Group Title: Buccaneer (Vero Beach, Florida)
Title: The buccaneer
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102950/00039
 Material Information
Title: The buccaneer
Uniform Title: Buccaneer (Okinawa Island, Japan)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Army Air Forces. -- Air Force, 10th
United States -- Army Air Forces. -- Air Force, 10th
Publisher: I & E Section, Hq Co, Tenth Army for the members of Hq, Hq Co, and Sp Trs
Place of Publication: Okinawa Island, Japan
Okinawa Island, Japan
Publication Date: March 29, 1946
Frequency: daily
regular
 Subjects
Subject: World War, 1939-1945 -- Newspapers   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okinawa Island (Japan)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Japan -- Okinawa Island -- Okinawa-shi
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1945. Ceased on Oct. 15, 1945.
General Note: "Scoops for the troops."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 116 (Sept. 5, 1945).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102950
Volume ID: VID00039
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 42868813
lccn - sn 99064069

Full Text











The B BUCCANEER

U. S. NAVAL AIR STATION


VOL. 2-No. 24

NAS VERO RED (ROSS
ap, KlIllIll IP l IIlfFr rf'


VERO BEACH, FLORIDA


NAS DDTer I


[U IV 1t ) UL Lt ,

The annual drive of the Ameri- '. ~
can Red Cross Society for funds
is almost over. At this writing
$750 has been received from the '
military and civilian personnel of .
this station. Last year the sta-
tion raised $791. Personnel has
since then dwindled from about
4,000 to 1,781. The results of this
year's drive are therefore grati-
fying. The Chairman, Chaplain C.
K. Myers and the Red Cross. Field
Director, Mr. John Morris, wish
to thank all who have given their
time and money to make the
drive a success.

Keep On Scrubbing!
(SEA) Easy on the paint
brush, mates, there's a shortage
of titanium dioxide, the base for tt. McCrary Awarded
quick drying enamels which a:re
needed for refrigerators, stoves Decorations and Stars
and other household goods.
To conserve materials which
are tight and needed for civilian During the war Lt. (jg) Shan-
use, the Navy has ordered scrub- non W. McCrury was awarded a
bing of painted surfaces, rather few decorations for his service.
than repainting, wherever possi- ThEt are: the Air Medal with
ble. During the war many sur-:
faces were left Inpainted as a Gold Star in lieu of a second
fire prevention measure. Now medal, the Distinguished Flying
there is another reason. Cross and three Gold Stars in lieu
of the second, third, and fourth
JOQ Monkey Business presentations of this decoration.
('thlor holders of decorations that
S- 'e:re awarded recently are:
SPresidential Unit Citation
J_ ,Cou(dr. Derrick C. Turnipseed
l' Lt. Comdr. John H. Bear (Al)
USNR
Lt. James F. Donnely
Lt. HIenry H. Shimer, USNR
SJoe H. Birmingham GM2c USN
Eugene S. Burris MM1c USN
Robert J. DeLoge SC3c USN
Audlie 'M'cGimley, Jr. Cox. USN
Frnk Monteleone BM2c USNR
Lloy Douglas AMM2'c 'ISN(twice)
S Navy Unit Citation
Si, Donl L. Dye RmIc USN
Harvey N. Barger MoMMic USN
Donald F. Jones, Cox, USNR.
When a man sees pink elephants iOR SALE-1940 Indian motor-
that'ss intoxication, when a man cycle Model 45. Good condition.
owns a green monkey it's either Contact J. E. Splane, Plane Capt.
news or exaggeration. F7F30, Day Shift.


