be
addressed to: Susanne
Kuechler. Program Director.
Department of Anthropology,
The Johns Hopkins University,
3400 N. Charles Street,
Baltimore, MD 21218 tel 301-
338-7863.


NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

PEGGY GILFOY
We regret to announce the
death of Peggy Gilfoy in
November .1988. Peggy received
her MA in 1966 in African Art
History from Indiana
University. She was the
Curator of Textiles and
Ethnographic Art at the
Indianapolis Museum of Art.
Over the past 16 years she
curated numerous exhibitions
on African arts and textiles.
Her research interests also
extended to American
decorative arts and crafts,
Native American and Indonesian


textiles. Along with her
curatorial duties she taught
courses at the Herron School
of Art and Butler University.
In 1987 She was founding
President of the Textile
Society of America and in 1983
a founding member of the
Ethnographic Art Society of
Indianapolis. Peggy was a
valued member of ACASA and we
extend our condolences to her
family.

DISTRIBUTION OF AFRICAN ARTS
IN AFRICA

ACASA in cooperation with
AFRICAN ARTS, the Smithsonian
Libraries, and UCLA Museum of
Cultural History has begun a
program to provide copies of
the quarterly AFRICAN ARTS to
African Institutions, Museums
and Libraries free of charge
to the recipients.

This project is the first
phase in what ACASA hopes will
be a more ambitious program to
distribute US publications on
African art to Africa. In
order to build the program
potential, the Board would
like ACASA members to
encourage their publishers to
run an extra 100 copies of
books and exhibition
catalogues to be distributed
gratis to African institu-
tions. The Board also
encourages its members to
budget for an additional 100
copies of publications for
Africa in any of their grant
and project proposals.


ACASA RELATIONSHIP TO CAA

At the annual Business meeting
there was a discussion of the
Arts Council's relationship
with the College Art


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Association. As many of you
are aware the representation
of non-western arts on CAA
programs has not been good in
the past. Suzanne Blier
reported that Susan Ball, the
new Director, is more open to
the prospects of including
African arts in the CAA
program. Judith Bettleheim
suggested that we gather
statistics on those African
panels and paper proposals
that have been accepted or
rejected by the CAA in the
past five years. Members
should send this information
to Chris Roy, Department of
Art, Iowa University, Iowa
City, IA 52242. Chris will
tabulate and analyze the data.
With these statistics in hand
Chris will be better able to
work as our liason with CAA.


PROPOSED SLIDE DISTRIBUTION
PROJECT TO AFRICAN
UNIVERSITIES AND MUSEUMS

At the Business Meeting Ekpo
Eyo urged that ACASA institute
a pilot project to set up a
slide library with a trained
librarian and the necessary
equipment to make slides.
Several Universities in Africa
were discussed who have
ongoing Art History programs
but no access to slides or
slide equipment. The
membership agreed that this
was a worthwhile project for
ACASA to undertake. As a
first step the Board agreed to
approach various Foundations
to discuss funding such a
project.


CONFERENCES, SEMINARS AND
SYMPOSIA

SEMINAR AT BOSTON UNIVERSITY

Boston University African
Studies Program is sponsoring
a 2 day seminar on the subject
of transformations in African
Art resulting from the
European experience on January
26- 27, 1989. Scholars
interested in participating in
the seminar should contact
Christraud Geary, African
Studies Program, Boston
University, 270 Bay State
Road, Boston, MA 02215 (617-
353-3673)

CONFERENCE IN HONOUR OF
PROFESSOR THURSTON SHAW (75TH
BIRTHDAY ANNIVERSARY)
Ibadan, Nigeria, Nov. 19-23,
1989

The central theme of this
Conference will be "Fifty
years of Archaeologoy in
Africa" with emphasis on West
Africa. Attention will be
focused on the state of the
discipline and its prospects
with reference to Cultural
Resource Management and
Societal Development.

Programme of the Conference
1. Keynote Address: "Thurston
Shaw and African Archaeology"

2. Plenary Session:
"Archaeology and the Cultural
History of Africa: The State
of the Discipline"

3. Thurstan Shaw, the Pioneers
and the Archeology of Africa,
especially West Africa:
Hominid Origins and Dispersal,
Hunting and Gathering, Farming
and Metallurgy, Language and
Population History, Ethno-
archeology and Ethno-History.

r







4.-Environmental Archeology in
Africa: Geoarchaeology, paleo-
climate, paynology, palaeon-
tology, dating, etc.

