• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Acknowledgement
 Foreword
 Table of Contents
 Statement of terminal project
 Research
 Program
 Design solution














Title: The NEFEC Center
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102988/00001
 Material Information
Title: The NEFEC Center
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: Gonzalez, Sergio Jr.
Publisher: Sergio Gonzalez, Jr.
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Copyright Date: 1978
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102988
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Title Page
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Acknowledgement
        Page 4
    Foreword
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Table of Contents
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Statement of terminal project
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Research
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
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        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Program
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
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        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
    Design solution
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
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THE NEFEC CENTER
Palatka, Florida



A Terminal Project by:

SERGIO GONZALEZ, JR.





In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements
for the Degree of Master of Arts in Architecture








This Document is the Property of the
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida



Spring 1978


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A mi amantisima esposa, Genoveva, 0
y a mi adorado hijo Sergito,

por los miles de sacrificios,
por la motivaci6n y el apoyo,
por el amor, -
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eternamente agradecido,
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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
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I would like to express my most sincere appreciation and gratitude to the

following persons for giving me their time and cooperation in preparing this terminal Q

project:

John F. Gaines, Putnam County School Superintendant

0. B. Hendrix, Director N.E.F.E.C. C

Dr. Leonard Pellicer, Director T.E.C.

Carol Pittman, Coordinator of Mandated Programs

F. Blair Reeves, F.A.I.A., Professor, Committee Chairman and Director

of the Preservation Program

Harold Kemp, A.I.A., Professor, Committee Member

George Scheffer, Professor, Committee Member


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FORWARD (-


As a graduate architecture student specializing in architectural preservation at the

University of Florida, I was required to prepare a report on the regional architectural history
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of a city.

I elected the City of Palatka due to its importance in Florida's history and because .

little research had been done on the architecture of the area. Through my research I became CU

well acquainted with the character of the city and its architectural history. A copy of this

report is available at the Palatka Public Library.

During this period I was searching for a potential site to use for a terminal design

project. This project would serve as a final requirement for a Master's Degree in Architecture.

In searching I came across two adjacent sites located in the central area of Palatka.

The first site, on Seventh and Eighth Streets, between Laurel and Oak Streets, is approximately

300' x 300' in dimension. On this site there is a well-preserved Spanish Revival building which

until recently was used as a school. The building is known as the Campbell Elementary School. WJ

Presently the building is being remodeled to house the new offices of the Putnam County School (1)

Board. _C


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The site next to it, on Eighth and Ninth Streets also between Laurel and Oak Streets,

is approximately 300' x 300' in dimension. It was once the site of the Davis Tank Factory 0
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long ago demolished. Today it remains as an empty site. C

Seeing the potential for development in this area, I proceeded to contact the School )

Board, owners of the site, for the purpose of investigating its future plans for the area.

In a meeting with John F. Gaines, Putnam County School Superintendant, it was expressed

that there were no immediate plans for expanding once located in their new remodeled facilities. 0

However, a building being planned that could be located in the area was the new offices of +-

the North East Florida Educational Consortium (NEFEC).

The North East Florida Educational Consortium is composed of several County school boards,

the Palatka School Board being one of its members. Their purpose is to pool together all their
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resources in planning and adopting educational programs.

I immediately expressed my interest in this project and made a proposal to the School

Board to develop a program and architectural solution for the Consortium as my terminal project.

The School Board was very receptive and approved my proposal. )

The contents herein are my proposed program and architectural solution for the new

facilities of the North East Florida Educational Consortium.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Acknowledgments . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . 3
Forward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Table of Contents .................. ........ 6
Statement of Terminal Project . . . . . . . . ... . . . 8
Scope of Project . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . 9

SECTION I: RESEARCH

State of Florida . . . . . . . . ... . . . 11
City of Palatka . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Palatka Central Area . . . . . . . .. . . .13
Brief History of Putnam County . . . . . . . .. 14
Brief History of Palatka . . . . . . . . . . 16
Climate . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . 20
Resources . . . . . . . . ... . . .... . 21 0
Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Forestry . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Minerals . . . . . . . ... ... . .23
Agriculture . . . . . . . . . .... . 23 (D
Palatka's Development Trends . . . . . . . . .. 24
Map: Development Factors . . . . . . . . .. 26
Land Use Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Description of the Plan for Commercial Land Use . . . ... .28 (-c)
Utilities . . . . . . . ... . . .. . . 30
Water System . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Description of the Plan for Streets and Highways . . . .. 32
Highways . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 I__
Growth Trends, City of Palatka . . . . . . . .. 34
Table: Population Growth . . . . . . . . . 35 -
Table: Population Projections . . . . . . . 36 C)
Structure of the Palatka Economy ............... 37 (0
Code of Ordinances, City of Palatka, Florida . . . ... .38 (D
Zoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Off-Street Parking and Loading Regulations . . . ... .48


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SECTION II: PROGRAM 0

North East Florida Educational Consortium/Teacher
Education Center . . . . . . . .... ... . 52
Board of Directors . . . . . . . . . .. 52 0
Historical Background . . . . . . . . ... 52
NEFEC/TEC--What? Why? . . . . . . . . . . 53
Objectives . . . . . . . ... . . . . 54
Progress to Date . . . . . . . . ... .... .. 55
New Directions . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Organization . . . . . . . . . . ... . . 57
Goals for 1978 . . . . . . .... . . . . 58 0
Functions NEFEC Center . . . . . . . . ... ... 60
I. Consortium . . . . . . . . . . . 60 -
II. Media Center . . . . . . . . ... ... .63 MD
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SECTION III: DESIGN SOLUTION

Pictorial Views . . . . . . . . ... .... .. 82
Schematic Design Drawings . . . . . . . .... .105 T
Model Photographs . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Preliminary Estimate . . . . . . . . .. . ..122 rc

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STATEMENT OF TERMINAL PROJECT
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Terminal project for Master's of Arts in Architecture in the Architectural Preservation

Option.
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Terminal Project

This project is intended to summarize undergraduate general education in Architecture c1

and graduate specialization; a continuance of research, programming, solution, explanation and 0
documentation of an architectural project. In the Architectural Preservation option, the student

will be expected to demonstrate his professional proficiency through the design of a contemporary )
building in a fixed environment significant for its architectural or historical values.
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SCOPE OF PROJECT

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The scope of this terminal project deals with a contemporary architectural design for
the North East Florida Educational Consortium. Their main offices are located in Palatka,
Florida. u
In order to meet their increasing need for space and for modern facilities the Consortium

has begun planning its future expansion.
My proposal to locate their future facilities at the site adjacent to the old Campbell 0

Elementary School site has been accepted with a great amount of encouragement. -
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This new facility would provide a stimulus for the revitalization of the downtown area (
and in particular those buildings within the immediate vicinity of the site.
It would also bring together two vital functions of the Putnam County Education System, (

one being the School Board, which is in the process of moving into the old Campbell Elementary cj

School, and the Consortium.
In order to tie these functions into the existing community I am proposing public (0

participation into the project by means of recreations grounds, walkways and a low-scale park. _

This would create greater acceptance of this project in the area. 4u


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BRIEF HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY _


Putnam County, Florida (Palatka, County Seat), heart of Northeast Florida, located 55

miles south of Jacksonville on the St. Johns River, was organized January 13, 1849, from parts

of Alachua, Baker, Clay, Marion, Orange and St. Johns Counties and named for Major Benjamin

Alexander Putnam, St. Augustine, prominent attorney and distinguished second Seminole War

