Title: Morocco Temple, Jacksonville, Florida
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102990/00001
 Material Information
Title: Morocco Temple, Jacksonville, Florida
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: Department of Architecture, University of Florida
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Copyright Date: 1974
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102990
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Cathein D. Lee AIA



2211 Copoat Sqar BoulT~evad
JacksonvihlV le, Florida 32216




DerCatherine:D ee I




I am in receipt of your letter to Professor Blair Reeves concerning a design
study project for the preservation option graduate students at the University
of Florida which would feature the Morocco Temple. This sounds like an excell-
ent project and you are to be commended for pulling this all together.

As per your request, I have made a search through the original drawings avail-
able from the Building Department for the Morocco Temple Building and would
like to submit my findings to you.

1) Eleven sheets prepared by H. J. Klutho are available from the 1910
construction (Building Department #1910A) as follows:
sheet 1 basement plan and details of sections through walls
sheet 2 banquet floor plan (first floor)
sheet 3 auditorium floor plan
sheet 4 balcony floor plan
sheet 5 roof plan
sheet 6 longitudinal section
sheet 7 cross section
sheet 8 front elevation
sheet 9 rear elevation
sheet 10- south elevation
sheet 11- Monroe Street elevation

2) No drawings are available for a $4,500.00 two-story addition to
the building in 1927 (Building Department #927w-27). The addition
was designed by jacksonville architects Marsh & Saxelbye. I have
contacted Mr. Jeremiah Lahey of the firm of Saxelbye, Powell,
Roberts & Ponder and he is checking their archives to see if they
have copies of the drawings.










SH64PARD
8SSOCIART45

ARCHITECTS
& PLANNERS December 15, 1981
INCO~rORATED

Professor F. Blair Reeves, FAIA
College of Architecture, GPB (904) 392-0205
University of Florida


RE: Morocco Temple, Jacksonville, Florida -
Adaptive Reuse Study by the Graduate Design
Students, Preservation Option, University of
Florida, College of Architecture
Dear Blair:

This letter is to confirm our telephone conversation of Monday, December
14, 1981, regarding the possible use of the Morocco Temple, Jacksonville,
Florida, as a design study project for the preservation option graduate
students at the University of Florida. As per our discussion, I have spo-
ken .by telephone to Mr. John Satterfield, Manager, of the Morocco Temple,
and Mr. Satterfield was most receptive to the idea of using the Temple
as an adaptive reuse design study. Mr. Satterfield indicated that he
would be happy to help in the planning of such a project and would wel-
come discussing it with you.

As per your request, I have checked into the availability of original con-
struction documents for the Temple. According to Mr. Steve Tool, Director,
Jacksonville Historic Landmarks Commission, the Building Department of the
City of Jacksonville does have some original documents copied on microfiche.
Steve did add that, to obtain good, usable copies of the documents from
the microfiche, would involve camera reproduction by a professional blue-
print company and the associated cost of reproduction. There are several
firms locally that have the capabilities to reproduce the microfiche with
good results.

I am sure that Mr. Satterfield would be glad to discuss this project with
you, and you may contact him at the following address:

Mr. John Satterfield, Business Manager
Morocco Temple
219 Newnan Street
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
(904) 353-6291
Best regards,


Catherine D. Lee
Cy Mr. John Satterfield
'-7 Mr. Steve Tool
HERSCHEL E. SHEPARD FAIA KENNETH R. SMITH AIA CATHERINE D. LEE AIA
2111 CORPORATE SQUARE BOULEVARD (904) 721-2111 JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 32216














































































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'c STATE OF FLORIDA
e THE CAPITOL
o~~ TALLAHASSEE 32304
(904) 4883680


GEORGE FIRESTONE.
SECRETARY OF STATE






January 8, 1980





Morocco Temple Association, Inc.
219 Neunan Street
Jacksonville, Florida


Ref: Morocco Temple


Dear Sir:


It is a pleasure to advise you that the referenced property
has been officially listed on the National 'Register of Historic
Places. A certificate of formal notification of the recognition
given to this site is now being prepared. If at all possible,
Secretary of State, George Firestone, will be in contact with
you concerning a mutually acceptable time and place for presen-
tation of the certificate.


With every good wish and
5-r_______

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Area buildings added

to National Register
Historic structures in architectural firm of Car-
seven Florida counties, .in- rrere and Hastings.
eluding. Duval and; St.-,: Other Florida buildings
Johns, have been added. to. added to the National Reg- -
the.National~.Register:-of sisterr include the Calhoun
Historic Places. toSteet ~Historic; District and
Se~cretary-o6f State- Park-Avenue Historic Dis-
George.Firestone an- trict in TallahssePe,.the J,
nounced that the Morocco, 0.:Douglas House..in Dun-
Temple~in Jacksonville and -edin, Charlotte Harbor and
the Grace United Method- ,Northern Railway Depot in
ist Church in St. Augustine Boca Grande, the Thiesen
have-been added to -the., Building in Pensacola and
Register, making them eli- Mount Zion A.M.E. Church
gible for federal historic in Ocala.
preservation f unds, ttax -
benefits ~and governmentaL
protetion.~
SThe Morocco Temple, lo-,
cated--at .219 Newman 'St,
.has served as a meeting
place for the Shriners, one
of the city's oldest frater-
nal organizations, for more
than 65 years. With its com-l
bination of Egyptian motifs
and Prairie-style ~ab-
stractions,: the, buildingeAS
recognized as being one of
the most unusual examples
of the work of Henry John
Klutho. Klutho was com-
missioned by the Shriners,
in :1910 to. designi~abieivy=
headquarters and ~on-
struction was completed in
May 1911.
The Grace -Sittohoi~s
Chaurch located' st 8 Cari-
rera St. in SL. Augusi~~
was constructed in 1887 as,
part of R~enry- orioi
Flagler's :si'hemfiebipr
mote and develop the area&
as air xclusivrewite e
.sorkr The rchurchwardie
Assigned ifi,"efea~ithe 'SI5**~i
ish :Renaissance ~styly-an
is one of-four suck
buildings 'in;St. Augustine
designed by the New York