5. Society and Ecology in
Africa: Ecological
Anthropology, Science and
Technology, Settlements and
Land Use, Cultural Ideology
and Practice, etc.

6. Public Arcaeology and
Cultural Resource Management
in Arica: Survey and Salvage
Arcaeology, Resource
Conservation and Development,
Tourism (Zoos, parks, wild
life resources, etc.)
Communication of Cultural
Information, Museums,
Legislation and Training.

7. Problems, Prospects and
Future Directions for African
Archeology with reference to
Societal Development.

On the basis of the
recommendations of conference
participants a committee will
prepare a programme of
cultural action which will be
sent to the OAU, various
African Governments, ECA,
ECOWAS, UNESCO, etc.

1. Accommodations will be
available within the
University and hostels/hotels
near the campus.
2. Visits will be arranged to
archaeological sites and
places of historical and
archaeological interest.

Registration fee US $50. or
equivalent: Cheques are to be
made payable to the West
African Journal of
Archaeology. Participants:
Those interested in attending
the Conference whether or not
they intend to give papers,


should send the following
information as soon as
possible to the Conference
secretariat:

NAME
Profession
Home and Work Address
Telephone Number or Telex
Theme of interest Specific
Topic and Abstract

send to: Professor Bassey
Andah or Dr. A. Ikechukwu
Okpoko
Dept. of Archaeology and
Anthropology
University of Ibadan
Ibadan, NIGERIA
MUSEE-NATIONAL DES ARTS
AFRICAINS ET OCEANIENS
1st European Colloquium on the
Arts of Black Africa. Paris:
Winter 1989-1990.

"De L'Art Negre a l'Art
Africain"
(The Evolution of the knowledge
about African art from the
1930's to the present)

For information please write
or call either:

Raoul Lehuard, Arts d'Afrique
Noire, BP 24 95400
Arnouville, France
tel (1) 39 87 27 52 or
Louis Perrois, ORSTOM, 70,
route d'Aulnay F 93143 BONDY
Cedex, France tel: (1) 48 03
76 22


VISITING SCHOLARS

Dr. Brigitte Menzel, author of
Goldgewichte aus Ghana and
Textilien aus Westafrika will
be available for lectures,
seminars, visiting
professorships, etc. for the
academic year beginning
October 1989. Dr. Menzel is


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currently.completing a. survey
of the African textiles in the
museums of North Rhine-
Westfalia. She is the former
Director of the Krefeld
Textile Museum and was on the
staff of the African
department of the Ethnography
Museum in Berlin for many
years. Her experience
includes extensive field work
in Ghana and Nigeria, adjunct
professorships at major
universities in Germany,
numerous lectures, papers and
publications on many aspects
of arts and ethnography. For
a detailed CV or further
information please contact
Dale Carolyn Gluckman,
Associate Curator of Costume
and Textiles, Los Angeles
County Museum of Art, 5905
Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA
90036 (213) 857-6081 or Dr.
Menzel, directly at
Bismarckstrasse 57, 4150
Krefeld, Federal Republic of
West Germany.
Dr. Obiora Udechukwu is
seeking a visiting
professor/artist appointment
for the academic year starting
in the Fall of 1989. Dr.
Udechukwu is on the faculty of
the Department of Fine and
Applied Arts at the University
of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria.
He received his
MFA in painting from the
University of Nigeria in 1977.
He has had numreous one man
exhibitions and participated
in many group exhibitions. He
has published articles on art
criticism, aesthetics, and
traditional Igbo design and
form. For a CV and more
information please contact Dr.
Udechukwu directly at the
University of Nigeria in
Nsukka.


Dr. Edith Melie, Chairman of
the Art Education Department,
Institute of Management and
Technology, Enugu, Nigeria is
seeking a 1 year sabbatical
teaching post beginning in the
fall of 1989. She is prepared
to teach in the areas of
clothing and textiles with an
emphasis in design, history,
production /construction and
consumer behavior. She
received her PhD from
University of Wisconsin,
Madison in 1980. and has
published several articles on
Ozo title taking insignia in
Onitsha.- She is presently
researching Nigerian woven
cloths. For a CV and more
information please contact Dr.
Melie directly at the
Institute of Management and
Technology in Enugu.

Dr. J. S. Tongai Jijide is
seeking a teaching position in
Social Anthropology. He
received his PhD in
Ethnography from Bordeaux II
University in France in 1984.
He is presently Regional
Director, Southern Region of
National Museums and Monuments
and Director of the Great
Zimbabwe National Monument.
His current research project
involves an assessment of the
impact of modernation and
industrialization of Zimbabwe
society on the global and
fundamental aspects of ethnic
cultures of this country and
to assess the ethnic responses
to this impact. For a CV or
more information contact Dr.
Tongai Jijide directly at the
Great Zimbabwe National
Monument. P.B. 9158, Masvingo,
Zimbabwe.