Officer. The county has about 100 miles of St. Johns River frontage and claims around 1,500

lakes. It embraces large parts of what was known as "Fruitland" in early days where about half 0

of the wild orange acreage in Florida was discovered. Hart's Late and Dancy's tangerines were

the first county grown citrus. (

The county is bisected into east and west portions by the St. Johns River and its tribu-
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taries. The county contains about 800 square miles of land area and 76 square miles of water

area. Eighty percent of the land area is in the St. Johns River valley with the remaining

20 percent in the central highland. Elevation ranges from 10 feet to 200 feet above sea -

level. The area east of the river is basically flatland with the area west being rolling sandy 0

hills. In the southern portion of the county the St. Johns River widens and forms numerous small _

lakes and low swamps. -

Originally Putnam County was covered by a dense stand of forest. The hilly area, C
the well-drained terraces at that portion of the flats which was not waterlogged
supported valuable pine trees, especially longleaf and slash pines. The ravines
and bottom lands were covered with hardwood hammocks. Today, due to man's careless- -
ness, a secondary forest growth of little value predominates. . The soils of
the country range from barren, dry sands to rich muck and peat. The latter are 4
usually too wet for cultivation. Outside of these the best soils are only of fair 0
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fertility. The hammock and the forests are reported to abound in game. Some
of the lakes and the rivers are rich in fish.*





























*Putnam County and Palatka, Florida Historical Data, published by the Putnam County
Chamber of Commerce, 1100 Reid Street, Palatka, Florida.


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BRIEF HISTORY OF PALATKA
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First Palatka history is found in Bartram's Travels, published in 1769; Bartram ()

describes it as an Indian settlement of some eight or ten habitations whose people tilled
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several hundred acres planted in corn, beans, squash, tobacco, melons and other fruit and (

vegetables. A large orange grove was situated at the upper end of the village near the

St. Johns River Bank. The elusive and heavenly blue wildflower called Bartram's Ixia, which

William Bartram wrote about in his book, grows in some areas of Putnam County. Frances 0

Brown, whose hobby is wildflowers, first found Bartram's Ixia here in 1952. Copies of

Bartram's Travels are found in the Palatka Library. (
Pilatka-Florida--a Seminole Indian word meaning the "Crossing Over" or "Cow's

Crossing," was the original local community name. The name was changed to Palatka in the )

1870s upon the petition of the local citizens to the U.S. Post Office Department. Palatka

was once known as the "Gem City of the St. Johns."

The earliest white settler in Pilatka was James Marver, a trader who stood in high

favor with the Indians. He, with two companions, Hines and Woodruff, came here in 1820,
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a year after Florida was ceded to the United States from Spain. Together they purchased

certain Spanish grants and established a trading post on the river front. They transacted C(

a large business with the Indians who came here in great numbers for supplies and to

barter their hunting spoils and to hold periodical canoe races on the river.

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This trading post was located where the ACL Railway freight station stood on the river

bank at the foot of Main Street. It was transferred to B.C. Copp, a young army officer, and 0
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from him to Dr. Nehemiah Brush, who, with his two nephews Thomas and William Brush, conducted

the business and maintained the trade with Indians until the breaking out of hostilities which (

became the Seminole War.

The Federal Government established a military post at Palatka in 1837, under command CJ

of General Worth. For several years during the hostilities with Seminole Indians, the town

was under military control. The post was successively commanded by General Winfield Scott,

General Gaines, General Taylor and Lt. Wm. T. Sherman. c

Palatka first acquired legal existence through a charter granted by the State Legis-

lature on January 8, 1853, upon petition of Isaac N. Bronson, an associate justice of the

Supreme Court, then resident of Palatka.

Wm. Dunn Mosely, whose remains now lie in West View Cemetery, served as Florida's -

first governor. President Tyler, on March 3, 1845, affixed his signature to a document

admitting Florida as a state. They named John Branch as governor, set an election date

on May 26, 1845, and Mosely was elected. The original Mosely home still stands at Palatka

in Forest Park.

Before the Civil War, Palatka was a Port of Entry, George Lucas and R. R. Reid (

having been the collectors. Schooners from Maine plied the St. Johns to Palatka bringing c


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loads of ice and returning with cotton and syrup. Smith's ice house then stood at the foot
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of Lemon Street on the Griffin Building site, now offices of the Florida Power & Light Co.

The first Protestant church in Palatka was St. Mark's Episcopal, built in 1852.

The building was occupied during the Civil War by Federal troops. Before 1860, Presbyterian, (

Methodist, Catholic and Baptist Churches were built. A small log house, used as a powder

magazine during the Seminole Wars of 1835, was on the site of the Presbyterian Church and

was used for church services until the present one, a memorial to the wife of Robert Lennox (

Kennedy of New York, was built. The log building was moved across the street and was the

ticket office for the J. T. and K. W. Railway. )

During the Civil War, Palatka was under fire of gunboats on the St. Johns River.

At one time, the city was occupied by 5,000 federal troops. The Times-Herald merged with )

the Palatka Daily News, January 1, 1958, was the oldest newspaper in this area of Florida,

founded in 1868 by G. W. Pratt.

In 1855, Col. Hubbard L. Hart brought and operated the stage line between 6

Palatka and Tampa. The same year, H. A. Gray started the first line of barge freighters--
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on the Ocklawaha River, propelled by blacks with poles. Three weeks was the required

time between Palatka and Silver Springs. From 1860 to 1919 the Hart Line steamers operated

daily through the winter season from Palatka to Silver Springs; also between Palatka and

Leesburg through the years as freight boats. A disastrous fire swept the business section _

of Palatka in November 1884, and only the courthouse and its records were saved.
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Many famous national figures have wintered in Palatka and among them were Josh --

Billings, Wm. Cullen Bryant, Sidney Lanier, Henry Ward Beecher, Jay Gould, John W. Gates, 0

Isaac Elwood, James R. Mellon, John Jacob Astor, Ben Butler and Harriett Beecher Stowe.

Gen. Ulysses S. Grant visited here after his term of office in the Presidency. President

Grover Cleveland and his wife spent their honeymoon here.

In the early days a visit to Palatka was not complete without a ride on Will CO

Livingston's street car, which was drawn by a mule, met all trains and took visitors to

Palatka Heights for a view of the city and the St. Johns River. Aside from historical

lore in which the community is steeped, points of interest now include Larimer Memorial @1
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Building given to the city by James R. Mellon, famous Pittsburgh banker, as a memorial to

his wife in 1930 and in which the Palatka Library is located; the Putnam Memorial Bridge

completed in 1927, a memorial to Putnam County's World War I Veterans. The site of Ft.
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Shannon of Seminole War fame is now occupied by the U.S. Post Office. There are other

public and private historically famous buildings.*
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*Putnam County and Palatka, Florida Historical Data, Putnam County Chamber of Commerce, --
1100 Reid Street, Palatka, Florida.
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CLIMATE

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The climate is temperate. There is an abundance of sunshine and monthly mean tempera-

tures range from 58.5 degrees in January to 82.4 degrees in July. Summer temperatures of (

over 100 degrees are rare and winters are mild with only a few chances for below freezing

temperatures.

The climate is kept mild by the presence of the numerous bodies of water in the area

of which the St. Johns River is the most important. Slight variations in temperature do

occur between the river valley area and the highland area. This is because of the absence

of bodies of water in the northwestern portions of the county.

Average rainfall is about 55 inches per year with the greatest amounts occurring

during the summer rainy season which produces almost daily thunderstorms.
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Since the county is inland from the ocean it is not subject to the damaging salt air.

Tropical storms are not considered a major hazard since the overland movement of the storms

reduces severely.
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RESOURCES -

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Water C

The St. Johns River is the most important natural resource in the region. The

numerous lakes that connect into the river system are also very important to the region. )

From the earliest times the water systems provided the inhabitants of the area with food,

transportation and an abundant water suppy.