MARCH 2v, 1046


rakes To Air STATION T START


akes To Air
ke To Air STATION TO START

DDT SPRAYING

S:FOR MOSQUITOES

Before very long the buzz of
the DDT Spray Plane will be
Heard over NAS marking the
opening gun of the main bout
Between the Medical Department
and the swamp bred mosquito.
SThe Medical Department has a
,, '* i osquito control program which
.. a is in progress throughout the en-
.., tire year.
In the Fall and Winter it is
4o limited to the spraying of road-
Sside ditches and easily accessible
breeding spots. However, with the
4 'coming of warmer weather the
problem grows quickly anld 0o the
_,. preventive n,'aslres nlust g' 'w
e. e .ccoul,,. Therefore a TB-M
fitted with special tanks and
spray pipes is used to spray the
S... ....possible breeding grounds under
New Uniorm Tryolu the supervision of a specially
trained officer.
To Take Long Period The problem of efficient spray-
ing was so great in 1945 that a
New uniform tryout by the request was put to the Bureau
Navy doesn't mean that you can for a specially trained officer to
throw away your bell hotl-ans. by be sent to Vero Beach in order
tomorrow afternoon. The question to take charge of the actual sp'ray-
-"when do we get 'em'"-rais- ing operations. On July 9, 1945
ed among enlisted men by he an- Lt. Brunson arrived at NAS to
nouncement of the tests ". ans- take over the job.
were in SecNav's annual report An enormous area is sprayed
made public 7 February. in order to prevent the mosquitoes
Here is what .Mr. Forrestal said: from coming in on the wind and
"In the interest of economy, no also to help protect our outlying
change in the uniform will be made bases. The area sprayed is from
until the stocks of existing uni- Sebastian Inlet to Fort Pierce
forms have been completely ex- Inlet, an area of 10,000 acres.
hausted. Of course, proqcurement Huge quantities of materials are
oil the present uniforms has ceased used to cover this area. In one
and the supply is. limited to those flying operation alone it takes up
already on hand. This supply, we 17 flying hours, 2044 pounds of
estimate, will be exhausted' with- DDT and 5110 gallons of Diesel
in about 18 months. This interval Oil; this covers the entire 10,000
during which the last of the old acres.
uniforms will be used allows the The actual spraying of the salt
Navy time to complete design of marsh is fairly dangerous work
a new uniform and to procure it." as it is all done at an altitude of
hTe Secretary disclosed officers: 100 feet. This altitude gives the
uniforms also were being consid- best. results in coverage as it al-
ered for possible changes, but this lows the plane to cut a swath of
work "is not being pushed as ag- 250 feet at once.
gressiyely as changes in the uni- Other devices are used besides
forms for enlisted men." it has DDT to fight the breeding of the
proceeded far enough, howe *'.r, "so mosquito in the salt marshes, a
that we are fairly sure that the old certain specie of fish, the Gwm-
fore-and-aft hats, frock coats and busia Affinis, has been intro-
epaulettes of the Navy drIss uni- duced into the marshes as it feeds
forms will not return," M.'. For- on the larvae of the mosquito and
restal said. so helps to deplete its numbers.







THE BUCCANEER
UNITED STATES NAVAL AIR STATION
Vero Beach, Florida
An Activity Of The Naval Air Operaticoal Training Coi?)Lmand

VOL. 2-No. 24 VERO BEACH, FLORIDA MARCH 29, 1946
COMMANDING OFFICER ............ CAPTAIN E. C. WARRACK, USN
SUPT. AVIATION TRAINING ... .- _. ........----COMDI R. E HARMER, USN
EXECUTIVE OFFICER....---...... -. CoMDR. H. G. MACINTOSH, USNR
EDITORIAL ADVISOR -----....... ..-...- ....-- CHAPLAIN MEYERS, USNR
EDITOR ..--. .... .... -...... -....... .. A. CONSOLI, RdMiJc
SPORTS EDITOR ---... .. ..---- -....._..--- 1. GUDOWSKI, Sp(A)2c
AMUSEMENT EDITOR -....--.......... ........--- W. E. PENTECOST, Y3c, USNR

In compliance with EXOS:AO(Pub)WBW:bmcd, dated 28 May 1945,
"The Buccaneer" is published bi-weekly without cost to the United
States Government and is distributed free to all hands aboard the
Naval Air Station, Vero Beach, Florida, and the outlying activities
attached thereto. It is not an official Navy Department publication,
and no article contained therein should be construed as the opinion
of the Navy Department. It is printed commercially in the interest of
station personnel. All contributions and criticisms from members of
the activity will be welcome. "The Buccaneer" receives Camp News-
paper Service material. The re-publication of credited matter is pro-
hibited without permission of CNS, 205 E. 42nd St., N.Y.C. 17. "The
Buccaneer" is a member of SEA (Ships Editorial Association). Repub-
lication of credited material prohibited without permission of SEA.