NEH FUNDING FOR AFRICAN
EXHIBITIONS

The National Endowment for the
Humanities, Division of
Museums and Historical
Organizations has demonstrated
their continued commitment to
funding quality museum
exhibitions on Africa.
In the last two years the
Endowment has funded the
following major exhibitions on
Africa and Afro-American
topics:

The Glory that was Carthage: A
Mosaic of Ancient Tunisia. A
traveling exhibition organized
by the American Museum of
Natural History which examines
the history and culture of
Carthage in the ancient world.
NEH Award $224,500.

The Transference and
Transformation of
Architectural Thought from the
Southern United States to
Liberia, West Africa. A
traveling exhibition organized
by the Brockton Art Museum.
The exhibition, catalogue and
educational programs examine
the concepts of acculturation,
diffusion and social
organization by focusing on
architectural style in the
southern United States and
Liberia.
NEH Award $90,000.

Cleopatra's Egypt: Art and
Culture in the Ptolemaic
Period A traveling exhibition
organized by the Brooklyn
Museum. The exhibition
incorporates recent
scholarship exploring the
era's aesthetics and culture.
The exhibition is accompanied
by a scholarly catalogue and a
variety of educational
publications and programs. NEH


Award $100,000.
Africa and the Renaissance. A
traveling exhibition organized
by the Center for African Art.
The exhibition explores
artistic and historical
relationships revealed by
objects crafted by Africans
for European use in the 15th
and 16th centuries. A
scholarly catalogue
accompanies the exhibition.
NEH Award $211,325.

Caribbean Festival Arts. A
traveling exhibition organized
by the Saint Louis Art Museum.
An exhibition, catalogue, and
educational program examining
the historical and cultural
background and spread of
Caribbean Festival Arts. NEH
Award $250,000.

The Essential Gourd: Art and
History in Northeastern
Nigeria. A traveling
exhibition organized by the
Museum of Cultural History,
UCLA. The exhibition focuses
on decorated gourds from
northeastern Nigeria and
explains the ethnography and
socio-cultural history of
gourd use and decoration. NEH
Award $78,431.

African Reflections: Art From
Northeastern Zaire. A
traveling exhibition organized
by the American Museum of
Natural History examines the
art of Northeastern Zaire in
historical perspective. A
scholarly catalogue, symposium
and educational programs
accompany the exhibition. NEH
Award. $450,000.

The African Impulse in
African-American Art. A
planning grant for an
exhibition organized by the
Dallas Museum of Art which


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0








examines the importance of the
African cultural heritage in
the work of contemporary black
artists in the United States
and the Caribbean. NEH Award.
$42,070.

Yoruba: Nine Centuries of
African Art and Thought. A
traveling exhibition organized
by the Center for African Art.
NEH Award $230,388.

The Elephant and Its Ivory in
African History and Culture.
An exhibition organized by the
Museum of Cultural History,
UCLA. Along with the
exhibition at UCLA, the
project entails collaboration
with exhibitions on the
elephant at the LA County
Natural History Museum and the
Los Angeles Zoo. NEH Award
$300,000.

The Endowment encourages
museums to submit applications
for planning and
implementation of exhibitions
and documentation projects.
If you are interested in
application guidelines,
deadlines and/or further
information contact the
Division of Museum Programs at
NEH. (202-786-0284)

HORNIMAN MUSEUM RESEARCH
PROJECT
CAMEROON QUADRANT

In 1988 a joint Horniman
museum/army expedition
explored the remote
rainforests of South West
Cameroon. Ethnographic
research and collection was
carried out by Keith Nicklin
in southern Korup, the Oroko-
speaking region of the Rumpi
Hills and at Isangele in the
mangrove swamps of the Rio del
Rey. Nicklin conducted