The Florida Thnes-Union, Jacksonville, Wednesday, January 30, 1980


C-5























B-2 r i i The Florida Times-Union, Jacksonville, Friday, January 16, 1981



Briefs

From Times-Union Staff, AP. UPI

Shiners purchase

tract for mosque.
Mlorocco Temple has purchased 36 acres of land on
St. Johns Bluff Road near the University of North Flor-
ida as a mosque site, newly elected Illustrious Poten-
tate Dr. William H. Wood said yesterday.
Wood said no plans have been drawn up for a new
building on the property. "That is some time in the fu-
iiture," he said. No purchase price was disclosed.
: Dr. Wood, as the head of the 11,000-member temple,
has a jurisdiction that extends into more than 20 North
; Florida counties.
Wood was selected Wednesday night to head Moroc-
co Temple, now at. 219 Newnan St. in downtown Jack-
sonville.
Former state Sen. Lew Brantley' was elected oriental guide, putting
him f~lfh in line of sucession as potentate. Others elected on the Divan
were Josellh Hll Sr. of Ocala, chief rabban; Jesse Keene, assistant
rabban; and Ben Reed, high priest and propheL
John Ek was re-elected treasurer and W. Lawrence Jackison, who
has relinquished his administrative duties in the office of the dow71-
town temple, will continue as ceremonial recorder.
Jerry Mlathews was named new~ Shriner on the Appointive Divan.
L~ou Frost moved up to second ceremonial master and Ed Turner suc-
ceeded Brantley as first ceremonial minister.
Morocco Temple's membership devotes its year-
round activities to raising funds in support of their
crippled children's program and Shrinredom's 18 ortho-
pedic and three burns institutes.





~


Site Name Morocco Temple


830=


8399=

916= =


Instructions for locating site SE corner of the intersection of N~ewnan and
Monroe Streets



813=


4 868= =
l01 00


Owner of Site:
NMorocco Temple Association


902


904= =


Specialist)
8i6= .

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Olv,Slon oI rhren~e. n1sso"
to Reco6S M~anag;ement
D5.ge e 3 Rev. 11-78

,Ite No. 8Du268


802=


808 = =


1009 = = County Duval


Othr am~s)fo SteMorocco Temple Ancient Arabic Order, 3
Nuob~les, M~ystic Shrine of Jacktsonville


906=


Other Nos. for Site


Other Master Site File Nos. for Site


NR Classification Category building

Address of Site 219 Newmnan Street, Jacksonville, Fl.


905= =


Vicinity of
Location: Hart 's Map of Jacksonville 94
5ubdivlslon name blDCt nO.


219 Newnan


St., Jacksonville, 1-1.


Address
Occupant, Tenant, or Manager:
Name
Address


Reporter (or local contact):
.nae Greer, Diane D. (Historic Sites
FDAHRM
Address
Recrdr:Deibler, Dan G. (Historic Sites


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,t.~.:., ..uvyb. 06


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N me of Pr ict (under wb ch site wa recordedd) re/utrlRs eSre
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t- i 6_-;F:~1 swiSif;ication,o~f Proj c'tr Ch'eck OnRe-
c F~hra 932- 1'- tte-- 98= = Loa 982i r= o ny 982 = =
;". ''iB enlty St~atus r914=

P evious Surveyv(s), Excavationls) or Collection(s): (enter activityllitle of project Er sv~curnaevine lefat it ositry
;nStirvey/C~ultural Re~source -Survey of Duval County 1975/FDLH1;


Ptcvic .;r


839=
- - 804=
-- ~ 832=


Recording Station
1)ate of Visit to Site


DT~be a. t:9ographic Record Numbers


828_ Recording Date


FLORIDA MASTER
SITE FILE


FDAHRM







,cation of Site (Specific):
AapReernn (nalscle& iae)USGS Jacksonville 7. 5 min PR 1 970 809 =


Township Range Section %/ Sec. % % Sec. %/ % %i Sec.


LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE COORDINATES DEF-INING A POLYGON LOCATING THE PROPERTY
LATITUDE LONGITUDE
Point Degrees Minutes Seconds Degrees Minutes Seconds






OR
LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE COORDINATES DEFINING THE CENTER OF A PROPERTY OF
LESS THAN TEN ACRES


800 =
Zone Easting Northing
UTM Perimeter:





890=-

UTM Coordinates: 17 891 = = 437040 892 = = 3355120 893=
zone eating nothing


)( )863=

Threats to Site:
Check One or More
0 zoning( >< >( )878= = O Transportation( )( )( )878=
O Development( xL x )878== O Fill( x X is7s==
O3 Deterioration( xj x )878= = O Dredgre( X H 187e=
O sorrowinor X x( )878= =
O Other(See Remarks Below): 878=
Threats to Site (Remarks): none Known


879 =


TO2S


R26E


S38


812=


Condition of Site:
Check One
XXExcellent 863=
O Good 863= =
O7 Fair 863= =


Integrity of Site:
Check One or More
~A~lered 858=
O Unaltered 858= =
O Destroyed 858= =


O Deteriorated863 =
O Ruins ses= =
O Unexposed 863-=
O Redeposited863= =


0 Restored( )(Date: )( 1858=
O Moved {)(Date: )( l858
O1 Originalsite ass=


)( well maintained building


Condition of Site (Remarks): (









Statement of Significance (use continuation sheet if necessary)
The Morocco Temple, headquarters for the Ancient Arabic
Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine of Jacksonville, is
significant for its community association and for its architec-
tural style. It was completed in 1911 according to the design
of Henry John Klutho (1873-1964), the well-known Florida
architect.
Jacksonville's Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the
Mystic Shrine was organized in June, 1888, and was the 45th
such chapter to be established in the United States.1 It was
the first in Florida although its jurisdiction encompassed all
of Alabama and Georgia as well. The steady growth2 from its
founding in 1888 precipitated the decision to construct new
facilities. As a result, the Order commissioned H. J. Klutho
to design a new headquarters building in downtown Jacksonville.

Klutho's prolific and diverse career spanned much of the
first half of the twentieth century. His fortuitous appearance
in Jacksonville just after the devastating fire of Mlay, 19013
led to an impressive number of architectural commissions be-
ginning with the office building for Dyal, Upchurch and Co.
(1901). Other important Jacksonville commissions included the
City Hall (1902); the Public Library (1904); the YMCA Building
(1907); the Bisbee Building (1908), Jacksonville's "pioneer
skyscraper;"4 and several other major commercial buildings.
Klutho's contribution to the rebuilding of Jacksonville was
acknowledged by an obituary which referred te him as "Designer
of the Skyline."5 His contribution to Florida's architectural
heritage also includes the design of the state's first official
governor's residence (1906) as well as the east (entrance) and
west (rear) extensions (1922) to the state capitol in Tallahas-
see.

