Group Title: Art of the Book exhibition materials
Title: Who is responsible for the look of a book cover?
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00103022/00001
 Material Information
Title: Who is responsible for the look of a book cover?
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: Hood, Barbara
Publisher: UF Libraries
Place of Publication: Gainesville, FL
Publication Date: October 2010
Copyright Date: 2010
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00103022
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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hinders
'1830o-845
In the early years of publishers'
bindings, the binder was totally
responsible for the
way the cover looked.
The binder invested
a good deal of capital
in establishing a
bindery business that
included a number
of employees, purchase and
maintenance of the machines
for embossing and stamping
the cloth, and purchase of the
brasses for stamping which
American binders imported
from England and Europe.


ngravers o
the passes
>'1845-,1877


In the mid-4o's a niche
developed for the individual
engraver as classical forms
(fountains, cherubs, flowers)
gave way to pictorial brasses for
stamping. Capital investment
was smaller for
an engraver than
a binder. He had
fewer employees
and did not have to
invest in as much
machinery. The
engraver interprets a drawing
by engraving it in reverse on a
piece of metal capable of being
pressed into the book cover


0


publisherss
o870-1889
In the United States, after
the Civil War, publishers
themselves took responsibility
for how the
covers of their
books looked.
The publishers
felt they knew
their market and
what the customer wanted and
they dictated to the binder and
or engraver what to put on the
book cover.


I








rypograpby

In the nineteenth century and
first half of the twentieth century,
typography was executed by hand-
setting metal and wood types into
printable forms. These forms were
then set in a platen press, and later a
cylinder press, to be inked
and printed onto paper
(see illustration left).
The craft of typography
includes not only letters,
words, and paragraphs, but
Vy-/ also decorative elements
Platen press. such as "dingbats" and
borders. These elements were used
to great effect in the industrial era -
when the design of typefaces became
more than a function of legibility,
but were used as decoration and sales
features of their own.


Galley tray with form of
composed metal type.


illui


an


Book binder working
L k at the sewing frame.
ocok ecoration


Books are vehicles for information,
but the book itself more than a
container. The structural materials
that comprise a book the decorated


covers (leather,


old-tooling),


the end papers and fly leaves (paste
papers, hand printed, or marbled
papers), the fold-outs, etc, are
used to support the way a book is
received by the public.


The


of those


materials ranges from
high quality, hand-
crafted materials to
the low end, machine-
made materials that


Engraving a wood block.


are mass produced quickly. Artists
and artisans take special care to use
archival materials that are attractive,
long-lasting, and elegant.


Printir
transfer
printing
of tran
that a i
of mul
printing
(printii
letter:
incised
printec
(the sti
metho
using a








from li
hold hi
reprod


which
quantil


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