-11-


research on the Ekpe, the
Leopard spirit cult at
Isangele, a settlement
regarded by present-day
descendants of slaves from the
Rio del Rey area now living in
Cuba as a "kind of holy city".
Ekpe lore was carried vis the
infamous slave trade to the
Caribbean, where it is today
practiced by Afro-Cubans.
Nicklin reports that the
chiefs and elders of Isangele
were not aware of these trans-
Atlantic cultural connections,
but were eager to establish
contact with their New World
"brothers" and "sisters".
While in the region Nicklin
also made a study of tradi-
tional art and material
culture, notably wood carving
and raphia weaving. Specimens
collected in the course of the
expedition provide a valuable
research resource from a
hitherto undocumented area,
and enhance the importance of
existing "Cross River Arts"
displays at the Horniman
Museum. For further
information write directly to
Keith Nicklin, Keeper of
Ethnography, Horniman Museum,
London Road, Forest Hill,
London SE23 3PQ


CURRENT EXHIBITIONS

CENTER FOR AFRICAN ART, New
York
Africa and the Renaissance.
The exhibition features
African art created in the
15th and 16th centuries for
European patrons by African
artists.

Center for African Art
Nov 17, 1988 April 9, 1989

Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
May 6 August 20, 1989

F








A catalogue, Africa and the
Renaissance by E. Bassani and
W. Fagg is available from the
Center.. 256 pages, 505 ills.
(102 in color).

Hardcover,. $60.00, softcover
$32.00.- (N.Y. residents add 8
1/4% .Tax):. Postage: U.S. and
Canada:. $5.00 per book
Overseas air: $10.00 per book.
All other categories 25%

All checks must be drawn on a
U.S. bank. Send orders to the
Center for African Art, 54
East 68th St. NYC .10.02....

The exhibition ART/artifact
organized -by -the Center will
be featured at the following
museums:- . ..

Dallas Museum of Art
November 1988 January 15,
1989

Henry Art Gallery, University
of Washington, Seattle
February 15 April 16, 1989

Cincinnati Art Museum
May 24-August 27, 1989

Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh
September 30 December 10,
1989

Denver Museum of Natural
History
January 7 March 3, 1990

Wight Art Gallery, UCLA
March 18 May 20, 1990

Canadian Museum of
Civilization
Ottowa
July 1 September 15, 1990


NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART
Washington, D.C.
The Museum is presently
featuring two temporary
exhibitions.
November 11, 1988 to January
29, 1989.
Kalabari Ancestral Screens:
Levels of Meaning

Echoes of the Kalabari.
Sculpture by Sokari Douglas
Camp

THE TEXTILE MUSEUM
Washington, D.C.
September .16, 1988 to February
12, 1989 -
Fabrics of Africa celebrates
the roles that fabrics play in
sub-Saharan Africa. The
exhibit includes hats,
masquerade dress, raffia fiber
wrappers, strip woven cloth,
and other materials.

METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART.
New York
Forest and Village: Art from
Liberia and Ivory Coast.
Michael C. Rockefeller Wing,
October 18 January 15, 1989.
The exhibition features more
than sixty objects from the
Museum's permanent collection
representing the arts of the
Baule, Guro, Dan, We (Gere)
and other peoples of southern
Ivory Coast and Liberia.

BAKERSFIELD COLLEGE GALLERY
Bakersfield, CA
Collectors' Choice: African
Sculpture
January 30 to February 24,
1989
Curated by Jane Matthews, the
exhibition features pieces
from the collections of Jim
Gulbranson of Los Angeles and
Jane Matthews of Camarillo.


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MESA COLLEGE ART GALLERY, SAN
DIEGO MESA.COLLEGE.
Values made Visual: African
Art from the Collection of
Robert and Patricia Berg.
Curated by Barbara Blackmun
features fifty-two masks and
sculptures from the Berg
collection. The exhibition
explores the social, ethical
and spiritual values expressed
in a variety of African
sculptures. A Catalogue is
available for purchase from
the Gallery.

CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART
The Museum will host a
traveling exhibit of African
sculpture from.the.University
Museum, University of
Pennsylvania curated by Allen
Wardwell. The show,entitled
Noble Ancestors: Images from
Africa
will run from February 8 -
March 19, 1989.

NEW PUBLICATIONS

Iowa Art Studies. Vol II The
Artist and the Workshop.
edited by Christopher Roy.
$20.00 paper. In can be
ordered directly from
Christopher Roy, Dept. of Art,
Iowa University, Iowa City,
IA. 52242

Monni Adams, "The Study of
Sub-Saharan Art History in the
United States in the 1970s and
1980s" Research Overview
Paper. The Joint Committee on
African Studies of the
ACLS/SSRC. The paper is
available for sale from the
Social Science Research
Council. The cost, including
first-class postage, is $3.00
per paper. Requests should be
sent to: Africa Program, SSRC,
605 Third Avenue, New York, NY
10158. Please make checks


payable to the Social Science
Research Council.

