Title: Grant and Lincoln Avenues : a development study
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102989/00001
 Material Information
Title: Grant and Lincoln Avenues : a development study
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: Bostetter, Jeff
Publisher: Jeff Bostetter
Place of Publication: Nantucket, Mass.
Copyright Date: 1985
 Subjects
Subject: Historic preservation
Nantucket, Massachusetts
Coordinates: 41.291568 x -70.107564
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102989
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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The development of the property on Grant and Lincoln Avenues on

the bluffs along Cliff Road began in the late nineteenth cen~tury.

Indi vi dual family summer houses were first built on Cliff Road. By

1881 Cabot Lane was formed running from Cliff Road out to the edge of

the bluff and bisected by Bank Street. Bank Street ran along the top

of the bluff and intersected Beach Avenue, which was paved with cobble

stones, and served as the only link between the beach and the to; of

the bluff.

The fi rst houses along Bank Street we re eighteenth centJr~y

structures moved from town and modified for use as summer cottages.

At the same time on the end of Lincoln Avenue, marked by the

rotary, a number of large late Victorian beach cottages were bu'1t.

Beyond this point a subdivision was planned by Henry Coffin called

Sherburne Bluffs which was never fully realized.

By the turn of the century the property along the bluff was lined

with houses and Bank Street was abandoned. The property on the inland

side of the street was also being developed.

A distinct neighborhood exists here which is centered on these

two streets and has carried forward into this century. This survey

focuses on the bluff side of Grant and Lincoln Avenues which serves as

a good example of the architectural development of individual farcil~y

summer houses on Nantucket in the late nineteenth and early twentieth

centuries.

Jeff Bostetter
Preservation Institute: Nantucket
Summer 1985













Grant Avenue Looking north-
east. Bluff on right of
picture. Hedges lining street
form enclosure for buildings and
help to unify streetscape in
this area.
















Lincoln Avenue Looking south-
west. Bluff and Nantucket sound
on far side of buildings.
Streetscape is more open in this
area, however, hedges are still
used to enclose property.














Beach Avenue Looking south-
east towards sound.






































1_1( _I_ __


LINE OF BL~IF~


ST~^S r0 ijCA~.(L


GRANT AND LINCOLN AVENUES: NANTUCKET MASS


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1. Number One Grant Ave.: Late 18th century, moved to
site from town late 19th century, early 20th
century additions and garage.
Traditional Nantucket heavy wood frame, two
story, shingled structure with neo-classical
elements.
Main structure has lean-to roof with shed dormer
and end chimneys. Three arched neo-classical
entrance porch. Enclosed one story, hip roof
porch on bluff side. One and one-half story
gabled e11, with gabled dormer, addition to rear
with central chimney, one story hip roof addition
adjacent to this, double sash six over six
windows and cornerboards.
One and one-half story shingled garage with
gabled roof and twin gabled domers.




2. Number One Grant Ave.: Traditional Nantucket heavy
wood frame, two story, shingle structure with
neo-classical elements, gabled end faces bluff.
Two ridge chimneys, contemporary wood deck
towards bluff, main entrance with pilasters and
cornice, double sash six over six windows,
corner-boards, and enclose neo-classical arched
recess.







3. Number Three Grant Ave.: Traditional Nantucket heavy
wood frame, one and one-half story, shingle
structure with late 19th century Gothic Revival
cottage elements.
Main structure has cross gable with shed dormers,
two end and one ridge chimneys with clay chimney
pots, a one story, hip roof open porch, and
Gothic Revival pointed arch windows. Two story
gabled and one story lean-to additions to rear,
with one ridge chimney, a variety of window
types, cornerboards, and lattice work.










4. Number Three Grant Ave: Late 18th century structure
moved to site in late 19th century.
Traditional Nantucket heavy wood frame, two
story, shingle structure with neo-classical
elements.
Main structure has wide cross gable with end
chimneys, enclosed hip roof porch, with two bays
left open, towards bluff, and shutters on second
story windows. One and one-half story gabled e11
with shed dormer and one story lean-to additions
to rear. Double sash six over six windows and
cornerboards. One story gabled contemporary
garage added to rear.
Two story gabled, detached garage with living
space on second story.









5. Number Five Grant Ave.: Two late 18th century
Structures moved to site from town in late 19th
century, early 20th century addition of garage.
Traditional Nantucket heavy wood frame, one and
one-half story shingle structure with
neo-classical elements.
Main structure has wide cross gable with central
chimney, hip roof bay window on second story, and
enclosed hip roof one story porch with three bays
left open towards bluff. One and one-half story
gabled ell addition with gabled dormers on rear
with one story gabled addition and garage
attached. Double sash six over six windows,
cornerboards, and arched entrances.






6. Number Seven Grant Ave.: Separated from number one
Lincoln Ave. in mid 20th century.
Traditional Nantucket wood frame, one and
one-half story, shingle structure with
neo-classical elements.
Main structure has gambrel roof with shed
dormers, one end chimney and a two story cross
gable addition toward the bluff.
Double sash six over six windows, cornerboards
and side pilasters on street entrance.
One story, gabled living unit at reads of
property.









5. Number Five Grant Ave.: Two late 18th century
Structures moved to site from town in late 19th
century, early 20th century addition of garage.
Traditional Nantucket heavy wood frame, one and
one-half story shingle structure with
neo-classical elements.
Main structure has wide cross gable with central
chimney, hip roof bay window on second story, and
enclosed hip roof one story porch with three bays
left open towards bluff. One and one-half story
gabled ell addition with gabled dormers on rear
with one story gabled addition and garage
attached. Double sash six over six windows,
cornerboards, and arched entrances.






