Group Title: Testing of an instructional strategy for improving reading comprehension of expository text in science and content area reading
Title: The testing of an instructional strategy for improving reading comprehension of expository text in science and content area reading
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00103058/00001
 Material Information
Title: The testing of an instructional strategy for improving reading comprehension of expository text in science and content area reading
Physical Description: x, 159 leaves : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Brown, William Michael, 1951- ( Dissertant )
Koran, John J. ( Thesis advisor )
Koran, Mary Lou ( Reviewer )
Powell, William R. ( Reviewer )
Todd, Eugene ( Reviewer )
Miller, M. David ( Reviewer )
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1995
Copyright Date: 1995
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Instruction and Criticism Thesis, (Ph.D.)
Dissertations, Academic -- UF -- Instruction and Criticism
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of high and low question generation as part of an instructional reading comprehension strategy called Reciprocal Teaching. A post test-only control group design was employed with aptitude factor tests administered prior to the study. In this design, the dependent variables were delayed written free recall and question generation for science and social studies expository texts; covariates were field dependence/field independence, induction, and verbal comprehension. gender and race/ethnicity also served as independent variables. One hundred eleven middle school students from five 7th grade classes were randomly assigned to four treatment groups in a 2x2 design. All groups differed in the level of questions to be generated from the passages: (a) low level questions; (b) mixed high and low level questions; (c) high level questions and (d) control. Subjects in all groups were trained for five consecutive days to use the four metacognitive activities of Reciprocal Teaching (predicting, questioning, summarizing and clarifying) while reading expository text. Scripts were developed for all groups to ensure uniformity of instruction. After training, subjects participated in two equivalent post test sessions. Analysis of covariance was performed with significant full model main effects for high level questions on total score for the question generation science text measure (F=3.80, p<.05). There were no significant main effects on the delayed free recall measures nor on the social studies question generation measure. Further analysis indicated that significant individual difference were found: (a) for gender (F=5.56, p<.05) on delayed free recall of science expository text; (b) for field dependence/independence (F=7.39, p<.05) on delayed free recall of science text; and (C) for field dependence/independence (F=7.11, p<.05) on delayed free recall of social studies text. In addition, interaction effects were found between high and low level questions generated and gender for delayed free recall of social studies text (F=7.75, p<.05), and between high and low level questions generated for question generation of the science text (F=7.75, p <.05). These finding suggest that the level of questions generally does not affect the quality of comprehension of expository text with Reciprocal Teaching. Implications of this study and questions for future research are provided.
Statement of Responsibility: by William Michael Brown.
Thesis: Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Florida, 1995.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (leaves 71-84).
General Note: Typescript.
General Note: Vita.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00103058
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: alephbibnum - 002056857
notis - AKP4877
oclc - 33815442

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