Judith Lynne Hanna. Dance and
Stress: Resistance, Reduction,
and Euphoria. New York: AMS
Press (56 East 13th Street,
NY, NY 10003) $18, $2.75
postage. tel. 212-777-4700.
Includes material on African
ritual and social drama.

Judith Lynne Hanna. "The
Representation and Reality of
Divinity in Dance," Journal
of the American Academy of
Religion 56 (2):
521-526, 1988.

West African Masks and
Cultural Systems. edited by
Sidney L. Kasfir. 252 pp, 86
b/w illus., 3 maps, biblio.,
published by Musee Royal de
L'Afrique Centrale Tervuren,
Belique. Available Now. For
Price and Ordering Information
write to:
Prof. S.L. Kasfir, African
Studies Program, 121 Silsby
Hall, Dartmouth College,
Hanover, NH 03755

Performance in Contemporary
African Arts. Ruth Stone,
editor. Indiana University,
Bloomington. African Studies
and the Journal of Folklore
Research, 1988. The volume
contains articles by Arnoldi,
Cosentino, Karp, Nketia and
Stone. Requests for
information on the price and
ordering copies should be sent
to the attention of the
Publications Secretary,
African Studies Program,
Woodburn Hall, Indiana
University, Bloomington,
Indiana 47405.


-13-


5









32ND ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ASA

The 32ND ANNUAL MEETING OF THE
ASA will be held at the Hyatt
Regency Hotel, Atlanta, GA
from November 2-5, 1989. The
meeting will be chaired by
Professor Ku-ntima Makidi of
the Department of Political
Science of Atlanta Clark
University. The deadline for
proposals is April 15, 1989.
ACASA members should begin to
think about panel proposals
now and about nominating
African colleagues for travel
awards for the ASA. Please
send your panel proposals to
Mary Jo Arnoldi by February
1st if you want them to be
included in the February
newsletter. This will give
your colleagues ample time to
contact panel chairs and to
meet the ASA deadlines for
submissions.


**** Please note that the
African Studies Association
Board voted in Chicago that
panelists will not only be
required to be pre-registered
for the annual meeting but
that at all future ASA annual'
meetings panelists will also
be required to be members in
good standing of the ASA.

The ACASA Board strongly urges
all of you to become members
of ASA. Contact the Executive
Secretary, African Studies
Association, Credit Union
Building, Emory University,
Atlanta, GA 30322 for
information on ASA membership.

ERRATUM

The September 1988 ACASA
Newsletter was listed as
Number 19. It should have read
Number 20.


FEBRUARY/MARCH NEWSLETTER

Send all news and
announcements to Mary Jo
Arnoldi, Dept. of
Anthropology, NHB 112,
Smithsonian, Washington, D.C.
20560 by FEBRUARY 1, 1989 for
inclusion in the newsletter.
We encourage colleagues in the
US, Africa and Europe to send
information about exhibitions,
research projects,
publications, conferences, and
other activities.


0


-14-'









1989 (JANUARY 1-DECEMBER 31) ACASA MEMBERSHIP RENEWAL

W embers and non-Members of the African Studies Association (ASA) are
invited to complete this form and to remit for the current year according
to the following schedule (check one):

Regular Members $20.00
Special Members $ 5.00
(students; unemployed or retired scholars)
Institutional Members $20.00

,Make checks payable to ACASA Please pay in $US

Members residing outside of the US should pay with a foreign drafts drawn
on a bank with an affiliation in the US or with a postal money order
payable in $US. Do not pay with stamps or international reply coupons or
with checks not drawn on or payable through a US bank. Payments not
marked with a US affiliate bank will be returned. Newsletters and other
ACASA correspondence will be sent via airmail at no extra charge to
members residing outside the US and Canada.

Send to: Dr. Lisa Aronson, Secretary/Treasurer, ACASA
Art Department, Skidmore College
Saratoga Springs, New York 12866

Name

B Home Address

ZIP Home Phone

Institutional/Work Address



ZIP Work Phone Position

Check at which address you wish to receive mailings: HOME WORK

Do you wish work/home phone numbers to be added to roster: YES NO

PLEASE CIRCLE THE APPROPRIATE TERMS/FILL BLANKS AS INDICATED

EDUCATION (Highest Degree): Doctorate Masters Bachelors

SPECIALIZATION: Art History Anthropology Other

PRIMARY PROFESSIONAL INVOLVEMENT: College/Univ. teaching Other teaching
Museology Research Other