Fishing on the waters of the St. Johns and its connecting lakes has been plentiful -)

since the time Indians first inhabited the region. During the late 1800s and early 1900s the

commercial fishing industry was doing well. Catfish, shad, bream and herring were the chief )

commercial fish. Today sport fishing is very popular throughout the region but commercial

fishing has declined due to water pollution and economic factors. )

The St. Johns River and the connecting lake system was the major source of trans- (1

portation to the early development of the region. Early settlers explored the region by

the river route. Military outposts were established at points along the river so that )

would be easily accessible. The first real industrial interests, lumber and naval stores,

were located on the river since logs could easily be floated to the mills. Supplies such as

ice, finished furniture and special items always came into the region from northern states

by way of the river. Tourists also arrived from northern cities on ships. Today the

river and lake system is mainly used for recreational purposes and a transportation medium

is of secondary importance. 0
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The abundant amount of fresh water in the region has been a major factor in the -

development of cities and towns. Cheap and plentiful water has been important to the C

establishment and growth of industry and agriculture. Water supply has made both

businesses successful. 0


Forestry

Ever since the earliest records of history Putnam County's economic development

was closely linked with its forest resources. Citrus, truck crops and tourists stole 0

the show during the eighties and nineties but only the forests could cushion the shock

of the "Big Freeze." It was for the exploitation of the lumber and naval store resources ()

that most of the railroads were constructed. Earlier, wood was the fuel used by the

steamboats.

Unfortunately, the forests were considered as mines and they were ruthlessly

exploited. Without thought of reforestation the fine stands of pines were clear-cut.

As a result, mostly in the western part of the county there are almost 87,000 acres of E

dominantly blackjack and turkey oak woods. What pine forests are left consist usually _

of young secondary growths.. The story of cypress is even more depressing. -

Still forest and potential forest land dominate the county. The dry land area

of the county is 476,575 acres of which 407,502 are classified as forest lands.
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Minerals
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The county is well-endowed with earth minerals. In the western half of the region

within a roughly triangular areawith its apex near Kinsley Lake (Clay County) and its base

extending from Hawthorn (Alachua County) to southeast of Interlachen there are large

deposits at Florahome. Common clay of some commercial value occurs around Rice Creek which

has been used for brick production in the past.


Agriculture

The soils and climate of the region have always proved beneficial for agricultural
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activities. Since earliest recorded times agriculture has been successfully practiced in 7

the region. Early crops were corn, tobacco and small vegetables. The Spanish introduced

citrus. By 1860, the first commercial orange groves were in operation and by 1890 citrus

was a major industry. As citrus died out after the great freeze of 1894-95, vegetable

crops such as potatoes and cabbage became dominant. Low lands were drained which made the

muck and peat land usable. Today the county is part of the famous Hasting farm area.

Cabbage and potatoes are the largest crops with commercial nurseries and citrus interests

also producing.






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PALATKA'S DEVELOPMENT TRENDS --
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An analysis of existing conditions and anticipated growth indicates a number of UJ)

development factors which must be considered in long-range planning for Palatka (see
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Development Factors map): U

*The incorporated city can expect a population increase of nearly

5,200 persons by 1985; the urban fringe will increase by nearly

6,600 persons 0

*The area's economy will shift toward greater service employment

*Through traffic will increase on Highways 17, 19, 20, and 100 C

*The city will increasingly become the employment center for the

surrounding rural areas E)

The long-range land use implications of these emerging trends can be summarized as

follows:

*The greatest amount of new growth will take place outside the City 0

of Palatka in the unincorporated area where no urban services or

development controls now exist such as zoning, building codes, and

subdivision regulations M

*The greatest development problem facing the city will be the re-

vitalizing of substandard and deteriorated areas C

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*Demand will increase for higher density development in the

central area around the downtown and along the St. Johns River 0

*As population grows, demand for retail and office space will
increase steadily. The amount which will be constructed inside 0

the existing city will depend in large part on the extent of

downtown redevelopment CO

*The expected increase in through traffic in the Palatka urban

area will generate harmful strip commercial areas along Crill

Avenue, State Road 19 and U.S. 17, unless prevented by land use (1

controls

*As the city grows, its image will be critically influenced by
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the type, quality, density, and location of each new structure
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*Development sprawl outside the incorporated city could produce -M

severe problems in the future. To abate this condition, con-
solidation of the Palatka Urban Area into one governmental unit,

or extensive annexation, should be considered*

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Comprehensive Development lan, May 1968, by Adley Associates, Inc.
*Comprehensive Development Plan, May 1968, by Adley Associates, Inc. 4-J
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LAND USE ANALYSIS

Present-day Palatka is the result of innumerable individual decisions made over
many decades. Consequently, as the City grew larger and these decisions affected the
well-being of more and more people, it became imperative that the City study these
decisions and their impacts and set its own course according to the best interest of
all citizens.*




















*Comprehensive Development Plan May 1968, by Adley Associates, Inc.


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DESCRIPTION OF THE PLAN FOR COMMERCIAL LAND USE --

0
By existing standards, the expected growth and development in the Palatka area will Cf)

require approximately sixty to one hundred acres of additional commercial land, according

to these principles:

*Limit new establishments along Highways 17, 19, 20 and 100 to

prevent strip commercial development, and require parallel access

roads where commercial development does occur

*Enhance existing, well-designed commercial areas

*Develop the downtown area as the regional shopping center (C

*Encourage compact commercial areas with greater convenience

and drawing power (

Palatka is the major commercial center for a growing rural trade area and has the C

potential to support one large regional retail shopping center. Until recently, downtown

Palatka served adequately as this regional center, despite very little commercial development 0

inside the city during the past decade. Today, however, downtown drawing power has been -

diluted by two outlying neighborhood shopping centers, Westgate and Azalea Plazas, and the Cn

potential for one regional center has been critically reduced. It is recommended that

immediate action be taken by downtown property owners and merchants to redevelop the down-

town area into a modern regional center which can provide convenience and the variety

of goods demanded by the trade area. Q
-__________________________________________________C Z









The developing strip commercial area between Westgate Shopping Center and Highway
19 and Highway 20 should be planned with a parallel access road on each side of a 100-foot
right-of-way. This will improve accessibility to the commercial establishments and protect
the traffic carrying capacity of the street for the residential areas to the southwest.
New commercial developments along Reid Street should maintain adequate off-street
parking to reduce congestion.*






















*Comprehensive Development Plan, May 1968, by Adley Associates, Inc.


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UTILITIES
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The existing Sewerage Treatment Plant, designed to accommodate 2.5 to 3 million
C
gallons of sewage per day, is treating only one million gallons. Only primary treat- 0

ment is provided,however, a secondary treatment will have to be added by 1970 as a

requirement of the State Board of Health and the St. Johns River Valley Advisory Commission.

Although the present site is adequate for expected expansion, it is recommended that a

new outfall into the main channel be constructed by piping the effluent underground into

the main channel of the river. It is also recommended that a comprehensive water and

sewer study be undertaken jointly by the city and county in the Palatka Urban Area and East

Palatka to determine the best method of estimating future demands on the collection -0

system.*


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*Comprehensive Development Plan, May 1968, by Adley Associates, Inc. L_









WATER SYSTEM


The existing water system, an inefficient operation which has been remodeled

numerous times in the past, is in need of major renovation, with supplementary pumping

capacity and water softening treatment to remove the high iron content of the water.

Old mains must be replaced and new elevated storage capacity added.

It is recommended that considerable study be given to the long-range water needs

of the community and to the construction of a modern plant west of the city, centrally

located in the future growth areas.*





















*Comprehensive Development Plan, May 1968, by Adley Associates, Inc.