CITIZENS FIRST


There is a lot of talk about servicemen i'.,iiimiiiiL a
political bloc on the "outside." According to some the chief
reason for such a formation is the protection of the economic
interests of the(e t i':ai. Bu, ;A, :t nrtl truI that we are all
citizens of the United States of America before we are vet-
erans or anything else? That being the case, our main con-
cern, whether we remain in the Navy or are separated,
should be the welfare of the country as a whole and not that
of any particular group. It stands to reason that if the nation
is depressed economically or socially, we all, veterans, serv-
icemen and civilians alike, are going to suffer.
We should remember that we, are FIRST of all CITI-
ZENS OF A DEMOCRACY and not part of any pressure
group out to satisfy merely selfish ends.
A lot of 'men and women are leaving this station headed
for civilian life. They will soon take on the privileges and
responsibilities of ordinary citizenship. There is a big job
ahead of them? and all of us. Ex-servicemen, will be remem-
bered in the generations to come by what they have done
for the nation as a whole. They will not be remembered for
what they have done for the support of selfish lobbies.
A great many demands of veterans and their organiza-
tions are legitimate. But we must not allow this to confuse
the issue. If this is done we who have served our country
in time of war may become convenient footballs for pressure
groups to kick around. No, we are citizens. FIRST --. and
after that veterans of the armed forces of a republic.
----- --
Conlractors Pay New WAVE Director
(SEA)-The Government may (SEA) New director of the
recover excess profits taxes New director of the
amounting to normal prewar in- Waves is Captain Jean T. Palmer,
come taxes for one year, accord- USNR, of Omaha, Nebraska, suc-
ing to the Attorney 'General's Of- feeding Captain Mildred McAfee
fice. MIore than $6,000,000,000 Horton who is resigning from the
have been turned back voluntar- service. Captain Palmer, a Wave
ity by wartime contractors since officer since the establishment of
1942, and the government is try- the Women's Reserve, has been
ing to collect $270,000,000 through assistant director since last No-
court procedures. vember.


I CHAPLAIN'S CORNERR RED CROSS NEWS

Protestant Services: FOR SERVICEMIN
Every Sunday --- Worship and-
Sermon at 1100 Readjustmneii Allow-
Every Wednesday -- Holy Conm-
munion at 0700 atcles For Former
Catholic Services: Members of Forces
Church Party leaves Ship's
Service at 0830 and 1000 for
mass at St. Helen's Church Any person who served in the
active military or naval service of
Religion is not fundamentallyy the United Statess at any time
ethics not the 10 Command- after September 16, 1940, and
ments. Rather, religion is a way prior to the termination of the
of life, an attitude toward life present war, and who has been
radically different from any oth- discharged or released from active
er. There are all kinds of differ- service under conditions other
ent attitudes one may take toward than dishonorable, after active ser-
life. For example, here is a man vice of ninety (ays or more, or
who looks upon his fellow men as by reason of an injury or disability
a means to an end his own sel- incurred in service in line of duty,
fish welfare. Other mnen are pawns shall be entitled, in accordance
in the game of his life. They are with the provisions of this title and
to be used and manipulated. But regulations issued by the Adminis-
religion says "No" to this. Man is trator of Veterans' Affairs pur-
never to be used as a pawn. He suant thereto, to receive a read
is created in the image of God; his justment allowance as provided
personality is sacred; he is an end herein for each week of unemn-
in himself, precious in the sight ployrnent, not to exceed a total'
of God. His destiny is above and of fifty-two weeks, which (1) be-
beyond this world (i.e. history). gins after the first Sunday of the
His destiny is nothing less than third calendar month after date
the vision of God himself. Con- of enactment hereof, and (2) oc,
trast this religious attitude with cure not later than two years
the attitude of a person who would after discharge or release or ti.'
countenance using menc or women terminatiim of the war, wllich-
as means to a selfish end. When ever i. the later date: Provided,
you do it is very easy to see how That no such allowance shall ib
important it is to have the right paid for any period for whiohh llht.
(which is the religious) attitude receives increased pensio:l or ,
toward life. Someday your life subsistence allowance. Provide(l,
itself may depend upon that held further, That no readjustment al-
by someone else. lowance shahll be payable for any
by som e e. week conimmencing more than five
Sears after the termination of hos-
BuPers Needs Hobby lilities in the present war.
a i Such person shall be deemed
Experts fr Training eligible to receive an allowalnc'
St'!)r any week of unemployment.
S- i( claim is made for such allow-,
(SEA)- (iii,. and enlisted ance Iand the Adminisstrator finds
personal trained and experienced with respect to such week that-
in hobby craft programs are ur- (1) the person is residing in the
gently needed for duty in in the the United State;. idi > 1).ii ial'
Welfare Activity of BuPers to ass- such claim; (2) the person i-
sist in setting up instructional ma- completely unemnployeld having
trial for more than 30 hobby performed no service and rec'iv
craft programs, according to Al- ed no wages, or is partially un-
Nav 99-46. employed in that. services hawr
Officers experienced in hobby been performed for less than a full
administration, including the me- week and the wages for the week
chanical construction of shops sand are less than the allowance under
naclihinery, c...'l.hit,' hobby job this title plus $3; (3) the person
sheets, and-correlating hobby in- is registered with and continues
structional pamphlets are especial- to report to a public employment
ly desired. Enlisted men are needed office, in accordance with its reg-
with training in lettering, poster .lations; (4) the person is able
design, free hand and mechanical to work and available for suit-
drawing, and production illustra- able work: Provided, That no
tion. claimant shall be considered in-
Commands have been requested eligible in ay period of continuous
to forward by dispatch to BuPers, unemployment for failure to com-
attention Pers 51, by 15 March ply with the provisions of this
names of personnel qualified for subparagraph if such failure is due
this diluty, indicating specially o' ,o na illness or di.:,l..ili which
menl. Applicaints must agree Lo e-. oecourls alter I lie comnnoncemnent of
main on active duty until 1 eptel- sulch period.
ber and will be ordered to BuPerA Fori the purposes of this title,
for duty. (Continued on Page 4)