Plans for the new temple were announced in January, 1910
after the Morocco Temple Association had been organized for
the purpose, "of erecting a two-story reinforced concrete audi-
torium and club house "6 at the southeast corner of Monroe
and Newman Streets. One of the major features of and motivating
factors for the new facility was an auditorium with a seating
capacity between 4,000 and 5,000. ThiS feature was seen by the
Shriners as an important addition to `Jacksonville which
would, "put the city in a 90ositio~n to attract national conven-
tions of every character." Construction by the Southern Ferro-
Concrete Company (Atlanta, Georgia) was underway by August,
19108 and the building was formally dedicated ten months later
on May 12, 1911 with splendid and public fanfare.9

Although thle design was described as "unique and pleasing,"
Klutho's work is a curious blend of Egyptian motifs (papyrus.
capitals, winged suns) and Prairie Style abstractions (finned
window mullions) on a composition suggestive of Frank-Lloyd


(See Continuation Sheet)


911-












P~


Rev. ~1178


HISTORIC SITE DATA SUPPLEMENT


Present Use (Check one or more as appropriate)
0 Agricultural 850= = O government eo= = O Park 850= = Transportation 850=
Commercial aso= = O Industrial eso=- = PrivateResidence 850= = Other Ispecity):
0 Educational 850= = O Miiitary aso= O Religious 850=- = Social aso=-
O~ ~~ Enetimet 80 O Museum aso= = O7 scientific aso= = O aso=-



Original Use (check one or more as appropriate)
O2 rpricultural 838= = O Government 838= = O Park -83s= = O rnpotton8
Oi Commercial 838= = Industrial 838= = Cl Private Riesidence 838= = Other (specify):
0 ~ ~ ~ Edctoal 88 Military 838=- = Religious 838= = SOCj al 838==
0 Entertainment 838= = O3 Museum as== OScientific 838= = O3 ass=


Cultural Classification: Specific Dates: Beginning +11 844==

Cutr/PaeHistoric/Americanic 840=



Period (check one or more as appropriate)
ri Pre-Columbian 845= = [7 16th Century 845 = = O 18th Century 845= = 8C~20th Century 845=
O 15thCentury 845= = O 17thCentury 845= = O 19thCentury 845=


Remarks & Recommendations:


835=


Site No


STATE OF FLORIDA~
DEPART~EN'T OF STATE
Diveston of Archives, Mrstory
and Records Management


MlO OC CO Te mp 1e


I_


Sile Naff


DS-HSP3B


Areas of Significance (check one or more as
O rsoolnome 9o= = O communitymlannlnp mo= =
0 Archiaeology 910= = O Conservation 910=
Prehistoric 910= = O Economics 910=
AJ rchaeology Historic 910= = O Education_ 910= =
O Aglncuure 910= = O Engnerig 10
Ar *chrtecture 910= = O Exploration& 910==
[3 Arl 910= = Setlelment_ 910= =
r~Commerce 910= = O industry _910=
OCommunications 910= = O loven(1on _0 10


appropriate)
O Landscape 910==
Architecture 910==
O~a 91 so==
O useralure mo= =
O Miliary smo =
O susic mo= =
O Phiosophy 910==
OPolitics/GovL 910==
O Reliion 910==
O seence 91o =


O Sculpture 910
~;oclallHumanitarian 910
OJ Teater Pto
O Transponlalon Ilbe
other O OIe~
O 91o=
O *so
O e1ro
O era


XXyes: restricted


O yes: unrestricted


O no


Accessible:


Status: XXoccupied


O unoccupied


O work in progress





8Du268
OF FLORIDA Shre No.
MVENT OF STATE site Nae MlOTOCCO J emple
of Archives. History
records Management
-3E g.74

11=CO NTI N UAT IO N S H EET


Wright's Unity Temple (1906), in Oak Park, Illinois. The exotic
Near Eastern atmosphere was carried through to the interior with
obelisks used as newel posts and floor mosaics executed in designs
reminiscent of oriental rugs. As completed, the third-floor audi-
torium was much reduced (to a 1,300-1,500 seating capacity) but
was lavishly appointed with wall murals of desert caravans painted
by George Ruckes and Amiclore Borgheal and a "deep smoke blue"
celestial ceiling with a cen gal golden moon and an appropriate
company of electrical stars.

The Morocco Temple has continued to serve as a meeting place
for one of Jacksonville's oldest fraternal organizations and
stands as one of the most unusual examples of the architectural work
of Henry John Klutho.




1HacFetel "Birth and Growzth of Morocco Temple A.A.O.
N.M.S.," Mlorocco Temple Yearbook 1888-1955 (Jacksonville, Fl.:
Douglas Printing Company, 195 5) p. 4.

2Ibid.

3Thomas Frederick Davis, History of Jacksoniville and Vicinity,
1513-1924 (Gainesville, Fl.: University of Florida, 1968), p. 25

Ibid., p. 224.

5Jacksonville Florida Times-Union, 4 March 1964.

6Florida Times-Union, 24 January 1910, p. 5.

Ibid.

8Ibid., 8 August 1910, p. 12.

Ibid., 3 May 1911, p. 8.

10
Ibid.




































































I


STATE OF FLORIDA ie o
DEPARTMENT OF STATE
Dir1sono Ar chiwes. HIStory Site Name I\orocco Temple
an,' Recolds Management
S-HSP 3BB Rev. 1178

HISTORIC SITE DATA SUPPLEMENT
Page 2
Present & Original Physical Appearance (use continuation sheet if necessary) (935 = = ):


The three-story Morocco Temple building is constructed of
reinforced concrete with applied terra cotta decorative details.
The original 105' wide x 160' deep building is divided into
three sections from west (entrance) to east (rear) with the
west facade itself articulated in three parts a recessed three
story entrance pavilion with flanking two-story pavilions having
subsidiary entrances. In addition to the entrance and stair_._
lobby which provides vertical circulation to the auditorium and
banquet rooms, the western portion of he building contains
smaller club rooms or offices. The second section or central
block is four bays deep and contains major public spaces a
1,300-1,500 seat auditorium on the third floor and a large
banquet hall on the second. The rear or west section is only
slightly expressed and devoted to support facilities, e.g., the
stage and kitchen on their respective floors. One-story addi-
tions expanding the Temple's facilities were added to the south
(a ballroom) and east (rear) in 1962.1

Exterior detailing is largely restricted to the entrance
facade, particularly the central three-story pavilion. The main
entrance is set within a two-story battered architrave with a
massive transom carried on s_quat Egyptian style columns (terra
cotta). Above the transom are tinted art glass sashes vertical~
arranged. Egyptian motifs, e.g., winged disks, rondels and
stylized cobras are applied symmetrically about the architrave
while free-standing sphinx-like sculpture flanks the entrance.