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DESCRIPTION OF THE PLAN FOR STREETS AND HIGHWAYS


The proposed network of state highways, major, secondary and minor streets provide

the framework for the total Palatka Urban Area. The street and highway system must provide

interneighborhood access as well as intracounty and through traffic movement.

Two major traffic problems face the City today: inadequate access to the downtown

area from the growing southwest section, and inadequate routes for through traffic. Further

complications arose from construction of the Azalea Plaza Shopping Center in an area where

congestion is most severe, and an old street system which did not anticipate the westward

urban expansion.*


*Comprehensive Development Plan, May 1968, by Adley Associates, Inc.


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HIGHWAYS
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The proposed highway system includes two east-west and two north-south four-lane, C/)

controlled-access arteries.
0
The east-west improvements include the present new bridge on Reid Street and (

upgrading the remainder of the street by eliminating curb parking, closing some inter-

secting streets, and phasing control devices to improve traffic flow. Parallel access

roads should be constructed from the triangle westward to insure good traffic flow and 0
+---
access to the proposed industrial areas.

Crill Avenue, one of the most important internal arteries in the Palatka Urban (0
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Area, requires major improvement. The section of Crill Street within the City should be

widened to a minimum of four moving lanes and one stacking lane. A new alignment should l)

be made for the extension of Crill Street from Diana Drive to River Road. Wherever

possible, abutting residential streets should be made into cul-de-sacs or dead ended to

eliminate access. Outside the City, Crill Street west of Palm Avenue (Highway 20) should 0

be four lanes with parallel access roads. New subdivisions along Highway 20 should front

on interior streets, rather than on the highway.*

SO
(1)

*Comprehensive Development Plan, May 1968, by Adley Associates, Inc.

0
______________________________C








GROWTH TRENDS, CITY OF PALATKA --
0
Palatka is one of the oldest cities in Florida. Incorporated in 1851, it was the (C
C_
sixth largest city in the state after Jacksonville, Pensacola, Key West, St. Augustine,
and Tallahassee. Prior to the Civil War, Palatka was a small community revolving around (
cypress log milling. Following the Civil War, the port facility of Palatka became one
of the most active along the East Coast and the little community began a period of rapid C
growth. The twenty years from 1870 to 1890 were the greatest growth period in the City's
history. During this time, steamboat activity along the St. Johns River substantially Mj
increased and Palatka became the distribution center for a large hinterland. This period
of prosperity ended with the development of the railroad systems, and from 1890 to 1910,
the economyof the area was disrupted, and population growth nearly came to a halt (see
Table 1).*

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*Comprehensive Development Plan, May 1968, by Adley Associates, Inc. L_
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Table 1

POPULATION GROWTH--PALATKA, FLORIDA
1860-1966

Increase over Preceding Census
Year Population Number Percent

1967 12,260 1,232 11.2%

1960 11,028 1,852 20.2%

1950 9,176 2,036 28.5%

1940 7,140 640 9.8%

1930 6,500 1,398 27.4%

1920 5,102 1,323 35.0%

1910 3,779 478 14.5%

1900 3,301 262 8.6%

1890 3,039 1,423 88.1%

1880 1,616 1,003 124.4%

1870 613

Source: Compiled by Adley Associates from U.S. Census of Population.
Population estimate by Adley Associates, June 1, 1967.


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POPULATION PROJECTIONS:
City of Palatka, Putnam
County, Florida Crown,
State of Florida


10,000,000
8,000,000
6,000,000

4,000,000


2,000,000


1,000,000
800,000
600,000

400,000


200,000


100,000
80,000
60,000

40,000



20,000


Source: Compiled by Adley Asso-
ciates from U.S. Census
of Population 1967-1985
Estimates by Adley
Associates


10,000
8,000
6,000
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STRUCTURE OF THE PALATKA ECONOMY

The present Palatka economy is heavily oriented to wood product manufacturing

including paper, paper products and furniture. Although these activities dominate the

economy, there is evidence that other activities are challenging their dominance.

In the sixteen-year period between 1950 and 1966, the City of Palatka added 1,009

nonagricultural employees for a 28.6% gain. Manufacturing employment gained only about

21.4%, but other private nonfarm activities gained 31.8% and the government work force

went up by nearly 30.5%.

Manufacturing's share of Palatka's total nonagricultural employment dropped between

1950 and 1966 from 29.7% despite a substantial absolute gain in the number of workers to

27.9%. This has resulted from two main factors: the leveling off of wood product

manufacturing employment and the sharp shift to service enterprises. This shift is a

national phenomenon reflecting the steady increase in consumer service demands, but the

heavy local gains in service enterprises also represent a change in the nature of the

economy--the addition of a new dimension of economic activities as the Palatka urban

area expands.

In addition to manufacturing, one other sector of the Palatka economy--construction--

showed a relative loss in its share of private nonmanufacturing employment. Retail and

wholesale trade employment remained nearly constant. Increases were noted in finance, insur-

ance, and real estate, while other services also gained in total employment.


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CODE OF ORDINANCES, CITY OF PALATKA, FLORIDA
Zoning

The present zoning area of the proposed facilities for the North East Florida /

Educational Consortium is designated as "C-2", which reads as follows:


C-2 General Commercial District:

Within the C-2 General Commercial District, as shown on the official zoning map

of the City of Palatka, the following regulations shall apply:
C)
(1) Uses permitted--land and structures shall be used only for the following purposes:

a. Any use permitted in the C-1 District as described in Section 7(1) hereof:

*Apartments, located above the first floor of a business use

permitted in this district

*Athletic clubs and health studios

*Art museums and auction rooms

*Banks

*Bakeries, where all goods are sold on the premises at retail
H-
*Self-service and coin-operated car wash establishments where no
--'
gasoline or service is provided C/

*Business, music, dance, or commercial schools (

*Dry cleaners employing facilities for not more than 1,000 pounds

of dry goods per day and using non-inflammable and non-toxic

cleaning agents





*Electrical appliance sales shops and repair

*Drug stores -
*Electrical transformer or gas regulator station, if essential 0
CO
for service to the zoning district in which it is proposed they

be located provided that: 0
1. The structures are placed not less than fifty

feet from property lines C0

2. The structures are of low silhouette and enclosed C

by a decorative solid masonry wall at least

eight (8) feet high
O
3. No vehicles or equipment are stored on the premises

4. The lot is suitably landscaped -
(1)
*Frozen food lockers

*Florist shops and greenhouses for retail trade only

*Funeral homes

*Furniture stores

*Grocery, fruit, or vegetable stores

*Hardware stores (
*Indoor theatres and auditoriums 0)

*Launderettes and laundromats
+--
*Meat markets or poultry stores if no slaughter or stripping is involved
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*Municipal buildings including city halls, libraries, and fire -

stations 0
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*Offices C_

*Pet shops or animal hospitals when conducted wholly within the
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permanently enclosed building

*Photographers' or artists' studios
C
*Retail stores and personal services, but expressly excluding those C)

uses listed separately in the C-2 district and M-1 district

*Shopping centers

*Signs relating to the name and use of the store or premises on which

it is located. Such signs shall either (1) be attached to the

building with no portions of the sign projecting more than one foot
cO
from the structure, or (2) be located no nearer to the street than T

the required set-back for this district and at least ten feet above

ground level. If illuminated, such signs shall not produce any

flashing or intermittent-type light that would create a safety or

traffic hazard for vehicles using the public streets, alleys, roads,

or thoroughfares of the City. All such signs erected under this

provision shall conform in all other respects to the requirements ._

of the City Sign Ordinance.