PRIMARY REGIONAL FOCUS: West Africa Central Africa East Africa
North Africa South Africa General Afro-American Other

SPECIFIC ETHNIC/COUNTRY FOCUS










THE ARTS COUNCIL OF THE AFRICAN
STUDIES ASSOCIATION


MEMBERSHIP ROSTER 1989










1989 ACASA MEMBERSHIP


MONNI ADAMS
Harvard University
Peabody Museum
Cambridge MA 02138

AFRICAN ARTS
UCLA
African Studies Center
Los Angeles CA 90024-1310

AFRICAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION
Emery University
Credit Union Building
Atlanta GA 30322
404-329-6410 (WORK)

AFRICAN STUDIES LIBRARY
Boston University
771 Commonwealth Ave.
Boston MS 02215

CHRISANNE F. ALBERS
4323 Lorcom Lane
Arlington VA 22207
703-841-8387 (WORK)

MARTHA ANDERSON
113 N. Main
Alfred NY 14802
607-587-8502 (HOME)
607-871-2468 (WORK)

SUSAN B. ARADEON
University of Lagos
Department of Architecture
Lagos
NIGERIA
820721 (HOME)
011 2341 (821115) (WORK)

CLAUDE DANIEL ARDOUIN
West African Museums Project
B.P. 357
Dakar
SENEGAL

EMMANUEL N. ARINZE
Centre for Museum Studies
P.M.B. 2031
Jos Plateau State
NIGERIA


0


MARY JO ARNOLDI
Smithsonian Institution
Department of Anthropology
NHB 112
Natural History Bldg.
Washington D.C. 20560
202-244-5386 (HOME)
202-357-1396 (WORK)

LISA ARONSON
Skidmore College
Art Department
Saratoga Springs NY 12866
518-583-0628 (HOME)
518-584-5000 e. 2741 (WORK)

RAMONA AUSTIN
The Art Institute of Chicago
African, Oceanic & Native Am.
Michigan Avenue at Adams St.
Chicago ILL 60603

ICHIAKA BAGAYOKO
Musee National du Mali
Section Exposition/Animation
Bamako 159
MALI
22-34-86 (WORK)

BARBARA BEALL
2716 Via Anita
Palos Verdes Est CA 90274

JAMES 0. BELLIS
University of Notre Dame
Department of Anthropology
Notre Dame IN 46556

PAULA BEN-AMOS
Indiana University
Anthropology Department
Rawles Hall 108
Bloomington IN 42405
812-335-5396 x1041 (WORK)

MARLA C. BERNS
University of Minnesota
Goldstein Gallery
250 McNeal Hall
St. Paul MN 55108
612-488-7071 (HOME)
612-624-3292 (WORK)










BERNARD GARDI
Museum fur Volkerkunde
Augustinesgasse 2
BP 1048
4001 Basel
SWITZERLAND

MONA GAVIGAN
Affrica
2010 1/2 R St. N.W.
Washington D.C. 20009
202-745-7272 (WORK)

CHRISTRAUD M. GEARY
35 Sagamore Park
Medford MA 02155
617-488-6033 (HOME)
617-353-3673 (WORK)

DALE CAROLYN GLUCKMAN
LA County Museum of Art
Department of Costumes &
Textiles
5905 Wilshire
Los Angeles CA 90036
213-661-2513 (HOME)
213-857-6081 (WORK)

FRANCINE GOLDENHAR
Parsons School of Design
Special Programs
66 Fifth Avenue
New York NY 10011
212-741-8975 (WORK)

GILBERT GRAHAM
6 Harvard Dr.
Woodbury NY 11797

JUDITH LYNNE HANNA
8520 Thornden Terrace
Bethesda MD 20817
301-365-5683 (HOME)

KRIS HARDIN
University of Pennsylvania
Department of Anthropology
325 University Museum (33rd &
Spruce)
Philadelphia PA 19104
215-898-7461 (WORK)


MOIRA F. HARRIS
4 Cardinal Lane
St. Paul MI 55127

BARRY HECHT
8412 Bradley Bvld.
Bethesda MD 20817
301-365-1204 (HOME)
301-942-5355 (WORK)

PRISCILLA HINCKLEY
Boston University
African Studies Center
270 Bay State Road
Boston MA 02215
617-353-3673 (WORK)

RACHEL HOFFMAN
3555 3/4 Motor Ave.
Culver Los Angeles CA 90034

MARILYN H. HOULBERG
School of the Art Inst.
Columbus Drive and Jackson
Boulevard
Chicago ILL 60603