Vertically grouped windows with massive square mullions
are located on the third story of the entrance pavilion. The
grouping is flanked by massive, abstract terra cotta brackets.
Horizontal rectilinear fins are found on the third story fenes-
tration of the center entrance pavilion and similar fins are
found over the secondary entrances on the west facade and on
the auditorium windows of the north and south elevations.
Window mullions similar to those of the entrance pavilion also
appear in the subsidiary locations.

Originally, a deep galvanized iron cornice (really a sun-
shade), with a continuous geometric design defined the window
heads of the third-story fenestration on the north and south
eleatins s wll s te wstfacade. This was removed some-
time between 1956 and 1962. Adtoa leain n16
included the installation of air conditioning, blocking- in
most windows on the north and south elevations and putting a
suspended ceiling in the auditorium. In 1967, many of the
original wooden window sashes were replaced with aluminum ones.3


(See Continuation Sheet for Footnotes)






Verbal Boundary Description


920 ==


Site Size (Approx. Acreage of Property) Less than one (1) 833 = =

Major Bibliographic References


Davis, Thomas Frederick. History of Jacksonville and Vicinity
1513-1924. Gainesville, Florida: Universi~ty of Florida,
1968.

Fretwell, Horace. "Birth and Growth of Morocco Temple A.A.O.
N.M.S.," Morocco Temple Yearbook 1888-1955.

Historic American Building Survey, Augus~t, 1975, "Miorocco
Temple." n.p., n.p., 1975.

Jacksonville Florida Times-Union, January 24, 1910.

August 8, 1910.

May 3, 1911.

March 4, 1964.






Site No.
SiteNam .Mnrocco IePmnpe


1"Morocco Temple, Historic American Bui~lding Survey,
August, 1975, n.p., n.p.


'Ibid.


Ibid.


STATlE OF FLORIDA
DEPASTMENT OF STATE
Division of Archives, Hlistory
and Records Management.
OS-HSP-3E g.



935=


CO NTI NUAT I ON S H EET










8Du268
Site No.
STATE OF FLORIDAC
DEPARTMENT OF STATE
Diveston of Archives. History Site Narne Moroc co Temple
and Records Management
DS-M.SP-3G Rev. 1178

ARCHITECTURAL SITE DATA SUPPLEMENT
A RCH ITECT Klu t ho, Henry John (JacksonvilIle, Florida 872=

BUILDER Southern Ferro-Concrete Company (Atlanta, Georgia) 874= =

STYLE Prairie School and Egyptian Revival 964=

PLAN TYPE re ctan gular 966= =

EXTERIOR FABRIC(S) concrete, reinforced gg4 .

STRCTRALSYTEMS)masonry: concrete, reinforced 86

FEATURE OF STRUCTURE (942):

PORCHES, VERANDAS, GALLERIES AND BALCONIES:

942=

FOU NDATION: concrete poure d-in -pl ace 942= =

ROOF TYPE: flat, gable 942= =

SECONDARY ROOF STRUCTURESS: none 942 = =

CHIMN EY LOCATION: none 942= =

WINDOW TYPE: fixed 942= =

MATERIALS (882):

CHIMNEY: noe882= =

ROOF SURFACING: built -up 882= =

ORNAMENT EXTERIOR: terra cotta; bronze 882= =

QUANTITATIVE DATA (950-960):

NO. OF STORIES 3 950=

NO. OF CHIMN EYS none 952=-

NO. OF DORMERS 954=-





chitrave; columns flank doors; glazed transom sashes

865 = =


JTHEq NOTABLE FEATURES OF BUILDING (FREE TEXT)

MAIN ENTRANCE:W/icentral, four glazed doors, recessed within battered


are


WINDOW PLACEMENT: regular, grouped vertically 865= =

WINDOW SURROUNDS AND DECORATION: plain, rectilinear horizontal fins

accentuate tops of window mullions on NT, S, and W\ sides

865==

EXTERK)R ORNAMENT AND COLOR: columns have gilt detailing; stylized

brackets flank 3rd story w-indow~s of entrance pavilion; winged solar
disk ovrer entrance; free-standing sphinx sculptures flianke entra-nce;
wall surfaces are monolithic concrete; rt glass transom 5s~h.

INTERK)R COMMENTS: tile; plasterwork; wrought iron

Lobbies on 1st and 2nd stories have mosaic tile floors and

wall decorations; wrought iron railing with obelisk newel posts


865==


OTH ER (SPEC IFY):
865= =


MAJOR ALTERATIONS (FREE TEXT): E/S/1962 one-story additions; N/S/WJ, 1962
metal cornices removed; N/S, 1967/ windows blocked up; auditorium

suspended ceiling added 1967 857= =

OUTBUILI)INGS (FEATURES OF SITE): nn


876==

SURROUNDINGS (CLASSlFICATION) Commercial 864=

RELATIONSHIP TO SURROUNDINGS (FREE TEXT): Building occupies SE corner of
intersection of Newnan and Monroe Streets
859=


















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1. Morocco Temple
2. Jacksonville, Florida
3. Dan Doibler
4. 1.979
5. F~lorida Division o E"Archi~ves, Hlistory and
Re cor ds ~analgement
6,. West (entrance) and north (sido) elevati~ons
7. Photo No. 1


















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1. Mlorocco 'Temple
2. Jacksonville, Florida
3.Dan Deibler
4. 1979
5. Florida~ Division of A~rchives, Hlistory and
Records M4anagement
6. Wes-t (entrance) -facade
7. Photo No. 2















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1. Morocco Temple
2. Jacksonville, Flori~da.
3. Dan Deibler
4 19379
5. Florida Di~vision of Archives, Ili story and
Re co rds Management
6. North (side) -elevation
7. Photo No. 3











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1. Mlorocco Temple
2. Jacksonville, Florida
3. Dan Deibler
4. 1979
5. Florida Division of Ar~chives, History and
Records Mlanagement
6. Main (west) entrance
7. Photo No. 4





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--


5~FLORIDA Duval Jackson ille



;Morocco Temple

21 Z9 Newnan Street. Concrete (stuccoed), recti

Sular, '(3 bay facade)x thr

stories, flati roof, battered entr~i pavrillior

lotus capitals on reeded .columns, winged dis

above entry, sphinx flanking entry, applied

ornament on third f-loor level comb3ining SuD~

vanesque, Prairie School, and Shriners' emb3

atic motifs; leaded and .stained glass lights

second floor facade, central hall, mosaic

tile murals and simulated oriental rug floozy

Prairie School7Eg ptign Tje~yiyal ~t le. 1910;

Henry john Kliuthi 'addition 1962;i Eln
Cel1lar. 'ext. photos' (_ ;,4 e


__ ___ __ _____ __















































photos ( ) photocopied sheets (
data pages (8/75) .