C-






_D

*Taverns and retail sale of alcoholic beverages -4-

*Tailor and dressmaking shops C
CL
*Telephone Exchange Building C

*Temporary buildings incidental only to construction of a permitted use C

*Service stations (conditional use permitted)

Any use permitted in the R-3 District as described in Subsection 5(1) hereof:
C
*Multiple family residential structures, including apartments,

cooperatives, and condominiums having no commercial businesses

connected therewith, but equipped to serve meals to their tenants

*Medical and dental clinics when located on a major street
*Professional and public offices when located on a major street
(D
*Clubs, lodges, and fraternal organizations when located on

a major street _)

*Libraries
0
*Nursing homes when built to the requirements of the State Board

of Health and located on a major street

*Convalescence facilities when built to the requirements of the id

State Board of Health and located on a major street C

*Wall signs conforming to the provisions of this ordinance

*Hospitals (conditional uses permitted)
C)








*Cemeteries (conditional uses permitted)

Any use permitted in the C-IA District as described in Subsection 6(1) hereof:

*Convenience retail business or services, providing that no estab- /)

lishment contains more than 2,400 square feet of floor space and L

the architectural appearance of the structure does not detract (

from the residential character of the surrounding area, and is

located on a major street. Fast-food establishments and drive-in (

restaurants are not considered as convenience retail businesses C

*Barber and beauty shops -

*Medical, dental and other professional offices

*Hospitals, excluding animal hospitals

*Prescription and apothecary stores when located within the ()

same structure as a medical clinic

*Typical Minit Markets and 7-11 Stores

*Laundry and dry cleaning pickup stations (

*Dance studios and permanently enclosed commercial recreation --

establishments

*Flower shops Cu

*Shoe repair
C-
*Tailoring shops
Watch and jewelry repair
-Watch and jewelry repair O


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*Wall signs conforming to the requirement of the City Sign Ordinance

Any use permitted in the R-l District as described in Subsection 3(1) hereof:
U)
*Home occupations (

Any use permitted in the R-1A District as described in Subsection 2(1) hereof: 0

*Carports

*Churches (conditional uses permitted): with their attendant education C
C
and recreation buildings and off-street parking area

*Schools, colleges and universities, both public and private (con-

ditional uses permitted)

*Farming not involved with livestock (conditional uses permitted)

Any use permitted in the R-IAA District as described in Subsection 1(1) hereof:
C)
*Single family dwelling with garages

*Customary accessory buildings and structures excluding carports (9

exposed to streets
0
*Disaster shelters

*Private boat houses, docks and slips _,

*Temporary buildings used for construction purposes for a period

not exceeding the duration of the building permit (

*Real estate signs not exceeding four (4) square feet, appertaining (

to the lease, rental or sale of the building or premises on which

C___________________________








the sign is located in conformance with the provisions of the

City's sign ordinance (
C/)
*Model home location signs conforming to the sign provisions

of this provision

*Publicly owned and operated parks, recreation areas, and

utility structures (conditional uses permitted)
C:
*Golf courses and related club house facilities; except for C

driving tees or ranges, miniature courses and similar uses,

operated for commercial purposes separately from golf courses
K3
(conditional uses permitted)

-Private bath, swim, tennis, or country clubs and community-owned
CD
and operated recreation clubs and associations (conditional

uses permitted)

*Cluster developments meeting the requirements of Section 26(7)

hereof (conditional uses permitted)
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*Subdivision or other development entranceways when built in
CO
conformity with the City's sign ordinance (conditional uses

permitted) ()

-Comprehensive planned unit development meeting the requirements
Jof Section 26(7) hereof (conditional uses permitted)J
of Section 26(7) hereof (conditional uses permitted) _
0
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b. Hotels and motels --

c. Agricultural implement sales and services conducted wholly within a C
C/)
completely enclosed building

d. Air conditioning and heating sales and services

e. Automobile sales or auto rentals, trailer sales or rentals, taxi service

station, and related shops when conducted wholly within a completely C@

enclosed building and as one integrated business operation. All exterior

storage areas for damaged autos shall be completely enclosed by a solid

masonry wall at least eight (8') high

f. Battery and tire service stations -

g. Beverage distributors, but not including bottling plants

h. Book binding
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i. Catering establishments

j. Car wash establishments

k. Expressing, baggage and transfer delivery services including bus stations

1. Marinas and boat storage facilities

m. Movie and television studios

n. Electrical, plumbing, heating, painting, upholstering, and roofing supply )

and workshops with no exterior storage areas 7


0





C-


o. Printing, publishing and issuing of newspapers, periodicals, books and

other reading matter (
C/)
p. Printing and sign shops

q. Wholesale establishments, excluding a building principally used for a
C)
storage warehouse

(2) Conditional Uses Permitted. When, after review of an application, the Planning Board
C
finds as a fact that the proposed use is consistent with the Comprehensive Development 0

Plan of the City of Palatka, the following uses may be permitted: 4

a. Service stations c

b. Manufacturing or processing which is clearly incidental to retail use
~-(
is permitted. Such manufacturing or processing is limited to that

which employs not more than ten (10) persons in the manufacturing and

processing

(3) Density Controls. The following yard, density and height of building requirements
0
shall be observed except as provided in Section 26(9) hereof:

a. The Density Controls established in C-1 District as described in Subsection

7(2) hereof:

For business structures: T)

1. Minimum required lot area: None

2. Minimum required lot width: None
CD








Off-Street Parking and Loading Regulations --

The following off-street parking spaces shall be provided and satisfactorily C
C/)
maintained by the owner of the property for each building in use. L

a. Definition of Off-Street Parking and Loading Space. Off-street parking and

loading facilities, including access drives and aisles shall be surfaced with a hard

dustless material consisting of a good rolled rock base, well tamped and topped with

oil and sand of asphalt or concrete of sufficient thickness to accommodate the proposed

vehicular weights.

All required off-street parking facilities shall have a minimum of ten percent

of its total developed area reserved for and used as landscape development, (i.e., trees,

shrubs, ground cover, vines, or grass). After effective date of this section (8/26/76),

appropriate plot plans showing proposed landscaped development shall be submitted to the

City Planning Board for site approval for all new off-street parking facilities and 7)

for all existing facilities that are subsequently improved, repaved, enlarged, or altered
0
in any way.

All required off-street parking facilities shall be drained so as not to cause
CD
any nuisance to adjacent private or public property. A Certificate of Compliance for

the given structure or premises shall be prohibited until the required parking area has )

been improved, inspected and approved in accordance with this Section.

b. Off-Street Parking Requirements. There shall be provided, at the time of the

erection of any main building or structure, or at the time any main building or structure C-









is enlarged, its use changes, or it increases in capacity by adding dwelling units, -

guest rooms, floor area or seats, minimum off-street automobile parking space with

adequate provisions for ingress and egress by an automobile of standard size, in

accordance with the following requirements: 0

Office and public buildings: Seven spaces for each 1,000 square

feet of floor area used for office purposes
C-
c. Location of Off-Street Parking Spaces: (

1. Parking spaces for all dwellings shall be located on the -

same lot with the main building to be served LC

2. Parking spaces for other uses shall be provided on the

same lot or not more than five hundred (500) feet distant, (-

as measured along the nearest pedestrian walkway

3. Parking requirements for two or more uses, of the same

or different types, may be satisfied by the allocation
(
of the required number of spaces of each use in a common

parking facility

d. Off-Street Loading Requirements. An off-street "loading space" shall consist

of a minimum of net area of five hundred (500) square feet, exclusive of access drives

and aisles thereto. The following spaces shall be provided for the uses indicated:

1. Every hospital, institution, hotel, commercial or industrial

building, or similar use, requiring the receipt or distribution

49







)

by vehicle of materials or merchandise, shall have

sufficient permanently maintained off-street loading space
C/)
so as not to hinder the free movement of vehicles and

pedestrians over a sidewalk or street C

2. All structures requiring the pick-up of large quantities

of garbage or trash shall provide an easily accessible

area for the pick-up and delivery of a dumpster or other

trash receptacle

e. Permanent Reservation. Area reserved for off-street parking, loading in accord-

ance with the requirements of this section, shall not be reduced in area or changed to

any other use unless the permitted use which it serves is discontinued or modified; except,
G)
where equivalent parking or loading is provided to the satisfaction of the Planning Board.*













-*Code of Ordinances, City of Palatka, Flrida
*Code of Ordinances, City of Palatka, Florida L__








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NORTH EAST FLORIDA EDUCATIONAL CONSORTIUM/TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER
\-^J

Board of Directors 0
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Thomas L. Casey, Bradford County

Coy G. Harris, Jr., Flagler County

John F. Gaines, Putnam County

W. Douglas Hartley, St. Johns County C5

William A. McGill, Union County

+-
Historical Background

The North East Florida Educational Consortium was planned and organized by the Superin- )

tendents of school districts in Bradford, Flagler, Putnam and St. Johns Counties during the

1975-76 academic year. The School Board of each of these districts passed an official reso- (

lution during the summer of 1976, establishing the Educational Consortium as authorized by

Florida School Laws, Section 230.20 paragraph (4) sub-parabraph (j), 1975 Edition. On April

25, 1977, the School Board of Union County, upon the recommendation of the Superintendent, 0

voted to affiliate the district with the Consortium, effective as of July 1. The Commissioner _

of Education has shown a high degree of interest and support in the establishment of an

Educational Consortium in Northeast Florida. Mr. Woodrow J. Darden and Mr. Carey E. Ferrell, (C

each as Director of Public Schools in the Department of Education, and their staffs have

worked directly with the Consortium staff during the formative stages. _

0








NEFEC/TEC--WHAT? WHY?
-4-- -

The Consortium is an extension of each participating District School Board, its 0
C/)
Superintendent, and staff. The goal of NEFEC/TEC is to help each participating district Q

meet its educational goals and objectives. It is a service-oriented organization perform- )

ing the following functions or tasks:

a. Developmental projects co

b. Free services 0

c. Contracted services

d. Purchased services
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PROGRESS TO DATE


At the completion of the initial year of operation, the Consortium is providing 0
C/)
the following services and/or programs for participating districts: (

1. Staff Development 0

2. Adult Basic Education Programs

3. Testing Program C

4. CETA (to compliment ABE program in Putnam County)

5. Mandated Programs: Consumer Education

Environment Education CL
0
Comprehensive Health Education

6. Printing

7. Contracted Services

8. Technical Assistance

0

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NEW DIRECTIONS

An effort is being made to develop the following services and/or programs in the 0
C/)
near future:

1. Educational Computing Services (

2. Cooperative Purchasing

3. Florida Learning Resources Systems Center Co

4. Multi-District Media Service Unit

5. Diagnostic and Resource System

6. Exceptional Student Education
0
7. Compensatory Education -

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ORGANIZATION
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The Consortium is owned by the participating district school boards, and operated )
C/)
by the Board of Directors through the Consortium staff. The Superintendent of each

district serves as a member of the Board of Directors with the Consortium staff being )

directly responsible to this Board. Through scheduled monthly work sessions, the Consortium

staff keeps the Board of Directors informed regarding programs and services in operating C

within the Consortium and receives assignments, directions, instructions and assistance

from the Board.

In order to insure district involvement in the development, coordination, and
C)
delivery of programs and services through the Consortium, each Superintendent has appointed

a member of his staff as the "District Contact Person." This individual works closely
CD
between the Superintendent and Consortium staff in program development, delivery strategies,

evaluation procedures and follow-up activities in each district.


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GOALS FOR 1978


1. To manage present programs, projects, services, etc., as effectively as

possible. (This should insure refunding and a continuation of present programs

and services.)

2. To write and submit to D.O.E. a Title IV-C proposal, preferably in the area of

staff development, language arts, or career education, by August 1, 1978.

3. To develop a cooperative purchasing program capable of providing participating

districts with instructional material, equipment, etc. (to include classroom

material, office supplies, custodial supplies, nonfood lunchroom supplies,

physical education equipment and materials, athletic equipment, first-aid

supplies, etc., to be completely initiated for the 1978-79 school term.

4. To secure minimum hardware for establishing a printing shop capable of providing

service for districts by July 1, 1978.

5. To establish a FLRS center within the Consortium by February 1, 1978, and

initiate appropriate services in exceptional education by July 1, 1978. To

initiate efforts to establish a D & R Center within the Consortium. The FLRS,

D & R, and TEC can be managed cooperatively to reduce the expense of providing

each such program and/or service.

6. To develop alternates to present scoring services of the CTBS by November 1,

1978.


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7. To establish a working relation with appropriate D.O.E. staff and national -_1

consultants in an effort to secure funds to develop a multi-district Media 0

Center (ongoing).

8. To continue the development of a multi-district computer system (ongoing). ()

9. To develop a multi-district approach to bidding school pictures by November 1977. (

10. To invite two new districts to join the Consortium, to become members by July 1, C

1978. (More specific operational procedures for becoming members should be
(
developed before initiation.)
-4 -
11. To develop a multi-district MIP through the TEC to be used by participating 0i

districts.

12. To establish a multi-district council or committee to plan in the area of 70

Management Information Systems (MIS).
01





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FUNCTIONS NEFEC CENTER


I. Consortium (
a)
A. Demonstration Teaching Seminar Rooms:

*Type A--Demonstration teaching room.

This room is to be occupied by a maximum of thirty students and one teacher.

Allow 800 square feet minimum. This room should provide the following:
C
(a) Audio visual equipment and storage cabinet (9

(b) Educational television

(c) Chalkboard, screen, etc. Adjacent to this room a viewing

room shall be designated to accommodate a maximum of fifteen

persons. Allow approximately 400 square feet. A glass window

shall be provided for the purpose of observing a teacher seminar
c5
in progress.

*Type B--General Purpose Studios or Meeting Rooms:

This room shall accommodate sixty persons. Allow 1,600 square feet minimum.

This room shall be designed so it can be divided into three small rooms

when necessary. This room should be provided with slide screens (for

multi-media presentations), chalkboards, storage for flexible chairs and (

tables.

I--'





(7

B. Professional Staff Offices:
t-J
Provide fourteen professional staff offices of approximately 144 square feet
0
each. Office to accommodate a work desk, credenza, chair, visitors' chairs, (J

and book shelves. L

C. Secretarial Pool: U

Provide a space for seven secretaries designed as open space concept. Secre-

taries shall be located in a manner so they can be accessible to professional (

staff offices. One secretary shall be assigned for every two staff offices.

Each secretary to have one secretarial desk, chair and waiting chair. Floor

area as necessary to provide a comfortable working environment. (

D. Reception Area:

Provide a space for reception to accommodate a minimum of ten visitors. Shall ()

be provided with a space for a receptionist preferably in a receptionist unit. (5

Floor area as necessary to provide comfortable environment.

E. Work Area: Q

A space shall be provided to be used as a general purpose room. Allow approxi- --

mately 500 square feet.

F. File Cabinet Area: co
CD
To be accessible to all secretaries and professional staff. Allow area as

necessary.

0
CL








G. Copy Room:
Provide a space to accommodate two copying machines, mail, mimeograph machine,

and office supplies. Allow area as necessary.

H. Restrooms:
Men's and Ladies' restrooms shall be provided. Restrooms to be accessible.

Allow area as necessary.