BA IBRAHIMA
Service du Patrimoine MJS/C
BP 215
Niamey
Niger
73 27 66 (WORK)
DELLA JENKINS
Box 336
June Lake CA 93529

BARBARA C. JOHNSON
17 Marsh Drive
Mill Valley CA 94941
415-388-8514 (HOME)

IVAN KARP
Smithsonian Institution
Department of Anthropology NHB
112
Washington DC 20560
202-537-0442 (HOME)
202-357-4733 (WORK)











BERNARD GARDI
Museum fur Volkerkunde
Augustinesgasse 2
BP 1048
4001 Basel
SWITZERLAND

MONA GAVIGAN
Affrica
2010 1/2 R St. N.W.
Washington D.C. 20009
202-745-7272 (WORK)

CHRISTRAUD M. GEARY
35 Sagamore Park
Medford MA 02155
617-488-6033 (HOME)
617-353-3673 (WORK)

DALE CAROLYN GLUCKMAN
LA County Museum of Art
Department of Costumes &
Textiles
5905 Wilshire
Los Angeles CA 90036
213-661-2513 (HOME)
213-857-6081 (WORK)

FRANCINE GOLDENHAR
Parsons School of Design
Special Programs
66 Fifth Avenue
New York NY 10011
212-741-8975 (WORK)

GILBERT GRAHAM
6 Harvard Dr.
Woodbury NY 11797

JUDITH LYNNE HANNA
8520 Thornden Terrace
Bethesda MD 20817
301-365-5683 (HOME)

KRIS HARDIN
University of Pennsylvania
Department of Anthropology
325 University Museum (33rd &
Spruce)
Philadelphia PA 19104
215-898-7461 (WORK)


*


MOIRA F. HARRIS
4 Cardinal Lane
St. Paul MI 55127

BARRY HECHT
8412 Bradley Bvld.
Bethesda MD 20817
301-365-1204 (HOME)
301-942-5355 (WORK)

PRISCILLA HINCKLEY
Boston University
African Studies Center
270 Bay State Road
Boston MA 02215
617-353-3673 (WORK)

RACHEL HOFFMAN
3555 3/4 Motor Ave.
Culver Los Angeles CA 90034

MARILYN H. HOULBERG
School of the Art Inst.
Columbus Drive and Jackson
Boulevard
Chicago ILL 60603

BA IBRAHIMA
Service du Patrimoine MJS/C
BP 215
Niamey
Niger
73 27 66 (WORK)
DELLA JENKINS
Box 336
June Lake CA 93529

BARBARA C. JOHNSON
17 Marsh Drive
Mill Valley CA 949.41
415-388-8514 (HOME)

IVAN KARP
Smithsonian Institution
Department of Anthropology NHB
112
Washington DC 20560
202-537-0442 (HOME)
202-357-4733 (WORK)













JANE MATTHEWS
458 Sobre Colinas Place
Camarillo CA 93010

PATRICK MCNAUGHTON/D.PELRINE
801 N. Lincoln St.
Bloomington IN 47401
812-334-3614 (HOME)

OUMAR MEITA
Musee National du Mali
Audio-Visual
Bamako 159
Mali
22-34-86 (WORK)

ROY MITCHELL
715 6th St., S.W.
Washington D.C. 20024
212-484-3185 (HOME)

NARADOUMNGUE NGONG MSITIBAYI
Musee National Tchadien
B.Pb 503
Ndjamena
TCHAD

DIRECTION DES MUSEES & SITES
Minister de la Jeunesse
Culture & Sport
Cotonou
REPUBLIQUE DU BENIN

MUSEE NATIONAL D'ABIDJAN
B.P. 1600
Abidjan 225
IVORY COAST

MUSEE NATIONAL DU COSTUME
Grand Bassam 225
Ivory Coast

DJAMIL MOUSSA NENE
Musee National Tchadien
Ndjamena 503
CHAD

FISHER H. NESMITH
4550 Connecticut Ave., N.W.
Washington D.C. 20008


0


ANITRA NETTLETON
9 10th Str.
Linden, Johannesburg 2195
SOUTH AFRICA
782-7766 (HOME)
716-3423 (WORK)

ANDREA NICHOLLS
1311 Delaware Ave., S.W., Apt.
S730
Washington D.C. 20024
202-484-0088 (HOME)
202-357-4871 (WORK)

ROBERT NICHOLS
1669 Columbia Rd. N.W. Apt. 10
Washington D.C. 20009

NANCY INGRAM NOOTER
5020 Linnean Avenue, N.W.
Washington D.C. 20008

POLLY NOOTER
c/o 5020 Linnean Ave. N.W.
Washington DC 20008
202-966-0306 (HOME)