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za 7 Eler .-.._---- -- 2__~~~~ 120, N. 3rd Plac Robnton, W .- H.......- ---------- ..616j .E. 7th St
arts. Walte N. ... ..... .~~,~_C/o 111 N.W. 12thr Av. Rog~er. Earlh L.....-I----0 ~S .E. 6th Tverr
etner, Cwln A._. ------------- ...204 N.W. 75th Lerane Sca errs Roswlll T..... -- -- Route 3. Box (LL
Gordoan Re. U.ra S - --- -- ---. Box35 St. pnimpson, Cear V ...- .1 h.W. 2nd S1
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Haye, Mlaston S- ... ------. ......133 SW. Alnato Ste. Thompson, I..anni H .-. .----- -10 24 N.E. 3rdh Pl t
Ha ywardn Paulr L. --- ----------......P.~Ut O. Box 447B Thunqes, Rho ya E.....-.. _._.. .. .Box 26t
Hiatt Lelnd W. ....P. O Box3835,UnivrsityStaton '31 Walku. erM i. H .. ..------------------ --.837 N ~. Man AvL
Dat oo. ashw n .---------- ------- ----- -- .H.. O. h Box 413 W son Wm.s B.J.. .......--------- 23 .i. is xv
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Inord. James H,.._.._.. ____2 ? .. .........77 irst St.c Wesiter, Woo A....... ------- ------ .3618 N.W. 14th Ave
J! ames, Jesser H...------- -.....1126 N~.W. 33rd Ave. Whitaer. HEr ma B.. ..- .......----- -- -88NW 3hS
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I~~- ---o.H~.U.S------. .......Route 3, Box 13 Wialliam. Curtis R..-.------------- th3
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Lane. Ralph e E ...... .._.._..__ --.... ..100 N.W Bth Ave. Ztrouier, Frn ...-- ------- -..... . 440N.ve. th Ave
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McR Txr. Yul -. --- ---------.-.. ...1928 N-. 7th~( GRACEVIul..E FLORIDA.:.. ._.B x t

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NAME OF STRUCTURE

Morocco Temple
ADDRESS OR LOCATION

219 Newnan Street
YOWN OR VICINITY COUNTY STATE

Jacksonville .Duval Florida
LAT~ITUDE LOtNGITUDE GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION CODE (poke supplioc
(or alttach detalled snefae preferably USGS, wl~r sit located) by flABS)


UTM: -17.3355000a- 437010'B

PRESENT OWN ER'SNAME AND ADDRESS

Morocco Temple Association, Inc.
219 Newnan Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
PRESENT OCCUPANT
Membership of The Morocco Temple of the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the
Mystic Shrine for North America at Jacksonville, Florida.

PRESENT USE

Meeting hall, social facility.

NRIEF STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE:
Designed in 19'10 by 'H. J. Klutho, Jacksonville's most prominant early twentieth-
century architect, The Miorocco Temple has a blending of Egyptian Revival detailing
and WJrightian massing unique in his oeuvre; and it is the home of the oldest chapter
of Shriners in Florida.



PROJECT INFOR~ATION: If these records are part of a cooperative or summer project, add a paragraph crediting
cooperating agencies and persons supervising the recording.

This project was undertaken by the Historic American Buildings Survey in cooperate
with the Florida Bicentennial Commcission and the Jacksonville Historical and Cultural
Conservation Commission, under the direction of John Poppeliers, Chief of HABS, at the
HABS Field Office, Riverside, Jacksonville, Florida, by Susan Tate (University of
Florida), project supervisor; Frederick Wdiedenmann (University of Florida), architect;
Carolyn Hamm (Cornell University), project historian; and student assistant architects
Robert Moje (University of Virginia), Ruthie W~iley (Mississippi State University), and
Robert Wriltse (Louisiana State University).


GPO B3t*3,s


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE
Office of Airchoology and Historic PIresrvation


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HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY
GENERAL WORK, SHEET FOR "PHOTO-DATA BOOKS'


HAB5 NO.






HISTORIC AM ERICAN! BUILDINGS SURVEY -
ARCHITECT'S WORK SHEET FOR "PHOTO-DATA 800KS' '"

K*ME OF STRUCTURE , MAB5eP nr~NO.
Morocco Temple
ADDRbss (Clty) (County) (state)
219 Newnan Street Jacktsonville Duval IFlorid
GENERALSTATEMENT


CONDITION OF FABRIC:
`Excellent
DE TAI LEDO DE SCRI PTION OF EXT ERIOR!
OVERALL DIMENSIONS: NUMBER OF BAYS: NUMBER OF STORIES: LAYOUT, SHAPE:
84'-0" x 124'-0" 3 Rectanqular
FOUNDA~TIONS:
Concrete :

WA*LL. CONSTRUCTION. FINISH AND COLOR:
Reinforced concrete, white stucco -. -

STRUCTURALSYTEMFRAM:NG
Concrete beain wal
Fat trus roo framing

PORCE5,5OOPSBULKEADSETC.
Tepl for to str atrd(atd poetn nr ihlitlonmn eoe






Glazedus enryoors flamnked by glze til EgpinclmswthLtscpt





PRooF:, Shope, Covering:ETC


~tl~L'C---r --- -- I -- -- ---


~Clar~-w-.


ARCHITECTURAL MERIT ANDINTEREST:DOSi
gned in 1910 b.y H. J. Klutho,

s


Flat, built up rooping. :

'-`- ** -- -- Cornice, Enves:
Projecting horizontal cornices with now removed galvanized'lozenge and quatrefoil frie
trim. Fanciful pair of giant brackets of Terra Cotta resembling inverted papal cross
filled with organic forms, ending in escutcheons of four concave sides.
Dorrners, Cupoins, Towrsr:


~ne








in Floor, former reading and storage rest rooms.

Second Floor ladies lounge Potentate's Office (sw), west Kit Facil. Former
Potentate's Office meeting room, auditorium (e).

Basement air raid shelter (e), rest rooms (w) plus storage.


~STAIRWAYS:
d'
Double stairs, each side of lobby.