I. Lounge:
A space shall be provided to accommodate approximately twenty persons and to

be used as lunch room. Provide space for kitchen with refrigerator and sink.

Coin vending machines to be located within space. Allow area as necessary.
J. Conference Room:

Provide a space to accommodate approximately fifteen persons for meetings.

K. Parking:


NEFEC

TEC

Visitors


30 spaces

3 spaces

50 spaces


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II. Media Center --

The Media Center is a center for learning for all county schools participating, C

both for students and staff. It is a place where pupils and teachers can go to find

a multiplicity of well-organized materials which will aid in whatever learning is

in progress. The emphasis is on the individual and the learning situation rather than

on the materials. The Center must provide instructional media of all types, both CTj

printed and nonprinted, and workroom space to facilitate the use of the media. This

space must include production area for teachers to continue to improve their skills,

and to provide quality materials in adequate quantities to stimulate the student to C

want to learn and grow to the fullest extent of his capabilities. Included in the

Center should be adequate areas for quiet reading, for exploring, for group instruction, -0

for reference work, for listening to recordings (both tape and disk), for viewing

all kinds of projected materials, and for preparation of the various materials by the

student, the teacher and the director.
0





C)



0_
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^ _ _____________________________c








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A. Educational Objectives:

The general objectives of dynamic services in educational media are common to r)

all schools. They are in harmony with the overall objectives of education _
0
which they serve. Briefly the objectives of media services are: U

1. To participate effectively in the school program as it strives

to meet the needs of pupils, teachers, parents and other

community members. 0

2. To provide students with the instructional materials and services
Co
most appropriate and most meaningful in their growth and development (

as individuals.

3. To stimulate and guide pupils in all phases of reading so that

they may find increasing enjoyment and satisfaction and may grow Mj

in critical judgment and appreciation.

4. To provide an opportunity through the use of materials for pupils

to develop helpful interests, to make satisfactory personal adjust- *_

ments, and to acquire desirable social attitudes.

5. To help young people to become skillful and discriminating users of C\

printed and audiovisual materials.


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B. Speci


C. Specia


6. To work with teachers in the selection and use of all types of in-

structional materials which contribute to the teaching program.

7. To participate with teachers and administrators in programs for

continuing professional and cultural growth of the school staff.

al Requirements:

1. This area shall have an independent entrance separate from all other

functions of the NEFEC Center.

2. Media Center to be designed as an open-space concept. This excludes

some areas needed to be enclosed.

3. The Media Center to be administrated by one director, two audiovisual

specialists and one clerk. A receptionist shall be in charge of

receiving visitors as well as assuming other responsibilities.

4. A loading ramp shall be provided and accessible for pick-up and

deliveries.

5. Bulletin board shall be installed and made visible to all using

Media Center. Size to be approximately 4'x'6'.

I1 Considerations:

1. Space and flexibility are to be desired above all else.

2. Provision should be made for the building expansion due to the

expanding concept of the Materials Center, especially important

if minimum standards are used in basic construction.










3. Direct sunight is to be avoided as it is harmful to bindings, a

problem for reading, and would require supplementary light control.

4. Artificial lighting should be so placed that the letters, numbers

and titles on books on shelves are visible without eyestrain.

5. Night operation of the center will require outside illumination.

6. Temperature and humidity control must be provided to preserve

book bindings and acetate projectables to prevent mildew, mold,

and expansion and contraction of acetate materials.

7. Telephone is needed.

8. Acoustical floor coverings, ceilings, and walls (above shelving)

to reduce noise, lower maintenance.

9. Intercommunication system should not be in main reading room, but

in director's office. It is a distraction to the serious student.

10. Running water should be provided in all work areas.

11. Plexiglass in upper panel of all doors, so that students will not

be injured by opening doors.

12. One main entrance, with fire exits from other rooms as needed

(AV equipment storage rooms, director's office).

13. Minimum of two bulletin boards at least 3'x5', preferably 4'x6'.

Additional ones are desired.


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D. Media Center Functions:
-4-,
1. Periodical storage--allow 250 square feet
(9
(a) Back issues of periodicals are used in reference work and C/)

must be kept available over a number of years, in correct

order, and easily available. (

(b) Special shelving is needed for this type materials. It

should be 12" deep and with adjustable shelves. These can

be built to the ceiling, and made accessible by means of C
A-t-
a good library ladder. One section of this to be 14" deep

by 3' x 6' for oversized periodicals. U
ID
(c) Bound volumes will also be kept in this area, along with 40-50

magazines indexed in the Reader's Guide. CD

(d) The door to this room could be a half door, with a shelf, or c

counter top to enable student assistants, or clerks, to

circulate and receive materials. 0

(e) Microfilming, in the future, will keep this room from becoming --

overcrowded. CU

2. Production area--allow 600 square feet; this space to be used by CO
CD
teachers and students. A counter space along one or more walls with

laminated plastic top, no metal edges. 4

0







(a) Storage drawers underneath for bulky sheets of cardboard and

drawing paper. (There is a commercial cardboard cabinet
0
available in various sizes, fairly inexpensive, that could be C/)

used.) C

(b) Electrical outlets, at 4' intervals, over counters. (

(c) Counter space in 3 wells sized for regular and bulletin

typewriters and reproduction machines.

(d) Sink with hot and cold water, single, 6" to 8" deep, 22" 0

square (approximate measure).

(e) Counter space will be used for the production of transparen- 0

cies, mock-ups, posters, dry mounting, duplicating and bulletin
C-0
board displays. C)

(f) A large table 4' x 6' x 35" high with laminated top for C

production work.
L_
(g) Space for a drawing board, lettering devices, an opaque 0

projector, a camera, camera stand, and photographic lighting

for this area.

(h) If there is additional space available, a similar area could C

be provided for students' use in making displays of all types

for reports, demonstrations, etc.

0
_____________-___________________c ~








(i) As much counter space as is possible. There is never enough. --

(j) Plexiglass viewing area to main reading room. Q

(k) Light table )

(m) Desk with typewriter return (

3. Viewing and previewing area--allow 250 square feet

(a) Viewing area should be adjacent to production room. One light C

control with two-way switch and dimmer on opposite walls.

(b) This room should be accoustically treated.

(c) This room could also be used for small conferences and com- (

mittees.

(d) Mounted screens, 2 or 3 minimum. T)

(e) Accessible to audiovisual equipment storage.

4. Reading room--allow 5,400 square feet. The reading room is the area

of the media center where much of the activity will take place.

Spacious and comfortably planned surroundings will lend to student 0

interest and eagerness to use this facility.

(a) The reading room provides for:

*Circulation of book and nonbook materials for [)

recreation and personal enrichment

*Circulation of book and nonbook materials for

study
CZ


~~___








*Browsing (including special exhibits, displays and -

informal furniture, sofas and arm chairs) Q

*Individual or group study

(b) The following are explanations: 0

*Circulation should be conveniently placed in relation (

to the entrance for proper checking in and out of

all instructional materials. Catalog--should be in
0
this area because it is usually first consulted in

locating materials. C

*Reference section should be located near the conference

and enrichment center area because they would be used __

by most people occupying these areas.