THE BUCCANEER


MARCH 29, 1946


PAGE 2








MAC 29 194 TH UCNERPG


NAS Success Story


lietly May, one of the three
Wave chiefs stationed at NAS
hails from Newark, Ohio. Before
enlisting she was employed in the
Owens Corney Fire Glass Co.
there. The Chief says that she
had expected the Navy to be a
lot tougher than she has found it
to be in her two and a half years
of service. Although she has no
definite plans she hopes to go to
college on the West Coast when
she is discharged this fall.
Sherry Colter, a native lowan,
had hoped to he a Tower Operator
when she left her job with the
iichtly Insurance Agency and
came into the Navy; however, she
likes her job and is satisfied.
Chief Colter expects to enter col-
lege after she is discharged in
September with three years in the
Navy.
Lee Vuoto CSp.(T) hails from
Connecticut and went to college
at Middlebury, Vermont. She left
her job with the Travelers In-
surance Co. in Hartford to join
up in September, 1943, When she
joined she hoped that she would
find a job that would prove inter-
esting. Having found one she says
that she is satisfied. Chief Vuoto
has no definite plans for her fu-
ture, she says.


Whales, Auks, Puffins
Were War Casualties
(SEA) Pity the blubbering
whale. Of all the innocent bystand-
ers of the war, these viviparous
mammal suffered most due to
their resemblance to submarines,
says the Department of Interior.
Thousands of auks, murres, puf-
fins, sea gulls and ducks perished
as. victims bf oil on the sea.
The department also cited bene-
fits to wildlife resulting from war-
time curbs on hunting and fishing.
and suggested that returning vet-
erans might look to this field of
fish and wildlife service for their
civilian vocations.


(SEA--Although World War II
was three times as long as the
last war and the number of veter-
anss will be at least four times
greater, the number of tubercu-
losis veterans on the pension rolls
will not greatly exceed the 64,000
peak of the last war, according to
Dr. Roy A. Wolford, Assistsant
Director of the Thberculosis Ser-
vice of the Veterans' Adminis-
tration.
ne reason for this is the use of
the chest X-ray in pre-induction
examinations, which prevented
150,000 tuberculosis persons from
entering the armed forces in World
War II.