6. Number Seven Grant Ave.: Separated from number one
Lincoln Ave. in mid 20th century.
Traditional Nantucket wood frame, one and
one-half story, shingle structure with
neo-classical elements.
Main structure has gambrel roof with shed
dormers, one end chimney and a two story cross
gable addition toward the bluff.
Double sash six over six windows, cornerboards
and side pilasters on street entrance.
One story, gabled living unit at reads of
property.



















7. Number One Lincoln Ave.: Rear of structure separated
in mid 20th century and moved to number seven
Grant Ave.
Traditional Nantucket wood frame, one and one-
half story, shingle structure with neo-classical
elements.
Main structure has gable roof with gable dormers,
central chimney, and open lean-to roof porch
towards bluff. One story gabled e11 addition to
rear. Double sash six over six windows and
cornerboards.








8. Number Three Lincoln Ave.: Built on Surf side Rd. in
late 18th century as farm house, moved to this
site in late 19th century, modified in early and
mid 20th century.
Traditional Nantucket heavy wood frame, two and
one-half story, wide course shingle structure.
Main structure has extended hip roof with long
shed dormer and lean-to open porch towards bluff,
and cross gable towards street, and one central
and one end chimney. One story gabled and one
story lean-to additions on rear. Double sash six
over six windows, cornerboards, shutters, and
side pilasters on main entrance.








9. Number Five Lincoln Ave.: Turn of century wood frame,
two and one-half story, shingle structure with
classic revival and late 19th century Victorian
elements.
Main structure is gabled with central chimneys
roof walk, gabled dormer and flat roof
projections on second story towards bluff,
enclosed one story hip roof porch with open ends
and doric columns towards bluff, side entry with
small gabled porch and doric columns, bay window,
and contemporary wood deck on side. Two story
hip roof addition on rear, cornice at roof lines,
double sash windows, diamond pane leaded glass
windows and shutters on upper stories.


















11. Number Eleven Lincoln Ave.: 18th century structure
moved to site in late 19th century.
Traditional Nantucket heavy frame, two and
one-half story, shingle structure.
Main structure has four bay facade and gable
roof. Central chimney, and a one story hip roof
open porch with brackets and paling balistrates.
Two story gabled e11 addition to rear with
central chimney and double sash twelve over
twelve windows.









10. Number Seven Lincoln Ave.: Turn of century wood
frame, two and one-half story, classic revival,
shingle structure.
Main structure is gabled with long shed dormer
towards bluff and series of one and two story
gabled additive pieces to the side and rear.
Open and enclosed porches with columns face
bluff, roof cornice, palladian window, entrance
with pediment and columns, two story octagon
corner piece. And roof walk, double sash six
over six windows, shutters, and two end and one
central chimneys.








12. Number Thirteen Lincoln Ave.: Two late 18th century
structures moved to site and joined in late 19th
century, with various 20th century modifications.
Traditional Nantucket heavy wood frame, two
story, shingle structure with neo-classical
elements.
Main structure has hip roof with central chimney,
roof walk, and broad, one story hip roof, open
porch towards bluff.
Two story, hip roof additions with central
chimneys to sides and rear, roof cornice.
Main entrance with side pilasters, cornice, and
shutters. Double sash eight over eight windows
with shutters one story open porch with hip roof
on side,and one story hip roof addition on rear.
One story hip roof structure at rear of property
with garage and living quarters.


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13. Number Fifteen Lincoln Ave.: Late 18th century
structure used as barn moved to site from below
bluff in early 20th century.
Traditional Nantucket heavy wood frame, one and
one-half story, shingle structure, with
neo-classical elements.
Main structure has gable roof, central chimney,
and shed dormers, one story open porch with
curved arch openings and lean-to roof, towards
bluff. One story gabled addition with gabled
projection to side, double sash six over six
windows, shutters,and cornerboards.








14. Number Seventeen Lincoln Ave.: Late 19th century
Victorian beach cottage with traditional
Nantucket elements, main structure gabled front
with gabled dormers. Blunt rear facade. One
story open porch with hip roof towards bluff.
Contemporary wood deck on side. One story, flat
roof projection on rear. Double sash window.
One and one-half story lean-to roof shed to rear
of property, two and one-half stories.













15. Number Twenty-One Lincoln Ave.: Late Victorian beach
cottage with traditional Nantucket elements.
Main structure has gable roof with cross gable
dormers, two and one-half stories, end chimneys,
and open, one story, hip roof porch towards
bluff. Two story gabled e11 and one story
lean-to on rear. Double sash windows and
shutters. One story gabled garage.











16. Number Twenty-Three Lincoln Ave.: Late Victorian
Main structure has gable roof with shed dormers,
two and one half stories, end chimney, open and
enclosed one story porch with lean-to roof
towards bluff, and gabled bay windows. Two story
gabled e11 and one story lean-to on rear, double
sash windows and shutters. One story gabled
garage.




















17. & 18. Number Twenty-Five Lincoln Ave.: One story, mid
20th century, contemporary, gable and hip
roof structures with some traditional
Nantucket elements, replacing late 19th
century beach cottages.
















SOURCES:

With thanks to: Mrs. Harold Braff
Mrs. George Dickenson
Mr. Woodson Houghton
Mr. Ward Reighley
Mr. Edwouard Stackpole
Mrs. Thomas G. Stanley
The staff at the Folger Museum,
Nantucket

Nantucket Yesterday and Today, John W. McCalley

The Arch of Historic Nantucket, Clay Lancaster

Building with Nantucket in Mind, J. Christopher Lang

Map 1923, Sanborn Map Co.
1881, Nantucket Town Map, Folger Museum

Photographs Matthew N. Dodds




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