(c) Facilities:

3,600 square feet for reading room

800 square feet for display exhibits 0

1,000 square feet for circulation and distribution
t-i-
of multi-media CO

5,400 square feet total C




0





*Special care should be taken in the placing of indirect -4-

lighting fixtures so that adequate lighting is pro- 0
K)
vided in all areas (see State Standards)

-Shelving to accommodate 16,000 books (standard shelving 0

and oversize book shelving)

*A work area around the card catalog for a table or table
CL
catalog combination should be provided. 0

*Bulletin boards (tack board in 3 x 5 sections peg board,

chalk board, projection screen should be strategically

placed in two areas of the reading room. Combination

units may be devised to offer more than one facility -

in the same area (see Sealey library for model)

*Display case (built-in). A glassed-in display case with

adjustable glass shelves and locked doors is desirable

for displaying such things as collections of coins,
r-t-
rocks, costume dolls, etc. This can be recessed in
CT)
the wall near the door, and should be eight to ten

inches deep, approximately three to four feet wide ()

with the lower shelf at least 30 inches from the



C_





C-


floor. The back wall of the case should be made of _

pegboard so that various kinds of racks can be used. 0

(d) Student independent study area:

.Movable carrels (dry 11OV only) for reference work. C)

Wet carrels connected to distribution point in audio-

visual storage room by way of conduit wells. (No CIJ

more than 40% of the seating area should be carrels,

48 carrels minimum)

.Newspaper and periodical display area--a minimum of 20 C

running feet of five foot slanted shelving for

display

.Area for three micro-reader carrels in student inde-

pendent study

5. Head Media Specialist office space--allow 200 square feet. This person

will be in charge of administrating the operation of the Media Center:

book selection, ordering, cataloging, area development and direction of

library services and conferences. U)

(a) Desk with typewriter return

(b) 11OV strip outlets all around walls C

(c) A small bulletin board on the wall
0
C








(d) Space for two file cabinets (legal) for professional cor-
respondence, catalogs, and other related materials.

6. Workroom for Media Specialist II--allow 850 square feet. All C
educational materials for the Media Center will be received, C

processed and distributed from the workroom. Provide work space
in this area for 2 clerks and 1 graphics technician.

(a) Sink with hot and cold water

(b) Small bulletin board 0

(c) Shelving wherever possible with sliding doors on some

(d) Long work counter around the walls with sink at one end,
with wells for two typewriters. Knee space where typewriter

wells are located

(e) The room must be designed to permit assembly line processing
from the point of receiving to completing, if processing is

being done in the school 0

(f) ll0V strip outlets along the counter top

(g) Three legal size vertical files

(h) Coat closet Cv

(i) Space for two book trucks (approximate size" 3' x 1' x 3')

(j) An additional entrance (other than through the reading room or
the director's office with no break in the floor levels)
_________________________________________________ (







7. Production-Graphics for Media Specialist III--allow 800 square feet.

Students and teachers will be encouraged to use the facilities in

this area in making materials for learning and classroom instruction.

Equipment and working space for the production of these materials will

be housed in this area under the supervision of a Media Specialist.

The Media Specialist will assist students and teachers and produce

instructional materials.

(a) One large counter-type (built-in) desk for Media Specialist

(b) Counter top cabinet with sliding doors, around available

wall space. Shelving above these cabinets with doors should

be provided for storage of materials.

(c) Small wall area reserved for opaque reproduction

(d) Work table in center of room

(e) Additional entrance (other than the one through the main

reading room)

(f) 110V strip outlets along the tops of cabinets and desk

(g) Equipment housed:
*Thermo Fax

*Dry Photo Copier

*Dry Mount Press

*Mimeo-scope


---- --------


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*Bulletin typewriter (electric)
-4--'
*Opaque Projector
0
(h) Sink with hot and cold running water (J)

(i) File cabinets (legal)

(j) Lighting should be installed with care. Lighting fixtures (
beneath the shelving that is over the work cabinets

8. Audivisual storage (viewing and previewing)--allow 400 square feet

In addition to the storage of audiovisual equipment and materials 0

there will be housed: (

(a) Storage for microfilm (

(b) A preview area for classroom visuals

(c) Distribution point for media fed to wet carrels in reading room )

Below are listed guidelines for determining amount of materials to (co

be housed: -_
*Filmstrips--2 per pupil 0

*Recordings (records and tapes)--l-1/2 per pupil

*Transparencies--15 per teacher (minimum of 500)

*8mm single concept films--7 per teacher GJ

*Microfilm

*Charts, pictures, prints, posters, maps _

*Objects, specimens, and models )
_______________________________________ L








9. Conference areas--allow 400 square feet. Two conference areas are
+J
to be provided in order to allow small groups of children to work

together on assigned projects. Location near the reference section

will provide accessibility of materials used in this area.

Children will use this area for the viewing of audiovisual materials

also.

10. The Communications Center--allow 800 square feet. The people involved

in activities within the Communications Center will be students,

teachers, technicians, aides and mechanics. The space should be

large enough to accommodate two programmers, four or five teachers

working together in the enrichment program preparation, and small

groups of students ranging in size from one to fifteen. The Communi- (ID

cations Center should be equipped with: c-i

(a) 2 video tape decks with ability to duplicate and special -0

effects generator and Fader switching devices 0

(b) 4 audio tape decks _

(c) 2 phono turntables

(d) Audio and video mixing units

(e) 3 television monitors

(f) Two-way phone communications hook-up with all instructional

areas in the school plant


C


'---







The physical make-up of the Communications Center shall be such

that channel television programs from outside the school can be
0
transmitted to any teaching station in the building and the (

center should also have the capability to transmit audio programs C-
0
coming in by way of radios or recordings. This center should C

provide the capability of transmitting video and audio programs
CO
anywhere in the school building.

Two-inch conduit pipes from each learning area to a central (

point (junction box). This is connected with the conduit well 4-+

system (3"x5") with removable coolers in the media to the console.

The Communications Center should be located in the Media

Center under the direction of the media specialist with sufficient 1

aides and technicians to operate and maintain it. The size of c(

the space should be approximately 800 square feet. It should be 0

carpeted for sound control and should be air conditioned. Lighting 0

should have capability of being varied from total darkness to about

150 feet candles, to insure comfortable conditions and constant

humidity control for the protection of machines and materials. C(

11. Soundproof recording room--allow 250 square feet. This room should
o..C -
provide the following: __

0
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(a) Floor carpeted
-+--*
(b) Table for recording must be carpeted

(c) Quadraphonic system U)
(d) Turntable L
0
(e) Cassette deck player U

(f) 4-channel receiver
CO
(g) 4-channel sinul track tape recorder U

(h) To accommodate 6 people 0
(i) Table with microphones c

(j) Tape storage cabinet )
-~)
(k) Record storage

12. Film storage room--allow 250 square feet ()
(a) Film inspector automated

(b) Flim storage shelves T.

(c) Film editor 0
(d) Film splicer

13. Audiovisual Equipment--allow 250 square feet
(a) Tape duplicating system CO

(b) 16mm projectors
C)
(c) Screen for previewing with viewing area +J

0
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(d) Capabilities of reproducing copies, transmitting and alli
4-_
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14. Photography--allow 400 square feet (f

(a) Slide duplicator

(b) Flood lights o

(c) Copy stand

(d) Work table C

(e) Film storage 0

(f) Lettering system storage

(g) Refrigerator
(h) Cabinet for expensive equipment

(i) 2 file cabinets (

(j) Cutting surface c

(k) Sufficent work area

15. Dark room--allow 250 square feet 0

(a) Space for 2 to 3 people -

(b) Print dryer

(c) Enlarger c

(d) Safe lights
C-
(e) Timer 4-

(f) Chemical storage 0
C-







16. Slide room--allow 400 square feet
-i-'
(a) Provide storage for slides
0
(b) Slide viewing tables C)

(c) 3 projectors L-
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(d) 2 large screens

(e) Projection table

(f) Dig-cue machine

(g) Dissolve unit 0
(h) Shelves for slide boxes

(i) Seating area for viewing slides (

17. Demonstration classroom--allow 400 square feet
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