STALEMATE


MARCH 29, 1946


THE BUCCANEER


PAGE 3










PACE~~~~_~_~~ 4 E UCAERMlOW2,14


Vets Ask Coverage

in Sodil Security

(SEA) When you return to
civilian life, are you automatically
entitled to social security rights if
they lapsed while you were in the
serve?
The answer is "No."
But if Congress heeds recom-
mendations of the Social Security
Board and the plaints of veterans,
the answer may be in the affir-
mative. The House Ways and
Means Committee is now consider-
ing revisions to the Social Security
Act, 1935, which would provide
coverage for the veteran from the
time he left civilian life to the day
he returns to it-if he was cov-
ered when he entered the service.
As the act now stands, you lose
all benefit rights when your social
security coverage lapses. It may
or may not lapse while you're in
the service, depending on the
length of time you actually were
covered as a civilian.
Here's the way it goes. You are
insured if you have worked ap-
proximately half the time be-
tween the beginning of the social
security program on 1 Jan. 1937
(or your 21st birthday) and the
date ou reach 65 or die.
Also, when you have worked
40 quarters (an aggregate of 10
years), you are considered fully
insured for life. However, since
the act didn't become effective un-
til 1937, nobody has yet qualified
on this basiss.
The important provision, so far
as veterans are concerned, is that
they are still covered if they held
a job coming under social security
at least half the time between 1937
(or their 21slt birthday) and the
present.
In other words, let's suppose
you worked on a "covered" job for
six years, beginning in 1937. Then,
in 1943, you entered the Navy.
Since you've been in the service
(which is not covered by social
security) for three years, as
against the six you worked as i
"covered" civilian, you're still
covered-and will be for the next
three years.
Another point to remember is
that, contrary to general impres-
sion, you don't lose your previous
social security account even if
you're no longer covered. When
you return to a civilian job cov-
ered by the act, you will, in effect,
be reinstated.
'The hitch is this: If you die in
the meantime, your survivors will
have no legal claim to benefits.
Plugging this gap is one of the
main purposes of the amending
legislation now under study by
congress.

Early to bed and early to rise
and your gal goes out with six
other guys.


RED CROSS NEWS
(Continued from PaF s 2)
utilities therein shall be considered
as terminating, in the case of any
individual, before the termination
of such individual's first period of
enlistment or reenlistment con-
job but she liked to be no a small
tracted within one year after the
date of the enactment of the
Armed Forces Volunary Recruit-
ment Act of 1945.
A claimant shall be disqualified
from receiving an allowance if-
(1) he leaves suitable work volun-
tarily, without good cause, or is
suspended or discharged for mis-
conduct in the course of employ-
ment; (2) he, without good cause,
fails to apply for suitable work to
which he has. been referred by a
public employment office, or to
accept suitable work when offered
him; or (3) he, without good
cause, does not attend an available
free training course as required
by regulations issued pursuant to
the provisions of this title.
A claimant shall a!so be diss-
qualified from receiving an al-
lowance for any week with respect
to which it is found that his un-
employment is due to a stoppage
of work which exists, because of a
labor dispute at the factory, es-
tablishmen-t, or other premises at
which he is or was last employed:
Provided, That this subsection
shall not apply if it is shown that
-(1) he is not participating in
or directly interested in the labor
dispute which causes the stoppage
of work; and (2) he does not
belong to a grade or class of
workers of which, immediately be-
fore the commenceene t of the
stoppage there were members em-
ployed at the premises at which
the stoppage occurs, any of whom
are participating in or directly in-
terested in the dispute; Provided,
however, That if in any case
separate branches of work, which
are commonly conducted as sep-
arate business in separate prem-
ises, are conducted in separate de-
partments sof the same premises,
each such department shall, for the
purposes of this subsection, be
deemed to be a separate factory,
establishmentt, or other prenises.

(SEA)-More than a million
veterans have found jobs scarce
and are drawing $20 a week un-
employment compensation. Read-
justment allowances paid for the
week ending 9 February totaled
$25,581,000. The number of re-
cipipet' ir,- e ;,,d from 963,000 to
l,0;!(,00.

Boy (looking up from his home-
work) : "Dad, is 'water-works' all
one word, or is there a hydrant in
the middle?"

Post card from sailor on leave:
"Having wonder Eul time. Wish I
could afford it."


Buccaneer Staff Retires


On the first of April the Buccaneer will lose both its Editor and its
Advisor, when Sic Sally Jackman and Lt. Coindr. R. 1. Simmons
are discharged.
Mr. Simmons' place will be filled by Chaplain Meyers, while the
Editor's seat will be turned 'over to A. Consoli RdM3c.