FLOORING:
Mosaic ceramic tile in oriental rug pattern (lobby).
WALLA*ND CEILING FINISH:

Plaster. Wall mosaic of Egyptian lions. :



DOORWAYS AND DOORS:


Glazed entry doors (new). "


SPECIAL DECORATIVE FEATURES, TRIM AND CA BINE T WORK:
Mosaic, stained and gilded glass.



NOTABLE HARDWARE:
None noted in accessible areas.

MECHANI C AL EQUI PMEN T: (Hearing, Lighting and Plumbing Syareznls and Fixtures ol N'ote)
Unique stained glass chandelier in lobby and light fixtures at flanking entries.



SITE AND SURROUNDINGS
GENERAL SETTING: (Includinfi Orlentation by Compass Reading)
Urban setting. Original structure corner..Newnan and M'onroe. Oriented west 290 degrf


MIlSTORIC LANDSCAPE DESIGN:
NOne


OUTBUILDINGS:
Additions side and rear.




II Augusf, 1975

CONTINVUA TIONS: Any of the entries above may be continuedl on additional sheets.


PLANS: (Dy FlOOrs)
























































































































































































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Present Use:

Statement of
Significance:






PART I


- -Meeting hall; social facility


."Designed in 1910 by H. J. Klutho, Jacksonville's
most prominent early twentieth-century architect,
the Morocco Temple has a blending of Egyptian
Revival detailing -and Wfrightian massing unique in
his oeuvre; it is the home of the oldest chapter
'of Shriners in Florida.


HISTORICAL INFORMATION


219 Newnan Street, Jacksonville, Florida


Morocco Temple Association, Inc.


Present Owner:


Present Occupant: .


Membership of The Morocco Temple of the Ancient
Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine
for North America at Jack~sonv~ille, Florida.


A. Physical History:

1.Date of Erection: 1,910-1912 (Jackson interview).

2. Archi tect: H. J. Klutho (1873-1964). Klutho brought the form-
follows-function gospel of Louis Sullivan and the Prairie School stylistic
earmarks of Frank Lloyd Wright to Florida. Having studied at Wright's Oak
Park, Ill., studio around the turn of the century (Meister), Kluthe came
to Florida to rebuild "about $10 million" worth of Jacksonville's central
business district which had been destroyed in a fire in 1901. Between
1901 and 1920, during hiis most Chicago-School -influenced phase, he erected
scores of commercial buildings and prestigious residences throughout greater
Jacksonville. Before his death in 1964, he himself summed up his design
philosophy thus:

Most works of art or architecture are undoubtedly marked by the
influence of some master. I followed closely the work of many masters
in my time and feel that I was particularly influenced by both
Sullivan and Wright. I do not feel that I, in any way, became a
copiest-but do know that the-ir influence is evident in some of my
handiwork. However, I am sure that I displayed enough originality to
have my work dubbed Kluthoesque.

Design is of paramount importance. A project should be so designed
at to -indicate its function. A church, a school, a hospital, a public
building or an office building should each be recognizable as such, a
project should be made to harmonize with its environment, even to the
extent of altering the environment where practicable to produce the
harmonious whole. We can find suggestions and inspiration from creators
.of the past and present. We should study and profit by their experience
without allowing ourselves to ape them (Carry). -

Concerning his earlier, most original or historical work, he wrote:


"Our homes should
windows from the sun.
our rain~y season when


be built with overhanging eaves 'to shade the
It also allows the'windows to remain open during
rain is accompanied frequently by adiving w~indis.





Southern California has evolved a distinctive style and somehow
this style suits their climate.
We in Florida have three times as much rain fall as California
and longer summers.

A composite style consisting of a little Spanish mission and a
touch of Italian villa architecture would suit us far better than the
steep-roofed New England cottage styles with little overhang, small
windows and small porches. The same may be said of the colonial
t~ype. They simply don't fit in.
A ride through the state and its towns and cities show the same
monotonous and uninteresting buildings, both public and private; one
sees in any of the Northern and Middle Western cities, a regular
Sinclair-Lewis Main-Street architecture, stupid and uninteresting.

While this is difficult to change in the North and Middle W~est
because there the population is settled and has become used to it
for a century or more and so new developments are naturally slow.

But here in Florida where new towns spring up over night and
development is in its infancy a special effort should be made to
introduce a style of architecture better fitted to the environment.
More color should be used and all building material that looks dark
and sombre should be tabooed.

It should be so striking as to be distinctive and as such would
become a wonderful asset as an advertising factor for the state."
(Carry)
After about 1925, his works such as the Love-M~cGinnis Residence
(see HABS No. ) are less original, but still functional, betraying
a reliance on historical styles similar to that of the popular Palm Beach
architect Addison Mizner.

The Florida AIA had lauded his work, and if the Cohen's St. James
Building (see .HABS No. ) and the Germania Club alone of his oeuvre
received national notice, it has been suggested that this was solely due
to Klutho's relative isolation in the Deep South (Bussard). A monograph
on Klutho by Robert C. Borward of Jacksonville is forthcoming.

According to Clarke's Florida Biographical: Henry J. Klutho was born
at Breese, Illinois, March 19, 1873, a son of Theo and Anna (Moliter)
Klutho, the former landowner and lumber dealer. After acquiring his educatic
in the parochial school he further qualified for the practical duties of
business life by a course in a commerical college at St. Louis, where he
studied for a year and a half, his father believing a business career the
safest one. His experience in commerical circles, however, did not appeal
to him and proved that work of that character was not as congenial as he
believed it would be. Another writing of him said: "His tastes were
artistic and having a constructive mind building especially interested him.
He always viewed the operations of builders with more or less interest, and
one day while walking along one of the principal streets of St. Louis he
came to a huge building in the course of construction. Two of the men
employed thereon were holding between them the plans of the building and
were engaged in an animated conversation. As he looked at the drawings and
saw there every detail of the big building in miniature, conceived and all
worked out intellingently before even a stone was laid, he became forcibly
impressed with and attracted to the work, and he decided there and then to
become an architect."