AMIR NOUR
1025 East 49th Street
Chicago IL 60615

JOHN NUNLEY
6120 McPherson
St. Louis MO 63112
314-727-7496 (HOME)
314-721-0067 (WORK)

ANN O'HEAR
P.O. Box 114, Bridge Station
Niagara Falls NY 14305
716-282-5487 (HOME)

MIKELLE SMITH OMARI
California State University
Department of Art
1250 Bellflower Blvd
Long Beach CA 90840

SIMON OTTENBERG
University of Washington
Department of Anthropology
Seattle WA 98195











0


KARL-FERDINAND SCHAEDLER
Georgenstrasse 85
Munich 8000
W. GERMANY
89-6090495 (HOME)
89-2710594 (WORK)

ENID SCHILDKROUT
American Museum of Natural
History
Anthropology Department
Central Park West
New York NY 10024

ELIZABETH ANN SCHNIEDER
876 Melville Ave.
Palo Alto CA 94301
415-328-3448 (HOME)

VICTORIA SCOTT
P.O. Box 335
Tesuque NM 87574
505-988-3885 (HOME)

THOMAS K. SELIGMAN
Fine Arts Museum
Golden Gate Park
San Francisco CA 94118
415-552-8846 (HOME)
415-750-3612 (WORK)

ROY SIEBER
Indiana University
School of Fine Arts
Bloomington IN 47405

WILLIAM SIEGMANN
The Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway
Brooklyn NY 11238
718-638-5000 (WORK)

RAYMOND A. SILVERMAN
Michigan State University
Department of Art
Kresge Art Center
East Lansing MI 48824-1119
517-336-9230 (HOME)
517-353-9114 (WORK)


FRED T. SMITH
Kent State University
School of Art
Kent OH 44242
216-672-7853 (WORK)

ROBERT T. SOPPELSA
1655 Illinois ST.
Lawrence KS 66044
913-841-1935 (HOME)
913-295-6639 (WORK)

ANNE M. SPENCER
The Newark Museum
43 Washington St., Box 540
Newark NJ 07101
201-596-6663 (HOME)
201-596-6663 (WORK)

JANET STANLEY
1791 Lanier Place N.W.,
Apt. 23
Washington D.C. 10009
202-357-4875 (WORK)

CHRISTOPHER B. STEINER
Harvard University
Department of Anthropology
448 William James Hall
Cambridge MA 02138
617-720-2264 (HOME)
617-495-4444 (WORK)

COURTRINA L. STEVENS
1037 7th St., N.E.
Hickory NC 28061
704-324-2256 (HOME)
704-256-9841 (WORK)

PHILLIPS STEVENS JR.
SUNY Ellicott Complex
Department of Anthropology
Buffalo NY 14261

ILONA H. SZOMBATI
P.O. Box 70043
Amsterdam 1007 KA
HOLLAND


0











African and Caribbean
Institutions listed
alphabetically by country

Angola
Direccao Nacional do
Patrimonio Cultural
C.P. 1267
Luanda, Angola
(Samuel Aco Director)

Barbados
Barbados Museum and Historical
Society
St. Ann's Garrison
St. Michael, Barbados

Ghana
National Museums of Ghana
P.O. Box 3343
Accra, Ghana
(F.B. Duah, Principle Keeper
Ethnography)

Guinea- Bissau
Biblioteca Publica
Museu Nacional da Guinea-
Bissau
C.P. 338
Bissau-Guinea-Bissau
(Diamatino Queiros -Librarian)

Liberia
National Museum of Liberia
c/o U.S. Education and
Cultural Foundation
Box 1011
Monrovia, Liberia

Mali
JAMANA
BP 2043
Bamako, Mali
(Alpha Konare Revue editor)

Mozambique
Secretariado do Conselho
Cientifico
Universidade Eduardo Mondlane
C.P. 257
Maputo, Mocambique
(Dr. Jose Negrao-Secretary)


Nigeria
Dept. of Archaeology
University of Nigeria Nsukka
Nsukka, Nigeria
(F.N. Anozie Dept. Head)

Swaziland
Swaziland National Museum
P.O. 100
Lobamba, Swaziland
(Rosemary Andrade Deputy
curator)

Zaire
AEQUATORIA
Centre de recherche
culturelles africanistes
Bamanya
B.P. 276
Mbandaka, Zaire
(Honore Vinck-Director)


I.




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