Lt. Comdr. Robert 1I. Simmons,
assistant training officer and ad-
visor to the Buccaneer, is leaving
the Navy after nearly four years
of service. During this past four
years Mr. Sinmmons rose froin a
Yeoman 3e to a Lt. Comdr.
First arriving here in January
1943 he found that he was as-
signed to be the Recognition
Training Officer, and as a collat-
eral duty he was the BOQ Officer.
Before long his collateral .I it
became the primary one as he bad
to the BOQ. At ttt time the
base was so small there was only
one barracks in existence, Bar-
racks No. 1. The only paved road
on the base stretched from the
Main Gate to the Supply Building,
the rest were only sandy paths.
Before BOQ was opened the chow
hall fed all the base personnel
from the youngest S2c to the
Commanding Officer. Besides his
duties as Recognition Officer and
BOQ Officer Mr. Simmons was
also Assistant Communications
Officer.
With the opening of BOQ Mr.
Simmons became the Night Vision
and Night Recognition Officer; he
was the first man in the Night
Recognition field and developed
the NR program now used by the
Navy.
It was natural that he should
be given the collateral duty as
Historical Officer as he was one
of the first Navy men on the base.
He has held this duty until re-
cently when it was given to Lt.
Comdr. Mewborn.
After his discharge on April
1st Mr. Simmons is going to take
a slight vacation trip on the way
home. On his arrival -at Columbus,
Ohio, lie expects to roe-irnter the
bIusincss world


Sally Jackman, Sic, and recent
editor of the Buccaneer is leaving
the Navy for the West which she
says she will never leave again.
When she first arrived at NAS
Sally was assigned to ACC but
before long she was sent to the
Buccaneer. This latter post
pleased Sally very much as she
had had much newspaper expe-
rience in her home town before
she enlisted. In fact Sally worked
her way through two years at
Oregon State by working on the
town newspaper. During her last
year Sally was advertising editor
after her boss was inducted into
the Army, besides being thet
Managing Editor of the college
daily.
Sally is one of those people
that are so rare in the Navy, she
not only was contented with h]le
job but she liked to be on a small
station such as NAS Vero Beach.
However we have not beeii ab,,li
to convince her to re-enlist. T1
seems that she wants to go to
college.


Hi "YOu're alright Miss Koy-- All
you need is o little son and oairr
"But Doctor, I'm not even married"


r A '. E 4


THE BUCCANEER


MARCH! 29, 1946






_MARCH 29. 1946 T


(SEA)-A long-range scale of
point reductions aimed to make all
women 'Marines and men with com-
bat service eligible for demobili-
zation by mid-summer has been
announced by Marine Corps head-
quarterss.
Begining 11 March the score for
men dropped two points to 40. On
1 April another two-point cut
for men becomes effective, while
discharge credits for women will
go from 16 to 13 points.
SSubsequent scores will be as
follows: 1 May-33 for men, 8 for
women; 1 June- 28 for men, 4
for women; 1 July-25 for men, 0
for women.
After 1 July, male Marines be-
come eligible for demobilization
after 30 months' service. Although
length of service will be the main

II MAR. I APR. I MAY IJUNS 77JU5
42

3 ------
25



"AFTER I JULY 30 MONTHS SERVICE


factor, the point system will be
retained after that date to cover
parenthood and personal with com-
bat credit but less than 25 pionts,
Practically all selective service
and reserve personal, it is expect-
ed, will be separated from the Ma-
rine Corps sby September.

Two Narcotic Centers

(SEA)-Activities of the Na-
val Air Technical Training Com-
mand will be concentrated at two
of the present four major centers
after 1 June. NATTC Jackson-
ville, Fla., has already been re-
duced to peacetime status, while
activities at Norman, Okla., and
Chicago, Ill., are being trans-
ferred to Memphis, Tenn., which
will become the major NATTC
center.
(SEA)-Department of Com-
merce employment figures reflect
the absorption of veterans into
industry. The number of men em-
ployed increased by about 1,200,-
000 between December and Janu-
ary while women employees de-
clined 800,000. Total U. S. em-
ployment in January was estimat-
ed at 51,720,000.