by enrolling as a student in Schenk's Drawing Academiy. A year was devoted
to the study of architectural drawing and he then obtained practical
experience in architects' offices in St. Louis for three years. Then the
mecca to which all architectural students of the time turn beckoned him
and he went to New York to further qualify for his chosen profession. He
devoted four years to study and practical experience in the metropolis under
such eminent architects as Francis H. Kimball, Clinton & Russell, W. Wheeler
Smith and others and then traveled for a year abroad inh Italy, Germany,
France and London, studying and sket'ching. In 1899, he entered upon his
professional career in New York, and in June 1901, arrived in Jacksonville,
Florida, a month after the great fire which had laid waste to much of the
city. From the outset he was accorded a liberal clientage, his business
growing as he gave practical demonstration of his power to plan and construct
buildings that combine all the phases of utility, comfort, convenience,
and beauty. The evidence of his skill, knowledge and ability are seen in
a number of Jacksonville's most prominent structures, including the City Hall
the Board of Trade Building, the Public Library, the Young Men's Christian
Association Building, the Dyal-Upchurch Building, the Clark Building, many
of the finest residences and several churches. Moreover, he was the
architect of the first ten story, fire-proof building the beautiful
Shriners' Temple and Germania Club--all in Jacksonville. The design that
'will, however, stamp him as a genius in his line is the Cohen Brothers
Department Store and office building--considered by many to be a marvel of
-- architectural design and constructive ability surpassed by few in the
country. His professional skill and labor were called into requisition
in the erection of the governor's mansion at Tallahassee and the new public
library for the Stetson University at DeLand and other smaller buildings
throughout the state. He is likewise the architect of thie Young Men's
Christian Association Building and of the new one hundred and fifty thousand
dollar hotel at Waycross, Georgia. In his profession he studies every phase
of construction not only in the erection of buildings but also with regard
to their environment and surroundings, that the whole may be harmonious and
attractive.

His first design for Jacksonville, the Dyal-Upchurch Building mentioned
above, was the first bank and office building to be erected after the fire
in 1901; the YMCA of 1907, the first reinforced concrete building in the
state; the Bisbee Building 1908, the first reinforced concrete frame office
building in Florida. In 1922, he was asked to remodel the state capitol
and added twio wings, a lobby, and a marble stairway to the structure (Anon.
"H.3. Klutho, Deisgner of Skyline").

After loosing a great deal of.money trying to promote the motion picture
industry in Jacksonville, Klutho returned to architecture full time and
continued to practice until he was well into his 80's, far-exceeding the
goal of $10 million worth of building he had set himself~more .than half
a century earlier.

3. Original and Subsequent Owners: The structure designed
b~y Klutho lies on the parcel described as Block 9, lot 4 of Harts' Map
of Jacksonville, recorded in the Harts' Jacksonville deed book in the Office
of the Title and Trust Co. of Florida, 200 E. Forsyth St., J~acksonville,
Florida, as follows:

1910 Warranty Deed, March 31, 1910, recorded April 6, 1910, liber 66 folio 13;
lot 4, Block 94; passed from

William R. Steckert, trust


Mourocco Temple Associa~tion





Warranty Deed, November 17, 1955, recorded November 17, 1955, liber 1771
folio 227; lot 4, Block 94; passed from

Morocco Temple Association, a corporation


Morocco Temple Association, Inc., a corporation not for profit

4. Original Plans, Construction, etc.:i The original plans are
on microfiche file in the Building and Zoning Division Office, seventh
floor-City Hall, E. Bay St., Jax. No other original construction records
are known to be in existence (Jackson interview).

5. Additions and Alterations: In 1962, the building underwent
Its first major alteration when additions were made to it on the east and
south. The eastern section of the basement was made into an air raid
shelter, the rest rooms in the west, storage. The reading and storage
rooms above them on the main floor were made into rest rooms. On the second
floor, what is now the Potentate's office on the southwest was a Ladies'
Lounge, and has been subdivided, paneled, and set up with kitchen facilities
The former Potentate's room opposite it on the north has also been paneled
and is now a meeting room. The auditorium lying to the east had its
clerestory windows on the north and south blocked up with cinderblock
when the airconditioning system was installed. The auditorium ceiling
was also dropped 12", a standard Armstrong-type panel ceiling being
installed as part of the same renovation (Jackson interview). The windows
of the east elevation were blocked in when the extension adding candidates'
rooms, showers, and mechanical equipment housing was made. This extension
and the southern addition of a first floor ballroom were the design of A.
Eugene Cellar, AIA, of Jax. (Jackson interview). A cornice made of metal
in a Sullivanesque design and the Prairie School-style leaded glass on the
third floor were removed after 1956 (Broward), probably at the time of the
1962 renovation, as no other building permit is on file. In 1967, the
wooden window frames were removed and replaced with aluminum ones (Misc.
permit). James Fulcher of Orlando, Fla., is drawing plans to extend the
temple to tLhe east and to Adams St., and to split t~he auditorium height
into tw~o floors In Klutho's building at a total cost of $3.5 million.
This alteration is pending acquisition of funds and property (Jackson
interview).

8. Historical Events and Persons Associated with the Building:

History of the Morocco Temple: The Morocco Temple was founded
in 1888, just sixteen years after William M. Florence, assisted by Dr.
Walter M. Fleming, an eminent Arabic scholar, founded American mother
temple of the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine for
North America, the Mecca, in New York (Fretwell, p. 4). The Morocco,
chartered in June 25, 1888, was the forty-fifth American temple, and the
first in Florida; all of Florida, Georgia, and Alabama was in its original
jurisdiction (Ibid). The temple was first situated in the Herkimer Block,
Newnan and Bay Streets and then moved to Board and Forsyth.~ In order that
the present building might be erected, it was necessary to launch an
extensive fund-raising drive. A Shriners' festival was held from March 28
through April 2, 1910, featuring a live white baby camel, circus acts,
raffles, drawings, and professional animal acts (Fretwe'll, p. 6); "The
Florida Shriners' Spring Festival and HFippodromne" was most successful in
making money and arousing the interest of all Florida Shriners in a new
Temple Building. The selling of a few debenture bonds was not too difficult
and the Temple was started" (Fretwell, p. 7). The temple has continued to
grow in membership ever since (Jackson interview).








1. Primary Sources:


Plans: Eleven original sheets at 1/8 scale, including basement, first
floor, auditorium, balcony, and roof plans, four elevations sections,
and cross sections, on microfiche, are on file with Building and Zoning
Permit Division, City Hall, E. Bay St., Jax.

Old Views: The south elevation (Newnan St. front) is shown in a promotional
pamphlet on H. J. Klutho's works, dated 1941 contained in the Master Files
of the State of Florida's Office of Archives, History, and Records Managemen
Tallahassee, Florida; the view shows the structure before the cornice on
the front was removed and before the 1962 addition on the east and north.

Deed Books: Office of Title and Trust Co. of Fla., 200 E. Forsyth St.,
Jax.