MR. DAWSEY BUILT THE BASE


Mr. Harry B. Dawsey, the Administrative Assistant to the Public
Works Officer has been on NAS's payroll for almost three years.
When Mr. Dawsey arrived he found that the base was only 70'%
completed and that Public Works had quite a job to do. At that
time the Public Works Department only had 63 names on its roster,
since then, however, it has grown to 143.
There are many interesting things that may be learned about
NAS, if you speak to the right people. Mr. Dawsey said that be-
fore the base was built the area it now ,occupies was once broken
up into ranches and orange groves. In fact the houses that the
Chiefs are living in today were once the houses of the ranchers and
citrus farmers of the region. These houses were moved from their
locations around the country side to make-homes for the chiefs'
families. Before Mr. Dawsey came to NAS Vero Beach hle was em-
ployed at the DeLand Naval Air Station.


Radar Hoopsters Splash Championship


Radar's quintet used its training in split second movements to
win out over the Marines in the recent hoop tourney.

POINT DROP WILL RELEASE SOME 300,000

MEMBERS OF NAVY PERSONNEL BY JUNE 15


(SErA) Reductiols in point
scores for separation of naval
personnel, effective 15 May thru
15 June, will make eligible for dis-
charge an estimated 26,000 offi-
cers and 307,000 enlisted person-
nel.
The new schedule substantiates
a previous announcement that by
2 June all "exceptions" to the en-
listed ratings' point-score system


would be eliminated. On 2 June
all male enlisted personnel having
24 points and all enlisted women
with 18 points will be eligible for
separation. Reductions after that
will be at a uniforin rate.
Most male officers' scuoes will
decrease to 34 on 15 May, 32 on
2 June and 30 on 15 June. Follow-
ing is complete table of point
scores effective 15 May through
15 June:


Male commissioned and warrant officers (general)
SMale Doctors -
Naval aviators in flight status above rnk of Ens.
Naval aviators in flight sttus, rank of Ensign
Female officers (including Nurses) ........
Male enlisted (general) ---- ....
Storekeeper (CB, Wlatertender (CB), Machinist's
Mate (CB), & MMG, Electrician's Mate (CB)
Electrician's Mate (except EM(CB)) -....----.----. ..
Watertender, Machinist's Mate, Chief Commissary
Steward, Ship's Cook, Baker (except WT
(CB), MMG) ....--.------... -.. -..
Specialist (C) Classification ....--- -- .............
Yeomen, Hospital Corpsmen (Physical Therapy),
Punch Card Accounting, Hospital Corps (Oc-
cupational Therapy) ...... ................... .. ..
Specialist (X) Transportation, Storekeeper (ex-
cept SK (CB)) ) ..-........- ..... ...
Female enlisted (general) ... ----- -- .. ...
Specialist (C) Classification, Specialist (X)
Transportation ...- ...
Hospital Corps (PHT), liospital Corps (OT)
Yeomen, Storekeeper, Specialist (T) Punch Card
Accounting .... ... .. ...


24 23
24 28


24 23
24 23


28 24


2.1 23
18 17


(SEA)--A comprehensive on- be eligible for benefit payments
the-job training program r-'e vet- under the .GI Bill of Rights anil
erans who want, !o ii io the will receive wages starting at $30
printing indusrC y liis li)(-< solh- weekly.
fitted by the Nev Y-l ..- 1 ... .
playing Printeis' Association to 'INANCIALLY SPEAKiNG
the State Departmetit of Labor. If As the WAVEsaid: I like guys
the plan is approved, ti;liinc(s will with blue eyes and green backs.


MARINE DISCHARGE POINT SCORES (UT


T-HE: BUCCANEER


PAGE b


MARCH 29 1948










THE BUCCANEER


FAIR AND WARMER


7n.

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...

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This film starlet haunted our files all winter. Now that spring is in
the air she's melted the ice in our hearts. We don't know her name
but the bird on the right is not a crow from a rating badge.

-Navv t0 Encourage (SEA)-High intensity lights
along runways and approaches
Ambitious Members have aided Naval air operations
in adverse weather. Their value,
(SEA)--Most enlisted men are in spite of the hazards of obstruc-
interested in working up in their tion, has been proven by records
profession. Many want to know of 295,737 landings and takeoffs
frankly their prospects of getting during months of operations in
a commission in the postwar Navy: the Aleutians area, according to
Reduced to simple terms, enlist- BuAer.
ed men desiring commissions as
ensigns or above should enter one candidates awaits necessary legis-
of the various officer candidate lation. Final, details of the postwar
programs before they reach the plan have not been fully determin-
age of 23. Several channels lead- ed. bit every avenue to commis-
ing to commissions will be open in sioned rank which is now open to
the peacetime Navy, and opportun- civilians is open to enlisted men
cities for ambitious young men will with the same standards of age
be numerous. Older men with spe- and education applying,
cialized experience will be eligible In addition, the Secretary of the
for warrant and commissioned Navy annually appoints to the
warrant ranks but will have rela- Naval Academy, 100 men from the
tively few chances for direct corn- regular Navy and 100 from the
missionss in higher grades. Reserves, who score highest on
The Navy's program for pro- entrance exams given on the third
curement and training of officer Wednesday in April each year.


"-rw\


'A^O---- ^^


1 APRIL 1946
ABOARD: "Little Giant" -- Abbott and Costello
ASHORE: "What Next, Corporal Hargrove?" --* Robert Walker
2 APRIL 1946
ABOARD: "The Blue Dahlia" Alan Ladd and Veronica Lake
ASHORE: "Confidential Agent" -- Charles Boyer and L. Bacall
3 APRIL 1946
ABOARD: "The Blue Dahlia" Alan Ladd and Veronica Lake
ASHORE: "Confidential Agent" Charles Boyer and L. Bacall
4 APRIL 1946
ABOARD: "Terror By Night" Basil Rathbone
ASHORE: "The Horn Blows at Midnight" Jack Benny
5 APRIL 1946
ABOARD: "Thow a Saddle on a Star" Ken Curtis
AHORE: "Dakota" John Wayne
6 APRIL 1946
ABOARD: "Dragonwyck" Gene Tierney and Walter Houston
ASHORE: "Stranger from Santa Fe"
7 APRIL 1946
ABOARD: "Dragonwyck" Gene Tierney and Walter Houston
ASHORE: "The Bells of Saint Mary" Bing Crosby I. Bergman
8 APRIL 1946
ABOARD: See the Plan of the Day
ASHORE: "The Bells of Saint Mary" Bing Crosby I. Bergman
9 APRIL 1946
ABOARD: See the Plan of the Day
ASHORE: "The Bells of Saint Mary" Bing Crosby I. Bergman
10 APRIL 1946
ABOARD: See the Plan of the' Day
ASHORE: See the Plan of the Day
11 APRIL 1946
ABOARD: See the Plan of the Day
ASHORE: See the Plan of the Day
12 APRIL 1946
ABOARD: See the Plan of the Day
ASHORE: See the Plan of the Day
13 APRIL 1946
ABOARD: See the Plan of the I)ay
ASHORE: See the Plan of the Day
14 APRIL 1946
ABOARD: See the Plan of the Day
ASHORE: See the Plan of the Day
15 APRIL 1946
ABOARD: See the Plan of the Day


ASHORE: See the Plan of the Day

SA /
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N AICGs 4iD A


I VT bALL.


Male Call by Mditon Cai, creator of 'Terry and the Pirates She Looks Different Without Bangs
PIP 'oI IAHO1 C H 'EIM1 LAC6'? YEAH! I RAP NO W6No EUGETA PooL TYEAH AMAY;9YE v*r AtIE 6 II
| yeiiYsE 1BiEiES e ISN'T S9E THAT JIEA 0 WAS IN TWE OLP.M AiN
AMIE LfAC C -A1'E CH STACK OF PINK THIKN HEAT ...LET'S A0I COoUPSCME HIMSELF WOL O'C b" L0LE T !r.'1' i
IU HOLP NTO WHO CALLS ALL FOLLOW THAT SOLDIER! s Hore! r $EA I$OS E WITH HER'
| U WIMMn, M '*ENER L'? -THEeEH A STOgY IM N HE A LUSA I 5 ll'.Z I14
r I/ v .'^l M ^ ^r" -^ ii^ M ^ c^B iW i^


MARCH' 29, 1946


- I -- ----


PAGE 6


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