Hisc.: Carry, Walter T. Unpublished paper in fulfillment of the
requirements of a six hour undergraduate thesis in architecture, University~
of Florida, Gainesville, Fla., undated, but prior to Klutho's death in
1964; containing biographical information, listings.of K~lutho's buildings,
and interviews with Klutho concerning his design philosophy. Copy in Jax.
Master Files, Office of Archives, History, and Records Management, Tallahasse
Florida.

Interviews:

Robert C. Broward, Pres. Jax. AIA, 1922 Felch Ave., Jax., 8/4/75, (Klutho
historian); concerning existence of original building records and alterations
to Klutho designs.

Lawrence Jackson, Building Administrator and Recorder for Morocco Temple,
219 Newnan St., Jax., 7/29/75; concerning existence of building records
and alterations to the Temple and history of local chapter.

2. Secondary Sources:

(a) Newsoapers:

Anon., "'H. J. Klutho, Designer of the Skyline, Dies", Florida Times-Union,
Jax., March 4, 1964, 27:1.

Anon., "Jacksonville and Duval County Builders", Jacksonville Journal,
March 21, 1924, 1:2.

Bussard, Dick, "Something to Remember", Jacksonville Journal, October 17,
1974, 84:1.

Meister, Charles, "No Greek Temples for Kluth~o: Jax. Architectural
Heritage Linked to Wright Tradition", Jacksonville Journal, August 29,
1957, 36:8.

(b) .Others:


Clarke, S. J., publisher. n -

















































































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By Cynthia Parks .
nimes-union staff writer
''The lotus-leaf capitals on the columns
of the new Morocco. iemple3,'19
N\ewnan SL, w~~ee 8exhqt reproductions
of tfhe columns~ on the .Temple of Isis in
Egypt, saiid the afternoon newspaper
The Metropolis in MWay, 191L .
The Nobles of the Mystic Shrine
celebrated with a grea..tylaradq through
town, and the paver contin~uedf aheut the
temple: "It is not only an ornament to ..
Jhloksoville-aild the state of ~Florida
Sbuit to the entire South, and adds luster
- to the. name of 11S. Kluthd thd
architect who has plannedi so many
Buildings that are a creiii~t to our city."
Well, that tempe which'i an
Sye ""Loledture and cAntrst ie

Shrinrs~r bought areage on St. Johns'-: -
Bluff Road. -
In the meabnwhile, Blair Reeves
professor of architecture for the
Eniversity of Florida and directoro t- --
the graduate program for architecturral ..
preservation, was looking for a project :
for 18 students. Reeves expressed his
hope'to Jacksonville architect Catherine
Lee, and Ms. Lee told Steve' Tool,- ~
director of Jacksonville Historic


Landmarks Commission.
Clearly, the stars were moving into a E
.benign position forbthe preservation of 'F
the remple:. I
On Nov. 22, 17 students gave ---- ---- :
20-minute presentations in the
Gainesville school of ar~chitecture, and
they suggester the temple be re-used as
a 16 sory hotel, a college of music siid '- f
Sa health center, among other things.
dii Wednesday, the stars may mocve_r c _
again.
Some 300 dleuelo`~ies have "beed'- --: :~~.
invited to the temple~ to see these
presentations, some built -oalouds,
some undiergirded wi~th steel, but all i~r:
~good for startingg the imnaging' o~n a
little bit," as Reeves says.
te enda and rpentaieC aft
at 0 am Teddevelloper oanhan
attend, can chat xfor~mally witht~~h'e
grad students and view their
..architectural re-use plans
Surely, out of that amalgam of brighti. ~ -- F
young talent and'thoughitful older --
n! money, the temple can shine again.
Students, of -course,- are not bound by 1
the meanness of dollars, and one idea

(See STUDEN'TS, Paea~~ C-11):


MEoroco


TemBple


Preservationa




































j


A:


II~ -I
L~RL~~F~11~6y-


The Morocco Temple (above)
with cornices as H.J. Klutho
designed it


- Special


















Colorful tile mosaic (left) on
stairway of the temple


(From Page C-1) -
ras an arts center with a library, gallery, studios,
courtyard with cafe and loft apartments for art-

However, the students worked in the' context of
city they came to know through meetings with
?e Downtown Development Authority 'and the
Its Assembly, and a Shriner's building they came
> known in a day of scrutiny. The arts center idea
ame from the temple's proximity to the Florida
'heater, the 2,000-seat movie palace being restored
y Arts Assembly.
Other re-use plans:
r/A mixed-use building two stories of shops
nd cafes, a third of office suites.
V A media center with studios for graphics art-
~ts.
V A YMCA with therapy for the handicapped on
re first floor, a ball court on the second and a hos-
!1 on a third floor.
V A corporate executive club with condos and
Entertainment facilities exclusively for those who
ave bought into it
V A holistic health center with spa, racquetbaH
ourts, health foods, a restaurant and sports shoap*
r/A school for the performing arts that would
se the second-floor auditorium for a dinner thea-
r and the first floor as a cooking school.
? Hotels ranging: In size from small to 16 stories.
Nearly every student re-use plan involved en-
treement with an atrium (a tribute to Atlanta ar-


chifect John Portman's ~y'atts) and skylights and
courtyards.
But their tribute to Klutho was respectfully mov-
ing the massive structures backward from that
firTst symmetrical 85-foot-wide temple with its hori-
zontal cornices. In 1962 the Shriners added a ball-.
room to the tem le, so that first balance is lost. Al-
so, the cornices facing Newnan and on the sides of
the first building were removed, skinning ff some
of that Prairie feel of horizontal planes. A the stu-
dents but one put the cornices back on.
The temple is on the National Register of Histor-
Ic Places. The students know that a 25-percent in-
vestment tax credit goes to the developer who re-
habilitates it, cleaving to that first Klutho look.
New constructions must be "compatible in scale,
building material and textures," read the stan
dards for rehabilitation from the U.S. secretary of
the interior. Even .on Interiors, developers are en-
couraged to use as much of the ori final material,
hardware! and architecture as possi le.
T'he task was not easy. Grad student Rhoda Law-
rence said, "Compatible design is pretty hard when
you are working on a building that makes such a
statement [as Klutho's does]."
Keith H~unnicut called the Morocco Temple "'an
outrageous building. Klutho thought it was an out-
rageous building. Therefore, I thought I could be
outrageous in my additions." H~unnicut sees the
temple as a college of music in an expansion of the
Florida Junior College program.
Reeves rather agreed with Hunnicut. "I don't if
Klutho had his tongue in his cheek when he de-
signed it, but he had fun."


Students suggest uLses fEor temple




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